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The Silvertonian Apr 14, 1900

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 VOLUME THREE.
TKm\mxjuJ! t
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    APRIL   1 i, lUOi).
NUMBER     42
nnd
«
iONSIGNMENTS
OFFR   SH
■titter
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
•9
SIlTrextom., IB. C.
Weekly Wftws IViiggcts OfSIoraiiaiid
Other Camps.
miUi HKH'S OH MSTMCTi
THE WAKLFIFLD CONCENTRATOR1.
,AKEVIEW   HOTEL
(gTHIS HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE EAR LS SUPPLIED WITH REST BRANDS OF
WINES, LloUOKS AND OIGAR&
1^£.   2T___no-^7-les.   Prop.
. .LSURatSS & co
WID.'I ES.M.E AND RBTAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RE I in. sroi:i:s at
Silveiton, Kelson, Trail, Ymlr, Kaalo,  Sandon.
New Denver, Cascade Ctty, Grand Forks, 8lrdar
Midway nn.I Gr. cnwoo I.
MAILORDERS PimMlMT.Y AND CAREFULLY AIT1NUKDTO	
11 F.Al)   ol'T-TOE NELSON, II. 0.
e
w^»w€^®
e
c
Are You Looking For
Siylish goods?
TII\TI> UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING   WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OCT OK BIGHT.
w      IF 80 DROP IN   AND   MAKi: YOUR   sl.l.F.C-
^   TION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
1    GURANTKED,   OV ERCOAT1NG8 JC8T IK.
*i      UEBSIUfill,   Tlie Tailor:   Silv.Tlon. II. C.
•<-*#o r^w^owts^w <j
?
w
t
J
3
i
HE WILLIAM IIUNTEI
COMPANY.
We
showing
are now
a nice assortment of
'JEN'S SPRING AND
SUMMER SUITS
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
Tlie Wm. Hunter Go.^Xrtcl..
SUyerton,   li*   O.
Tliin spring, when somo of onr old-
timers lmiko their yearly pilgrinpuge to
the Lead waters of Four Mi!., creek lo
do their nnininl assessment work on
t'nir mineral claims, they will he inure
tliim mirprisi-il to see the wonderful im-
pr iveincnts made upon the Wafci field
Company'! property, It will be a new
sight to ninny of them to see thecoase-
less Mting of buckets going up and down
the mountain on the new aerial tramway, brioginjl down ore to keep the
hi-' red mill pounding utvay night and
day.
A trip to the Wakefield'., new concentrator, fjiir miles up ihe cn-ek Irom
Bilverton, will wall repay the Iron We,
not only ol the curious sightseer hut also
of nnv one interested in mining or mining machinery, lor here can be neen the
most pcifcrt and complete concentrating
plant operal(pi within the boundaries ol
British Columbia.
The mill baa a capacity foi treating
10'J tons of ore daily ami it in mi arranged
that ita <'_ip.ii'!iy cm bo doubled at anv
time liy adding more jigs and tables. At
present aboul .c0 toi.B of ore a day me
I" ing run through the mill and some ten
tona of concentrates are being turned
mil daily. Five jigs are in 11 are and
running,'and seven of the new VVhiffley
tahlcs aie in iis«. These latter are
the latest improved devise for tbe close
saving nt mineral, ami are giving entiie
satisfaction at this concentrator. The
mill is under the charge ol 3. Kelly, an
experienced mill man, and every thing
i.s running smoothly the mill being everything liml ixpeiicuco or skill couM devise or money purchase.
Tho tramway, which connects the
mine and mill, is nearly ouo ami a
quarter miles in length. It is a Fin Ian -
aon Patent Atrial Tramway, r.f which
theie aiu several already running in Ihe
Kooti nays, none ut which however are
more complete or hnve a bigger earning
capacity than that of the Wakefield
Mines. Tli 8 tramway has a capacity
for delivering 150 tons of ore daily, and
besides bringing down the on to the mill
it furnishes a means for delivering at the
mine all mnteiiul an,I snpulii s and also
saves tho employees many a weary
tramp up ami down the trail. The
buckets used on the tramway carry *t%
hundred pounds of ore eiah and make
the round trip ol neatly two ami a half
miles in liO minutes.
Thanks to the energy and intcrpri-o
of Mr. A. V.. Patemon, the general
superintendent, tbe Wakefield Mine is
now the best cipiipt and biggest mining
euteipiise in the whole Slocan Lake
region and has reached n period in its
history when the stockholders cnn
reasonably look for dividends (rom Ihi.
property
SLOCAN LAKE ORE BHIPMENT8.  I    HE MISTOOK HIS   AI'DIENCE.
lilt: GOVEMMMT PLATFORM.
Shipments   of  oro  frnm Silveiton for
the year 1891). totaled 161)3 Tons.
All other Lake points 13&">     "
The shipment   ol   oro   from   Slocan
Lako points, up to and including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Ilosnn Landing,                    Tons.
Bosun 180
From New Denver
Hailiiey  20
Capella  7
From Silverton Tons.
(Cmilv Edith  20
Vancouver    '20
Wakefield, [concentrates) 20
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 24)
From Slocan City
Arlinaton      200
Black Prince    (!•.)
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York. Mar. £9.—liar Silver, 59J8c
Lake copper,   !(10..r>0.
Lend—The firm that fixes the selling
price for mine!■* and smelters quotes lead
nt +-l 41 at the close.
Frederick DKllburp, Stale superui-
lendoot of liiinliing in New York, made
a campaign speech for Governor Roise-
velt lust tail that Wis a record-breaker.
Kllburn and other spellbinders were
tourine tho extreme northern part of
the ituto.   Ini' .lorning the en
gine sto,;  ,i   for   water near a lumber
camp.   Kll bum  got   nil on tho end ol
PREMIER     MARTIN     PUBLISHES
HIS   VIEWS.
In appealing to you anWlm Premier of
tho Province, I beg to lay before you the
platform of the m w Government aa
follows:
1. The abolition of tbo 1200 deposit for
candidates for tho Legislature.
iho cm nnd delivered a< rip-roniing j 2. The bringing into force, as soon ss
speech on ihe evils of Tammany Sail [arrangements can be completed, of the
tu.d kindled campaign topics. The j Torrena Registry system,
lumbermen listened with no idiowofj jj„ The liedisiiihution of thocoustit-
enthuslasm, A trifle nettled, Killiiiru | utricles on the basis of population, allow*
returned lo tho car. A brakeman, h0g \u iparjujy populatod districts a
noticing bis gloom, said cl eel (nil v: proportionate.)^ laruer representation
"Don't mind llios ■ Frencfc-Oanatllsns; i than to populous districts and cities,
they're a womUndiended lot." "Frem-b ., jlm . nactment of an accurate sysr
Canadians I" *ld Kilbnrn, wiih surprise; ,cin 6f (}1)Vprm,ioiit scaling of logs, and
"Where ara ve'. We're |«rt ovir the: jl8 ri ,., mifori.ement.
lino iu Canada,'' replied the  brakeman.
Last Thursday tho WakofMd Mine
-hipped lo the smeller the first car-load
of concentrates from their new mill nnd
another car'oad is to he ^hipped today
riiftre is now lying on tbe dock two
carloads nf concentrates and it is comma
'•o*'r: fiom the mill at the rate of a carload eveiy two days.
QOC03CXJOOOOOOOOOC5COOOOOOOO
TIIE LOCAL LATOOT.
Tb"   subscription   books oi the Sii
vertton  Waterworks Company are now
op n,   at   the   office of William Hunter,
and those who wi.-h to subscribe for any
of  the  stock  of this company can now
do SO,
AN   INCIDENT.
What might hnve been a serious accident and was only pi evented fiom being
so hy one of those curious happening!
ih.it show that u guarding Providence
protects the lives of miners happened on
| Monday lost when lhe assessment work
on the .Miilvaue-elniui, near town, was
1 oing done.
(j.ralil (ianliner, who was working on
Iho claim, had two holes ready to fire
and as th" tunnel was only  in some Ai)
6O0300O0OO0OOOOOOOOOO0OOC
The Sandon P. md will entertain theli
friends at a Bill on Mon lay evening.
The work if cleniin? iff and enlarging
the football field will bn commenced immediately.
Word from Slocan Citv vices promise
of some interesting political news for the
near luture.
Now is the time to start your garden
Now is the time to seed vour lawn. Call
at the Silveiton Drug Store and select
your soeds, t
A blase amons some old k»rosene tini
at Ihe rear of the Thistle Hntel caused
some little excitement on Wednesday
afternoon.
Biocan'j cillsonsto the last man will
join in making Silverton's Di U-oialion n
success They have promised to recip-
rocntc on Dominion Dty.—The Drill.
DlVlSE RXRVtCI will lw he'd iii Silver-
tin n^xt Sunday morning at 3 r. m ,
everyone is cordially invited to attend.—
Johp Q, Duncan, Presbyterian  Miuistor.
A in»e'in_l of the 'i embers of the Foot-
h di Clhb will he held to-iiin. t at the
Vietoria Hotel, at8:30. All intei sted
in the game should attend, as n:atters ■'
iiitcrc.-t will he discussed.
