BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Silvertonian 1900-09-15

Item Metadata

Download

Media
silsil-1.0312942.pdf
Metadata
JSON: silsil-1.0312942.json
JSON-LD: silsil-1.0312942-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): silsil-1.0312942-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: silsil-1.0312942-rdf.json
Turtle: silsil-1.0312942-turtle.txt
N-Triples: silsil-1.0312942-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: silsil-1.0312942-source.json
Full Text
silsil-1.0312942-fulltext.txt
Citation
silsil-1.0312942.ris

Full Text

 THE SILVEKTON I AN.
SLOGAN'S BEST
KNOWN WEEKLY, i
A _1,      -v. 1
J-
THE SILVERTONIAN.
LOCAL MINING MEWS.
SUBSCRIPTIONS, $2.0
VOLUME FOUR.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 15, 1D00.
NUMBER  11
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL M,NES AROUND
THE DISTRICT.
Silverton	
(&THI8  HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE    BAR   IS   SUPPLIED  WITH  BEST   BRANDS   OF
WINES, LIQUORS AND 0IGAR8.
\Xd.   2v£-   SZxiOTxrles,   Prop,
F>. BUR1VS & oo
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL STORES AT
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaalo, Sandon,
Now Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Green wood.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. 0.
9
i
c
J
5
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GUR VNTKED.   OV ERCOATINGS JUST IN.
LIEIiSMER,   TheTaik:   Silverion. B. f.
i)
II('i:(!(jiiarlfi8 For Intel Mon
THE I
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.
EVERYTHING NEW, NEAT
AND   UP-TO-DATE
the mmuR mm.
A properly, Ilie richness ol which Is
going to surptiso not only tlie natives
but also the ounide mining men and
capitalists, in the Smuggler mine at the
hoad of Ten Milo creek. This proporty,
which belongs to the Warner Miller
Syndieate, has (or some lime been under
development and has now reached a
stage v here its succeBB aa a mino is
iiHHiiri.d,
It lias been systematically and success-
fnlly opened up under the management
o( Dickenson k Felt, and under the
foremaiiship ol Patrick McGuire, formerly of the Noble Five mine. Over 1200
feet of underground development work
has Oeen done upon the Smuggler vein,
cosisling of tunnels, winzes and upraises.
The properly is a tunnel proposition und
in all three tunnels have beeu driven
upon it. No 1, ihe upper tunnel, is now
in a distance of ovei 400 feet and the
face is nearly under a big ore shute exposed on the surface. This tuunel lias
been driven directly upgn the vein
which varies in width from nine to
twelve (eet and carries, as (ar as explored, a continuous paystreak of ore
«alely running 800 ounces in silver to
(he ton and varying in width Irom two
to (our iuches. Tuunel No 2. ia also in
over 400 feet and is in ore ita entire
length as is also an upraise put up from
this tuunel over 100 (eet. The lower
tunnel, No A, is iu 1'20 feet, the first part
of which being a cross-cut, but aa soon
as the vein wus struck ore was encountered and the bulance of the tunnel is in
ore aa is also a 30 foot winzu sunk fronr.
it.
The strike of the vein is northerly nnd
southerly, the character of the ore taken
from Ihe paystreak being a black iron
and ainc mixed with galena that wil)
run from 800 to 1000 ounces in silver to
the ton. Good quartera have been
erecto ! at the properly aud a force of
about 20 miners are ttradily employed.
A contract for the packing of this ore to
Enterprise Landing on Slocan lake has
lately been let and it will now take its
place as a shipper of rich ore.
AimtIn i properly owned by the same
company, aujoiuing the Smuggler is the
Slocan Chief. The ore from this property,
which oooajetl of galena currying large
quantities of urey copper, is so rich that
the muck taken out is washed aud any
oro that it might contain raved iu that
way.
TABLE UNSURPASSED IN
THE NOLTHWEST.
JAS. BOWES,   Prop.
SILVERTON,
B. C.
a\Km ±M. ttlZJLKlZl^XJlM*
ASSATEE.
iilverton
B,C
VIRGINIA    CAPITAL     EOR    TIIE
SLOCAN   MINES.
J. M. M. Benedum o( Silverton has
succeeded in interesting some Virginia
capitalists iu Slocan mining and (or them
has secured control of tbo Hoodoo claim,
| ono of the moat promising properties in
the Sloean City Division.
Mr. Benedum lelt for Slocun on Tuesday and experts to put in several months
in developing the claim. Next Bpring
the Virginians will pay the Sloean a
visit and will inspect the Hoodoo. Then,
il the result of Iheir visit proves satisfactory, extensive development will In-
begun.
®
YES!
-******lt jroui clo not get your CLOTHING
PromBOURIVE BROS.f>r|
'     ;
i         ^
1
§
1
■
s
1
1
REMEMBER
WE ARE AGENTS FOR ONE OF THE BEST TAILORING ESTABLISHMENTS IN MONTREAL. WE TAKE YOUR MEASUREMENT RIGHT HERE
AND IN THREE WEEKS WILL TURN YOU OUT WITH AN ELEGANT
SUIT. 7 50   SAMPLES    OF  SUITINGS,
ICriNleril PANTINOS k OVERCOATINGS TO
hy* wto en ts*
(ONE HALF THE ORDINARY.)
CHOOSE FROM.
GIVE 118 A TRIAL ORDER.
tJOURNE BROSij    New Denver, J3, C*
A. P. McDonald ia busy with his
packtrain bringing down ore Irom the
Hewett mine.
Work on the Red Mountain wagon
road will be started within the next few-
days and pushed to completion before
winter Beta in.
Sunday the Vancouver mine sent out
another car of ore to the smelter,
bringing ita ore shipments for the year
up to 100 tons.
F. L. Byron left (or Slocan on Monday
last to begin work on the Howard Fraction, having obtained a six months lease
on that property. He expects to begin
shipping at an early date.
Ou the Lone Star property, near
town, a new shaft ia being sunk on the
vein at a point about 70 feet west of the
old shaft. In this shaft tliey have a
foot of rich carbonate and galena ore.
At the L. H. gold property on Red
Mountain a cross-cut tunnel ia being
driven across the vein at a point iu the
lower tunnel about 160 feet iu from its
mouth. The cross-cut is now iu 35 leet
and is io ore the entire distance.
Some rich ore is now beinu packed
down for shipment to the smelter (rom
the Ethel Fraction in the Silver Bund
Basin. This property bids (air lo
become a steady shipper.
THE   HIGHLAND  BOY    MILL.
The Silverton district is the looser of a
first-class mill man when Mr. J A Kelly,
lately in charge of tha Wakefield concentrator, left for the Ainsworth camp
last week- Mr. Kelly haa entered the
employ of the Highland Boy Minim: Co.
who are heavy operators in the Ainsworth district and who are to be
congratulated upon the addition of such
an efficient mill man to their present
staff of officer. The Highland Boy Co,
are erecting a concentrator, of 150 tons
daily capacity, about one mile from
Ainsworth for the reduction of the oreB
Irom their Group o.r mines. The mill
will be eijuipt with the best and most
modern inrchinery, most of whijli is
being furnished by the Gates Iron
Works whose engineer G O Brady,
assisted by Mr. Kelly, will have charge
of tl.e construction. The Highland Boy
Co, is nnder tne supervision of E. S.
Woods of Nelson who has so far been
very successful with this property. The
new mill will be driven by water power
of which the company have ample, be.
ing able to get 480 feet of a direct
preseure.
A   BUSY    CAMP.
The Slocan Drill is kept busy at the
present time recording the various deals
being made iu the noiv flourishing
Slocan City dist'ict. At lhe present
time things are coining their wav and the
prospect holders are reaping the benefit
of their patient waiting. During the
past week announcement has been made
ol deals on the Mabou, Necpewa, Ohio,
Empress Fraclion. Summit Fraction,
Howard Fraction, Tamaruc and Hoodoo.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE  SHIPMENTS.
Shipments   of  oro  fr.im Silverton for
the year 1800. totaled 1693 Tone.
All other Lake pointa .1385     "
The shipment   ol   ore   from   Slocan
Lake pointa, up to and Including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
!■'rom Bosun Landing.                   Tons.
Bosun 100
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
From Silverton Tona.
Emilv Edith 20
Hewett 70
Vancouver 100
Wakefield, (concentrates) 680
Galena Mines       20
I'rjm Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 920
Neepawa   7
From Slocan City
Arlington     300
Black Prince    60
Kilo 20
Total 2984
0(K>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOg
TIIE LOCAL LAYOUT.
James Bowes made a business trip to
Nelson during the week.
Charley Copp returned to the Lardeau
country on Wednesday.
Fred Fingland returued yesterday
from a business trip to the coast.
A barge load of lumber was delivered
here on Tuesday for local builders.
Charles A. Hope, manager of the Emily Edith mine, returned on Tuesday.
Go to R. G. Daigle's for fresh fruits
and confectionery.  Near  Postoffice.*
During the week Ihe family of J. A.
Kelly left to join Mr. Kelly ut Ainsworth.
