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The Silvertonian Jul 7, 1900

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 THE 8JLVEHT0NIAW.
SLOCAN'S BEST
KNOWN WEEKLY.
VOLUME FOUR.
SILVERTO™.
TIIE SirA'liHTONIAN.
LOCAL MINING*NEWS.
SUBSCRIPTS)  S, |2.00
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,   JULY   7,    1900.
NUMBER  1
CONSIGNMENTS
OF FRESH
and
«
COMING IN
WEEKLY TO
Ji A.t JML'K:i_n.r_io_r_i
& Co.,
SIlTrexton.,
B. C.
THK CHEAPEST PLACE IN
TOWN TO DO YOUR FAMILY BUYING. TRY IT AND
LEARN OUR PRICES ON
OROOEEIEE
iM*_**M_M_M*<¥M*l»*»*¥¥¥M»
MINES AROUND
SILVERTON
Which
are Tapped by the Alpha
Wagon
LOSG    CROSSCUT    TUMEI,,
To Ihoso who think, ns so many outsiders ilo, that all ol Silverton's mini's
aro  dependent  upon   the  Four
About half a mile beyond the Emily
Edith mine the Alpha road ends at the
foot of Alpha mountain and tbe tramway
from the Alpha mine. The Alpha
ix ine was one ot the first properties to be
opened up in this- camp and a large
amount of work hae been done upon It.
Tlm vein' is large varying from 18 to 20
feet in width and lying In tbe slate
formation. The character of the ore is
a floe steel galena and 1100 tons of clean
ore has been shipped to the smelters
from this property, the returns from
which gave 115 ounces in silver to the
ton and 51 per cent lead. Tbe Alpha
has heen standing idle lor some time
hut we understand that the property "ill
soon he working again.
Below the Alpha and upon the Same
ledge is situated the Surprise claim, one
of the Briggs and Grady Group.   This
ATHLETES
upon  the  Four    Mile i Pr°Pe«'ty *>«» «• fine showinR of ore and a
wagon road, a walk up some of our side't,lllnel   I"18 been  driven on the vein a
roads or trails would be a revelation and! (l'slance ol 120 feet and about a carload
ABROAD.
ftlLI'ERTOS WM'S PRIKKS AT SLOriS
AID RELSM.
A   BUSY WM    OK
i es were a heavier team than iln>
visitors and tbe latter were ln no shape
t > stand the heavy body checking dealt
out to them, ln the laat hall McNaught
went on in Watson's plaoe, who had bean
knocked out by a severe back check.
Silverton's backers dropped considerable
money on the game, but fortunately
Nelson did not cover one quarter ot tbe
Silverton money offered.
This Is the first inatoh lost by Rilverton this year and the goal registered a*
gainst, her is the first one in the six
g.-t lues pluyod.
largely extend their knowledge of the
mineral resources of Silverton. Let
them take the Alpha road whicli although
only two nnd one half miles long traverses one of the best mineral sections of
the Slocan.
The first property, worth a mining
man's inspection, encountered is the
Lone Star Group which* lies almost
within ihe towuslie and is reached by
a  trail   that  branches   oil'   the   Alpha
of clean ore piled up on the dump. The
character of the ore ia a steel galena
carrying considerable gray copper and
nnd giving values ranging from 150 to
500 ounces in silver lo tbe ton and 63
percent lead.
Lying near the end of the Alpha road
and connected wilh it by short traila are
several very promising prospects Ihat
only lack development work to make
them into possible shipping propositions,
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
{Silvertoii
G0-TIILS   HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE    EAR   IS   (SUPPLIED   WITH   REST   RRANDS   OF
WINES,   LIQUORS AND OlOARfi
road at the first creek, the property lying i chief amongst which are the Brunswick,
about three hundred yards np thiR (rail. ) Cliff, Evelyn and Standard.
This properly is a silver-lead proposition      Lack  of space  has  compelled us to
omit mention ol several other promising
prospects that are tapped by this short
piece of road, but enough we believe has
and has had considerable work done
upon it, coueisling of shallow shafts and
numerous open cuts on the smlace and
a long tunnel which is being driven, and j been mentioned to show that the Alpha
I*. BURNS §s co
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL STORES At
Silverion, Nelson, Trail, Ymir. Ksslo, Sandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
...MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO..
JlE.vD  OFFICE NELSON, 11. O.
is now in 200 feet, to tap the ore shute
that has been exposed on the surface.
The vein is frorr. four to six feet in width
and lies in the slate formation. An ore
shute has been exposed on the surface
for a distance of over 100 feet in length
snd consists of a paystreak that varies in
width from four to fourteen iuches of
carbonates and galena that gives values
of from 150 to 255 ounces in silver to the
ton aud as high as 72 per cent lend.
The tuunel now being driven wili tap
this shute at n jlepth of over 125 feet and
as the owners expect to tap the ore shute
within the next fifty feet the value of,
this properly will soon be demonstrated.
A further walk up this trail will biing
the visitor to the Manitoba, Texas Boy.
Willard nnd numerous other prospects
some of winch have li.nl considerable
work done upon them and are worthy of
an examination.
Continuing up the Alpha road about
one mile from town will bo found the
OKI Maid property. This property lies
Within   a   few   feet of tbe load and i.s i
road, short as it is, taps a rich mineral
country and amongst the properties
mentioned the farthest does not lie more
than three miles from Silverton.
IMPORTANT WORK   STARTED.
Another long cross-cut tunnel has
been started at the Vancouver mine.
This tunnel whon completed will be over
700 feet long, tbe longest cross-cut tunnel yet undertaken in tbis district aud as
it is to be used as a main working tunnel
and wili have to be driven through the
hardest kind of rock it is au undertaking
of some magnitude. This tuuoel will
tap the Vancouver vein nver 200 feet
deeper than the No. S tuunel or oyer 600
feet below the surface croppings of the
ledge. It is believed by the management that this tunnel will strike the vein
deep enough to settle the question as to
• whether there is a body ol galena ore
; underlying the bodies of rinc ore encountered in the Vancouver vein. This
property is again sending down ore for
r
—
c
I
5
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
TIIE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MARK YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED.   OV ERCOATLNG8 JUST IN.
LIEBSCHER,  The Tailor:   Silverion, B. C.
large well defined contact vein ovei 20
feet   wide   and   lying   in   tho   contact! shipment to the smelter and foreman
between the slate and granite. A tuunel
has been driven on it over 100 feet anil
crosscuts run, all of which work has been
done ou ore. Tbe ore in this property it
an iron sulphide and is what is known
as a dry ore, giving values of from 20
to OO ounces in silver iu the ton. The
Old Maid is looked upon as one of the
best prospects in the Silverton district.
The next property of any prominence
W, J. Barker is again a busy man
directing the various work being done
by this company.
a
t
** * »t* •.*.*.+_.
On Tuesday W. Kyte lelt for Slocan
City to look after Ins mining interests in
that district.
Dsve King, of Kootenaian fame, is
developing some mining claims near
Cape Nome, recording to the Nome News.
On Wednesday supplies were sent up
to the St LawnSnoo claim, near the
Wakefield mine, and considerable work
will be done on that properly this
season.
During Ihe week work hns lioen
Started on the Silver Rand Group, in the
Silver Dand basin at the head ol Eight
Mile creek. E. Foyle Smith who had
charge of the work lust year is again in
charge.
The Woik lately done on the Iron
Horse property on Ten Mile has resulted
in thn uncovering of a paystreak in that
property of over a fool of 200 ounce ore,
1 he Iren Horse lies just below and
a.ijoining tho Enterprise mine and the
vein is identical and there is no reason
why, with work, the Iron Horse
should not be as big a properly as the
Enterprise.
HILL JOHNSON'S OPINIONS.
I've alius notissed, fellers,
Hit's a risky thing to do
To kulknlate accordin*
To how ibiugs looks to you.
The man 't talks the nicest
Don't help yon uphill;
The ono 'at prays the loudest
Don't alius pay bis bill.
Sometimes the biggest fishes
Bites tho smallost kinds o* baits;
An' mighty ugly wimmin
Can make the best 'o mates.
The smartest-lookin'  feller
May be a reg'lar fool,,
You'cr alius kicked the highest
By the meekeet-lookin' mule.
—I see County (On.) Journal.
MINING INDUSTRY OF TODAY.
The Industry of metal mining never
rested upon so firm and lasting foundations as it does today. Divining rods,
encountered on this road is tbo Emily | spiritualistic hunches, pot holes of gold,
Edith mine, which has without doubt j Aladdin lamps and like jimcracks and
the largest bodies of concentrating on j an$ mystifying hnmbuggery have faded
yet developed in ibis camp or for that jaway undor the R|ure 0i the light of
matter tho whole of the Slocan. Some
idea of the size aad extent of these mv
boilies can be gained  from  the fact that
In the No 2.  tunnel  a hotly ot ore has '    llu|
been cut that is over 200 feet long nnd
measures 55 feet wide, Ihere being five I
cross-cuts run in it, ull of which will pav
to run through a concentrator. Dining
the last three years nearly one mile of
underground development work Iuib
been done on it. The vein has beeu
developed by a system of funnels, there
being four on the property, all o( whl
have been driven directly on the vein,
besides numerous uprnises, cross-culs
and winzes. While doing this work n
large amount of concentrating ore bus
neen piled up on the vaiious dumps and
immense bodies of tbe same character
of ore blocked out in tbe mine. Although
tbe Emily Edith is not a shipping mine
still some 1C0 tons of clean ore has been
shipped from tbo property that has
netted the owners nbout $1000 to lhe car.