Sandon has taken on  a new  lease of
I dfe.   Tho mines there ue putting men;
feet, he had cut  short  fuses.     1I»  was i (0 W0|k jn y^ Illnu. rr, alu! ., few
lighting   these  with  ma'cbes   and   thej
liisi one caunht  readily,  the other one
refusing to ignite. Afraid ol being caiijiht
oy the first sllOt lie left   the other   unlit.
Alter leaving the tunnel he heard thu
shot go oil. and after hesitating a few
moment* started in to put off the other
blast. Tills hesitation no doubt saved
hia life, for just as he stepped in front of
the tunnel the second shot exploded.
Gardiner was knocked down and received
n few cuts and bruises, bnt had he heen
a few seconds spot er in returning he
would have been killed or very severely
injuied.
Bow the secoi.d blast came to go oil as
it did i.s hard to explain, it either having
raagbt and hung fire or been ignited by
k piece oi burning Lie from the other
shot.
in lar_:o nuiii' er
days are expert, d to buott the
on its ol I palmy day perch.
pay-
town up
5. The re-enactment of tbe disallowed
I Labor Regulation Act 1898, and also «!J
the __--t.it nt. m i.f 1R09, containing ami Monr
g .ii in clauses if disallowed as proiKwed
by the Dominion Government.
0. To take a firm stand in every other
possible way wiih a view of discouraging
the spread of Oriental cheap labor io
thi.s Province.
7 To provide for official inspection of
all buildings, machinery und works,
wilh n view to compelling the adoption
of proper safeguards to life and health.
S. With regard to the Eight-hour Law
the Government will continue to enforce
the law as It stands, An immediate enquiry will be made by the Mioister of
Mines into all grievances put forward in
connection with its operation, with a
■view ol bringing nbout an amicable
settlement, If no settlement is reached
tho principle of the referendum will be
applied end n vote taken at the general
election its to whether tbe law shall be
repealed. If tbe law is sustained by the
vole it will bc retained upnu the statute
book with its penalty clau«e. If modifi-
cattuns can he muite removing any of tho
friction brought about, without impaling
the principle of the law, tbey will be
adopted. If tho vote is against it the
law will be repealed.
9. To re-establish the London Agency
Iof British Columbia, and to take every
. effective  moans   cl   bringing before tbo
British public thn advantages of this
Province, as a p'ace for the profitable
Investment of capital.
10. The retaining of the resources ot
the Piovince r.s nn asset for the heuefit
uf the people, snd taking effective
me isnros 11 prevent the alienation oi the
public domain, except to actual settlers
nr   fur   actual   bona fide   business, or
Purely P.T.sii:i.)l Paragraphs;
iiKlustiial  purposes,   putting  an end to
All   work   in Ihe Jewelry  Repairing   the practice cf speculating in connection
line, left nl the Silveiton linii! Store, will   with the same.
he promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei I n. xi,e taking of active measures for
tbe well-known Nelson jeweler. All re ; t|„. pysteinatie exploration of tbo Prfri
pairs are (ii'.\KAM'i:i:n foi: onk ykak *      vince.
Miss Murcitt. Provincial Organbtar of 12. The borrowing of money for tbo
lhe W. C T," U., addressed fair audiences purpose ol providing roads, trails and
here on Tuesday and Wednesday ninhts i bridges, provided that in every caee the
In her efforts to establish a branch ol the money necessary to psy the interest and
W. C. T. U. Ii'ic, Miss Mniciitt wnaun- sinking fund in connection with the loan
successful. Silveiton has uot jet reached shall ho provided by additional taxation
Uiat stage of culture. I so  as  not   to   impair  the credit of the
I* O V 111 l*f*
the New  Denver sports have organ- j
ised a Football Clnhfhnt have not yel
answered the letters Inviting them lo
Join the proposed Blocan League.   They
THE   HEWITT.
A tnnnel to be known  as  No 4,  has
heen started at the lbwlt Group.
This tunnel Will lap the ore bodies,
Already exposed In Ihat property, at over
100 feet ih Sper than the No. ,! tunnel or
ODOUl WO feet in depth below the apex
of tho main ore lilmte on tbe surface.
The company ihat is operatina this
Group are well satisfied with the wny
the mine is developing and there is a
i-tiong   likelihood of  n   Irninwav   being
elected at the mine ami a wagon rod
built (rom town, during this summer,
CHE  OLD  MAID.
Thn tunnel on (he Old Maid claim,
mar town, is now in 112 feet and the
ledge has heen ciosseut. Tho cioss-cut
shows the ledge to be 22 feet wide and
filled with ore from wall to wall. The
Old Mnid ledge le the only well defined
contact vein in this district carrying
nayoTOi the hanging  wall  being slate
nnd the footwall granite.    The character
,,( the me is nu   iron   sulphide   carrvi'i-r
■liver ami a   little gold, nil values I.ting
I out i40.    Ii   this  properly was in tho
Jack Thompson spent a tew days in
Bandon tois week.
Mr k Mrs, Yates expect to move Inlo
th. ir new house next week.
All.in Leslie of Montreal la among the
new nr rivals in town this week. He will
make   Silverion   his Britiah Columbia
home.
( has MeNicholls is hack from his
Ontario home, greatly Improved in
health, ('hail, y's was "> aiiiily welcomed
by his numerous friends hero on hi-
return
Mi. and Mrs. John Scott, tho parents
of Wm Scott ot this town, are hero to
spend a few months. Their homo is in
Perth, Out.
Alex. Dodds, foreman at thn Wakefield Mines, has gore to Ontario, having
ni eived word ot the serious illness of
his mother. I'M. Ward, of Sandon, is
filling Ids phue at the mine.
Charles McLaughlin, nephew of Chas
MeNicholls of this town, arrived here on
Wednesday and purposes   becoming a
Silvertonian.   Mr. McLaughlin will be
n welcome addition to thu athletic circle
1,1 the samp.
The Hammond Bios., Charley and
Bob, of Sandon, have sold their freighting outfit to L <'. L.niMiiid left last Mm -
,.n> shutting themselves
out  of a good
tl ing,   although   Ihey
should   not  be
blamed for not knowing
it.
hands of u strong company a hig shipping   day for Tape Nome.    Before having, the
proposition could be made out of it iii ii hoys wero presented with some valuable
ghort 'i""'
r.'s.'ois by their Bandon Irlonds
Th" Ball h. he given here on the evening of May 24th will probably Lo given
under the auspices of the local Miners'
Union. This will iiism,. ils .fcicrees, ss,
if ihe Onion t ikes boi I ol tho m itter,
llu v « ill en o a largo pavilll in for the
dancers tuM i ut all llu ir efforts Into
making this part oi tli" program a hi,;
•tl.   !  I
The S.iniUiti Band  has  been  engaged
lo pi'y for the Kaslo merrymakers on
Mav 2l.h.   This B md played in Bilver
Ion during onr last Celebration, giving
much satisfaction,   lt had been hoped
that the band boy a would again nsr-ist in
in this year's Celebration here, but si
Kaslo has seemed iheir services, Silver- !
to    can only hope that Ihey w ill do llieni- '
selves  justice  and   enjoy  llieiuselves Bt
tbe other side oi the rango'
STOCK BEING SUBSCRIBED.
stick in the Bilverton VYatorwoiks
Company is being rapidly subscribed for >
hy She citizens, who  hnve  every  eonfi-;
ilci.ee in tin'  sUCCeSS  of the  Con.puny. I
I'ii es and other necessary material for,
the  woik  of supplying this  town  with
water have been ordered and operations
will commence Immediately  after their
arrival here
The Gaaelte ni'Ida week contains the
announcement oi the incorporation of
this Compauy, with n capitalisation oi
tap.ooo
IS. In connection with the construction of Government roadn and trails, to
provide hy the employment of competent
civil engineers and otherwise that the
Government money is expended upon
some system whieh will be ndvautageniui
to the genual public, so tbat Ihe old
system of providing roads as a special,
favor   to   supporters of the Government
may be entirely discontinued.
14 To keep the ordinary annual ex-
peiiilitnie within Ibe ordlrnry annual
n venne, hi order to picserve intact the
credit oi lhe Piovince. which is its best
asset.
1". To adopt a system of Government
const ni,tion and operation of railways,
and Immediately to proceed with tho
construction ol a railway on the south
side oi the Fraser liver, connecting the
cosat with the Kootenay disiiict, with
the understanding that unless thu other
railways now constructed in the Province
j give fair connections, aud make ei|uitablo
'. ] iol height aii-i passenger arrangement*
I the Province will continue ihis line to
. iho cistern bnumhiry of the lVovince,
Proper connection with such Kootenay
railway to he given to the Island of Vancouver. Willi respect to other parts of
the Piovince, lo proceed togivo to every
portion of it railway connection al aa
I early a date as possihh', the railway
w hen constructed to he operated by tbo
! Government through a Com mission.
Iii. A milwiiv bridge tube constructed
in conned ion with tbe Kootenay railway
across ihe Frnscr river, at or near New
Wi'Sltnlnsti r, and running Doners given
over it to any iiiilway company applying
(or the same, under proper conditions.
17 In enso it is thought at nnv tlm*
advisahhi to give a bonus to any railway
« "iiHiou-il mi llucU   Tpgfi,
'iii
_____________■ am*m
STILL HOLDS OUT
British Face a Vigorous Attack at
Camp Elandslaagte.