Tbe Lakeview Hotel is being redecorated inside and fixed up preparatory for
a busy winter.
Divine Service will be held to-morrow
afternoon, at 3 o'clock, in tbe Union
Church.   All welcome.
Reevea has just received a big consignment of fresh candies from the manufacturer.   Drop in and sample them.
Wednesday Win. Scott left (or
Ainsworth where he expects to work on
the new mill being built in that camp.
On Tuesday G. A. Jackson returned
from a trip to the prairie country. He
is enthusiastic as to the future of
Canada's Northwest.
On Thursday Mrs. Barclay accompanied by her three youngest children
left for Spokane Wash., where she
expects to remain for some time.
Several applications for hotel licences
are in awaiting the appointment of a
Board of Licence Commissioners under
the new law. The appointments are expected to be made at once.-
All work in (lie Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silvertou Drugstore, will
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelaon jeweler. All repairs are (ipakantrki, for okic vkaii. *
ABOUT CLOSED.
Another examination of the Noonday
mine was made on Thursday by Mr. P.
Dickenson, of Dickenson k Felt, dnd Mr.
Kingsbury, engineer for the SIocan-Kiln
Co. Mr. Dickenson's company already
represent a three forths interest, in that
property and arc about to acquire the
remainder, when the property will be at
once started up. Should this deal go
through, which it is almost certain to do,
lhe Noonday may be again a shipping
proposition before the snow flies this
winter.
MATTERS POLITICAL.
Conservative Convention   To-night.
A meeting of the local Conservatives
was held hereon Thursday evening for
the purpose of selecting delegates to attend lhe party Convention to-night in
Revelstoke. It was decided however
not to send delegates, and Silverton wiH
be represented only by proxy.  .
Information is supplied The Sii.vek-
tonian to the effect that either Goodeve
or Mcintosh will receive the Conserve'
live nomination to-night. If this provee
to be so it will be in spite of a large number of the delegates.
It is quite possible Ihat a Slocan man
will receive the nomination.
Want* A  Labor Candidate.
The Industrial World, the official organ of the allied labor unions of Kootenay, comes out as a strong advocate oi
the idea of nominating a labor candidate
to contest this Riding, and speaks .ot
Jus Wilka as a likely man.
Shouli Mr Wilks, or any other conservative labor leader, be nominated he
would make it interesting for both tbe
old party candidates.
A  GOOD ROADS CONVENTION,
The Kamloops Board of Trade will
hold a Good Roads' Convention on tiie
27th inst, and has invited the editor. At
the present time in thi< district it is not
so much a question of having good roads
as it is of getting any old kind of a roud.
When we can't get a road at all we're
awfully thankful to get a pack-trail.
When a ro.nl goes five miles out of tha
way for a place to blast switch-backs out
of, lite slope of the rdadbed is not tha
matter of supreme importance that it ia
around the Inland City. However, tha
question of good roads is an important
one and we hope the Kamloops B. o/T's.
initiative in calling the convention will
be productive of much good.
STRUCK THE ORE BELOW.
At the Hewett mine Ihe ore shute cut
by the upper tunnels has at lust been
struck by the lower tunnel at a distance
in of 520 feet. This gives a depth on
this oro sbuto of nearly 400 feet nnd
assures the permanency of that mine for
somo lime to come. The oro taken out is
sorted nnd the best sacked ready for
shipment to the smelter. This mine
hue shipped so far this season 70 tons
and a packtrsiu is now engaged in
bringing down another 20 ton shipment.
Wanted—a rink.
Within the last few day the idea of
building a rink has been revived among
the Silverton sports, but beyond talking
nothing has been doue. If anything is to
be done it is now none too early to begin.
It haa been suggested that a hockey clnb
bu organized to take the matter np and
if possible build the rink. We sugtrest
that a meeting of those interested be
called in the near luturo and a committee appointed to see what can bo done.
Unless nil our weather-prophets are very
much at fault tbere will be severe
weather this winter, and what is to be
done when the baseball is put on the
shelf and the wind has leaked from tha
football'!
A SURE SIGN OK PROSPERITY.
"Bobby" an old timer and a loader in
Silverton's canine society is again with
ns having returned during the week.
This of itself is a sure sigh of returning
prosperity to our camp, for Bobby loves
excitement and will not live in a dead
camp. Some six months ago Bobby
made a tour of the mines around here
and held an interview with the chief
mine-owner doirs of the cnmp. He then,
without saying a word, left the camp,
whicli h.'H been dead ever since, only
returning this week. This is looked
upon as a good omen by our old timers
as Ihey feel sure that Bobby has inside
information of a boom or he would never
have returned to Silverton.
ORE  EXHIBIT.
THE   METAL MARKET.
New York,   Sept. 13.—Bar Silver, 61#
Lake copper,   $10.50.
Lead- The firm that fixes the selling
price for miners snd smelters quotes lead
at |4.00 at (Iiq dope.
W. A, Coplen, Commissioner (or the
Slocan for the ore exhibit at the Spokane
Exposition, is now in the Slocan arranging for a proper display of ores from this
district. He has arranged for a splendid
cabinet in which to show off the ores and
has been promised the rupport of nearly
all the mine owners and prospectors in
tbe district in his work of advertising the
Slocan. There is no reason why there
should not be a big exhibit from Silver-
ton, us the cost will be trifling—at the
outside $50.—and the benefits large. All
ore sent to Spokane will lie carried free
by the railroads.
NIGHT ON A CATTLE RANGE-
There's a weird-like charm In the starlit
night on the breast ol the Western
plains,
Where a stillness fulls like a veil of pence
as the day in its ulory wanes.
Where the night breeze kisses the fevered
earth and (begems of the star world
gleam
With tbei.- twinkling sparkleH of ail very
light lill the heavens with beauty
leein.
The   heart   beats  soft   with a soothing
sense of freedom and calm delight
As we lie and gaze ut the whin poor-will
o'erhead in their playful flight,
Wbere   the   irrasses   rustle a lullaby by
the breath of the night windstirred,
And   the  dog-woll howls in lim Bandy
rills und the cowboy sings to the herd
Oirthere on (he breast ofthe rising slope
the cattle in quiet lie.
Nor raise tbeir heads when the shadowy
form of the rider passes them by.
But close their eyes when the soolliing
song  of  the  tireless   watcher they
hear—
The aong that tells them to lie in peace;
no danger is lurking near.
The wearv man  (rom the city's noise on
the grass in his blankets lies
Aud reads a story of peaceful rest on Ihe
scroll of tlio starlit skies,
And dreamily watches thn fitful flight o(
the restless nocturnal bird,
Where Ihe dog-wolf howls in the sandy
lulls and Hie e.iwb iv sinus to bjj, ),,.,,(
How nesr to the presence of God we feel!
How sacred the stillness seems,
How tbe wearied soul in   its new-found
rest with the joy of existence teems!
How we almost think we can see the face
of the Father of all up there
In n twlnklina frame ol the silent stars
That jewel the midnight air!
What fancies fill the   delighted brain as
we float on a dronmy sea
To the mystic shadows of Slumberland
from ihe cares of the earth set free-
Float on till the last dim vision of earth
tiy tbe finger of sleep is blurred,
Where the dog-wolf howia in the sandy
hills and the cowboy sings to hia
herd.
—From The Denver Evening Post. 	
m
_______ IH
I ■
WM
H
A LONDON LETTER
Politics and War Are of Absorbing
Interest
Special Cable Letter.
London, Sep. 8.—Among the
questions which have stood out
most prominently the past week are
the South African question and the
general election. By help of the
desire for peace dominating all
nations, Great Britain has been enabled to achieve, without hinder-
ance, the formal annexation of thc
South African Republics. Lord
Ro. ..li' "proclamation," however,
has not advanced matters much.
In spite of the disconcerting persistence of the burghers, the British
government appareutly has determined to carry out its scheme for
an early appeal to the country.
Everything seems to be shaping for
an October election and ths return
to England ot Salisbury during the
coming week will probably be
speedily followed by a definite pronouncement of the date ot the dissolution as well as British views
of far eastern matters.
Among the interesting features of
the election news is tne movement
on the part of the Liberal Unionists
to return to the Liberal fold and to
be again what Sir Vernon Harcourt described himself to be in his
case re September 4, "a Liberal
without any adjectives."
Mr. Anthony Hope. (Hawkins)
the novelist, is again a candidate
for a seat in parliament. He has
been adopted as the Liberal champion for Folkirk.
'•I never knew so many improvident Americans in London" said
United States vice consul Westa-
cote to a representative of the Associated Press. "Of course there
are no means of our hands to
finance stranded travellers, and if
there were, they would long since
have been expended.
HOSTOIKVS    t**H.V?ll_M
Tbe Asaela will Pay 100 Cento ou Ihe
ttollar.
Concerning Mr. Bostock's assignment, a coast paper says the
Province Publishing company is net
included in the Bostock estate, but
the B. C. Printing & Lithographing
Co. is included in the assets.
The assignment caused much surprise among those who heard thc
news. It was due to numerous
large unprofitable investments in
the province, although the estate
comprises among its assets many
valuable investments and would pay
over 100 cents on the dollar.