The character of the ore is of a concentrating nature and consists of blotches,
streaks and bunches of wavey steel
galenn scattered thickly through the
ledgo matter nnd gangue. Tho clean
galena will run from 00 to 130 ouncos in
silver to the ton nud from 45 to 00 per
rent load. The company tbat bos been
operating the Emily Edith have lately
erected thn finest set of mine buildings,
for tbe accommodation of their men
that has yet been built in tbis district.
The mino bas now reached a stngo in its
dovelopnibnt that Justifies the erection
of a mill for the treatment of its  ores.
A new company, lately organized in
England, bus taken this property over
who will erect a mill and work tho
property on a large scale.
common sense.
There was a lime when a man who
failed to successfully run a peanut
insurance company, bank or
other commercial enterprise, "back
east," at unco betook himself to tbe
mineral districts of the Rockies picked
up a few valueless prospect holes,
memorized half a dozen terms and sentences from the vocabulary of mining
slang, and, returning to the field of his
9 ! former failures,' gathered iu the lambs
'' from the flock of friends he possessed,
sometimes, but rarely, to profit, more
frequently to loss. Well it is, however
that the days for the preformance of
such deeds of legerdemain bave passed,
and strict business methods hnve
assumed controling sway over the
mining industry, Romance, with its
varying lights and shades, will always
environ tbe business of mining with Its
seductive atmosphere; the possibility of
encountering bonanzas will keep hope
ever green in tbe miner's heart under
tbe recurrence of most disappointments,
hut the "wild cats," pure and simple,
have been forced out of the mining
corrnl and should never be re-admitted.
Under these conditions of business
mining tbe immensity of our mineral
future can be conceived of but by few
and experienced by none of the living
geueratiou—Western Mining World.
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, July 4.—Bar Silver, 60»g'o
Lake copper,  $16.25.
Lead - The firm that fixes the selling
price for miners and smelters quotes lead
at J3.00 at the close.
Dominion Day in Slocan was Silver-
ton's Day, tbe athletes from here ivii-
ning every event in which tbey bed
representatives entered with one exception, and securing second place in that.
The winnings included the Football
Tournament, the running broad jump,
100 yard dash and the 220 yard race.
In the running jump, Gusty of Sandon
and McNichols of Silverton were tbe favorites, both towns backing their man.
It was a considerable surprise to the
Sandonites when their man was beaten,
and they refused to back him again in
the other events. In tbe 100 yard dash
Q"sty fouled McNichols and refused to.
start again when the contest was declared
"no race." In the long race McNichols
led all tbe way, winning by ten feet.
The list of winners was as follows:
Running Hop, Step k Jump,
Gusty, Sandon, 41ft 8iu;  Rock-
cliffe, Sandon, 38ft 3in.
Ruuning Broad Jump.
McNichols, Silverton,  19ft 9>.jin.
Gusty 10ft 5in.
Standing Jump.
Gusty, lift OKj, McNichols, Uf 4%
Pole Vault.
Hicks and Lnke, Slocan, tie, Sft.
Hundred Yard Dash.
1st. McNichols, 2nd. Brett,Slocan.
220 Yard Race.
1st. McNichols; 2nd. Brett.
The Football Tonrnameut was won by
Silverton, the team Irom here defeating
the Sandon and Slocan teams by tbe
same score, two goals to none.
The first game, which was wilh Sandon, did not call for any very hard playing on Silverton's part, as the Mountaineers played with ouly part of Iheir regular team, Tbe scoring, for whicli
Findlay wss responsible, was done one
goal in each half, both being scored on
long shots.
In the final game, Silverton vs. Slocan,
both teams lined up confident of victory,
but Slocan's confidence wss rudely
shaken when Silverton shot the ball
past tbeir goalkeeper early in the game,
Findlay again doing the trick. Alter
this game was scored, iu the remainder
of the half, a great deal of unnecessary
rough playing was indulged iu, much to
tlie delight of the spectators, the play
being of tbo knock-down variety. Id
this half the Rev. Mr. Robeita.of New
Denver, acted as referee, but ns tbe
Slocanites objected so loudly to some of
his decisions, he handed over tbo whistle to Jack Gusty of Sandon.
The second score for tbe visitors was
made by Walker, he putting in a beautiful swift shot off a pass from Findlay.
When time wns nearly through, Slocan
grew more agressive and pressed hotly
on the Silverton defence, but nothing
passed Malloy and McLaughlin that
goalkeeper Jackson could not easily gather in snd the whistle blew without a
score for the locals.
Taken altogether, Slocan's celebration was a big success, thoroughly enjoyed by the large Dumber of visitors
present. Had the morning been more
promising, there would have been many
more visitors present, but as it wus the
gathering was a large nnd jolly ouo. The
committees were anxious to please and
performed their onerous duties to tho
satisfaction of all.
PRIZE   WINNERS.
Tho result of this year's work in the
Silverton Public School Is recorded in
the following prize list. Those who received honors are as follows:
Roll of Honor for General Proficiency
awardod to Alice I. Calbick.
Roll of Honor for Deportment awarded:
to Mary Kate McDonald.
Roll   of   Honor (or   Regularity  and
Punctuality awarded to George 8 Horton
and Fay T. Elliott.
V Reader.
Arithmetic, Ines L Calbick. History,
Alice I Calbick. Grammar, Addle Horton.
IV Reader.
Geueral Proficiency, Fay -T. Elliott.
Spelling, Mamie McDonald. Arithmetic,
Janet Barclay.
III Reader.
Grammar, Patrick Kelly. General
Pioliciency, Maggie Barclay. Geography
Harry Wheeler.
II Reader.
General Proficiency, Harry Carey,
II Primer.
General Proficiency, George Horton.
Spelling. Annie Kelly, Arithmetic,
Bertha Barker. Spelling. Jeanie Barclay.
I Primer.
Spelling, Evelyn Horton. Arithmetic.
Willie White.
Chart Class
Oeneral Proficiency. Mary Hyland.
Arithmetic, Jimmie Hyland. Spelling,
Eddie Kelly.
FOOTBALL BECOMING POPULAR.
The Orangemen wbo purpose gathering
at Slocan next Thursday wish to see
a Battle of the Boyne, without the water,
and have accordingly issued invitations
to six football teams to meet tbere and
hold a tournament. The prise ia $200 to
the winning team. Silverton will compete in Um games and the team is desirous of again meeting Nelson. A good
crowd from bere will accompany the
team.
THIRD GAME  TOO MUCH.
It was a weary and draggled eleven
tbat lined up on the field at Nelson last
Tuesday to meet the local football team
In the trophy cup scries. The two hard
games of Monday, together with the incidental fatigues of the trip to Nelson
and the occasional partaking of Thorpe's
soda-water( 1), had taken Ihe starch out
of the Red-and-While, and it was a poor
exhibition of their playing that they put
up. The liuo-up of tbe visitors was the
same as at Slocan with one exception.
Culver going on hi McNaugbt's place,
tbe latter having a badly swollen aukle
In the first half the Nelsonites scored,
although tbe backs worked hard to pie-
vent them, and tbo visiting forwards did
not connect. The side-bill grounds was
a piuzle that tho visitors could not
solve. No games wero scored in the lust
half, although Silverton constantly men*
acod the Nelson   Hags.    The N.lson-
TREATKD SHABBILY.
The reception dealt out to the football
team by our city neighbors, the Nelson
ball kickers, was blubby in tbe extreme.
The hoys were not met at any time during their visit by any member of the
homo team, nor was any attempt made
at any time to entertain the visitors.
Before the game the Silverlonians were
kept waiting on the field for nearly an
hour before the home team appeared and
then the visiting captain had to hunt np
tbe Nelson man in order to arrange the
preliminaries. A suggestion made that
somo ti itiii.g alterations be made in regard to tbe goals met with the response
that if Silverion wanted the poatB
marked they roud do it themselves.
Our city friends need several lessons in
coutlesy. The Kaslo players express
themselves iu tho same way.
Go to R. G. Dnigle's for fresh fruits
and confectionery. Ne.tr PostoQiee.*
Mi.is Dyker,  school lonelier at Cran
brook, is visiting hero with her sister
Mrs. W. Scott.
Miss Duncan is writing lor a Second R
Certificate iu the teachers' examination
now progressing in Nelson.
Mrs. Rowo of Greenwood, with her
three children, is visiting here with her
sister, Mrs. W. J. Birker.
Hnlph Gillette nnd Charley Snyder
have gone into the Lardeau to develope
some of tboir claims thero.
