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The Silvertonian 1900-06-30

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 TIIK SILVEKTON I AN.
SLOCAN'S BEST
KNOWN WEEKLY.
-HFI"   «■■    ,mw
VOLUME THREE.
SILVERTONIAN.
TH
LOC.
E SILVER*^.    {yi/3M
AL MINING NEWS. I" J N
SFBSCRIPTIO ft, ♦2 00|
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,   JUNE   30,   1000.
NUMBER 52
CONSIGNMENTS
OF FRESH
find
RECEIVED
WE   KLYBY
& Co.,
Sil-srertori., 33, C.
T
ooooooooooooooooooooc
ooooooc
A good Blrikeof rich oro is reported on
the Roby claim, near the Bosun.
Tlie Stewart brothers are busily developing tho Noonday anil promiso something inten sting from that property in
the near future,
J. SI. M. Ileneiliiin will shortly begin
work upon tho   Oolden   Wedge,   ono of
the best known prospects In the Slocan
Cily division.
Julius Wolff, from tho Nuw   Denver
Kei'ord Office, was in  town  during the j
week securing nre samples for iho Win-
QipegFalr,   lie sucuei'iled in gathering]
about fifty   pounds of good specimens
from locul cabinets.    These exhibits are j
hound to do somo good.
'lhe tunnel lieing driven on tho Congo
ledge on  Ked Mountain, is proving that
aud case aro still hi Spokane, and u few
additional samples ure all thut is needed.
Tho exhibit last year was supposed to
have won some medals, although no ono
here has yet seen thorn.
ALL CAUGHT NOW—BANKERS AND
SWINDLERS.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
Silverton
C':HUIS   HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE    BAR. I.S   SUPPLIED   WITH   BEST   BRANDS    OF
WINKS,   LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
L.  2v£-   _KZrLO-^7-les.   Prop.
A little over two years ngo, a slick confidence man got his work in un u Calgary
banker, beguiling him to Revelstoke,
and selling him a brass brick for its
weight in gold. And all the world wondered and American papers called the
Canadian bankers "easy gair.e." Now
comes a report from Nebraska showing
thu'this sumo swindler, to judge from
bis methods, can work even tho shrewd
Yankee.    The despatch runs:
"Hasting, Neb., June lS.-Willlam Ker
president of the Adams County Bunk, of
Hustings, has received word from the
Denver mint thai a 'gold' brick he bad
purchased from a stranger from leaven-
north, Kansas, a few days ago for |13,
000, is made ol copper. The brick was
transferred to Kerr by a man who represented himself to bo an old mining partner in (••'lifornia of Albeit Kerr, a cousin
of the hank president. .Mr. Kerr on June
3, accu u| tilled Ihe stranger to Leaven-
worth, where the brlek held by an Indian
companion of "the miner" was drilled.
The nam nie which Kerr had assayed in
Kansas City, was found to run $20 to tbe
ounce. Kerr returned to Leavenworth.
drew on his bank Ior $13.(100 and been me
. , | possessed of the brick, whirl', he sent to
shipments trom this mine will bo  bus-  the First National bank at Denver.
property to bo ono of the best gold-
copper propositions In this camp. The
tunnel is being driven directly on the
ledge and a fine body of copper ore is
exposed.
This week Silverton's ore shipments
were increased by 40 tons, tho Wuke-
IHd sending out that amount to the
Trail Smelter. Owing to the washout oi
tho road between  town and  iheir mill
ponded for a few duys.
PACKING ORE FROM THE HEWETT
*
9
&
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL STORKS AT
Another shipment ol oro is being
brought do'vn from the Hewett mine to
be sent ofi to Iho smeller. This time
two ciHoads are being brought down
and twenty one pack mules are engaged
in the undertaking, about three tons be- |
ing brought down nt a liip. Tbis ore isj""r8ln>! .
of high grade and should net tho oivd»™ • 0ul ''" "i,!-''"'''
In the despatches of yesterday's papers
lhe arrest Is chronicled of three would-be
Hold brick swindlers. To judge from
tho description given, the Calgary
banker will be avenged.
A NOVEL   IDEA.
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir. Kaslo, Sandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND 0ARB1TLLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD   OFFICE NELSON, II. C.
9
*\*>W
t
<?
Are You Looking For
Siylish goods?
THAT is UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OE BIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE VOUB   SELECTION PROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED,   OV EKCOATINOS JUST IN.
The Tailor:   Silverton. II. C.
<J
over $2000 to lhe car.