Mr. Bostock, however, realizing
that necessary large sums were not
available readily to satisfy immediate demands, thought the safest
and best way to satisfy creditors
was to assign and thus insure full
returns for those who had claims
against him.
county yesterday. Among the
speakers were Hons. Messrs. Fielding, Patterson, Blair and s). C.
Fraser. Fielding told a story of
the surpluses; Patterson defended
the government's tariff policy, claiming that it was tariff for revenue
only; Blair defended his manage-
of Intercolonial railway.
A Bis PI re.
New Vork, Sept. 8.—The five-
story brick building occupied by the
Thomas C. Clark paper box factory
was totally destroyed by fire early
this morning. The loss is about
$100,000. Two men were burned
to death.
Cleveland Declluea.
Washington, Sep. 8.—Expresi-
dent Cleveland has declined the
president's appointment as a member of the international board of
arbitration under the Hague treaty.
Expresident Harrison has accepted
the appointment.
8I10I By Thlevem.
Lacrosse, Wis., Sept. 8.—Pa-
trollman Perry Gates was shot dead
by three thieves last night as he
was attempting to arrest them for
holding up a man on Lacrosse
road. 	
DEFINING   TUB   POLICY.
I
Liberals Meet In  Nova  Scotia-*Logan
Nominated.
Amherst, N. S.,  Sept. 8.—H. J.
Logan,  M. P., was   renominated
by  the   Liberals  Tor  Cumberland
Decrease In Becelpto
Toronto, Sep. 8.—The Toronto
exhibition closed last night. The
total receipts show a decrease co ti-
pared with last year of $3,000.
WICHIC UBBAT IMCHS.
Tod  Sloan IHakea  Big  Winning*   at
Paris.
Paris. Sept. 8.—At the Maison
Lafitte yesterday, "Cash," Sloan
up, the Due de Gramont's Barne-
belt won the Prix de Chamant, a
thousand francs, over a course of
3100 metres. The American jocky
also won the Prix de Maule, 4000
francs, over a course of 890 metres,
on the Due de Gramont's  Frascier.
THE GENESEE WON
Grossed the Line a Mile and i Half
Ahead.
A Britiah Columbia Soldier
Toronto, Sept. 8. — Private
Greaves, of the Fifth regiment C.
A., British Columbia, is among the
list of invalided Canadian's, who
will sail from Liverpool next Thursday for Quebec.
STOH.1I   11 A4.IM.
OO* Ibe Coast of Loulaana, Many LIvea
Loat.
New Orleans, La., Sept. 8.-—All
the southern coast of Louisana has
been storm swept. The sea water
has been backed up to the Mississippi river levees on the east bank.
Dr. C. H. Buford and Superintendent Richard Quinn, the government
otlicers at Fort St. Phillip, went
down the river in a canoe on Thursday evening and last night the boat
was found bottom up.
USEFUL VS. BEAUTIFUL.
There i.s a quarrel of long standing among philosophers as to the
relative value of the useful and the
beautiful, or, as the phrase of the
schoolmen goes, the aesthetic and
the utilitarian. Philosophers, however, frequently quarrel above the
clouds, and their scholastic debates
have little interest for men on the
ordinary level of human life—life
with its dinner, breakfast and supper, its pay roll and poll tax, its
rent day and board bill, its wash
tub and cook stove.
In this debate, however, they are
not so far away from the sea-level
of humauity with its complex and
throbbing thought. In the inmost
heart of every housewife as she
sweeps and dusts her little hallway,
of every home-builder as he plans
his lawn and basement, of every
growing lad as he brushes his shoes
or ties his cravat, there is the conflict between the useful and the
beautiful.
No one denies that the beautiful
is to be desired; but there are those
who contend tnat it must be sacrificed for more practical ends. This
is frequently a mistaken idea, and
now that many of the buildings and
grounds in this city are in their for.
mative state, it may be well for
owners to consider the matter of
beauty. A kitchen need not be
hideous and untidy simply because
it contains a cook-stove or a range.
A sink need not be unsightly simply
because foul matter is deposited
through it. A woman need not be
a slattern because her income is
meagre. A man need not be a
sloven merely because he cannot
wear diamonds.
The fact is that the beautifying of
a city, besides contributing to the
artistic pleasure of life, adds to it
from a practical standpoint. Of
what use are pictures in a room,
asks the cynic. The best answer is
to take them away and let him realize the nakedness and bareness ot
the walls. A decent lawn? A vine-
clad porch? A well-kept show window? Try the value ot these on
husband, guest or purchaser and be
convinced.
Hamilton, Ont. Sept. 7.—Ex-AI-
derman McLagan, one of Hamiton's
respected citizens, is dead, aged
77 years.
(By Associated Press.)    .*
Rochester, N. V., Sept. 8.—
When the sunrise gun was fired
this morning from the dock of the
Rochester Vacht club, many of the
members were astir preparing for
the race tor the international cup.
The morning mist disappeared at 8
o'clock and the lively scene was
flooded with sunshine. At 8 o'clock
the work of unfurling sails and pre-
p.iring finally for the races was begun. At 8:30 a. m. Skippers Davis
and Jarvis appeared on their respective boats, and at 9:15 the Mi-
nota swung into the centre of the
river.
The race today was the first of a
series between the Minota of Toronto and the Genesee of Rochester
for the Fisher cup. The course was
triangular, three and one-third miles
to a leg, a total of 10 miles! The
yachts went over the course twice,
making 20 miles. The judges were
Thos. B. Pritchard, Rochester,
Frank M. Gray, Toronto, and J.
F. Monck, Ha ilton. Wilson H.
Cross was semti teet for the R. V.
C. on board the Minota, and Ernest
MacRae was scrutineer for the R.
C. Y. C. on the Genesee.
The start was made as follows:
Genesee 11:03:30, Minota 11:04.
The Canadian yacht was to windward on the start, and Jarvis sailed
closer to the course than Davis.
On the second leg of the first tack
the Minota was well in the lead,but
the Genesee, being to windward,
picked up. An hour later the Genesee was leading.
Geneace Wine,
Rochester, N. Y., Sept. 8.-2:53
p. m.—The Genesee wins, crossing
the finish line at 2:52, the Minota
being fully a mile and a half from
the finish line.
Par for Loat Time.
Wininpeg, Man., Sept. 8.—A
strike on the Canadian Pacific is
almost certain. The company offers
to reinstate the four men removed,
but they refuse to work unless given
pay for the time suspended.
WORLD'S COAL   SUPPLY.
The first lord of the treasury in a
recent article sounds a note of alarm
to the effect that the world's supply
of fuel is rapidly becoming exhausted, and that the only remedy lies in
some new discovery or invention
which will effect a saving in the
consumption of coal or increase the
power produced by its combustion.
J. A. Longden, formerly president
of the Institute of Mining Engineers, has lately spoken in the name
line, insisting that more attention
must be devoted to economy in the
use of fuel. As possible remedies
he indicates the adaptation of furnaces to the class of coal burned,
and the super-heating of steam.
It is believed that the same conditions which have called forth these
suggestions will result in calling renewed attention to the coal fields of
Canada as an available source of
supply. The Cardiff chamber of
commerce recently|had under discussion the placing of a large contract
for steam coal to be shipped to Naples. They had to compete with an
American offer as follows: coal I. o.
b. Cardiff, $5, freight to Naples $2;
a total of 50 cents more per ton
than the American coal. The Canadian Mining review says that if
this ctn be done from the United
Stutes it can be more easily done
from Canada, and predicts for this
country a growing share in the foreign markets.
MISCELLANEOUS   NOTES.
Alan Walters, writing in Temple
Bar, says that England had no real
national song of the sea until James
Thompson received a commission
to write words for a musical medley
at the Prince of Wales' private theatre on August 1, 174c,. The result
was "Rule Britannia," set to music
by Arne and afterwards touched up
by Lord Bolingbroke. Today England is richer in sea songs than any
other country. German, Dutch and
even Scandinavians with their love
ofthe sea, have very lew such
songs, and France has none.
The sudden death of Steinitz, the
veteran chess player, who for more
than a quarter of a century maintained his position as the leading
player of the world, will be noted
with sadness by every lover of the
game. The cloud under which he
rested on account of his impaired
intellect is too well known by chess
devotees to need adverting to. All
in all he was probably the most
brilliant player since  Paul Morphy.
Commenting on the odd name,
Dragitu, of the new queen of Servia, it is interesting to note that
when the bany daughter of the
duke of Kent was given her first
name, Victoria, it was confidently
expected that she would be called
Alexandria. Had it not been for
her devotion to her mother she
would have reigned under that
name.
The Record again takes pleasure
in urging the citizens of Rossland,
irrespective of party or creed, to attend the ppbi ' reception to be tendered Lord -vlinto at.Miners' Union
hai! next Monday evening. His excellency has personally signified
that the arram.winent to have the
affair an infoi iul one meets his
hearty approval, and thc public at
large should avail themselves of the
opportunity to be presented to him.