Don't overlook the entertainment tonight in McKinnon'ii Hall. Admission
50 cents; Children 25 uonts.
last Saturday's e'ection to fill the
vacancy on tbe School Board, resulted
in the ro-cleuti >u of Geo. A. Jackson.
All   work   in the Jewelry Repairing
lino, left nt Iho Silveiton Drugstore, wil|
be promptly forwarded  to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson juweler.    All ra
pairs are ouaiiantiskii roil unk YKJK  ,
I
I
*1
» WILL BE AVENGED
Emperor William With Other Powers,
Will Punish China.
Copyrighted 1900 by the Associated Press.
Tien Tsin, June 29, via Cheefoo,
July 1 and Shanghai, July 3.—A
courier from Sir Robert Hart, inspector general of customs, hijsjust
arrived. He left Pekin on Monday,
June 25, and reports the situation
desperate.
He reports that Baron von Ket-
teler, the German minister, and his
secretary, attempted to visit the
Lsung li yamen. The minister was
shot four times and died at the
rooms of the tsung li yamen. His
secretary succeeded in making his
escape.
All the legations except the British, German and Italian have been
destroyed. The diplomats and
missionaries are in the British legation under rifle fire. Cannon com
mand the legations, hut they are
not being used.
It is impossible to start relief to
Pekin at present. Captain McCalla,
commander of the United States
cruiser. New Vork, estimates that
50,000 soldiers will be required for
the rescue of the ministers.
. .'nidi') Willi Take Uetemge.
Berlin, July 3,—Addressing the
detachment   of   German    marines
which sailed  from   Wilhelmshaven
for China yesterday,   the  emperor
made a remarkable  speech,   during
which he notified the world of Germany's intention to avenge the murder of Barn von    Ketteler, the  late
minister of Germany at Pekin,  and
the   missionaries,   and   to   dictate
terms to the Chinese from  the  palace at  Pekin.      According   to  the
Lokal Anzeiger he yesterday  spoke
as follows:
Pekin, but there is no   confirmation
of the report.
Shanghai reports that the international torces at Tien Tsin are suffering from lack of good drinking
water, owing to the Pei Ho river
being choked with the corpses of
Chinese and other victims of the
bombardment.
According to the same dispatch,
the international troops, so far from
being strong enough to advance towards Pekin, are not sufficiently
numerous to attack the'Chinese still
surrounding Tien Tsin and keeping
up a fire on the place. Thousands
of Chinamen are said to be arriving
WILL NOT DODGE
Bryan Insists on a Specific Declaration
for Free Silver.
By Associated Press.
Kansas City, July 3.—"Bryan
w:ll not run on any platform that
does not contain a specific declaration in favor of free coinage of silver at a ratio of   16 to 1.      It   this
INHUMAN TI'<.__H.OVr CAPTAINS.
 convention does not put the declara-
from Lutai and to be desperately tion in the platform, it will have to
attempting to re-occupy the British nominate another candidate for
road leading to Taku. president."
This statement was made today
to the Associated Press by Judge
Tibbetts of Lincoln, delegate-at-
Inrge from Mr. Bryan's state, and
chairman of the state delegation to
this convention. It serves to emphasize the determined stand taken
by the Nebraska statesman. His
declaration is that he stands for a
principle and those who would have
him change or modify his views are
simply swinging in the wind of ex-
Wilt Be Prosecuted Iter Not Having Vl< -
lima of Dliaaler.
New Vork, July 3.—The search
for bodies of persons who perished
in the fire at the North German
Lloyd company's piers in Hoboken
was resumed today. Up to 0:30 a.
m. seven bodies had been taken
from the river todav.    This swelled
f     .-Mil I JM ^      CSV
the total number of dead  found  to 1 ne<jjeocv
M* Cato Sells, chairman of the Iowa
A sensation was created today by I deteRation| who had a three hours'
an announcement fnom Mayor Ba- ; conference with Mr. Brvnn Mon
gan, of Hoboken, that he would he came |Q KansJ|S q^ ^ on,y
prosecute all tugboat captains j fUl**rma the statement made bv
against whom charges of refusing j Judge Tibbi„Sf ^ ainp,jfies ;,.
"After talking with Mr. Bryan
for some time," said Mr. Sells,
with respect to his pctsitiou  and to
Washington statue here yesterday
says that the friendship between
France and the United States.whieh
now exists, may be followed by .111
alliance. The newspapers say that,
when the Franco-Russia.] alliance
was first spoken of, it was considered impossible. Few persons, now
as then, are believers in the Franco-
Russian alliance.
Nevertheless the iden is gaining
ground and as a result of the reciprocal manifestations of friendship
a society is about to be formed under the presidency of Leon Bourgeois, called "The Union Franco-
Americaine." Its object is exclusively patric.lu and party politics
wn. ue ignored as a result of a desire to strengthen the bonds now
existing between the two peoples
and the two governments.
HORRORSOFPEKIN
Not a Whiie Man Believed to Have
Survived the Massacre.
IJKHMANY   AM  A SKA PO Wl-.lt
to save 1'fe  can   be   substantiated
The mayor said he would  also   apply at once for   warrants   charging
two tugboat captains  with  murder . ^ al|itu<k y, ftknm ou^, m ^
___._j .1 . 1 1 1  —;j    —   	
and that he had evidence to prove
that these men used boathooks to
keep drowning men Irom climbing
on their tugs, because the unfortunates had no money. An Effort will
be made also to have the licenses
of offending captains revoked.
sume in this convention,   I   asked
Kiuperor  William Hay  the Oeean !■
Indispensable lo Her Urentne**
Berlin, July 4.—At a banquet  at
Wilhelmshaven of the officers  of a
club yesterday,   subsequent  to  the
launching of the   warship   Wittels-
back, Emperor William made some
emphatic declarations upon the subject of Germany as a sea power, asserting that the ocean was indispensable to  Germany's  greatness and
that it had been demonstrated  that
no great  decision   could   ever   be
reached in respect to the sea  without consulting   Germany   and   the
German emperor.
"The German people," said he,
"did not conquer and shed blood 30
years ago  in   order   to   be  thrust
him this Wunt question,      f^^^^^^^^mmw^mwmmw**^mm^^^*m**^mmmw
" 'Suppose the convention should   aside *hen £reat  forei&n problems
refuse to adopt a platform contain- j are ^'"S se,t,ed'    If that had haP
"The German flag has been insulted and the German empire treated with contempt.      This  demands
exemplary   punishment   and    vengeance.    Events have moved  with
frightful rapidity and  have  become
profoundly grave and still  graver.
Since I called you to arms,   what  I
hoped to effect with the help of the
marine infantry has now  become a
difficult task, which can only be fulfilled with the help  of   the   serried
ranks of all civilized states.     I will
not rest until the German flagjoined
by those of the other powers, floats
triumphantly over China's flag, and
until it  has  been   planted   on  the
walls of Pekin to  dictate peace   to
the Chinese.
Both III* Lex* Cut Ofl
Tuesday morning a man whose
name could not be learned lost his
legs near Slocan junction. The
man had been at work on a steam
shovel and tried to board a freight
train. He slipped and fell under th_i
wheels, severing both limbs. A
special 'rain took him to Nelson.
"Vou will have to maintain good
comradeship   with   all   the    other
troops whom you will come in  contact with over yonder.     Russians,
British and French,   all  alike,   are
fighting for one common cause,   for
civilization. We must bear in mind
too, something higher, namely, our
religion and the defence and protection of our brothers out there, some
of whom stake  their lives   for  the
Saviour.     The   flags   which   here
float above you go under fire for the
first   time.    See  that you     bring
them   back    to    me   clean    and
stainless, without a spot.      Many
thanks; my prayers and my solicitude go with you."
Think Kempir Waa Richt
London,    June   3.—While   the
British comment severely criticises
American  non-participation  in the
bombardment of the Taku   forts,
several of the London  newspapers
are beginning to find out that  Admiral KempfT had  better foresight
than was possessed   by  the allied
chancellories of Europe   when  he
protested   against    an  attack   on
Taku forts on  the ground  that  it
would throw the Chinese government in the arms of the Boxers and
make all the   other  nations technically at  war with  China, and  the
advisability   of    attacking   Taku,
when   the international forces were
manifestly insufficient even to guard
the legations and the Europeans in
the interior from  retaliation, is now
generally acknowledged.
Rumors are current in Paris that
the British embassy has received
notification of the massacre of the
French and British   ministers   at
FRAWKFORTTAKEN
Hnnter Captures the Town and Rescues Wounded Prisoners.
London, July 3.—The following
dispatch has been received at the
war office from Lord Roberts:
"Pretoria, July 3,—Gen. Hunter's division has crossed the Vaal
and should be at Frankfort today,
where he will be joined by Colonel
MacDonald's brigade from Heil-
bron.
"General Buller's leading brigade
have left Standerton for Graylings.
"Both here and at Johannesburg
several families ot the men who
have been fighting against us are
being fed. Some are in a state of
destitution. At Heilbron, where
food supplies ran out, groceries,
neat and other supplies of food are
being distributed among the inhabitants under the supervision of the
relief committee.
"Arrangements are being made
for the distribution of oats for seed
purposes to farmers actually in need
of it, those who are unable to secure seed oats in any other manner."