London, April ii,—General Roberts wires to the war office from
Bloemfontein under date of April io
as follows:
"The enemy have been very active during the past few days, One
commando is now on the north
hank of the Orange river, not far
Aliwal North, while another is at-
tacking Wepener. The garrison
there is holding out bravely and yesterday inflicted serious loss on the
Boers. Major Springe, of the Cape
mounted rifles, was killed. No other
casualties have been reported as
yet. The troops are being moved
rapidly. A patrol of six men of the
Seventh Dragoon guards, under
Lieutenant Wooley, who had been
reported missing since April 7, has
returned safely."
Another Boer Pake.
As the foregoing does not mention the alleged British reverse on
Saturday at Meekertsfontein, the
Boer telegrams are discredited at
the war office and they are further
discredited on account of the discrepancies in the dispatches, as
Meekertsfontein in one message i
located near Brandfort, and in
another southeast of Bloemfontein.
Hecull ol Oatacre.
General Gatacre's return to England i.s accepted as being in the nature of a recall, though no reason is
given for it, and it will be associated in the public mind with his lack
of skill. Lord Roberts criticised
his management of the Stormberg
attack and probably Gatacre's arriving an hour and a half too late to
rescue the Reddersberg force may
have decided his return.
General Rundle seemingly succeeds General Gatacre and, according to a dispatch from Bloemfontein, the commanders of several
brigades will be changed.
No New* from Wepener.
The Reuter's Telegram company's
correspondent at Aliwal North,writing at 9:30 this morning, says:
"There is no further news from
Wepener. Too cloudy for heliograph. More British troops are arriving."
Boera Threaten Portugal.
It is learned that tha Boer government has formally notified Portugal that they consider the shipping of British troops and munitions
ot war to Rhodesia by way of Beira,
Portuguese East Africa, to be tantamount to hostile action. This,
however, will not stop General Sir
' Frederick Carrington's force entering Rhodesia. Whether or not the
Boers will make reprisals upon Portugal remains to be seen, although
the best informed opinion here inclines to the belief that the Boers
are not likely to follow their protestations by acts which would bring
them into hostilities with another
nation. 4
British boaa at Wepener.
Aliwal North, April 10.—The
British loss in the fighting at Wepener yesterday was 11 killed and
41 wounded. Fighting was resumed this morning. The British
are holding their own.
Boera MielllnK Blandalaaate.
Ladysmith, April 10.—The Boers
opened Are this morning, sending
shells into the British camp at
Elandslaagte from three positions
widely separated. The shells did
no damage. The troops moved
out to reconnoiter and found the
the Boers in strong force and well
fortified. A naval 4.7 inch gun replied to the Boers, who have placed
a long torn in position.
When the Boers commenced
shelling, the British were drilling.
One private was killed and another
wounded before* the soldiers were
withdrawn from range. Then the
navaljbrigade opened fire, and drew
a hetvy Boer fusilade, and two of
c - uiser Philomel's gunners were
killed. The naval men stuck to
their positions, however, and the
Boers iinmeeked six guns, includ
ing a too-pounder, and shr.I's fell
in all the British camps.
After three hours bombardment,
the Boer fire slackened and the
burghers cleared from a kopje on
the right, when a shell lit on the
spot occupied by their gun. Another
commando was seen moving toward
the British left, apparently with the
intention of flanking them, but the
British shells forced them to retire.
The British advance pickets were
continually sniped, but few casualties have been reported. In the afternoon the naval brigade fired a
few shells.
It is rumored that a body of
Boers have gathered souhwest of
Elandslaagte with the apparent intention of cutting the British line of
communication. Gen. Clery directed today's operations.
Oatacre Ordered Home.
Bloemfontein, April 10.—Gen.
Gatacre, the commander of the
third division, is about to return to
England. Gen. Pole-Carew has
been appointed to the command of
the eleventh division. Several
changes are likely to be made in the
brigade commands.
Britain Will Back Portugal.
London,  April   n.—The British
government,  the  Associated Press
is officially informed,  stands  ready
to take the part of Portugal in case
the Boers attempt   reprisals, but so
far   Portugal   has   not applied for
British  aid, nor has she replied to
the Boer notification.    With  Great
Britain at  her back, it is said, she
will   not   give   in   the   slightest in
maintaining that the transactions at
Beira are fully justified by the longstanding   treaties   between    Great
Britain   and   Portugal.    While the
situation  is admitted to be grave,
the foreign office is  not inclined to
believe the Boers will take agressive
action.    The consensus of opinion
is  that, should the  Boers attempt
reprisals, it would react to the  advantage of Creat  Britain, enabling
her to use Delagoa Bay freely.
Martial Law for the Rebels.
Colesburg, Cape Colony, April
II.—In view of the state of unrest
acioss the border, Lord Roberts has
proclaimed a warning to the Cape
Colonists that further acts of hostility will be treated with, the utmost
rigor of martial law.
Strathronaa Arrive at the Cape.
Montreal, April 11.—The Elder-
Dempster line agents here received
a cable this morning announcing
the arrival at noon yesterday at
Capetown of the transport Monterey, with the Strathcona horse.
One hundred and sixty-three horses
died during the voyage.
British sUstaet to Date.
London, April 11.—The war office issued this afternoon a return
of the total British casualties up to
April 7. It is as follows: "Killed
in action—211 officers and i960
men. Died of wounds—48 officers
and 4605 men. Missing and prisoners—168 officers and 3722 men.
Diedof disease—47 officersand 1485
men. Accidental deaths—3 officers
and 34 men. Reported invalids—
288 officers and 4934 men. Total
13365 exclusive of the sick and
wounded now in hospitals.
To the war office return of casualties must be added the losses of
last week and the wounded, aggregating about 10,000 men, making
a grand total of upwards of 23,000
officers and men put out of  action.
When Baiter Cornea.
It seems that some people are
questioning the date of Easter in
this centurial year, when everything
seems to be aiksw. The prayer
book says that Easter is the Sunday
following the first full moon after
March 21. and that, if the full moon
is on a Sunday, then Easter is the
Sunday following. It happens this
year that the moon is first at its
full after March 21 just after 1
o'clock on Sunday morning, April
15, and, consequently, it is contended that Easter cannot be the 15th,
but the 22nd. of April. However,
the full moon referred to in the
prayer book is not the actual full
moon, but a fictitious and statutory
full moon, sometimes called the
ecclesiastical full moon. Some
fictitious moon is necessary, otherwise Easter might have to be kept
on different Sundays in different
parts o! the world.
PLAGUE OF WATER
Western States Have Booming Rivers
and Floods.
Denison, Texas, April 11.—High
water is reported at all points in the
Red river territory. The Red river
has risen 10 feet within the past 24
hours. The Washita is on a big
boom and an overflow is threatened.
Advices from Texarkaua say that
the Red river has risen eight  feet,
BURNED TO DEATH
Joshua Wayne Meets a Terrible Fate
ia His Cabin.
As the result of a Saturday night
debauch, the charred body of Joshua
Wayne was found Sunday morning.
After a period of abstinence from
liquor beginning with the city election, Wayne took to drinking again
i on Saturday night,   and went home
and is increasing eight inches  anj^  ^ ^  o|j   Kooteniiy aveinie
hour. The rise comes trom the up-
ptr tributaries and will be augmented by the heavy water  spouts
near Cliff sheet about 5 o'clock on
Sunday morning. He appears to
! have lighted a candle in a  miner's
the
wall over his bed. The candle
must have burned through the
socket and dropped out, setting lire
LATEST STOCK QUOTATIONS
of the past 24 hours in this section, j . ... ,
Ha_.    ^ , cantj|estic|.) Which was stuck in
The Sulphur river and Little
river are also booming, the latter
being out of its banks in the  lower
an s" I to the bed, or the paper on the wall
Chicago, April 11 —The whole a},amst which the bed stood,
west and southwest, including the J xhe first person to see the flames
states of Colorado, Wyoming, Ne- i was j. stussi, who was putting up
braska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, j his team in the barn near by. He
Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, is expe- j ran up to the window and, seeing
riencing a series of rain and snow through the smoke the figure of
storms accompanied by tempera- j Wayne resting with his outstretched
tures ranging from 15 to 30 degrees hands on the table, while the flames
below normal, with heavy frosts I and smoke enveloped him, seized
over a large section of the wheat , him by one arm to pull him out of
belt. At Denver this morning the ' the cabin. The flames and smoke
thermometer registered eight above I were so thick that Stussi fled, fear-
and at Dodge City, Kan., 10 above,   ing   suffocation,   and   Wayne  fell
back into the flames.
Meanwhile  a  paper   carrier had
seen the flames,   but   hesitated  for
bid j three or four  minutes   before  turn-
3   j ing in an alarm, in   doubt   whether
he ought to do so.    He finally gave
uyi i the alarm and the  department was
|33 OU    ' on the scene in  a  minute  Or  two,
"   ; but his delay had cost Wayne's life.
11    I Stussi was just turning away  from
I the window when   the  firemen   ar-
}'* I rived.     Had they been called soon*
WXi ,er, they would have rushed into'the
cabin and quellingthe flames with the
j5     chemical would have saved his life.
As it was,the building was a mass of
flames and, when they were  finally
subdued and the firemen took hold
of Wayne's body to carry it out, the
flesh   came   off   his   arm   in   their
hands.