The second Thursday in October is the date fixed for the
holding of the next Conservative
convention, and Revelstoke is the
place chosen.
A. G. Berry, late secretary to the
Australian delegates, boasts that
under the new law Australia will
have a wider suffrage than the
United States or Canada.
It is known that a number of
American soldiers contemplate settling permanently in the Philippines.
Now it is officially announced that
probably 15,000 British 'roops will
settle on So- h African soil. In
commenting ii tHs fact, H. A,
Bryden, a w il u-wn writer, suggests that hai nillion pounds
sterling would not _,'.• too 'much to
spend in'state-aided immigration.
He thinks some such measure the
key to the problem In South Africa.
PUSH IT A^ONG.
MORE OUTRAGES
The Long Roll of Missionariss Killed
Has Been Recived.
(lXy Associated Press.) I f
Washington, Sept, 8—There is
reason to believe that the Chinese
negotiations have now reached another crisis. Developments are
expected, the nature of which it is
not possible at present to even outline.
Li Hung Chang is still at Shanghai and unofficial advices that reach
here indicate that he is in no hurry
to leave for Pekin.
Beatli of missionaries,
Washington, Sept. 8.—The state
department is in receipt of a cable
from,UnitsdStates Consul Goodnow
at Shanghai, dated September 7,
reporting the deaths, about July 31,
at Funcu and Tai Ku, of the following missionaries:
Rev. and Mrs, C. VV. Pierce and
daughter Florence.
Rev. nnd Mrs. E. B. Atwater and
two children.
Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Clapp.
Rev. Geo. L. Williams.
Rev. T. VV. Davies.
Miss Bowen Bird and Miss Mary
L. Partridge,
The department has notified the
respective missionary boards of
which the victims were members.
Great Britain's Preferenre.
New York, Sept. 8.—A solution
of the Chinese question which
would have been popular in England would have been the adoption
by the American government of a
distinctly punitive policy, enforced
by the employment of an army of
25,000 or 30,000 troops, says the
London correspondent of the Tribune. The British government would
have followed the lead of the American state department and would
have largely increased its own military forces in China for the purpose
of securing the punishment o( the
guilty mandarins, the dethronement
ol the dowager empress and the reorganization ol the imperial government,
It may be safely assumed that the
British foreign office will assent to
any policy which secures a general
agreement of the powers and obviates the necessity for a partition of
China.
Both political parties in British
Columbia will unite in securing
from their representatives a pledge
that the. will favor a revisiofc of
the tari'r in so far as it affects our
lead I rests. Now the eastern
papei., nre taking the matter in
hand and the Toronto World presents the matter in this very concise
parag:aph:
"cannd'. produce., iiuch more
pii? '..id than she requires for her
own uses, /md yet we are importing 7000 tons of white lead annually
from Germany! The statement
would hardly be credited if the
blue books did not corroborate the
fact. We might as well import
wheat and butter from Great Britain as white lead from Germany.
We are an expoiting country of
both products, and the idea ot importing the one is as ridiculous as
our importing the other. What is
required to break up the grip Germany has on the Canadian market
is the imposition of a protective
duty on white lead, litharge and
other articles of which lead is the
base. We have a duty of 35 per
cent, on lead pipe, with the result
that we Tianufacture that article
ourselves. On white lead, litharge,
etc., the du..y ranges *Yom nothing
to fiv^ per cent., which, of course,
affords no protection whatever.
The white lead industry has reached
large pioportions 1 tht United
States, and there ■■ no reason why
it should not beci.r.t a proportionately important industry in Canida.
The miners of British Columbia are
taking a firm stand on this question."
j abroad, and in view of th
production of lead bullion   '. '**
ing on in Canada (a prodllcl^
a few yean since did not wto™1
in view ofthe great ionqj.^1
duties levied on lead pSfl
other materials used in th
facture of paints, *,ch duui 5
ing from nothing to « Der    %
the    value   thereof ;  £*** *
tion would recommend that ill
iff of customs of lead p^H
such   other material  „Stt|. Jl
manufacture of paints comim, • f
Canada, be revised andVo,,!
ity with each other, and 9JI
duties now levied for revenue I
poses upon similar m'^
goods."
Modern statesmen who are u
clinedtobe pessimistic are someti
prone to bewail thc lackofoppor.
tunity for the exercise of p^l
statemanship.    Here is 0pp(
unliminited, and those who en,k( I
it   will   be   hailed as benefacTf
Modern partisans and politic,,,    I
sometimes inclined to believe twf
their best powers of adminisiraJ
and legislative reform are clipJ
and curtailed  because of the fi«,|
fight of a faction or the angry J
declamatory  eloquence  of a'riJ
politicnl platform.    Here, hotmj
in  the establishment and devtul
ment of a great industry andiJ
tential source of wealth, there it J
opportunity  for   patriotic amlJ
lanthrepic action which, proak
it  may be in the dry figures 1
homely   product   with which ij
called   to   deal,   will lift men,
above the foggy, sultry atmospl
of clique or factional partisan
into the clear sunlight and |
where sound judgment is _
and where good work can bed
A Jealous Man.
New York, Sept. 8.—John Bed-
ler, a veteran of the civil war, killed his wife and himself at his home
in Brooklyn today. He was 69
years old and his wife 20 years
younger.    |ealousy was the cause.
A CHANGE NEEDED.
It is gratifying to notice that Ihe
recent suggestions in the Record on
the necessity of advancing the duty
on manufactured lead are meeting
the hearty commendation of practical, thoughtful and public spirited
men, and that other newspapers
are advocating the same measure.
Attention is being called to the fact
that at the time of the adjustment
of the tariffs now in force, the mining of lead ores in Canada was in
its incipiency, and the growth to
which the industry was destined
was not taken into consideration.
But wise legislation adapts itself to
actual conditions; and however advantageous the present laws may
have been designed to operate toward the manufacturers of paints
and other lead products, it does not
apply to conditions now in effect.
With the general progress of the
country lead mines have been opened
up, and the field of their operation,
providod a home market can be se-
cured for their output, promises to
be a vast and remunerative one.
The Liberals of this district in the
convention held at Revelstoke yes-
terday adopted several resolutions,
one of which, bearing on this subject, follows:
"We recognize with approval the
action of the governmeut in the
provision made for the free return
into Canada of lead of Canadian
•ngm smelted in Canada bul refined
PROSPERITY  AND GROW
Few  things  about Rossland 1
tract the attention of visitors 1
thnn  the  number of buildings 1
cently erected or now in the c<st|
of  construction.       Of these'
I
courthouse,   which is   soon to I
completed,  is by far the costlie
and most extensive.    Bnttheotl
buildings  in the aggregate **»
yond it in value and are vastly 1
significant.     The courthouse s 1
public structure, provided and pall
lor at  public  expense.    The ottal
buildings are matters of private»f
terprise and investment, and iti
them     we   wish |tn  speak.
through the business section of ll
city new and  substantial stores 1
going up and old ones are being»
modeled or  enlarged.    In the r
dence   districts   new dwellings 1
rising on every hand.   Far outj
the suburbs even, little cottages!
springing   up   in   groups.   If'
takes his  stand on  any of the'
tops about the city he |may
count scores of new baildings.
We said these new houses atW
the attention of visitors,
wish to emphasize visitor *•
than resident. The latter is I
member of the family circle'
scarcely notices the rapid gro*i*
the child he sees every day.
the other hand the guest
comes only at intervals sees'
child reaching toward manhood
leaps and bounds.
The building of the«e new lw
in Rossland means far more
mere activity in  trade and mm
caused by their immediate consttJJ
tion.      They   belong    not to '■
wealthy capitalist, but in tht ■
to the laboring man.    He doti
build for speculation  but for
dence, and all the laws of econoi
show that he puts his savings
a home only when he has conMf
in the permanency of the city a» 1
its future development.   This 1
case in today in Rossland.
Another  moral we would *1
from the array of new roofs*
from the hilltops: this building
wise move on the part of the
ing man.   By a prudent I"'"'1
ment he can pay for his new     ■
in installments, the monthly0"
being    hardly    greater   than
amount he would have to spe   j
he were paying   rent; and a
end of   a year  or so he "*'   *j
home.    Working toward this a   _
objective point, he lives more    ,'
fully and at the sam time wt'^,i
strong er link in the clip""*"   J
of family life—the basis oft**    |
municipality and commonwe* [ACE PROMISED
Qiug of the Negotiations Duly Authorized.
London Sept. io—The Chinese
ister in London, Chih Chen Lo
g, it is understood, has received
Kentials authorizing the opening
Iieace negotiations. It is inti-
:ed that similar powers have
n conferred on the Chinese min-
rs at other capitals and that
kr credentials are such as will
Lfy the European  governments.
Will Keatore tba Kmpcror.