The following dispatch was received this afternoon at the war office from Lord Roberts:
"Pretoria, July 3.—Gen. Hunter
reached Frankfort July 1 without
opposition and Macdonald joined
him there yesterday. He found the
men of the Seaforths and 18 of the
Derby militia in the hospital. They
had been well treated by the Boers.
"Methuen reports from Paarde-
kraal, on the Heilbron-Kroonstadt
road, that he has captured the commander of Dewelt's scouts, two
other prisoners and the head of the
Afrikander bund."
The war oflice has received the
following dispatch from Gen. Buller:
"Standerton, July 3.—Clery occupied Greylingstad yesterday without opposition, but met with a good
deal of sniping. There were four or
five casualties."
ing a distinct declaration in favor of
free coinage at 16 to 1.'
" 'Then,' said Mr. Bryan emphatically, 'I will not run as a candidate.* "
That the convention will bow lo
Mr. Bryan's desires nobody who
comes in contact with the delegates
can doubt for an instant.
It is said that neither Mr. Croker
nor Mr. Hill desires the nomination
of Towne for vice-president. While
the New Vork delegation has not
presented formally any candidate, it
is known that Hill favors the nomination of Elliott Danforth and that
Croker is quietly pressing the claims
of Judge Augustus Van Wyck.
The convention will be called to
order tomorrow at noon and, unless present plans are upset, William J. Bryan will be nominated for
the presidency at the first session.
He is to be presented to the American people as the Fourth of July
candidate. The scene gives promise of being one of the most dramatic that were ever seen in a political
! convention.
And then, according to program,
Mr. Bryan is to be brought to Kansas City by a special notification and
escort committee, and he will deliver his speech accepting the nomination in the hall in which ihe nomination was made.
The demand upon the national
committee for seats in the convention hall is said to be almost unprecedented.
pened then, the position of the Ger
man as a world power would have
been at an end. I am not inclined
to allow matters to reach such a
pass. It is the emperoi's duty and
highest privilege to employ suitable
and even the sharpest methods to
prevent it."
The German emperor expressed
t as his conviction that, in this matter, the princes of Germany and the
entire people were closely arrayed
behir.d him.
Lord Salisbury's advice to form a
rifle club in every village has been
followed by Fort Steele. That
town has formed a club of 80,which
has asked the minister of militia for
50 Lee-Enfield rifles.
There are some men who view
with alarm the approach of a railway. They are men who cannot
succeed in business with thc sharp
competition which a railroad usually brings.—Fort Steele Prospector.
Lord Roberts has furnished the
Boers with another grievance
against Great Britain. He is feeding their families while they fight
him. He also tempts them to de
sert Kruger by offering them seed
to start farming.
By Associated PreM.
London, July 4.—Not a single
foreigner is now alive at Pekin, is
the latest Chinese report which has
reached Shanghai.
Earlier reports from the same
sources describe the condition of
the British legation as something
awful. It is said that the rooms of
the legation were filled with sick
and wounded, the killed lying un-
buried in heaps.
It is to be expected that many of
the members and officials of the
tsung li yamen perished when the
German guard, enr.«ged by the murder of Baron von Ketteler, the German ambassador, set fire to thc
h.uilding.
That the foreigners at the Chinese capital had been abandoned to
the same horrible fate seems no
longer open to doubt, in the light of
messages received by the Associated Press from Taku this morning
announcing the decision of the admirals regarding tlu hopelessness
of further attempts to relieve Pekin
under the circumstances.
□ ..Shelling Un HriiUI, Legation
Shanghai, July 4.—A message
from Sir Robert Hart, the inspector
general of customs, dated Pekin,
June 25, reiterated that the situation
was very desperate. The Chinese
troops were shelling the British
legation, where all the members of
the diplomatic body «had congregated.
Antl-Forelgu < nmnili- Decreed.
New Vork, July 4.—A dispatch
to the Herald from Shanghai July 3
says:
"This imperial decree dated Pekin June 25 has been sent by courier
to Pao Ting 1- u, and thence telegraphed broadcast:
" 'We are now warring with the
foreigners. Boxers, patriots and
people, combined wilh the government troops, have been victorious
in battles with our foreign enemies.
We have already sent imperial commissioners to transmit the imperial
praise and exhortations to repeat
the successes. There must be men
of similar patriotism and bravery in
all the provinces of the empire. We
therefore command all viceroys and
governors to enlist such and organize them into troops. Let this decree bc sent to all the officials in the
empire at the rate of 200 miles per
day.'
China, after he had been murdered
by the Chinese.
Hot Fighting alTaltu
Taku, June a9, via Shanghai
July 3, and London, July 4._Are'
connoltring party under Lieutenant
Keyes, of the torpedo boat Kame
captured and destroyed the M'
city and the port, 12 miles fro*
Taku, |une 28. There was little or
no opposition. Two bluejackets
were injured by an explosion am
many Chinese were killed.
The river is pVactically clear [m
Taku to Tien Tsin with the eXcep.
tion of a few sunken tow boats and
lighters.
Allies Capture tha Aruum
In the second attack upon the east
arsenal on June 27 the Russians re-
tired for reinforcements. A force
of British, one company of Germans
and 30 Americans then engaged the
enemy, who, with lour guns, made
a determined resistance until the
whole allied force supported the ar.
tillery. The allies advanced and
stormed the west end of the arse-
nal. Fifty Chinese were killed.
The remainder retired. Lack of
cavalry prevented the capture of the
whole force.
Flank Attark Striven Mark
As soon as the allies had cap.
tuted the arsenal, 1500 imperial
troops made a flank attack from the
city. The British and Russian guns
drove them back. The British cu.
ualties numbered five killed and n
wounded. The Americans had only
one wounded, while the Russians
had 17 killed and wounded.
AWFUL ACCIDENT
Street Gar Jumps tbe  Track-Forty
Killee and Fifty Wounded.
CONVENTION   IN   NENNION   •» .' •
RAILKOAO   WIHCt'K NBAII   Ml TTK
Train aUU-hed, Two Killed, Waof   !____-
Jnri-d-A Hrrolr (ouduilor
Butte, Mont., July 3.—A wreck
occurred late last night on the
Montana Central railroad, at Trask
siding, twelve miles from Butie,
by which John L. Kelly and John
Luceskes were killed and thirty-
three injured.
The train left Butte at 8:50 last
night for Helena when the rails
spread, ditching the baggage car,
smoker, day coach, and sleeper.
The cars were thrown over on their
sides and the passengers, who were
not badly injured, climbed out
through the windows.
Conductor Zeick, with shoulder
and hip dislocated, made his way
back to Woodville, five miles, and
telegraphed to Butte for help. A
special train with doctors and nurses brought in the injured, who
were taken to the hospital.
llrnioi ratli flatherlng Began at Noon,
right on Free Sll 1 er.
Bj Associated Preta.
Kansas City, July 4.—The It,*
000 seats in the hall were filled
when at 12:01 p. m. Chairman
Jones called the Democratic national convention to order.
The opponents of the 16 to 1
proposition ate hard at work trying
to agree upon a platform, which
would prevent the incorporation of
the specific provision in the platform.
Ex-Senator Hill, the leader of the
movement, says prospects are
bright ior success and, in case of
failure in committee, the fight will
be carried to the floor of the convention.
The national convention of the
National Silver Republican party
met in the auditorium today, with
24 states and territories represented
Charles A. Towne presided.
A Day Will Deride Legation*' Fate.
'High   Chinese   officials     here
stated   today that they had received
a message from Pekin  saying  that
twenty-four hours would decide the
fate  of the  remaining  forei^i:   legations.    Severe fighting contin ues
around Tien  Tsin.    Admiral  Seymour    is   reported   to  have  been
wounded     at    a  pitched     battle.
Reports    from    the     surrounding
country    show  that  proclamations
urging the  massacre  of foreigners
and Christians   have  been   posted
upon   the  walls of the  missions."
< ini'i Hellevc Pekin.
London,   July    4.—A    dispatch
from  Taku, dated  Saturday June
'30 and Chefoo Tuesday |uly 2, says
that the British and Russian admirals, at a court ot war held on June
30, decided that  it was  impossible
to attempt to relieve Pekin   without
greatly   increased    forces,      They
also concluded that it would be possible  to  hold  Tien   Tsin.    In the
event of this not  proving  feasible,
they would endeavor to  retain possession of Taku.
Tacoma, July 4.—The most ap- |
palling accident ever kuown in thi
history of Tacoma occurred this
morning, when the 8 o'clock Edison
car, loaded with excursionists coming down to see the parade, wat
dashed down 160 feet over the
bridge at Dolin street gulch, burying the passengers, among whom
were many women and children,
under the wreck of the car.
The car turned completely over
and mangled the unfortunate victims into unrecognizable shapes.
To this hour 40 dead and 50 injured have been found. The mangled
remains of the victims were brought
up ont of the gulch in blankets and
gunny sacks and those not killed
were borne to waiting vehicles to
carry them to their homes or hospitals.
