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The Silvertonian Jun 16, 1900

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Array THE SILVERTONIAN.
BLOCAN'8 BEBT
KNOWN WEEKLY.
VOLUME THREE.
SEVEETOMAN.
THE SILVERTONIAN.
LOCAL MINING NEWS.
SUB8CRIPTIO  S, $2.00
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,   JUNE   16,  1900.
NUMBER 50
CONSIGNMENTS
OF FRESH
and
s
I
RECEIVED
WE  KLYBY
&
Wbit is Going on in Tht Hills
Minister of Mines
Year of
Report for tbt
ISM.
ELECTION
RETURNS.
Returns    Fran   tht    Provide.
Robert
F. Green    Sweeps
81mm tiding.
Tbe
Silvert©aa, 33. C.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
 (Siivertoni	
|yTHIS   HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
TIIE    BAR   IS  SUPPLIED  WITH   BEST  BRANDS   OP
WINES,   LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Xj. 2v£.   2Q_ao"W"les.   Prop,
j—T.     r'-i" f.   '■ ti     —rr- i     1       '.H  ■
F». BUR]__V«S & eo
 1	
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND 8ALT MEATS
REIAIL STORES AT
silvertoH, Nelson, Trail, Ymir. Kaalo, Sandon,
Ne* Denver. Cascade Ciiy, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY ANO CAREFULLY* ATTENDED TO.
HEAD  OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
e
Are You Locking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
TIIE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF 80 DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY 8HELVE8.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED.   OV ERCOATING8 JUST IN.
UEB81BEI,   TheTaik:   Silverton, B. C.
If
BB
» »t
2
•o
OT
TO A MINER
Stetson Hat
Is. is good ts a nugget.
They're worn all over the
world by men who work mostly
out-of-doors, because they are
Lj    durable and protective.
"        Our stock of this  famous
ff    brand is now complete.
P*     . We have many styles, made
•. up in several grades and colors,
from which you can choose.
<M_MAMM^^MA_»l^»W^<»W^M_¥)
The report of tlie Minister ol Mines,
which is accompanied by an excellent
mapoi the mining districts, has Just
been issued and contains much interesting information. j
The mineral output of the Province
ior last year totaled $12,366,055. This
includes coke, coal, etc., and is sn iu-
cresseof 11,449,794over Uie production
of 1898.
The values ol sold, copper, silver and
lead produced, compared witli that of
1898, ia as follows:
1898
Gold, placer,    $ 643,346
Gold, lode.       1!.201.217
8ilver, 2,375 841
Copper, 874.781
Lead. 1.077,581
The great decrease
of silver and lead is
shutting down of all    ^^^^^^^^
in June 1899.
Of the total production ol mineral,
West Kootenay ia credited with $6,187,
800. or a 1 in le over one half, Tbe Slocan
la spite of her troubles, produced one and
three quarter millions of dollars worth
of ore.
The Slocan Mining Division statistics
reported by Mining Recorder Mclnnis,
show:
Locations made during year, 393,
Certificates of Work recorded.... 778.
Amount paid in in lieu
of assessments.... $8000
Certificates of Improvements— 80
Water right permits issued    0
Free miners' licences, individuals 868
••       " "       companies . 31
Special F. M. licences Issued—   7
1899
1 fl .344,900
2.857.57S
1,153,708
1,351,453
878,870
in the production
attributable to the
tbe Slocan minea
The election in this Riding passed off
very much aa predicted in these columns
last week. Robert F. Green, tbe miners' candidate, the nominee of the Provincial Party, swept the Riding, carrying
eyery polling place of any importance.
Ir. Silyerton, Sandon, Kaalo and Whitewater his vote equalled tbe combined
votes of Keen snd Kane, and hia majority over the two throughout tbe Riding
was over 100. Out of a total vote of 1190
be received 643. Kane, the Government
candidate, loaes his deposit and Keen
only saved hia by 50 votes.
Iu Silverton, the voting was carried
on quietly, the count showing, Ksne 5,
Keen 23, Green 65, and one spoiled ballot. W. Horton represented Kane bere,
J. G. Gordon and C. McNichols were
scrutineers for the Business Men and B.
Mcintosh and R. O. Matheson looked
after tbe interests of tbe successful candidate. Tbe returns as they came in
were loudly cheered by the crowd that
had gathered In from the hills doling
the dsy, while fireworks and bonfires
helped out the celebration. The figures
as announced were:
Green. Keen. Kane.
66
SILVERTON'S
PROSPECTS
a  Substantial    Increase.
Worthy the Attention  of Inventors
and Settlers.
While other towns in   the
country bave been puffing and blowing, j
pushing citisens of the West. Tlie
headquarters of the biggeat Slocan
business firm is located bere, and the
hotels and business blocks would do
credit to a much larger town. Although
at the present time Silverton has a
drawback in the absence of a bank, Ihis
is a matter which promisee to adjust
itself within a few months. Six mining
companies bave their headquarters here,
and'among the other companies operating iu tbe neighborhood are found
some cf the largest and wealthiest in
tbe Provinoe. Two concentrators are
already built on Four Mile creek and two
others are assured in the near future.
From the present bright cutlook for
tbis town it ia eaav to prophecy the early
incorporation of Silverton, when it will
. take ita place among the other growing
Slocan ] cities jn the mineral belt of tbe Province.
NEARING the ore shute.
Tbe tunnel being driven on the Lone
Star near town, which wil tap the ore-
shute st considerable depth, is nesring
comp'etion and it would be no surprise
to tbis community if a big strike is made
upon thia property at any time. The ore
jn the outcrop of this shute is a heavy
galena, assaying 200 ounces in filverand
60 per cent lead to tbe ton, Tl.e tnnnel
being driven will tap the shute at a
depth of over 125 feet.
WORK ON THE  L. H.
Work ia being pushed on the L. H.
cluim on Red Mountain. Tbis is a fairly
well developed property, situsted about
fonr miles from Silverton, it being a big
altered dyke nearly 100 feet wide. It is
being developed by a system of tunnels
and has already been tapped at a depth
of over 100 feet. Tbe ore ia an iron
aulphide, carrying values in gold ranging
in values from $10 to $125 to the ton.
Tbe L. H. is a big proposition and the
character of its ore ia such ss can be
treated by either concentrating or the
cyanide process.
Silverton
New Denver
Ainsworth
Three Forks
Wbitewster
Robson
Slocan City
McGuigan
Enterprise
Lardo
Balfour
Duncan City
Argenta
Kaslo
Sandon     M^
Pilot Bay
Slocan Junction
Deer Park
57
IS
17
47
7
64
22
6
0
7
15
7
124
174
9
^B
5
23
54
15
19
14
5
44
4
3
1
14
4
, f
3
64
80
24
5
2
5
4
2
4
4
0
52
2
0
4
6
3
1
61
16
4
2
1
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York. June 12.—Bar Silver, 00c
Lake copper,  $_6.50.
Lead—The firm that fixes the selling
price for miners snd smelters quotes lead
at $3.70 at the close.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of  ore  fram Silverton for
the year 1899. totaled 1693 Tons.
All other Lake points 1385    "
Tlie shipment   oi  ore   from   Slocan
Lake points, up to and Including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                   Tons.
Bosun 340
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
From Silverton Tons.
Emily Edith 20
Hewett 30
Vancouver    20
Wakefield, (concentrates) 340
Galena Minea       20
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 020
From Slocan City
Arlington     300
Black Prince    00
Totals       643      378      168
The election of John Houston in Nelson, although expected, was gratifying
news for the people here, and nearly all
were pleased to hear the news of Smith
Curtis' victory over Mcintosh in Rossland. His narrow majority should be a
hint for him to stay at home during tut*
ure elections and not speak against labor
candidates abroad while aeeking the labor vote at home.
Of the niuety odd candidates before
the people last Saturday, 20 lose their
deposits.  Of these 11 were Martinite*.
4 Conservatives, 2 Provincial Party and
3 Independents.
The members returned are:
Victoria, Turner, Helmcken, Hall and
McPhillips (Turnerites.)
Vancouver, Marl in and McQneen, (Gov,)
Tatlow and Garden, (Con.)
Esqoimalt, Pooley, (Turner) and Hayward, (Ind.)
Casaiar,   No returns yet.
Cariboo, Rogers and Hunter, (Con )
New Westminster, Brown, (Ger.)
Nanaimo City, Smith (Prov  P)
Nanaimo North, Mclnnis (Gov.)
Nanaimo South, Dunsmuir (Turner)
Alberni,   Neill (Prov. Party.)
Comox,   Motince (Con.)
Cowichan,   Dickie (Con.)
Victoria North,   Booth (Turner.)
Victoria South,   Eberta  (Turner)
East Lillooet.   Prentice (Turner.)
Weat Lillooet,   Smith (Prov. P.)
Dewdney,   McBride (Turner)
Delta,   Oliver (Gov.)