The only vestige of clothing
which remained on the body was the
neck-band of a blue shirt. One
arm and one foot were burned off,
:he eyes were burnt out, all the
hair gone, the intestines protruding
and the ribs bare of flesh. The remains were taken to Beatty's to
await the action of Coroner Bowes.
naic id
Athabasca  28
b 0. Gold Fields        4
Big Three  9
Brandon ,V Golden Crown. 23
Canadian Gold Fields         7%
Cariboo [Camp McKinney] 95
Crow's Nest Pass Coal |38 WO
DeerTrail No. 2  XH%
Deer Park [newj         2
Dundee..  IS
Evening Star        8%
Fairmont.	
Giant  2%
Homeatake  2
Iron Mask  3XU,
Iron Colt  (j
IX. L  IU
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  W4
1
19
25
15
80
17
sii
Jumbo
King (Oro lienoro)...
Knob Hill	
Lone Pine Consol	
Minnehaha	
Monte Christo	
Montreal Gold Field*
Morrison	
Mountain Lion	
Noble Five 	
Northern Belle	
Novelty ,
Okanogan	
Old Ironsides	
Palmer Mountain  ...
Peoria Mines	
Princess Maud	
Kainbler-Curiboo	
Kathmullen	
Republic S 1 12    $ X Oil
St. Elmo Consolidated....        SU .
Smuggler         iu
Tamarac [Kennethl         (J
Trail Creek Hid. Treas ...        3U
Van A min         4^
Victory-Triumph         3%
Virginia          4
War Kagle Consolidated. ,f 1 60
WoUsrloo         8
WhiteBear         2\
Winnipeg       16
Wonderful        3u
93
*%
s*
902*
25
2
8
20
Vr*
65
16
3
3
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xy.
2
10
4
21'.
3
I ) 60
5
IM
13
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IT CB  FATF8 < H I.TII Vt L*.
Provincial   Reformatory roiidnnned
Bf Victoria Grand Jury.
Victoria, April 11.—The grand
ury spring assizes in a presentment
this afternoon complain of the poor
accommodation at the provincial reformatory. They say the inmates
are treated too much|like prisoners
in a common jail and that the training there is more likely to create
criminals than reform them.
DEATH OF Min 1101 mu:m i.r
All Prisoner* to Co to Nt. Helena.
Simonstown, April 11.—In consequence of the unfavorable conditions for keeping thc Boer prisoners
here, the authorities have decided
to ship them all to St. Helena with
the least possible delay. The sickness among the captured burghers
is abating.
HI SHIM. THK EXPOSITION.
The I'loneer miaalonarr to Bc Burled
In III. Hi u r, I.'. It uh,..
It UUI   Bc   Opened   ftaturdai    All ll,,
DlBiiltarlea are Invited.
New York, April 11.—A Paris
cable says immense steps are now
being taken for thc completion of
the exhibition sufficiently to permit
opening on Saturday. Scaffolds are
disappearing and the wilderness of
bricks and mortar is being transformed into attractive gardens.
The official program of the opening will be issued today. Thc ceremony will be very simple.    About
Victoria.April 11.—Father Roun-
deault, for 42 years missionary to
the Cowichan Indians, died here to-] 12,000 people will be admitted, in-
day, aged 75. His remains are ly- eluding the whole parliament, all
ing in state at the bishop's palace the ministers and ambassadors, in-
and will be buried on Monday in the eluding Dr. Leyds and the papal
ruins of his burned church.
H. M. S. Arethusa arrived today
from England to replace the Am-
phion.
nuncio.
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
IONEWSPAPE   MEN!
FOR SALE.
A Paper Folder, a Washington Hand Press,
a Cylinder Press.
Also the "Trail Creek News" and plant.
For particulars, address
WILLIAM K. ESLINfl, Rossland.
SCfiffB   OF  FliaiTINC.
The Ureal Upland Plateau Now Occu-
1( I oil By BrlllKh.
The country in which the British
army under Lord Roberts is now
lighting is very different from the
mountain districts in northern Natal
and northern Cape Colony where
the battles were fought until Methuen crossed the Orange river. The
New York Sun thus describes it:
From Bloemfontein to Pretoria
the distance, as the bird flies, is
about 300 miles. The territory to
be covered en route will be all the
way at an altitude of from 4000 to
5000 feet above the level of the sea.
It is almost a treeless tract, except
at a few centres,where by assiduous
irrigation, clumps of timber have
been induced to flourish, The vast
plains, always deficient in that respect, have now a smaller supply
than ever, for the land has been
scoured far ard wide to provide
timbering for the diamond mines at
Kimberly. In 189(3 it was estimated that over one million trees had
been cut down for this purpose
Very little water will be found along
the direct route, this being the
dryest part of the Orange Free
Stale, and the pastoral people who
inhabit it take the greatest pains to
collect and husband every drop. In
this way only are they able to maintain pleasant gardens and orchards
at the clusters of farm buildings
that are thinly dotted over the wide-
spreading sheep ranges.
Except around Kimberly, the
west-central part of the state is
wholly a pastoral region. There
are nearly 7,000,000 sheep and 1,-
000,000 cattle in the country and
if the British travel through the
state to the Transvaal by the direct
route which would bring them to
the Vaal (the Transvaal frontier) at
its nearest approach to Pretoria,
they will pass all the way through a
region of vast domains parcelled
out to the burghers for grazing purposes.
The agricultural region lies 60 or
80 miles to the east in a narrow
belt along the eastern frontier.
This is the granary of the republic
and produces large crops, but it is
far from the direct line of the British advance, and is bordered in part
by the mountain region where the
Boers have been holding Gatacre's
men and other British forces in
check on the Cape Colony side of
the frontier. Scattered here and
there over the gently undulated
plain are hills or hill ranges rising
several hundred feet above the general level and offering the opportunities for effective resistance which
the Boers know so well to utilize.
West of Bloemfontein, hovwver,
they are not so numerous as east of
it and in the. Transvaal.
The capital lies iu a stony, • treeless plain, but in the town itself
there are verdure and trees and a
little east of it is an eminence that
the Boers kept fortified during the
years of their early troubles with
Great Britain
_noitl'_   < t\VIIIA\N   WANTED
Flit)'    Wcnieru   Men   to Kcpla"C   the
Killed and Wounded.
Ottawa. April n.—Lord Strath-
cona's request for fifty more troops
for his contingent in South Africa,
to take the places of those killed or
wounded, has already been acted
upon and arrangements are about
completed for the required number to
sail from Halifax on the new Allan
liner Tunisian, sailing from Halifax
for Liverpool April 22. All necessary equipment is ready. The men
will be selected from western Canadians.
OPIiHA TOBN   ASK   FOB   ItlOBE.
Tliono on «!. P. It   Wentorn   OivlMou
It r<|iicftl Higher «:,»,.„
The operators and agents of the
Canadian Pacific railway from Fort
William to Vancouver and branches
have given notice to W. White,
western general manager, that at
the expiration of thirty days thev
will present for his consideration a
new schedule asking for an increase
in wages. The western men are
asking for the increase chiefly because their living is higher-. The
telegraphers on the main line out
west receive $50 a month, while
the men on the O. & Q. division
receive $40 a month.—Toronto
Telegram.
==5*l2i^
ELEGTIONJALLEil
Tho Governor Dissolves the House
Obedience to Orders,
Victoria,   April   11.—It   js
nounced that the J'eu'enant-govem. I
or has dissolved the legislature a
set June 9 for the date of a gei,era|
election.
Nominations   will   be   made on
May  26.     The   house,   meets jl
July 5-
The dissolution was the result of
direct pressure from Ottawa.
Premier Martin says the reason
for holding the elections on June 0
instead of 15 was the fact that the
Odd Fellows convention will \.
held here on the 13th to 15th, and
tbeir friends did not want to have
the dates conflict.
Ralph Smith announces that bt
will run for Nanaimo City instead
of South Nanaimo.
Mr. Cotton, who is here today,
refuses to s.ate whether he will op.
pose a straight Conservative candi.
date here by putting up one of his
own.
Mr. Huff, of Alberni, said today
that, if he runs, it will be as an in.
dependent.
IT  IS  RATIFIED
The People Endorse the Nomination of
Gov. Mackintosh.
Miners' Union hall was filled
Tuesday evening at the meeting to
publicly ratify the nomination of
Hon. C. H. Mackintosh for the
legislature. The governor was
given an attentive hearing, was frequently cheered and evidently his
speech made a favorable impression.
Dr. Edward Bowes, president of
the Trail Creek Liheral-Conserva-
tive association, occupied the chair
and introduced the speaker in his
usual happy vein.
The governor, on rising to speak,
was greeted with loud cheers. He
promised that, in the campaign, he
would say nothing unjust about his
opponents and would never strike
beneath the belt. He recalled his
early trips to Rossland in its pioneer days. He referred to his success in interesting capital in the
camp and to his responsibility to the
investors, which led him to accept
the nomination. He then reviewed
the political crisis and its causes,
He compared the Martin government to an old curiosity shop, and
predicted that, after the election, its
members would have neither portfolios nor constituencies. He reiterated his conservatism, but had
come to the conclusion they must
call on the best men in the province to assist in the work of emancipation. He condemned attempts
to array class against class and
paid a tribute to the reason and
fairness of workingmen, appealing
to them, with all others, to aid him
in bringing about the formation of
a government composed of the best
practical minds in the province.
