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The Silvertonian Apr 28, 1900

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Array t*iV
VOLUME THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    APRIL  28, is>00.
NUMBER  4»
CONSIGNMENTS
OF FR  SH
»_F»«J
s
RECEIVED
WEEKLY
BY
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Weekly News Nuggets Of Stocau aod
Other Camps.
araL mm of district.
•9
Silverton., B. C.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
bilverton....:	
USTTHIS HOTEL 18 NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE BAR IS SUPPLIED WITH BEST BRANDS OF
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
mm.  2*£.   SEZEj-OTsrles,   Prop,
A    GOOD   PROSPECT.
The work being; done on the Storm
claim, which lies within one mile if
town, is proving that property to be one
Cf the veiy best prospects struck within
the district t) in year. Considerable
surface work has now been done upon
the claim and the vein traced for some
distance nud wherever it has been nn-
coveied it has leen found to contain ore
snd to lie bin end down. The owners
are now nil.king on tho vein and are
putting down u large well'timhered shaft
which Iihs reached u depth of about SO
feet. The bottom of this shaft is all in
ledge matter snd time isu streak of poy
ore, composed ol lead carl onutes and
galena, that is ever fift.cn ii ches wide
and which is growing aider as depth is
gained upon it. Tlie Storm may vol
pro\e to le r.imtli.-t shipping mine fer
Silverton.
0_>9a_>9999 iHuKll.yiu>u\
« LOCUS.
O3000O0D0D33333O
The Slocsn-Kilo Company will at once
begin lhe construction of a wigon road
from the mouth of Lemon Creek to the
Kilo group, following the survey line of
the proposed railway line to the summit.
Mr. P. Dfckensnn, manager of the Com
pany, returned to Slocan from New York
this week.
We learn that a deal is now under way
among the Slocan Kilo people by which
they will secure another valuable Stocan
property, and a sub-company bo funned
to operate it.
F». BUIfcIVS & co
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL STORES  \T
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymlr. Ksslo. Sandon,
New Denver. CuswideCitj', Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway ami Greenwood.
-MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD  OFFICE NELSOS, IL 0.
y
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
1>HE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED.   OV ERC0ATING9 JUST IN.
The TaiUr:   Silverton, B. C.
(
I
w
J
w
5
t
■w
THE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
We are now showing
a nice assortment of
MEN'S SPRING AND
SUMMER SUITS
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
^lie*. Wm. Hunter Oo., T-,tcl..
Silverton,   **,  C,
THK VANCOUVER STARTS.
On Wednesday tin- Vancouver mine
of ihis disuict, was staittd up oitei
lying practically idle for iiearly a je_.r.
Tbis property will now he winked icr all
ilme is in it snd will be as humeri)-
i.i ih r the direct chaige md forimsmhip
of V\ J. Psiker. As k.oii as lhe wagon
n ad ilu.t connects the mine with lhe
nioin Silveiton road, und a foice of men
sre already at work upon it, the shipment of ore fiom lids mine to the
smeller will be tefUmrd. Tbe Vancouver
is a well developed and fully iqmpt
mice with o large aoicunt of ere blocked
out snd resdv to s^ope, and with a
lecord as a shipper ot rich ore not sur-
ran>t d by any of our Lake miies. The
ore produced by tbis mine is s silver
Inuring galena cariying tons idem lie
grey copper, mby und native silver hnd
it is iu uncommon thing for lhe smelter
relurns on ciirlosd lots ol Vancouver ere
to net over i.AACO per rsr Last y.ar
ibis mine shipped to lhe t-pielu r some
320 tons of tl.ii- rich ere.
A  MAJ'TIN MEUTING.
The first meeting of (he political
campaign, in the Silverion district, was
held iu McKiunohs' Hall on Wednes
day evening. It whs a meeting of the
supporters snd sympathizers of the
piesent Government and was for the
purpose of electing delegates tt attend a
convention to be held, which will ■ om-
inaie a candidate fur the Slocan Riding
to stand in the interests of Joseph
Mm tin's Government. There wet*
suine twenty persons present several of
whom avowed support-era and the rest
more or less in sympathy wilh the
movement. J. A. McKinnon presided
over the meeting and acted asohsirman.
After a lew short addresses and several
animated discussions, in which the
chair took a prominent psrt, four delegates were chosen to attend the convention which is to ne called chortly.
The delegates chosen were: Messrs J.
A. McKinnon, J. I MrInto_.li, W. 3.
Horton and J. Mcltobbie.
Considering the serious object for
which the meeting was called those
taking a prominent pari in it appeared
to fail to sppnii»te the gravity of the
pohlitial situation into which this Province has drifted, and the effect that the
present campaign will have on the
business interest-- of our country.
j which a miny is working.
Chalcocitoi-A mineral of a le vb'taf.
color, tarnished with blue or green, cou»
taining sulphur, copper andiron,
Contact—Close union or junction ot
one body with another,
Cross-cut—A drift to intersect a vein
of ore.
Country rock—Tbe strata in whieh
metallic lode is found.
Collar—When speaking ot the collar
uf a shajt: The curbing around a shaft
to keep loose ground from falling in.
Drift—A passage in a mine, horizontal or nearly so, forming.ii road for
the extraction of ore or tor carrying off
the wafer.
Dip—The inclination or pitch of a
vein or stratum. The angle with the
horizontal is the amount of dip.
Dyke—A bank of hard rock by which
SLOCAN LAKEORF. SHIPMENTS
Shipments   of  ore  from Silverton for
the year 1899. totaled 1693 Tons.
All other Luke points 1383     "
The shipment   ol   ore   from   Slocan
Lake point*, i\p to and including   lhe
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                     Tons.
Rosun   220
From New Denver
Hartney  20
C.ipella 7
from Silverton Toiih.
Emilv Edith 20
Vancouver    20
Waketii'hl, (concentrates) 120
I'r iin Enterprise Landing
Enterprise  300
From Slocan Citv
Arlington      300
Black Prince    00
During the week a fmce of men wero
put to work on the Four Mile wagon
road putting that thoroughfare into a
Qtato of repair. A largo amount of
heavy hauling is done over this rond,
wagons passing over it daily loaded with
from four to six tons of ore. The force
now engaged hy the Government are
repairing tho wjrst parts of it and
filling in the worst umd holes with rock.
The keeping of thia rosd in n passahle
condition is of vital im|ioitsnce to the
town of Silverton and the many mine-
ou tiers of this district and the Governments action in putting men to work
upon it is highly commendable.
Silverton's ore shipments for tho week
consists of three carloadB, all of which
was sent out by the Wakefield Mines
and consisted of one car of clesn nre nnd
two nf concentrates. Early in May it la
expected that the Vancouver will commence steady shipments lo the smelter
and the Emily Edith may bo expected
to fall into line st any time. Owing
to the bad slate of the trail to the Hewett
mine that propeity will not bo able to
ship ore nt present, although having s
lot of ore narked ready for shipment.
THE SLOCAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE.
The Slocan Football League is now an
assured fact, tbe Kaslo, Sandon and Sll
verton plubs having united tu boom the
game in this district. The League starts
off with the prospect ot a good season
and is boaod to do much to tester legitimate sport in the Riding.
Last Tuesday evening the delegates
chosep by the tl ree Clubs mentioned
met in Sun.Imi and formed the League,
drew up a constitution and srranged a
sehidule of games. Ail fouthsll teams
in the Sloe in and Ainsworth Mining
Divisions, playiqg Association rules, are
eligible for entering the League, provided
that application he made to the Secretary of the League before May 15th I his
will allow New Denver and Slocsn City
to enter team if they so desiie.
The delegates present from Silverton
were Messrs. Bowes and .Vatheson, and
Kaslo and Sandon had each two representatives at hand.
The oAJjeers ol the League for the first
season will he: President, R 0- Matheson, Silverton; Vice-President,B. Hunter, Kaslo; Secretary-Treasurer, W. F.
Lawson, Sandon. The Executive Committee will consist of the officers and one
representative irom each Cluli.
Unless other teams take adtnntagc of
the opportunity to enter the League, tho
schedule of games will bu us follows:
June 4 ,     Silverton at Kaslo.
June 17.,   K if lo at Sand ■ui.
June 28.,   Sandon at Silverton.
July 13 ,    Siheiton it'Saudon.
July L'S.,    Hmdou at K.islo
Aug. 6.,   Kaslo at Silveiton.
Mrs. R.J. Daigle left on Tuesday on a
trip to Rossi.oul.
Bomr. In StUr-rton, on April 19th, to
the wifa of J. A. Kelly, a son.
A prominent curler of .Sandon recently
referred ton divine as "theskip of the
doxology works.''
Premier Joseph Muri.u wi'.l sddress
the electors of Sandon tonight, fceyerol
from her,i will .so up to hear him.
An event in the matrimonial line will
take place in Sandon next Wednesday,
in which a lade well known in Silverton
will play a prominent part.
Divikr Kervicb will be held in Silver-
_>     .      , .,„.   .,,„.v   lodes aie frequently divided,
ton next Sundav a'ten oou at 3: o'clock, I *
everyone is cordially invited to attend.-     Drag-Material wideb haa_ been die
John G. Duuean, Presbyterian  Miuister
REDUCED. RATI S.