Weat Yale,   Murphy (Prov. P.)
North Yale,   Fulton (Con )
East Yale,   Ellison (Con )
Revelstoke,   Taylor (Con.)
Nelson,   Houston (Prov, P.)
Slocan,   Green (Prov. P.)
Rossland,   Curtis (Gov.)
North East Kootenay,    Wells (Prov. P.)
5 East Kootenay,   Smith (Gov.)
Richmond,   Kidd (Prov, P )
Chilliwack,   Monro (Ind.)
Summary.
Government  7
Turnerites   10
Wilsonites  0
Independent   2
Provincial Party  8
Ci
(No returns.)
38.
throwing bouquets at themselves and
trying to make tbe outside world believe
that they were the hub of tbe Slocan
aud had a monoply on all that waa good
in this country, Silverton haa been
quietly going along about her business
and developing her own resources, with
the result that she has now reached a
position where she towers head and
shoulders over her sbter Slocan Lake
towns aa an industrial, business and
raining centre. Tbe time bas now
arrived however when Silverton is in s
position to invite intending settlers and
those looking for business openings to
come and look over the resources and
the backing that our town already has
snd what we may expect when our
resources are fully developed, and ask
them to settle down amongst us and
help make Silverton what she ia bound
to be, tbe chief city of the Slocan.
Silverton, like other towns in this
portion of British Columbia, is dependent almost entirely upon the mineral
wealth and mining resources (hst
surround her. But unlike her sister
towns tbat tell about what they are going
to bave, Silvertoniana are in a position
to talk about what they already have as
well ss what they are reasonably sure of
having. Silverton already bu five fully
developed minea directly tributary to
the town, each of whicli bas thousands
of feet of underground development
work done upon it and large bodies of
paying- ore are blocked out' in these
various mines. A large number of
promising prospects, gold, copper and
silver, are rapidly being developed in
this district, some of tbeee having
reached that stage in their development
when they can almost be called developed mines. <
As an ore shipping point Silverton is
third in the whole province of British
Columbia, second in the Slocan and first
in the Slocan Lake region. Last year
Silverton's ore shipments amounted to
1603 tons of gslena ore, that netted,
after paying freight and treatment, over
$160 000., or nearly twice the value of
tbe ure shipped from all the other Lake
porta combined. Tbis year Silverton's
ore shipments will at least double in
value tbat of last year and although the
shipping season has hardly yet begun,
already over $50,000 worth of ore has
been abipped to tbe smelters from this
point. When Silverton's mineral re-
sourses are more fully developed it ia a
conservative estimate, when we say,
tbat at least $1,000,000 worth of mineral
wealth will be produced here annually.
The situation of Silverton ia such as
to make it an ideal townsite and the
natural entorport and shipping point for
a large scope of country. The townsite
is comparatively level, rising gradually
from the lake to the base of the mountain
and embracing some 400 ncres ol land
lying along tbe lake shore, extending
on both sides of Four Mile creek, which
empties into Slocsn Lake at this point.
Its situation Is such as to make it safe
and free from any of those disasters
thut so often overtake mining camps in
the west, such sa snowslides, waterspouts
and avalanches. Navigation is open
on Slocan Lake the year round and
steamers csn enter and leave Silverton's
port in any kind of weather. Tbere is
abundance of good spring water and a
water works system is now being installed. Tbe townsite has a good natural
drainage, there having been not one
case of malaria or typhoid fever in the
place, and that it ia healthy is shown by
the fact that but one death, tliat of an
infant, bas occured since Ihe laying ont
of the town.
For mining men who are looking for
investments either in surface prospects,
partially developed properties or fully
developed mines, there is no better field
of operation than that afforded by the
Silverton district. For those that are
looking for real estate Investments, it
would pay them to look the possibilities
of Silverton oyer, and the erection ot a
number oi dwelling houses for rent in
this place would pay big interest on
the investment.
Silverton numbers among her business
men some of the most progressive i nd
The Wm. Hunter Co, are building
another warehouse*
The Sandon Mining Review will make
its reappearance in a short time.
Miss Helen Nelson has gone to Coeur
d'Alene City to visit tier brother.
Go to R. G. Daigle's .for fresh fruit*
and confectionery. Near the Postoffice .*
M. Grady, accomuanied by his niece,
Miss Smith, left on Tuesday for Vancouver.
Chaa. McLaughlin is now Secretary o
the Football Club, J. Barclay having re-
signed.
A Service of Song will be held in the
C hurt li on Sabbath evening at 7:30 r. m.
All cordially welcomed.
Manager Hand of the Payne mine,
accompanied by bis family, were in
town during the week. Tbey will spend
the summer at the Galena Farm.
Closing Day at the School will be Friday, the 29th inst, Closing services will
be given by tbe pupils on tbe morning of
that day to which the parents' and all
others interested are invited to attend.
All work in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drug Store, trill
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler. All repairs are GUABANTKSl. FOR ONE YEAR. *
An election of a trustee to fill the vacant place in the School Board caused by
the expiry of Trustee Jackson'a term ia
called for the 30th inst. Electors can
uot do better than replace Mr. Jackson
in office, as he has proved hia usefulness
on the Board.
With tbe inauguration of the "Imperial Limited" service the Canadian Pacific Ry operate a through sleeper between
Arrowhead and Vancouver for the accomodation of the Kootenay business.
This will be a very great convenience to
the travelling public.
A change in tie schedule of tnatcliea
was made by tbe Executive Committee
of tbe Football League lately. Silverton
will meet Sandon in Slocan City on July
2nd, instead of going to Sandon and the
Ksslo game here has been dated for oue
week earlier. Both Kaslo and Sandou
plav here in July.
E. M. Bi indie was over from New
Denver during the week trying to arrange a football match between the
Champions and the New Denver team.
The local boys however report all available dates tilled and New Denver will
have to forego the honor of a game, at
least for the near future.
A. A. Webb returned on Monday from
Fire Valley and will remain here until
the season is more advanced. He says
there is too much snow there at present
to make prospecting practicable.
At the Emily Edith mine some development work is being done, T. Burley
and W.Wills of this town having si cured
a contract to drive 300 additional teet in
the No. 3 tunnel. They have put a small
force of men at work and two shifts aro
boring into the mountain.
A force of men have been put to work
on the Biunswick, a claim adjoining the
Surprise group, and considerable work
will be done upon it this summer. The
Brunswick is a hig concentrating silver-
lead proposition snd is considered une oi
our best prospects.
Tbe Great Britain Group on Granite
creek, a tributary ol Four Mile, haa been
started up and the owners, A. L. Roberts and Jack' Roberts, intend doing
considerable work there this Reason.
Last summer the owners erected buildings on the property unl built n good
pack trail to it. This season thev will
devote their attention to doing development work upon the proper y.
II.
I
•I —u
■
■I
I -4
TERROR IN CHINA
Government Approves Crusade Against
Foreigners.
By Associated Press.
New York. June   12.—A London
THK MEW ____Kr.l_AI.ATI KK.
•-••ji-Thirfi
correspondent of the Tribune says
London has been severed temporarily from communication with two
centers of the most interesting news
—Pekin and Pretoria. The Boxers,
like the Boers, have cut the wires,
and Tien Tsin and Taku have not
known with precision what was
happening at Pekin, where the imperial government is censuring the
regular troops for offering resistance to the rebels and complimenting the fanatical mobs for their
patriotism and public spirit in killing foreigners and burning their
property.
The force of over 2000  marines
which left Tien Tsin on   Sunday in
three   trains   is   believed to   have
reached the capital in   safety.    The
presence of this force was urgently
needed, lor the   dowager   empress
has dropped all pretence  and   is in
open sympathy with the enemies of
missionaries and foreigners, and all
the mission property   at   Pekin  is
menaced with the fate of the American station   at Tung   Chau, where
the buildings were   destroyed   and
the native Christians  murdered by
the soldiers   commissioned to   protect them.    It   is   the story oi  Armenia   repeated   in     Pekin.      All
Christian converts and foreigners at
the capital are at  the      rcy of the
mob, as well as the regular soldiers,
unless marines from 31 ships of war
can protect them.
The great powers are co-operating in a determined effort to protect foreign interests in China.
Reports that Russian troops have
crossed the frontier and that 6000
men from the garrison at Port Arthur are preparing to go to Pekin
under an arrangement agreed upon
by the European powers are not
fully confirmed.
member* Klreied, with   Pari) .tlHlia-
tloit*<-Strength of Partie*.
The   following   candidates  have
been elected,   according   to  the returns received so far:
Riding.   Winning Cand'te.    Party.
Alberni.... Doubtful	
Comox.... A. Mouiice ... .Turner
Cassiar.... Doubtful.	
