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The Silvertonian Feb 17, 1900

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Array Vhjr^^1^^'
And Up Tp Dafe
Wining News
THE
XI %
Of The Richest
Camp  Of British
Columbia? 4
*mtt
VOLUME THREE.
8ILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY J7, W'jO.
NUMBER 51
99**
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t A* I^I'XCInriLon
GENERAL
MERCHANTS,
HM***_***A*^>_M_*¥^W¥¥**V¥M¥WVMV¥MV
#     t
iAKEYIEW   HOTEL
 Silverton -
IHTTHIS  HOTEL 18 NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE    BAR   IS  SUPPLIED   WITH  BEST  BRANDS   OF
.WINE8, LIQUORS AND CIGARS
"OUT TO TUE DEAD MAN'S CITV."
"Tramp,—tramp.—tramp, ho)e, to tbe
toll of the old church bell,
Marching In solemn order out to the
barren slope,
Oat to ihe -'end mau's city, hia ghaatly
ranks to swell,
For another soul signed death's pay
roll, from down lu tho deep black
slope."
\Xd.  2v£.   rEZrLOTxrles.   Prop
QP# BXJKISCS &co
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER8 IN ALL
KINDS OP FRESH AND SALT MEAT3
RETAIL STORES aT
Bilverton. Nelson, Trait, Ymlr, Knslo, Panrtun,
New Denver, Cascade Cily, Grand Forks, 8iro"ar
Midway and tin en ti rod.
MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTFNDF.D TO.
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. 0.
a>i
Are You Looking For
Si YLISH GOODS?
t
1
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF 80 DItOP IN  AND   MAKE YGUR   tfELFC-
TION FROM MY 8HELVE8.      FIT AND FINISH
GURVNTEED.   OV ERC0ATING8 JUST IN.
LlEBSl'DEH,  lhe Tailor:   Silverton, B. C.
w
3'Ani Mcintosh, one ol Silverton'e old-
lime miners, ilieu iu the Slocan Hospital
last Wednesday iiiuht.
The deceased wan one of the pioneers
of lh*. Sii.chii and was vtsll ami levurahly
knoit'ii throughout VV est Kootenav. He
was an Outuiio man, Ilia home having
been in Vanlake 11.lis, near Glengarry.
He hud made Silverton hia home fur
some Years, and had  pounded steel  in
sll the prihcii al minea around here, b.iv-
IIM been unplo.ed uulil a ft ty days  mc
ai Mm H.-tsiu in inc.
Hia euddeu death comes aa a shock to
Iim fiieud* aud tomiadea here. One
week ago he wss in b'a aucustound
health, a flight cold tout rattled on ^al
unl.iv laat developing into acute pneur
iiiomu on Suudiy. He was taken lo the
no_.pii.il aud lmur.-ved sic.ulily 11,1 t.i u
1.1 e hour un u ednesd it night when he
took a eii i.leu change lur the worse,
i-iiinma pealli's pay roll after a ahull
atiuaule
Tl.e Silverton Miners' Union to which
lhe (tectum d Iim i belonged, tm'j
ciitidiicl the funeral ceremo..! ■*, wl 1.1,
take piuue this morning al 10:30, ii
New Denver.
THE LOCKOUT
NOW OYER,
'-Tfee Mirers' UraIoiti» take ti*@
Initial Steps*
wm let tbe mi mum fulfill their m\ pilots.
PUZZLFS MINING EXPFKTS.
A remarkable development tb. t a
,.i ci lug i veiy i neiueer and mining m»i.
Ol ativ ex eriiiice in Cripple Creek di-.
tnct who has hcHid uf il ha- occur, d t>|.
Ilie Clara D. claim belonging to >h-
L-aiii|(ioii company. Tlie lessees "per
a'inx on the snuib of this pio.mtv hivt
discliu-ed ■ (leak fotuiatinli Which ie the
Uml ol its iibiute to be found In thi-
dUiriet, or in tnt't any iit-iiT distiict, at
far as kimwn. Tlie strike ws made in
the Ui'tniii nl a lOtl-iuoi siuifi un.i j-an
ineitul ir vein ..(tj'i.,1 z in the nnnirt
nH'k whicli is iii'ilesite. The Vein lib-
tlielKiiioii.Kftbesb.il and runs .'nun
(100 io t5"0 accoiding la thei.wajs
ihe peoali.rity it ili.it lb- quarti ve'.n i-
. miipoeed ol nodules ui qu t'x which are
iiniut il.e t-ize nf a pea wbicli when
broken men are impregi ateu with flue
i a11ides ul flee gold. These nodules are
►ciiter .A ibr'.ii-jli ibe audeaite as pluma
sre In a i milling.
Mr. Charles I. Mnnre the well known
mining engineer ami expert, has eg-
amiui'il the fiiru.iiti'iii and i- reimrti-il as
having said Ihat li U ih-siinil <r l'i anv-
'hlng he has tei S'i n in ill- Cilpide
C'eek di.-liici. O lit-r mining men stale
dial the formation is a novelty snd sre
a' a lo-s tn explain Imw il oii lira. At
all events this Hnd ia the thai uf I *
nature made in the great g Id ei'iip nu I
mny mean considerable to the future i.f
the district —Daily ltecord.
List Thursday afternoon, in speciil inee'iog-i, tht Slocan Miners'
Unions resolved to lower the Union scale of wages from $3.50 per
hift,  to $3 25 per   shift.
Tide virtually ends the lab.-ir troubles in the S'ocan aa it leaves
thn men   at liberty    to   work   in   any   mine offering that stale   of  wages.
Nothing has been given out rffiiaily by thn heads of tbe various
diner*' Unions as to the decisions of the meeting*, but it can be
r..ken as  true  that    action   as   above   has  been   taken.
tt only remoiiu now for tho various mine owners, who have promised  to throw  open tbeir mines at  thia figure, to hire  th? ir minera and
XO    tO    WQ'lt.
liie B.,sun has alrea ly* engaged a considerable crew of minera and
' ia thought tbat only a te. days will piss before the Wakefield,
Galena Mines and E nily E litb will bo employing large numbi m of
miners and all our ild shippeia    will again resume shipping.
Next week the Wakefield concentrator will le-gin its trial run and
u tbn early summer the promUeJ mills at the E nily Edith and Galena
Mines    wid   be   begun.
The Slocan in central and Silvnrton in particular ahould have a
prosperous summer, with all the old mines working at full blaat and thine w ones  developing.
make mention uf an importation uf
-wedet from .Mfiinesnt i for lhe 1'uvi-e
.nine In heb df id unH.it and ciitllili-j.
men lier-. I wish lo empha'ii'ally dent
thai ilnrn were any tfwides hiiiiih^i
the late lutisinii "Out, they In mil' cuiu-
p.i-ed aliuo.-! il nut en'iiely uf fiiuis,
Yours U.-h|iec|[iil.f,
.Ions  E. Ntlek.
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JM* IM* BENEDUM,
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Silverton.      •
B, C
the main Trail runs past the door of
!E
1E. TEETER, PROPS.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES
BAR  FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS OF WINES, LIQUORS
AND CIQAR8.
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET, SLOOAN, R. 0.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  JI0RSE8  FOR  HIRE   AT   RFABONABLE
HATES A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS DONE.
.ml li'iui.. m**mmm***i i—j—ZTZi—m
Ootalde Partlea Dfialring Horses iu Silverion nrti_iATT»
Pan Have Them ReaervedBy Writing To—   Al *' McDONALU,
f        f t.        t t t t BILVERTQN, - • B. C.
VISITED THK CONCENTRATOR
La-i Saturday • veninic. a mer y sleitth
loa I o1 Silv.-rtnni.ins waa driven lo lh-
Viakefleld C"iici ntrauir, llinuudi the
kindness uf Nell O'Donnell, who placed
lb-lab, (oiii-in-li.iiiil and -kill with tl e
rilirniie nt their cominaiid.
Upon uriivini( at Ihe UmIc field build-
i'lidt the party found the renfc4kHMa
e'esred out (or a dance, by C< o1*
M Court and II. Tborimrn, the ml. r« of
thut part of lhe uil my. After don't iu.
tli.i inniy whs treated to ii'iundsnce of
H n.»d ihing'i prepared hv Mr. M C l\rt
who mutt hnve In en complimeuled by
the way Ida viand" disappeared.
Then the Couctntratnr was explond
and ibe spick and span new maehiiuiy
exsnvnel under the iiuidanee of J ^.
McRae. who hss charge of its in tidl-
atimi. The tramw y, whose wond rt
were laid bare hy the builder, l'etf r
Lemieux, was i ext ln«i«ecie', and an
inviteiiiiii to run over the line was • n-
lended to the ladies, bin dechn d wilh
thanks Tlie hook-keeper's ntflee even
wa-invaded. .Mr. Sickle-, exhibiting his
hnuaeh Id no Is gracion-ly.
Tie party drove home early Sunda
mornhiK, leeling that  thanks  to  the|r
many hoata thev had had on enjoyable
outing.
Wednesday evening aa- "Kag Time
Niuhi" for the Lil.riry 8 i.iiety, which
met at Ijra. II Cilbiuk's. At miy he
iiifeinil   from   the naioe,   the   i-vinini!