\ek\n, Aug.   31,   via Shanghai,
[t 8.—It is unofficially  but rely slated thnt  Prince Ching will
Jduce the emperor.      The  situa-
seems to hang upon  this.      If
lice Ching can discover the em-
jor, his majesty's rule will proba-
be re-established, as there is no
Ier likely candidate. Prince
ng comes under the imperial
et ai.d two other leading China-
will be deputed to assist the
lotiations for a settlement, one of
jn will   probably   be   Li   Hung
t'he British, the Americans, the
inese and the Russians are post-
1 pioclamations, defining thejur-
Iction of their respective dictricts
the preservation of order, prom-
protection to  the  inhabitants
inviting a resumption  of   busi-
(s for the purpose   of   restoring
fidence.     The streets, however,
still deserted.      A   scarcity  of
1 seems inevitable, owing to the
that no produce   is   arriving.
various generals have   accoru-
informed  their governments
recommended  a  partial   with-
»al of troops before winter.
The Triumphal Entry
Pekin,  Aug.   26,   via  Shanghai,
pt. 8.—Yesterday Col.   Ferrence
Ranged   the  triumphal  march to
palace in the following manner:
ussians and Japanese   800   men;
ptLsh, American and French,  400
ch; Germany 250, and Austrians,
Indians   and the marine detach-
|nt.     They   were   to  enter   the
|ith gate at 8 o'clock in the morn-
All will be dismounted except
j generals and their staffs.
Will Drainud Ratlalhetlou
andon, Sept. 10.—A special dis-
from Berlin says  Great   Brit-
and (iermany have  agreed   not
[evacuate Pekin until full satisfac-
fn for the  recent   outrages   have
Hi obtained.
a m tit 1 ih miLUon
BroiiKia »ow„ lrou, Klondike- Wharf
Burned at Dyea
Victoria, Sept. lo.-The steamer
Danube reached here at midnight
with over half a million in Klondike
gold. Of this H. Berry, one of the
Berry Bros., had a quarter million.
The rest is divided in small sums
from five to $25,000. The wharf
at Dyea, on which there was 30,000
feet of lumber, burned last Monday.
Victor Gilmore, who was arrested
at Skagwav a year ago on the
charge of smuggling diamonds, was
released and the stones returned to
him as the charge could not be
proven.
Influenza is playing sad havoc
with the Indians on the west coast
of Alaska.
YACHT MINOTA
IS DISABLED
Leading   in   the   Race,
When Her Spreader
Was Broken.
IELD UP
THE TRAIN
|ne Bandit Does a Big
Job   Large Reward
Offered.
Rochester, N. Y. Sept. 10.—In
the race between the Genesee and
the Minota today, the Minota was
disabled and had to come off the
course.
The start was made at 11 o'ciock,
Genesee was in"the lead by 12 seconds with the Minota in the windward position.    It was a fine start.
11:15 a, m. Both yachts are still
on the ilarboard side with the Minota pointing high, and both apparently on even terms. The distance
of perhaps four hundred yards separates the two boats.
11:20.—The Minota has come in
disabled. Her spreader has been
carried away. She has just passed
the pier on the way to the dock.
The Minota was leading when the
the accident occurred.
1:35 p. m.—The Minota was
seriously disabled by the accident.
The carrying away of her spreader
made her rigging useless. The
Genesee is continuing on her course
and will win the race if she finishes
in the time limit of five half hours
from   start. Everyone     regrets
Skipper Jarvis' misfortune as he ap
parently had the race well in hand,
as the Minota was far in the lead at
the time of the accident.
penver, Col., Sept 12.—The ovei
nd tlyer was held  up  by  a lone
hwayman this morning near the
llorado line. The robber secured
J°l't $500 in cash and probably
flce thai amount in diamonds and
atL'hes and then made  his  escape
bringing the train to a stop.
he railroad officials offer $10,000
^vatd fur his capture and a posse
»ve started out in all directions.
■a Crltlrally III.
Quebec, Sept. 12.—Hon. Mr.
P'ircliaiul, premier of the province
T Quebec, suffered another relapse
M night and had the last rights of
I1- church administered him.
Declare I.11, 11III11   \l_iil.iri,
New York, Sept. 12.—A dispatch
to the Tribune from   London   says:
"The Boers hive decided to make
a formal declaration of guerrilla
warfare Gen. Botha i.s understood
to have dissented from this course,
but, according to a correspondent
with Lord Roberts' forces, he was
overruled by the other members of
the council of war.
"The news correspondent at Belfast learns through a refugee from
the Boers that President Kruger
was at Nelspruit on Saturday, and
that President Steyn, Viljoen,Christian Botha, Fournier and Delarey
were with him. Lucas Meyer has
been deposed from his command,
but remains Mr. Kruger's military
adviser. President Kruger is said
to be feeble and apparently takes
little interest in the military movements. He remains in his railway
carriage constantly reading psalms.
It i.s believed thai his ultimate intention is to lake flight towards
Koomatipot."
Ll HUNG CHANG
Aged Viceroy Once More Comes to
the Front.
Washington, Sept. to,—The Chinese minister has received an imperial edict conferring on Li Hung
Chang extraordinary power for the
complete settlement of Chinese
trouble. It gives him authority to
make any terms according to his
own discretion without referring
them to the emperor. This is unusual authority and is said at the
Chinese legation to meet all the objections heretofore raised as to his
power to negotiate for peace. The
edict is dated two weeks ago but
has just been forwarded from Li
Hung Chang.
Fire at Peklu
Pekin, Aug. 28. via Shanghai,
Sept. 8.—A fire occurred last night
in a pagoda where the company of
British and American heliograph
operators were at work. The large
structure was totally destroyed.
Died at Toronto.
Toronto, Sept: 12.—Henry A.
King,for a number of years a prominent stock broker here and formerly mayor of St. Catharines, died
last night of Bright's disease,   aged
S3 years-
Deatroyed by Fire.
Halifax, N. S^, Sept. 12.—A vessel which has arrived at Wood's
Harbot, Yarmouth, from Grand
Manan, reports the total destruction
of Seal Grove, Grand Manan, by
fire;  only one church remaining.
t.lmit Powder Fxploalon.
Victoria, Sept. 12.—Part of the
giant powder works here was
wrecked by an explosion of 200
pounds of nitro glycerine yesterday
afternoon.    No lives were lost.
Lota Over s;t,lioi>.(i(iii
Ottawa, Sept. 12.—The annual
report of Superintendent ol Insurance Fit/gerald, just issued, shows
the total loss in Ottawa-Hull fire by
Canadians, British and American
companies to have been $3,062,-
098.
...»_,...._..
llagod Laat Night ou Lake Brie-Many
Boata Liwl.
Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 12.—Reports from Crystal Beach, a summer resort on the Canadian side of
Lake Erie, says that every dock has
been destroyed by the terrific wind
storm last night and that many sea
yachts were completely wrecked.
The wind attained a velocity of 72
miles an hour. A woman, while
picking up debris, took hold of an
electric light wire and was killed.
Membera Benoimluated,
Victoria, Sept. 12.—Messrs.
Prior and Earl, the sitting members
of Victoria city, were renominated
by the Conservatives last night.
WESTMINSTER
VICTORIOUS
Champions at Lacrosse
ain  Defeat the
Tecumsehs.
Toronto, Sept. 10.—New Westminster lacrosse team defeated Tecumsehs here on Saturday by a
score of seven to one. The play
throughout was brilliant. In (act
it i.s doubtful if better lacrosse play-
ng was ever witnessed in Toronto.
I jToronto, Onl., Sept. 10.—President (_.' lemes of the Canadianl acrosse
association this morning decided to
suspend the Tecumseh lacrosse
club lor the remainder of the season
for playing Soules and Carmichael
as members of its team with New
Westminster team on Saturday.
<'uiii|ioaltora Wage* Increaaed.
Ottawa, Sept. 12.--The government increased the wages of compositors in printing bureau from $12
to (13.50 per week.
OUR FUTURE CITIZENS.
COMPLETE
COLLAPSE
Boer Resistance  Is Believed to be Practically Ended
Alllea After the Hoxera
Tien Tsin. Sept. 8, via Shanghai,
ept. 11.—Four thousand allied
oops marched today against the
ties of Sheng Hai Sien and Tiele,
here the presence of Boxers
•reatens the Tien Tsin region. The
ipanese siege guns were taken
'th the expedition, which included
'arge force of cavalry. One regi-
ent of cavalry (German) nnd one
r'tish battery have arrived.
Hoblirry at Kaalngton.
Victoria, Sept. 12.—The steamer
Queen City brings news from Es-
sington ol the robbery of the registered mail there, containing about
$3000.
A Peulnn Head,
New York, Sept. 12.—Dr. Dennis Mulcahey, once an active Fenian
agitator, who was imprisoned with
O'Donovan Rossa and others, died
in Newark N. J. last night a ged 58
Lorenzo Marquez, Sept 12.—
President Kruger arrived here last
night.
Departure or Ailarhea.
Washington, Sept. 12—The following dispatch has been received
by the war department from the
United States army officer who accompanied the Boers in their campaign as a military observer,
•Lorenzo Marquez,—Events have
required departure of attaches Irom
Transvaal.      Request  instructions.
Signed, Reichmadn."
This message is interpreted at the
department to mean the complete
collapse of- Boer resistance to Eng
land. Captain Reichman has been
cabled permission to start at once
for the United States.