Cariboo... A.  S.   Rogers ... Con
"     ., J.   Hunter Con
Chilliwack C. Munro. .. .Govt
Cowichan.. .C. H. Dickie.  . Turner
Delta   John Oliver Gov
Dewdney.... R. McBride ... .Con
Esquimalt.. C. E. Pooley ..Turner
" .W. H. Hayward.Turner
East Lillooet.. .J D Prentice.... Ind
West Lillooet. A W Smith. .Turner
N.E. Kootenay...— Wells.... Ind
S.E. Kootenay..E C.  Smith..Gov
Slocan ....  R F Green Prov
Rossland.... Smith Curtis.... Gov
Nelson.. . John Houston .... Prov
Revelstoke....— Taylor.... Con
Nanaimo... Ralph Smith... Labor
N. Nanaimo. W W B McInnes.Gov
S. Nanaimo..Doubtful  	
New Westmins'tr. .J C Brown.Gov
Richmond T Kidd Prov
Victoria... J H Turner... .Turner
"     . ...H D Helmcken..    "
"      R Hall        "
" .. A E McPhillips.. "
" North... J Booth.... "
"    South.. D M Eberts..    "
Vancouver.... J Martin Gov
'«        HGilmour...     "
'•        ...J F Garden.... Con
"       ..R   G   Tatlow..    "
West Yale.. D Murphy Turner
East Yale.. Price Ellison Con
North Yale F J Fulton Con
Siunmary
Turnerites. 12
Conservatives 8
Provincial  3
Independent  2
Labor -  1
the enenty th*y Will be at America
siding tomorrow at 8 a. m. General Knox Jtioved out from Kroonstad to intercept the enemy. Full
particulars later,"
A Crop or Boer Lie*
London, June 12.—A plentiful
crop of Boer reports have been filtering through Lorenzo Marques.
According to these Gen. Dewet wj|h
13.^00 burghers is marching on Johannesburg, the Boers have retaken Bloemfontein, where President
Steyn again occupies the presidency, the British have sustained a se
vere defeat at Elandsfontein, and
have lost 750 killed and wounded
and 150 prisoners in a fight at
Vredefort.
experience were his vulnerable
parts. I sent French with Porter's
and Dixon's cavalry brigades and
Hutton'3 mounted infantry round by
oUr left, ahd Ian Hamilton with
Broadwood's and Gordon's cavalry
brigades, Ridley's mounted infantry
and Bruce Hamilton's infantry
around by our right.
Camped <>u tirouud The) Won
. "Both columns met with great
opposition. At about 3 p. m. I saw
two of Hamilton's infantry battalions advancing to what appeared to
be the key to the  enemy's  defense
ent cable that,though the announce-
ment ol the resignation of Messrs.
Te water, Saner and Merriam was
premature, it seems certain that
they will do so and it i.s not likely
the whole ministry will resign, a solution of the difficulty being possibly found by the progressives lending Premier Schreiner two members
to fill vacant seats in the cabinet.
FAMINE IS WORSE
Cholera C&rrries Off Swarms of Starving Victims.
Total Opposition.
Government	
Doubtful	
Total.
26
8
" 4
38
KB VOLUTION IN   CHIIfA.
The People Olive ont nualonarlea and
Clamor lor a New Bmperor.
t By Associated Preas.
London, June 11.—A special dispatch from Tien Tsin says it is
reported that the dowager empress
has fled to the Russian legation at
Pekin.
A special dispatch to the Associated Press from Pekin, under date
of June 9, says:
"The situation is growing steadily more alarming.    The missionary
compounds   were    all   abandoned
yesterday evening.    Forty American and  English   missionaries  are
gathered at the American Methodist
mission,  surrounded  by 300 native
pupils, whom  it   was impossible to
send   to their   homes.   They   are
waiting,  with a few  revolvers and
guarded by ten American  marines,
for reinforcements  to take them to
the coast.
"Missionaries who returned from
the country to the east say the populace are asserting that they must
have a new emperor."
BAYONET CHARGE
The British General Smcamped  Beyond Volksrust.
Cl.N. pasnkni;kh THA IN WRKCKKD
II Hub> Into a Ditch  and !tO  Paaaen-
gera are Injured
^ my Associated tress.
St. Louis, Mo., June 12.—A
special to the Globe-Democrat from
Spokane, Wash., says:
"Meagre particulars have reached here to the effect that the Great
Northern     east-bound   passenger
train,   which  left   here yesterday,
was derailed at  Summit, Mont., at
an  early hour this morning.    It is
supposed the accident was the result of a broken rail.    Two engines
and   four   coaches are reported  to
have gone into the ditch.    A  score
_>r more of passengers  are  injured,
bul none  killed  outright.    Among
the   severely   injured is   Frank O.
Gantor, Winnipeg."
There are still two or three revo-
R|tions in progress in Spanish America, but they do not attract any
more attention than lynchings in
the South.
By Associated Press.
Londoii, June 12.—9:12 p.   m—
The war office has issued the following from Gen. Buller to  the   secretary of war:
"Joubert's farm, June 12.-5:15
p. m.— Encamped four miles north
ol Volksrust.
"Laings Nek and Majuba were
completely evacuated by the Boers
last night. Gen. Clery, from Ingo-
go, is now coming over the Nek. I
have had to ca mp here for want of
water. '
"A correct list of yesterday's casualties will be sent as soon as secured. .
Buller Takes Another Paas.
London, June 12—10:10 a.   m.—
The   war   office posts the following
dispatch from General Buller.
"Headquarters in Natal, June 11.
We forced Almondsek   to day.    It
is not marked on the map,  but is
the last defile to Charlestown  flats.
The enemy   were m considerable
force with several guns in position.
The brunt of the fighting  fell   upon
the Second  Dorsets,  who carried
the position at the point of the bayonet, and the third cavalry brigade,
who also heavily attacked on our
right from   a very broken country
round    Iketini  mountain.    I  hope
our casualties are less than  100,
which,   considering     the  extreme
length of the position, is much  less
than I expected.
"The whole attack was directed
by Hilliard, whose dispositions
were extremely good.
"The artillery, tenth brigade and
third cavalry brigade did the most
of the work."
Boera In Orange River Colony Oereatod
The war office has received the
following dispatch from Kelly-
Kenny:
"Bloemfontein, June 12.—Our
troops from the north are at Hon-
ingspruit (south of Rootleval, where
the Boers cut the British lines of
communication).     Having defeated
The Fact* about It.
Nothing from any source lends
color to these stories, with the exception of the last, which is probably the Boer version of the disaster
to the militia bataltion of the Derbyshire regiment at Roodeval. In
regard to President Steyn being at
Bloemfontein, a dispatch from Maseru, Basutoland, dated June 11,says
President Steyn was then at Vrede,
200 miles from Bloemfontein.
Gen. Buller seems to be making j
substantial progress and ought
soon to possess the railroad at I
Charlestown,in the northern extremity of Natal, whence presumably he
will advance on Heidelberg and effect a junction with Lord   Roberts.
Johaaue*burc Police Yield.
A dispatch from Lichtenberg,
dated June n, says 60 Johannesburg mounted policemen with a
Maxim gun have surrendered to
Gen. Hunter.
Move Through Swaziland
A probable explanation of the reports that a British force is moving
through Swaziland comes m a dispatch from Port Elizabeth, dated
June 11, announcing the return of
the British cruiser Doris from Koosi
bay, where she has taken a number
of whale boats with the object of
landing an armed force, presumably
part of a plan to penetrate into
Swaziland. The Boers, however,
got wind of the expedition and the
force was not landed.
Cape Cabinet Crlals
According to a Capetown dispatch the cabinet crisis continues.
It is alleged that, should Premier
Schreiner secede from the bond, as
he pretends, his action would place
the bond in the minority in the assembly. Mr. Schreiner has accepted the resignations of J. X. Merri-
man, treasurer, and J. W. Auer,
commissioner of public works.
Among the members of the yeomanry killed at Lindley was W. T.
Power, proprietor of the Canyon
ranch in North Texas and son of
Sir W. T. Power.
BOERS BEATEN
Roberts Attacks General Botha in Force
Near Pretoria.
By Associated Press.
London, June 13.—A lengthy
dispatch forwarded to the war office
by Major General Knox from Kroonstad, presumably sent there by messenger, reads as follows:
"Kroonstad, June 12.—We have
been requested to forward you from
Lord Roberts the following dispatch
from Pretoria residency at 8:30 a.
m. today:
"Pretoria, June 12.—Pretoria
and Johannesburg are perfectly
quiet and several of the inhabitants
have expressed gratitude for the
peace and order which prevails.
"After   surrendering     the   city,
Botha retired to a   place   about 15
miles east of the Middleburg road.
He had a small force at   first,   but
during the last   few days his   numbers increased and his being so near
the town kept up the excitement in
the country, prevented the burghers
from  laying down their arms and
interfered   with   the   collection of
supplies.    It,     therefore,    became
necessary   to   attack him.   This I
did yesterday.
