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Similkameen Star Jul 27, 1901

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Full Text

 SIMILKAM
Published in the Interest of Princeton and Similkameen District,
PRINCETON,   JULY 27th, 1901.
LOCAL AND   PERSONAL.       !)   The Wilson Brotl
■i has nearly finish-
ient   building.    We think
W. D. Young of Mir
cola Lake.     He
|     Mr. Max Wilsor
tel Tulameen.
:ek in Victoria, keeping
I   ous among the successful c
it   Buildings
rete   form  i
:opper  sulphide
Judge is a genial whole-souled westerner
of the genuine type.    We   are   glad   to
Mr. John H. Jackson, the genial proprietor of the Hotel Jackson, has been
suffering for the past week from a case of
ivy poison. We are glad to see that he
is losing that painful expression, and will
!Soon be himself again.      1
There is to be a social assembly of *.he
young people of Princeton at the Hotel
Tulameen on Wednesday evening next,
July 31st. It is to be hoped that all those
interested will do all they can individually to make it a grand success. .  ,
F. Lambert and D. Ross were in town
this week, having just returned from Kelly Creek aud Summit Camps, where they
have been doing their annual work, they
and the prop*
n the s
>oking well.
Mr. Gallenger, of California, has bee
looking over Boulder Creek properti«
for a company in which he is  largely in
Mr. O. N. Scott, who is associated with
Mr. Smith Curtis, left for the Boundary
last Sunday. He contemplates returning
to our bus}* centre in a few weeks.
The bnsh-fire on the bench west of the
city is assuming larger proportions every
day. It is a pity that such picturesque
surroundings should   be marred  in  that
. Smith Curtis, M.L.A., has engaged the
I services of Mr. Jos. Heslop, P. L. S., to:
\ lay out his new townsite at Nine Mile.
They left with their party for that point
] last Saturday.
the
Parties arriving from Roche River report the Red Star claim looking exceedingly well. Pouch's and Bonneviei
owners, have been sinking on it for
time past, with the result that they
have five "feet of clean ore in sight.
A. E. Howse, one of our leading merchants, in anticipation of the arrival of
the government survey party, has put a
new roof on his warehouse to better protect the chesnuts and other goods to be
furnished an up to date trail builder.
Rapid progress is being made with the
rebuilding of the Tulameen bridge. The
last vxst^ges of the old bridge have disappeared, and Messrs. Swan & McAlpin,
the contractors, have placed a large gang
of men upon the reconstruction work,
which is being   rapidly pushed forward.
Messrs. Rogers and Silverthorn, of the
Vlaira Monte Company, will move to
Summit and represent four prospects
>wned   by their  company.   They have
mlt of their labors. Diligent, well direct-
id work will always be rewarded, particularly when applied to a Similkameen
mining proposition.
A    NEW   INVENTION.
A Buffalo, N. Y.,
new system of sme
/ented
ich, if i
will
ed for it,
. constructed.'
part the th
Dlutionize the mining busine*
the world.    His claims are  set   fortl
| The fugy- ■
■ of .copper, and the estimated expense of
building is about $3,500. The furnace
just completed is said to be capable o?
handling 125 tons of water each 24 hours.
"The furnace consists of a water tight
vertical shaft not very dissimilar from the
present pyritic furnace. In the new far-
nace, however, the use of fuel is absolutely unnecessary, the required heat being generated by the combustion of sulphur in the ore and oxidation of the iron
and matte.
" While the heated gasses arise from
the hearth of the furnace, beginning the
combustion of sulphur in the
upper part of the furnace, the mass of the
charge keeps passing downward till it
passes the great heat on top of the slag.
There the silica is converted into slag by
the action of the lime and the iron contained either in the ore or supplied as
flux.
'" The copper matte, as is well, known,
sinks below the stratum of the slag, and
here is where the value of the inyention
comes in. At this point there are some
extra tuyeres delivering a blast under
pressure of 7000 pounds to the square
inch on the molton matter, and a very
intese oxidation develops the heat necessary to convert the copper that is yet in
a state of sulphide into a metallic state.
Thus there are accomplished in one operation the redncing of the copper to the
metallic state.
