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Similkameen Star 1900-07-07

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 a
SIMILKAMB
T-k i.j x- A<_- t_a a t ta_e ■. ._ J it- C« itt	
Vol. i.   No. 15.
PRINCETON, B. C, SATURDAY, JUEY 7th, 1900.
$2.00 Pbr Year.
IT WAS A GALA DAY
Keremeos Welcomes her Sister
Town on Dominion Day.
Princetonites, Ollala, Fairview, Loomis
and Surrounding Country Vie with
Keremeos oh Pleasure Bent.
On Saturday evening and Sunday, all the bloods of Princeton who
I could scare up a little of the needful started on their way t6 the Dominion day sports at Keremeos,
with the avowed purpose of capturing their share of the spoils and dispelling any doubts as to their ability
to hold the first prize against all
comers. Among those whose exchequer was sufficiently large to
carry them through the attack were:
Messrs. Budd, Aldous, Jlind, Webb,
Ryder, Irwin, Harris, Richter,
Summers, Richardson, Allison and
Kruger, while a number of others
accompanied them in order to take
care of the wounded.
Although it had rained quite
heavy in Princeton the night before, at Keremeos it had cleared up
sufficiently so that the sports were
carried through in the most pleasing manner. The races were of
1 the highest order, the Princetonites
I taking a hand in most every one.
In the foot races J. Richter secured
the biggest number of prizes, followed closely by W. Kruger of this
place. The jumping contests were
easily won by Vic Ryder, seconded
by Press and Richter. In the horse
races J. Budd, of Princeton, carried
away the best prizes. The Richter boys of Keremeos won the greatest number of entries during the
day, obtaining first and second prize
in nearly every contest entered.
In the football contest the Simil-
kameeniters outplayed the Fair-
Views after a lively and interesting
tussel. The team for this district
was composed largely ofiJfennceton-
ites whose battle-scarred visages tell
of a battle dearly fought and won.
The   judges of the   day   were
Frank Richter and R. Cawston, who
in most instances carried themselves
in a dignified manner.   In the evening the day's pleasure closed amid
I the dizzy whirl, which was indeed
I one of the most enjoyable instances
I <jfj£he day.    Thus with the singing
oFGod Save the Queen  closed  one
of the most memorable Dominion
j Day exercises in the Similkameen
I valley.
The following is a list
of events
and the prize winners.
100 yard foot race—ist. Prize
...J. Richter
and.   "
W. Kruger
50 yd Smoking " —ist.     "
W. Hine
"                      2nd.    "
C. Richter
Sack Race 1st.     "
W. Kruger
"                     and.    "
B. Erwin
X Mile Foot Race isf.    •*—
■"j. Kleiner
W. Kruger
120 Yard      "          ist.      »
W. Kruger
E. Richter
Boys Foot Race ist.     "
Adamson
"               2nd.    "
Maneary
Girls Foot Race ist.     "
Miss Daly
Miss Kirby
3 Legged Race  ist.      "
I W. Kruger
i E. Richter
"                     2nd.    "
( W.    "
| ...Naracese
16 Pound Shot ist. .   "
Joe Richter
and.   ;•
C. Richter
High Jump ist.      "
Vic. Ryder
2nd.   "
W. Richter
Broad Jump ist.     "
Vic Ryder
"                     2nd.    "
Tom Press
Hop, Step & jump..ist.      "
Vic Ryder
'•                     2nd.    "
Tom Press
HORSE RACES
Saddle ist Prize, $15....
.E. Richter
"                 2nd. "        7.50
.R. Hantrey
% Mile ist.   " ^-50.00
 J. Budd
....C.Allison
Cowboy ist.    "      10.00
.... W. Ricter
"                 2nd. "        5,00
K. Summers
Cowboy 1st.    "      10.00
..H. Richter
..W.      "
.Klootchman 1st.    " tf 5.00
..Chin Chin
X Mile ist.    •'      20.00
...J. Richter
"         2nd. "      10.00
 J. Budd
Turncoat ist.    "      10.00
..WTK'ruger
2nd. "       5.00
..W. Richter
Pony -.ist.   "      10.00
 J. Budd
2nd. "        5.00
..H. Richter
STOLEN GOLD DUST
$500 or $600 Worth of Gold
Dust Shipped by Cook & Co.
Spences Bridge, July 4—Gold
Dust valued between $500 and $600
was taken out of the office of the
Dominion Express Company at this
place, while the agent was at lunch.
Detectives were soon on the spot,
and the constable atEjrtJ^nLfollow-
ed up three_Indja|STan<l arrested
them at tlie 20 MileHouse on the
Nicola road. On searching one he
found $70 worth on him. The gold
hust stolen was from the Similkameen and Tulameen rivers and
Granite creek, having been shipped
out by the firm of Cook & Co., of
Princeton and the old mining camp
of Granite creek.
NOTICE.
On and after this date we will not b
responsible for any debts contracted nr
ss signed by us.   Martin & Harris.
For the Martin-Harris Saw Mill Co.
One Mile Creek, B. C
A WEEK'S   REVIEW
More Ore Bodies Coming Out
in Sight.
A Smelter for Similkameen a Possibility at No Distant Date~0ur Payroll Rapidly Increasing.
Although Dominion day disturb
ed the equilibrium of many of our
prospectors and mine owners, they
are again back to work and pushing ahead with renewed energy after a well earned rest. All over the
Similkameen reports come of 1
developments and discoveries and
arrH an increased number of men at
work on both old and new properties. Parties coming in from Keremeos state that work in that part of
the district is progressing very favorably and the outlook most encouraging. The Daly-Rogers properties at 20-Mile are increasing in
size and numbers, showing their
unbounded faith in the Similkameen country. On Copper mountain work on the different properties are showing up fine, and on the
Sunset and Lost Horse the men are
making especially good progress.