"He held a very strong position
practically unassaible in front,
which enabled him to place the
main portion of his troops on his
flanks which he knew from former
on their left flank. This was almost gained before dark and I ordered the force to bivouac on the
ground they had won.
"Pole-Carew   with   his   division
occupied our center.    As I have explained, he could not attack, but he
gradually advanced so as to support
Ian Hamilton and, when I   left the
field, he was on the line held by the
enemy's outposts in the morning.
Methbeu Defeats llewet
"I hurried back to   get  news of
Methuen's movements. On hearing
that the Free Staters had taken advantage of our crossing the Vaal to
interrupt   our   line of   communication, I   sent   Kitchener  with  such
troops   as   I   could then   spare to
Vredefort with orders to push south
and  communicate   with   Methuen,
who   I   knew had a very   compact
force in the vicinity of Heilbron.    I
also dispatched.'a special messenger
to]Methuen, instructing him to push
on  at all speed to the main line of
railway.
"These     two  officers     met    at
Vredefort road station on the evening ot June 10.    They marched yesterday   to   Rhenoster  river, where
Methuen gained a complete victory
over Dewet and took  possession of
his  camp and   scattered his troops
in all direction.    He and   Kitchener
marched today towards Kroonstad.
No Pear for the Army
".Her majesty's government need
have no apprehension as to the security of the army in South Africa.
The enemy gained a slight success,
which was unfortunate,   but  which
will be remedied very  shortly,  and
it will not  take   long to repair  the
damage done  to the  railway.    As
these diversions are all in   existence
I am now able to hold the   line  between     this     and     Rhenoster  in
strength. Methuen will  arrange  to
guard it onward as he advances.
Hunter's and BiUler'm Advance
"Hunter   should be at   Potchef-
stroom today.    He will then   move
on Johannesburg.    We have communicated with Buller, who will no
doubt  soon  make the  prestnes of
his force in the field felt.
"Our losses yesterday were not,
I trust, serious, but I deplore the
death of that gallant soldier, the
Earl of Airlie. The only other casualties reported as yet are: Seventeenth lancers—Major the Hon. Lionel Fortescue and Lieut, the Hon.
C. Cavendish, both killed."
Gen. Knox adds that  Kroonstad
is quite safe.
Losses In Heroin Fights.
London, June  13.—The  following dispatch has  been   received at
the war office from   Lord   Roberis:
"Katsbosch, June   12.—In  yes-
terday's engagements Methuen had
1 killed and 18  wounded.    Among
the latter is Lieut. C. Ivarle, of   the
Twelth    battalion    of  Yeomanry
On June 7,  the  Derbyshire  militia
lost 36 killed and 104 wounded,   all
of whom were in the yeomanry hospital, which  was  captured  by  the
Boers and retaken by Methuen."
Buller Carry Ins all Before Him
London, June   13.—General  Buller is rapidly  fulfilling  Lord   Rol
erts' hope   that  he  will   make  his
forces felt.    A dispatch from Joubert's farm, under todays date,  announced the continuation    of  Buller's successful mnrch, the  occupation of Volksrust without opposition
and the capture   of  a   number   of
prisoners  while the Boer casualties
yesterday are reported to have been
very heavy.
A special dispatch from Capetown reports that the Boers recently captured a train at Smalldeel and
destroyed two miles of the lines.
But subsequent dispatches show-
that General Hunter routed all the
Boers in that neighborhood.
Cape Cabinet Crisis.
At the Cape the  ministerial crisis I
continues.   The Times correspond". I
llovlsed lli'liiriiMlroiii Victoria
Vancouver, June 12.—The following correct returns from the elections have been received:
Victoria city—Helmcken, 1668;
Hall, 1^97; Turner, 1552; McPhillips, 1449; Martin, 1352; Brown,
ia^n: Yates, 1233; Beckwith, 1154
The actual vote was 2,994, with
48 rejected ballots, leaving 2,946
actual count. Plumpers—Martin,
57; Yates, 1; Brown, 3; Beckwith,
1; Turner, 9; McPhillips, fi; Helmcken, fi; Hall, 5.
Texadn—Dunsmuir, 33; Rad-
cliffe, 73.
Prohibition bills have been introduced in the legislatures of Manitoba and Prince Kdward Island.
In Manitoba it is proposed to license only druggists to sell by retail, but others may keep alcohol
for scientific purposes. There will
be a large increase in the number of
scientific experiments as to the effect of alcohol on the human  body.
London, June 12.—The famine in
India grows worse. The Stardard's
Simla correspondent, in a mail let.
ter, says:
"It  would   be   rash   to assume
fronl the   almost   stationary relief
figures that the corny will  soon be
turned.    So   devastating  has  been
the cholera outbreak, so enormous
tho mortality and so" blind the ter-
ror inspired by the black death, that
the famine relief camps  in   Bombay
j presidency, which contained  thous-
ands of workers, melt away and are
left empty in the course of a  couple
: of days.    Staiving though they  he,
. the people prefer to fly to their own
homes and to die rather than to die
! rather than to remain in the famine
relief camps, where   the  cholera is
killing   a  hundred  workers   daily
, Terrible stories come from ponad "
■    The    Standard's    correspondent
says mortality  estimates  are  inac-
curate.    Unnumbered  dead  bodies
jare polluting streams and spreading
contagion.
Women have been made eligible
to sit as aldermen and councillors of
t ie London boroughs.'
Election Returns Up to Date.
The following table shows the total vote cast in the election for each
candidate, except in Cassiar and South Nanaimo, where the figures are
not to hand, and in Alberni and Fast Yale, where the returns are not
quite complete The vote of the missing po.ling p.aces in the tJ
latter ridings will not, however, change the result. The additional re
turns given today are from Richmond, Comox, Chilliwack,   Alberni  and
1 -«lM    i ilk*.
RIDINGS 'CANDIDATES
•ALBERNI—1
Rcdford. J.. Gov	
Thompson, I 11, Cont..
NelU, A W, 1 ml
COMOX- 1
McPhce, J, Gov..	
Mounce, A. Turn	
CASSIAR   2
rubles, J,   Gov..
Clifford, C \V, Cons...!
1 lodlre*]   Ind	
Irving, Capt, Ind .
CAR I BOO   I
Kogeis. S A, Cons	
Hunte-, I. Cons	
Kincluni.     l'ro\
lones,    I'rov .
CHILI.UVACK-i
Munro. C, Gov	
Ashwell, G R,  Cons
Vcddcr. A S.   Ind.
COWICHAN    1
I'ord. W, Gov	
Oickk.CH.  Turn ....
DELTA-1
Oliver, I. Gov.. ,
Berry. J W, Cons.'..."
bEOfevIi* Prov"
\\ helium C, Gov.
_,   McBride, R.   Cons.
ESIJCIMALT- 2
rraser. D. Gov 	
Bi_-.aiu.-on, I,,   Gov
Pooley. C E,  Turn
ayward. W II. Turn
■ „llWi",> D W, ind...
LILLOOET B   1
Graham, |<   Gov
, , Prentice. J I). Ind..
LILLOOET W-i
l.ochore, A, Gov
Smith, A W, Turn ...
Skinner, K B.   Ind..
KOOTENAV N E
Burnttt. F, Gov....
ArmstronK.    Con»..,.
Wells.    Ind.
KOOTENAV Sfc-i
Smith. B C. Gov
CosHgan. I R, font...
SLOT )S    'nd	
Kane. G. Gov	
Keen, J. Cons	
„r,^'fen. RF- Prov...
ROSSLAND-,
Curtis. S,  Gov..
NRSTh'C":S"!
Kletclier, f,   Cons..
ouston, I.    I'rov.
,     Hall. Urfi A II,   Ind   '
KEVKLSTOKE-"'    "" "
Macrae, A.   Gov
... '»\lpr.   Cons ",'"
NANAIMO CITY-1	
Vales, J S,   Gov.. ..
McKinnel, G,  Cons
Smith. K.   I ab
NANAIMO N   i    	
KSJ"«SW>B,   Gov
Brvdcn. J,   Turn
Dixon, J,   lab
NANAIM(I.S-!70
Dun
Gov.
57
2SJ
PARTIES AND VOTE.
Turn. I Cons. I prov. |   Ind.
346
..
»7
lo/.
3o6
.....
»»5
V.
95
Labor
...
74
49
4*1
166
IJJI
86
I9.S
	
i.15
2:2
'.15
140
220
Mo
111
241
joritie
"is,"
88
»5
So
NT
D'liisi.iiuir. I,   Cons	
Radclilfe. J.   I.ab
I'-W WESTMINSTER^"
Bf'mn JC,  Gov....
uwffi'.'-K'-'C'ons...    	
RIUlMOND-i 	
8RM..D,   Gov	
Wljinj,,, MB.  Con,'."
VI(.'T(i|<l.\'ciTV-4	
Mailin, J,   Gov....