FOUR MILE ROAD DAMAGED,
Saturday night's storm did considerable damage to tho Four Mile wagon
road, washing out about sixty feet of
crib-work about half a mile below lhe
Wakefield concentrator, and taking out
about 100 feet of the road bed. A force
of men are now at work under charge of
T Ardiel repairing the damage, whicli
will cost in the neighborhood of $300.
As a result of the road going out the
shipping of concentrates from the
Wakefield mill is temporarily suspended.
<o
fff
0 a*
Bl
• ft
<P
• 0
• »
i?
ef
fit
s
a
>
n
Stetson Hat
is as good as a nugget.
They're worn  all  over the
world by men who work mostly      ^ %
out-of-doors, because they are
durable and protective.
Our stock of  this   famous
brand is now complete.
, We have many styles, made
up in several grades and colors,
from which you can choose.
*)
b
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, June 28.—Bar Silver, liO.V'
Lake copper,   tflfi 25.
Lead--Tlie firm that fixes the selling
price for miners and sin-Iters quotes lead
at |3.60 at the close.
SLOCAN LAKE OUE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments   of  oro   fr.mi Silverton foi
tin- year 1899, totaled 1608 Tons.
All other Lake points 1389     "
The shipment   ol   oro   from   Slocan
Lake points,  up  to and  including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing. Tons.
Bono 440
From New Deliver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
From Bilverton Tons
Emilv Edith 20
Hewett 80
Vancouver   20
Wakefield, (concentrates! 380
Galena Mines         20
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise (12U
From Slocan City
Arlington     300
Black Prince    80
Kilo 20
Mrs Kgerton, nn English ladv, who did
work in Dawson City, carried
idea   in   London    which
[greatly  gratified   the  C.P.R.   people.
' Mis.   Kgerton had been much struck by
i the scenery ulong the line of the C. P, H
i as  well   as   with  the service which the
, company rendered across the Continent,
and   she   determined   to let tbe folk in
'England  know  Something  about both.
For this purpose she availed herself of a
fancy  hall at Covent Garden, to appear
;iua   costume  which took Ihe first pri/.e
■ for  originality   and   which    illustrated
i Canadian scenery and Ihe   C. P. E. in a
highly striking manner.   The lady's but
was   trimmed   in a manner to show the
C.  P.   R. trains in motion ; her cape sO
forth  Lako Ontario, Lake Supei ior nnd
the Rocky Mountains, while the front  of
her dress showed  a train rushing at full
speed  through lhe wonderful ravines in
the far Northwest.    In the lady's hand
was a banner which, contained the  coats
of  arms  of   the several Provinces con
stituting the  Domini' n.   Tho  tout ensemble,  as the London press remarked
at   the   tiiu.1,   was wonderfully stiiking
and  impressive  and gave ut a glance sn
idea   of  u country of which Londoners,
previous to the jubilee, knew very little.
Mrs. Egeiton, as Mr. Baker Ibe C. P. R
agent   in   London,   pointed out, did all
this   'off her own   hat,'and solely with
Ihe   patriotic   view   of   making Canfl.a
known.   The lady is coming out »
proibly   this   summer,   when   she    .,il
uvike au extended tour of the country
Photographs   of   Mrs.   Kgerton   in   her
unique  costume  are  at    the
ollices of the C. P. It.
OOOC_000000000(X_K>0000000000
8     THE LOCAL LAVOIT.      §
ooooooaooooooooooooooooooo
GotoR. G. Duigle's for fresh fruils
and confectionery,  Noar  Postoflice. *
it Is feared that Thursdays hail storm
will min tho orange crop in tills vicinity.
Douglas Anderson who has been
working ut the Wakefield mine left for
Sandon on ThuinJuy.
Silverton needs somo moro dwelling
houses. Thero is not even an empty
shack in town at present.
Tho shortness of tho iron market is
delaying tbe anivnl of the pipes for the
Bilverton waterwork system.
Silverton housekeepers will find something of interoil in J. I. Mcintosh's advertisement, in another column.
Owing to lack of space, tie list of
prize winners ut the Public School has
to be held over for our next issue.
Mrs Wm. Brandon gave a tea on
Tin'" "iv afternoon in honor of .Mrs. J.
M.. Benedum and Master Richard E.
Benedum.
J. McRobbie, who is one of Silverton's
old lime , left during the week for the
Red I cr country in Alberta to look up
a lOc.i'.i'  ' ior a cattle ranch.
David L'remner, .it c.io lime managor
of the Wakefield Mines here, who has
been spending some time in Scotland,
returned to tow n last week.
Government Agent J. A Turner, of
NelBon, speul part of Ibe week here
investigating tho damago done to the
Four Mile roud by the recent storms.
That tho C.P.R, has faith in the
growth of Silverton as a shipping point
is shown by the amount of work they
are having   done about their dock here.