The C. P. R. now issues return tickets
good for GOdaj'ii sll the year round between    the undermentioned   points   in
West  Kootenay and the Halcyon  Hot
Spiingaat tlio following reduced rates:
From Revelstoke (2 25.  From Tm.il $7 00
'     Auisw'iiih $8.20     "   Kaslo$y 75
"    Rossland    18,26    " Rnhson $6.75
"   Silverton   |3 05     " Sandon |3 85
"   Nloean City $4 35    " Nelson f7.50
J. I. Mcintosh will recivea small shipment of Haxelwood's "double Jersey''
pasteurised milk. Equal to cream. Will
be sold at 20c a quart. A trial order is
solicited. r
Football players are requested by the
Executive of the Football Club to appear
on tlie field in unif irm every Monday,
Wednesday anl Saturday evenings for
team practise.
Mr. J. H. Howartb, the veteran watchmaker of Slocau City. is out for a share
ol Silverton's bisinesa in his lino. Re
guaranties satisfaction aud promptness
in tbe tilling of all orders.
AU   work   in  the Jewelry  Repairing
line, left at the Silvcrtou Drug Store, will
be promptly forwards I to Jacob Oovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler.     All re
pairs are ou.vitANTKisii for onk year. *
Johnny Langstaff, quill driver of the
Trout Lake Topic, visited the Slocan during the week. He reports the outlook
for the Lardeau aa heing particularly
bright at present. It is quite possible
that Mr. Langstaff will invade the Slocan with a loug haired eleven looking for
gold medals aud glory at the Football
Tourua i ent bere on May 24ih,
We wish to draw onr tenders' attention to the advertisement of McCallmu
k Co., of Slocan. which appears hi this
issue Mr. .McCullum ennies a large
stock of goods and is prepared to fill all
orders for hardwire and mil ing supplies
iiiini dijicly. Ho also ctuiics on baud a
full lino of paints and builder's material
iu the Shane nf lumber, laths, shingles,
doors and sashes.
The Webb Hodsdon entertainment
given here lust Saturday evening did not
draw the audience that the excellent
program deserved. Miss Webb is a
clever render and is up-lo d^lp in her
s 'lections, pleasing all who heard her in
both her oomic and serious readings,
scoring best in "Tho Ruiial of Oeneral
Waucbope." Mr. Hodsdon bus a good
tenor VQioe and leceived several encore?.
PREPARING  FOR THE   TWENTY-
FOURTH.
placed by tlie faulting or movement of a
largo body.
Diorite—A granite-like rock, grayish-
white to nearly black in color. Itde»
rives its name from being unmistakable
or clearly defined.
Fissure—A c rack in the earth produced
by volcanic or earthquake action or
subsidence, Most fissures are filled,
from below nnd become metallic or
mineral veins.
Fault—The sudden interception ot the
continuity of strata, until then upon the
same plane, this lieing accompanied by
a crack or fissure varying in width from
a IH.-U) line to several feet, and generally
filled with broken stone, clay or similar
material. There are faults in some
sectious of which the horizontal extent
is 30 miles or more, and the vertical
displacement varying irom 600 to 3000
feet.
Foot-wall—The Bide of the rock under
a mineral vein ; the underlying|wall.
Felspar or feldspar—A genus of minerals rather than a single mineral.
Gangue—The mineral matters lo
which metallic ores are emliedded.
Horse—A mass of earthy matter inter-.
veiling between the branches of a vein,
The vein straddling on each side of a
non-mineral rock is aaid to take horse.
Hanging wall—The overhauling side
of nu in.'hned vein.
Infiltration—The process of filtering in
or penetrating tho interstices of rock of
other matter.
Monoclinic—Having ono single dip,
persistent for a considerable distance..
O.tide-Tho product of the combination
of oxygen with any metal. For instance,
oxidized silver is silver on tbe surface of
which a thin film of the black oxide boa
beeu formed.
Pyrites—An uneven, brittle mineral
tbat strikes fire when struck with a
hammer, occuring frequently crystallised
Selvage—A wovon border of close rock,
ueed iu a mining sense as tbe outer
ii.iug of a vein or fissure at its contact
with another body.
Sulphide—A neutral salt of sulphydriu
acid.
WHEN A FELLER IS OUT Ol' A JOB.
The work of the Subscription Committee for tho Celebration Fund  is now
well under way and irom  the readiness   At, naturo ig sU.k (rQm her hwU ,0 Wr
with  whicli tlio subscription  paper   is hair
being tilled on, the Committee (eel jus-;        W'en u feller is out of a job;
tiiied   in  promising   !.»,*.tWtor. «* WTUKWlBt'1'*
that the Celebration this year will ecllpie | Ain't no juic„ jn tho earth an' no salt  iu
auvthing in the ceiehratioii lino hereto-! tue sea;
fore given iu ihe Slocan.
In the Football tournament it is expected that teams from New Denver,
Slocan City, Nelson and the local team
Ain't no ginger io life in this land of the
f i ee;
An th' universe siu't what its cracked up
to be
W'en a feller is out of a job.
will compete,  while quite  possibly the j W'iU'8 the good of blue bkiei au'of bloi-
Laideau will enter a rt-iui'sentntive team | somiu' trees
to compete will,  the Slocan  cracks fori        W'eu a feller is out of a j)b,
tlie hsndsouie gold medals put up by the | w'«n jour boy has laige patches on both
n        i.. ti     t     i   ii ii ol his knees,
Committee.    The football groutid   has A„. „ Wjw £ 0,'lt of a job7
been put into apple-pie older for tlie j rbein paiches, I say.look sobig to your
kickers and an exciting Series of games j cyu
is looked fur.
The two horse races billed will prove'
sn attraction lor horsemen as the purses I
offered are substantial ones and should |
lie competed for by a largo field.
The  Miners' Union   ure   making all
preparations for their Anniversary  Rail,
wbicn takes place on the evening of May !
24th, to which sll the neighboring V
That 'hey shut lut the lan'.+capjan' cover the sky,
A a'th'sun can't shine through 'em   i
best it can try,
W'eu a feller 1* our of a job.
Wen a man has uo part in the work nl
thu earth,
Wen a feller is out of a job,
He feels the whole blunderin' mistake of
his birln,
Wen u telier is out of a job.
NOT AMBITIOUS.
Epi^OR Sii,VKRTONUH.
Dear Sir,
Reports ta the effect that I am .in
aspirant for Legislative honots in Ihe
coming election are entirely unfounded
and unauthorized hy mo.
A. E. Tkktek.
Slocan City, April 2^ 19C0.
Ions will be invited. j |[e (e„iH |1(,'8 ,„, simro iu tlie'wholo of the
Special train nml bout service  will be I plan,
arranged for to accommodate the large iTtmt he's got jheynitlnn Irom Nature's
crowds expected from Now Denver, Slocan, Sandon aud Nelson.
own han
That he's a rejected an' left-over man,
Wen a feller is nut nf a job.
A. B. Doi'kstadei ol Cody has been
appointed Returning Ollicer for the
Slocan Riding In Iho coming election.
For you've just lost your hold with the
rest of the crowd
Wen a feller is ou! of a job;
An' you feel like a dead man with nary a
shroud,
Wen a fe lcr is out ol a job;
You arecrawlin' aroun' but yer ont of
no pethamx oi benefit lo some of oqr j Yml agfljJfltSkd, but yer dead just
readers. t|,e same—
Apia-Tho lop or summit of a veiu or Ypr d"*d' wilh n" ,0,nbflt(>n', '" l",ff ""
,   , ver name,
WO. w,.;, „ feipjrisuutof a job.
Bretst,-»-The fine uf rn ore body nt 5?ew0rlean| P|i'iyon%
SOME DEFINITIONS.
The following definitions of mining
tei mn most commonly used, which are
taken from the Anaconda Standard, wfll fttf     nsr\rr\f\     PI fit    in^ ai Wepener and  have captured
THE BOERS FLED :,^iG—■BMs <°u"
"General De wet's losses at Dewetsdorp were tour men killed and
six men wounded. Twenty British
were captured, besides the killed
and wounded. The British appear
to be retiring beyond   Dewetsdorp
Roberts Laying His Plans to Make
Another Patrdeberg.
Leeuw     Kop,   April     .33.—The
Boers   retired    so     quickly   from
their     positions   here    that    they
left a quantity   of ammunition and
many  rifles 'behind   them.    When
the Warwickshire regiment took the
farm house at the foot of the ridge,
the  Boers'  pom-pom   inflicting  no
damage, the  Welsh   regiment  advanced   along  the  Warvvickshires'
left  and   approached the ridge, experiencing a cross fire.
When the Boers fled, they were
pbliged to move for some distance
along the skyline, and the artillery
planted a shell with great accuracy,
It burst just above the Boers, rolling over three horses.
It appears that Gen. Dickson met
with   opposition,   the  Boers firing
their  rifles  at long  range.    Their
position   was one of great  natural
strength.    Gen.   Pole-Carew's   admirable   disposition    of   his    force
thoroughly puzzled the  Boers, who
were unable to see the  direction  of
the attack owing to a deep spruit.
The British artillery was   unable to
join  in  time lo  reply to  the  Boer
gun, which was shelling the mounted infantry vigorously.    The shells,
however, burst   300 yards high and
did no damage.
It is stated that Gen. Dewet holds
the waterworks with a strong force.
The Boers who held  Leeiiw  kop
trekked to the  eastward.    General
French sent out a  body of cavalry
to the south and a few  shots were
heard, but apparently the Boers  do
not hold strong positions anywhere
in close proximity to Leeuw kop.