Manager Campbell is expected in
from Greenwood next week and
he will at once proceed to put e
more energy in the development
.work. They are now working in a
solid body of ore, a large specimen
of which was brought down this
week to be sent out to the coast.
President Stevenson is very inthus-
iastic over the outlook and says
they have any amount of ore in
sight. He also stated that the company thought very seriously of putting in a small smelter.
R. A. Brown of the Sunset will
start east soon, and he is quoted in
outside papers as making preparations for carrying out the scheme of
building a smelter on the Sunset
property.
S. G. Silverthorne, A. D. Rogers
and G. A. Rogers, who are operating principally in the Aspen Grove
district were in town Monday and
report the Muldoon and joining
claims looking fine. Mr. G. A.
Rogers started on Tuesday for his
home in California where he will
stay for a few week, but expects to
return as soon as possible. In his
absence his son and Mr. Silverthorne will carry on the work and
push it forward.
Messrs. French and Day returned
from Copper mountain yesterday,
where they have been doing assessment work on the Jennie Silkman
claim. They report a splendid
showing, having run a cross.cut
some 40-feet, without encountering
either wall." The ore is a high
grade copper, and judging samples
they display is destined to be one of
the leading properties on the mountain. It is situated about ^ of a
mile south-east of the Sunset of
which the ore is very similar in appearance.
The New Similkameen Bridge.
1 The contract for the new bridge
over the Similkameen at Princeton
has now been given to T. McKay,
and work will be commenced forthwith. When this is completed and
the new road to Copper mountain
on the Similkameen side constructed, following the easy grade of the
present trail, the distance will be
greatly curtailed. Eleven miles
will be the entire distance from
Princeton to the Sunset as against
the present round-about route.
HAPPENINGS OF A BUSY TOWN.
Richard McFarlane of 20 Mile was
in town the first of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Eock came down
yesterday from the Royalty mine.
Mr. Hinkling, of the Vermilion
Forks Co, expects to leave tomorrow
for Rossland and the coast cities.
Budd & Aldous^took their racing
stock on to Jbpotnis, Wash., after
the Dominion day races at Keremeos.
S. Spencer, manager of the Royalty group has let the contract for
a handsome cottage on  Fenchurch
The lumber has been hauled and
work will soon be commenced on
Surveyor Hislop's new office near
the Star building.
Euke Gibson and wife went over
the trail to Hope to celebrate Dominion day and to visit friends.
They expected to be gone about 10
days.
Harry Bell and Mr. Hart, two
Rossland business men have been
looking over the country for the
past week with the view of-invest-
ing. v^
Adapts & Burnell have finished
burning their first kiln of brick,
which are of a very fine quality.
The yard is located about ^ of a
mile up the Tulameen. A sample
can been seen at Howse's store.
V^C
VI
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESOUCES.
, The area of British Columbia is
about 356,000 square miles, com'
posed mostly of mountainous country, with here and there arable and
pasture lands which will produce
almost anything in the cereal, fruit
or vegetable kingdom. Cattle and
horses range in herds over the
bunch grass country along the Fraser and Thompson rivers. The
hills are composed of conglomerates
and covered with a bunch grass
which  is very nutritious and on
which the cattle
ng the
season.-. These hills, which are
part of the Cascade range, cut
through the Boundary west of Trail,
through the Similkameen, Nicola
and Kamloops, crossing the Fraser
into the Chilcoten country. In fact
these conglomerates have been
known for some years back to have
existed for some distance up the
North Fraser, and are well known
to contain gold in larger or smaller
quantities, and by many the source
of the Fraser river gold is attributable to this wash. The height
averages about 4,000 feet.
However, of all the varied resources of the province, which comprise the various metals, coal, timber, fish and furs, the most important of which is metal inining. In
.fact our existence depends mainly
on the development of our vast mineral deposits. The several provincial governments have up till now
neglected to give prominence to the
illimitable source of wealth stored
up in. the hoary hills which surround us, or to assist-the prospector
in his difficult task over an extremely rough country. He has never
been recognized as an indispensable
factor to our growth—the wealth of
the country, which he undoubtedly
is. Had any but blockheads controlled our provincial affairs, results
would have been attained to tangibly show that our mineral resources are, par excellence, beyond
dispute as to their character and
value.
As a result of the recent election
we hope to see a live administration, who will take the ..matter in
hand for the public good, placing
officers in charge of their respective
departments and districts who shall
be competent to advise the Minister
of Mines of the value of new finds
and to aid the propector in his
arduous task, either by monthly or
quarterly reports dealing with the
properties in question after examination, and recommending those
which are likely prospects to capitalists for development. This course
would minimise "wild-catting" and
be far the cheapest system in the
end to the province.
The construction of railroads and
the making of trails through portions of the country, from which
revenue may be derived by the open
ing up and development of mineral
deposits contained therein, should
be commenced at the earliest possible moment. Those who have witnessed the exploration of the Koote-
nays and the building of railways
through these rich portions of the
province, know that the advantage,
which should have accrued to the
government and the people from
these sources of profit, have, through
the utter want of diagnosing the situation by the proper authorities,
been allowed to. drift»away from us
and build up cities in the United
States. The acumen of the Ameri-
has been the quantity that, to
say the least, 'v
ve admin
xthough we
deplore the ws
nt of it i
a the aver
age Britisher,
when
it comes to
taking initial
chance i
1 the devel-
opment.    Afte
r all "th
; spoils be-
'he advantage however is at
present against us, through the
apathy of the people who should
have taken hold of the railway
question from the start. It is useless retrospecting unless we make
up our minds to alter conditions
and identify ourselves individually
and collectively in our own development and thus obviate the mistakes
of the past. Doubtless individual
selfishness has been responsible for
ncalculable mischief and has retard-
d our onward progress to a large
extent. To say this must be eliminated, if we wish to succeed as a
people, is a fact that the sooner we
recognize the better.—B. C. Mining
and Investors Guide.