WHS if. Voted to till' litest   |lo|_tl|,||   tlllltil-.
and choiu.tes, solos ant orchestral
-e|. ciions were itiven by the inembeis.
More new meml.frs wme e; rolled at
tbis meeting, and the Sicietv ran row
11.lust of a larite membership ns Well
as a talented oie.
NO SWEDES AMONG THEM.
We are glad to be aide to pnhll-h Ihe
billowing letter, which expbiina itself
Kaslo, Fuh. Uiti. 1890
Ediloi Silvertoni ui,
Deur Sir,
lu your laat issue you
The R v. Father C ne will say ms-s
heie tu morrow in imi ig.
Mr ami Mrs W. H. Brandon n-pre-
s. met) Silverion at Die ItmsUud Winter
Carnival.
Sime ft lend of Tub Silvbbtonian
iionored Hi. I iy the presentation of n
. Hlnliiie last  Wulees.tay.
Five men went in work ut the Eider-
pi i-e Hiine last Momlat. Thev biiuuhv
He ir blauke a lu Irom lhe Coast in hand
.trips.
Themercurv plajing taa around lhe
aero mafjk the latter part of the week
iniikei, things interestiun for the wood
i-ellera.
To asve  money, study   the  _jehate
J.fcaidon lux. s paid before June 80di
„exi.   Tne list will be found in another
column.
A hargn load ol ice from Summit Lake
ha- been dellVcled lure lur our I C.d
hotels keepea, who are preparing to do
a nig b'lsineiis this summer.
Divine ^eitvicK will be he'd In Silter-
ti-n H»SI Suiid.iv eveuiiiK «l '••••'• every-
oue is cordiaily Inviied lo aiiend.—Juhn
U. Duncan, Picsuytcriaii  Mluisler.
All   work   in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the fdivertoii Urun Store, wil
be promptly forwaided to JaootiDovei
tbe well-known Nelaon jeweler.    All re
pursareou.va\sre«ii nu o.xu yeah.*
Our thunks ure due the New Denver
L "dge for auppleuieiiling onr ttf.jria in
Informing the pnlitio of the next nieei-
lug of ihe Licence Coiu'idssiuiiera. It
is hiich iit-iglilioily acta as these Hint
make iiewapsperdom a pleasuut field in
the Slocan.
James Wllka, Organfcer for Ihe
Weeteni F. deration of Minera In British Columbia, C. Foley. Canadian
member of the Executive Board of Ihe
W. F of V., and Alfred Parr, S.cretary
of the District Boird, Here in town
un Sunday last.
The Sloean Minera' Union Ball, held
last night, drew a large number ul
iliinoera from here No rupn t has yet
bi en received from them, but, judging
from the \\4 preparations made for their
wnlciune. it can he safely stated tbat
ihey had a good lime.
THE BULLETIN BOARD.
"All day lnnu Ihe Bulletin board* at
M im liet-i' r boils.- me clun-lv n-aiu ed h\
friends   a-d   relatsvea  of soldiers ai the
frunt "—Dully pdper.
Up tn lhe IniHe'iii hnsrds thev go
Fathers snd motliera and aweethearls
and wivca,
Reading lhe names with voices low—
K.iliah Mildi-'re have be* tlu-irlites.
A lii-t ■■) n.iniea of wounded ami d. ad,
On the bulletin boird. and ihst is all-
I'.ui hearts are hr->ken and tears areehed
Fur heroes who fell at duly'a cull.
A mother looks up ut the fatal 11_-t,
And lu-r eyes ure lihured   wilh  falling
tears,
Aashes es the nameof her hoy ahe kissed
A month ago 'mill tinin-l -i ing cheers
Of Ihe crowd that stooil by the liuusport'a
side
When her boy's regiment sailed  away
On ihe Koijs'h cre-l her hem died,
And idle Is u'o'ie ill 'he wutlil   to-day.
A father looks up at the list nf dead,
Aid a i.ame is there that be dreads to
see.
He iliinkaof his boy and the words he
said:
' U "iid bye. dad: don't fear for me;
I'll do my duty as t on did yours,
When you  fought  and bled at Majuba
Hill.
We've got the ch nice to tthip iln>se Boers
Or die like men ami Btitons still,"
A girl lo kh over the names with fesr,
Ds dl and her tears tell  unrestrained,
Sweetheart ur brother? 'iwtis soiueone
d -ar,
But men mnrt die for rietorles gained.
S.ul are the nights when the battle's done.
And dire the havoc of Aie and stvord.
And sal are the hearts of muuy  a one,
Wholearu   their loaa at the bulletin
board.
'Tis the fortune of war, and somo must
full,
And some will return as victors crowned
Honor to 'hem ihey mc heroes all;
Tlnir deeds  wili live while the world
goes round,
And song and story for time wil'. tell
H'-w  Briiain's soue froir  every land
Fa'ed iifl- ball and bursting shell,
Fur Queen and Empire, bund iu hand.
t-J, W. S. in Victoria Times.
Purely Personal 'Paragraphs.
Mra. Bsenn ia confined to ber bed
ihrongh illness.
Miss Bertha Barker entertained her
voiitigfii-ndaata birthday parly laat
Vednedajr.
Q. A. .Tackinn left for Nelson oa
riuirsd.iv to meet Mrs. Jackson, wbo is
rfi'ii'liiui; IIOIU   l\ejjllKt,
General Freight-Agent Peters and
Aid, (Blake) Wilson were np from
Nelson on Wednesday.
Wm Hunter has left for Victoria," vie
Phoenix. He will do some wire polling
for Phoenix while among the politicians.
W. J. Twiss of Ka-lo paid the town a
visit on Wednesday. While here be
maintained Ids reputation aa a lightning
insurer by writing up five policies.
Rotiert Tinling. fuherof John Tinling
f Ihis town, died In Tacoma oa the
3 li inst,, at the residence of Ida eon, Alexander Tinling Tne deceased waa 71
tears old. 'I he many Sloean friends ot
Mr Juhn Tinling will sympathise with
uim in this soriow.
L-isi MondiV, Mr. and Mm. Bert Mc-
Ssugh; returned to Silverton, where
hey intend to make Uieir home. Mr.
Mi-Nni-dit will build himself a cottage
itdj lining the residence of Ids father, Mr
N F. MeN.uiuhr. The return of tbe
!'<.uiig couple id welcomed by their many
f iends here.
MARK
TWAIN'S    EARLY    LIFE.
By   Himself.
What lo do next T It wa* a momentous vnestion. 1 had gone ont into the
worl I to shift fir myself, at the age of
ihiiteen ((.r mv father had endorsed for
Mends; and allium ;b be left us a sump-
iit'iis legacy of pride in hia fine Virginia
stock and its national distinction, I
presently found that I could not live oa
ihat alone without occasional bread to
wash it down wiih). I had gained a
livlih-Hid iu various vocations, but had
not dazxled anybody with mv successes;
-■ill the list waa before me, and the
eiiipWt liberty In thn matter of ehooav
ing. proviiM ( wanted to woik—which
t mil not, utier lielng vo wealthy. I had
i.pee la^n a yiroeeiy clerk, for otm day.
tint had noii-uined so much sugar in that
lime that I nas relieved from further
luty hy the proprietor: said he wanted
me outside, so Mist be could have my
custom. 1 bad studied law an entire
week, and then gw. n it Up because it
was so pr <sy and tiresome. I bad engaged briefly in the study of black-
smithing, but wasted so much thro
i r\ ing In fix the bellows so that it would
nlow its.lf, that the master turned me
••drift in disgrace, and told me I wonld
rome to no good I had been a bookseller's cleik for awhile, but the
.-ost i oners but herr d me so much I
could not read with any comfort, and ao
the pmpiietor gave me a furlough and
forgot to put a limit to it. I had clerked
in a ding : tore part of a summer, but
my piei-cripiions were unlucky, and we
appeared to s II more stomach pnmpa
tint u soda water. Holhsdtogo. Iliad
made of myself u tnlerablu printer, under
:he impres-ioii th'-it I would be another
Franklin some day, but somehow had
mi>-Bed the connection thus i'ar I was a
good average St Louis and New Orleans
pilot and l-y uo means ashamed of my
uiiiliiies in liml linn, and t did long to
stand behind a wheel ag.iin aud never
rosin any mori—but I had heen making
such sn uss of myself lately |n graudil-
uipieni letters Inane, about my blind
le, d ..nd European excrnsinn that I did
what luaiiy mid mine a pjor disappointed miner bad done Iiefore; aaid "It ia
all over wiih me now, and I will never
go back borne to be pitied —and snubbed.
I hud been a private secretary, a silver
miner and a silver mill operative, and
amounted to less than nothing in each,
and now—What to do nextT
I yielded to Higbie's appeals and
consented to try ihe mining once more.