S. C. McClure, until a short time ago
foreman at the Galena Mines here, is in
charge of the Wutseca Mine, near Rochester, Montana, He is employing 00
men,
Jas Otto left on the 19th inst. for the
Lardeau, where be iB interested in some
valuable mining property. Ua will do
development work on these this summer.
Jabob Dover, lhe well known Nelson
Jeweler, who has just returned from tha
East, has something to say to our read-
Whito in the Tournament will 'ie; Goal,
Jackson; Backs, Malloy and McLaughlin
IluIIbacks, Watson, Bowes and McNaught; Forwards, Walker, McNichola,
Jack, Findlay and Matheson.
SPECIAL TRAIN SERVICE
For the convenience of those who desire to aMend the Blocan Celebiation on
Monday next the 0, P. R. will operate
tho following special service on the N k
S Branch and Slocan Lake:
(1:45 Iv 13:35 lv Sandon ar 13:10 ar 22:20
7:15 14:05 Three Forks 12:40 21:59
7:20 14:10 Alamo 12:86 21:46
7:40 14:30 Denver Canyon 12:15 21:26
7:55arl4!45ar Rosebery Iv 12:  lv 21:06
Ou Slocan Lake.
8: lv 14:55 lv Rosebery ar 11:50ar21:rn
8:20 15:15 New Denver 11:30 20:40
H: 15 15:40 SILVERTON 11:00 20:16
0.10 10:10 Enterprise 10:35 10:46
I): 50 ar 10.55 ar Slocan lv 10:00 lv 10:00
In addition to this tbo evening train
for Nelson will be held at Slocan until
18; 30.
en.
pag<
See  his   advtitisement   on back
of | _/'
town
general
CANADIAN  BORN.
A SLOCAN LAKE  EXHIBIT
W. A. Coplen, of Spokane, formerly of
Slocan, was in town lust Sunday drum- I
ming up an interest in the forthcoming
mineral exhibit nt the Spokane Industrial Exposition, stales that this year the
exhibit will be kept, in prominence by
the management. He thinks it desirable
that the Slocan bo well represented a-
mong Iho exhibiting camps, and proposes that Slocun and Silverton should
combine their samples bbu "Slocan Lake
Exhibit," which will make a bolter display at a small expense. If Mr. Coplen,
who is on the ground could be induced
tn take charge of the exhibit, the
would doubtless he of value. To do any |
good, un energetic man must be in
Charge,   Silvorton's lust year's exhibit'
Wo first, saw light in Canada the land
beloved of God.
Wo are the pulse of Canada, ils marrow and  its   blood.
And we, lhe men of Canada, can face
the world and brag,
That we were born in Canada, beneath
tho Biitish Hag.
Few of us have the blood of kings,  few
tire of courtly birth.
But   few   aro   vagabonds   or   rogues of
doubtful name and worth.
And  all   have    our   credentials   that
entitle us to brag
For we wore  born  in Canada,  beneath
the  British   Hug.
We've yet to  make onr money, we've
yet to mako our fame,
But   we   havo   gold   and   glory   in our
clean colonial   name;
And  every  man's a millionaiic if only
ho can hnig,
That   ho   was   horn in Canada beueatb
tbe British Flag.
No  title and   no
proudly worn.
As   that   which   we
Canadian born,
We count no man so noble as tbe ine
who n akee the brag
That   he   wiih   born in Canada beneath
the British Flag.
The Dutch may have bis Holland,
tlie Spaniard have his Spain,
The Yankee to the south of us must
south of us remain ;
result i ji-or not tt lnan ,irtri. lift a hand agatnet
the men who brag
riintlhoy were born in Canada beneath
the British   Flag.
—E. Pauline Johnson
as
coronet   is   half
inherited us men
Moon . of Kaslo, Superintendent
. ment roads und traiis was iu
day ascertaining what was
nei-ilcv iu is camp this summer iu the
line of roads.
Last Tuesday, Sam Watson returned
from Phoenix and will do some work on
his claims here belore returning Boun-
darywardfl He reports business dull in
the Boundary',
All   work   in the Jewelry Kepairiig
line, left at the Silverton Drugstore, will
be promptly forwarded  to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler.    All re
pairs are uu.uianteei. rOB one ykar. *
The ladies of the Silvertou Church
gave a very pleasant und successful
Strawberry and Ice Cream Festival iu
the Chun h last night, The inside of the
building had been tastefully decorated
and the program given was first-class.
In Nelson, next Monday, the Nelson
Football Ttam, which has beaten no
0''.°, wiil | lay wi'-h the Kaslo team,
\\ hich was l u it Ml by Silverion, for "the
Championship ol the Kootenays." The
let. m thai would bear the title a champions have Silverton to reckon with und
they must bring their kicking boots a-
long.