Thomaa Flint Nominated.
Halifax, N. S., Sept. 12—Yarmouth Liberals have nominated
Thomas F. Flint, sitting member,
as candidate at the general elections.
Those were wise and weighty
words of Lord Minto's yesterday,
when in addressing the school children he referred to them as the future
citizens of the country, into whose
hands its interests and destinies
were soon to be committed. It is
with this idea and from this standpoint that our educational system
becomes fraught with tremendous
importance and far reaching consequences. On the shoulders of these
boys and girls now growing up
about us will soon rest the weight
and burden of responsibility'in providing laws and in carrying out the
active duties of government. It is
doubly important that they be trained and fitted not only for the duties
of professional or industrial life, or
lhe cares of the home circle, but
that they be taught the practical
side of civics, the true idea ol the
voter, the dignity of the franchise
and the wide horizon of the man
who mounts to official position in
this vast and rapidly developing
country.
Perhaps it may not be unwise to
suggest in this same connection
that too little attention is paid by
our educators to this phase of
education. It is well enough to
have the ground work of classical
instruction and the various arts and
sciences come well into play in
rounding out a curriculum; but no
well ordered scheme of study today
can afford to omit ^ or ignore the
practical duties of life and citizenship. Indeed we are inclined to believe that in the advance of the future, pedagogy will place larger and
larger emphasis upon this line of
study and then the true comprehension of how to vote and how to
govern will be considered of greater
and more vital importance than the
correct solution of a problem in algebra or an accurate classification
of a fossil. With all the necessity
lor classical culture, there is much
dead work In scholastic circles. In
course ol time it will be cleared
away or regelated to the museum,
and its place taken by the live and
practical issues of the day.
THEIR VISIT ENDS
Lord and Lady Minto Take Their Departure.
Rossland, B. C, September 12—
The special vice-regal train conveying Lord and Lady Minto and
the members of their party left
about 11 o'clock this morning, the
journey eastward being by way of
Nelson, The party was accompanied to the station by a number
of prominent ladies and gentlemen.
Expressions ot regret were heard
alike from hosts and guests as the
hour of parting approached. There
is every reason to believe that Lord
and Lady Minto thoroughly enjoyed
their visit to Rossland. That the
community has enjoyed it goes
without saying. The result cannot
fail to be beneficial in the closer acquaintance brought about with the
head of government in the Dominion and in this personal knowledge
he has gained of the mining, industrial and other local interests of
Rossland and of British Columbia
in general.
The community is under obligations to the ladies and gentlemen
serving on the various committees,
and to W. Wyllie Johnston, the
honorary secretary, to whom the
success of the program is largely
due.
The remainder of yesterday's program was carried out well, affording enough diversity to keep the
visitors pleasantly busy without
fatiguing them. The visit to the
mines seemed to he thoroughly enjoyed by every member ofthe party.
At the Centre Star the party, clad
in regulation mining costume, descended to the 400-foot level, were
shown the stope between the 300
and 200-foot levels, the method of
timbering and of extracting the ore.
They also examined the compressor,
in which they seemed much interested, Several photographs of the
party were taken. Lady Minto was
presented with the costume provided for her as a souvenir of her visit.
The party was then driven up the
hill past the War Eagle boarding
house and to the head works.
After the luncheon provided by
Edwin Durant on behalf of the B
A, C. directors, the party visited
the mines of that company under
the escort of J. M. Long, superintendent of the Le Roi.
The banquet arranged at the
Hotel Kootenay last evening was a
thoroughly enjoyable affair. The
room and table were artistically
decorated with flowers and bunting,
while from the ceiling long streamers of ribbons in the national eolers
were gracefully drooped. In the
ante-room was hung a splendid
Scottish standard, loaned for the
occasion by T. S. Gilmour. The
menu was an elaborate and elegant one, comprising eight full
courses set off by the best ol wines
and liquors and finished by the fragrance of choice cigars.
At the close of the banquet Mayor
Goodeve proposed the health of
Her Majesty the Queen and the national anthem was sung. The
mayor also proposed a toast to the
guest of honor, paying him a high
tribute and reviewing briefly the resources of Rossland. Three ringing cheers greeted the toast. Lord
Minto made an appropriate reply,
adverting pleasantly to the time
when he had marched through the
Selkirks before Rossland existed
and when the city of Vancouver
was just begun. He spoke glowingly of Rossland, dwelling- especially on its mining interests, and expressing the hope of seeing these
entirely in Canadian hands. His
entire speech was in excellent taste
and was received with marked enthusiasm.
In accordance with the announce-
mei t in the Record Lord Minto
presented the Humane Society mei'-
al to Dr. Hoyes of Trail. Col.
Topping pronounced a eulogy on
Mr. Johnson, who was associated
with Dr. Hoyes in his life-saving
service, but was unable to attend
the banquet. The banqueters sang
"For He's a Jolly GocJ Fellow,"
and three cheers   were   given   for
Dr. Hoyes. Frank Oliver then sang
"First in the Field," and as an encore "Long Ago." W. T. Oliver
and W. J. Nels, n responded to
toasts on "Canada;" Gov. Mackintosh and Dr. Bowes, "The Army,
Navy and Volunteers;" Alexander
Dick, "Mining and Smelting;" E.
Kirby, "A Prophecy," ]. B. Hastings, "Equipment of the Mines;"
C. O. Lalonde, J, S. Clute and
Hector McRae, "Our City;" A. J,
McMillan and J. B, Kerr, "The
Press;" Edwin Duiant, "The B. A.
C."
The health of 'he Countess of
Minto was proposed and, with the
singing ot "Auld Lang Syne" and
three cheers for the Earl of Minto
and the national anthem, the banquet ended,
LOOTING THE DEAD
Fearful Mutilation of Bodies at Gal-
Houston, Texas Sept. 12—The
ghouls have been holding an orgie
over the dead at Galveston. The
majority of these men were negroes, but whites took part in the
desecration of dead. Not only did
they rob the dead, but mutilated
bodies in order to secure ghouls,
booty. A party of ten negroes returning from a looting expedition,
had stripped the corpses of all their
valuables and their pockets were
fairly bulging out with fingers of
the dead, which had been cut off
because they were • o swollen the
rings could not  hi   removed.
t'oiiflaealed   Fund
Pekin, Sept. 5.—The Rosso-Chinese bank,which removes tc Shanghai, will confiscate, as part of the
indemnity to be paid to Russia, the
Imperial University fund of five
million taels deposited with it.
As an additional reason why Germany cannot withdraw from Pekin,
it is pointed out that 3000 native
Christians have heen rescued from
the Pei Tang cathedral and if now
abandoned they would inevitably be
massacred.
Dispatches received here say that
the international forces attacked the
Chinese fortifications it Pei Tang,
north of Taku, and that the losses
were considerable.
3000 LIVES LOST
Conservative Estimate of Death by the
Texas Storm.
Houston, Texas, Sept. ia.—Conservative estimates of deaths have
been shattered bv the estimates of
Mayor Jones of Galveston, who declares that 3000 deaths will result
from thc storm. Over one hundred
lives were lost at other points in
Texas. Ten millions of dollars will
cover Galveston's property loss,
while half as much tiiore is an estimate of that of the rest of the
slate. Seve.i hundred human bodies
have heen weighted and sunk at sea,
the majority going to their graves
unknown.
The situation grows worse every
minute. Water and ice is needed.
Scores have died   since   las'   night,
and a number of sufferers have gone
insane.)
Flit) Rou la l.iiat.
Detroit, Mich, Sept. ij.—-The
steamer Lawrence of the People's
Transit Co., is given up tor lost.
She had fifty people 011 board.
Fraaer Hi'tiominated
Watford, Ont., Sept. 12.—The
Liberals of Fast Lambeth have
again nominated John Eraser, M. P.
for parliament at lhe general elections.
K
I I
:
W.J. t   OT".-   "•
,_____.■»..*. -a** i»» ^
MAR
THE
!■■ n .(-^'i. ":u..:..'3T
JEiOTM^I,,
£ARGE    AtfD   "COMFORTABLE
^QOMSttTA?^    UNSURPASSED    IN    TIJE
NORTHWEST-
HfflNl & BARRETT - -   IW&
SILVERTON. B. C.
Watches,
Clocks and
Jewelery,
Till! SIUCRTMIAJ.
PATcanAY, Peptkmdkb 15. 1900.
rniiimiKi) xvkrv  satciiiiay  at
SILVEKTON, B. 0.
NATHEION BKO*..    Keillor* * Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
TWO DOLLAKR A YEAR.
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this ollice.
IP YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUK
0««*««0  OR   IN  ARREARS    A
tt I   BLUE   CROSS    WILL
5*f«®«S  BK  FOUND    IN THIS
SQUARE.       SUBSCRIPTION    AUK
PAYABLE IN  ADVANCE.    PRICE
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
»uuuuuuuuuuuu\
EDITORIAL 0I!T«OFPIi\(JS.
All Work }Jitt ni;;Tl.e Lakeview
Hotel, Silverton, will l-eforwrnil-
ed and promptly atteiiil»'l to.