How tlie Net I* Being Hum n.
London, April   24.—All attention
is centered    on    the   interesting,
though complicated,situation on the
southeastern portion of the Orange
Free   State,   from   which developments of the most importance must
ensue in the near  future.    General
Rundle, apparently, has  found   the
Boers confronting   him   at Dewets
Dorp stronger than he cares to en
gage, so he is marking time   pen cl
ing the arrival  of support.    While
Gen. Rundle is  preparing to strike
Dewets Dorp, Generals Brabant and
Hart are pushing along the frontier
of Basutoland, whence they will  be~
able to frustrate any attack on Gen.
Rundle's right, and Generals French
and Pole-Carew are hastening from
Bloemfontein to  bar  the Boer line
pf retreat.
Work Cut Out lor French,
In   the   meantime   the   burgher
forces occupying  Thaba  Nchu   are
in a position to fight a delaying ac
tion,   giving   the   Boer  farces   at
Dewets Dorp and Wepener time tJ
retire in case of defeat, and it seems
as   though   Gen. French must dispose of this Thaba   Nchu  force before he   can 'reach   the  rear of the
Boer forces opposing Generals Rundle   and ^Brabant,   otherwise    his
flank would be open to assault. The
Boers driven out of Leeuw kop will
probably   rally   at    Thaba   Nchu,
where a stiff fight may be expected
Should the British fail in this  attempt to bring about  another Paardeberg, it must immensely affect Ihe
larger issues of the war, as it would
undoubtedly lead to a persistent repetition   of   the    guerilla   warfare
which has  been  largely responsible
for  the  stay  of   Lord  Roberts  at
JUIoemfonteiii   for so many   weeks
I Trap Net tor Canadians.     ^^
During the course of General Anderson's advance on Leeuw kop, Ihe
Canadians  found  themselves  in  a
tight corner on Sunday  near Don-
t kerpoort.      The Canadian mounted
infantry,   sent  to  reconnoitre   the
Boer   position,   approached  within
300 yards of a farm flying, the hospital flag, under cover of which the
Boers opened such a hot fire on the
Canadians that they were unable to
attempt to retire until another force
of Canadians covered  their retreat
by threatening the rear of the  Boer
position.
Boar Visions of Victory.
Pretoria,   April   23.—An  official
bulletin issued today says:
"The federals continue their fight
^^^^^^*^M**'*SS*!ggg»«lMiM«a»i»MMMMia-aM^^
A OVNAMITE GANcItHE TRAP IS SET
A_.Ann-._J   _-:• TM    ■-,. _____ 1
1 mm 111   1
wmst**s**smis**sts**m*
Accused of Plotting to Wreck the Welland Canal.
A New Cronje lu the Field.
"Cronje   reports   that    with    a
strong commando he attacked  the
British northeast   of   Boshof.      A
' heavy engagement followed and the
British were driven   from   kopje  to
Kopje.   The federals displayed great
courage and resolution and spiritedly engaged the enemy.     Only  two
burghers   were    wounded-       The
British lost 15 men  killed  and  left
three wounded and eight  prisoners
in the hands of the burgheis"
The Cronje referred to in the
above dispatch is Commandant
Cronje, the second son of the Boer
general who is now a prisoner on
the island of St. Helena.
A Rapid Movement to Gut  0? the
. Boer's Retreat.
THE JAPANKNK INVASION.
Nearly 3000  Came to   Victoria Since
,1::'.- January   1   'liie t'untie.
Victoria Colonist.
Altogether a total of 5026 Japanese have been brought from their
own country by the steamers touching at this port from the orient since
January 1. Of these, 2245 went on
with the ships that brought them,
leaving 2781 dropped at this city,
to be accounted for.
The reasons for the present  rush
are given in many forms,   while the
Japanese in   relation   to American
life, trade and conditions  comes  in
for equal variety of criticism.    It is
said the Japanese are leaving their
own country in consequence of the
reported imminence of Russian war;
then again it is asserted the closing
of Ihe gates of Hawaii  has  turned
the volume of plantation  immigration hitherward.     The  opening  of
the fishing season accounts for quite
a number.and the initiation of large
railway   works   on   the   American
roads probably explains  the  presence of a larger quota.
On the authority of a railway and
steamship man of prominence  it   is
asserted that not more than 15 per
cent of the incoming Japanese remain   in   British  Columbia,   while
quite 65 per cent go through a week
or two after landing to  the   United
States.      The N.   P.   R.   employs
them along its line,   working. 4000
at present; the G. N. R.   has   1000
or more and will  soon   treble   this
number; the C. P. R. gives its road
work to white  men,   and  this  explains the predeliction of the brown
people for both or either of the rival
lines. B
Then   comes   another   question.
Speak to the Japanese, and  he will
tell you that more than half of these
arriving Japanese were here before,
or else had   relatives   here.     They
travel more and spend their  money
quicker   than  do  Iheir rivals,   the
Chinese, and in the latter respect do
more perhaps for  the  country that
doesn't especially want them.
After   the  fishing season of last
year, according to one of the  customs  officials  close   in touch with
the interesting subject,   more than
4000 Japanese  went    back     from
British Columbia, visiting, their aggregate wages amounting to $600,-
000; while workers in the Cariboo
and  other  up country mines  went
home with many  thousands   more.
These   men    returning   form    a
large proportion of the  present  arrivals.    They also explain  a point
raised by the Japanese  consul   and
which otherwise would  seem  unin
telligible.    Japan,   it   seems,  does
not allow unrestricted emigration of
her people.    One hundred and sixty
in any month is the  limit that  may
be sent  to Canada, although those
who have previously been here may
naturally return just  when  it suits
their business or convenience.
Niagara Falls, Ont., April  23.—
Chief Young  and  Detective  Main,
assisted by Buffalo detectives,   have
unearthed a   gang   of dynamiters
operating from the  Dolphin  house,
Suspension Bridge, New York,   the
Rosalie hotel here and  Buffalo,   N. I
Y.,  by rounding up John  Walsh,
aged 27 years, John Nolan, 35 years
of age,   and   Karl   Dullman,   all
of    whom     are    charged      with
having   attempted   to    blow    up
lock 24 of the Welland canal Saturday night.
The general impression is that
this gang has been operating as the
hirelings of capitalists to cripple
the'Welland canal in order to divert the traffic of the upper lakes
from Montreal to Buffalo.
A detachment of the Forty-fourth |
battalion   is   guarding   the    court '
house   to  prevent  any  attempt of
a mob from Buffalo, which, it is reported, is preparing to liberate the
prisoners.
The court   house   this  morning
was crowded when the hour of trial
arrived.    Among those  present  to
give evidence were American government  secret service detectives.
After   the  reading   of   the charge
against the accused by Police Magistrate Logan,   Solicitor McBurney,
on behalf of the three accused,asked
for immediate trial, but the magistrate refused and remanded the case
for eight days.    The prisoners were
taken  to Welland jail this   after
noon.
London, April 25.-—4:37 p.  m.—
The   war   office   received  the  following dispatch from Lord Roberts:
Bloemfontein,    April   25.—Pole-
Carew's division reached Roodekop
yesterday   without  casualties.    Its
I advance   was  covered  by  cavalry
and horse   artillery,   which  drove
back the enemy   with   heavy  loss,
their dead being left on the ground.
The mounted troops halted for   the
night at Grootfontein  and  at  7:30
this   morning   were   crossing   the
Modder river at  Valsbank,   in  accordance  with   my   instructions   to
French to endeavor to place himself
ELECTION IS NEAR
It Will Shortly Follow Tarte's Return
from Paris.
Montreal,   April  24.—It   is   announced here that  the  Hon.  J.   I.
Tarte will return to Canada on May
20.     A  local   Conservative  paper
couples with this the announcement
that the general elections are likely
to follow shortly after the minister
of public works returns.
Ottawa, April 24.—A  caucus   of
• "•»     f..-»».W     llllll.lLli
astride the enemy's lines of retreat.
French's arrival near the Modder
river evidently, however, alarmed
the Boers, for they evacuated their
strong position near Dewetsdorp
during the night and it was occupied by Chermside's division this
morning.
"The mounted infantry under
Ian Hamilton drove the enemy off
the kopjes in the neighborhood of
the water works without casualties
to our side.
"The Highland brigade marched
24 miles yesterday to support Gen.
Hamilton, and halted for the
night at Klip kral, four miles from
Sanna's post.
"Brabant  and   Hart  are still a
few m,les short  of Wepener, and
the numbers of the enemy appear to
have been somewhat increased during the last few days. Butitisnot
'kely that there will be much
trouble in the neighborhood of Wepener, once Dewets dorp is occupied
by our troops.
"1 inspected the city imperial volunteers battalion on their arrival at
Bloemfontein yesterday.    They are
'n fine   form   and look very workmanlike.    I also inspected  the first
comfny of the Imperial yeomanry,
which have arrived here.    The men
turned out smart, and their horses
are in admirable condition."
Hepor, that o,e ^ WereTr,pped
Hershel, Cape Colony,   April 24.
-It is   reported   that   the  British
have occupied Wepener, after heavy
%ht,ng.    It is also  said  thaf  ^
Boers are unable to  escape to the
received today   has   little  bearing
upon the question of the hour.
Hen. Merer Dead.
A dispatch from Durban, dated
April 24, reports that Gen. Meyer is
dead. He is known to have been
well on the previous day.