R. M. Spencer, of Georgetown, Colo.,
with his wile and family, bus taken up
bis residence here. Mr. Spencer was a
partner at one time of Jack Thompson,
the popular proprietor of The Thistle,
Uj Is accompanied here by E, Patriquln
■ind hia bride, who were married in Col-
orud" on the day ol their departure for
Silverion.
WILL BE HERE   SAIURDAY.
Next Saturday evening Miss Lottie L
Tillotson, of St. Paul, Minn., will give
an elocutionary entertainment in Mc-
Kinnon's Hall. Miss Tillotson comes te
us wilh recommendations from all the
large cities of the United States and Canada, and all who enjoy good elocution
should attend the entertainment. She
wilt be assisted throughout the evening
by heal musicians. The price of admission has been placed at 60 cents, which
will bring the tickets within the reach
of all.
BAGGED THE LOT.
Jack Carlin who has been doing aa
assessment work up near the Wakefield
MineH. started down for town last Wednesday and when just about down off
the bill and within a short distance of
the concentrator he was jumped by three
hears, an old one and two halt grown
cubs. Jack did not stop to srgue the
question but lit out for the mill where
he arrived out of wind, with blood in his
eye and lookiug for a gun. After seeming a rifle and 6ome cartridges from
one of the boys at the mill ho started
hack up the hill looking for the bruin
family. He bad uot gone far before he
met the hears and then there waa
trouble in that family, wilh the result
(hat there are noiv three new bear hides
io town and bear meat is a drug on the
maiket.
TOO TRUE.
Pants are made for men and not men
for pai.ts; women are made f >r men and
uot for pants. When a man pants for a
woman and a woman pants lor a man,
they are a pair of pants. Mistakes are
often made in such pants. Such mistakes are called "Breeches of Promise"
Pants are like molasfes, Ihey are thicker
In winter and thinner io summer, Men
get ou a tear in their pants and it is ull
right; but when the pants got on a tear
it is all wrong. There has been much
discussion as to whether pants is stngiilur
or plural. Seems when men wear pants
they are plural, and when they don't
wear any ihey are singular. Don't lie
singular, try Leihscher the Tailor,
WILL CELEBRATE DOMINION DAY.
Silveiton will be well represented at
tho Nelson und Slocan Dominion Day
Celebrations, although the bulk of the
crowd will be found in Slocan. The
special train service, n timetable of which
will ue found in another column, has
boei. Well arranged, the lato train to
Vison being especially convenient for
■.'.oso who wish to appear at both cele-
biations.
Silverton's Football Ciub, which has
had a succession of victories this season,
will participate in the Slocan Tournament, ii which it is expected to carry off
the hoi 'f The team will he a strong
one an ii any event will require lots of
beating, ii the Caledonian events C.
McLaughlin ol Bilverton is relied upon
to uphold the honor ol Silverton.
The players who wear the Red-atid-
SILVERTON PUBLIC SCHOOL.
The  standing   ot the pupils for the
month of Mav is as follows:
V Reader.
IV Reader.
Ill Reader.
II Reader.
II Primer.
I Primer.
Chart Class
1, Alice Calbick,
2, Addie Ho rton.
:!. Inez Calbick,
1. Fay Elliott,
2. Janet Barclay.
3. Mamie McDonald
1. Maggie Barclay
2. Htirry Wheeler
3. Patrick Kelly,
1. Hairy Carey
1. George Horton
2. Annie Kelly and
Bertha Barkor, even.
3. Jennie Barclay
Eve|yn Horton
Willie While.
Mary Hyland.
Jiminio Hyland and
Eddie Kelly, even.
May Qkhtropi Duncan.
Teacher.
m
.
I NEW GOVERNOR
Distinguished Career of Sir Henri Joly
de Lotbiniere.
Hon. Sir Henri Gustave Joly de
Lotbiniere is the eldest son ot the
late Gaspard Pierre Gustave Joly,
a Huguenot native of France, who
became Seigneur de Lotbiniere by
his marriage with Julie Christine
Chartier de Lotbinier, granddaughter of the last Marquis de Lotbiniere, engineer in chief of New
France. Born in France on December 5, 1829, he was educated at
the Keller school, Paris, in company with the hue Monsieur Wad-
dington, the French minister. Coming to Canada, he devoted himself
to the study of law and was called
to the Quebec bar in 1855. He
practiced his profession in the city
and district of Quebec and was created a Q. C. in 1878.