Vales,J.s.   Gov.     	
eckwiil,J I.,   Gov..'"
"/"W". JG\   Gov . 	
}' eliuckcn   H I),   Tur "
8F&JS T"rn
run, R,   turn...
)?ni\'.U,   Oov	
Booth, j.   Turn...        '
vAZTLV-' lmi::::
Sanuster, 0,   Gov.
,-. £■}!e',',• DM.   Turn
VANCOUVER CITY".
Martin. J.   Gov	
McQueanJ,   Gov.
'•"'■our, II,   Gov.
Mcihcrson   R,   Gov"
Wood, Wil,   Cons,
(widen. IK,   Co,,,
.Wlson, I,   Cons.,,
r.illow, R t,.   Cons
Op pit, K c.   Pro
Wi  iains E.    |..,|,
McClaln. W.   Sor  .
VA«-*   kfi
tVAjiffe?'   ,mi"
BM<1|»T1M,   Gov. ..
;N,"»-1J.   Cons.,
1 A I.E N-i
Palmei
Pulton
Deanc
62V
»04
I15»
"54
"59
117
".'..::
20.S
17.17
i.W
1462
"1.1.1
118
169'
!_"<
I2«'
507
•■■    .   I	
504
•95 1..:::
103
"_6j'
"ia
241
»'
f'44
I     74»   	
I	
92
go
55
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ti
166S
1552
•597
ill')
■2.1
259
541
i.is
753
' 7.V
tbb
*35
....
"49
667"
43
88
aiS
	
i.!49
1799
MJ'i
il/it
I   1
er.AI,   Gov.
'"•'•I. Com
*<V).   Prov.
«5   I.
'04    .
.116
200
Ui
97
...
6
V
I t
Sou'
177
tJ0nnco,fee:,, '"'«"»>'•
*i
500    	
 I w.:::::
'    MJ
201
	
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I9»
♦»
119 RUSH TOJETTLE
Expected Result of Impending Close of
the Boer War.
(Cable Letter, by Associated Press.)
London, June 9.—To all intents
and   purposes   the   South  African
war, so far as the average Britisher
is  concerned,   is  over.    With the
exception of the possible capture of
President   Kruger   and  the  homecoming of Lord   Roberts, his calendar of probabilities  contains noth-
ing of interest.    Already  China is
becoming a   keen  rival  of  South
Africa—the burning question of the
day.    The capture of 500 members
of the imperial  yeomanry,   which a
few months ago would have thrown
the nation into a fit of despondency,
has passed comparatively unnoticed.
The work of stamping out  the rebellion, for such,  according to the
Hritish point of view,  is the nature
of the opposition   now encountered,
is too prosaic and too common in the
annals of the British army to merit
the   absorbing   attention    hitherto
ment ensued and the leader of the
government, unable to restore or-
aer, called up.n, the speaker to
take the chair to quell the disturb-
ance. Several members were on
the floor of the house ordering each
other to sit down, when the s
tators in the gallery
excitement.
pec-
arose in great
"<"M'''"'»'Bicycle lolluiou
Woodstock, Ont., ju„e g.i,
A- M Miller, pastor of Kastwood
Methodist church, i.s dead, as a re-
suit of blood poisoning due to a
bicycle accident on the Queen's
birthday. Deceased collided with
another cyclist while descenJing a
hill.
IMIK
OPEN A NEW LEVEL
Drifting Begins on the Seventh in the
War Eagle,
TO SAVH THBPLAG I'HoniNSI LT.
* »<,r"«<*  Uccllne   Imitation  to •
War Celebration m Detroit.
Windsor, Out., June g.—Mem-
bers of the Canadian club in Detroit are anxious to have a big
body of Windsorites participate in
the monster celebration of the defeat of the Spaniards by the United
States, to beheld in Detroit shortly,
but the attitude of certain   Detroit-
ers in pulling down the Union Jack
bestowed on each detail of the san-1 the other day so enraged the committee who had the arrangements
in hand that J. W. Drake, the master of ceremonies, has informed
Major Rdthwell, of the Canadian
club, Detroit, that Windsor people
are possessed of the idea that the
British flag would again be insulted,
if they carried it, and they say they
don't want to run any chances and
will stay at home.
guinary struggle.
"What  shall we do with it?" is
far more the topic of  the hour than
speculation regarding the expenditure in lives  and  money that seem
likely to  ensue before  the pacification of the  Boers shall  be accomplished.    Large numbers of enqui-
ries are daily made in London anent
the  prospects  of the  undeveloped
crown   lands of   Natal,   while  tbe
rich resources of the Transvaal and
Orange River colony form the basis
of frequent  articles.    Before  many
months shall have passed the steamship companies  plying to and from
Sou lh   Africa,   the  companies connected with the development of that
portion   of   the  globe  and   others
equally interested and well informed
look for a large and steady emigration of trained British agriculturists
and  others to fields on  which the
blood of Briton and Boer is scarcely
dry.    All the letters from the front
indicate an increasing desire on the
part of a large   proportion  of the
irregular   and    colonial   forces   to
settle down on this fertile land.
The British high commissioner,
Sir Alfred Milner, it is learned,
is devoting his whole attention to evolving a scheme of
civil government applicable■ to the
Orange River colony and the Transvaal and relying to no little extent
upon the influence of the British
settlers to exercise it. The commissioner is in constant comtnuni-
cat on with the secretary of state
for the colonies, Right Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain, who has got the
forces of the colonial office hard at
work on the problem, though the
keen sighted oflieials believe the
day is still far distant when the
military administrators will be able
to hand over the reins of government in safety to the civil authorities. The contingency of President
Kruger's still undefedted force scoring a victory of consequence over
Lord Roberts is generally regarded
BS sp remote as to be scarcely
tvorth mentioning.
uisiiMiN AGAINST NBI
ttotiftsit'tTviiv. wiUi:*.
Mnm: Ppire. Attack* Hoberu' COM'
imiulralloun Near Rronummi
London June 9.—-General Pores*
lier-VValker cables to the war oflice
from Capetown, under date of
June 8, as follows!
"Kelly Kennv at Bloemfontein
reports that the telegraph has been
cut at Roodtval, north of Kroon-
utad, by a body of Boers, estimated
to be 3000 strong, with six field
guns. He is sending strong reinforcements to Kroonstad and I
um reinforcing from Cape Colony.
I hope the interruption will be only
temporary."
HOT TIRI-K IN P.  I''.. 1. »!<»• M•'..
Charge* AkhIiiki < 1 minim:-, sur 1 |i au
Uncontrollable I'pronr.
Charlottetown, P. E. I., June 9.—
Yesterday afternoon's session of the
legislature eclipsed all previous
records for scenes of disorder,due to
the opposition accusing Cummisky,
of the government side of having
mi-appropriated the poor fund of
his district. Cummisky denied the
t'harge, whereupon  a heated argu-
.lu«ii'iiliHi.» Who Will Fight litlNoulh
.tlriin 1 win' rarrlugton
Sydney, April 25.—Another contingent of Australian bushmen,
several hundred strong, has just
left Sydney for South Africa, and
within the next few days the contingents from the other colonies will
also be on their way thither says a
Sydney, X. S. \V\, letter to the
Montreal Herald. The total
strength of the imperial bushmen's
regiment will be over 2,500, which
could easily have been increased to
10,000. ln fact, a reserve force of
nearly -',000 men has been formed
from the mass ot disappointed volunteers.
The troops will land at Beira,
and, under the command of Sir
Frederick Carrington, form a kind
of armed police on the northern and
northwestern borders ot the Transvaal. Most of the officers are
Australian-born, many being well
to do professional men, and not a
few celebrities in the colonial world
of sport. All are good bushmen
and excellent rideis. The rapidity
with which they have become trans-
ormed into a regular military force
constitutes another argument in
favor of a Stizen soldier system.
The khaki uniforms arc of a
darker shade than those of previous contingents, atul consequently
less'conspicuous at a distance. It
looks as if it were destined to seal
the fate of scnrlet and other brilliantly colored uniforms, save for
official or parade purposes, a change
which it has taken the imperial
authorities over a century to effect.
The growth of the military spirit
in Australia has largely affected the
national sports, many of the leading colonial turfmen, cricketers,
football players and experts at other
sports being now in South Afrca.
There has, however, been a large
increase in the number of rifle clubs,
and it is estimated that by the e.id
Ol the year the number ol men
capable of bearing arms in the
seven colonies will be over 100,000,
exclusive ol school cadets.
The experiment of training the
senior cadets as mounted infantry
has proved successful, and it is proposed, after Ihe return of thc various coloninl troops from South
Africa, to have periodical exercises
rn the art of defending hills, mountain passes and other natural obstacles lo the inland advance of an
invader.
A contract has been let for running the drifts on the seventh level
of the War Ragle mine and work
was started yesterday. After a
drift has been run a short distance
east, crosscuts will be made north
and south to tap both veins.