A Boer version of the recent British attack at Fourteen Streams says
that two Boers were killed and four
wounded. Little damage was done
to the camp, though it was vigorously bombarded.
Native*' Gallant Fight.
The arrival of Mafeking dispatch-
has reduced the interest and anxiety in regard to the fate of its defenders.    Lady Sarah Wilson's account   of the slaughter of 33 natives who went out from  Mafeking
last Friday to  recover some  cattle
which had been looted by the Boers
and who, while they were sleeping,
were  surrounded  by  the burghers
and shot without quarter, apparent-
I—   I L._ • -    -
AFTER JHEtI
Other Powers Join Americain Demand-
ing a Settlement.
es
 -     ....    -.|U....W«,     ,»J'f'«,Vlll
ly harshly misrepresented the action
of the  Boers.    A dispatch received
by the Associated Press from Mafeking says the natives in   question
were unauthorized raiders, and that,
instead of being  ruthlessly  slaughtered by the Boers while asleep,
they beat back the burghers, who
were obliged to get reinforcements
of Maxims and Nordenfelds.    The
dispatch   adds:    "There     was  no
question of surrender.    The leader
of the natives rallied his men to the
I..--L «    ...»       «    -
Constantinople,    April     2,    .
view of the steps taken by the>'u
ted States government i„ reptile claims arising out of J*J
menian massacres, the embassies^
Great   Britain,    France,     Aust i
Italy and Germany have asked th)
governments for instructions J'
making similar claims.
The  promulgation of the  irad.
authorizing the building of Z
American structures burned "
Kharput and the enlargement 0
Roberts college is regard °
showing clearly, the desire 0f th*
Yildiz Kiosk to be agreeable to the
United States, in the hope that th
•alter will not press for the payment of the indemnity. The United
States government, however, has
no intention of abandoning its
claims. 6   w
WIIA BR PI MSHBD AT HOnK.
f-IUd 8totM W||, *.0t Bwni-i(e ^
^^  Thoroid ALmmtlmeeee.
Buffalo, Agril as.__A specia,
the Express from Washington says;
 -•■'»'•'''» ms men to the  f-    'he state department will con-
last and the fight  progressed  from     "Ue't? ,nvestigation in the Thor-
the rising to the setting of the  sun.   °!       a,r w,th a view <° punishing
Vrstatuwt _.,__        ... the   perpetrators,  if they can   be
found in this country. The extra-
dttion treaty will be strictly adhered
to as to its wording, however, and
? there *s no Pulsion for extradi-
rjncrs,ofconspirac^the«""
responsible   for   the   explosion,   if
O—     ,..»•?*«*■     HUH
the rising to the setting of the sun.
Until their ammunition was finished,
the natives fought, and then the
Boers killed all but one, who, hiding in the reeds, escaped."
tlnl-'klDg Weary of WaltluK
The   correspondent     concludes:
Mafek'ng may be forgiven if it begins to'prefer some attempt at relief rather than empty congratulations for its gallant stand. Though
there is only sufficient to keep body
and   soul   together,   it   will never "*" "•*'■*
dream of surrender.    But it is  very   '"g a Protest-"
•.A|„U.'.l(.1|l, It
found in this country, will receive
their punishment here, if at al'. It
will not be possible to extradite
them under the terms of the treaty.
"England has not protested and
the state department is not expecting a kwI"' ''
weary of it all."      ^^^^^
Hrlll.h Take Brvrrtadorp.
London, April 25.—2:25 p.  m.—
Lord Roberts has telegraphed  the
following message to the war office:
Bloemfontein, April 35—Dewets
in.     ..    ' —
No Fi Idmi <■ of Conspiracy.
New Vork, April, 25.—An investigation extending over the last
two months into the reports that a
conspiracy had been planned in the
United States against Canada on
account    of the    Boer   war   has
* umcm' APr" '5-Dewets- account    of the    Boer   war   bV.
doqp was  occupied  by Chermside brought out nothing to^L  !
without opposition at 9:30 o'clock them, says  a  WafhLto„t    t
this morning." to tha   J    "   •^""'ngton  special
8 to the Herald.   This  investigation
n '      I t-      '*    i-autus     OI	
thinrn;;\Tewtrthwas j* north^at^-^ 0^. *■"««* ap* ^
cussed.      it   was   also decided to
make a vigorous protest  in parlia-
•nent against the delay i„  bringing
down certain departmental reports
It was decided to insist on invesi
tigation into the charges of corruption in the Brockville and West
Huron election cases.
TURKEY   Ml ST   PAY   DP.
Her Ambaaaador Bay* Uncle 8am Will
,,'/.;      Not Stand Procrastination.
Constantinople, April 24.—The
porte has received telegrams from
the Turkish minister at Washington, Ali Ferrough Bey,pointing out
the bad impression created in the
United States by the non-payment
of the indemnity due, and announcing the determination of the Amer-
can government to insist upon a
prompt settlement of the claims.
Dr. Borden on tbe War.
Hamilton, Ont, April 24.—Hon.
Dr. Borden, minister of militia, delivered an address  at the  banquet
of St. Georges society in  this city
last night, in which he ' referred to
the   important   part   Canada was
playing in the South   African   war
the result of which   would  tend to
bring about closer  relationship between the mother country aod  her
colonies.
MISCELLANEOUS  NOTES.
Having proved his ability to hold
the fort, General White is to be
made governor of Gibraltar.
Cuba is to have an election of a
municipal governments on June 16,
but tbe people are not content with
an indefinite tutelage to the  United
Shelling on the Vaal Blv«r«
Warrenton,   April   23.—Shelling
was renewed this morning, tbe fire
being directed at the  Britiah river
redoubts, which are steadily being
pushed forward.   The Bocr.s appear
to be in stronger force down  the
river, and the yeomtenry patrols are
frequently "sniped." It i* constantly believed that important developments are not far off.
are expected.
London,    April    25.—The  indecisive actions and slow progress   of
Generals Hart and Brabant are relatively unimportant, when compared   with  the progress of General
French.     It is now evident   that
Lord Roberts  wishes   not  only to
defeat the Boers but to pen them in,
as at  Paardeberg.    For  this end,
40,000 British   troops  are  concentrating in the southeastern  part of
the Orange Free State and are operating a ccording to carefully de-
I vised plans, in which delay may  be
as much due to strategy  as  to necessity.
The success   of  this   important
movement almost entirely  depends
on General French.  If he can sweep
down from the north   with   the  rapidity of execution  which  he displayed at Kimberly and Paardeberg,
he will effect the same  swift,  sudden transformation which   followed
the cavalry evolutions two months
ago.    According to   the   last   accounts he was pushing on   successfully.    Every day the Boers remain
at     Wepener    improves    General
French's chance of success.
To     put     a   girdle   round the
t wenty-fi vethousand Boers estimated
to be in the southeastern part of the
Orange Free  State,  Lord  Roberts
has evidently taken   large chances,
The British critics differ   regarding
the result,  some declaring it is already impossible for the Boers to
•escape  from the net.     There is a
.general impression that the advance
upon Pretoria will be taken up with-
| -out any   reconcentration at Bloem-
, fontcin.    With more than half the
British  arany   stretched in   echelon
•across tihe Orange Free State such
[. -a change 'in .directions would indefi-
',' nitely delay the accomplishment of
Boera Advance bj Night.
Maseru, Basutoland, April 24.—
1 the breaking up of the bivouac
this morning, General Brabant discovered that the Boers, who fell
back towards Wepener yesterday,
had advanced during the night several miles nearer to Strauss' farm,
which is a favorable position for resistance.
......  invt-Niigaiian
was conducted as a result of representations made to the state department by the British government.
It is certainly a fact, according to
the state department officials, tbat
no evidence has been obtained
showing that persons in this country conspired to blow up tne Wel-
and canal.
Another Attack on Dalgetty.
Colonel Dalgetty's garrison  was
I severely attacked with six guns this
morning, probably with a view of
preventing him from] assisting  the
relief column.    It seemed yesterday
that Dalgetty had practically been
relieved, but the  offensive  attitude   Drift,
assumed by the Boers this morning
I shows this idea to have been erroneous.
General Hart is now a few miles
behind General Brabant's division,
which is waiting for tbe former to
come up.
Thirteen British wounded were
removed to Mafeteng at midnight
and placed in the  English church.
"rakant and Hart Fl.hU.,.
Aliwal   North,   April   a4.__It  j8
reported that firing has ^  ^
ittTr aStr°m and WeP«ner,and
tisbeheved that Generals Br.Lt
and Hart are ,n contact with the
e^my. The Boers are so numer
o« that it took them two days to
cross the Caledon river at Barnard'
FATElTuJlSER
Volney Bull Crushed to Death tt «
Barn-Raising.
Brttl.hAd»Mce|,,Wow
Maseru,   April   24.-Evening.
neyBu,rk:NV-'-ApHI  ^.-Vol-
~™,   .pn,   24.-Eveni„g-   '^^^ ,&T *>*
Generals Hart and Brabant cove ed   Chautauq^ ountv  1'°° f"mS ''"
only a short distance today and    death today whi *' Tl T^ "
finding a stronfr force ^   barn.raisi Jn^eL^,st,ng_ at a
them,b'vouaced on the ground they
had occup,ed. The firing has bJa
desultory and the casualties very
sl'ght. The British are edgiJl
to the Basutoland border. * P
Persistent rumors are in circula
tion that Commandant Olivier, with
... assisting at a
barn-raising at his home in Greenfields.