We climbed far upon the mountain aide
and wei.t to work on a little rubbishy
claim of urns that had a shaft on it eight
feet deep. Higbie descended into it and
worked bravely with bis pick till he had
loosened up a deal of rock and dirt and
then 1 went down with a long-handled
shovel (the most awkward invention yet
c nit rived by man) to throw it out. You
nni-t brace the shovel forward with the
side of your knee till it is full, and then,
with a skillful tots, throw it backward
over your left sbolder. I made the toss
ami landed tbe mess just on the edge of
the shaft and it all came back oa my
bead aud dowu the back of my neck. I
never said a woid. but climbed out aad
walked home. I Inwardly resolved
that I would starve belore I would
make a target of myself and shoot
rubbish at it with a long-bahdlt.4
shovel. ttPsAk
BOERS ARE READY
ENGLAND ANXIOVS.
\w] An Making Preparations to
Shell Kimberley.
Modder River, Feb. io.—Appar
entlythe Boers have brought all
their big guns from Mafeking to
ahell Kimberly. Our naval guns
jhelled Magersfontein today, but
the Boer guns were silent. It is
supposed that the enemy have withdrawn their artillery. They are
blowing up the permanent way beyond Morton Siding.
.The Boers still man their trenches
but their numbers are apparently reduced. The bulk of their force has
gone to Kimberly or towards our
flank.
Modder River, Feb. ti.—-Lord
Robetta is here. On appearing before the troops Friday he was enthusiastically received. He visited
the camp of the Highland brigade
this morning and complimented
General Macdonald and his men on
their bravery at Koodorsberg.
London, Feb. u.—Midnight—
The war office has just issued the
following dispatch, dated today,
from the general commanding at
Cape Town:
"Clements reports from Rensburg
that on Friday, February 9th, the
Boers tried to turn his right flank,
but were beaten off. Position maintained.    Casualties small.
"Kimberly reports that the Boer
fighting force was apparently increased on Wednesday, February
7th. Next day the Boers commenced the construction of trenches
to the east, nearly parallel to the
Glacis and 4cxx_ryards from the Premier mines. A native reported that
he accompanied some Bbers who
left Mafeking for Kimberly, carrying with them a six-inch gun and a
quick firing field gun. The former
opened fire on Kimberly. Otherwise the situation is unchanged."
Mulled British damp.
Rensburg, Feb. 10.- Tbo Bo»«
today shelled the British camp with
bat little effect.
Hlllysrd'. Lo...
London, Feb. 12.—A dispatch
from' Buller's camp, dated yesterday
noon, describes a daring feat on the
. part of the Boer general, Viljoen.
A Maxim-Vickers gun, abandoned
by the'Boers in a donga, was about
to fall into the hands of the British,
when the fearless Viljoen himself
brought back a team of horses and
escaped with the gun, heading his
way between the red flashes and
black clouds of lyddite shells which
the British artillery concentrated on
bim.
During the night General Hill-
yard fortified himself continually
with much skill, building traver and
bead coveri. Consequently.though
exposed to a terrific shell fire all of
the 7th, he only lost 41 men. In
xi minutes 63 shells exploded in the
bill and 240 were counted in two
hours, besides smaller shells irom
Maxim-Vickers guns, which were
innumerable.
Preparing   For   Alias k
London, Feb. 13.—Later war ad-
rices amy that both sides seem to
be collecting themselves for attack.
The left horn of the Boer army is
creeping through Zululand and
threatening the British right at
Chievely. Gen. Joubert with 6,000
■en ia reported as endeavoring to
•tuck Gen. Buller.
Volnntcers   Go  North
London, Feb. ia.—The London
volunteers have gone north from
Cape Town, after an enthusiastic
send-off.	
Tke Last Rite..
Brockville, Ont., Feb. ta.— The
fooeral of the late Judge Senkler
•eeurred Saturday afternoon.
Bis Health ImproT**
Ottawa, Feb. 13.—Hon. Israel
Tarte, who haa been ill for the past
week, haa recovered.
Waiting lor News From fcord Huberts
ahd Mekair Blrer
New York, Feb. 13.—All England is waiting eagerly for news
from Modder River, according to
latest London advices, and the fact
that Lord Roberts is there in person adds to the great interest in the
events which it is believed will
soon be reported from   that   point.
A dispatch received in London
last night from Durban says that
the Boer raid into Zululand is assuming alarming proportions.
Natal colonists in London declare
that the natives will break away and
fight the Boers on their own account, as the country where the
Boers are is the best grazing land
in South Africa and the Trans-
vaalers will be able to seize vast
quantities of cattle.
The London Daily Mail has received a tetter from Julian Ralph,
who is at Modder River. He tells
in clear language of the new problem in warfare, which the English
are now forced to jolve.    He says:
"British defeats at the hands of
the Boers are due to the facts that
the methods of warfare have been
brought to a pause by the demonstrative power of the weapons of
today. The man behind the guns
stands more supreme than ever.
Dig a trench and line it with good
shots, supported by modern artillery, and no enemy can advance in
the face of them. They can fill the
whole plain over a radius of at least
4000 yards with such a withering
blast of shrapnel and rifle bullets
that no troops can stand in the open
before it."
Late advices from Ladysmith are
that fresh meat is plentiful there, 30
oxen being slaughtered daily. It is
also said that the Boers have over
100 guns between the Tugela and
Ladysmith.
A IHynterlous Dt>_tib
New Vork, Feb. 13.—Congressman Chas. A. Chickering of Copenhagen, N. V., was found dead outside the Grand Union hotel in this
city today. He had either fallen or
jumped from the fourth-story window of the hotel.
SHOT AND SHELL
WAS UNDER FIRE
Kimberly Was Bombarded on February 8th.
How   Ladysmith   Withstood    the
Bombardment.
Appointment or Medical Omeot,
Ottawa, Feb. ta.—Dr. Keenan
el Montreal haa been appointed
medical officer to accompany Strath-
l'a Horae tu South A-friea.
London, Feb. ta.—A picturesque
account of life in Ladysmith, written
by the late G. W. Stevens for the
Daily Mail, dated Ladysmith, Nov.
io, is as follows: "That bombardments were a terror, I had
always understood but how
not till I experienced the bombardment of Ladysmith.
It must be said that the Boers
make war like gentlemen of leisure,
they restrict their hours of work
with trade punctuality. Sundays
was always a holiday, also was the
day after any particularly busy
shooting. They seldom begin before breakfast, knocked off regularly for meals, the luncheon interval was 11130 to noon for riflemen,
and 13 to 13:30. Gunners hardly
ever fired after tea time, and never
when it rained.
The inhabitants were mostly under ground so that there was nothing really to suffer except casual
passengers, beasts and empty
buildings. Few shells fell in town,
and of the few many were half
charged with coal dust, and many
never burst at all.
And now what does it feel like to
be bombarded? At first, and especially first thing in the morning it is
quite an uncomfortable sensation.
If you have nothing else to do, and
especially if you listed and calculated you are done; you get shells on
the brain. Whenever you put your
head out of a hole underground,
you have a nosebreadth escape. A
day of this and you are a nerveless
semicorpse, twitching at a fly buzz,
a misery to yourself and a scorn to
your neighbors. If on the other
hand you go about your ordinary
business, confidence ravivaa immediately.
London, Feb. 13.—The war office has posted a dispatch from
Col. Kekewich dated Suuday, Feb.
it, to the effect that Kimberly was
bombarded Feb. 8. During the
morning of Feb. 9, a small infantry
engagement, lasting two hours, occurred at Alexandersfontein. The
situation otherwise is unchanged.
Two TJ.oiii«a« Dead   Boers
London, Feb. 13.—-A dispatch
from Modder River announces the
arrival of 1,400 refugees from the
Barely West district. It is learned
that 3,000 Boers were killed and
wounded during Gen. Macdonald's
reconnoissance.
A report comes from Durban that
British artillery forced the Boers to
evacuate their camp on Iangwana
Hill, south of Colenso. This is an
important position. In Rensburg
district the Boers are meeting with
minor success.
The Boer invasion of Zululand is
causing keen anxiety apart from the
fact that it threatens Gen. Buller's
communication. It is difficult to
believe the Zulus can long be kept
quiet, while their cattle are com-
manderred aBd their country overrun by their hered!tary foes.
British Flank Threatened
Rensburg, Feb. 13.—The Boers
are actively pressing around Rensburg. The British force under Lt.
Col. Page, consisting of a section of
artillery and 150 horse, which
reached SlingersTontein Feb. 10,
has been compelled to fall back on
Rensburg, owing to its eastern
flank being threatened.
Boer* Driven Ont.
Rensburg, Feb. 12.—Hobkirks
and Bastard Nek which the Boers
took possession of Saturdayi have
been reoccupied by the British.
The Boers were shelled.
Rensburg, Feb. 12.—Evening—
The Boers have again driven in the
British outposts on the western
flank today. All outposts at Bastards Nek, Hobkirks, Windmill
and other points retiring to Maeder
Farm. There were several casualties, but details have not yet been
received.
Britiah Setae a Position
London, Feb. 13.—A private telegram received here says that the
force commanded by General Wood
has moved up from the southward
and seized Zoutpans drift, which it
now holds.
New Batteries Created
London, "Eeb. 13.—The only
point in the war office plans that
meets with universal approval is the
announcement of the creation of 43
batteries, which, as explained, are
to consist of impounders of the
newest and most modern type, and
the further announcement that the
reserves of ammunition, which Lord
Lansdowne has admitted has been
kept far too low, are to be rushed
to the level required by modern improvements and maintained thare.