O. B. Knowles,
SANPON, R C
imuu'fuuuuumuu
There are many questions which may
pertinbntly be diseusped by the Kootenay prc-s during the coming political
struggle into which all will be drawn
within the next few weeks.
There are also many questions now
being written about in eastern Canadian newspapers with which we  have
f iM WatrN Repairing » Specialty. I ■">""»« °°™™ ih*n thpyhftVP- »nd
it is to Ub hoped that in this piovince
few will follow them into the mud
holes of ruit and religious controversies, or raise the hackneyed "loyalty'
cry.
What niattei* it to us wheiher our
premier be French or English, as long
as the question of the lead tariff* remains unsettled! What difference
does it make whether he be Protestant,
Roman Catholic or Atheist while the
Chinese or Japanese are depriving us
of onr jobs! Does it effect our welfare
to know tbat the majority of M. Ps
sons in South Africa are Grits, or
Tories, as the case n-ay bet Does the
Hying of a tricolor more or less affect
the populating of the country? Will
the singing of the National Anthem
do anything towards settling a strike
or oiling fh|i machinery of commerce?
And yet part of our provincial press
presists in subordinating important issues to these.
These questions of loyalty, race and
religion are not worth discussing.
Why should we quarrel over any of
them here, where a mar,'* religian is
his own business, where all are loyal
who are industrious and when.- all are
Canadian regardless of what Hag they
were born under.
Conveniently Situated near
Railway 8ta»l«n and Wharl.
GOOD  SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
Dining Room under thu charge ol
Miaa Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with all the delicacies
pf the season.
HENDER80N& OB r If ING, - Paoi<».
SLOOAN CITY B. 0.
Jtxst I**,
A*
J&*&-*w*%r
Irlne
Of
choice
Imported
and
domestic
Confectionery.
FRESH AND DELICIOUS.
Fresh Fruits
COMING   IN   DAILY,   TIIE
BEST ON THE MARKET.
I will be glad to quote
I trices on crate tuts ol
fruit for preserving.
Stationery,
FULL LINE CARRIED IN  STOCK.
H- H- Beeves,
Silverton, B. C.
CANADIAN
F»ACIJEMC
AND SOO  LINE
FAMOUS
KT "IMPERIAL   LIMI^D-
}Vith li, proved Connection; Service Via
Rbvblstokb or Cbowb Nest Route to
 ;— or froiji	
KOOTENAY   COUNTRY
J-'irat-claw Sleepers nn all trains from
ARROWHEAD k KOOTENAY LDG.
Tourist Cars pass Medicine Hat
daily for St. Paul, Saturdays for
Montreal and Boston, Mondays
and -Thursdays for Toronto.
Same oars rase Revelstoke one
day earlier.
connections:
Es Sun. To k From the North.  Ex Son.
11:00ly. Silvkrtpn Arr. }5:4fl
Ex Sun. To k From ihe South. Ex Sun.
J5:40lv hfiLViBToN Arrl-j.QO
For rates, tickets, and full information
Apply to G. B, Chandlbh, Agent, Silver -
fun, B. C, of
W. F. ANDERSON,
Tray. Pass. Agent, Nelson
|j. 3, COYLE.
In this issue we publish a notice tq
a delinquent co-owner, according to
the recently passed Amendment to the
SJineral'Act. This is the first notice
of the kind ever published in British
Columbia. The amendment in question has been law only a few days and
prospectors, who have felt the need of
such a measure for years, will he quick
to taks advantage of it.
It is singularly appropriate tbat
The S;lvei{Tos|as should be the fir tt
to publish such a notice, as we have
In cn persistently contending for nearly
three years for just such a law as bas
been past, and stood alone for some
time in our advocacy.
'■■■"fi V, 1 *■ "H' '"'■'-?'■ 'H ■" \ '' '' 'AHMwI-'IAwK ■»■■_-._ ilg-.ms I —   _>! 'I.ll.l'i   l _ K" *
under most pleasant conditions, that the
C P R bas caused t-> be built this house
boat. It Is to be rented to parties and at
a figure which makes it within the reach
ol everv one who cun afford an outiim.
Tbe boat itttell will rent ut *o per day,
with a minimum charge of $20. It
will be towed to any point that cau be
reached from Nelson at the regular
towage charge of 50 cents u mile, wiih a
minimum towage charge of (6. All that
those who rent the bunt huve to do, is
in stock it with eatables and drinkables.
Nothing else is required by them unless
they desire a servant and this the C P R
officials will undertake to secure them.
. ..._v.').i. .ty .*. j !• ."**,•*;.i '■•■■. ■_.
J C Bolander; Badger, same, J A Austin
ASRHSSMKNTN.
PICKUPS.
Jt .cannot  be too often repented that
it Is nut helps, but obstacles,   not fueil
ities,   but   difficulties,   that  make men
aud bring final success.
The oldest German coal mines were
first worked in 111)3. They are near
Worms. Ktmluiiil did not begin to
mine ils coal until the fourteenth century.
" >"es she is one of tho Pest wives in
the world, upd he got her by u>U
vertising."
"It doesn't seem lo me I conld ever
bear to think of marrying a man who
would advertise for a wife."
'I didn't sny he advertised for a
wile. Rut he was such a lii.eral and
judicious advertiser of his liusiuess that
She wus satisfied he would make a
good liiisliuiiil—ami hhe took hill)."
In commenting on Ihe "Deceived
Workmen's Bill" the Canterbury Outcrop terms it tne "Deceased Workmen's
Bill." The Outcrop evidently thinks
that the proposed legislation had to do
with "old stiffs" and "dead beats."
"I saw a funny thing in corsets on the
streets yesterday."
"What was it?"
"A shirt waist man."
Young man—Johnny, your sister's
hair curls naturally, dosn't iff
Johnny (the young woman's younger
brother)—Uh yes. She juft naturally
curls it.
'What is the mother's congress, pa?"
"It is an organisation  of 'women designed to give other women useful hint*
on how to bring up their children.
"The Pollers have a new runabout"
"I should think those Potter girls were
all the runabouts Ihey could stand."
"Did jou ever leflect on tl e ipipiensi-
•y ol the solar sy.-tem?"
"No, I've got my  mind full reflecting
on lhe eixe of the uQte I have  to p_}y
nejct week."
MINING   RECORDS.
NEW   IllCNVKR—LOCATIONS
Aug28-Ai. Wilson ck. Alia Libby;
Alio*, name, VallanceC Simmons; Sunrise, feme. H F Lilihv.
Su—Red Metal. Red Mountain, M E
Rsinmehneyer; Copper Fr, aame, FL
Bvron,
3>-Queen, Four Mile ck, W H Brandon; forest, aame, I) Brandon; Snow-
stotui, Fennel ck. A S l<riiul'.e; FreuH,
Four Mile ck, M R W Itatlihom; Souria,
Fennel ck, irloc Souris, F. M Brindle.
Sept 4—Anglo Suxon Mo 3, Silver Mt,
Amos Thompson: Edith Fr, Silver .Mt,
I D McMuMer.
Sept 5—lialkin,     Wilsonnjk,    Alliert
Oaens,   Baido Anderson;
Windsor, same, A Owatta and Ilur.lo An-
csri-on.    Nicor-llmii-Kxer. same, All.ert
Owens, B Anderson, T J Llpvil.
Sept 11— .\Jiiliuglit Four Mile ck, J.
Fraser; Thu Fraser Frau.. same ; M|ii
Frac, nr s.union, W A Chile,
8—Second Extension. l(owson o'_t, W
O Scott.
10—Gleu Ore, nr Monitor, J IJonuli;
Poorman, Sandon ck, RoM A Lungill;
Hawkey* and Buckeye, Goat Monntain,
Am.'28-A F. Heiwater. 21)—Black
Home, White Horse. Fedora. Mono Fr,
30—SnmvHlini'. MMily. May dee. Exlen-
sion, Wnr Frac, Province. 31—Producer. Galena Frac. Woodpnsnnnn, Belle
Rnihh. Toronto. Seplj 1—M"ior Frac.
4_01d M«i<l. Morninir Glory Fran. 6—
Iniriiiiitioiiiil, Sir Kitchener, Linnet
Fraclion, Washinslon Fniction.
fl—Aila Bell. Mav Flower. Neglected,
Imperial. 7—Giheraller. Bosphorus,
Con'iniinl. Pliilailelpela. 8— Little John,
Kori' Frac. Sunrise, Sunrise Extension,
111—Oakland, L'ikfiview Frac, Lakeview,
Alpha. Aurora. IXanv. Viinoni, Romoln,
Forrester, Orient, Vanoni Frac, Dividend, Dewey, Havana.
CKBTIKICATKS OK IMPROVEMENTS
Ans 29—Altona, Towanda, Bowknot,
D.ivt.in. Rnehen.
Sept 10—Elaithar Prae. Gentle Annie.
Reliance, Ceiunry Frne. Lakeview Frac.
Luiieview. Alpha No !(, Kop|e Frac.
11—Stormoiint.
TRANSFERS.