Bull has a terror of burglars and
often went to jail, paying his board,
to enjoy safety.   On one occasion '
he was   tortured   by masked   m»"
 ol vommanaant Olivier, with He   "ved   the   life   «7       •     W
•5oo men,  is preparing to iZl *ough the riche ffa         m'Ser' al
Genera. Hart's rear.                  ta<* tauqua county            mCr ,0  Chau
There is nc.sign of the advance
IfAnannl      D ii __■
of General  Rundle
dorp,
from Dewets-
_. -,., -~u.i, fsiiaiu
Roberts' .objective    move.
^^^^^   Urc In New voric
New York, April 2S_Three per-
sons were killed and three seriously
injured in a fire  today in the six
News    1" 7 °ay '" the six-
ewsj story tenement, 74  Forsyth street.
Buffalo,   N    V    a    -.
.f..r„oo„plpersIy',f^/4-An
"°»» liirnished Ihi. ' ^""<*
'^~"i.nch.^vrn':Bof.,he
'" Mowiip_ock»„,        *'   "Wta«
""'^Z"""m"c"i'"'
/are Boer   sympathizers."
 »i_.».ii—.. ENEMY DRIVEN OFF
 ,—    #
The Relieving Army Drives Them
from Strong Positions.
London, April 21, 6:18 p. m.-~
The war office has received the following dispatch from Lord Roberts:
"Bloemfontein, April 21.—Run-
die's lorce came in contact with the
enemy yesterday,' four miles southwest of Dewesdorp. They occupied strong positions covering the
town. The yeomanry and mounted
infantry seized another position,
which enabled Rundle to drive the
enemy off and occupy the high
ground the enemy hud been holding. Rundle advanced this morning early and is now again engaged
with the enemy. Our casualties
yesterday were two men severely
and Lieutenant O'Connor and seven
men slightly wounded."   '
Fight With Besieging Boera.
Bloemfontein, April 20.—Continuing their march ori Friday, Generals Chermside and Rundle came
into contact with the Boers near
Dewet's Dorp at noon. Fighting
continued until dark, and was principally carried on by the artillery,
which temporarily silenced two
Boer guns. The British comman d
the hills for miles around the Boers,
who are reported to hold strong positions, but are probably retiring.
The casualties on the British side
were slight, and most of them occurred among the yeomanry and
mounted infantry. The firing was
at long range. None of the British
troops were killed.
Boer* Strongly Belnforced.
Maseru, Basutoland, April 21.—
The Boers around Wepener have
been reinforced and are now
stronger than ever. The firing of
cannon and rifles, heard today in
the direction of Dewetsdorp, was
looked upon as meaning that relief
was approaching. Heavy firing is
hourly expected. Two large Boer
forces left the vicinity of Wepener
this morning, one going in the direction of Dewetsdorp and the other
towards Rouxville.
The Boers are excited and jubilant in consequence of President
Steyn's assertion that foreign intervention is certain and that it is the
only thing to continue the struggle
for a short time. Generals Dewet
and Olivier are inspiring the burghers with inflammatory patriotic
speeches.
Several houses have .been filled
with the Boer- wounded and others
have been sent tb Ladybrand.
Field Cornet Bouwert, who surrendered to. the British and afterwards joined the Free Staters, has
been arrested by the Boers. His
wife offered ^600 bail for his appearance. . It was refused.
Boera t'lalin Man)' Prlaonera.
Pretoria, April 21.—President
Kruger has received, through President Steyn, an official report sent
by Gen. Dewet under date of April
20 to the effect that the latter still
surrounds Gen. Brabant's forces at
Wepener and had captured us
prisoners, including the chief artillery officers. The report adds that
the British from Aliwal are destroying farm houses.
The Irish brigade paraded this
morning in front of President Kru-
ger's house and the president made
a speech to them.
Rellel Nhonld Come Tomorrow.
London, April 21.—Gen. Cherm-
side's and G*m. Rundle's divisions
were only 50 miles from Wepener
yesterday, and unless unfortunate
difficulties arise, they should oe
getting into touch today with the
little colonial force, which is besieged, and by tomorrow have ac-
complishished its relief, tho two
divisions being overwhelmingly superior to the Boer forces.
As governor of the Free State,
Maj-Gen. Prettyman is organizing a
corps of mounted police and dividing the country into sections to be
administered by commissions, probably army officers.
Lieut.-Col. Girouard, director of
railroads, is forming a railroad
corps with prospect of permanent
employment. Many of the colonials
have joined.
Metli in i> Repulse* Boer Attack
Boshof, Orange Free State, April
21.—At midday yesterday General
Methuen's field force at Swartzkop-
jesfontein was ordered to return to
Boshof. Its convoy extended over
six miles and with the escort took
up a position on a hill commanding
the road just in the nick of time, as
a force of 2000 Boers, witn two
guns and a pom-pom, suddenly appeared in the vicinity and fired
heavily. The British however held
them in check until the colujnn
reached a point of safety, when they
retired. The British had several
casualties. The Boers fought de-
terminedly and must have advanced
to within 300 yards of the hill,
whence a concealed detachment of
the British opened a heavy fusilade
on them.
Bracing Up Boera With JLlea.
Kimberly, April 20.—Boer official notices have been found placarded at Campbell and elsewhere,
saying that in the recent battles the
Boers captured 18,000 troops, 18
cannon and 800 wagons,and setting
forth that the burghers were full of
valor, that the outlook was bright,
and saying confirmation had been
received of the report that Russia
had invaded India with two and a
half million men. Another official
Boer notice appoints Gen. Lieben-
burg to command Griqualand West,
and warns all burghers to join under
penalty of punishment in accordance
with the martial law of the Free
State.
Canadian Dead and Wounded.
Toronto, April 21.—A Globe
special from Bloemfontein says:
"Private J. McMillan of Winnipeg,
an artificer, who came here with
the second contingent and was attached to the Thirty-eighth company of the army service corps,died
today (April 20). The following
were sent to England by the steamer Austral on April 5: Color Sergeant Thompson, Privates Loh-
man, Finch-Smiles, Beach and Carter of the Western company; Private Rae of the Toronto company;
Privates Craig and Maentette of
the London company; Private
O'Connell of the Ottawa company;
Privates Johnston, Durant, Frand-
shaw and McFarland of the New
Brunswick company. Most of
these men were wounded in the
ghting at Paardeberg.
NEWS FROM NOME
Scarcity of Wood the Great Question in
the Arctic Camp.
THK   SULTAN'S   NRW    STAND-OFF
He Denlei That   American  Claimant*
Are Preferred Creditor*.
Washington,April 23.—The state
department has received through
Lloyd Griscom, the United States
charge at Constantinople, the reply
of the Turkish government to
the latest representations of the
United States touching the American missionaries' claims.
It is gathered that the very brief
outlines of the Turkish response
cabled from Constantinople, to the
effect that American claimants must
take their position along with those
of other nations, do not convey accurately the tenor of the whole note,
though it is admitted that it does
set out clearly one portion of it.
The opinion prevails in diplomatic
circles here that, assuming that the
Turkish government has insisted on
including the Americans' claim with
the others, it has played a diplomatic card of some strength, as it
places the United States in a position of seeking to extort better
terms from the Turks than are to
be accorded to the claimants of
other nations.
The state department has determined not to abandon the preferential position respecting its claims
that it has secured through the sultan's own promises, so it is anticipated that an energetic response tb
this last note will be sent to the
portt through Mr. Griscom.
■10% Kits    MCBDEB    CHBINTIAN8.
Foreign Warship* Kent to Suppro** the
Chinese Fanatic*.
Tientsin, April 23.—Members of
the Boxers Society on Saturday
masacred many Chinese Catholics
near Pao Ting Fu in the province of
Pe Chi Li, southwest of Tienstin.
The German gunboat litis arrived
atTaku Saturday. Other foreign
war vessels have left for those
waters.
Victoria, B. C, April 21.—C. P.
Dam and Capt. Hecklman of Nome,
formerly of Seattle, who left there
January 24, and came by the Kat
mai route, arrived in Victoria as
passengers on the Cottage City this
morning. They brought out the
U. S. mail and completed the last
stage of their journey in company
with J. D. Morgan and John-Fredericks, also from Nome, but formerly of San Francisco, who had
left fully a month in advance of
them.
It has been a quiet winter at
Nome, according to Mr. Dam, and
while there has been considerable
scratching of the country in all directions, no really notable new discoveries have been reported since
the last advices from the camp were
sent forward.
The great difficulty of the Nome
camp has been during the now ending winter, and still is, the scarcity
of fuel. The cold is piercing and
the problem of getting sufficient
wood to keep the cabin holders
from freezing has become very
erious. For miles east and west-
of Nome all the wood had been
gathered up before January and
consumed, and miners' meetings
were talked of for the purpose of
compelling a sharing up by those
who thriftily had gathered a store
of wood, when it was available for
the purpose of ground thawing.
Stealing from the piles having
grown common, it had become the
practice, even before Mr. Dam
started out, for the wood owners to
mount guard day and night,
rifle in hand, over their
property. The current price
of beach wood on January 20 was
$40 and $50 a cord (of most inferior
quality), while coal was quoted at
from $125 to $150 per ton. There
is a fortune in it for the first steamer
that lands fuel in the camp this
spring.
Good reports continue to reach
Nome from the Port Clarence district, Norman Smith, the United
States deputy mineral and land
surveyor, and Charles L. Cole be
ing among the latest to return from
the port. Each had staked and
recorded a number of claims.