Blacksmithing
and
Horseshoeing
Wagn Repairing a Specialty.
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRINCETON, B. C
G. flurdoch
ClARKS STAGE
LINE
Leaves Kamloops for Quilchena and
Nicola Lake every Monday.
Leaves Nicola Lake for Kamloops
every Friday at 6 a. m.
PRINETON ROUTE.
Leaves Spences Bridge for Nicola,
Coutlees, Nicola Lake, Granite
Creek and Princeton every
Thursday at 6 a. m.
Leaves Princeton for Spences Bridge
and intermediate points every
Sunday at 7 a. m.
Carry flail and   Express.
PRINCETON LUflBER,
SHINGLE and PLANING MILLS
A. E. HOWSE, Prop.
Hill and Office
Bridge Street,
PRINCETON. B. C.
ON YOUR WAY TO
PRINCETON
You will Find a Comfortable Resting Place at the
15 Mile House
'BRADSHAWS'
Well Stocked Bar and Excellent Dining Room*
HEADQUARTERS FOR 20 MILE
CREEK MINING CAMP.
*&<&
Stable in Connection
Hold Princeton
JAMES WALLACE, Proprietor.
PRINCETON'S PIONEER •
«# «afr  HOTEL <£ *£
The Resort
For Prospectors and Mining Men.
First Class Dining Room and Bar.
No trouble to talk to guests. The Boer
War and Fighting Joe's campaign discussed every evening.
Come and hear the Phonograph,
AND SEE THE IRISHMAN.
Seeds and Drugs
FRESH, NEW AND GOOD.
The   Largest  Garden  Seed Dealers in the
PROVINCE.
Send lor
Catalogue.
The Nelson Drug and Feed Co.
—! 100 Cordova St., VANCOUVER,
 . THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
BOUNDARY ORE SHIPMENTS
What  Perseverance,   Capital and a
Railroad Has Accomplished.
g Argument*  Which   5b<
e Most Skeptic and   Doubting
Southern B. C.'s Possibility
■ The Grand Forks Miner in an'
■article relating to Boundary ore
■Shipments says:
W "It is said that the Ironsides and
Knob Hill alone have more than
8,000 tons of ore already in the
bunkers only waiting for the completion of the track (spur to Granby
I'smelter) before commencing ship-
Bnents. The Victoria, Banner,
War Eagle and the properties of the
ppe
upa
l^rearly as much ore as this in sight
and between the lot there are 1
.'■.■weds of thousands of tons blocked
out underground and ready to be
taken out as soon as there is any
'iffiace to send it.
^■The Phoenix Pioneer in an article on the same subject says:
M Wm. H. Aldrich, general mana-
ger of the Trail smelter, and David
W. Moore, ore buyer for the same
jfflmcern, who came into the Boun
JHiry with the C. P. R. officials last
Tuesday, were visiting the shipping
'nines of this  section.     Thursday
the two gentlemen  drove  back  to
MMoenix, for the purpose of inspecting and securing samples  from the
jRraoklyn. Stainwinder,    etc.,  and
*aj&> drove out as far as the Golden
Crown.    When asked by a Pioneer
jMBresentative if his smelter was re-
ceiving much ore from  the Bound-
ary, Mr. Aldridge said:     "Yes; we
are beginning to get regular ship-
ments from this section  now.     On
an average we are receiving about
'{'xSk cars daily from Boundary mines,
and we expect this to gradually in-
crease.    We shall have  no trouble
'm furnishing all the ore  cars  that
may be needed.     We  are  looking
!|wer the mines of the  district  for
the  purpose  of familiarizing  ourselves with the character of the ores
In  the  different   properties,    from
JHhich we expect to receive  large
^■ipments in the near future."
Some time ago the remark was
heard on the streets of Princeton,
made by a misinformed or unknowing person, that there were no shipping mines in the Boundary. Such
n§|3leading statements only go to
show the gross ignorance, of our
own immediate country, some knowing ones possess. Every day we
see some striking incidence of this
B&k of knowledge from parties that
are making mining their business.
We heard one party make the statement that he was through Phoenix
■vguring the winter and that the Old
^Ironsides and Knob Hill mines were
jclosed down, and had been all win-
Up'to-Date I
Merchandise I
In Quantity and Quality to Suit the Purchaser, g
If you are intending to furnish your house it will pay you to see our line of New m
CARPETS and HOUSE FURNISHINGS. * * * Or probably you are moving 1
ahead with the town and need a new coat of paint on your house.   If so try our 1
SHERWIN WILLIAM'S CO., Paints and Oils.   There are none better.
Whether it be for Farmer, Miner, Prospector, Hotel Keeper,  Contractor or Me- 1
-•chanic, we are able to furnish them with their particular line of supplies in quan- 1
ties large or small. 1
A. E. HOWSE, I
princeton and nicola.    SSen^ral Merchant a
ter. On being cornered he finally
admitted that he might be mistaken;
that somebody told him the mine
near town was closed down, but he
was not positive of its name. As
a matter of fact the neither one of
the mines were closed down, but
were kept running all winter, and
later on in.the season put on an extra force of men. The unimformed
persons who make these mistate-
ments do not confine their remarks
to any particular country, but for
mere effect go about condemning
and running down any property
or part of the country which they
do not take a fancy too, thereby
giving strangers an entirely wrong
impression. We .occasionally hear
parties giving their opinion on some
undeveloped property, which does
not happen to be their own, making
it appear that the property had no
showings to work on, securing their
information from no source whatever but their own emulous and
meddling brain.^ If these parties
could only hold their information
until called for there would probably be no occassion for any remarks on the subject. The two
preceeding articles give an idea
as to whether the Boundary country has any shipping mines, and
nly give the Similkameen one-half
the chance other portions of the
province have had and we will take a
back seat for no one in the way
of shipping mines.