The Times, which thinks theschem,e
not very satisfactory, says:
"No amountof searching through
its intricacies and conjectures can
lead to the discovery of any guiding
principle or definite object. This is
scarcely the way to meet a great
emergency. Lack of principle and
a fine display of imagination are the
leading characteristics of this disappointing scheme."
C. P. R. CHANGES
British   Columbia   Officials  Receive
High Positions.
Montreal, Feb. 13.—Special—
The announcement of the promotion
of the C. P. R, officials from British Columbia has brought out some
interesting lacts in connection with
the construction of the Columbia & |
Western railway from Robson to
Midway, a piece of work which has
won for those in charge substantial
recognition. It is accepted as one
of the most difficult, yet perfectly
constructed branches of the entire
system and one of the most expensive pieces of work ever undertaken.
It remained for the two engineers,
W. F. Tye and J. G. Sullivan, who
only a few years ago, tramped over
the mountains in search of a puss
giving access to the Boundary
country, to finally assume entire
control of construction. Both are
comparatively young men, scarcely
past 35 years of age, but their
merit has met with such reward as
seldom befalls the lot of men who
have given a lifetime to the company's service.
Mr. Tye, who was chief engineer
of construction on the road from
Robson to Midway, has been appointed chief engineer of construction for the entire Canadian Pacific
railway system, with headquarters
at Winnipeg. J. G. Sullivan, Mr.
Tye's assistant, becomes chief engineer of construction over the
Columbia & Western railway's completed lines. Engineer A. C. Dennis, who was in charge of the track
laying of tbe new road, has been
c\uly rewarded by appointment to
the position of engineer in charge
of the maintenance cf the entire
system from Vancouver to Halifax.
George Farr, one of the division
engineers has been made chief of
construction in, Manitoba, and the
other divisional engineers, Messrs.
England, Voting and Rice will be
promoted. In addition to all these
honors, when the gentlemen mentioned looked in their stockings
Christmas morning, they found
other recognition of their services.
Mr. Tye's Christmas gift was a
$5,000 check; Mr. Sullivan, $1,000;
Mr. Dennis, $500; Messrs. Farr,
Rice, Voung and England $500
each.
Mr. Tye gathered around him,
only the most capable men. He
paid such salaries as the men were
worth to him, and his reports were
to Mr. Shaughnessy direct. It is
safe to say that there was less red
tape and more satisfactory service
in connection with his department,
than has yet been experienced in
the history of the C. P. R. His
auditor, Mr. J. W, Kimball, who
has been a railroad accountant fot
several years, has been appointed
auditor of the construction department, with headquarters at Winnipeg, while Mr. Kimball's assistant,
V. G. Croissant, will have charge of
the auditing department of construction in British Columbia, with
headquarters at Trail.
Dawson is ii.'ina.
Business Men Are Deserting lhe Klondike Metropolis.
Tacoma, Feb. 12.—Dawson advices say little will be left of the
Klondike metropolis after the home
rush in May nnd June. Merchants
are closing out their business and
instead of every building being
crowded,"to let" signs are frequent.
Business is dying and most dealers
are going to their homes. Many
workmen are leaving Dawson because of the new law preventing the
relocation of claims, and providing
that lapsed claims shall revert to the
Crown.	
Prayers for Peace.
Montreal,Feb. ta.—Special prayers were said in Anglican churches in
Eastern Canada yesterday for the
speedy termination of the war in
South Africa and for the success of
British arms.	
Blae la O P  B Ntoelt
Montreal, Feb. 12.—The bull
movement in C. P. R. stock this
morning reached a climax by jumping up i?4 points which resulted in
about a quarter of a million dollars
being invested in this stock on the
Montreal exchange. The cause of
the jump is said to be due to the
pending announcement of an increased dividend.
FOR TEN MILLION
Boers Will Hold   Cecil Rhodes for
This Much indemnity.
Tbe Stratbeona Horse
Ottawa, Feb. 13.—The minister
of militia has given orders for Elder
Dempster, of Milwaukee, to sail
with the mounted rifles of the second contingent on February 31. It
is expected the Monterey with the
Strathcona Horse will sail about
March 1 or 3.
Prince Henry Arrives
Berlin, Feb. 13.—Prince Henry
of Prussia, brother of Emperor
William, arrived here this morning.
He was welcomed at the railroad
station by hia majesty and a large
anite.
Accidentally ahot
Yarmouth, N. S , Feb. 13.—C.
Sullivan, of this place, was accidentally shot and killed by his
uncle, George Beveridge, while out
duck shooting this morning.
The Fnii'l la Growing
Ottawa, Feb. ia. -The Patriotic
fund has now reached $107,513.
An Blectlon In Armazb
London, Feb. 13.—In the elec
tions held today for the middle
Armagh district for representative
in parliament to succeed Mr. Dun
bar Plunket Barton, the vote resulted; J. E. Lonsdale, 3313; John
Gordon, 1811. Mr. Barton was
recently appointed  to a judgeship.
Financial Uncertainty
Toronto, Feb. 13.—Hon. Edw.
Blake has resigned his office as
chancellor of Toronto university
because that institution requires
an efficient wot king chancellor
to guide its destiny with success,
which is somewhat impaired owing
to stringency of finances. Protestor
Clark has also resigned.
London, Feb. 13.—The friends
of Cecil Rhodes are becoming
alarmed at his possible fate, and
have sent an emissary to see Dr.
Leyds, the diplomatic agent of the
Boers in Europe, in regard to the
probable course the Boers would
pursue in the event of his capture.
Dr. Leyds said that the Boers did
not intend to kill Mr. Rhodes, but
they would certainly hold him as a
hostage until the indemnity for the
Jameson raid should be paid.
In view of the development since
the raid, the Boers have decided to
double the amount of the indemnity,
so that Mr. Rhodes' friends would
have to hand over $10,000,000
before he would be released.
ItlEN    MUST    SKIP
A 0. P. B. Dividend
Montreal, Feb. 13.—The C. P.
R. has declared a dividend of three
per cent for the half year, making a
total of five per cent for the year.
Died or His lujiirli-s.
Danville, Que., Feb. 13.—Roger
McElery, the Grand Trunk brake-
man who was run over and injured
by a freight train yesterday, died
last night.
Hospital Ship Halne at Oapc Town
t
London, Feb. 13.—Today's advices state that the Maine has arrived at Cape Town from Natal
filled with wounded soldiers. The
hospital ship committee has made a
stirring appeal to American women
to supply a working fund for keep-
inn the Maine in operation throughout the war, at an expense of Si 5,-
000 a month.
They Are Nat Permitted la the Pre*
enee ol Thia Lady
New York, Fett I3.—The wife
of the Turkish minister has reached
Washington City. The Sultan consented to her coming only on condition that she adheres strictly to
the rules of the Koran. She is permitted to receive lady visitors only,
and in returning calls the male
members of the executive or other
households, must absent themselves.
THE WILY DUTCH
How They  Maneuvered to Prevent
Passage of Troops.
London, Feb. 11.—Military men
say that Gen. Buller's third passage
of the Tugela has been a curtain-
raise with a prologue, and that the
real drama will now go on at the
front, which is apparently Modder
river.
It now remains to be proved
whether the wily Dutch have been
duped as easily as the military experts here. The object of this
manoeuvre was to prevent the
passage of Free State troops westward to Bloemfontein, where they
could be used against Lord Roberts'
force. The Ladysmith gerrison has
reported that a movement of the
Dutch forces has been in progress
during the last week toward the
Drakensburg range. Possibly this
has been anticipated by the westward march of a portion of Warren's division with Lord Dundon-
ald's cavalry, but there are no signs
of this.
The bulk of the Dutch forces
seem to have awaited Buller's third
advance toward Ladysmith, and if
Lord Roberts strikes a series of
blows this week ttfere may not be
time for the Free staters to tack
across the country.
Roberts' campaign will probably
open either with a movement toward Kimberley or in advance upon
Bloemfontein, and Jacobsdal is
likely to be the earliest point of attack. He will have a large army,
with Tucker's division, Gen. Methuen's force, the household cavalry
and olher troops, and will have a
railway system of supplies already
in operation to Modder river and the
mule and oxen service with Gen.
Kitchener has been organizing at
Cape Town for additional work
eastward,
Favors More Troopa
Hamilton, Feb. 13.—The board
of trade here has passed a resolution to the effect that Canada should
now offer to her majesty to increase
the Canadian contingent to whatever extent found necessary by the
imperial government.
Mill on atrthe
Toronto, Feb. 13.—Mouldera who
went on a strikein the Massey Harris Works about ten days ago are
still out.
Death of a Volunteer
Toronto, Feb. is.—The Globe
correspondent at Belmont, South
Africa, announces the death of Private J. C. Purcell, of B company,
of London, Ont., at Orange River
hospital.
TBMBOHAPHIC   THTfS
Mayor T. L. Bou langer, of Quebec field battery, has been appointed to succeed Col. Drury.
N. & M. Connelly has been
awarded $32,000 damages in their
suit against the Cordage Consum-
rs Company.