Another party of contractors will
begin sinking the main shaft from
the seventh level tomorrow. The
diamond drill has been taken down
to that level to do some crosscut-
ting.
Work continues on the fifth level
in the upraise and on the west drift
on the north vein. On the sixth
level dritts are being run west on
the south vein and east on the north
vein. The upraise on the south
vein also continues.
The new hoist is working well
and all the dirt is now raised to the
main shaft house, the auxiliary
hoist on the second level having
been laid off.
Plans are being prepared for the
new ore bins to be erected adjoining
the shall house. They will provide
a much larger number of pockets of
smaller size than the old ones, admitting of a better classification
of ore.
The station on the fourth level of
the Centre Star i.s being timbered
preparatory to the resumption of
sinking, which will take place some
time this month. During the next
ten days drifting both ways from the
shaft on this level will be started.
The crosscut tunnel on the first level
has connected with the raise for the
second level and the tunnel is being
continued as a drift west on the
ledge. It is in high grade ore for
the lull face and a crosscut is likely
to reveal a still greater widtn.
John Bull to Uncle Sam—I aip
about through with my conlrrfct,
Sam. Do you want me to come
and help you to finish off those
pesky Filipinos?
DBPBNCB <n   uiToiiit
Nearly lOOO mm to He tioblli/, .1 Her*
lu Jul)
On the first two days in next
month Victoria is to witness the
mobilization in this city of all the
Canadian coast forces for the purpose of manning the fortresses and
otherwise participating in the defense of this port.
It is expected that nearly 1000
men will take part in the exercises,
which will be a practical exemplification of how the British naval base
aud the provincial capital would be
defended by land forces in the event
of an invasion. This will be quite
apart from and supplementary to
the operations of the navy.
The details, while probably known
to those in authority, are not yet
divulged, but it is understood that
the plan emanated from the department at Ottawa, with the co-opera-
lion, doubtless, of the war office.
The corps which will take part will
include the Royal Engineers aud
sub-marine mining corps, the Royal
Garrison artillery, A company R. C.
R., the Fifth regiment C. A. and the
Sixth rifles of Vancouver.
The expense of transporting the
troops will be borne by the department of militia and defense. The
artillery will man the guns, while
the rifles will act as auxiliaries, and
the engineers in their regulation ta
pacily.
The manoeuvers arc expected to
form a practical lesson in defensive
warfare, while thc brigading of
militia with regulars is expected lo
have a beneficial influence on both.
—Victoria Times.
Mil  11 IMI   OK  TIIK   WAR
Buruhaui   thr   » I    Seoul   Willi
I..11.1 Hubert*' Torre
Bennet Burleigh writes to lhe
London Daily Telegraph from
Bloemfontein:
"One of the unique experiences at
Koorn Spruit was that of Mr. F. R.
Burnham, the famous American
scout. I!c came here recently on
the invitation of Lord Roberts, to
assist in Ihe operations. South
Africa knows him well, for he has
ere now gone into battle helping
British troops. Perhaps he is best
know   to the world as the man who
ended the Matabele war by managing to trek and   shoot  the «reat native Witch Doctor in a Cave a'rtiQngist
the hills.    Burnham is a squa;e-seV,
wiry, medium-sized man of 30, with
light blue-grey eyes.    His senses of
sight, smell and hearing are acutely
trained   and   highly developed, as
much so almost as a sleuthhound.
Tobacco he abjures, as it i.s calculated to impair his faculties for tracking. Like an Australian aborigine, he
is guided by sense of smell as much
as by sight.   An onion, a negro and
a Boer are all alike  to him, easily
recognizable in the dark or if blindfolded,     Many a time has he saved
his  own   and   others'   lives  by  his
exquisite sense  of scent.    Perhaps
this i.s not so wonderful as it seems,
for a negro kraal and a Boer camp
are   equally.odoriferous.      I   could
myself undertake, were the wind in
the   right   quarter, to   tell   where
either was more than a bow shot off.
But Burnham goes beyond  that in
niceties  of distinction, even to the
presence of the unwashed, itinerant,
solitary dweller upon the veldt.   He
fell into the  Boers'  hands  through
an accident at Koorn Spruit.    As a
prisoner   he   witnessed   the  whole
action, and ultimately, having heard
the officers' story of the fight, gave
the Boers  the slip upon the road to
Winburg and returned into Bloemfontein."
COT THERE FIRST
Buller Wins a Race with Boors r'
Possession, of a Pass.
Persons interested in war news
may now "roll up the map of South
Africa" and spread out the map of
China.—Toronto Globe.
MARTIN'S DEFEAT
Latest Returns Confirm His Complete
Overthrow.
By Associated  Press.
Vancouver, B. C, June ii,—So
far returns complete have been received from 25 constituencies out
of 29.
Fsquimalt gives two opposition,
Victoria City four opposition and
Vancouver city two government and
two opposition.
Cowichan, Comox, North Victoria, South Victoria, Dewdney,
North Vale, West Vale, East Vale,
Revelstoke, Slocan, Nelson, North
Fist Kootenay, Lillooet Fast and
Lillooet West return opposition
candidates.
North Nanaimo, New Westmin-
ter, Chilliwack, Delta, Rossland
and Southeast Kootenay return
government supporters.
South Nanaimo, Alberni, Richmond and Cassiar are not complete.
Richmond may go government, but
the others are considered certain to
be in the opposition ranks when returns are all in.
Aiin-tlii'* Latent (rime.
Vancouver World,
Alfred Austin's poem on the relief of Mafeking is an outrage thai
deserves condign punishment. This
man is no more fit to wear the mantle of Tennyson than the ass in the
fable the lion's skin. Those wretched verses would disgrace a boy of
14. The attempts to get a rhyme
are simply excruciating, and arouse
the same murderous instincts, even
in the heart of the mildest man,
that are provoked bv a had pun.
Austin should be suppressed by act
of parliament, or sent to an asylum.
War Medal* Arr Heady.
There has been great complaint
in this country because the war
medals were not ready for the soldiers foi months alter they deserved
to wear them. Great Britain ha's
heard of that complaint, and bas
anticipated the close of the war.
She has the coveted decorations all
ready for distribution as soon us
peace is declared. The medal is
described as the most costly ever issued. It is in the form of a five-
pointed star, with a gold center,
carrying a mininture portrait of the
Queen, which is surrounded by a
ring of bronze bearing the words
"South Africa," while the ribbon
will be colored red, white, khaki
and blue.--Salt Lake Tribune.
Loudon, June 11.—10:30 a. m.—
! The following report from General
i Huller has been issued by the war
' oflice:
"Headquarters in Natal, June 11.
The force concentrated on the Klip
river at its junction with the Gans-
vlei last night. We anticipated at
that defile a force of the enemy
about 3000 strong, who had, I
think, intended to occupy it and
who retreated as soon as our heavy
guns opened fire, which were very
smartly brought into action by
Major May, of the Royal artillery,
and Captain Jones, of the Royal
navy. The South African Light
Horse and second cavalry brigade
were smartly engaged while covering our left front. Our casualties
.ire about six killed and seven
wounded."
il,ne ll<«.r* Surrender
Ventersdorp, June 11.—Two hundred and fifty Boers have surrendered to General Hunter and the
remainder in this district have promised to give up their fight.
Heavy _Lo»»ci»al Hoodevnl
London, June 11.— Lieut.-Gen.
Sir Frederick Forestier-Walker, in
command of the lines of communication in South Africa, reports:
"Capetown, June tr.—Sunday—
The following telegram has been received from Charles Knox, Kroonstadt: The following casualties reported from Roodeval June 7, have
been received from Stonham,2com-
mander of the Imperial Veomanry
hospital, dated Rhenoster River,
June 8, received here by flag of
truce June 10. The fourth batallion
of the Derbyshire regiment (the
Sherwood Foresters): Killed—Lieut.
Colonel Baird Douglas and Lieut.
Hawley, and 15 of the rank and file;
wounded — Col. Wilkinson, Capt.
Bailey, Lieuts. Hall, Lawder and
Blahchard, and ^9 of the rank and
file. Tbe Shropshire light infantry
one, Cape Pioneer railway regiment,
seven; ammunition party, royal
marines and imperial telegraph, one
each; post office corps, one.
"Stonbam reports that many were
severely wounded and the remainder of the fourth Derbyshire and
details ol prisoners, except six of
the rank and tile, are in his camp.
All the wounded are in the camp
lately occupied by the fourth Derbyshire. Enquiries are being made
as to the names."
It i.s inferred that the Boers captured 500 men and as late as June
10 held positions cutting ofl the
British forces north of Kroonstad
from reinforcements.
Another dispatch from Gen. Forestier-Walker is as follows:
M, Hun 11 (u a Hard   Flithl
"Capetown, June 10, Sunday—
Kellv-Kenny reports from Blocm-
fonlein this morning that Methuen,
with the greater pail of his division,
was fighting early in the morning
of I une 8, 10 miles south of Heil-
bron, where Colville was reported
to be with the Highland brigade.