" One great point of value lies in the
fact, inasmuch as no fuel of any kind is
required, it makes no difference how inaccessible the mine may be, the ore can
be treated right there and converted into
ingots ready for refining. Furnaces can
also be built of a size to accomodate the
capacity.
"In the old method and up to the
building of this furnace, the only mode
of extracting metal from the ore, three
separate processes were required. First,
the ore has to be roasted, which is an ex
pensive process. Then the metal is extracted from the roasted ore. Later, by
still another process, the various metals
are separated one from the other. The
entire treatment is very expensive. By
the use of this new furnace the expense
is only one-tenth as great.
"For many years  efforts  have   been
pr.
srfec
whi<
ndoni
might have been worked with profit."
A company has been organized with
$5,000,000 capital to manufacture the furnace, and proposes to erect a copper refinery near Niagara Falls. The first furnace is going to the copper district of
North Carolina, and the second wilLsgo
to California.
A BIO LEDOE.
One of the best defined and strongest
leads in the Province is on Bouldercreek
in the Otter Flat. The ledge haTbeen
traced for a distance of over two miles,
and four groups have been located and
more or less prospecting of their property done by tbe owners. Where opened
out it has proved to be from eight to
twenty feet wide and a true fissure. The
gold values are high, while there are
supplementary values in silver and copper. On the Cousin Jack group the ore
body, on sample, assays $52 in gold and
silver, and a sampling of the lead on the
International group gave $60 in gold and
copper. An average specimen from Tom
Conley's group gave an assay of $126 in
gold and 8 per cent, copper, and from
the Charles Law group specimens have
been taken which ran even better in
gold, but the average is about the same
as in other parts of the lead. From all
appearances these properties will devel-
ope into mines, but they must be touch
ed by the magic wand of the genius of
transportation before much progress can
be made.—Kamloops Standard.
Very Considerate.
"My wife is very considerate," said
the newly married man. "She is always
buying me neckties and colored  shirts."
"And I suppose you are considerate
and generous in your turn."
"Yes. I wouldn't hurt her feeings for
the world.    I wear'em."
" It is quite useless for him to aspire
to any office in the gift of the   people."
"Gift! Who said anything about gift?
He expects to pay for everything he
gets."  ^
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
The Development of the Similkameen District.
merely requires sufficient water round it
to carry on operations, as it cuts its own
channels and uses the same water over
and oyer again." The value of the gravel he places at 12 cents per cubic yard.
Both Copper Mountain and Kennedy
Mountain appear to be mineralized, nearly the whole surface of these mountains
has been staked out in claims. Although
the industry is  yet too  young  to  have
this district is due the
has recently been paid
couutry.   For the
the Similka-
lical proof Rossland,
1 the
any of the smelters, either at Trail,
Greenwood, Grand Forks or Northport,
and the smelter will have a base of ore
supplies in the two mountains we referred to of over 250 miles of mineralized
area, so that as a smelting, and possibly
as a refining centre, the capital of the
Similkameen may be regarded as having
an extremely bright future before it.
iatc vicinity, and the freight charges
lake a substantial increase to the price
ley pay for their fuel. The Similka-
leen copper deposits haye mal measures
dually adjoining them, and the Vermil-
on   Forks   Company has   opened up a
the
•ystalline rocks of Cop-
the south, and those of
rth of Princeton, forru-
of the valley referred
last and West Valley),
chiefly in the form of bornite and chal-
copyrite, iu proportions varying in the
different shafts. A number of assays
have been made from time to time, and
among them, some which seem reliable,
of average samples of ore taken from the
various dumps. These would show that
it contains from 4 to 10 per cent, of copper (with about the same.s
and lime, and about 60 pe
eigfain
south, ab
ton, and that on the nc
itself. In several places
and banks outcrops of 1
JOHN LOVE & CO.
DRUGGISTS AND
STATIONERS.
Presriptions^Carefully^ Compounded.
BUSINESS and PROFESSIONAL CARDS
W. J. WATERriAN, M. E.
P. 0. S. M. A, I. n. E.. Etc.
Examination, Development and Management of Prospects, Claims
and Mines Undertaken.