Opposes New Telephone Charter,
The petition of William B. Davey
J. B. Donald and Alexander Miller,
of Grand Forks for a charter for
the Western Telephone and Telegraph Company, the proposed extension of the Columbia Telephone
Company's lines to the coast, it
opposed by William Farrell, of
Vancouvet, a stockholder in the
New Westminster 81 Burrard Inlet
and the Vernon & Nelson Telephone Companies. He alleges that
his interests will be prejudicially
affected and that the petitioners
did not comply with the rules.
MISCELLANEOUS  NOTES.
Anurew Carnegie is earning the
title of the "crank mlliionalie," He
is said to have offered to repay lhe
United States the $30,000,000 paid
Spain for the Philippines if they will
give up the islands and to have offered $1,000,000 to the Democratic
campaign fund, if the party will
make anti-imperialism the main
issue.
It is proposed to suppress lynching in Mississippi by passing a law
forfeiting the office of the sheriff
who is responsible and making the
county pay the victim's heirs $3000.
But sO long as the public opinion of
the whites approve lynching, no
law against it will be enforced. "'
public opinion condemned lynching,
the present law would suffice. *****
ROBERTS' ARMY
Is Still Advancing Towards Modder
River.
London, Feb. 14—6:28 p. m.—
Tbe following dispatch has been received at the war office from Gen.
Roberts:
"Riet River, Tuesday.—Col.
Haney, in command of a brigade
< of mounted infantry, marching from
Orange River to R'amah, had a
alight engagement Feb. 11 with the
Boers holding the hills and threatening his right flank.
"With a detached patt of his
force, Col. Haney continued to engage thi the -enemy while
he pushed hts baggage and main
body through to Ramah. The
object of the march was successfully carried out. Four men were
killed, twenty-two wounded and
thirteen are missing."
The Qneeu Anxious for News.
New York, Feb.  i4.—Cable dispatches to the morning papers say
that London is in a state of uneasiness   over   the news  from   South
(Africa.    A cable to the World says
'that the queen, because of the se-
[ rious state of the war, will not go
•broad for a holiday,  but will remain near London.
Large Porce at Modder Blver.
The London Morning Post war
expert says: "The announcement
of the new appointments confirms
the supposition that a large force
haa now been assembled at Modder
River."
Boers Shelling the Women.
News from Mafeking is to the
effect that the Boers on the 27th
deliberately shelled the women's
laager, throwing eight shells from
the big gun. Considerable shelling
and "sniping" has been going on
for the last fortnight and the Boers
have of late been attacking hard on
the western trenches. The tire of
the big gun has caused many casualties, mostly natives. Shells were
dropped into the town in a desultory way, more trying, because unexpected, than a regular bombarding would have been. Ot late the
casualties have been less.
The Boers tried to force Kaltirs
into the town under a flag of truce
on January 17, but Col. Baden-
Powell refused to receive them.
The Boers fired heavily on the flag
while retiring. This cansed tremendous indignation and Commandant Snyman subsequently sent an
apology, after protest had been
sent. Protest has also been made
against ihe Boers arming the natives for offense. The Boer commandant answered that the armed
natives were only used as cattle
guards. He also said that British
forts had been made on Sunday,
and if this were repeated, he would
open fire.
Col. Baden-Powell answered that
the wire lines had been relaid, and
that he had been vastly interested
on Sunday in observing the Boers
at work completing a new work on
the western front.
There   was a   skirmish  between
working parties at midnight on the
30th and the  Boers were repulsed.
Weird atory Prom Brussels.
Brussels, Feb. 14.—The Petit
Bleu, in correspondence from Pretoria, publishes an extraordinary
account of 3,000 British soldiers,
Who, it is said by the writer, arrived
toward the end of December last,
during the retreat from Dundee, at
t ie river Maputa, the boundary between Swaziland and Portuguese
territory. According to the narrative, they had lost their way and
wandered for weeks in Zululand,
arriving shoeless, in rags, and dying of hunger. These soldiers, tt-e
correspondent says, were thought
to have been shut up with Sir
George White in Ladysmith.
A Spy In the lighthouse.
New Vork, Feb. 14.—A story to
the Paris Temps from its correspondent at Durban, which tells of
the execution of an English lighthouse keeper, who was a spy in the
service of the Boera, is printed by
tbe Herald today.   One day, while
a troopship was passing the high
promontory ou whicli the lighthouse
is situated, no Officer's attention vvas
attracted by singular heliograph
signals that were being made on tlio
other side of the lighthouse. Thc
keeper was watched, and it was
found that hy means of Ordinary
heliograph code he signalled each
arrival of troops, each movement
in the port and the number cl" men,
cannon and horses, to accomplices
situated on a mountain some distance away. His wife and Ins children would not believe in his guilt
and a painful scene took place when
he was transferred on board a man-
of-war, where he was shot.
GENERAL NEWS NOTES.
A bill has been, introduced in the
Dominion parliament providing that
a Canadian ctlicer shall command
the Canadian militia. There will
be plenty of experience when the
Boer war is over.
Tbo Sale (liirstloiicil.
Madrid, Feb. 14.—Senor DsivillSi
in the senate yesterday, questioned
the subject of the Reported s;ilc to
Great Britain of Maxim cartridges,
Senor SilVela promised to obtain
the required informal ion.
Hi-solutions Arc 11 "ml5
Chicago, Feb. 14.—A committee
on resolutions of the national antitrust conference last night, after a
stormy meeting, agreed upon a report which will be submitted to the
conference for adoption today. The
discission was caused by a difference of opinion among tbe members
as to the details of how the government should obtain control of the
railroads, telegraph and telephone
lines.
The Toronto Globe devotes two
columns of its editorial page to renunciation of the New York World
for a scurrilous attack on Mr.
Chamberlain. It overlooked one
fact which is very consoling, that
whichever side of a controversy the
World takes, the decent people of
the United States may always be
found on the other side.
WHY   HE   LEFT
Balsed $0000 lor Hospital Ship.
New York, Feb. 14.—Six thousand dollars were raised at Mrs.
Langtry's concert, whicli is to be
devoted to the American hospital
ship Maine, now in South Africa.
Where tbe lav-li-liiii;ui tonic* In.
B. C kokw.
The most successful investments
made by English and Montreal capital in British Columbia have been
in buying up the stock of western
companies and reorganizing litem—
not in purchasing areas of mineral
ground. The reason is not far to
seek. A good thing in British Columbia is always picked up and directed locally before companies and
syndicates in London have lime to
get reports on it. most of these
organizations enter upon a period
of suspended animation from lack
of capital and thSt i.s exactly wherein lies the opportunity of Eastern
and English promoters.
Shipping Orr 1'nnu l.iirclraii.
D. T. Eaton, of Ferguson, in the
Lardeau country, tells of some
good shipments of hi;,rh grade galena ore from that section to the
Trail suielter. The Sunshine Ltd.,
a subsidiary company of tlie Hornc-
Payne syndicate, has shipped 170
tons from the Silver Cup and Stin-
shine, the Sunshine ore running 140
ounces in silver besides gold and
lead and the Silver Cup aoo ounces
in silver. The Nettie L. has shipped 100 tons and the Beatrice on
Fish creek, 30 tons, which runs
over 150 ounces. The ore is hauled
to Thompson's landing, on the
northeast arm of Upper Arrow
Lake, 24 miles from the Silver Cup
and 20 miles from the Nellie L.
Sir Charles Tupper and Sir Wilfrid Laurier have found a point of
agreement, both complaining that
they have been misquoted by irresponsible newepaper men. The
former threatened to bring the matter before the house and the latter
offered to support him.
Il is noteworthy that Lord Rob-
cits has not made any engagements
lo dinner in the Boer country. In
this respect he is unlike General
Huller. Let us hope that the engagements he has with the Boers
will have different results from that
general's, who, saying he never
would retreat, retreated.
WHAT   BULLER   HAS   DONE.
Busluess or N111.-Iters In I sun.
Of the ore shipped from Rossland
in the year i8qci the smelter at Trail
received about 89,000 tons; I.e Roi
smelter at Northport, 94,552 tons;
and the Hall Mines smelter at Nelson, 111 tons.
The Toronto Telegram comes to
he defense of Gen. Buller in the
following terms:
The difficulties of the original
situation are forgotten by those
who rashly assume that General
Buller has put no great work to his
credit since he landed in South
Africa. . The condition which confronted General Buller on his arrival
in Cape Town was, briefly, that all
Cape Colony lay at the feet of an
invading army. The railway, the
one line of communication with the
British people in the north, was
threatened. All Natal, down to
Ouiban, was in lhe gravest peril.
Valuable stores were piled up at
De Aar, practically undefended,
,md open to attack by any body of
Free State raiders.