Tacoma, Wn., July 4.—A car
was enroute from South Tacomi,
due In Tacoma at 8:30 a.m. The
motorman lost control of the car
on the hill and. when the car struck
the curve on the Twenty-seventh
street bridge, it left the track,
going over the bridge and tailing
to the gulch below, some hundred
feet. It turned over and Itruck the
roof, killing some 25 or 30 people-
There were many injured.
ralkol Fran, a-_tnirrl.au  Alllanre.
B/ Associated Pre.,.
Paris, July 4.—A leader in the
Eclaire on   the   unveiling   of   the
By insisting on a specific "16 to
1" plank in the Democratic platform, Mr. Bryan inspires more respect for his consistency than for
his judgment.
"Bumptious Bill," is the new
name the Kingston Whig gives W.
W. B. Mclnnes.
Oreat Chinese Army Advanrlug
One hundred and forty thousand
imperial troops are stationed between Pekin and Tion Tsin. The
total of the allied forces which can
be concentrated at the present
barely numbers 20,000. It is re-
P£rt«*th»tjGeneraJ Niep Si Chang
is advancing fl)r an attack on Tien
Tsin with 90,000 troops. Another
report has been received at Taku to
the effect that the German guards
rescued the body of Baron von Ketteler,  the late German minister to
Tacoma, Wash., July 4.—Thirty-
five men, women and children were
killed and 18 injured, nine fatallyt
in the wrecking of a trolley car on
the outskirts of Tacoma today.
The names of the victims are nM
yet obtainable.
Happy excursionists, 104 of them,
boarded a trolley car at  Edison. •
suburb, al 8 o'clock.     They wet*
en route to this   city to   view ••"
civic parade.    The car bowled along
at good speed.    Where the  track'
turned from Dolin  street,   the «»'
suddenly lurched and left the rails-
The motormnn   was   powerless l°
theck its speed.      A gulch 120 fce'
deep yawned below.    Only a sligW
rail of wood ran along the edge «
the precipice. RIFLES' HOT FIGHT
Canadians Lose Heavily in Attack by
Rig Force of Boers.
Powers. As those rumof| ,,
been broadened and exaggerated
among the masses, hostile feeling
on the part of the people against
foreigners and missionaries and the
converts has increased. Hi
'Boxers' movement.
lence the
Toronto.June 28.—John A, Ewan,
the (ilobe correspondent wilh the
second Canadian contingent in
South Africa, cables the following
from Kroonstad, Orange River colony, under date of June 27:
1 'The Canadian rifles are scattered along the railways in the northern section of the Orange River colony, where General Dewet is causing some trouble. The Cossack
post of I) squadron was attacked on
I une 22 by a superior number at a
point tour miles from camp at Honing Spruit. The Canadians took to
their horses, but  suffered severely.
"Privates T. Patterson, (of McLeod,) ). F. Mordor.Pincher Creek,
and Kerr were killed. Lieutenant
W. M. Inglis, late of the Berkshire
regiment, Privates T. R. Miles,
Pincher Creek, and A. Aspmwall,
N. W. M. P., were wounded. Privates Bell and C. P. Ermatinger,
N. W. M. P,, were made prisoners.
"The Boers pursued the party to
within rifle shot of camp, when
Private Ed. F. Waldy, Calgary,
not caring to be shot or captured
ftithout making a good fight for it,
jumped from his horse and killed
two Boers. Another was shot from
camp. Their friends dared not attempt to remove the bodies and the
Canadians buried them."
THE CAUSEANDTHI.; RESULT
ma
The revolt of the Boxers in Chi
is a revolt against foreign spheres
of influence. This is the latest
euphemism adopted by diplomacy
to apply to a country which is practically annexed by a foreign nation,
while its own government cotinues
to nominally rule it. In China, the
European powers have landed troops,
built fortifications and begun the
constiuction of railroads and telegraph lines and the development of
mines within their several spheres,
which embrace 13 of the 19 provinces. The chief trouble h«s been
that some of them have assumed
that the grant of a sphere carries
with it the ownership of the soil
itself. Thc Belgians and Germans
have proceeded  wilh  their railroad
one side and of one of the best
French-Canadian families on the
other. He is a type of the best
blood of old Canada.
An occasional murmur is heard
at the appointment of a man from
outside the province to be at the
head of its government. It is best
so. There is hardly a man in the
province, of any ability or standing, who has not been identified
with one or another of the several
factions by which it has been torn.
This fact would be a fatal objection
to the appointment of a resident of
the province to the ollice, the incumbent of which is required to be
above and apart from all party
strife. Mr. Mclnnes can trace his
downfall to the fact that he took
sides in controversies from which he
should have held aloof. Any man
from^British Columbia would be more
open to the same temptotion than
one who had been a distant spectator of these conflicts. Nor has the
dominant federal party any leader in
the province who could acceptably
represent the crown. It is divided
by factions and its pretended leader,
Mr. Bostock, is  violently  opposed
MORE BUTCHERED
Wholesale Massacre of Christian Natives by the Boxers.
construction with a brutal   indifference to the rights of the individual | by a large  proportion of his fellow
liberals.
The only persons  who  seriously
object to  the  appointment  are the
KiiXl.lts I'LKIW.Fll IN HLOlia
•I'lirir  Areret Oaths and   Mlgns-Wh)
Titer Kill Foreigner*
Edwin Wildman, late vice-consul
m the United States at Hong Kong,
says o( the Boxers:
"They are divided into lodges
and have common signs and passwords, known only to themselves.
They have several methods of interrogating each other and recognize peculiar manners in placing
cups and dishes at the table, of
wearing their garments and saluting each other. They hold their
meetings usually in secluded
places in the dead of the night and
draw blood from their bodies,mixing
it with water and pledging each
other to oaths of vengeance against
their enemies. The Boxers have
adopted a flag bearing the motto:
"l'p with the Ch'ing dygnasty
and down with tbe foreigner.' The
foreign tradesman in China, to the
mind of the native, is a barbarian
and the average celestial is as incapable of turning back the pages
of history and restoring idol worship and burnt sacrifices. The
Boxer believes in immortality and
in a heaven-sent mission. He i.s a
foe to fear, and the present alarm
felt by all foreigners in China is
fully warranted."
B* •Minister nmb)'. Views
Former Minister to China Denby
writes:
"The chief cause of this dissatisfaction is jealousy against the foreigners. China sees herself powerless to control in any wise the foreigners who are swarming on her
borders. These people are under
extra-territorial jurisdiction and
cannot be touched by the Chinese
authorities, no matter what crimes
they may commit. A hundred or
S°o mites away from a consul the
foreigner is safe from any judicial
action. Witnesses cannot be transported such a distance, and it follows that the foreigner has no restraint upon his evil passions. Out
of this cause secret societies have
arisen whose members are hostile
to the Ming dynasty, and who find
the easiest mode of embarrassing
the government to be to attack the
foreigners."
A Kiiiim-iioIIiIiik I'arlr
Tarn Pui-Shun, a Chinese diplomat, visiting in  this country, says:
"Vou had in this country years
ago a 'know-nothing-party.' It
was a movement against foreigners.
The 'Boxer' movement in China has
the same political and philosophical
cause, but founded probably on
more aggravating grounds. There
have been rumors and rumors of the
partition   of China by the foreign
owners of the soil. In any white
man's country, a railroad company
has to buy its right of way; in China,
these people have simply taken it
without so much as saying: "By
your leave." In thn maratime
provinces, where almost every inch
of soil is cultivated, they have torn
up vegetable gardens, ripped up
fences and destroyed whole villages.
In this manner they have aroused a
natural antagonism to all white
men, for the Chinese do not distinguish between nationalities, and an
Englishman is called a foreign devil
on account of the misdeeds of a
German or a Belgian.
That is tbe secret of the failure of
continental nations at colonizing.
They treat a colony as a conquered
country and ignore the rights c>I individuals in the country they occupy.
With them the government is everything, the individual nothing; with
the Anglo-Saxon, the government
is merely a device for the better
security of individual rights. They
ridicule as a sign of weakness the
action of the British in South Africa,
in paying for supplies taken from
non-combatants in the enemy's
country. They are more inclined
to follow Weyler's dictum: "War
is hell."
Now that they have aroused the
sleeping Chinese dragon, they will
first have to beat him into submission and then decide what to do
with him. They are all showing a
feverish haste to rush troops into
China. While the immediate object is the rescue of the threatened
white men's legations, the ulterior
object doubtless is to have as large
a force on the scene as any other
nation, in order that they may get
fair treatment in the settlement
which will follow. Russia is mobilizing her whole army, Britain is
sending troops from India and is
preparing to detach some from
Lord Roberts' army in South Africa,
the United States are sending a
fleet of war ships and 5000 troops,
Germany and France are each
strengthening their fleet, Japan is
sending 20,000 men. When all
those forces get together on Chinese
soil ai.d have disposed of the Boxers,
the really interesting time will begin-     	
THE NEW GOVERNOR.
office-seekers, who grudge a plum
to any other man, whether in or out
of the province. Their disappointment is doubtless keen, but their
fellow-citizens will feel no sympathetic pangs. The people feel confident of being well governed, according to law and precedent, and
of having a rest from dissension.