At Norton Bay, Christmas was
followed by a series of tragedies.
These included the killing of a man
named Wright, and the slow death
by starvation and cold of another
named Keyser, the disappearance
of a third, Scott, and the accidental
death of Haines, a fourth.
The Cottage City brought upwards of forty passengers, many of
whom were from Dawson, having
left there as late as the third of the
present month.
DAY AND NIGHT
The Struggle Near Wepener Continues
in Rain Storms.
Amazon* Anionic the Boer*.
London, April 21.—A letter from
a nurse in a hospital at Capetown
says the medical officers, for sanitary reasons, forced a number of
Boer prisoners to bathe in the river
behind the hospital. Several of them
absolutely refused to strip and,
when forced to do so, it was found
they were women in men's clothes.
The writer adds "quite a number of
the dead on battlefields have been
found to be women similarly disguised and, wo rse than this, it has
often been these women who were
guilty of atrocities, killing the
wounded, etc., mentioned in the
dispatches."
Boer Camp, Thabanchu, Orange
Free State, April 27—Fighting continues day and night at Jammers-
burg drift. The English trenches
are so full of rain that the men have
been obliged every now and then to
clamber to the banks, only to be
shot down. The Boers were so
drenched on Saturday that they
were unable to sleep, so they started
a debate on the subject of the good
to be derived from virtue and courage. The discussion lasted most of
the night, shells at intervals interrupting the speakers.
Robertson's lower mill is reported
to have been captured April 21, and
it is said that the Cape mounted
rifles have lost during the siege 120
out of 500 men. The British prisoners defy the burghers to capture
Colonel Dalgetty's camp, even if the
British are not reinforced. A surprising number of relatives are fighting on opposite sides  at.  Wepener.
Boer Movement Fall*.
Wakkerstroom, April 22.—Evening.—After yesterday's shelling, it
was expeeted that the Boers would
open again, but Colonel Brabazon,
with the yeomanry, made a thorough scout to the left. The Boers
endeavored to turn the British right,
but the movement was detected by
the yeomanry and mounted infantry,
and the guns opened fire and drove
them off, greatly extending the position. None of the Boers' guns
were in action. There were no
British casualties. Many of the
Boers are moving southward.
motive of Boer Mo vement*.
New York, April 23.—Isaac N.
Ford cables to the New York
Tribune from London:
"Light has been thrown upon
the mysterious opeiations in the
southeastern section of the Free
Stite. The Boers have been less
intent upon raiding the main British line of communications than
upon holding possession of the
granaries between Wepener and
Ficksburg, and drawing off General
Roberts' forces from a direct advance northward. They have from
Wepener to Harrismith a base well
stocked with good supplies and
well suited for guerilla warfare.
Reports of the strength of their
forces in the mountainous districts
are exaggerated, but with the advantage of a hilly country and roads
impassable for British artillery, a
few commandos can do much to
harass the flank of General Roberts'
army. It now seems probable that
General Roberts has adapted himself to these tactics and, without
abandoning his direct line of advance, may swep the eastern border as he goes and carry out a wide
turning movement. Otherwise the
relief of Wepener would have been
left to Brabant and Hart, who are
advancing northward through Rouxville.
Two strong divisions are approaching Wepener through Dewetsdorp and it is conjectured that
there may be another one headed
directly toward Ladybrand. The
British preparations are made on so
large a scale that the relief of the
small colonial force at Wepener is
likely to prove an incident rather
than the main motive. When tha
garrison has been rescued, Ladybrand may be occupied and Ficks-
burgapproached. The large British force will be in the right quarter
I for turning  the  Ventersburg-Sene-
IO NEWSPAPER MEN!
FOR SALE.
A Paper Folder, a Washington Hand Press,
a Cylinder Press.
Also the "Trail Creek News" and plant.
For part-ruln™, nddreRs
WILLIAM K. ESI.INU, Rowland.
kal line of entrenchments   and for
clearing the eartern frontier.■
London, April 23.—General Rundle is evidently advancing towards
Wepener, every step being closely
contested by the Boers. From the
republican side, there is a good deal
of interesting news today. A Thabanchu dispatch, dated April 20, reports the arrival there of Commandants Dewets and Villiers and an attack upon 3000 British under General Gatacre. The latter, of course,
is a misstatement, and probably
General Rundle is referred to. The
British, it is added, occupy some
kopjes, but their left wing was
driven back. The Boer loss was
one killed and five wounded.
Brl tlab Patrol Captured.
From Brandfort comes the news
that on April 21 a British patrol of
ten men ventured to that place
and suffered the loss of one killed
and two men captured, including
a Free Stater, who was leading
the party.
A Pietoria dispatch dated April
21 says the latest official news was
that fighting was proceeding within
half an hour's march ol Dewetsdorp
with no recruits.
To Take Care or Boer Prlaonera
The Transvaal government, it is
added, is to be allowed to send a
clergyman to St. Helena, and also
a neutral consul to watch the interests of the prisoners, in the same
manner as Mr. Adelbert Hay guards
the interests of the British in Pretoria.
A proclamation has been issued,
prohibiting the working of the
mines on Sunday, and inflicting
punishment on managers paying
over a pound a month to natives.
From Ladysmith today comes a
dispatch saying all is quiet and that
Boer guns are silent.
No New* of Roberta' Advance.
There is nothing from Bloemfontein to indicate the progress of the
preparations for the main  advance.
At Capetown a government contractor named Ball has been arrested for harboring three escaped
Boer prisoners, dressed as clergymen. The prisoners were sent
back to Simonstown, whence they
had escaped.
Canadian* Are with Roberta.
Toronto, April 23.—The Globe's
correspondent with the first contingent cables from Bloemfontein under date of April 21 as follows:
"The Canadians moved this afternoon to Springfield, six miles east
of this place. John A. Ewan has
arrived here."
Ewan is the Globe correspondent
with the second Canadian contingent. His arrival at Bloemfontein
indicates that the second contingent
will take part in the movement toward Pretoria, which has probably
commenced.
Hoapltal Ship Maine Arrive*.
Southampton, April 23.—The
United States hospital ship Maine
arrived here from South Africa this
afternoon, unexpectedly early, with
Lady Randolp Churchill on board.
Immediately after the vessel was
moored, the Netley and other officers
boarded the Maine, ard within an
hour all the wounded men were removed in ambulances and placed on
board a train bound for Netley.
A Bid for 10,000 Army Horses.
Chicago, 111,, April 21.—An
English army captain and a special
commissioner called upon a firm of
horse dealers at the stock yards
yesterday to ascertain what they
would charge for 10,000 horses for
the English government for service
in South Africa. The firm submitted estimates in the neighborhood
of $100,000, and they were sent to
England by cable.
Toronto, April 21.—The imperial
officers sent out to purchase remounts for the army in South Africa are meeting with success and
expect to have the first consignment
ready for shipment from Montreal
by May t.
TRUSTINROBERTS
No One Questions Justice of His Criticism of Buller.
London, April 21.—It is marvellous to note the wholeheartedness
of the English public trust in
Lord Roberts in his criticism re
garding the engagement at Spion
Kop. Not one paper has attached
to his criticism of General Buller—■
his predecessor in the command—
one iota of unfairness or selt-ia^er-
est. This, perhaps, is explained by
the universal recognition of the fact
that the field marshal has little to
gain by this campaign, and that he
gave up all to which long and brilliant service entitled hirn, in Order to
serve his country. Whatever the
outcome of the Boer war, Lord Roberts' name would stand in England's military annals as one of the
most successful and best-loved of
her commanders. This fact is ever
before the public, and they believe
their commander-in-chief in South
Africa to be miles above any jealousies or rivalries that might actuate
other generals.
Democratic. King Oscar.
The visit of King Oscar of Sweden to England, though undertaken
incognito, has attracted a surprisingly small amount ol interest. The
spectacle of that monarch—burly,
despite his 71 years, and standing
head and shoulders above his fellows—pushing his way past the station barricades to shake hands with
the Swedish workmen, who had
cheered him as he entered the London depot, can for impulsiveness be
scarcely exceeded in the actions of
the most democratic ruler.
Turkey Baying Blj; Gun*.
The possibility of trouble between
the United States and Turkey has
attracted passing comment in England, though the average newspaper
reader is much more interested in
the Croton dam situation. In connection with the former subject, the
Birmingham Post is responsible for
the statement that Turkey has
placed several important commissions with the Krupps, to be completed before the end of the year,
which include better machine guns
than are at present used by any
European power, and 10,000 mau-
sers, which, immediately upon their
receipt, will be delivered to the
Turkish first army corps.
Simla Show* Hindsight
Spain is apparently scared by a
post bellum publication showing
how many authorities thought the
United States would have been well
advised immediately to attack the
Canaries, for Premier Silvela's ministry is now sending to these islands
a number of heavy guns for defensive purposes. One ot the most
frequent comments heard in English naval circles is that America
should have captured the Canaries
at the outbreak of the Spanish war.
BLOODY WKRK'D WORK IN LI'ZON
1 n_;ll-l>  Capture Camphor monopoly.
Tacomi, April 23.—Oriental advices just received state that Samuel
& Co., an English firm, have outbid
Americans and other foreign firms,
and secured the Formosa camphor
monopoly for ten years.
American*   Accounted  Tor   Kino   lill-
plno* With Slight Lo**.