Job Printing
Of Every Description
at the STAR office,
TAX NOTICES.
Similkameen Division of Yale Dist
NOTICE is hereby given, in accordance \
One-half of one percent, on personal property.
On so much of the income, of any person as ex-
If paid on or after ist Juiy, 1900.
Four-fifths of one per cent, on real property.
Three-fourths of one per   cent, on  personal
'Three^er cent, on assessed value of wild land.
ceeds one thousand dollars, the folfowing rates,
HUGH HUNTER,
inceton, March 3:
NOTICE.
Certificate of Improver
>UVER MINERAL CLAI
fcrict.   Where Located:
I. Clive I
er 7767B,
_.B. McAr	
Certificate number 79777A, W. G. McMynr
id sixty days from the date hereof to apply to
grant of the above Mineral claim.
A"D Further Take Notice that action un-
nce of such Certificate of Improvements.
CCIVE PRINGLE.
Dated April 17th, 1900.
Certificate of Improve
FRISCO MINERAL CLAIM, situ
)A, and Reuben R. Shuttlewf
Certificate No. B7446, intend,
hereof, to apply to the Mini
rtificate of Improvements,
:ty days fro
for the purpose
: action, under se
L
Hotel Driard
NICOLA LAKE.
JOHN CLARK, Propr.
Headquarters for Mining Men and Pros
pectors.
An Ideal Summer Resort.
Dining Room Service Unsurpassed.    Only the
JOB RICHARDS, Manager
Special Stage
A Special Stage will leave
Spences Bridge for Princeton and way points every
Monday morning at 6 a. m.
arriving at Princeton Wednesday at noon.
Returning: T,eaves Princeton Friday morning at 6
a. m., arriving at Spences
Bridge on Sunday.
JAS. SMITH, Propr
Hunters'
Saw and Planing
Located 3 Miles from Princeton.
A full stock	
Of Rough and Dressed
Lumber.
The   Driest   and  Clearest in the
country.
I   ■
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
W
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR
PRINCETON,   B. O.
THE PRINCETON   PUBLISHING CO.
J. ANDERSON,
Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION
RATES.
Payable Invariably In Advance.
Advertising rates furnishe
Legal notices 10 and 5 cent
"Certificates of Improvenu
$10.00 for legal life of notice.
Pour weekly insertions co
advertising.
H
UNITED EFFORTS NEEDED
In these precarious times when
the province, and in fact the whole
world, is in a state of doubt and
nebulosity, it behooves every in-
individual to be up and doing if he
desires the immediate and surrounding country to go ahead and prosper. The residents should cast
aside all their animosity for neoteric
ideas and work hand in hand with
each other for the upbuilding of the
Similkameen country. The fact
that we are so far away from the
outside world in the matter of transportation, and yet so near in actual
distances, should only be more
cause for a concerted action on the
part of the whole community. If
the people of the Similkameen valley could only drop their inveteracy
and have one mind what a blessing
it would be. If such were the case
our energies would be placed in the
right paths and could be used as a
sort of a combine to force the needs
of a long suffering community upon
an unobservant administration.
Possibly our needs in regard to a
better mail service could be brought
closer to the thinking tanks of our
worthy postmaster-general at Ottawa, and probably our efforts in regards to the opening up of roads,
trails, bridges, schools, and etc.,
would meet with better success if
they were backed up by the grim
determination to stand for the best
interests of the Similkameen country, first, last and always. If we
can not live up to this resolution, it
would be better for us and the
country at large, if we with our
autochthonal ideas, packed up and
moved on.
our antiquated mail service by draw
ing a comparison. A letter direct
ed to Phoenix, B. C, and datec
June 10th, was sent the same day
to Keremeos, getting there too late
to catch the tri-weekly stage—thereby losing too days—arriving al;
Phoenix, June 18. An answer was
mailed the same day and going by
way of Robson, Revelstoke, Spences
Bridge arrived in Princeton on June
30th, takingatotal of 18 days. Ifthe
letter had been mailed from Princeton via Spences Bridge it would
have taken 22 day. The distance
from to Princeton to Phoenix via
Keremeos is about 140 miles. By
Revelstoke 400. On June 11 a letter was mailed to St. Louis, arriving in that city on the 21st. Ar
answer to this letter was received
on June 30th. The distance to St
Louis from Princeton is something
like 4000 miles. To St. Louis and
returnj[i9 days. To Phoenix anc
return 22 days. Both letters arrived at Spences Bridge on the 26th.
If they had been a day later they
would have had to lay over for a
week, thereby requiring 30 days to
receive a reply from the Boundary
miles away. What gyratory
movement these letters are required
to go through between Spences
Bridge and the Boundary is more
than we can imagine.
A FINE MAIL SERVICE. (?)
The postal authorities have had
their attention called to the poor
condition of our (weakly) mail service by the people of the province
so many times in the past few years
that it seems about time some concessions were made. Without trying to gain an ear of our august
post-master general at Ottawa, in
regard to this matter, we will rather
seek condolence from our brother
sufferers in other parts of the province by giving an illustration of
\   EDITORIAL COMMENT.   \
Our Boundary exchanges are
lightly out-of-date when they ar-
ive at our office, consequently the
latest papers are just telling "how
it come to happen" at the recent
election.
The approximate payroll of Rossland for June  15th footed up to
1,000, with every prospect for an
increase next month. There will
be a day in the near future when
Princeton's mines will go them one
better.
The postponement of the
tiye session for two weeks, was anything but satisfactory, as the present condition of affairs all over the
province require prompt action in
regard to the public and private legislation left undone by the untimely
end of the last
It is estimated that the entire
yield of spring and winter wheat
in the United States will not be over
500,000,000 bushels. If the calculations should be borne out by the
harvest, the crop will be the smallest since 1896. The yield in 1897
was 530,000,000; in 1898, 675,000,-
000; and in 1899, 547,000,000
bushels.