Three months ago, when Buller
landed in Cape Town, the situation
w".is little short of desperate. An
insufficient number of troops was at
his disposal, but there was none at
all of supplies needed for South
African warfare. It was Buller's
strategy which Ihrnst Gatacre and
I'"rench into Naauwport and Queens-
town, the very heart of Dutch
disaffection. These forces, in spite
of Gataere's reverse at Stormberg,
have severely localized the rebellion
and have pushed the Boers out of
that part of Cape Colony, except at
one or two points.
lt was Buller's strategy which
thrust the forces of Methuen, Gatacre and French in like a wall between the Free State and the Cape
Dutch, whose loyalty is of that type
which is "willing to wound and yet
afraid to strike." It is true that
Buller's plans have not yet been
fulfilled in the relief of Kimberly and
Ladysmith, but he is to be credited
with other important results which
have put a general revolt of the
Cape Dutch out of the question,and
his advance to the relief of Ladysmith has rolled back the tide of invasion beyond the Tugela and rendered the greater part ol Natal absolutely secure.
Mu Hill nt Vp the Country.
B. C. Review,
The Canadian Pacific Railway
company maintains ihat it has never
made a dollar of profit upon the
haulage of crude ore from any portion of British Columbia. The
company is prepared to haul ore at
cost and to treat it also as near cost
as may he. The filling up of the
country with population, and the
establishment of trade and smelting
centers on Canadian soil are its declared policies. By so doing the
company prevents the draining of
the country's business into the United States and reaps its reward
from incoming traffic of all kinds.
It is a broad-minded policy and has
done much to popularize tlie railway
I in mining sections.
I
Consul Macruin Soales Why He Returned to the United States.
Washington, Feb. 15.—A signed
statement was given out last night
by Charles E. Macrum, formerly
United States consul at Pretoria, in
which he .says in part:
"The situation in Pretoria was
such that; first as an official, I could
not remain there while the government at home was apparently in the
dark as to the exact conditions in
South Africa; second, as a man
and a citizen of the United States, I
could not remain in Pretoria sacrificing my own self respect and that
of the people while the
government at home continued
to have me iu the position of a
British consul. There was not one
request of me through the department of state looking to the cure of
a British prisoner in Pretoria which
I did not fulfil and report upon according to my orders.
"On the other hand, American
interests in South Africa were in that
condition which demanded that the
department of state should be cognizant of them. It was over lour
weeks from the time the war opened
before I received a single dispatch
from my government or a personal
letter. The mail from the Transvaal had all been stopped at Cape
Town by order of the high commissioner. When this mail was finally
forwarded to me, the envelopes
bearing the official seal of the American government were opened and
officially sealed with a sticker, notifying me that the contents had been
read by the censor at Durban."
Mr. Macrum then relates his experience in delayed cable correspondence with the Washington
authorities relating to his desire
for leave of absence from his post.
He says he finally, on Dec. 8ih,
received the following:
"You may come. Put Atterbury
temporarily in charge. Department
will send man from here."
nic-GlLl, UBAMUATKN BBCNION.
A    NEGLECTED    DUTY.
HIS   l'lllll    IS   UNSHAKEN.
the
Wii) in-  narllDKlon's Opinion  ol
Wnr F.iiiilc and Centre Ntar.
The recent suspension of shipments from the War Eagle and
Centre Star mines has caused much
discussion in Montreal, which inspired C. R. Hosmer to telegraph
Wayne Darlington, of this city,
who recently examined the mines
for John W. Mackay. Mr. Hos-
mer'a message read:
"Alter your recent examination
ot both properties, is your faith id
their future still unshaken?"
To this Mr. Darlington replied
on Feb. 7: "You may say without
qualification that my faith In both
remains unshaken, and that when
the mines resume they will he in
belter shape for more economical
working."
The depletion of the northwest
mounted police by volunteering for
the contingents sent to South Africa
has caused a demand that it should
be recruited up to its full strength
again. The first drafts on it were
made to police the Yukon territory,
then came the volunteering for the
second contingent and now Lord
Strathcona's Horse has still further
weakened it until it is almost wiped
out of existence. The Calgary
Herald says:
"The press of the territories, regardless of politics, are a unit in
demanding that the force be restored to something like its
strength four years ago, but not
only is no notice taken of the just
demands of the people, but even
the few remaining men are now
wanted elsewhere. The people
have sufficiently good memories to
recall the special promises that
were made regarding the police
force when the Liberal party was
seeking office, and they will know
how to treat in the future those
politicians who have so unblush-
ingly violated their most sacred
pledge."
There is no excuse for neglecting
Ttne maintenance of this necessary
force to preserve order at home
because men of the same stamp are
needed to fight the queen's battles
in other lands. There are plenty
more of the same kind to fill the
gap left by the drafts to the Yukon
and by the volunteers for South
Africa. They should be enlisted in
the service.
The annual reunion of the graduates of McGill University, Montreal,
now residents of British Columbia,
was held in Rossland this week.
A McGill degree Is recognized
throughout the continent of America and Great Britain as a guarantee of scholarship and ability and
many graduates, especially in medicine, are filling professional chairs
in the leading American universities. The idea of this annual reunion originated last year with the
Rossland graduates when a banquet was held. Dr. McGuigan and
Dr. Tunstall are in the city to represent and convey greetings from
he McGill men at the coast.
The next meeting was fixed for
Nanaimo on the first Tuesday in
January, 1901.
In the evening a banquet was
held at the Clarendon, at which J.
M. McGregor, B. A., of Slocan
City, was toastmaster. Among the
guests were Simon J. Tunstall, B
A, M D,) Vancouver; G. M. Foster,
M D, Greenwood; W. J. McGuigan,
Vancouver; Angus Davis, Republic;
J. T. McKenzie, M D; A. A. Cole,
M A, B Sc; J. A. Miller, D V S;
W. F, Ferrier, B A Sc; R E Palmer, B A Sc; Stuart A. Ross, M D;
R. Reddick, M D, all of Rossland.
Many appropriate toasts were
drunk, songs sung and good stories
told. It was announced that an
annual mining scholarship of $100
for men in British Columbia was to
be founded at McGill and $25 was
raised towards the fund.
IN A TIGHT PLAGE
At the recent annual meeting of
the White Bear Consolidated Mining company held in Toronto both
the treasurer's and managing director's reports were read. The treasurer reported that 300,000 shares
of treasury stoc|« had been sold.
This gives the assurance that the
property can be developed for an
indefinite period.
___!___
(£_/iass
IjDorfc
9leatfyj
ana
Quictftf
ecutea
at
tfos
©ffice.
The Two Armies on th*
Decisive Battle.
New York, Feb, 15.—The specials from London to the New York
papers printed this morning, all
tend to the idea that English military critics believe Lord Roberts to
have Gen. Cronje's forces in a tight
place and look for a decisive battle
before the end of the week.
The exact situation, as seen in London, is put by the Herald correspondent in these words.
"Lord Roberts has begun his
operations against the Boer army
between the Modder river and
Kimberly by initiating a flanking
movement which up to the present
time has proved successful. The
drifts referred to in Lord Roberts'
official message are all to the east
of Lord Methuen's camp on the
Modder river and within Free State
territory. With this huge British
force threatening his left wing,
Cronje is forced to decide whether
he will remain or retire. If he
elects to go, Kimberly will be relieved at once. If he chooses to
stay he will have to entrench in
his rear or his. works will be carried. If his rear is entrenched, he
will probably be held in check in
his present position while Kimberly
is relieved.
The London correspondent of the
Tribune says of the operations:
This entire movement, with its concentration of nearly all the British
battalions outside Natal and the
slender columns left under Gatacre
and Clements, has been brought
about by scientific strategy under a
vigorous operation of the censorship, the utility which has been
demonstrated at last. An army
corps and strong auxiliary forces
have been massed where the enemy
are the weakest, aud the previous
balance of forces in the military
problem has been suddenly upset.
This column on the Riet has a
promise of potency for the relief of
Kimbetly and a subsequent advance
upon Bloemfontein, and is so great
a diversion of military resources
that Ladysmith may yet be rescued."
Slocks Oo Vp In  London.
New York, Feb. 15.—London
advanced the prices of Americans
before he opening here on the
favorable developments in the British campaign in South Africa.
Prices of the railroads advanced all
around.
Latest Stock Quotations
4RKM
Athabasca  32
h. C. Gold Fields         3M
llig Three         "1
liraiiilon k Golden Crown. 28
Canadian Gold Fields         "IV.
Caribou [Camp McKinney] 8S
Crow'n Nest Pass Coal... .$38 60
I lard.i nullcs   8
DecrTrail No. 2  10*
Deer Park [newj         IH
Dundee  U
Evening Star  tt
Kairiiimu.	
liiaiil         OH
llumestake  4
Iron Mask  80
Iron Colt	
I.X. L   26
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  80
Jumbo   28
King (Oro Denoro)  1»H
Knob Hilt	
Lone Pine Consol  lo%
Minnehaha   	
Monte Christo         4
Montreal Gold Fields         7
Morrison         6
Mountain Lion I 1 00
Noble Five          8
Northern Belle	
Novelty         2
Okanogan         *%
Old Ironside* % 1 00
Palmer Mountain    23
I'eoria Mines '         1%
rnucess Muud  8
Itambler-Curiboo  60
Itiithniiil Ion  6
Republic % 1 00
Si. Elmo Consolidated         Z%
Smuggler         1J4
Tumurac IKennethJ         IM
Trail Creek Hid. Treas....        4>»
Van A niia          6
Victory-Triumph	
Virginia         i%
War Eagle Consolidated..$ 1 80
Waterloo  \l
White Bear         3%
Winnipeg..,  26
Wonderftl         4
■I*
28
3X
6
23
OH
77
$'28 00
4
•7*
7
5H
16
lfiX
12*
3
4
4
86
4
1%
4
80
16
1
*x
43
4
80
«X
6
« 1 76
6«
*%
20
___
EDITORIAL   NOTES.