P. O. Address, PRINCETON, B. C
J. CHARLES McINTOSH,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
AND
 NOTARY PUBLIC	
PRINCETON, B. C.
centCef-srr-
ed by those in authority as an upheav
from below, due to v^canicjictioti, sir
ilar to the formation onRed Mountain,
at Rossland.   The ore~does~"not   appei
to be as rich as that found in the   Le R
and other  Rossland   mines, being mo
like the Boundary deposits, which, though
of lower grade, are likely to prove even
more  commercially   valuable, owing to
their  self-jluxing qualities.    There are
indications of auriferous gravels in many
places  along   the valley, and   although
some attempts have been made   to   mine
this with hydraulic monitors, the results
have not so far been remunerative, owing
either to lack of experience on the part
of those carrying  out the   operation
difficulties with   the   water   supply,
the Chinese, who   have been   for   many
years washing this gravel with the crudest possible appliances, have earned good
wages.   Exactly what   yield   they have
obtained is unknown, as the Chinese
are extremely secretive in regard to their
mining returns, but they have certainly
made over $2 a day with   a   rocker, and
such gravel should   yield very large r<
turns with a proper system of hydrauli
washing.
Commenting on the placer mining ou
look, Mr. Neave says:—"There   is   on
thing which has not yet been  tried, and
that is  a   New Realand dredger, wh
Priuceton itself, and   the   other fot
•ered while the writer's inspection w*
ngmade. At Princeton there is
lneljof some 65   feet, showing   at tl
inches coal* 1 inch clay,
inch slate.        48 inches coal,
inches coal.       Clay bed.
y foot of
ASSAYERS'   CARDS.
PRINCETON ASSAY
OFFICE,       C.  B.  HARRIS,
Assayer and Chemist.
Mall Your Sample* to
. . GUESS BROS., . .
Assay Laboratory.
(Established   1895.)
GREENWOOO, B.  B.
PELLEW-HARVEY,
BRYANT&GILMAN
ASSAY OFFICE and ORE TESTING WORMS.
Lssaving and Complete Mining Smelting Tests Made from
Small Samples up to Ton Lots.
iST&wSiST1*11    VANCOUVER, B.  C
RICHARD H.PARKINSON
Provincial Land Surveyor,
Civil Engineer
and   Notary Public.
i-eys on  the  Similkameen   Promptly
...JAMES HISLOP....
The
point mentioned, the
have been upheaved
, giving an anticlinal
v from north   to   south
ippn
itely
Dirt, 6 inches.
Shale. Coal, 4—5 feet.
Sandstone. Sandstone, etc., 15 ft.
Coal, 4—5 feet.       Coal, 5—6 feet.
Dirt and Shale, 8ft. Sandstone, etc., 20 yds
Coal, 4—5 feet. including 3 in. coal.
Dirt. 6 inches.        Coal, 6 feet.
Coal, 1 foot, 3 in.-  Sandstone.
Aggregate, over 20 feet.
Although there has been no opportunity at present to test this coal for its cocking qualities, those who are conversant
with the nature of these deposits have
expressed the opinion that it will fulfil
all necessary requirements. The well-
defined coal basin comprises an   area o:
conjuction with the" neighboring copper
deposits is evidently recognised by the
fact that representatives of the Vj
Railway liave" recently acquired coal
areas in the district, but the Vermilion
Forks Company, having been the first to
appreciate the value of these deposits, acquired the choicest areas, both for sup
plying the mines and the proposed smel-
Iti
r the townsite.
what tc
. fors
timate of the price at which coal ca;
supplied to the smelter, but being right
on the spot, it will certainly be 50 per
cent, below what is now being paid b*
MINING AND CIVIL ENGINEER
PROVINCIAL LAND SURVEYOR.
 Princeton,!!. C	
LINDLEY & FOSTER,
Taxidermists   and Furriers.
The Best Prices Paid for
i Johnson St. VICTORIA, B. C.
JOHN  W.   PECK  & CO.,
Wholesale Clothing
Mens'   Furnishings.
VANCOUVER,  B..C.
Correspondence Solicited from the Trade.
Careful    and    Prompt    Attention to all
LETTER ORDERS.
Your        We can save you money
Watch   on your Repairing.
Repairing.
W. J. KERR, Kamloops, B. C.
B. C. POTTERY CO.
CHIMNEY PIPES, SEWER PIPES, ETC
VICTORIA, B. C.