Running a newspaper is the one
business which nine out of ten people think they know all about, yet
as a matter of fact the successful
conducting of a journalistic venture
requires more and various kinds of |
diversified talent than it takes to
put a backwoods barnstorming theatrical company through a poor
season.—Grand Forks Miner.
Doubtless individual selfishness
has been responsible for incalculable
mischief in the past and has retarc
ed our onward progress to a large
extent. To say this must be eliminated, if we wish to succeed as a
people, is a fact that the sooner we
recognize the better.—B. C. Mining
and Investors Guide.
G. L. ALLAN
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN
BOOTS
AND
SHOES
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Try Our Own Mining Boot.
It is just right.
H. A. WHILLANS, M. D.
PHYSICIAN
and
SURGEON.
. JAMES HISLOP	
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
PROVINCIAL I.AND SURVEYOR.
..Princeton, B. C...
Take a lesson from the
SANDON FIRE
And Insure  your Building.
Stock and Furniture in the
PHOENIX INSURANCE CO.,
_of BROOKLYN, N. Y.
J. ANDERSON, Agent, Princeton, B.C.
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC......
PRINCETON, B. C.
W. J. WATERriAN, M. E.
p. a. S. M. A, 1, n. B., Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
PRINCETON
ASSAY OFFICE.
 C. B. HARRIS.
Assayer
and
Chemist*
Accurate results Guaranteed. Reports will be returned on stage bringing samples.
Correspondence Solicited.
Regarding    Mining   Properties  in   the
slmllKameen District.
Properties   Carefully Sampled and  Assayed.
R.H.PARKINSON
FAIRVIEW, B. C.
PRINCETON, B. C.
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR,
CIVIL ENGINEER
and NOTARY PUBLIC.
i the Similkameen Promptly
Attended to.
S. A. HARTMAN
ROSSLAND, B. C.
MINING AND MINES
PROMOTER OF STOCK COMPANIES.
We have first class connections and can find the necessary capital to
work and develop meritorious copper propositions in the Similkameen
country. If you have a good claim with a fine showing we will fir#
you a buyer.    We cordially invite your correspondence.
Respectfully,
Office: 43 Columbia Ave. S. A. HARTMAN.
=:= „_. =
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
| By the Wayside.
There if 1 ydfing Priticetoif pbli
tician who we fear, through disap
aBRintment and.melancholy OTerrtbfi!
recent reverses in the late election,
has forever-forsaken' his native land
:«ld soiij ■■' While in  Keremeos  on
WpomifJioTl cBry, trie thought that by
going just a few miles farther he
'could enter the domain of another
great and mighty country was too
much for him, and with the courage
of an ancient gladiator he determin
ed to discover the actual mode of living of a real live Yank. Thathe^li
ever come back is very doubtful,
he will, after a hard fought battle,
finally sucumb to the wiles of some
Loomiston belle.
It   is quite observant  that Lee
Lee one of our local celestial n
nates is a^ui tea philosopher.    Upon
,^Bing questioned as to his opinion
on the Chinese difficulties he said:
"He whitee man killa lotee China-
man.    Chinaman he no sabe  fitee.
Mjftepe lotee Chmamlrn. Killa \>ne
tousand; nuder one come; Killa.two;
nuder one come; by-bye tousands
'dome.    Ale  samee  Similakameene
^Bsketoes. Li Hung Chang he
no good. What for old man wante
m'onee.' Wetry soone hefdie^
Sometime back, whfle'^af ^v<
known Grand Forks dentist was
town, Lee Lee had occasion to ha
KB-teeth fiiked. A few"|l$jjf)@§$$
upon being .asked fr^eTWfis. nrakintr
lots of money  said:     "Heep  litt;
^ffimee.?   Too mucheexplence. (and
^Bawifis: nis nand across his mouth)
Flixera tiefe slixte fi dolla." No
wonder the Hnrtnr went away_with
a good opinion of Princeton.
It is a very noticeable fact that
among the many different things
which Princeton can  boasC/oTiSxf
| celling in, her .large, canine-, jfajnilv
comes in about the head of them
all.    There isrfche lean,   lki$t,ii&&
Mmverous Siberian hound, the Shep-
ffljgird, bull dog, spitz, terrier, just
plain dog, and in fact every, specimen the 'folrld*4fck?^«pl«nbvm.
There's Scotty's trick dog,- the dog-
j-aRt cries, the dog that can talk,
and then there arejtaps^gjjel^h^^
e.e!aS)ow-wows who have  a  general
Mhfipathy for the pig-tail celestial.
'i*BuS thev sdj^ade hi significance
when it comesltp Ti|bJ|^^c^^)^
1$& % very inwl^ent dog but of late
he has been falling in bad ways, and
fifieJhas  assumed  a very ^agajjrnjfc
■J|aY- Toby taking advantage ofl
his masters absence had taken guard
over    Landlord   Jackson's   KU&ts
P when he spied a gentleman* frr^fe'e
acfl- of 5paying a bill. A spring, a
grab,   and  the deadlyw-work   was
done, and a five dollar bill had gone
down Toby's mouth never to return.
Whether it was "just the nature of
the brute'' or caused by masterly
training only his master knows.
JM; arfjffimte 'dog' lias raised in the
canine market.
Gronile
Creek
Hold
MRS. JAMES, Propr.
jij ThetfMrest point, to ..the
richest Silver Lead mines
in B. fi-a'.Summit City."
There is more gold in GraniUȣreek
than has yet been taken^rat.
Your
*e omfrgave you
Rejpj^ong*
A full line of.Watches and the
Latest Styleslof Jewelery always
on hand.
W. J. kerrT|
I - «OOK & CJH;
|PrincetoiJi||i.