He urged more eflicient mine in-
spection. He condemned delay in
the issue of crown patents. He
declared himself strongly in favor
of redistribution, giving a member
to Boundary, saying that, until this
was done, he would represent that
section as thoroughly as Rossland.
He paid a tribute to R. C. Clute and
Ralph Smith for their work of mediation in bringing about a settlement of the mining dispute.
In conclusion, he referred to the
noble deeds of the Canadian soldiers
in South Africa and to the duty of
commemorating the in some way.
He proposed that, for this end, the
British flag should float over every
schoolhouse during school hours.
Baden Powell II.ported Dead.
Pretoria, April 10.—It is reported
here that Colonel Baden-Powelli
the British commander al Mafeking*
is dead.
"     ' • •   '   ".. nn i_* niTi i
"* ■'   1111 I III I
IOERS ARE ACTIVE
heir Commandos Spread Through the
Southeastern Free State.
London,   April 9.—The amazing
ctivity of the Boers southeast  and
juthwest of Bloemfontein contin-
es, the Boer commandos seemingly
loing   and   coming throughout   a
tide  region as   they   please, but
gking   good   care   not   to   throw
hemselves against bodies   of the
Iritish,
The retirement of the Irish rifles
rom Rouxville to Aliwal leaves
len. Brabant without communica-
ton with the British forces. He
las 2000 to 3000 colonials holding a
Ine defensive country, but is apparently invested, so far as London
Itnows.
Telegraphic and railroad communications with Bloemfontein are
Iteat up hs usual, but nothing comes
Ihrough for public consumption.
Lord Roberts' last dispatch was
dated April 6 and the last unofficial message, dated April 7, says
the good spirits at Bloemfontein
are continuing and tells of the arrivals of animils and two fresh cavalry regiments. Lord Roberts now
iias 15,000 mounted men altogether.
In the Orange Free State the sit-
tion is complex, with scanty
uiterial for lorming a correct esti-
nate of the situation, and the afternoon newspapers, not being in the
Confidence of the war managers, are
criticizing the conduct of affairs as
[they see them.
Balding tbe Small Tmnn.
Maseru, April 7.—The Boers,who
were massed last week near Ladybrand to the number of 10,000,after
seizing Thaba Nchu and the Modder river water works, broke up into stroi.g divisions and tbey are
now raiding the south of the Free
State, re-occupying the small towns
which were evacuated by the British. The Boers' policy seems to be
to make rapid movements with little transport, looting English storekeepers freely for provisions and
cutting the communications of the
British forces.
Colonial* on the Eve or Battle.
General Brabant's colonials are
mostly at Wepener. They are a
splendid force, capable of great
striking power and used to cross
country riding, and are able to deal
roughly with the Boer commandos
roaming about the country. A
squadron of Brabant's horse captured 400 rifles near Wepener. His
outposts are reported to be in touch
With the Boers and a fight is regarded as imminent.
Persistent reports are being circulated that the Boers are preparing to retake the British position at
Wepener, and thus to secure entrance into Basutoland. Such an
attempt will be resisted by the Basutoland government, which is believed to have made every preparation.
Meanwhile the approach of armies
to Basutoland produces much excitement among the natives, necessitating the utmost vigilance on
the part of the local officials.
Boer* Threaten the Ballroad.
Bloemfontein, April 7.—The Boers
arc reported in force to the south,
threatening the railway, which however is strongly protected. British
pickets at Springfield, eight miles
distant, were attacked today by
Boers advancing from the waterworks. Remounts are rapidly arriving. The British are in high
spirits and anxious to   advance.
Boer* Beaten at Fourteen Stream*
Warrenton, April 7.—Yesterday
evening the British shelled Fourteen Streams, which was crossed
hy a force of Boers. This morning
the Boers placed in position a big
gun, which they fired ineffectively.
A fusilade of mausers followed at
intervals throughout the day. The
British dropped lyddite nnd
shrapnel shells into the Boer
position,     finally    silencing    the
enemy's   fire and driving off the I
snipers.
General Bundle ordered  to Kimberly
Capetown, April 9.—Lieut. General Sir Henry Rundle, commander
of the eighth division, has been ordered to Kimberly on special   duty.
■    ■___,
TELL IT TO THE WORLD.
Canada has come into the front
rank as one of the great metal producing countries of the world, but
the world in general does not know
it. That is because the Canadian
government does not take pains to
tell the world of it. The director of
the mint of the United States publishes an annual report giving the
production of the precious metals
by States, and also telling what
other countries have produced. He
also publishes othet reports and estimates from time to time, which
keep thc importance of the United
States as a mining country constantly before the eyes of the world.
Canada should do likewise. lt
should bc made the business of
some one of the officials at Ottawa
to collect such statistics and publish them from time to time, giving
the production of gold, silver, copper, lead, &c, by provinces and
territories. It is such information
as this—the tangible results of mining—which draw the attention of
investors to a mining country and
put to silence the croakers who,
through badly chosen investments,
or good investments badly managed, or through habitual pessimism,
declare this, that or the other district "no good." The figures of
production published by the Johannesburg chamber of mines have
kept British money pouring into
the Rand. The spectacle of over
Go men, who had goue north poor,
walking down the gang-plank of a
steamer loaded with bags of gold,
has drawn 100,000 people to Northwest Territory and Alaska in three
years and has started a movement
which still continues.
Canada can make a splendid
showing, but she does not profit by
it, simply because she makes no effort to display her wealth. A Chinese merchant keeps his finest
goods hidden away on his shelves;
a white merchant displays them in
his windows. Canada is like the
Chinese merchant.
British Columbia, it is true, publishes an admirable annual report
from its minister of mines, but does
not get the full benefit of it in an
advertising sense. The United
States director of the mint does not
wait till his entire report is printed
and bound before giving it to the
public. His general summary is
no sooner made up than he gives it,
as good, fresh news, to the Associated Press, and next morning it is
printed in every important daily
newspaper in the country. Canadian officials are so bound up with
red tape that they fear that, if they
make public any information regarding an official report before the
whole volume is complete, the
heavens will fall. The result is that
their news reaches the newspapers
months old, buried in a mass of
dry detail, from which the
newspaper editor, with whom every
minute counts, has no time to exhume it. If the official would burst
the bonds of red tape, and put the
news on the wires while it is hot
and fresh, it would be printed the
world over.
This should serve as a hint to
the British Columbia minister of
mines who makes up the report for
the year 1900, whoever he  may be.
THOUSANDS NEE THE QUEEN.
Her ltt*Je*ty'* Boiile Through Dublin
1* Thronged With People. 1
Dublin, April 9.—Queen Victoria
took her usual drive in the viceregal grounds this morning and paid
her promised visit to the city this
afternoon. Large crowds of people
witnessed her majesty's departure
from Phoenix park, and the route
followed was thronged with people.
Will Strengthen the Squadron
Kingston, April 9.—News has
been received here that the British
North American and West Indies
squadron is to be increased by ■
battleship, two cruisers and several
torpedo boats.
ARE KEPT MOVING
British Forces Attacked on Three Sides
-at Wepener.
London, April 10.—The Boer
attack on Gen. Brabant's force at
Wepener was resumed at daylight
today. The enemy's attack on two
or three sides on Monday lasted
until 2:30 in the afternoon, when
firing ceased, and it was believed
the enemy had been beaten jff. But
it is announced this morning from
Aliwal North that the fight had
again begun.
Gen. Brabant's force, numbering
from two to three thousand, hold
positions in a rough country. The
Boers are in unknown numbers,
with reinforcements reaching them.
Another body of 2000 Boers is
marching towards Springfontein
from Stnithfield. The detonation
of heavy guns was heard at Maseru
on Monday. Sir George Lanyon,
the British resident commissioner
of Basutoland, has left Maseru for
the border.
The events in the southeast portion of the Free State have caused
the eighth division, which has been
ordered to Fourteen Streams, to be
diverted to Springfontein.
Mysterious movements of troops
at Bloemfontein are proceeding
The newspaper correspondents are
not allowed to telegraph their destinations, and the presumption is
that Lord Roberts is making dispositions to cut off the raiding Boer
forces when they try to withdraw
northward from the British pursuing
columns.
The reappearance of the Boers in
the occupied country has caused a
revival of the war-like feeling
among the Free Staters of the Fauresmith and Philippolis districts.
The federal agents are busy getting
details of the surrender of Boers,
and owing to the British garrison
being withdrawn from those districts, the British residents are uneasy and have sent delegates to
Springfontein to ask for help. They
were told that steps for their defense would be immediately  taken.
Boer* Fortifying Blggaraburg.
The Boers are said to have ventured south of the Biggarsberg and
to be posting heavy guns four miles
north of Elandslaagte. They are
said to have fortified the vicinity of
Wessels Nek.
General Sir Frederick Carrington
has reached Cape Town and ;s going to Beira, Portuguese East Africa, forthwith.
Shipload* of Home*.
The war office proposes to land
nl Cape Town before the end of
May 20,000 horses, which will be
conveyed there in 23 steamers sailing from New Orleans, Buenos
Ayres and Australian ports.
Buller Take* One of the Pa**e*
In connection with the resumption of hostilities in Natal, an interesting rumor is current that Gen.
Buller has obtained command of
one of the Drakensberg passes,
where he hopes to take the Boers
in the rear. In the event of his
being successful, Gen. Buller has
enough troops to leave 20,000 men
to hold Natal, while he should advance by way of Harrismith,whence
he would be able to threaten the
Boer positions at Bethlehem and
Kroonstadt.