,000 Shingles
s Bridge. B. <
Q. nURDOCH
Blacksmithing
and Horseshoeing
Shop on Harold Avenue.
PRI NCETON,    B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
^
HEDLEY CITY
20 Mile Creek, Similkameen
District, British Columbia.
The centre of the Mining Industry of Middle Similkameen.
The following Mines are in operation within one half mile.
NICKLE PLATE
The KINGSTON
The Rollo
0
The Sunset
Golden Lily
and Many Others.
Lots now on the market and selling like hot-cakes.
Buy early and get the choice.    Prices
$100 to $1 50
In three Payments:=- 1-3 Cash;   J-3 in Six months; J =3 in Twelve months.
R.H.PARKINSON,Gefll MflP.
HEDLEY CITY and FAIRVIEW, B. C.
 THE SIMILHAMEEIN STAR
PRINCETON,   B.   C,
THE  PRINCETON   PUBLISHING  CQ.
THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
July 27TH, 1901
I®
NIOCLA  NOTES.
Charles Brown of Ten Mile, was up before Messrs. Murray and Dalby, J.P's.,
charged with assauk.011 oneJThQs1__Hare;
a wel I known prospector, and fined $68.
Hare had three ribs broken, one  in two
It is reported in society circles, that
soon wed one of Princeton's fair daugh-   ■M-V-j
ters* *?K*y, cues &o b*# ^hW
The rt-eath-T is as if made to order, and | (p
Mr. Thos. Pearson and  pa
uver, arrived by the last stage..-Mr.
arson is  going
JOB
PRINTING
OI Every Description
Neatly Executed
at the
T
Phoe
nix
Us
that
made by the
the  contract
the^
•/.. '
/. & E.
railw
raydirict  in-
to the ci
y of Ph
jenix
,is  gratifing
news
. There was
no d
oubt, whatev-
er, that the line \
'as t<
> be built this
year
ye
it is mc
re sa
tisfactory  to
kno\
v th
at   the
cont
ract   for   the
actu
al gi
ading of
the
roadbed  has
been
av
*arded.
At
the   bound-
aryl
ine,
near Cascade
this new line
will
com
lect with
a Great Northern
bran
chfi
•om Mar
:us, to be  built to
that
poit
t, the cc
mtra
:t for which
has
aire
ady   bee
n   "g
ven out, the
work no
v being
unde
r way.    This
will
give
the mos
portant min-
ing
cam
p   in the
Bo
undary direct
conn
ecti
m with
Spok
&ne within a
tran.
s   ti
me, and
tinental
thu
railw
5 with three
ays.    In this
way
Ph
>enix   w
ill   h
ave   another
railw
ay
to   haul
its
ores   to   the
*
OFFICE
Quick Repair work.... *
Pickles, per gallon .
.     1.25
to 1.50
Postum Cereal, per 1
■>.        35c
to    —'
Rice, per sack   .    .
•     3-5°
to 4.00
Salt, per lb   .    .    .
4J-2
c to      6c
Vinegar, per bottle .
25c
to    75c
Nails, per lb. .    .    .
9c
to      IOC
smelters.
Out of the maze of railway r
ors that have been so plentiful for
the last year, one can at least di
cern something definite, Jim Hill
and Mann & McKenzie are actually building into the Boundary and
to Phoenix, and thus making a
start on the long talked of Victoria,
Vancouver & Eastern railway,
wnich was such a bone of contention at the last session ot the legislative assembly. This they will do
without bonus or government aid
of any kind, which is a convincing
proof of their faith in the riches of
the Boundary.
ioked S
'-, p.l
"      Backs, p
Roll, per lb.    . 21c to —
Breakfast, per lb 22><c to —
Roast Beef, per lb .    .    . 12c to —
Porterhouse Steak, per lb 15c to —
SirloinSteak, per lb .    . jrjjc to —
Soup beef, per lb   .    .    . 10c to —
Pork, per lb.*  .    .    .    . 15c to —
Veal,   per lb  12c to 15c
Prime fat steers, per cwt. . $4.75 to $5.25
Lambs $4.00 to $4.50
Sheep $4.75 to	
Hogs, per cwt $6.00 to $6.25.