Pifpeer Stojff.
g  STORES  AT	
H        PRINCETON   and GRANITE CREEK.
Princeton Express
S* and Pack Trainfl^
BAGf AGE, FREIGHT, AND
EXPRESS CARRIED FROM KEREMEOS
TO TWENTY MILE AND PRINCETON.
Saddle Horses to any
if point in the Similkameen.
Pack Train Leaves Keremeos  every   Monday
°.ancl Friday on arrival ofr.sj:age from Fairview.
For rates apply to
ffisro & mmiRMi1
Slop Line
FAIRVHEW
 AND	
KEREITEOS
W. Hine & Co., are now running a
Tri-weekly stage fron^JMiffleTCtp,
Keremeos, connecting wShttej
Greenwood and Camp McKinney
stage at the SawdftiHs? *» 4
«Aip M^|||||ney to
Keremeos in one day
■HtageTXfeave Fairview Monday,}
•Wednesday and Friday, returning}
from Keremeos Tuesday, Thursday?
•and Saturday.
Connecting with the Princeton
Express and' PtfcTfTriraffi     ;
KEREMEOS
PRINCETON
'Mm GORDON,
Manufacturer of and
Dealer in all Kinds of
Furniture, Carpets, Oilcloths,
Window Shades, Chains,
Gamp Beds, Cornice Poles, Picture Framing.
Estimates  for  HbfSJ', Office  and  all  other   Furniture  Furnished  on
Application.
•...Kamloops, B. C.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
G. W. Aldous,
PROPRIETOR.
'•••
The
Hotel
Tulameen
Is Now Open to the
Public.
Fisrt-class Dining Room
UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF MRS. W. HAEG-
ERMANN.
COMMUNICATED.
Editor Similkameen Star:
Sir:—In your issue of June 23rd
you gave some most valuable information regarding the revenue received by the government frcni th«.Similkameen district, and you conclude
with the very pertinent inquiry
"What has the Similkameen received in return?"
Had the Semlin cabinet remained
in office six months longer an answer to this question would have
been forthcoming. After a vast
amount of interviewing and petitioning the ministers at last commenced
to recognize the needs of the district. They were made aware of
the importance of the new town of
Princeton as the centre of supply
for the numerous mining camps
which are springing up around us
and were forced to realize the advantages to the province of opening
up the vast sources of minera
wealth which has been proven to
exist in the neighborhood, anc.
had signified their intention of placing on this years estimates all the
most urgent work demanded by the
Princeton delegates. Then, came-
. their illegaldismipsal hy ^he late
WG^hA^governor with the result that all the
exp&ldilule of money and time has
been fruitless, and we are no farther
forward than we were a year ago '
Well! What are we going to do
about it? If I know anything of
the community of Princeton they
are not the sort to take a reverse
like this lying down.
We must organize a fresh campaign and put renewed zest into it,
for the reason that we have now to
Iireckon with a little mushroom su-
I burb endeavoring to further its own
I interests by interfering with  ours,
and trying to sow discord amongst
us. Such figures as those lately
published by you should prove a
serviceable weapon to fight with if
a future fight becomes necessary;
but I think we may safely reckon
upon a bloodless victory. No self-
respecting government could possibly go to work upon such distinc;
promises as those made by their
predecessors; we have only to prove
these promises and ask that they be
fulfilled.
We have no reason to suppose
that the present government well be
unfriendly to us, and we may safely
count upon the advocacy of Mr.
Murphy who received such a substantial support from the Princeton-
ites at the late election, and will see
that a community contributing so
largely to the funds of the government are not ignored in the future.
Your remark that $2500 was uselessly expended last fall on the road
to Keremeos is scarcely just to the
late government. Certainly so long
as the road remains incomplete the
money spent upon the construction
of the first few miles is so much
money lying ide, but this road is
one of the most pressing needs of
the district. It was the intention
of the late government to complete
it this spring, and there will be no
peace for the new ministry till they
take this work in hand and so give
a value to the $2,500 already lafci
out.
It would be a crying shame if a
town of the present size of Princeton, which is now^^lmost ripe for
^pncgrpor.ation, should remainlonger
*"" without such necessaries as a school
a court house and a recorder's
office. We shall get all we want if
we only pull together and use
enough of that most valuable commodity called, Ginger
/A-/t^v***y
For the Best LUMBER try
■■■THE NEW SAW MILL^
MARTIN, HARRIS & CO.
WHO ARE NOW
Ready to Supply Lumber at the Lowest Prices.
E. HARDWICK, Manager.
Otter Flat Hotel
DEBARRO & THYNNE
PROPRIETORS.
THE FINEST BRANDS OP WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
FISHING AND HUNTING RESORT. BO-TS KBPT
boats kept FINE BOATING ON OTTER LAKE.
Nearest Stopping Place and Supply Point for Boulder Creek, Kelly Creek, Slate
Creek, and Summit Mining Camps Mining Men and Prospectors can outfit at
Store in connection with hotel.
Prospector's Supply Store
C. E. THOHAS.
A new line of Gent's Furnishings
Just Received.    See Our Specialties in Shirts.
BRIDGE ST.
Princeton, B.C.
SIMILKAMEEN
BUTCHERING QO.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any Point in the Similkameen Valley.
C. Summers,
PRINCETON BRANCH. manager.
m
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
To Bon a Newspaper.
All a fellow has to do to run a
newspaper is to be able to write a
poem, praise Jones' new house, umpire a base ball game, report a wedding, beat a lawyer, saw wood, describe a fire so people will shed
their wraps, make one dollar do the
work of ten, shine at a circus, address country fairs, test whisky,
abuse the liquor habit, measure calico, subscribe to charity, go without
meals, attract politicians, defend
th«R national platforms, sneer at
snobbery, wear diamonds, invent
advertisements, overlook scandal,
prtdse babies, delight the pumpkin
raiser, heal the sick, fight to a finish, publish resolutions free of
charge, speak at prayer meeting
and stand in with everybody and
everything.—Rossland Miner.