. wn *tur -r-v "1 -•■nn.n    mn_-_.ii
It is proposed to offer Canadian
militia to replace the imperial troops
in garrison at Halifax, in order that
the latter may go to South Africa.
; Probably the Canadians would be
better in the field than the regulars. r
^he) orrosin
LARGE    AND   COMFORTABLE
■BOOMS TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IS    THE
NORTHWEST.
KIMS & BARRETT
SILVERTON,
B. p.
Daigls's Black-
smith Shon.
Oeneral Blaeksinithing
•. •     and Hi failing Dmr.
EXPERT  HORSE   SHOER AL
WAYS   ON   HAND.
TQQL SHARPK.nINU A SPECIALTY
8.DAIOLE,      WLVFRT^N, n. C.
W
atch and
Clock
Repairer.
9t»»9}$S'£9ft
A9*9k6ea,9ae
Visits Silverton
Wednesdays.
ALL WCBK (iUAKANTFip
(Leave Ymir Orders at The Laks-
view Hotel.
E>. M. 3rl«clle,|
rhe Jeweler,
NEW DENVER B 0.
j*OT:_er_„
_,— .»
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Mellon and Whntf.
POOD  SERVICE CO.UFORTABLI
ROQXfg.
Dining Room under the chance ot
Mi>s Ida Carlisle.
tables nipplied itlth nil the delioaeie.
of the season.
_PBNDKR*ONA HEIHINU, • Paoes .
SLOGAN CITY BO.
j.if. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     8URVEYOR
AND MININ'J ENGINEER. "*
SLOGAN CITY, .         B.C.
• ANFORD M.INTOSH,
(tytral Nfht and Transfer
Umm hw\
Orders lelt at  News Stand will   he
promptly attended to.
Ji Q. GORDON,
|L!2UUliKmr^(MKYAMR
NOTARY PUBLIC.
SILVER rON,       -      -      -      B. C.
J1-1-1.   - 1    ■
TUE SILVUT0S1II.
Satomhy,  February 17, iWQ.
PUBLMHfcD KVKRV   BATl'pDAY   At
SILVERTON, BO.
MArHEHON MBOfl..    .JMItora * .Props.
SUBSCRIPTION BATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR
Adveriiiinii rate? will be made kuown
niton application at this office.
888S88S88888»S8?8S?S8S8J«
EMTOIML 0LTlR01TIi\0S.
«
28888888888888888888888981
Tl.e 1«l>or airpggle through whitl
the Slooan has jut passed. f»l«l>'*ug»
woiking* hardship on both the minim
• d IiUmiims iitinns if il« Hibi.
hat not been without its redemiiii.
features. It lms for one thing shown
both aides lo the di-pute, brganix d
labor and organis-d capital, that thev
have both rights tint the other ia
bound to rei-pnct and aLo that one
cannot very well live without tli •
other. It has also bt-^n the means of
forcing most of our big mining companies to ei eet MiitaMe buldings for
the scconim.datioii of there employee*
and alto gren them a chance tu pn h
their d vel"pniei_t wok ahead ami
thus our mines are iu better ahap-
than ever to produce larg- quaiiti'iec
of oie at a cheaper rate per ton than
formerly. The strike Ins been th*
neans of advertising the rich minera1
wealth of lhe Slocan more extensively
thtn could have been done by the
xp't'diture of thousands of dollars.
he attention of all clissee helm/
Inwti to this country and the ricli-
e«a of our mines comp ired with th w
>f nearly every other camp on the
. •ntineiit, comparisons iruch to III*
.redit of the Slocan. The r.lass tha'
mi suffered the moat anil have borne
he brunt of the struggle has lieen th.
twines* element in onr camps l,u'
hiw that the struggle is over theie
.vill be a rush of wmk heie and a hip
lematid for goods cf all kinds, SO thai
Iir bu int'ss linn if the Slocan wil'
nave a chance to reap a golden hurv.st
that should more than put them even
for all they have lost during the
itrike.
per oent are immigrants and not Canadian born. In this provinoe anglo-
mania runs riot.
We hopo that the B. G. contingent,
when formed, will be found thorough I)
Canadian.   sfcuMtt
8INN0TT 4 0 DON NELL
TBfc.IQHTr.R8 AND FACKER8.
Contracts large or small taken
And promptly attended to.
Stables in 8ILVERT0N, B  O.
OHA& A. WATERMAN A CO
The Sandon Mining R view pub-
I ishes a statement which, it say*, hnS
'■een signed by the imported F.i ns at
he Payne, in which (hey state, in
highly grammatical English, tint
they sro ta' is ied with their j lis
and thn way they seemed them. Un-
foitunately the Review did not pub
lii-h the names of the signers of the
document, either because the compos
ttot could not read them or the editor
did not wish the public to hnve s
glimpse at what the Slocan Voters'
List Will look like in the future.
Vt. .- L.
ANCIENT  H18T0RY.
V'A psge from lhe history ot the great
wnr of 1899 00 )
Thn forward atieo': was beru-i l>\
the general of the Silver-Lead) force*
bringing into action the low calibie
nuns of the Mining R-yifiv oorp, Thn
eorp, before active hostilities had brok-
en ou', had tn-achorouhly asaistei tin
Union forces, which ho knew were al
lied with the Western Federation, !■>
scoring for them their provincial
charter. The renegade ou'firj accordingly Iwgan shelling the kopje with
patriotic piragraphs delivereil weekly
in volley, hut the material proved top
miHewey and th • ordnsnefi of two
ancient a 8t)ie to raise tpore than a
laugh from the trenches.
•'War in hell." cabled the loyal general, "aend another subsidy. Ren ret
to report I si ot butalhnn advancing to
relieve Enterprise. We upheld the
glorious traditions of our arms and retrented to Nelson."
Then the heavy guns of th'i Nelson
Miner Were brought into play, but the
gunners, who had spent the summer
between the fishing ground and the
tennis cnur'8.-.nowed much inconsistency in their aim, one day shelling
the Union lines for trying to prevent
a juni'ture between iti" ?ilvir-Lead
foro-is and a foieign relief column and
(hen slewing round their guns to attack other foreigners for presuming to
take sides. It is reported that the
Miner contingent were securing famine
peicei for their goods.
Considerable unfavorable own ment
had b-eii caused by i ho mUuie ■ f the
white flag by the S-L general", tbey
having aliu.-i-d tbe pen. da of truce by
taking MiiVa'i.age of llieni to huirv Up
their foreign coutingetits, snd iu invading neu» ml territory.
Alexai der the Great wa«, nt the
very 'imo wh. u pi ace was declined by
the Union troop*, raisii g a inercenacy
brigade in Michigan. As u»u>l he
was away behind at the finish—not
P nnish,
SLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments of ore fr.ii|> Silverton for
the year 1809. totaled 1698 Ton*.
All other Lake points 1383
The shipment ol ore from 81ocan
Lake points, up to and Including the
present week, from Jsn. 1, 1000.
From Bosun Landinj.                   Tons.
Bosun **
From Silveiton Tons.
Emilv Edith 20
Vancouver    20
THE   METAL MARKET.
New York, Feb. 14.-B»r Silver, 69fte
Lake copper,  $16.80.
Lead—The firm tlmt fixes the selling
price for miner* and araeltera quota lead
I M 4-1 «' 'be elose
THE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY,
ASSESSMENT ACT AND PRoV
INCIAL REVENUE TAX ACT.
"Just Arrived,
u
WEST KOOTENAY  piSTRlCT.
SLOCAN R1DIN3.
For Sale or Rent,
C^ij Id Silverton.
GOOD LOC*TIOtf.
FULLY   FURNISHED,
PLEA It TITLE
APiiljr to—Hathcti.il Kri.s,
Silverion, B, O.
/ ■    i_
Ox Course
^ro-u.   s-woie
o*f*t s3m.o!3s^
IxifeT a-rxd,
N'oticr is hereby mven that In aecor-
dsnee wilh Hie elMlllles. that Provltlrlal
Revenue Tax snd all t»xe* levieil -inder
the a-ri'hsiiii'iiI Aci.sre now dm- for the
V nr 1IKX) A'l ih^ iili.v.- lux aciilterillili'
within the Wmi Kootenay Dihtrict. Slo
can Killing, are payable at i..y office,
KhhIii.
Ar4i Minent taxes are collectible at Ihe
followinit rati'H. vis:
If paid on or bu'ore June SOili, 1903:
Tlireefifilisulone per cent, ou real
pri'iiett.v.
Two Hill one-half per cent an a*seised
value of wild lund.
One-lnilf of one per cent, on personul
properly.