This is what they have most keenly
desired.
Humors Persistent hut False
San Francisco, June 28.—The
persistent rumors circulated in the
east that Rev. J. George Gibson of
this city is dead and that before his
demise he made a confession that
he murdered Blanche Lamont and
Minnie Williams, the crime for
which Theodore^Durant was hanged, have no foundation in fact.
The Patriotic Kuutl
Ottawa, June 28.—The Canadian
patriotic fund to June 28 is $306,-
388.81.
It. II. I lor SiilliThii;  India:
Simla, June 28.—The monsoon
prospects are decidedly more favorable.
King ol'Nsxoii) Is III
Berlin, June 28.—Reports from
Dresden say- that King Albert of
Saxony is suffering from cancer of
the bladder.
Boy Killed b>- Llglilulng
Delaware. Ont., June 28.—Clarence Mahler, aged nine years, was
struck and killed by lightning.while
seeking shelter under a tree here on
Tuesday evening.
DKVLIN DKPKNDN   HIS   I'IMIII
It is doubtful whether the Dominion government could have chosen a
man for lieutenant governor of British Columbia who would be more
acceptable to the people of the
province in general than Sir Henri
Joly de Lotbiniere. He has for 40
years held a foremost place in the
affairs of the whole country. He
has served the people with distinction, proved his possession of high
ability as a statesman nnd won the
esteem of political associates and
opponents alike. His record and
his character are a guarantee that
his accession to oflice will signalize
a return within those constitutional
lines.of government, the departure
from which by his predecessor has
been the principal cause of all our
ills. Socially, also, Sir Henri will be
an acquisition. He comes of a family
of the old French aristocracy on the
-llakrrol Rnicrgeuc)' Ration* Challenge* Investigation or their Merit*.
Montreal, June 28.—Dr. Devlin,
who supplied emergency rations to
the government for the Canadian
troops in South Africa, the quality
of which has been under investigation by a special committee of the
house of commons, in an interview
expresses his willingness to give
his side of the case whenever called
upon to do so..
Contrasting highly concentrated
food with that supplied hy him, Dr.
Devlin says the former, which contains a higher percentage of pro-
teid matter, may, instead of proving
beneficial, prove highly injurious,
owing to their deficiency in other
equally essentials, viz: carbo-hydrates and fatty matter.
Mr Henri Joly the It lulu OTau
Montreal, June 28.—Major Bennett of Vancouver is in the city. In
an interview he expressed himself as
well pleased with the appointment
af Sir Henry Joly de Lotbiniere as
lieutenant-governor of British Columbia. He says a better appointment could not have been made.
Harvard Win* the Hare.
Boston, June 28.—Harvard wins
the four-oared raiM in 12:16 1-2.
Cheefoo, June 28, via Shanghai,
noon.—Admiral Seymour's expedition has been relieved, having failed
to connect with Pekin. There is no
news from Pekin. The Russian
colonel, Schtelle, commanding the
combined forces of 10,000 men, is
supposed to be proceeding to Pekin.
Admiral Seymour's expedition is
returning to Tien Tsin. His force
has suffered greatly. It is estimated that from 40,000 to 60,000 Chinese troops are now before Pekin.
Boxers Irom all sections are swarming there.
How Ibe lli'lli I < huh-.
St. Petersburg, June 28,—The
minister of war has received the following dispatch from Admiral Alex-
ejeff:
"Port Arthur, June 27.—During
the night of June 25 a detachment
of four companies of Russians, Col.
Schivinsky commanding, and the
same number of foreigners, relieved
Admiral Seymour and brought 200
of his wounded to Tien Tsin."
Legation* Have Been Rescued
Berlin, June 28.—The commander of the German squadron at Taku
telegraphs, under date of June 26,
as follows:
"The foreign ministers are with
the landing force."
A P. Lot tbe News First
London, June 28.—As was the
case on the occasion of the relief of
Tien Tsin, the Associated Press
was able to give the foreign office,
the admiralty and the queen the
first news of the rescue of Vice-Ad-
miral Seymour.
A telegram from Jardine, Matheson & Co., dated Shanghai this
afternoon, suggests that the ministers are still at Pekin, but admits
that there is no news from the capital.    The telegram adds:
Worse Than Armenian Horrors.
"Seymour arrived at Tien Tsin
with 312 of his force wounded, besides 62 killed. The damage done
to Tien Tsin has been exaggerated.
Shanghai is quiet. Other dispatches
from Shanghai reiterate the announcements of the massacres of
native Christains in the inland districts, which are worse tban the Armenian horrors. The officials at
the places watched by gunboats
make a show of protecting the missionaries, but there is not even a
pretence of the protection of converts in the interior, who have been
butchered wholesale."
t'WXDN'T STAND THK 1.1 Ll .
Admission or IKr*. Langtrj' Disrupting
Professional Women'* League.
New Vork, June 28 —A number
of women have resigned from the
Professional Women's league because of the admission to membership of Mrs. Langtry.
The list of resignations now confronting the league contains the
names of many who have heen identified with the organization since its
inception.
Jem-lea aud Hulillu to fight.
New Vork, June 28.—James J.
Jeffries and tins Ruhlin will meet
probably at the Twentieth Century
club the list week in August. Their
representatives will meet today or
tomorrow and arrange the details
of the match.
MISCELLANEOUS   NOTES.
The Chinese government, like
Kruger,has taken its prisoners with
it in its migration to a new capital.
The European ambassadors are
probably to be held as hostages.
The Royal Canadians in garrison
at Halifax are having a dose of regular army discipline. Forty of them
are to be court-martialed for refusing to do musketry drill practice.
A canvass of leading Canadians
has brought out opposition to a
scheme of imperial federation which
would involve direct contributions
by the colonies for the imperial
army   and   navy. . The alternative
Wu Ting Paug Is a ''Josher"
Wu Ting Tang, the Chinese minister at Washington, is sharp as a
trap, with an underlying stratum of
humor which is intense. He was
at the Mardi tiras festival in New
Orlcan, where an autograph-hunting fiend found him and induced
him to write something on his cufl'.
Then he cut oul Ihat part of his cuff
and put it in his pocket book. Since
then he has been showing the treasure to Chinese laundrymen. They
all agree that they "no can read
him." At the same time they go
into convulsions of merriment as
they look at it. Now, the outside
world has a little curiosity to know
what really was written on that
cull'.    Salt Lake Tribune.
The Speculators' Monopoly
If there is an industry in the
world in which the interests of the
discoverer, the laborer and the capitalist are identical, is gold mining
One of the questions that must be
taken up in this province is the law
relating to mining, with a view to
amending it so as to render the development  of mines   more  speedy
most favored is the maintenance of
a small standing army and navy in
each colony, at the disposal of the
mperial government.
Postmaster-General Mulock has
introduced a bill for the collection o
labor statistics and for the settlement of labor disputes by boards of
arbitration and conciliation. This
is a step in tbe right direction.
The growth of Southeast Kootenay may be inferred from the vote
polled. This was 974 at the recent
election against 303 in t8q8.
The example set by the powers
in obtaining spheres of influence has
been followed by the Boxers with
telling effect. The boundaries of
their sphere ar* marked with blood
and fire.
Britons and Americans raced for
the honor of being the first to enter
Tien Tsin and they ended by entering neck and neck. May they ever
engage in such friendly rivalry in
the cause of civilization.
The election frauds commission
has begun business and it is now in
order for each fellow to show what
a consummate rascal the other fellow is. It is an opportunity for the
politicians to have a grand washing
of dirty linen.
British Columbia seems to be a
poor sort of country for any man to
embark in the czar business.—The
Province.
Dutch railroad men, having refused to operate the Transvaal
railroads for the British army, are
to be sent home to Holland. It is
just as well that they showed their
colors and cleared the way for the
employment ol loyal men in their
places.
The killing of the Chinese dragon
will be comparatively easy. When
it comes to cutting up the carcass,
the prospect is good that the powers
will carve one another instead of
the carcass.
The Prohibition party of the
United States has adopted a platform of but a single plank—a sort
of political footbridge, wherefrom,
it you slip, you fall into "the
drink."
Aguinaldo's ex-generals have accepted the American amnesty. The
evasive patriot had better name his
price before it goes down to zero
and must remember that, if he sells
out this time, he will have to stay
bought.
The complicity of the Chinese
government in the Boxer rebellion
is proved by the discovery of direct
orders to regular Chinese troops to
join the Boxers.
Britain will have to provide a
continuous supply of horses for her
army and the London Outlook
suggests an imperial horse ranch in
the Canadian northwest as a possibility. Canada can furnish men
to whip the enemy and horses on
which they mav ride him down.
Flax fibre is now being used to
make paper and North Dakota has
taken to growing flax for the purpose.
a
than it is at present. There are
altogether too many claims locked
up in the hands of people who
either cannot or will not do
anything with them. The
rights of prospectors must be carefully guarded, but the policy of monopoly in all its varied phases must
b* put a stop to. And the monopoly of capital is not the only brand of.,
that objectionable article. There
is a monopoly of the speculator in
mining claims, which does harm
both to the prospector and the investor and the country at large.—
Victoria Colonist.