Manila, April 23.—The last week
has been the bloodiest of the war
since the first day's fighting around
Manila. Authentic reports, mostly
official, show a total 01378 Filipinos
killed, 12 officers and 244 men captured and many more wounded.
Thc number of them is hard to
guess. Considering that the Filipinos entirely lack hospital facilities,
a great majority of the wounded will
dit.
Probably the week's work finished
1,000 insurgents. The. American
total loss was five killed, i(> wounded. Two sergeants and one private
were killed in ambushes, while
escorting provision trains.
MISCELLANEOUS   NOTES.
Competition between cities is
growing too hot for comfort when
it leads to dynamite plots like that
at Buffalo.
Judge Spinks has sold the B. C.
No. 2 in Summit camp to. Jonathan
Miller and J. B. McLaren, of Van.
couver, for $5000. — ..i-jfv"*-.-.-!.
■
tttie OPPOSIT*    T|£ ximrroiiAi
TBE
WWII
HQTEIv,
LARGE
AND    COMFORTABLE
BOOMS TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN*    TI'E
NORTHWEST.
HAWJf&BMCTT^.  twm
B. C.
SILVERTON,
Daigle's Blacksmith Shon.
(tanl Ihebwdiag
• • •      and Rt-paiiing Dom
pCpERT   HORSE   SHOER  ALWAYS   ON   HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
8. DAIGLE,     8JLVERTON. B. C.
Satcmuy, Amul 28,   1900.
rimiHiirrr. every sircitDAV at
fclLVERTON, B. 0.
MATHEION BROS.,   KditOM £ Props
SUBSCRIPTION BATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
Advertising rates will be mailo known
upon application at this office.
,».a.iaiiai..taa»a.
EWTORIIl OITfROPPH'fiS.
\ ma »aimaa.a ami
in the building up of the town.
the citizens and Townsite Company
pulling together (".ilvejton will soon be
jerked out of the rot into whicli the
Slocan towns havo settled. This will
be Silverton's year.
Mr. H B. Alexander, President of
the fownsite Company, informs oue of
our citizens that within a few weeks
a townsite agent will he here yith only
the work ot advancing the interests of
tho town on his hands. As a guarantee of what Silverton can expect this
year, the Company has subscribed liberally towards the Celebration Fund.
I
THE
ARLINGTON
 wy,	
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Sta'lnn and Whmf.
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
Dining Room under I he charge ol
Mine Ids Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil thc detlcacii-
ot the season.
_piNDERSOX& GETHISi, -Paois.
SLOOAN CITY,   ....   R. C.,2
Tj G. GORDON,
MifES, mimxte, comtamr
NO.XARY PUBLIC.
mlverton/    -     -    -    B. C.
J.M. M
cG
REGOR
-t—i-
PR0V1NCIAL   LAND     BURVEYOI.
AltO MIXING ENGINEER.
sloo*^ city; :  b. c
THOSE APPEAR AND MR. CLIFFE.
What we say and what tbe Mining
Review savs we say often differ materially. The editor of that paper has
the highly developed faculty cf pre-
rerting what ho reads and hears. We
will not particular^ an a perusal of
Thi Silvs&TONIax aim The Mining
Review will -huw exactly what we
mean.
In tbe Inst issue of the Review, Mr.
I ' f
OlitTo takes us to task for oar remarks
_ ...      i . • •
on his actions in appealing against so
many names on the Voters' List. He
also sends u 3 a lengthy letter on the
same subject, which owing to la<'k of
space wc are unable to reproduce, He
states in his Icier wine we have allowed in our columns, that his motive!
were not malicious. As wo have said
before, Mr. Cliffe has made trouble for
himself in undertaking on bis own responsibility (q do a public task and in
blundering in its execution. Being
personally unpopular with thu umjority
of the voters, as Mr. Chile must surely
know he is, lin should know enough to
keep quiet, if only for his friends sake.
J-I- Mcintosh,
DEALER IV ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT—-CONFECTIONERY	
0IGAR8     AND
TOBACCOS
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY     LINE
 FI8HING TACKLE—
THE LATEST  NOVELS,  Ac.
Genial John Ke -n of K.slo has resigned his position as Mining Recorder
and Assessor and will stump the Slocan as the nominee of the Liberal-
Conservatives in the Riding. In
choosing Mr. Keen as thmr champion,
the Conservatives have chonen wisely.
He will make a bettor fight for them
and is in a better position to do it than
any other they could havo chosen from
tbeir ranks. Well-known and personally popular, he will be a strong candidate.
SilYeiion,B.C.
8INNftTT k Q'DjONNELfr
FBEIGHTKR8 AND PACKERS.
Contracts large or small taken
And promptly attended to.
BUblesin 8ILVBRT0N, B  C.
OHA& A. WATERMAN & 00.
'■   \   :\ ' 11,. .
Auctionkess, Customs Drokebs,
Akd OkswiAL Rkai Estate Aoesw,
l» Baalsy Black    .   .    Inker at.
NELSON,   B, 0.    »""
NO. 88. W. F. Of M.
Hall in Silverton", at 7 :'M
rr
Meets every Saturday in tbe Union
M.
W. HOBTOH,
President.
1.1. McIhtomi,
Financial-Secretary
"ITI'ATIO.N    WANTB9.
-If      1   \     .   1
A third year student of the School of
^ractieal Science, Toronto,' desires em-
kjior, sisrai in some oiflce requiring sn expert draughtsman, Apply to "DraughU-
4»sn" cure of The Silvertonian.
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
$"«•*$  OR. IN ARREARS    A
I { BLUE 'cRtfJiS     WILL
flttf**^' **%  FOfSD,   IN THIS
-'QUAKE.      KUBWJRIpilOfl    ARE
^AYiULK IN  ADVANCE.    PRICE
*W0 DpLLllW A \L.vR.
With
tion \4, nnd Perseverance H
Norman
We are in receipt this week of a
communication from Mr. J. A. Foley
of Slocan City, jn which he makes
some astonishing charges against tbe
Independent candidate, Mr. R. F.
Green. We do not feel like taking the
responsibility of publishing the letter
as the charges are such as,' in fairness
to Mr. Green,.should be made at one
of his meetings, where he wijl hav<_ an
opportunity of replying to them m
once. W11 bin a few days, Mr. Foley
should have an opportunity of meeting
Mr. Green upon the platfonn and can
then advance against that gentleman
whatever charges he may see fit.
MINING  RECORDS.
NEW   DENVER—LOCATIONS
A pr ,1—Grinnet, Slocan Lake, II F
Hyland.
4—No 4, Four Mile. J C Butler.
10— Four Mile. No 5, F F Lieb-M-her.
IB—Nip Cat, F-'iii Mil.-, W S Jarkson.
Crank Fraction, Four Mile, Annus L
McLean. D W Fraition, Eight Mile
creek, C II Abarcrombie.
18—Lizzie, near .Mctiuigan, M Penrose". II Gil'son.
19—Tiust Fraction, near Cody, Annie
Johnson.
20— Kopje   Fraction, near Alpha, W
Drewrv.
23-Wiz
Byron.
sard, on Ei«lit Mile creek, F L
ASSESSMENTS.
John Houston, the people's John,
has announced bis intention of entering, the fight for legihlative honors in
the Nelsou Riding. Mr. Houston
should carry the Riding ia the face of
any opposition that can be brought
out He will, have the support of all
true friends of Ltbor, of which cause
Houston is a proved friend. On June
the ninth we will expect to sen John
Houston in his usual place on the top
of tbe heap.
KASLO   FOR  CANDIDATES.
Next week thc election campaign in
tho Blocan will begin in earnest and
the voters will havo an opp< rtunity of
hearing the several, candidates expatiate on tljelr own merits. The next six
i   i   ii     i . ,
weeka shonlfl  be interesting ones as
the campaign promises to be a hot one.
•   i         ■ .   i
Kaslo's crop of politicians this season
is a heavy one. Rooert F. Green wbo
fought the fight for the miners in Victoria since '98, is again in the field;
John Keen, another prominent Kaslp-
ite, will be brought out as a Business
Men's candidate; G. O. Buchanan is
spoken of as au anti-Martin Liberal;
and the Martin party is also looking
towards Knslo for a candidate.
And sad to say, t^here is only room
for one at Victoria.
"AM/TQG^TilER, NOW!"
\ye are glad indeed to be able to
slate that this year the Townsite Company are going te take an  active part
Apr 3—Chetopa.   Opatnnka.   5—Hu-
nert Fraction,  WWId.   U—O K  Nn  2.
Eliza    Murphy,    it iile»     10— Kalian.
Fraction.   11— Ru nv   Fiaiti    Manitoba.   12— Pride ol tin-   We* . Molly
Pawn,   Little    Until.   14— Lone   Mar
17—Superior. Diiii,.l, (,'rnnloid. G"ido.
Donnelly,    (}»)t.     Jin  M, re.    18-Mh.
Queen Fr^ctM.n, Brvjtten l-nuti in    19-
HigA Ore Fraction, Mirie S, BiuOgti' '
Pixib  Hummer.   20—.Siveot  tirai-s.   21
—Echo No 2, Hillside.   23-Giant.
TRANSFERS.
Apr 8—Sandow  nnd Lone Star No 3,
B U Gol.i   Trust.  Ltd.   to H U Skiuo.
and Dg Smith, Mar 31.
4—Nettie Frartion, Carter H Brljid e
to AiiioU'iion, Mu 21.