Aug 30— Troy snd St Helena. Angus
McLean to The FislieriiiRiilen Consolidated M A 8 Co. Ltd. A ni; 23. f<iC0.
31—PenohM- -t, Chas Culver to M tt W
Riiilil.orn and Frank ('nlver, Aug 10.
Cliff Extension. E M S.indilands lo M
R W Ratliliorn. Aug 25.
Same. M R W Ratliliorn to II B Alex-
under. Aug 25.
Sept 1—Snowstorm, A s Br'ndle to
lhe Mount Mabel MAS Co, Aug 31.
Sept 4—Denver >3', liardo Anduison to
Emilv Byrnes, Aug 30.
Neglected 1-1), S T Owings to S T Walker. June I). 1801).
.Same, lis ST Walker to J C Harris,
Sept 4
Oakland ij, John Smith to FFLiebscher, *50, Julv !).
Sept 6—-Snowden f^. Chas French to
Lawrence Doolan, An_r }S
Galena Fruc '_,, II Wilson toT 11 Muv.
Aug SO,
.Mupli. Leaf,'... D G McDonald to Dun
lii-tlinne, Aug IS.
Sent 6-J R L. B A T. Windsor, Hal-
kin, '„ eiii-li, Burdo Anderson to Donald
Mrl.iiiirlilan, Sept fl
Sept 7—Same claims, \t\ in each, same
to same. Sept 7
Sept 8—Power of Attorney re Noondav
C"rley Mines, H J Stewart and Anily
Stewprt ty Joseph Hrnndon, Sept 8
S»"pt 10—Silver Lake Falls. (Jus F*»n-
drey to W W Warner. Sept 10
Sept IJ— J R L, B A I1, Windsor, Hid
ksns, V{,  Donald McLaughlin--'to Bardo
Anderson, Sept 11
BATH
HOUSE
AND , „_
LA UNDRY
~n-^.;
UP-TO-DATE IN EVERY BR^ci,'
WOHK LKKT AT   E. AN08i"nw's nAlllu.„
shop in NEW DENVER w,LI, „„ JfJ
WABDKD TO ME AMI) l-KOMPTLV   hvruRl.?"
___»• ^tici^biMan
-**-*s3eatatatoejt. •
silvertonTT h Q
(LHiiiniry Work Culled For and Delivered Weekly.)
CALIFORNIA  WINE
COMPANY, LTD.
NELSON, B. C.
■w:eiox
•sTTXlrTwwwS wiw.2t7ZQ
OXCr-wiw.'RQ,
AGENTSTOK       "
CALGARY BEEB.
Advertisers
MM¥VMW¥MMMVyM^^^^l^^M_M^
Sandon Miners' Union
HOSPITAL
OPEN   TO  THK   PUBLIC.
Subscribers,  fl, per month.
Privale Patients, i, \wr day
exclusive of expense of physician or surgeon iiinl drugs.
Dr. W. K. Gonim. Attendant Physician
MisiS. M. Chisiioi.m, Matron.
J. D. McLahoiiun. President.
W. L. Haoleb, Secretary.
Wm. DoNAiitE,  J. V.  Martin, R. J.
Mc-I.i-an. A.J. McDonald, Mikk Dr/ nv,
Direi-lora.
Fresh  Bread
Pics and Cakes Mad« to Order.
i OJRKV, . Silvcr^n, B. C.
Tlie mirLOXs' txad.e
is tlie trade. ETrex3T
week oxie tlio\_xsaxid,
Slocan xxiixiers read.
THE SILVERTONIAN
y_^^WV»^WVVSi^/WW»AA^^_^V^
JDo You Want
Tlieir Trade?
TUE MAIN TRAIL KINS PAST THE POOR Oft,
rH Wilsoix   <">„<">
E HOtel^      iii'iuBo,
PATRONS ARE WF.I.L TAK IN CAKE OF.
A FIRST-CLAdS BILLIARD ROOBl ON TIIF PPKMIM'.S.
BAR   FI'RMSHF.D WITH THK   BK8T   PRAM'S Q9   \UNFS, I ltiH'18
AND CIGARS.
HKADQU/.KTFRS FOR MINING MIN.
main sTriKirr,  -  -  - si.ocax, ii. c.
THE C. P. R.  HOUSE BOAT.
The new C. P. R. house boat whicb Is
now completed snd ready for occupation
lias been  visited  l.y a large number ol
Nelson people, all of  whom declare it to
be an ideal outing home.   The boat is
completely furnished in every respect.
The  four  state rooms  with their four
double snd four single berths are equipped with everything one would desire in
a bed room at home. In tbe dining room
is al) that a dining room requires, silverware, glassware, etc., and tbe room itself
|s suflii.ently large to accommodate any
party who could travel on the boat.   The
kitchen is complete,  too,  and in fsct,
there is nothing lacking anywhere.   All
of the rooms are carpeted  and the hallway is laid with oilcloth.   Upstairs you
are  in  the open air, with an awing to
shield you from the spn and a hammock
if you would lay down and read and rest.
No more delightful  place,  to spend a
week or two could be imagined, provided,
of course, the boat is anchored in some
one of the   thousand  beauty spots of
Kootenay Lake.   Nowhere, perhaps, In
ail the Dominion of Canada  is  there a
body ol water offering to the man of the
reel and  fly or he of the gun such inducements as are offered anywhere on
Kootenay Lake and nowhere are there
more delightful secluded places than can
.,   ,      . .. ' be found here.   Aud it is  to give vl —
A- <* ?«Atf»?>t, VancouvPr j ^ the o^^ly ot seeing all this,
NOTICE    TO   DELINQUENT
CO-OWNER.
To Jami-.s AKpRMSON, Von sre hereby
notified that we have expended One
Kur.dred Dollars in lalmr and improve
uienta ii|m>ii tlie Oakland Mineral Claim
on Four Mile Creek in the SU-aii Mining
Division, located on the :<0l>. day oi
August 189tt. and recorded at the reconl
otlire of snid Division on the 12th. iiav ol
September 181*0. in order Jo Iml.l aaid
claim under the provisiona of ihe
Mineral Act, being the amount required
to hold ihe aame for the year endiug
Sepiember 12th. 1900. And if within
ninety days irom the date of this notice
you fail or refuse to contribute vour
prnpoilion of such expenditure together
with all coat of advertising, your Interest
in said claim will become the pru|ierty
of the subscribers under Section 4. of
An Act to amend the Mineral Act. 1900.
F. F. J.Il.iiKi in i:.
T. H. WlLSOK
„     .  , W. It. Gordon.
Dated this fifteenth dsy of  September
{HUU.
Fine
laundry Work
Of The
Best
DONE BY
Oa ^yr*&*&9
i*Silverton. B. C.
MLttttw mm mm.
HO. 95. W. F. Of M.
It is nothing
*   but fair
I STAHI.!MIK1I IN NHHiN   "IS'.NI."
Meets every Saturday in the Union i      T.i lit 111)' Sl'ifll!) HP I Oil* \,W,,'
Hall in Silverton, at 7:30 p. m. I
j. u, Roman, I ***** I have just irlornrd IVihu % par*1*
3.c,TytvVe',eM'0U Ifliiisiii? trii> in tlie East   I an
Fin.*,,*.».•„•„„ p|(,ilS(,(!(0[(l,oll knoff ,||al , ,_;|VC
"Five
A RHEUMATIC CURE
THAT CURES.
WE   ARE   THE  AGENTS   FOR
THIS    ALIO FOR
Lilac 0nu, Aixtlfy's Hair Reneirrr,
Canadian Com Cure ami Syrup
of florelioond and Tolu.
KINK WATCH       <
KKl-AIUlNi: A
BPttClAL'H.
Prescription Depsrtment Complete; and
Up ,To   Date
BILVERTON DRUG STORE,
SILVERTON. B. C,
J; G. GORDON,
IH_\ES,ltK,\liKSiAlK,4)
NOTARY PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      „      D> 0
j. m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL ~LAND~   SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN C^TY  B.C.
iflitted tli« v.iy latent iiji-to-dati' goods in nc\vdp.Mgns, surli U never H
fore lieen shown in this country. All goods bought here are gftiuM
A^ quality and j riees an* sur.'i as will compete with Eastern market.
* ""  WHENINNRL80H
I INVITE YOU TO CALL
AND INSPECT M Y STOCK
J«oot> Dover, O W JKffELtt, • UIM, 11
General Full Line Lumber,
Mining Dry & Mixed Sash and
Supplies.        Paints.       j Doors.
MoDonedd'o Livery
3ta"ble.
BAT^^^SS^^f  H?B*"M  FOR   HIRE   AT   RKAH0MBL*
A °hWi^AjL>REIOHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS DONE.
Ca?Hde Pa.H ^' i''lr,n,tHorM"in Overton 	
Can ^ Have Ihem Reserved By WriUng To—    A. P. McDONALD,
 ...  *  + t t * SILVERTON, - • »• C
j  Syrup of Horehound & Tolu
FOR COOGHS AND COLDS.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.silsil.1-0312942/manifest

Comment

Related Items