TlllTK IR A NPKNDTHRIPT.
Nquaudered nniii.iino on a <!heap aud
Uglr Hulldlng lu Paris,
The following is an extract  from
a letter just received from Paris:
"To say that Canada's pavilion
cost $90,000 would mean little to
those who have no means of seeing
the structure, but to Canadians in
Paris it seems incredible that the
unimposing building, ugly in appearance, cheap in construction,
and half hidden by trees, should
represent so considerable an outlay.
An authority on building told me
this morning that the same structure would cost to build in Ottawa—
he is an Ottawaile—about $18,0.10.
Add to that, said he, $2000 for the
sake of round figures, and multiply the whole by two, so as to give
a good wide margin (or Paris prices
in 1900. That would make $40,-
000—and it cost $90,000! It has
even cost more than $90,000, for
Mr. Tarte, with that spirit of generosity in spending which is so well
known a characteristic of the minister of public works, added some
$5000 more on his own account.
Just to g\v* a rough idea of the
cheap construction of the building,
it may be mentioned that the
largest piece of timber used in it is
only eight inches square. The pillars, which look larger, are all enlarged by plaster of paris."—Montreal special to Toronto Globe.
The three Boer delegates have
returned to Europe from the United
States with three gripsacks full of
Ameri:an sympathy.
Dr. Jameson, of raid fame, has
been elected to the Cape parliament
at Kimberly. He will now carry
the war into the Copperhead camp
at Capetown.
Gov. Roosevelt is coming to Spokane and Rough Rider huts will
become epidemic.
Brigham H. Roberts of Utah
only had to pay $150 for having
three wives instead of one. Polygamy is cheap at that rate.
The Muir giacier in Alaska has
been wrecked by an earthquake and
the steamer captains will have to
find another glacier to show the
tourists.
The British are fighting an Amazon in Ashantee. A dispatch Irom
Prahsu to the London Daily Express says: "The brain and inspiration of the Ashantee rebellion is the
aged queen of Ofesu. Although
old, she is full of physical energy.
She carries a gun herselt, and personally leads 1000 picked hunters.
Her personal confederate is the old,
blind, crafty king of  the   Adansis."
Transvaal gold, used by Dr.
Muller, thc Orange Free State agent
in Holland, is said to have instigated the Ashantee rebellion, lie
formerly lived on the Gold coast
and furnished the chiefs with modern arms.
mineral Kxhlbll lor Wluulpeg
A collection of mineral specimens
for lhe Winnipeg exhibition has
been sent to the provincial mineralogist by Hi W. C. Jackson, secretary of the board of trade. The
mines represented are the Le Roi,
Josie, Nickel Plate, No. 1, Centre
Star, War Eagle, Iron Mask, Cliff,
Consolidated St. Elmo, Monte
Christo, Virginia, Evening Star,
Georgia, Columbia and Kootenay,
Iron Horse, 1. X. L, Jumbo, Sunset, Homestnke, R. E. Lee, Lily
May, Velvet and Portland.
■
1 !
I
P-
J.VROE    AND   COMFORTABLE
1{0;).\iS TAHI.K    UN8U "*
PASSED    IS    TIU'l
northwest.
BR IIMM-BARRETT
SILVERTON,
B. C.
Watches,
■ Clocks and
*     JBweiery,
Fink Watch  Repairing a
All Work Left al The lakeview
Hotel, Silverton, will l-e forward-
oil and promptly at inn If I to.
O. B. Knowl
SANDON, B. 0.
TIIE SimiTOlMAH.
8_tTtinn.iv, Junk IK)   iWO.
II III INIIKIi EVKRY   HATl'WMY   AT
SILVEKTON, B. 0.
MATHEHON DUOS..    Kdltora * Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES:
TWO DOLLAK8 A YEAR.
Advertising rates trill be made known
upon application at this ollice.
II-' YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
0S*»*«O OR IN ARREARS A
| «»   BLUE   CROSS     WILL
tJmMO BE FOUND IN THIS
JljUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. PRICE
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
j8888888g8888S88g8gS888882
EDITORIAL OUTCROPPINGS.
1888888888888888888888888
ARLINGTON
HOTB^
Conveniently Situated near
Kail way Station and Wharf.
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
Dining Room under tlm charge of
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with 'ill the delicacies
of the season.
HENDERSON* GRTHINfi,
SLOOAN CITY,   ....
PitOI'H.
B.C.
YOU
Win have a
postcard from
me
as soon as Fruit reaches its
lowest figures.
Don't   preserve   any until
then.
J-1-Mcintosh,
Silverton, B.C.
CANADIAN
P'ACIIMC
RAIJUWAY-
IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.
The Hon. Mr.  Mnlocb,; the Postmaster-General, has introduei-il into
the House of Commons a bill to aid in
the prevention and settlement of trade
disputes and the publication of statistical industrial information.    The object of tbe bill is by thn aids of boards
of conciliation to adjust the differences
arising from time to time between employers and employee?, and it is hoped
Uiat in its application it will  do much
to prevent strikes and  lockouts.    In
case such are undertaken the bill will
aid greatly in bringing about more sot-
actory   and  permanent   settlements.
Another object of tbe bill is to establish a Department of Labor, the duties of which will be thn gathering of
statistical and other  information affecting labor and the publishing of the
same in a monthly gazette, which »ill
bear the same relation  to labor as the
report of the Minister of Agriculture
dues to agriculture.    This gazette will
not he a medium for the expression of
opinions, but for the  registration oi
facta    The publication of such information will be useful to both employers and  employees as it will enable
them better to  understand not only
their own condition bnt 'he conditions
affecting the other side, and with additional information, such ob the  bill
is purposed to provide, all  parties  in
industrial controversies will be  better
able to understand each others views,
thus paving the way for settlements.
The bill is drafted on tbe lines of
the Conciliation Act of Great Britain,
passed in 1896, which has been the
means of settling several big strikes
and lockouts. Although the measure
does not go the extreme length hoped
by many, it is at least a long step in
the right direction and as such will be
appreciated hy those of the great majority, the employees.
hands they have refuted to take it out 18 Rashdall
of the post- ollice ever since. Silver-
ton's business houses are up to date
and can furnish a roan anything from
a gum boot to a full house, it all
depends as to which business house
you patronix". We are having a
building boom, but as we got into jail
once foe telling the truth we refuse
to mention it Silverton has good
dogs and scrub dogs, good men and
scrub men, young dudes and old st id's.
in fact every thing that goes to make
op a community. Taking it all
together the town is fairly prosperous
and so are we, having managed to
renew several notes lately. Tiik
SlLVKRTOKiAK will be published in the
future as in the past for the common
benefit of the townsite company, ou
merchants, prospectors and incidoti
tally for the publishers.
Now that tbe row is ou across tin
Pacific it would be n good thing if
some of the Chinese lovers, with which
this country is cursed, would raise u
few regiments of Chinese, Chinese
employees, Missionaries and sucli
other breeds of humanitarian cattle in this country, go to China and
light thn cause of rum and bibles,
Canada would bo the gainer and China
i ould   lojk after herself.
WIIO IS THE DRAG?
There is now lying on Silverton's
wharf for shipment ore from three
different mines tributary to this place,
the Hewett, Vancouver and Wakefield
mines. Two other big properties are
about to resume operations, the Galena
Mines and Emily Edith This with
the other properties big and small
which are working in this district
should make Silverton a prosperous
place this s ason. If it docs not
then there is something wrong with
Silverton's business men and town-
sito company. Excepting Sandon no
other town in the Slocan has as many
mines, and no other town has as many
natural advantages as this place and
no place takes so little advantage of
her advantages as Silverton.
Every section of the country is more
prosperous for s liberal patronage of the
advertising columns of the newspapers,
and in nearly every instance where a
community fails to advertise tho failure
may be traced to lack of education.
The partition ot China amongst the
great powers is not proving the snap
thai was anticipated and it will he a
wonder if thoy do not come to blows
over, not who is to get tbe biggest
share, but, who is to do the biggest
share of the fighting that will have to
be done before the pigtails are decently
licked.
tt
8L0CAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of ore  fr.im Silverton for
the year 1899. totaled 1693 Tons.
All other Lake points 1383     "
The shipment   ol  ore   from   Slocan
Luke points,  up  to and including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                   Tons,
Bosun 440
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Cnpella  7
From Silverton Tons.
Emily Edith 20
Hewett 30
Vancouver    20
Wakefield, (concentrates) 380
Galena Mines       20
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 020
From Slocan City
Arlington       300
Blnck Prinoe    60
Kilo 20
June 57—Sheridan, Carpenter, J Sheridan. Pembroke and Minnesota, nr
Sandon, F. L. Christie.
June 28-Centrnl, Right Mile ck, Wm
Brooch. Oregon, Trout ck, J Tinling.
lllack Bear, somo, 0 H Abercrombie.
Echo lr, nr Sandon, T Avlson.
June 29-Nell fr, McGuigan ck, G Alexander.
TRANBFIBS.
Juool9-EinmaNo8«nd4, % each,
J C Bolander and J A Austin to T H
Hoben.