A Liberal politically, he was returned in that interest to the Canadian assembly at the general elections of 1861 as the representative
of the county of Lotbiniere. He
took a prominent part in the debates on the confederation of the
provinces, 1865-6, joining Messrs.
Doriori, Holton, Huntington and
other Liberal leaders from Lower
Canada in opposition to that measure. In the first election for the
United Provinces he was returned
to the house of commons and the
provincial assembly. He remained
a member of both until 1874, when
at the abolition of dual representation he elected to remain in the local legislature. He led the opposition in the assembly against the De
Bouchervillegovernment until March
1878, when on the dismissal of his
ministers by Lieutenant-Governor
Letellier, he was called lo the premiership.
While at the head of the government, he initiated and carried out a
vigorous policy of retrenchment as
well as of political purity. The salaries of ministers and the indemnity
of members of the legislature were
reduced. An effort was made to
abolish the legislative council and
all unnecessary outlays were cut off.
Defeated in the house in 1879, he
resigned and from that time up to
1883 was again the leader of the
opposition. In 1885 he retired from
public life in consequence of his disapproval of the course of the Liberal party on the Riel question.
He reappeared on the surface
June 1893, as a delegate to the reform convention at Ottawa,of which
he was elected vice-chairman. In
February 1894 he undertook a mission of peace and goodwill to the
province of Ontario to dispel the
prejudice existing there against the
province of Quebec and to bring
about a better feeling between the
two provinces. In February 1895,
in response to a general call from
his party, he agreed to return to
public life and from that time took
an active part in the agitation which
led to Sir Wilfrid Laurier's success
at the polls in 1896. During the
contest he was returned to the
house of commons for Portneuf.
On the formation of the new administration at Ottawa, he became
controller of inland revenue and became a -privy councillor with the
title of minister of inland revenue
on June 30, 1897. He is an honorary D. C. L. of Lennoxville university, an L. L. D. of Queen's university and in. acknowledgment of
his public services received the K.
C. M. G. from Her Majesty in May
1895. He declined a seat in the
senate in 1874 aiu' again in 1877.
In the latter year he also declined a
seat with the oflice of minister of
agriculture, in the Mackenzie administration.
Sir Henri is known all over the
continent for his interest in agriculture, horticulture and forestry, having written and spoken frequently
on those subjects. In 1893 tie was
entrusted with the preparation of
the provincial forestry exhibits sent
to the Chicago world's fair, and
throughout the Mercier regime he
assisted in the administration of the
department of agriculture.
During the existence of   the   Imperial Federation  league   he   gave
the scheme his entire support, and
Ije is now as warmly inclined towards the British Empire league.
He is also connected with the
United Empire Loyalist association.
In religious belief he is a member
of the Church of England and has
served as a delegate to the dioceas-
an and provincial synods of the
church.
In 1888 he was authorized by the
Quebec legislature to add De Lotbiniere, his mother's name, to that
of Joly. He married in 1856 Mar-
garetta Josepha, daughter of the
late Hammond Gowen of Quebec.
Their eldest son, Edmond, is a
lawyer; the second, Alain, is a captain in the Royal Engineers, and
the third, Henri Gustave, a lieutenant in that corps, both the two latter having graduated from the
Royal military college at Kingston
and being now in service in India.
—From Canadian Men and Women
of the Time.
Sir Henri has a beautiful country
residence at Pointe Platon on the
St. Lawrence river, a few miles
from Quebec on the opposite bank.
PEASANTS SLAIN
Sanguinary Conflict with Insurgents
in Bulgaria.
PEARFt L  KAILW.tl   ACCIDENT
All  Vaafmaera Killed Except TIiom
ob sleeping Car.
Atlanta, Ga., June 25—A passenger train on the Macon branch of
the Southern railway ran into washouts 100 feet long and was completely wrecked. Every person on
the train except the occupants of the
Pullman car perished. Thirty-five
people in all were killed.
President Kruger evidently has
an eye to the safe side of a proposition. He is now paying bills
with printed I. O. U.s and holding
to his gold.—Seattle Times.
DIED FROM A FIT
Tragic Death of John James, a Record
Newsboy, in the Pond.
John James, a newsboy who was
well known to subscribers for the
Record from his selling the paper on
the street, met death in the pond on
Trail creek at the west end of the
city yesterday morning.
The boy, who would have been 15
years, 10 months old had he lived
till tomorrow, is subject to epileptic
fits and was sitting on a raft on the
pond about 12:30 p. m. watching a
number of other boys bathing when
a fit sized him and he fell into the
water. He must have died instantly
for he never rose again and not a
bubble came from the place where
he sank.