6—Joker Fraction an I f!ody Fracllm
liv fthcrifT, all intrrest of Win Oullaitlni
to M H Bentlev, too>. Aor 3
6—Alert W. Frauk Pviuon to .lohn .'.
Tm lor, Kept 18. ' *
AJert^, Dan Mcf.e.id to J A Taylor.
Jan lo.
Alen i,, siime to same, Aug 22.
A.iin, all interest, Evelyn M .S:\mii-
lamls and John Hsniilion tiiui ni Jn-
Marshall, »425, .Ian '\2
7—Paymaster }£, John Vallanee to F
SwAiineil, Fob IS.
ft—0 K, ail, tins Knijrer to Einmanilel
JHok, Aor 5, f250.
Murch Bird \i. Snow Flake %. Munli
Bird Fiaciiou nil, Rn iv |3,  Knhv Frac-
CERTIFICArE OF I..1. KO\ I.    \..s
NOTICE:—••T-jirMPii,-   ' Imi-iikov
ble" and "Rainbow ticAnr/.'   uin'i
Claims;   situiiiiin   Ilie   Vnow   Ln>
MiniiiK  DlvUlon   of Wusi Knot, im
District.
Where   located:—On  PaiIIiqo   oret"
adjoining    lhe     .iiidie  .du'.k    Mine'
Claim.
Take notice that I, J D Anderson  P. 1.
8 , of Trail, B C.i acli/n; as ugent ior lh.
Kamloops   Mining   am)    lirvxlopmei.
Company. Limited. Free Miner'* Certi
ficste No. 014445, i/itend sixty daya fion
the dale hereof, to unilt u, i,„   iit ,.
Recorder for    Cenillc.il.a   nl   In pi
einents, for the pm pone   of    hluh .
Crown Grants of tbe above claims.
And further tan.- none     that    acli i
nnder section 37,miiMi     e enmmei.i <
before the issuance of such  Certirltut
of Improvements
McMillan to Andrew Jacobson, Nov 28,
10-Kepiiblicaii 3i, Geo Davis to Jas
B O'Neil, Apr a.
Nob Hill li, Malcolm L Nicholson to
W S Grady, Apr 1Q.
Great Ksifle >.;, T I/OniKan to >> 8
Grady, Apr 7, 	
Bird Fraction i3', A C Behne lo Alex
Sn.itli. Msr 19.
12—Power nf Attorney, Alexander
McDoueall to Marv McDugall, Dec 4
0 K .<o '2, Calliopa. London Fraction,
Ashland, Silver Blossom, Silver Orown.
Washburn, Snowball, all lritereht, A A
Mi'Doiiilall and Marv McDnugall. heir
and heiress of PelerMcDugnll, to Duncan
Grant, Dec 23.
Same claims, Duncan McDougall and
Christie MrDougall, heir and heiress of
"e'er MoDoimall all inte.est, to Duncan
Grant. Dee 20.
H—Aiett &, D A Van Dorn |o Chas
iIvNichoi, i^epi 13.
Frisco and Snowbird, Norman McMillan to Andrew Jacobson, Nov 2©, all
Interest in aL'reemeni to purchase.
17-0!d Maid M, M L Nicholson to
David T Davis,'Fel. 28.1899.
19—.Mo*loll }a, V W Greenleo to J H
Moran, Apr 9.
Clara Moor, Storm, Twiliirht. %. eH,'n-
Snowdrop. Silver Key Fraction, 1-6
aaih, A S Reed'to G A Jack-on, Apr 17.
J
Silverton •
ii
T
TttE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF
H
E
t. r, mm, riw.
THE   METAL MARKET.
New York, Apr. 25. -I? ir Silver, b5%c
Luke copper,   |10.50.
Lead—Tha firm that fixes tho selling
price for miners and smelters quotes lead
at J-l 43 at the close.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS OF WINFfi, LlguORR
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN .STREET,   -   -   - SLOCAN, B. 0.
StaTple-
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK   HOICKS   FOR   HIRE   AT   REASONABLE
KATKy a OENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS TONE,
Qutshle Parlies Detdrinp Ilnrses in i-ilverlon
Cnn  Have Them  Reserved By Writing To—
♦ + t + t t +
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON. - • B. C.
Iuve-t your money wi-ely.   II you nie |
■mviii)f unylliinx see that you get Im
0 'St fnr Iho   money Ihst is   posslhle,
If you are goiug to take a spring tonic,
cull ut the -jiu'ritm. Drug Sl^re in.d kit
lhe best,
Why do you wag your beard so constant!.. ?"Jin)'jired tho impolile deg of
the hlllj goat.
"Because I chews," .replied ((is goat.
CAIVADlAX
PACIFIC
RAIIvWAY-
and S00 Line.
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KuOTENAY OJUNlY
10 ALL POINTS
EAST and WEST
r iret-Class Sleepers on all Trains from
REVEL6TOKF,   and KOOTENAY LD
TOURIST CAKsi   puss Medicine Hat
Dailv for St. Pall.
Slxdays ^nd Weiikhsdays for Ton-
ONTO.
Fridays lor Moktheal and Boston.
— Same cars pass Revelstoke otio day —
 earlier. 	
CONNECTIONS.
F.wtheNorth.EevelBtnke.and Main Line
.7:30 ex- Sunday iv.  Silverion,
ar. ex. Sunday, 16:20
i-or   Rossland,   Nelson     Crows   Ifeit
Branch and BouiuIhiv Couutry
10:20 ex. Sunday Iv. Silverton,
ar. ex. Sunday 13 U
To and from 8-indon.
13:00 ex S.inday Iv Silverton,
 ar. ex Sunday, 10:20.
Tickets issukd thkocuu a.nj B.ooaoe
 cmcKsu to nesriNATiox.	
For rates sn I full Uifo, in_nion apply to
iii-.iiest local agent or
U. H. REEVKS, A,ent, Silverton
W. F. ANDER-JOS,
Trav. Pass. ARent, Nelson
E. J. COYLE.
A. G. P. Agent, Vancouver
THE WM. HAMILTON MflKUFACTING CO..
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
F»et^r|3Qroti8:lT»* Ontario.
CANADA.
»W^M|MMMIWIIW
Syr p of Horehoirid & Tolu
FOR COUGHS  AND COLDS.
*rmt****rV*Vmr\r\*t
% :•; Bnlfsatoi For SRidnp Men :•.
THE
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.     I
L\1.\!1R]JG MV, M.'.T
AMi (KlC-rAlE
TABLE IKfeLhPAtSED IS
TIIE NOL1HWFST.
S BOWES &MIEMIRS,  fr*p.
8ILVERT0 V,   I' P:
im
Dal^d this 8tli dav of September A I
fl». '"    •
..,-,„ 3. D. Anderso*.
m f j 00,
L
C
axative
AAAAAAAJ1AJ
w*r*r*r*rww*s*t*w
0»;0
TilC Strike Is Off   BwaToms, Jmriuai*
,   , ... REDumoxds, Sriijy. so
\*\i Huare now   Bum ptaT«D novK..-
I'mAriinu d t* NutiN "JFt-C."
Wi
Roadv for
4
Biuiiim.
l'i im Lajii s
iJljTIKR
!*'»sb Omri Tablki.
!•; OiiiEr. Atnctn
|2Too NoinKovs To
i<*    Call / nu   Ex/.m-
And now  my Kcot-Ji.sK Them.
euay Friends I am *
prepared to  reciive*
your     orders      Fo' *J
O «
old Cure.
To'Cure a   Oold ln   Qnc Day.
Contains   Thn Now  Ingredient.
4WAt\***t***i
O  R   MATCH  AND JFWFIEHY
REPAIRING t>E  /•1TM1NTINAI.
As we only employ tlie most expe'*
lutiUid nun, ullttork is r,UAkiiMU»
/   Mail and Express Orders Receivs Onr
> Prompt Atteution.
DON'T FORGET THE PLACE
JACOB DOVER.  "Tut Jewble«,"
NELSON, R. O.
TRY   Ii.
PR iv   :r>c
At All Pruiri'iit"
General
Mining
Supplies.
Full Line
Dry & Mixed
Paints.
Lumber
Sash and
Doors.
MoCnUum eSO Co.,   Sloenn, B. O.
HOWARTH
JEWELER kc,  KLOOAft B. O.
^»^^y^^A^^%vvyvYJ^»yw
IS PREPARED  TO  REPAIR
WATCHES,    CLOCKS    AND
.IEWKLERY FOR THE SLOCAN PUBLIC.    AN EXPER-
1ENCE OF FIFTY YEARS   WARRANTS   THE  GUARANTEE  OF  SATISFACTION WITH 111,4 WORK THAT HE GUV KB.    ALL REPAIRING IS
DONE AS PROMPTLY AS GOOD WORK WILL ALLOW.
A FULL I^INE OF WATCHES, CLOCKS, FANCY GOODS, Ac. IN STOCK.
WR.T^ Tv»i ™£f£ Krtllli^U WAvJlTiiiia* AND   VISIBLE
WRITING TYPE-WBITER8 WRITE US    CATALOGUES FREE
-r»r
The THISTLE HQTIZU
NOW REOPENED
VFT>ER A NEVV
MANAGEMENT.
HDI'SF, RENOVATED
AND THE BAR FULLY
RESTOCKED
Thompson ur<
•oa.,   Props;
MICF AVE.,   'qiA-KHTON, 5   Q;

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