On eo mnch nf ibe Incrme of »nv person us ixriedsOne TliotiSHnd iMIurnIlie
fi<llowl'iitr,iieii. na'i'ely, n ona|tch exeat*
of income when the mnir Im mn more
tlniii Ten Tiinifand I) Hare, i'iii. per
eenl; when hiicIi i-xc'-hs Is ov.-r Ten Thnn-
siind UillarH ami nni more than I'wettv
TiiiuhiiiiiI Dolhiis. one end une-qimrtei
nf one per c>'nt ; when meh excess i»
nverTwenivTIionxand I)._ill..r-, one and
Oi'e-lmlf of one |ier cent.
If paid on or after July 1st. 1900.
Fmir Htilis of une per cent, on real
property.
T tit |vr cent on tho assessed value
of wild lainl-i.
Three f iiir:hs of one per cent, on per
smnil p'nperty.
(in ho tuncl. °f the Income of any per
mi" ns .-xcetdii One Thousand I'ullaiMthe
lollowinn linen, ininielv. up.n m.-li ex-
cfiw «'h^n ih.- BHine ia i>oi mme ilmnTe"
I IntiH ,iiil llnlhiri, one ami om-qnartei
of one per i-eitt ; wlwn S'icli excens is
over Ten Thousand Doll iihhihI not mor-
than Tweiilt 1 li iimihI D liar, uneaii'*
one-half of one per rem., when snch ei-
f*e* if over Ttten y Thonaand DtllaiR
o- e and threi'-q-iai u-rs of one p^r cent.
Pr.iviucial Revenue Tux, |3 00 pei
capita
JjHN KEEN.
Assesia r and C.11. dor
Ka*lo. B C . 15th fehruarv, 1900.
When You B»eak Thnee
Rem lotions Come And
Look Ovvr My S'ock Of
*9
ToTo
accos,.
J 1. McINTOSH, : HII.VERTON.B C
AoonovEERS, Customs Bbukehs,
Akd General Rkax Estate Agents.
fete* la Real by Hlook  '-  *    Kskcr bt
NELSON,   B, 0.
NO. 96. W. F. Of M.
•very Saturday in the L.iion
^sll in Silverton, at 7:80 r. m.
J. M. M. Bkmedum,
Preeident.
3,1. Mclmoaa.
Financial-Secretary.
m
Col. Dnnvillo Al. P. Ins given notice of a Motion in th • Home of Commons that should strike an approving
chord in the heart of every Canadian.
This motion is an Amendment to the
Militia Act, which, if carried, wilt
malp tbe head pf the Canadian Aliliti-
always a Canadian, instead of, ai Inn.
always been the rule, one from thi
British I-dea. Tbe gallant and pstri
otic Colonel thinks that if a Canadian
officer is considered fit to go to Socth
Africa aud fight, he is sun-ly fit to
control Canadian native troops. This
would be a further step toward Canada for Canadians.
IF YO0.1 SUBSCRIPTION l'i DUE
OUR   IN ARREARS    A
BLUB  OROStS     WILL
BE FOUND    IN  THIS
JBQUABB.       SUBSCBIFTION    ARE
fATlBLE  IN  ADVANCE.    PRICE.
^W0, DOLLARS A YEAR.
Canadians who were present in Ncl-
during the enrollment of troopers for
Strathoona's Horse tell among themselves, in shamed anger, that good
Canadian men, fit in. every way, were
rejected in favor of any among tin-
applicant-! who showed their old country origin. In what was supposed to
have been a Canadian troop, Canadians
feel asbaui^d to know that nbout 00
Lilac Cream
l-DR CRACKED OR SOR1
HANDS. FOR USE AFI'ITt SHAVING. AN EXCELLENT HFALER OF
CUI8 OR BURNS    Price 25-.
THIS PREPARATION IP
BEYO D DOUBT THE UNEdT 01-
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET All.
LIKE IT rtHOTRY    Price :3c
NOTICE.
'Tux   I.iqi'or   I icenck    Act 1899, or
BkIT.SII  ('Ol.l'MB A.
Tbe fnllowliig nppilciitions for I'qnoi
IIiviipps have heen made and will he cnn-
nider d hy the Boanlnf I i.<enre Cummin
"inner* fnr ihe Sloean Di-tiici al New
Denver on Mondav, ihe 20th duy of February, at lOo'ciiH'k a. v
Henry Steire. Kewmsrket Hotel, New
Denver. Hotel I i'-em-e.
Oethii u k Henderson, Arllniitnn Hotel. SI...'an Citv  Hotel  I, fence
Allien HnMiir. K AS Hot. I, McGuiga<
Hotel licence.
James Bmwn. McGnlgan House, J'c-
Uuigun. Ho'el Lh-emo.
John 1. Black,
Chiel Ll enee Inspector.
New Denver. Fehrnsry 1ft. 1H03.
Perhaps
THE MANY SUDDEN
OHANGF8IN THE WKATHER HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD. IKY HORE-
HOUND AND TOI.U.   Price it\:
SYRUP OF IIOUEHOUND
AND TOLU IS KNOWN TO MANY
WHOM IT HAH CURED, ir HA>
KNOWN NO FA1LURE8. SOLD UNDER A GUARANTEE. Price 39c.
Sola
*T   THE
JSilvrorton
Drus
Pore
UrugH And
Mi'iuicah Kept,.
LA,KE AVE,  IsILSrEUi'U.M, B. 0
f»_a.cii^io
RAILWAY	
tnd $00 LME
1 HE DIRECT KOUIE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
'10 ALL POINTS
EAST and WEST
First-Class Sleepers on all Train*  fron
REVELSTOKE   und KOOTENAY LI)
TOURIST CARS  | usa~Medlc<ne Hm
Daily for St. Paul.
Tndays aud NViPNESOArs for Toronto
Friday* for Montskal and Boston.
— Same care psi-a Revelstoke one day —
eurller. ——
str
ic
tiy f
re
s
EGGS.
h.
Tlx© Wm. Hunter Co., X*tc*,,
Silverton,   13.  O.
aps*s____i •»»
MINI1Q   AND   C03MERCIAL  MEN MAKE THE'R
HEADQUARTERS   AT   THE
Thorburn uPTaD*t<,ww
H o us© DonE mm mmm
GRANT THORBURN,   Taor.
SILVERTON, B. 0.
i V^^^AMMMM^M^^M^^WM»MWWWWvWW»vy
Syrup of Horehomd & Tolu
FoK COUGHS  AND COLDS
THE
p - j
,;•; ifiwiipirtfrs Fer Mining Men:
VICTORIA
HOTEL.
EVRYTHINO NEW, NEAT]
AND UP-TO-DATE
TABLE UN8URPASSED IN|
THE NOLTHWEST.
B:;«ES&HiRBllR!H,   Props.
j SILVERTON,    B. Cl
'l   .'"-Ll
CONNECTIONS
f"* theNortli.Kev lat.4H, end Main Line,
7 3d rx Sunduy iv. Hllvennn,
^. sr ex. Bumliiy, 16 2i)
Kor   Roseland,   Nelmw      Crows   Ne»l
Br null and  Bonnilsrv Comiiry,
10:20 ex. Siinduj Iv Silverton.
ar. ix Sunday 18 10
To and from Sandon.
13:00 ex Sunday Iv S Iverion,
 ar. ex Sunday, 10:20
Tickets issukd thuouuii an... Baooaoe
—ciibcicki) to dkriinatiok 	
For rules anil finl iulormmion apply to
n aicut loi-al agent or
H. H RKF.VICS. Ajent, Wlvertoi
W.F.ANDERSON,
Trsv. I'oss. Agent, Nelson
E. J.COYLE.
A, G. P. Agent, V*ncouve>
hboit .,.. . .
ffod li^iTO^udesi^usrkMW
But iqvj ao Opal oi) far breast
t,t)6 tjopc Mill lull tb« woejTorfy
WE CARRY THE LARGEST
S'ock i.f ci set Hi the Province.
14k Oold Plain, Engine turned anH
Engraved — The Jas. Boi>S filled
IMH — 1 h- D- nber filled cases. —
Tne Imperial 26 year esses. — Lad.
let solm gold wat' lies with plait
snd set eases.
FINE WATCH B' PAIR'NO A PPKi
ALL ORDERS BY
THE POPULAR AND BEST AMERICAN MADE, LOW PRIOED
WATCH MOVEMENT,
"CUT 01!."
19 *'s Crescent atrei ts. with  Walt*
hum style cases st f 26 00, goaracttfdl
to keep good t me for three years.
The same with P. S. Bartletts naore-j
ment st |13 60
D-ulier Hampden 23 Jewels.
Deulier Grand.       E'gili 17 Jswel*
R <yal 21 Jewels.
ALL   GUARANTEED   FOR THBEB|
YEAKS        I      t       t      f      t
WE CARRY THE  LARGEST
S'ock Of Dianuids Rohies,
eralds and   pals In tha   Pro viucr |
■Cell snd gi t pnoes at
JACOB DOVER'S
THE JEWELER,
NELSON, B. a
51VTY.
M .11   PROMPTI Y ATTFNDI D TO.
YOU CAN
MAKf
itToao
MISS
etaeat
GCORCtTOWN
CANADA.
KT   FuK I'uWtii KM1T1NO MACHINES AND   VlSlBtj
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRITE US    CATALOGUED  FBI
IDE
$g.oq ^. "^qB^.55

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