Methuen left Lindley June 5 with
ample supplies for himself and Colville, leaving Paget to hold L'nd-
ley with a Sufficient force and supplies. Kelly-Kenny has ordered
Knox to press on the enemy's outposts, believing the enemy's
strength to be exaggerated."
MIII'I'IM.   TO   THAU. —
This will be the second British
annexation of the Transvaal.— Toronto Telegram.
This time it will stay annexed.
Li' Hot In  Jinn   Neudluif  Ore to   Both
tbe lllit *m.l*.tPt
The ore shipments from tbis
camp this week were again limited
to those from the'I.e Roi mine.
The total was 3005 tons, making
the total for that mine for the year
to date 38,482 tons. This includes
a carload of -1 tons from the 1 X L
shipped last Saturday, but not included in last week's figures.
The falling off in the Le Roi
shipments was due in the first instance to some changes in the tram,
made necessary by the erection of
an extra ore bin of 500 tons
capacity, which   was   erected at the
I pince llu^ was con,, ,.,..,, ,tu  »i.j< ii
j of ore c.irs Yin*, bit lieeii sufficient 10
j make np the  ap M«d  lost   and  for
1 this reason the hoist has only  been
run on the day ^hilt.
The first carload of second-class
ore lor the Trail smelter is being
loaded today at the Le Roi. Further shipments to Trail will be made
until the capacity of the Northport
smelter is increased sufficiently to
meet the increased output of ore
from the B. A. C. mines.
The two batteries of boilers at
the Black Bear plant are ready for
steam, furnishing 600 horse-power.
Good headway is being made with
the installation of the compressor,
all of which has arrived except one
carload. The foundations for the
new hoist are ready for the capstones and will be finished in a
couple of days. The collar sets of
timbers are.in on the five-compartment shaft, which is being enlarged
to full size and timbered. Work
commenced today on the preparations for the erection of a new head-
frame. The ore bins at the railroad
terminal on th£ Black Sear ground,
with a capacity of 1000 tons, are
well along.
Orders have been placed with the
Link Belt Machinery Company
of Chicago;,for the conveying machinery for the new sorting plant,
which is the last of the new machinery equipment. It will consist
ol three long traveling tables, from
which Jhe sorters will pick the
waste as it passe.*'.
CABINET MAKING
Mclnnes Expected to Call on J.&Brown
to Form Ministry.
Victoria, Jure it.—Diligent inquiry fails to show that any action
has been taken by the lieutenant-
governor in regard to his office, or
in calling upon some one to succeed
Martin. Rumor, though, is busy.
On all sides one hears the story
that the governor has resigned.
Some say he has been dismissed,
but he and others in authoiity are
mum.
Mr. Semlin and Dr. McKechnie
arrived here last night, and the cabinet makers on the street said there
was much in this. Mr. Semlin says
he is here on business acd, beyond
this, will say nothing. Dr. McKechnie was also non-communicative. He was asked in regard to a
rumor that Ralph Smith would be
called, and said this would not surprise him, but Smith's chances for
success were hopeless.
Many connect J. C. Brown of
Westminster with the premiership
on the strength ol the reported understanding on which he entered
the cabinet of Martin, namely that
he would he called to form a ministry if Martin made any showing at
the elections. In well advised
quarters it is believed that the governor will take that action; though
prominent Liberals say that the
governor will be dismissed forthwith, Hewitt Bostock, M. P., succeeding him. Martin men say that
the premier will hang on to office
Until the house meets, if he is permitted to do so by the lieutenant-
governor.
Additional returns yesterday assure the election of Wells in North
Fast Kootenay. His opponents lost
their deposits. Mr. Dunsmuir, as
expected, is elected, Ihe returns from
Texada island not changing the results. Mr. Booth is reported elected
hy six majority. This will increase
the opposition to 18, making the
total combination against the government 2H out of a house of 38,
with Alberni and Cassi; r only to
hear  from.
Martin may lose another seat in
Vancouver, for Wilson's friends
have asked for a recount and believe
an impartial tally will elect him. It
seems tbat when the ballots were
counted Saturday night, one scrutineer read out the results from the
J4 boxes. There were many spoilt
and doubtful ballots and, as 12
candidates were running, the columns of figures were numerous.
Wilson was counted four ahead of
Gilmour, then the returning officer's
deputy declared he had made a mistake of ten in counting Gilmour's
column and Gilmour led Wilson by
if
1
■
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LARGE    AND   COMFORTABLE
ROOMS TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN    TIIE
NORTHWEST.
IIANR ft liiun
SILVERTON,
PROW
B. 0.
Watches,
Clocks and
Jewelery.
HwfikJi  Repairing a Serially
AU Work Left at Tlie lakeview
Hotel, Silverton, will hetirward-
. ed and promptly attended to.
O. B. Knowles,
SANDON, B. 0.
THE
ARLINGTON
HQTEL*
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Wharf.
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
Dialog Room under the charge ol
Miat Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil the delicacies
cf Uie season.
HENDERSON A GEMING, • Paors.
SLOOAN OITV,   ....   EC.
J-1. Mcintosh,
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT 0ON-
FECTIONERY	
CIGARS    AND
TOBACC08
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY    LINE
 FISHING TACKLE	
THE LATEST  NOVELS,  ke.
Silverion, B.C.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
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I'l WISHED  KVKRV   SATURDAY   AT
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MATH MON UBOn.,   Hilton. A rrop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8:
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Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this office.
IF VOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
0H4«M  OR   IN ARREAR8    A
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TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
umuuuuuuuuiui
m\m\hi •DTcuirrnas.
'8*888S88888888888888888 8*
It is safo to say that this portion of
the Province views with alarm the
ascension of Dunsmuir to the Premiership. In the Slocan, Dunirauirisra
is synonymous with all thst was rotten
in Turnerism. It is true that just on
the eve of the election the Premier-
elect experienced a conversion in his
pro-Mongolian views, but whether he
will abide by his promise to employ
neither Japs nor Chinese in the future
remains to be proven.
What the Province needs is some
sort of settled government and if
Dunsmuir can give it to us, all well
and good. But this is a debatable
question. Those few who were elected
as Wilsonites were not in sympathy
with the eld Turner regime. The New
Westminster platform wu the opposite of Turner's. Will Dunsmuir
abide by that or is a return to the old
state of affairs at hand! None of the
members elect for Kootenay would
aipree to this, the old Government
party would go into opposition, as
would also the Provincial Party,
Independents and Labor members.
Dunsmuir has either then to modify
his course or be defeated at the first
meeting of the Legislature, even if be
succeeded in filling his slate.
Had either Helmcken or Garden
bejn called upon a strong government
could have been formed from tbe
Wilsonites, Independents and Provincial Parties.
Should the Provincial Party amalgamate with whatever new government be formed, the Slooan member
stands an exoelient ohance of securing
the Portfolio of mines. This office
belongs to the Kootenays and none
of the six members from hero has a
better chance than R. F, Green.
Howevsr, at present, all is uncertainty, although a short time will
show what is what
work  to do and receive little thanks
for doing it.
■ The Laurier government promises
tj do something to shut otF^the steady
itream of Mongolian emigration into
this province and as a first step Sir
Richard Oartwright has introduced a
measure raising the poll tax ob
Chinese from $50. to 1100. The
Dominion authoriries must do better
than this if they expect to receive
endorsation from B. 0. constituencies
ia the near approaching election. A
head tax of $500. would suit the ease
much better than that of 1100. It is
not a esse of revenue raising but
of prohibition that is wanted.
For one hundred and fifty four
consecutive weeki Tiik Silvkbtoni an
has appeared at least once in every
seven days, during summer and winter,
n timei of prosperity and in periods of
dulness. We consider that once in
every three years at least we deserve
a holiday, consequently there will be
no issue of Thr Silvirtojuan until
June 30th, when the last copy of the
III Volume will appear. In the
interim our subscribers will bave two
clear weeks in which to rustle the two
dollars annua! assessment which all
must pav wbo appear upon our Honor
Roll.
Tlie Ledge is trying to boom a
tramway lino up Carpenter creek.
It wonld be about as easily built and
mantained as the New Denver-Three
Forks wagon road and of about as
much good. There is already a
railroad covering the route proposed
and if business would justify it the
0. P. R. would be only tco glad to run
extra trains.
In the turmoil of last Saturday one
thing wu proven beyond a doubt,
and that was that there is something
decidedly rotten in the manner of
preparing the Voters' List The list
aa it appeared last Saturday was filled
with printers' errors and corrected
partly in red ink, by whom is unknown
The names of voters who cast tbeir
ballots in the last election were not
found in tbe new list and many who
expected to find their names there.
having duly forwarded applications to
the Collector, came down from their
work, many walking several miles,
only to find tbat their applications
had been overlooked or rejected, without their being notified in the matter.