Hot Fighting at Wepener.
Aliwal North, April 9.—An engagement took place today at Wepener. The Boers' Vickers-Maxim
did considerable execution at first,
but the British guns soon got the
range and made great havoc. The
Rouxville commando has gone to
Wepener.
Aliwal North, April 9,—Evening.
—The fighting at Wepener was severe and lasted all day long. The
Boers received a check. Casualties
were heavy on both sides. Another
commando is advancing towards
Wepener from Dewets Dorp.
Aliwal North, April 10.—Heavy
fighting was continued at Wepener
this morning. The result is unknown. Three Boer commandos
are attacking the town.
Final Assault on mafeking.
Mafeking, March 27. — News
was received yesterday of the advance of the southern relief column.
The Boers this morning opened fire
at sunrise with seven guns, including one 100-pounder. This has been
the Boer siege gun and alone has
already fired over 60 rounds.
Under cover of the fire, the Boers
advanced to the northern face of the
forts, but retired precipitately on
coming within rifle range. They
also advanced to the southwestern
posts, but were repulsed. There
was one casualty.
The Boers under Commandant
Jan Cronje are evidently falling
back before the advance of the
southern relief column and are concentrating with two commandos,
who are retiring before Colonel
Plumer, in order to make a final effort to reduce the town. All the
forts and outlying positions are
manned. The troops are standing
to arms and everybody is under
cover. All are convinced that this
is the Boers' last attempt.
Colonel Plumer'* Latest Fight.
Buluwayo, April 3.—Colonel Plumer engaged the Boers between
Ramathlabama and Mafeking on
March 31st. The Boers appeired
in considerable force six miles from
Mafeking, and to prevent being outflanked on both sides, Plumer had
to withdraw on Ramathlabama by
retiring to his basis camp. The
engagement lasted three hours, and
the retirement was well carried out
in good order under a heavy fire.
The above dispatch is the British
version of the affair, first announced
April 5 in a special dispatch from
Lorenzo Marques.
Boer* Were Two to One.
Gaberones, April 1.—Yesterday
Colonel Plumer, with 2000 mounted
and a few dismounted infantry and
one Maxim gun,arrived at Ramathlabama, where he left the dismounted
men and proceeded along the railroad to within sight of Mafeking.
The advance guard, under Colonel
White, encountered a large body of
Boers, and almost simultaneously
the left and right flanks were attacked, ar.d sharp fighting followed.
The Boers were in crescent formation and outnumbered the British
two to one, according to British information. They advanced with
skill and stubborness and persistently endeavored to encircle the
British. After holding his ground
for an hour, Colonel Plumer retired,
with the Boers slowly following
him up. The fighting continued
throughout the ten miles retreat to
Ramathlabama, where the British
Maxim gun was brought into  play.
After a stiff fight, Colonel Plumer
reached his camp. The British
casualties were: Killed—3 officers
and 7 men;wounded—3 officers and
24 men; missing—11. The Boers'
loss was believed to be more.
The above is another British version ot the engagement and retirement of Colonel Plumer.
It is reported here that the advance guard of Lord Methuen's relief force has lett Vryburg for Mafeking
Gatacre Wa* Not to IIIi.mii-.
New York, April to,—The press
dispatches are still filled with belated accounts of the Reddersburg
fight, and the adventures of Burn-
ham, the American scout, says the
London correspondent to the Tribune. General Gatacre does not
deserve censure for sending out a
British column without artillery,
as it had been dispatched on a long
circuit tor the purpose of receiving
arms and pacifying the country,
and was caught through a sudden
change of the Boer tactics. The
troops offered a stubborn resistance
and fought as long as their cartridges held out. There was nothing
discreditable to the British arms in
this affair and General Gatacre
was well advised in not renewi ng
the attack with an inferior force
when he arrived with reinforcements
from Springfontein.
The Boers are reported to have
retired eastward, dispers. ,ig In
small bands. They were probably
bent upon sending the prisoners
north before renewing their attack
upon the isolated British posts.
Boer* Entrenched In Nalal.
The   Herald   prints   a   dispatch
from Ladysmith dated Sunday,
which says the Boers have posted
a big gun on Knights hill, north of
Elandslaagte, and another in the
vicinity of Wessels Nek station.
The enemy are reported to be
strongly entrenched at Helpmkaar.
Fighting at Elandslaagte
Pietermaritzburg, April 10.—
H eavy car.r.cnadicg ccirmence
this morning in the vicinity of
Elandslaagte.
Ladysmith, April 10.—Heavy
firing was heard early this morning
in the direction of Sundays river.
It continued for a few hours. No
details of the engagement have been
received.
Boer* Will Attack Bridge*.
Bethulie, Orange Free State,
April 9.—It is expected that the
Boers will endeavor to retake
destroy the bridges over the
Orange river. Consequently extraordinary precautious have been
taken. A force of Boers is located
12 miles east.
As a matter of fact, the Boers
again practically hold the Free
State eastward of the railroad and
are greatly encouraged by their successes at Reddersberg and Korn
Spruit.
PrUoner* Arrive At St. Helena.
Island of St. Helena, April 10.—
The Niobe and Milwaukee have arrived here with the Boer prisoners.
The health of the men is good, with
the exception of four cases of measles, which necessitated the Milwaukee being quarantined. The prisoners are quiet and well behaved.
They will probably land tomorrow.
The governsr was notified of the
desire of the authorities that the
prisioners be treated with every
courtesy and consideration.
WHOLE CONSPIBACY EXPOSES.
Taylor aud HI* Officer* Implicated ln
murder ol Goebel,
New York, April 6.—Henry E.
Youtsey, the Newport stenographer
now under arrest for complicity in
the assassination of Goebel, has, it
is said, made a complete confession
of the crime, says a Louisville dispatch to the Evening World.
He charges that the fatal shot
was fired by Jim Ward, a noted
Clay county feud leader, who previously had one murder to his credit.
Youtsey further declares that in the
conspiracy to remove Goebel were
Governor W. S. Taylor, Secretary
of State Caleb Powers, ex-Secretary
of State Charles Finlay, Captain
John Powers, of the Barbourville
militia Company, Sergeant Wharton Golden, of the same command,
W. H. Culton, clerk in the office of
Auditor Steeny, and himself.
A price was placed upon the
man's life and the sum paid over
was $1600, which Youtsey says he
himself handled. The $600 as the
first instalment was paid just before the fatal shot was fired.
Bubonic Plague In Australia.
Perth, West Australia, April 9.—
A man has died from bubonic
plague at Fretnantle.
I li.ll IIM. IN AMIIANTI.
Native Troop*  Sent to Nuprc** Tribal
War*   The Wire* Cut.
Accra, British Gold Coast, Africa, April 5.—Tribal fighting has
taken place in Ashanti. Governor
and Lady Hodgson are at Coomas-
sie. The telegraph wires have been
cut, communications stopped and
dispatches destroyed. A band of
Hoossas is leaving here for Coom-
assie. The situation appears to be
serious.
■IMIlM'l UI-tOLT SPHBADS.
Hi UUI. Native Troop* fio to Kuiua**lc
—TIM City I* Besieged.
Accra, Hritish Gold Coast, Africa, April 10.—A detachment of a
hundred Hoossas started for Kum-
assie today. As this body of troops
is considered insufficient, a large
force is being concentrated in the
hinterland.
Kumassie is evidently invested.
The Ashantis have captured several
native teachers and their families.
The rising is spreading.
BRITISH SUFFERED
Nearly 600. of the Morthumberland8
Are Prisoners.
London. April 7, io_5op. m. —
Lord Roberts reported to the war
office as follows:
"Bloemfontein, April 6.—The
casualties at Reddersburg were:
Officers killed—Capt. F. D. Casson
and Lt. C. R. Barclay, both of
Northumberlands; wounded, 2,
captured 8 N cn-commissioned
officers and men, killed 8, wounded
22, the rest were captured. Our
strength was 167 mounted infantry
and 424 infantry The enemy was
said to be 3200 strong with five
guns "
Boer PrUoner* Try to Escape,
Capetown, April 7 —A determined effort was made by the Boer
prisoners to escape from Simons-
town today. In the confusion one
prisoner was killed, another wounded and 14 are missing
The latest unnofficial dispatch
from Bloemfontein,dated Thursday,
says: "The Boers continue to
show much activity, and numbers
of British troops are arrivii 0 Jaily.
A small contingent of gunners from
the battleship Monarch left Cape
Town Friday Though Lord Roberts has lost nearly a thousand men
this week he is stronger relatively,
as four times as many men have
been landed at the Cape "
Par*on* Capture* 200 Bebel*.
Carnarvon, Cape Colony, April 6
—200 insurgents, who were not
aware that Sir Ch arles Parsons had
occupied Kenhardt and were on the
way to that place,have been captured by   the British troops
Boer* In Force at Wepener.
London, April 7—2:35 p. m—The
Boers aie in force at Wepener,
north of Smithfield, Orange Free
State, and are threatening General
Brabant's colonial division, the main
body of which, with the artillery, is
at Wepener
Telegrams which left Maseru,
Basutoland, north of Wepener, at
midnight, describe J the Boers as befog "in great torce" and as afraid to*
make a frontal attack, but it is added that they were endeavoring to
turn the British position by crossing
the Basutoland frontier by a road
starting on the Caledon river, the
road emerging south of Wepener.