Poultry is scarce.       Prices are:
Live chickens per doz. . . $6.00 to $7.
Princetonians^6 j*
When in Phoenix
The Victoria Hotel
R TONKINS,
HOP,
e desi
a large F
3UND
RY, a
pair a
large
vork fo
K RE
PAIRINC
uething i
mill
lly all
from t
kinds
he foi-
Pumps; Pans, Blowers, Ore Cars, Ore Buckets, Giants, Grizzlies, Belting, Pipe, Valves, Boiler Tubes, Engineers' Fittings.
A Personal Call op a communication Will Have Oup Courteous Attention.
VANCOUVER - ENGINEERING - WORKS.
[Successor to ARMSTRONG & MORRISON.]
IRON    FOUNDERS,    BOILER    MAKERS    AND   MACHINISTS.
. Muralo Wall Finish
A household necessity and a household beautifier—a dry powder put up in 5 pound packages and 25 beautiful shades.
When house cleaning be sure and use Muralo and have
some thing for your work.   Easily applied and won't rub off.
McLENNAN, McFEELEY & CO.,
LiniTED.
122 Cordova Street, VANCOUVER, B. C.
THE DRIARD HOTEL
JOE RICHARDS,  Manager NICOLA   LAKE.
Headquarters for Mining  Men and Prospectors.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN     STAR
PLACES    GOLD.
A Scientific Opinion on Sources /rind
Deposition.
CORRESPONDENCE.
B. C, July 22, 1901.
\j ^Silm'-WourvSuab
ode
rf.
relat
the partic
hardness  of the    lode   enclosing rocks
>untry  rock  dc
swhich
nfluence on the   <
it he still had the inter
if his constituency at he:
iurprised   that we, the
oder the broad
raise sufficient mo
,   poll-tag (a pet   :
of fact,  much
of it is c
omplete
lv broN
P
ken  up,  freeir
g the go
d   in  p
lace to
prosi*
accumulate ant
form a pc
cket   ri
ght on
Jiving
top of the large
below it.   "£he
outcrop
ntry ro
diatelj)
cks, by
becotr
wearing  down
under  e
ore ra-
pidly than the
relatively
harde
rock,
expec
gold when  they  tl
fragments   are   pushed
stream.    In the harder   1
ti^ij^tWllv
mparatively small
In the California mountains the stre:
cut through 'successive bands of g
containing rocks, so that distribu*
of deposits of placer gold were formed
over long continuous channel distances,
as compared with many other distr
ailes from the upper _1:
rlodT
and draft a'r
ness, asking
To*fhe 'cjffff limit ttey
but insufficient
payable, is about the
limit. Above the source there is, oi
course nothing. Below the workable
placer there is a long downstream distance in which there is gold, widely distributed in traces that are apt to be misleading. These fine colore and general
prospects are due to tbe widely distributed fine gold that is more or less Abatable
either by itself or as fine particles in
fragments of lode rocks. These particles
are, if anything, more likely to b<
plentiful near the t^p of adeposit, rathei
" thanj at the    bedrock or"T>5ttoTn-'   The
correctly estimated frotn^iis light gold
of the top wash. It is only safe to es
tiinate from prospecting the entire depth
Generally a gradation downwarjL-«f the
size of the particles can be observed"beginning at the lode source. Coarse gold
is very generally found close to the
iginal Wde source, very fine light gold
at a considerable distance from it.
Generalization as to probable quantity
in a deposit are unsafe without considerable prospecting, covering a comparatively large area.—Mining and Scientific
Press.
Doctor—How do you criminal lawyers
feel when a client has to go behind
prison bars?
Lawyer—About the same as you phys-
• icians   feel   when a pal
lossible comfort,
ving the welfare
of the money he
ropriated, be ex-
needed   for the
until honest brain power is used  in th<
management of public affairs.
ton, B. C
..July
23, 1901.
KAMEEN
STAR.
-Consider
ing th
a  fact that
uing dist
rict, ir
°yk£?rtic-
than anj
section of
bia by th
elate
late set for
His Roy
al   Hi
ghness, the
would it
notb
i advisable
and citiz
ens in
this poorly
strict, to
hold
a   meeting
morial to
His R
oval High-
3 priv;
e life s
.Mr.   Duns-
date, and permit ttisbiased railroad legislation to proceed in the interesto of the
PEOPLE.