The Slocan lint should be cancelled
and a new and proper list prepared
before another election.
blame yourself—
It is because you neglected to tell the
editor—
You expected him to hear of it somehow without your telling him.
If tbe facts were contorted, it wm because you did not give the facts to the
editor.
The editor's time ls too valuable to
spend in chasing after a little news
Item—
And shoe leather is too costly to wear
out chasioic an ignis fatnus.
If the editor spends sll Ms time running down rumors and boring people
with his augur, how is the type to be
eet?
Because—
Tbe average editor in this country is
also the business msnsger, tbe entertainer (he has not always time lo be
sociable), the printer, the pressman, the
mslling man. and the head devil ol the
establishment—
And his work is never done.
Rest, he bas none.
Yet bis services are seldom appieci-
ated.
He is patted on tbe bsck by those for
whom he works, but when be suggests
something more substantial he gets a
dizzy throw'down.
He is supposed to work for glory,
- But he really works for money,
Which he seldom gets,
Because bis friends always wait for
someone else to pay him,
And his enemies want to beat bim oul
of his just dues.
Then if be is unable to pay bis own
debts,
People] will say "Poor fellow—I told
you so. He was industiious and honest,
but a poor manager."
J
Put. _M. BBKBPCM.
Jw*e
Silverton
B.C
THE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF
j    "WilSOJ*    %.^
E HOt©I»      1.1 mm, now.
ELECTION ECHOES.
Slocan Lake polled 374 votes, of
which G/een got IK, Keen IM and
Kane 61.
In Slocan City msny believed Kane
would be the winner. A Silverton sport
took advantage of their innocence |200
worth.
Sloean City polled thejsrgest number
of votes on Slocan Lake, the returns
showing: Slocan City 160. {New Denver
115, Silverton 04; in 1898 tbe figures
were: Slocan City 9b, New Denver 103,
Silverton 50.
"Five
Drops.
J9
Limited"
■bwiob   worn   nr   team   i»oe
will h* comt»»ne*cl .HIKE
l*th< ' The "InprrUl Mml-
t«d" ■__.___•• yoa across the
ComUneat la four 4*ye wilh—
•nt   ehtusg*. it  !■ • Miid
▼••Ubalad trata, lwa.arl.wlr
•*alp»«4 for tha contort aad
eoavsalaaoo *t Paassatera.
Ash /oar Meads who havo
Ira oiled   oa II, or add roll
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson
* J. COYLK.
A. G, P. Agent, Vancouver
As if Sandon was not having trouble
enough of ita own, the New Denver
Ledge must start slinging mud at her.
To hit a min when be is down and
curse him after death, appears to be the
aim of our contemporary. Sandon
has a class of enterp rising business
men who have built up one Sandon
and will build up another, bigger and
better than tbe former, and are deserving of encouragement and not
slurs. Oo in Sandon and win, you
have what makes a town, plenty of
big paying mines, which are better
backing for a town forty times over
than a piece of waste land at the
mouth of tbe creek.
Some'politicians and church dignitaries in Eastern Canada are
endeavouring to rake up again the
Manitoba School Question. Such
attempts are disgraceful. The party
who 'would again drag religion into
Canadian polities should be confined
to an asylum or removed from the
earth by Eome gentle but effective
method.
If the labor unions in this Province
wish to prove that tbey are not the
selfish associations some paper would
like it to be believed they are let them
establish a boycott on the slop product of eastern sweat shops and keep
their trade in tbe Provinoe, where it
belongs. Start a little union in the
home circle. Tbe sight of a union
man packing a bundle marked with
the brand of a certain eastern "cheap"
itore is too common to give an outsider a great idea of their consistency.
Now that tbe elections are over let
internecine strife be stilled and all
pull together to make the Sloean the
busiest distriot within the Dominion.
Let disappointed candidates remember
that members of parliament have hard
ft is said that one of the aspiring
onea who fell by the wayside in this
constituency last Saturday was asked
whether be would stand agsin in the
event of another election being necessary in the near future. "No," replied ths ex-candidate, "I was vaccinated last Saturday—end it took." ,
FOR
A RHEUMATIC CURE
THAT CURE8.
WE   ARE  THE  AGENTS
THIS    ALSO FOR
Lilac d'reani, AuUey's Hair Renewer,
(anadian Corn Care and Syrup
ofHorehomCandToIu.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.'
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS OF  WINFS, JJQL'ORg
AND CIGARS.
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,   -   -   - SLOCAN, B. 0.
StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  HORSES  FOR  HIRE   AT   8KAU0NABL1J
KAXES A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS LONE.
Outside Parties Desiring Horses in Silverton
Can Have Them Reserved By Writing To—
f        ♦ ♦ t     '♦'.,:■ t        '*
a. p. Mcdonald,
8ILVERTON, • - B. C.
THE WM. HAMILTON MANUFACTURING CO.,
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
Peterborough, Ontario.
CANADA.
Syr p of Horehound & Tolu
FOR COUGHS   AND COLDS.
THE
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.     2
:•; llfadqnarlirs r#r Jinirg Mil :•
EVERYTHING NEW, NEAT
AND   CP-IO-IMIE.
TABLE I'KSrKPAtf-'FD IN
THE NORTHWEST
s
JL
J.1S.MWE8,   Pnf.
SILVERTON,
II. fi
Prescription Department Complete snd
Up   To   Dale.
SILVERTON DRUG STORE,
SILVERTON, B.
Jj 0. GORDON,
IMESiREAL ESTATE, WMMKR
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      B. C
0*0
^Watches, Jewm.kky
S|Dmmo_«i>8, Stkhi. m.
<• inii l'i..\ri_ii Nuvi.i-
i£r!CH. Piano Lam iii
9 and Onyx. Taiii.k „
.,    Other   Aanrua
S Too   Ni Mssoia   T»
  I*   Call /.nu   Exam-
And now my Koot-jS ink Tumi.   .   .   .
enay Friends  I am£
prepared to reciivea J*
orders     For£ ^
490
Tke Strike Is Of
Ind We ve now
Read) for
Bnineu.
your
I hTAiu inn i> u, Nn win "1W0."
THIS   18   NO JOSH.
Fresh  Bread
Pb and Cakes Made to Order.
OUR WATCH AND JEWELER*
REPAIRING DEPARTMENT IS AI.
As are only employ the most exper«C
ienced men, allwork ia Gt.AK.iNTm>
f. Mail and Express Orders Receive Our j
> Prompt Attention.
^****A***_*_*WWVM¥WW***^
DONT FORGET THE PLACE.
JACOB DOVER.  "The^Jewkleis.
  NEL80N, R. 6.
The THISTLE HOTEL
i CAREY, - Silverton, li. C.
J. m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND"   SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
8LOCANCITY    R. c
SILVERTON MINERS' Ml,
If you want an item of news published,
bring it or send it lo this office.
If it is worth publishing, it ia worth ] NO. 95, W. F  Of 11
the trouble of giving it lo the editor.'     \  -
If It interest* yon, it will yery likely I Meets every Saturday in the Union
interest others of our readers.                 < Hall.in.8ilverton, at 7:30 r. m.
If it appears Urns to you, it may be/ W. Horton,
intensely interesting to some.                 J President
If you are disappointed in not seeing J, I. McIntoh,,,
a certain item of local news in Uie paper, | Financial-Secretary
NOW REOPENED #
UNDER A NEW *
MANAGEMENT.
HOUSE RENOVATED
AND THE BAR FULLY*
RESTOCKED
THISTLE   CAFE.
1 'mill the management of
Carlo SchnioHer
•lust Opened.        Good Serrfot
Meals at  All Hours.
Tl*omj>
J. H. HOWARTHi
JEWELER Ac,   SLOOAN, B.C.'
18 PREPARED TO   REPAIR WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELERY
FORTHE    SLOCAN   PUBLIC. AN    EXPERIENCE   OF NEARLY
FIFTY     YEARS     WARRANTS     THE     GUARANTEE      OP      SATISFACTION WITH HIS WORK THAT HE GIVES.    ALL REPAIRING IS
DONE A8 PROMPTLY AS GOOD WORK WILL ALLOW.
A FULL LINE OF WATCHES, CLOCKS,FANCY GOODS, Ac. IN8TO0 K.
W axative
G
son Bros.,   Props.
LAKE AVE.,   SILVERTON, It. c.
To Cure a  Cold   ln   Ono P»T;
Contains   Thn*" New  Ingrrdi>n(-
old Cure.
^mmmtmey^mtshast
 TRY   IT	
PRICE 25c.        At All DrugifW'
+H4*
General
Mining
Supplies.
Full Line
Dry & Mixed
Paints.
Lumber,,
Sash and I
Doors.
MoCaliutn^Co.,   •iocan.B.H

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