EinmaNo4,'i.T II Hoben to J C
Holonder.
EmmoNoS, Vj'.T II Hoben to X A
Austin.
Emma No 2, l-12,Amsr.on \i, to each,
Sumo to J A Austin and J C Bolandor.
Eight Hour, }3, same to J CBolander.
! fJuno 20—Orient, M each. W II Sandiford to C S Raohdall, A E Fauquier and
E Stewart, Nov Ifi, 1899.
Havana, ',,CMcNIohol to 1' Stewart,
Oct I, 181*8.
Dowey, >3', P Attaffer to some, Oct 1.
1898
Dewey, Havana, % each, T Avison to
H G Shave, May ».
Same, '3 each, E Stewart to same,
May 9.
Orient *4, same to same, May 9.
Sauio all interest, A E Fauquier. C 8
Kashdall to H O Shove, May 9.
Eight Hour, 1 6. Emma No 4,1 6, Emma No 2,1-21. Amazon, 16. J C Bol-
ander to J E Brouse, June 18.
Haotings, M, C E Siuilhorlugale to H
S Nelson, Juoe 11.
June 22—Forest King.'.Glpsy Queen,
1-6, A. Wilds to W H Brandon, June 4
June 2.)-Brock fr, M S Nicholson to
M F, Kammelmeyer, f500
Juno 29—Mollie O, jr., 3 MJThompson
to J AJWhlttier, Octfl3,1897.
ASSESSMENT*.
June 18-I'hoenix 20—Glen. Bloom-
ington, Ked Cross, Lost Boar, Freddy.
Beo. 21— Agnes. 25—Big Timber,
Mary Durham, Camden, Harlem, Snow-
cap, June Bird, Black Colt, Sandon,
Chief. 26—Sinfl, Flower, Violet, Black
Fox, Linnet, Mountain Goat. 27—But
terfiv, Belfast fr, New Phoenix, Number
One, Betsy Ross. Eotella, Lost Tiger,
Link fr., Marion, Mountain Queen,
Lucky Three, Alice. 29-MolIie O, Ashland.
CEhTIKICATES OF IMI RO'.'KMKNTS
June 30—Betsy Ross. Lost Tiger, Link
Fr, Merrimac, Estella.
J
Silverton        ?     ■
'■*
"Five
Drops."
A RHEUMATIC CURE
THAT CURES.
WE   ARE  THE  AGENTS   FOR
THIS   ALIO FOR
Lilac Cream, Aisllii's Hair Rcoewer
Canadian Corn Cnre and Syrup   ,
of llorelmuiid and Toln.   .
Proscription Department Complete and
Up   To   Date
SILVERTON DRUG STORE,
SILVERTON. B. C
Fresh   Bread
Ties and Cakes Hade to Order.
A. CAREY, -Silverton, B.C.
START   A  NEW   YEAR.
• KRVICK     FOR     TUI'
will   bc
YEAR      1900
commenced JUNK
10th. The "Imperial Limited" tak** you ocrou the
Continent In tour duy* without change. • it in ■ »e|i
Vertll>nled train, lumrioimly
equipped for the comfort and
convenience of Vattengett,
Auk yonr friend* who hare
Ira wiled  tin ll, or addreu
W. F. ANDERSON,
Tray. Pass. Agent, Nelson
«. J. COVLE.
MINING  RECORDS.
With this issue The 8ii.vkrtoniak
enters upon its fourth year and
I I ml t-Ofi" "'^oogh wehave not grown rich we
Lll IJluU have manosjed to keep one day ahead
of the sheriff and have only been in
jail once. That waa for telling the
1 nth and it taught ns a lesson. We
have handled the truth very carefully
ever since. We have been liberally
patronize! with adi when times
with good and poorly when things
were dull, and ao the town has been
on the ragged edge for the last three
years we have borne our share of tbe
grief. Silvertonians ore patriotic to
their town when they are away and
curse it at home among themselves,
win n they can spare the time from
the townsite company. Tho town-
site company is very liberal towards
tbeir town paper. Tbey let ui eat
provided we rustle the price from
some stranger. The mine managers
here like this paper.    Thev liked it so
much that they offered to buy it last
A. (J. p. Agent, Vancouver; mollth>  Thtt w„ ^t^ the electionj
and  rather than   sec it fall into bad
MLIIRTOV gjgOHIQI,
NO. 95. W. F. Of M.
H
r ■ - ' B,C
<^1E MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF
E HOtelj A J. TEETER, PROPS,
PATRONS Altf WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON TIIE PREMISES
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THE   PEST   URANUS OF  WJNF8, l.IQToJ
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -   -   - SLOCAN, B. 0.
3^©:D©:n.alcl*c3 XdlTroxy
®ta"blo-
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  HORSES  FOR   HIRE   AT   RKAtiOHABll
KATKS A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS UQKK.
Outside Parties Desiring Homes in Silverton
Cou Have Them Reserve'I Uy Writing To—
t ♦ t t ♦      _* J
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON, - . Ii,C
THE WM. HAMILTON MANUFACTURING CO,
LIMITED/
MINING MACHINERY.
F»etert>or»ot*i£_t*, Ontario.
Syrup of Horehound & Tolu
FOR COUGHS  AND COLDS.
THE
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.
s
C* . .
0) .'i
£
•>
I
(C
i
Cl
<•
0
<e
Cl
(c
ci
(C
*>
llr_nli|i_Ri'lM Tor Mining llnf
EVERYTHING NEW, .\n
AM»   IP-IC-IAIE
TAJilK IKfcl LrA^lMJ|
THE NOI.THWE8T.
M BOWES,  rr«p.
SILVERTO N,
n cl
Khtaiii.imiiki) in Nki.hun "18!K).
It is nothing
*   but lair
To let my Sl-iean ciislomi-rs know
that I bare just returned from a purchasing trip in the East. I am
pleased to let you know tliat I iiavc
seleeled tlie v. ry litest iij)-!<i.:!a!e goods io new designs, such as new I
low bin shown in this rani: v. All goods bought here arc g«n
Al iimiifr and prices arm^i as wiil eonijietc with Eastern market
'"A<Vo/W*VV»/«.VV v' 11) N IN N E I.SON
KimXHA      I     HN VII i: VOU TO CALL
SPECIALTY. J   ANlUNy'ElT .MY STOCK.
MAILORDER
PROM ITI.Y ATTENDED TO.
Jaool> Oov©*», • TIIE JEWELER, • MLSOU1]
Meets every Saturday in the Union
Hall in Silverton, at 7:,'_.) i\ ».
W. HoRTON,
President.
J. I. McIntosii,
Financial-Secretory
The THISTLE HOTEI
NKW   DENVER—LOCATIONS
Jane 19-Dublin, Cariboo cr, J. Tinling. Annex fr, nr New Denver, 8. T.
Walker, A Jacobson, H. M. Walker.
Battle Axe fr, Silver Mountain, A Jacob-
son. Four Suckers, Wilson ck, G 6 Van -
stone.
June 20—Boston,   nr Sandon,   E L
Jakes.   Indiana, same, P. Elenalne: nnd )
M Kirlln.   Gem, same, P. FIkuiIiik.       \
June 21—Swansea, Four Mile ck, W SILVERTON,
H Sandiford.   Malvern, same, N W Mf
Syndicate.     Africa,   Granite ck, A L   j M. McGREGOR
Roberts.   General Kitchener, some, J HI •
Roberto. PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
June 25-Ideal fr.nr New Denver, Ol AND *"NING ENGINEER.
J; 0. GORDON,
HIKKK, REALKSTATB, -OOMVEYIMOKR
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
-      -     -     R. 0.
SLOCAN CITY,
B.C.
J. H. HOWARTH]
JEWELER ko.,   SLOCAN, B. OJ
IS PREPARED TO   REPAIR WATCHES,   CLOCKS AND JEWELERY
FOR THE     SLOCAN   PUBLIC. AN     EXPERIENCE   OP NEARLY
FIFTY      YEARS      WARRANTS      THE      GUARANTEE      OF      SATISFACTION WITH HIS WORK THAT HE GIVES.    ALL  REPAIRING 18
DONE AS PROMPTLY AS GOOD WORK WILL ALLOW.
A FULL LINE OF WATCHES, CLOCKS, FANCY GOODS, Ac. INSTOCK.
NOW REOPENED
UNDER A NEW
MANAGEMENT.
HOUSE RENOVATED
AND THE HAR FULLY
RESTOCKED
*
#
*
*
THISTLE   CAFE./
Under the monogenic'ex
Carlo 8ch
Just Opened.        GoodSfl'
Meals at AH Hou*
ni«H
Thompson Broi
LAKE AVE..   SILVERTON, B,
Props*
a.
To Cure a   Cold   In   One W|
Contains   Tho'" New Ingredi**|
c
old Cure.
TRY   IT.
PRICE 25c.
At All Drug
K^D^ABE.
General
Mining
Supplies.
Full Line
Dry & Mixed
Paints.
Lumbe
Sash H
Doors.
MoCa11^ «& Co.,   Sloean, 13a
_■_____.

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