Why Willie Stayed Home.
A teacher in a certain school
cently received the following note
from the mother of a boy who had
beemabsent for a day or two: "Dere
Mam—plese eggscuse Willy. He
didn't hav but one.pare of trowsers,
an'I kep him home to wash an'
mend them, and Mrs. O'toole's cow
came and et them up off the line,
and that awt to be eggscuse enuff,
goodness nose. Yours with respeck.,
-Mrs. B." jtc G+fr *>**&%
Marvelous.
"Why, sir, the growth of Kentucky is remarkable."
"Yes, Colonel. Its population
increases in spite of its politics."
I French* Day I
V TINSMITHS l
J PLUflBERS I
J GUNSniTHS J
I ...PIMP DRIVING DONE...
7  Our Camp  Stove is the Boss for
t Prospectors.
A   Repair work of Every  Descrip-
I tion.
SMOKE
Tucketts
TOBACCOS, CIGARS  and
CIGARETTES.
Tphey are the Purest
j^ certainly the
Dest in the market.
Geo. E. Tucked & son Co.
HAMILTON, ONT.
New General
...Store
Just Received
A well   assorted stock of Clothing, Gents'
Furnishings, Blankets, Stationery, etc*
We sell none but the Purest and Best
Groceries
TRY OUR "HONDI CEYLON" TEA.
Call and See Our Boots and Shoes.
JUST ARRIVED.
Bridge St.
Rennie & Bell
Princeton   Meat   Market
WARDLE & THOMAS
Orders  for  Mining  Camps   promptly  attended   to
and delivered.
The Sunset Copper Mining Co., lm
Owning and Operating
The SUNSET Mine.
On Copper Mountain, Similkameen Mining District.
Everyone who has seen the property renders a unanimous verdict*
The Biggest and Best Mine in British Columbia*
Now is the TIME to BUY Stock in this Wonderful
nine. It is an investment! No Speculation! Ore
enough in sight to return ioo percent, on amount
invested.   BUY TODAY before advance in price.
Sunset Shaes Will Make You Rich.
R.A.BROWN,
President and Gen'l Manager
PRINCETON or Griti Forlis.
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
FROM THE RECORDS.
lusiness done in the Mining Recorder's
ring the week, ending June a th, 1900.
MININO LOCATIONS.
I'ENTY MlLE—
Mountain Rose—A. E. House.
iE Mile Creek—
Lake Side—Frank Bougard.
'UN GH
Derby—Fr
:id.
Daw:
:. Lo
—Charles Burns.
-W.J.Murray.
Colussus-
Buck Hoi
Col ling wo «1—Hector Strai
Garnet—Henry Smith.
Aurora—Geo. Murray.
'icola Lake District—
Marsh Lake—Angus McGii
Last Chance—Alonzo B. R
Iennedy Mountain—
Lord Roberts—John E. Sfa
:'elley Creek—
Great Western—T. C. Hartman et
The Little Rhine—Wm. Burdich.
ASSESSMENTS.
.Mountain King—Charles Connell.
North Star—J. W. Dryden.
Little Bear-
Great Bear-
Southern Cross     '■
Sunset-
Boston— "
Copper Belle—E. P. Lowe.
Moonshiner Frac.—A. P. Rogers.
Lucky Silverthorne Frac."
Golden Nob—Richard Gulliford.
King Solomon—Claude M. Snowdc
TOWN TOPICS.
Use Blue
A new supply of Jessop steel has arrived at the Howse store.
For the best Paint, Oils and Leads in
the market go to the Howse store.
For Sale—One ton of fine potatoes
for $20.00.   Apply to the Star Office.
20 Mile  Creek.     Two l/$ interests
Apply, Cook & Co., Princeton.
Blue Ribbon Baking Powder is made
in Canada by Canadians.
The finest and best fitted Bar in the
Similkameen is at the Hotel Princeton.
A. E. Howse can supply you with the
very latest in shirts and gent's furnish
ngs.
For Sale—About three tons of Finest
Oat Hay for $22.50 per ton.   Apply
D. McKay, Granite Creek.
Bennet's Patent Fuse, the best in the
world can be purchased at the Howse
For reliable informatic
the Similkameen countr
the Star.
1 in regard to
■ subscribe for
J. CHARLES McINTOSH
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
_ Pioneer m
Hi Barber!
S@ggi
HUGH COWAN, Prop.
The First Barber Shop Established in the
Opposite Post Office,     Princeton, B. C
Blue Ribbon   Baking Powder   make
Woodward's
...HOTEL
LOWER NICOLA.
rinceton from Spences. Bridge
Via Lower Nicola.
The table  i
duce from 01
supplied   with  pro-
3wn gardens.
COMFORTABLE ROOMS.
Headquarters for Smith's Stage.
mm
Headquarters for all stage lines.
Hotel Jachson
J. H. JACKSON, Sole Proprietor.
^PRINCETON
DINING ROOM UNDER PERSONAL SUPERVISION.
ONLY THE FINEST BRANDS OF LIQUORS AND
CIGARS AT THE BAR FIRST-CLASS STABLE IN
CONNECTION.
|3^"Patrons of the Hotel Jackson can keep posted on the mining
Development of the entire Similkameen.
Blue  Ribbon Tea
Most Delicious in the Market.
When a prospector returns to camp after a long
day in the mountains, there is nothing he looks
forward to more than a cup of
e£Pea*t£p
BLUE RIBBON TEA.
WMM^^w>AA^^M^^w^^www^^yywrwvi
Hudson Bay Co.
NEW GOODS.