The other boys seem to have
thought he had dived, but after ten
minutes had elapsed without his
coming to the surface, several of
them dived after him, but without
success. Finally John McKay, a
youug Cornish miner who works in
the Le Roi, dived after the body and
brought it to the surface after it had
been under water 45 minutes. There
was very little water in the lungs,
which is an evidence that death
must have occurred almost immediately after he struck the water and
not from drowning. The body was
taken to the boy's home on Davis
street.
The boy was a son of Thomas
H. James, a miner at the War
Eagle. His brother, Thomas James
also a Recoko newsboy, had broken
his arm ut the circus only last
Wednesday.
The funeral services will take
place at St. George's church of England at ten o'clock tomorrow
morning. The newsboy's union,
among whom the dead boy was a
favorite, has asked to be allowed to
share the funeral expenses and will
attend the services in a body. The
boy was held in high regard by all
connected with the Rbiokd, and
they mourn his untimely fate.
Sofia, Bulgaria, Jiine aa.—It
transpires that 90 persons were
killed and 312 wounded in the recent conflict between the troops and
peasants in the Varna districts.
A state of siege has been proclaimed in the districts of Varna,
Sliumla, Tirnova, Rustchuk and
Ristovatz. '
The government is anxious to
limit the number of newspapers,and
has issued stringent regulations as
to the qualifications which must be
possessed by editors.
THE   NOMINATIONS.
The Boers have quit their laagers
and are now grouped around a
water tank at a railway siding
where Kruger's capital car is.—
Toronto Star.
It i.s rarely that the nomination
for both president and vice-president
has been made by acclamation '>y
either of the great parties of the
United States. The fact that this
has been the case with President
McKinley and Governor Roosevelt is
the strongest testimony to the hold
they have gained on the mass of the
Republican party. It also proves
the supremacy of the "man on horse
back" over men's minds, even in a
nation commonly, but erroneously,
supposed to be totally absorbed in
the Sordid occupation of money-
grubbing. The renomination of
President McKinley and the nomination of .Governor Roosevelt are
the direct outcome of the Spanish
war. It proves that the American
people can be dazzled by military
glory as much as the subjects of 1
European monarch.
But it proves more than this.
Taken in connection with the platform declarations on the results of
the war, the extension of foreign
trade and the protection of American rights abroad, this event means
thut the United States have at last
come out of their national isolation
and determined to take an active
part in the affairs of the family of
civilized nations. America realizes
at last that a nation, no more than
an individual, can live for itself
alone. The logic of events hasforced
the United States into a position
where she must share the benefits
of membership in the family of nations, through her interests in the
Phillip.nes, Hawaii and Samoa, and
her trade rights in China. These
benefits carry with them international obligations, which cannot be
shirked.
The brief declaration on the subject of President McKinley's tender
of his good offices to aid in ending
the South African war proves this
last assertion. Party conventions
in the United States have heretofore treated foreign nations in a
mannerentirely irresponsible, and the
mere statement that offensive words
or acts were only for campaign purposes was considered ample excuse.
The South African war would have
been considered sixteen or twenty
years ago an opportunity for a positive carnival of ta'l-twisting by the
conventions of both parties. President McKinley has had positive evidence of British friendship which he
cannot ignore. The American people
know this so well that they must be
considering the necessity of revising
their school histories. Mr. McKinley did his utmost as a (rend of both
parties to the South African war, in
order to reconcile them, and having
failed, he could do no more. The
convention approves his conduct
and does not pour forth any verbal
froth" on the merits of the questions
which led to the war.
President McKinley's friends justly
claim credit for a large share of the
renewed confidence and prosperity
which have signalized his first term
of office. The settlement of the
silver and tariff questions no
Joubt had much to do with this revival, though it was certainly due in
a considerable degree to causes
common to the whole commercial
world and not peculiar to the
United States.
population now being taken is incomplete and are making vigorous
efforts to secure a complete count.
The practice in the United States
does not compare for system and
thoroughness with that followed in
Great Britain. The Americans
make it drag along through three
weeks and count people who are
temporarily absent from home.
Thus people who die and babies
born while the count is in progress
are liable to bl counted or omitted,
and many persons are liable to be
cou ted twice.
The British practice is to make
the census as nearly as possible exact as to the number of persons in
each town at noon on a certain
day. The enumerator- makes the
round of his district beforehand,
leaves a blank census paper at each
house with exact instructions to the
head of the household to fill in the
names of all persons residing there
at noon on census day. A person
who dies one minute before noon is
omitted; a baby born one minute
before noon is counted. A person
who dies one minute after noon is
counted, but a baby born at the
same instant is omitted. In the.
course of the next tew days the
enumerator makes another round,
corrects errors, fills in papers where
the matter has been negated and
gathers up all returns. In this manner, duplications are avoided, as
well as any other errors.