Settler,
'•Oh, Effie,
v* hat and govf^n a
'Yes, Alfred hasn't recovered yet from
shock the bill gave him."
• <»<■»<■» <w<m<m<m<^<m<m<1<m%
^ *)
»   The Nearest Point to the   10  Mile   A
\    mm    5
1
1
I
1
1
#»   The  shortest  route by 10  Mile
a   Princeton from  Spence's Bridge
(*     Via Lower Nicola.
V The  table
V duce from
n
...HOTEL I
LOWER NICOLA,     t
pplied   with  pro-
»» COMFORTABLE ROOMS. K
(? *)
£ Headquarters for Smith's Stage t\
c S
Owning
and
Operating
The
SUNSET
Mine
On Copper
Mountain,
Similkameenl
Mining
District.
Everyone  who  has  seen the property
RENDERS
A UNANIMOUS
VERDICT
The Biggest and Best MinTm British
Columbia*
NOW IS.THE
TIME TO BUY
STOCK IN
This Wonderful Mine. It is an investment ! No Speculation ! Ore enough in sight to return 100 per cent, on amount
invested.    BUY TO-DAY before advance in price.
Sunset Shares Will
Make You Rich.
FOR FURTHER IMFORMATION APPLY TO
R. A. BROWN,
PRINCETON or Grand Forks, B. C.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
Jui,y 27TH, 1901
The Fairview Corporation.
A circular has been forwarded to the
'shareholders of the Fairview Corporation,
in which notice is given, that the (irstyis-
scssuient q£ ',«tf ceukg per sharp'is payable
'on "or before July aoth pros., while a
second call for a like amount will be
made within four months. Accompanying the circular is a report on the company's properties by Mr. E. S. Thurston,
a mining engineer of New York, who recently made the examination on behalf
of Messrs. Gooderham & Black-stock.
This report is most favorable, particularly in respect to the Stem-winder mine,
in which a large ore -body has been blocked   ont, and   that on $5 ore, a  6o-stamp
i pn
$10,000 mont
er, claim that the present value of the«
from daily sampling   is  $10.25.   Me:
while the following letter has   been
1 from Mr. Blackstock by the pre
dei
odet
A Dangerous Clim
Prospectors
....sfopr
If you want to Outfit
cheaply and quickly,
KEREMEOS STORE
WM. HINE & Co.,
Mining Supplies
of Every
Coal  License  Application.
NOTICK—Within 30 days from date I Intend to
apply to the CUlef Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for coal on
Coal License Application.
north side of Nine-Mile creek,'commencing at a
chains,' to starting point,  and containing 64a
Dated 26 May, 1901. D. R. You kg, Agent.
Palace
\ Livery
Stahlem
KEREMEOS, B. C.
G. L ALLAN
Boots and !
i ** SHOES ^
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Try Our QwaMin
It is just rig
Rennie & Bell
 FOR	
Men's
Clothing
( OR	
Anything
Groceries.
jj FRENCH* DAY \
7     Tinsmiths, Gunsmiths, and Plumbers    1
Boot and Shoe Repairing. a
Repair work   of    Every   Descriptioi
Princeton Meat Market
WARDLE  & THOMAS
Orders for Mining Camps promptly attended
to and delivered.
first lady to make an   attempt
Mount-Sir Tlnnalil   at -th-e-*G4a
: Keremeos Hoi
iifficulty
Its.-fr JAjuf, Aw/
Notice of  Forfeiture.
mm pacific
HOTEL «AMl00P8.B-c-
Tfmwfwwwwww
Good Rooms.
Good Table
Good Liquors,
l>. A. BARNHART, Prop.
Coal Notice.
Hotel Tulameen*
The
Largest and
Most
Home-
like
Hotel in Pri
nceton
is now
open
for the tra\
-elling
public.
'    Our
bar  is  stocked w
ith the    \
Best
of Wines,
Liquors   and    ;
[    Cigars.    Special
efforts
will be    J
made
in the Cull
nary
Depart-    j
ment
and tables
will be furn-    !
ishec
with the best the
market
affords.