Up-to-date and Great Values in Ladies Blouses, Printed Cambrics, Printed Muslins. Costume Lengths in Dress Goods
Orders promptly filled for any part of the Similkameen Country
Hudson Bay Stores.,
Kamloops, B. Cm
l^^^^*^^^*^>^^^^^^^^>**^^^^VWWWVVWWS'V**'»
Princeton Feed stable^
BUDD & CO., Proprietors.
Cayuses or High Priced Race*
Horses Equally Well Cared for.
THE MOST COMMODIOUS HORSED
Opposite Hotel Jackson. HOTEL IN THE SIMILKAMEEN «r«^
 THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
*
MMiM^J^MM^JM
Keremeos
The Centre of the Lower Similkameen Valley, 45 miles
from Princeton.   A Mining and Agricultural Centre.
f ...LOTS NOW ON THE MARKET...
137 TCTMCCC    ^' I 'B 17 L^ I f THIRDAVE' 100 Feet Wide, Lots 30x120
iDU^llNEiOO    O  1  IxJClli  1     CORNER LOTS $150; Inside Lots $100.
/'YT'TJITD CTDCCTC  corner lots$100.00.
\J 1 llCK O 1 KC.il 1 O   INSIDE LOTS $75 00.
TERMS: 1-3 CASH; BALANCE THREE AND SIX MONTHS TIME.
»or Further Information Apply to:
R. H. PARKINSON, Fairview.
I   j^jhhiE. BULLOCK WEBSTER, Keremeos.
BEALEY INVESTMENT & TRUST CO.
LIMITED.
General Ageni.   QreCUWOOd,   B.   C.
uocaiAgents: jjjg ppjnCet©n Real Estate, Miring and Assaying Office.
War Eagle Has 500 Feet.
Early this week a Pioneer man visited
he War Eagle, and was shown through
lie workings of the property by the resi-
ent manager, Clifford G. Buck. Drift-
lg has been in progress for some time
rom the main shaft at the 100-foot level,
he east drift is now in 125 feet and the
L-st drift 180 feet, with 50 feet in other
tnali drifts. This work, with that done
11 the surface aggregates over 500 feet of
evelopment done thus far on the prop-
rty. At present the compressor—being
alf of a 10-drill Rand machine—is oper-
>ting two drills, and the average daily
rogress is nine feet.—Phoenix Pioneer.
Additional Snowshoe Plant.
The British Columbia (Rossland and
_locan) Syndicate, Ltd., owning the
""howsfloil of which A. J. McMillan is
ye managing director, have let a contact to the Jenckes Machine Co., of Sher-
Jrboke, Que., for additional machinery.
t consists of a 70 h. p. boiler, a % Little
iant drill, a duplex No. 3-2-3 pump,
500 feet of pipe, new air receiver, etc.
he order was given this week to R. P.
,'illiams, the resident agent of the com-
my at Greenwood.
The tunnel, on the Snowshoe, running
Jnder the railway track, is now in 240
et, and is still in ore. Foreman Tre-
srrow intends to work it with air as
ion as the new machinery arrives.
The Winnipeg Mine.
Work on the Winnipeg is making good
ogress, and up to date 14 carloads, of
e have been despatched to the Trail
'Aielter, aud returns have been received
ft all but the last two sent. The three
3t carloads of ore  recently sent gave
returns as follow: No. 1, $10.20; No. 2,
$13.86 ; and No. 3, $14.05 per ton. This
was after the freight and treatment had
been paid. The net return for the three
carloads was $787.93, and the management is pleased with the result.
Tregear, formerly of the LeRoi, has taken
charge of the Winnipeg, and under his
superintendence good results are expected.—Greenwood Miner.
The finest and best fitted Bar in thi
Similkameen is at the Hotel Princeton.
A. E. Howse can supply you with thi
ery latest in shirts and gent's furnish
lgs.
For Sale—About three tons of Finest
)at Hay for $22.50  per ton.    Apply
D. McKay, Granite Creek.
Palace Livery
.* STABLES I
^^^^^^^^^^
KEREMEOS, B. C.
D. J. INNIS, Prop.
Travellers from the Boundary
District can secure horses
through to Princeton.
Run in Connection with Keremeos Hoi
Prospectors
....STOP!
If you want to Outfit cheaply
and quickly, do so at the	
..KEREMEOS STORE..
WM. HINE & Co.,
make money by buying
your outfit at the point
you start prospecting.
Mining Supplies of Every
DESCRIPTION KEPT IN STOCK.
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
f-iIRVIEW and
Presriptions jtCarefully^ Compounded.
Orderg_by mail or stage promptly
M&TEL
1ME0S..
JONH NEIL,
Proprietor.
Stables in Connection.
i
This hotel is Situated at
•the Gateway to the
Similkameen valley. <a*
Well Furnished Rooms.
Bar and Dining Room
Service First-Class.
w
We Gaiter Specially to
Mining Men
and Prospectors.
WM. BEAVIS,
......GENERAL BLACKSMITH.
Expert Horse-shoer.     Wagons and Agricultural Implements Carefully Repaired.
A1X WORK GUARANTEED.
Opposite Keremeos Hotel.
 KEREMEOS, B. C
 I
THE SIMILKAMEEN STAR.
THE VM1L10N FORKS MINING
AND DEVELOPMENT CO.. Ltd.
o» OWNERS OF <*
The TOWNSITE of
PRINCETON
...Lots for Sale...
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers* The business centre for the
following mining camps:- Copper Mt, Kennedy Mi, Friday, Boulder, Granite and 20 Mile Creeks, Summit,
Roche River, Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove*
Enormous Agricultural Area to Draw from.
Splendid Climate Pure water
Government Headquarters for
S<   Similkameen District*   S
PRESENT PRICES OF LOTS FROM
$2.00 TO  $10.00  PER FRONT FOOT.
SIZ$ OF LOTS 50x100 FEET AND 33=100 FEET.
Send for map to
W. J. WATERMAN,
Resident Manager V. F. M. & D. Co.

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