Reports reach Maseru hourly of
Boer activity in the Orange Free
State
Ml ST   BE   OPEN   ON SI _ID.IV
French     t.overuuieut    Ha*    Abaolato
Control Over the Exposition  .
Paris, April 9.—-The French
authorities have decided that all exhibits at the exposition are to be
open to the public on Sundays.
The exhibits are under cover in
buildings erected by the French
government and over which other
authorities have no control.
LOW I.   TO    .il.MltltK.
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
»aul*h Wot Indie* Object  to Being
Sold to United State*.
St. Thomas, D. W. I, April 9.—
The king's birthday on Sunday was
unusually celebrated at St. Thomas
and St. Croix. There was an outburst ol loyalty lo Denmark and
demonstrations against the sale of
thc islands. There were a night
and day procession, people being
costumed in the national colors and
cheering the king.
Telegrams were sent by the inhabitants to the colonial council,
wishing his majesty a long reign
and expressing the hope that the
Danish flag would ever wave over
the islands.
■
•: ;;
Th^ opposnu
J.ARGE    AND   COMFORTABLE
ItOOJIS TABLE    UNSURPASSED    I.V    Tlin
NORTI|WE_?r.
SRMUBMETT'. -   Mini's
TIIE SILVKRTO.mil
f'.vTi KiiAY, .Venn. 14,   i!W0.
Tho   writs   for the   elections have |
been issued and the following urn the'
THK GOVERNMENT PLATFORM.
Continued From First Pnge.
J
1\1. TVT.  RRNEDUM,
SILVERTON,
B. C.
1'IIII.I.SIII.n  EV'KllV   KATUBDAV   AT
SILVEKTON, B. 0.
MATHESON nuns..    Editor* & Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
ml
|.iritercstitig dates:   Nominations,  May j company, tho same tobelncasi
■>r,i. x> ii-        t       n.i    «r-. ' not by way of n land grant; and no 8'jch
20th; Polling,   June Oth;  Writs   re-.        -      -, .   .   ,,.„,„., ,.non tha
"' i bonus  to  be granted except qpoowi
turnal.Ie J unit ;i0th; Legislature meets j COiittitioiJ that a fair amount ol the bonds
ruly f)lh. '■ or slimes oi the corni any bfi transferred
^^m ■' -   >. i...-    i  affective  moans
jfaigle's Black-
smih Sfion.
and Repairing Done.
EXPERT   JIOR8B   SHOER  ALWAYS   ON   HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY.
&. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON, B. C.
ARLINGTON
Conveniently Sitiniteil near
Railway Station and Wharf.
lhe
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS,
Dining Boom under lim charge ol
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with ill tho delicacies
pf the season.
pENDERSONA GKTHING, - P,,oi'n.
SLOOAN CITY,
B. 0.
J* G. GORDON,
iiiSFs,REiLi:sr.iTfi, co.\vf,vi\(;fk
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
glLVERTON,       -     -      -      II. C.
j. m. McGregor
provincial  land" surveyor
and mining engineer.
SLOCANCITY,    It. C.
Advertising rates will bo made known
upon application at this office.
.. ..<,......... a........ t
EDITORIAL'fflTCROPPIM   jj
lm:a-m;*.*iaam'.a'»
As requested, we publish j.i por
news columns tho platform upou
which Premi' r Martin appeals tq the
voters of the Pro-inee for their support
at the ensuing election. This plat-
form will furnish inntcrial for plenty
of thinking ou the part of the electors
,1-1-Mcintosh,
DEALER IV ALL KINDS OF
' FRESH FRUIT CONFECTIONERY	
CIGARS     AND
TOBACCOS
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
" STATIONARY     LINE
—FISHING T'ACKLE	
THE LATEST  i'QVELS.  kc.
The Miners' Union in engaging in
tbo coming election should remember
that they nie entering a period of more
significance and importance to tlicm
than was tlio strike, through which
tht-y have just passed, and it is Important that they maintain an unbroken
front In the contest. And if, as some
would have us believe, the Unions nre
going to rotiti'l on their friends, it is
time that it shun I I bc made known.
It   is through  legislation  and  not
through strikes and boycotts that  the
workingmen will ultimately win their
victories.    Tho ballot  js nov; the only
legitimate weapon in  their bands anil
in the near approaching election  they
should sink all petty  difference! and
exercise (heir franchise for tlio common good   This, we know, his been
preached to the worklngman for years,
Imt tho lesson Inn) been barlly learned
hy tin in.    Incredible as it may appear
to the onlooker of Unionism, tlie niem-
I hers of the various Slocan Unions appear roudy to play into the hands  of
their political antagonists  by dividing
their forces and nullifying   their  own
strength.    If   tlio  Unions wish to  le
a  potential   factor in   Slocan politics
they must unify their efforts  and  use
tho ballot as a lever  and not   as a
plaything.
No*- the political atmosphere must
rapidly clear itself and electioneering
begin. In n few days more Slocan
Voters will   begin   to   arrange   tliem-
to the   Province,  and  c
taken to give tlio Province control of the
frelghtand passenger rates, and provision
made against sueh railway haying any
labilities against it except Hftual cost.
18. To take away from tlio Lieutenant-
Silverton
B.C
selves   and   street   corner  politicians' Govornor-in-Cuuncil any power to in alee
' substantive champs i« the law, coofln-
get in their deadly work.
The statement that "Billy" Tliopi-
linson makes public, denying tho report that ho would be a cuiKtidate, has
made the stock of some others tuko a
rise in the political market, B.lly has
saved several aspiring politicians many
a sleepless night by his prompt action.
ing Ilie jurisdiction entirely to mutters of
detail in working out the laws enacted
by the Legislature.
19. Tlio establishment of an Institution
within the Province for iho education ol
tie Deaf mid Dumb.
20. To repeal lhe Alien Exclusion Abt,
as the reasons jnatl'ying itj enactment
no longer obtain,
21. An amicable settlement of the di.-
*********t»********w**w I puto with the Dominion Government SS
CitizenB of the Windy City  are   re- | to Headman's Island,.St.inley   Pork  an'
joioing over tlie appoint ment of a Slo
can coroner, as  they   will   now learn
from what the town died.
Silverton, B.C.
SINN OTT k O'DONNELL
Li •■ 'i
FREIGHTERS AND PACKERS.
Contracts large or small taken
And promptly attended lo.
Stables in SILVERTON, B   C.
OHA8. A. WATERMAN k CO.
AUCTIOKKKIIN,  CUSTOMS BrOKEIIH,
And General Real Estate Aornth,
9»r* In llcalrr Blosfc    -   .    u*ker St.
■ NELSON,   B, C.
SILVERTOIH PggjlMM.
NO. 9fi, W. F. Of If.
Meets every Saturday in the Union
11*11 in Silverton, nt7:30 v. M.
.1. M. M. Bk.nkdiwi,
1'rbsldent.
J, I. McTktohii,
Financial-Secretary
NlTUATION   WAKTRP.
; ,'    i .
A third year student of tbe School of
Practical Science, Toronto, desiros employment in some ollice requiring an expert draughtsman, Apply to "Draughtsman" care of The Silvertonian.
}»««fSO   OR   IN  ARREARS
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 18 DUE
BLUE  CROSS     WILL
U***e&  BE   POUND    IN  THIS
jgb.VRE.   '   SUBSCRIPTION     ARK
VAY/.BLK   INvADVANCE.    PRICE
^WO DOLLAR^  \ YEAR.
Through Tlio Week.
Extracts   From    Various  Sources.
A larjre nuiiilier fiom here journeyed
to New Denver on Ttinrsilny evening to.
Iie.irtlie Louise Brehany Company izive
what proved to I.e one of the best entertainments ever given In the Slocun.
Miss Brehany possesses, a sweet nnd
expressive voice, which showed at its
be-*t in "Tlio last Rose of Summer." Too
mnch rri-ise cannot' e aivea of Miss 01-
ga Rchmoll's violin playing. Her pxi cu-
tion is nil that could be desired, and lur
"Old Folks nt Home'' must certainly
have pleased those who could not < njoy
h"r more classical selection "Faust K.in-
t.isi de concert."
'"They sny that the Canadian sleeping
gitl is awake now for good."
'"How lonu did she  sleep?''1
• Six weeks at n stretch."
"Dill she snore?"
"I duniio. She only spoke once during her longest nap,"
••What did she sayT"
' Is my nightcap on straight ?"
The Initial number of the Slocan Diill,
which appe '.ictl mi Friday of last week,
is n very eredital.le issue. It promises
to look niter SI..nun's interests, and to
jndge from the inn? af hand, shonldbe
fully uhle to do so. The Drill should
assist materially In reinoylng the cap-
piug of somnolence which has encrw-
ted ihe energy ot our neighbor town fur
some time
other Iniiiis. and nn arrangement with
Mr. f.u.li'nte, hy which, if possible, ii
sawmill indn-try mny be established and
(tarried on ou Deadman's Island, under
[siilUfaotoiy  conditions,   pt'otociing the
i interests ot the public,
22. Proper menus of giving technical
' instruction to miners uml prospectors.
TLIE MAIN TRAIL RUNS FAST THE DOOR OF
T-pWilsoJiL   Hf#^
fe E HOtelf A. E. TEETH. PROPS.