TAKING THE CENSUS.
The large cities of Washington
complain that the census  of  their
The crisis in China has now
reached a point where a peaceful
solution of the difficulties is no
longer possible. The all-absorbing
question in the United States at
this time is, what part will this
country take ;n the affair? If the
United States keeps out of it altogether, she will lose her commercial
interests, and if she joins with the
other powers she must inevitably
take part in the division of the
spoils.—Spokane Chronicle.
SWEPT BY FLAMES
Bombardment of Tien Tsin Starts the
Fire Which Destroys the Town.
New York, June 25 —The Chi-
nesn bombardment of Tien Tsin set
fire to the mission buildings first,
says the Chefoo correspondent of
the Journal and Advertiser. It
spread to the native citv and destroyed everything. The attacking
force, well supplied with modern
artillery, has been pressing the
small allied forces very hard. Already the dead number 160. Relief is heing rushed from Taku,
but the column will have to fight
its way through the big Chinese
army.
All Foreign minlMer* safe.
London, June 35.—The French
consul general at Shanghai has
been informed by Chinese ministers
that all foreign ministers and foreigners at Pekin were safe last
Thursday and preparing to leave
with the authority of the Chinese
goverment.
Admiral Bruro'i Heport.
London, June 25.—The admiral-
ity has received the following dispatch from Rear Admiral Bruce,
dated Taku via Chefoo, June 24:
"The total force which left Tien
Tsin with the commander-in-chief
ior Pekin was about 2000, composed of detachments from the allied
ships. No action could possibly
be taken to relieve the commander-
in-chief, because it was only known
that he* was cut off by Tien Tsin
being invested.
"Tien Tsin has been fighting for
its life ever since. It was on receipt of imfoi■mation that the Chinese army had ordered trains for
attacking Tien Tsin and that they
were ravaging Tonku and reinforcing Taku, as well as mining the
mouth of the Peiho, that it wns
promr 'y determined to seize Taku.
Since then every effott has been
made to relieve Tien Tsin.
"I have commandeered a small
coasting steamer for taking troops
and sick wounded across the bay to
Wei Hai Wei, where I intend making a temporary base hospital and
asylum for refugees."
ORIGIN OF BOXERS
They Are to China What Know-
nothings Were in America.
The "Boxers" society i.s a secret
org nization, supposedly encouraged by the ruling Chinese dynasty,
and has fo its principal object the
driving of all foreigners out of the
empire. There is some reason for
believing that certain foreign powers are secretly abetting the disturbance in the 'ope that pretext
for a conflict with he empire may
be afforded and uniur that thin excuse dismemberment be hastened.
The Chinese race has _«ti antiquity
of at least 6000 years.
Itllulalcr Wii*iExplanation.
Wu Ting Fang, the Chinese minister at Washington, was asked:
"What i.s the meaning of the
term 'Boxers' in Chinese, or what
is its derivative analysis?"
He replied:
"I have seen from Chinese papers
that the local word applied to the
people that your papers call the
'Boxers' is 'Yee-ho-chunn.' 'Vee'
means 'righteousness,' 'Ho' means
'harmony,' 'Chuan' means 'fists.'
'Yee-ho-chuan' would therefore involve the righteous idea of promoting harmony by the fists, the righteousness resulting from the harmony, with the fists as an incidental
means to a good end. The term
undoubtedly arose in connection
with athletic sports and teachers of
the art of boxin» or defense by the
fists."
Derivation ol' the Name
The Caucasian may be inclined to
sneer at the simplicity of this definition, but it is not to be lorgolten
that as a matter of indisputable history the word ''righteousness" and
the word "right" have a foundation
in the Chinese vocabulary more solid
than rock. Anyone who has intimate and honest business relations
with Chinamen in this country
knows that. A Chinaman in this
country who has not yet learned the
worst features of American or English or German commercialism in
his dealings with his white brothers
invariably starts out with the query,
"What is right?" He puts it in his
own way.but that is what he means,
and he never betrays until he has
been betrayed.
MINING  INVESTMENTS.
With the substitution of a government of responsible men for the
scratch cabinet headed by the demagogue Joe Martin, and with the
succession of the veteran statesman
Sir Henri Joly to Mr. Mclnnes as
lieutenant-governor, the people of
British Columbia can reasonably
look forward to a change of conditions for the better in the near future. So long as the South African
war was in its critical stages, there
was little hope of interesting capital
in the province, even if the local
conditions had been favorable. It
is therefore as well that, if the people had to perform the unpleasant
task of killing off a Martin government, the necessity should have
arisen at such a time. But now
that Mr. Martin is disposed of and
the Boer war i.s in its last stages,
we may reasonably hope for an un-
loosing of the money bags for good
investments such as this province
has to offer, unless the Chinese
crisis should become more serious
and lead to foreign complications
and a European war. It is probable however that the very fact that
all the greatest European powers
are so deeply interested in the fate
of China will induce them to prefer
a compromise of their conflicting
claims to the dread alternative of a
general war. The Berlin treaty of
1878 was a compromise of equally
conflicting interests fraught with
equal danger and we may fairly
hope that thelChinese question will
be met in as reasonable a spirit as
was the Turkish question.