	
j£— ——
	
Si !
PRINCETON,   B. C.
GEO. W. ALDOUS, Prop.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
SCALE OP PRICES ON LEGAL I
Purchase  of  Land.
3 hereby given that
I intend to apply to
ner of Lands and
1 to purchase  160
bank ofthe Simil-
ingle of A. F. Proc-
FOR   SALE.
Sawmill Machinery as Good as New.
KEITH   & TOWNLtY
REAL ESTATE AND MINING BROKERS
COMMISSION   AGENTS.
Dated 19th da}
NOTICE—Not
on the north
Thirty days after date we, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Chief Com-
D. O. DAY, Loca
C. O. FRENCH, Age
ajune.igoi.
Dated 17th June, 1901
1 N   the two crippled horses left at the  Lake
House, Hope, last summer, by Messrs. McNicol
within thirty days from date, I will sell same to
defray expenses.
a. E. Raab.
Hope, B. C, June 16th, igoi.
Application for Timber License.
N°|
May 20th, 1901.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
vision of Yal.
tvfive. dollar
r the   expens
ill become the property of the subscriber,  ui
•r Section Four of au  act entitled, "An Act t
FOR SALE—100,000 Shingles  at  $2.40 per M
Extra dry and well seasoned.   Apply to A.
CLEMES, Spence's Bridge.
Correspondence Invited.
Certificate of Improvement.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 ABB	
SOO LINE.
IMPERIAL  : :  LIMITED
COAST TO COAST IN4DAY?.
FIRST-CLASS
TOURIST SLEEPERS.
BOOKED    TO    AND
-EAST  AND WEST-
Sailings from Vancouver for.
ALASKA,
CHINA,
JAPAN,
AUSTRALIA.
J. E. BOYLE,
LEADING HOTEL IN PRINCETON
11 Are you going to Spend the Coming Senson
1 In the Hills?
if If so you will need to know where to go for your CAMPING            |
H OUTFIT and SUPPLIES.    We Make it Our Business to         I
H Prospectors and flining Hen
t Generally, find that it pays for them to do their trading at the           1
PROSPECTOR'S SUPPLY STORE.
II B. E. THOMAS, Prop.   W
CLAMS
STAGE
LINE
es Kamloops for Quilchena and Nicola Lake every Monday. Leaves Nicola
Lake for Kamloops every Friday at 6 a. m. Leaves Spence's Bridge for
Nicola, Coutlee's, Nicola Lake, Granite Creek and Princeton every Thursday
at 6 a. m. Leaves Princeton for Spence's Bridge and intermediate points
every Sunday at 8 a. m.   Carry Mail and Express.
Similkameen   Butcher*
ing Co.,
RICHTER & SUMHERS,
PROPRIETORS.
NCOUVER.B.C.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
Dealers in Heats.
Orders Filled for any point in the Similkameen Valley.
LIVERY, FEED STABLE and PASTURE.
Saddle Horses to All Points in the Similkameen.
 THE    SIMILKAMEEN    STAR
July 27TH, 1901
-:PRINCETON I:
British Columbia.
Lots for
• • • aZ^cII C • • •
PRESENT PRICES OF
LOTS
From $2.00 to $10.
Per Front Foot.*£^
Size of Lots 50xJ00
Ft. and 33x100 Ft.
One acre Residential
LotS.e^ *£ *& <& <£ <&
Terms: 1-3 Cash;
Bal. 3 and 6 months,
with interest at 6 per
cent, per annum. *£ .
Government Head-
quarters for the Similkameen District.
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED at the Forks of the Similkameen and Tulameen Rivers. The BUSINESS CENTRE for the following Mining Camps:— Copper Mountain
Kennedy Mountain, Friday, Boulder and Granite Creeks,
Summit, Roche River,  Upper Tulameen and Aspen Grove
FINE CLIM&TE
and PUREJ^TER
ENORMOUS AGRiaLTUR-
AL AREA TO DRAW FROM
wwwwww w wwmww
Send for Map and Price List to* «£ t£ «£ «£ «£
ERNEST  WATERMAN,
Resident Manager VERMILION  FORKS
MINING AND DEVELOPMENT CO.

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