PATRONS ARK WELL TAK FN CAKE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THE   BEST   BRANDS OF  WINI S, LIQUORS
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MlNLSd MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -   -   r SLOCAN, B. (J.
StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK   HORSES  IOR   HIRE   AT   REASONABLE
KA'n s A GENERAL KREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS 10NE.
Outside Parties Desiring Horses in diverted
Can  Have  Them  Reserved By Wilting To—
»       "♦        f      ' t '      ♦     . 4
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON, - • It
little willie's Profession.
A New Kitglaml small hoy has heen
discovered doing a lucrative business in
Ins mother's backyard-, A placard pinned upon the fence to this effect shows
Iho direction of his financial sulienping.
IVM I IK J0.VK8 wi!.l. EAT
One small green worm for     I een'
One large green worm for - cents
One small fussy worm for * cents
One largo fussy worm (or.....'. ,.5 .en'-
THE WM. HAMILTON MANUFACTING CO..
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
l*etej;l)()roiiKli» Ontorio,
Ono small gieen to.nl for.
2o cents!
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENT.^I
NOTICE:—"Tniuurn,"  "lavtataiiAr ,
ni.K" und "R.UMiow QlTAUTg"  lilneryl
Claims;   situate in   the  Arrow   Luki i
Mining  Division   of ',i e.st Kootenu)
District.
Where   located:—On  Cariboo   creek.
adklntng   tlio    Millie Mai'k   .Mine'..
Claim.
Take notice that I, 3, D. Anderson. P. L  ;
S , oi Trail, lt ('. acting as agpnl fur the ,
Kamloops  Mining   and    Devel ippiuin
t'ompany. Limited, Free Miner's  t'eiti
lieateNo. alt415, intend i*i.\ty days fiom
the date hereof, to apply to tha Minim.
Recorder for    Certificates  of Improv-1
ements, for the pmpi.se   of nbts^uing
Crown Grants of tho above cbiims.
Anil further take noticj  t li.it   action]
iin.k-i si rtnm .';7.'nili-i    ne  commeiii'ea
before the issuance of snch Certificates
of lnii>rovMiiielits
Dated this 8th dav of September, A.D.
1800.
Saturday Nicht j   ^/*^'WV\'>i>W****»*r\r^^
|   Syrup of Horehomd & Tolu   |
AND ( ^^^^^H        <
A^<V\AAA_*/»A.V>.'' lV*^A^~^',^*AA_AA)VVkA• iWW/AWW iVWW ftf
THE
VIOTORIAf
HOTEL.
I!f8dqp.arlftt For Miiiiii" Men :•
i \ i viiii.Mi m 4t, : I .T
AND   ( 1   'i(   l'A'IK.
;.i i r \ nm l.r.'^si i> in
n;i: N<i.'iii\\i>T.
{\mU&MfyMIU,   PrifN.
'•>        a i i. v i:rton.  b
■'I  i 2 j Ml.
J. D. Akoebson.
";CA3WAI3iAX
E. M. Brindle,|pacific
Jeweler   &c,
esirestoinform
his many cus-
TIIAT    HE    WILL
comers IU,:si;MI, BySIK]£ga
IN TIIE SLOCAN DURING TIIE
HUMMER, AND TIUNKS THSM
FOR THEIR PAST PATRONAGE,
Charles Cliff.', of Sandon, with an
uvownd intention of porginj; the Vo'ers-
List, llns entered appeals ngninst some
six hundred names on the Li*t
We are assured hv Mr.  Oliffe  that
his only   iutention  in   (h's   wliolesile
appealing is to have a perfectly  fair
List for June  15th.     If this is so,
we are surprised  to seo lioiv  greatly
hi- Z"al  has  exceeded   his  discretion.
Among those who are appealed against
many are undoubtedly entitled to vote,
ipiite ns much so as the  virtuous   Mr.
Cliffe himself.
The modus operandi  of Mr.  Clifi'e
* I
was to send copies of tho Voters'  hitt
to the various postmasters in the Rid- I
ing, asking them to  check   them up.
All who wero returned as "dead," "left
tho country"  or "not  known,'' were 	
promptly appealed against without any j ITS KIND ON TDK MARKET,   Al.l
further effort, being made to  find out
the correctness of the checking up.
Through this district many voters
are not generally known by their proper names, a nickname answering most
purposes. Thus many ".veil-known
voters nre on Cliff..'s blacklist. Others
appealed against as "left the country''
have merely moved from one part of
the Riding to another; some are appealed against without any apparent
reason, and ni! duplicute names will be
struck off.
Mr. ClilFe's action, while it may not
deprive nny of their vote, is bound to
cause inconvenience to many, Mr.
Clitl'e among the number. One who
keeps slicking his lu-atl coiitinunlly in
the road, must not expect to by put
'nside r.livayi with (plfltlonell,
Lilac Cream
FOR CRACKED OR snl.l
HANDS.     FOR  FSK AFTI'lt BHAV
ING.   AN EXCFLLKNT IIKALFK OF
CULS OR RUItNS.   Pi ice LV.
THIS PREPARATION IS
BEYOi D DOUBT THK FINEST OI
ITS KIND ON TilK MARKET.
LIKE IT WHO TRY.   Prico ita
Perhaps
THE MANY BUDDEK
CHANGE*IN TDK WEATHER HAS
GIVES YOU A COLD.  TRY HORE-
HOUND AND TOI.U.   Price 20c.
SYRUP OF IIOREIIOUND
AND TOLU IS KNOWN TO MANY
WHOM IT HAS CUItKD. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES, SOLD UNDER A flUARANYEF.. Price 2.«-.
Sold
AT   TDK
SUv<3rtoi*   I'ure
Ortitr 1'rngs \\u\
»tor«3.     ('Ii/'iiiir.ils Ke|il.
LAKE AVE,   HILVERTOV,   D   Q
and S03 Line.
Till: DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
'JO ALL I'OINls
EAST .a si. WEST
First-Class Rleepers on all Trains from
P.KVi.f.STOKT,   and KOOTENAY I.I>
TOURIST CARS   pan .Medicine Hat
Daily for s-r. r.ui..
Slxovvk nnd  Wkonickilivs for Toii-
oxrii.
Fiiiihy. for Monthk w. and BOSTON,
— Sumo cars pass Revelstoke one day —
 earlier.	
i u.\.\i:crio.Ns.
IV ihe North,Reyi Ish Le, nnd Main Line
7:80ex' Monday iv, fiilvrrton,
ur. ex. .Siimii.y, 10 UO
I'or   RosbIuii I,   Nelson       CfoWl   Nest
llr nu h ii 11 iiiiii.i.i.itv Country,
10:80ex, Sundij Iv Bilverton,
ar. i x Suudiiy 18:CO ,
To H d fio.n Bandon.
13:00ux Sfliid.iy Iv Silverton,
ar, U Sumbiy, 10:20
TtCBIII ISSI'I'I' lllUiiI'lill    AS.I    H.'.IIHU.I
 DIIBCKKD Tu ni.'.l'IS.VTIOX. 	
For rates nnd full Information njiply to
n aiesl local agent or
Jl. H  RFKVIS, A.'ont, .Silverton
W. V. ANDERSON,
Trnv. Pans. Agent, Nelson
E. .I.COYLE.
A. < i. P. Aganti V^ne.iiivei
[The Strike Is Off
Int] Wi arc mm'
; Keadv for
I Badness.
.. A' \ n UKS, JSWI : KB '
'*,!>■ I-UOXIM, >l I.I.I. M.
ip \mi Pi \ ,m. N -.. i -
JiriEs.    I'mno L.sMrs
• ini> O.WI r.\nu ..
• OWBfl     AtmCLKB
'* r."i   Nt m roii    : .
H^________________^_____BEx a  -
I   M
'■'■: 11 ;\ Vn.-i n
lKt'lt
And now  my Koot-jSjixu Tiikm.
onny Friends  I an. *■
p RPated to  rer. ive •
voiir     oiders      Fo.  ■j
'///• i"  ri
/j^*3t
^0" //r\ ft
,.•>.
w
^•ViMVv\ WWirt,VWW\*
I     OUR   W.\T( 11   AND .11 WE1KUY
> RI I'AlKlNO 1 1 'I/I.1M1 NT IS AL
*   As ive o ily employ He most expe •
y     iono il men, alUoik jh (,iaiustbi n
|   Mail mid KipnN Older* Receive Onr
> l'i impl Attention,
IM.VTHHU.KT THK PLACE
JAOOD LOVER.   "Tiik Jkwblui."
NFLKON,  11 O.
L
C
axative
old Cure.
*A/V*A*>A_<WWVW
To"(Jure a   Oold In   One Day.
Contains    The  New   ingredient.
.......   'I RY    II'	
PUICK :/...        Ai All DruguUts.
AODMShr
CRteui^
GtORCETOWN
w««So KmCSV/S A'SD V,S",LK-
  _.._ WRITE L.s    OATAIiOdUES FR^E,
The THISTLE HOTEL
NOW IlEoi-ENici,
I'FDF.I! A NEW
MANAGEMENT,
«OU«E LK.NtiVAl'EI)
A^'"» Tin: iiar it r.i.v
RESTOCKED
W^p AVK„   SILVERTON, R. <,,.

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