The time is ripe to make a fresh
start in procuring Hritish and Fast
ern capital for development of Brit-
Uh Columbia's virgin wealth. It is
timely to study and profit by the
errorsMf the past that they maybe
avoided in the future.    One |
which has surely been learned th
oughly by this time is the felly
incorporating companies with I
assessable stock   on the  preteC
that it is the means of develop1
prospects into mines.     The m-
which have been   developed to
paying basis by this means are
few and far apart that   they Co'
easily b* marked individually on
map of th» North  American com
nent.     Thiv  are  the except,0t
which prove ihe rule, viz: that suc
an undertaking requires large cap
tai at the outset, combined with i|
highest skill and integrity j0 ma(
agement.    If the capital eottita.
driblets, the cost   of developmeo
will be increased   and   work m,
have to be  suspended  for lack 0
funds, just when the enterprise is w
the eve of success.
But the small capitalist, tempted
by the few great successes |n „g
ing, is determined to take hi,
chances and, though the risks an
greater in proportion to the small.
ness of his investment, there is 1
way for him to at least "get a shin
for his money." This is by invest-
ing in the stocks of c 'mpaniesnan.
aged by men of proved ability and
integrity in the mining business,
The investor cannot afford, it he i,
competent, to personally investigate
the property or to hire a mining engineer to do it for him. But he cm
judge men and he can judge whether
the company is organized on a basii
and managed in a manner whkt
gives reasonable ground of hope k<
its success. His judgment of met
will enable him to decide whether
the men in charge of a company art
safe leaders for him to follow.
As to the organization and management of a company, he cu
judge by a few leading principles.
Its stock should be assessable, with
the assessments so limited it
amount and frequency as to ensure
the small holder against being froi-
en out. The cost of developing the
property to a paying basis ought 10
be estimated, as far as possible, ty
a competent engineer, with ample
allowance for unforeseen contingencies, and the amount sf stock placed
in the treasury should be sufliwnt
to provide at least the amount
this estimate. The promoters' stort
should be pooled, or locked up il
such a manner that no possible »i/
will be left open for its sale to breit
the market for treasury stock. The
commission allowed brokers on tbe
sale ot treasuty stock ought to bt
kept down to a fair rate and know
to every purchaser. There art instances in this town where 50 p*
cent on the sale of treasury stock
has been demanded by brokers, and
deals have fallen through because it
was refused. Such commission it
robbery of every shareholder in tin
company.
There are any number of met
who will grab greedily at a glitW'
ing bait and disregard all these precautions. The chances are 999,9?*
in a million that they are playing •
bunko game Irom the outside a*
will have nothing to show for the*
monev except their experience at*
a nicely engraved stock certifafl
They deserve to lose their montl
and can claim no sympathy, "j
only Arthur Orton wrote:
"Some men has money and n»
brains an' some has brains an' «•'
money. Them as has money*11
no brains was made for them as h*
brains an' no money."
Arthur Orton knew more about
truth than grammar.
"Skin the Goat" and Mutlelt, *
Invincibles who were rejected "j
immigrants to the United Stal«M
have become an issue in the pt(*\
dential election. Their return "j
quoted as evidence of the chat*1 J
heard on all sides that thc prese^j
administration was controlled a«|
dominated by England and Fng
influences.
The prediction that the niiietwnl'
century would wind up with a'•"''
nival of carnage is in a fair wayw
be fulfilled. We have the Boer »'<"'
the Chinese war, the Ashariti <*
bellion and a revolution or tw" j
South America.
The Chinese war has outfla"
the Boer war in its claims on t
lie interest.
nvA
mM NEEDS MORE TIME
Re-election of Ministers Will Delay
Legislature.
Special to the  Record.
Victoria, June 22—Premier Dunsmuir has completed his cabinet,
presenting to the lieutenant-governor the names of J. D. Prentice as
provincial secretary and minister of
education; W. C. Wells, commissioner of lands and works, and
Kit-hard McBride, minister of mines,
ihe new ministers at once took the
oath of office, and were sworn in,
and assumed charge of their departments.
Writs for bye-elections in Victoria
city and South Victoria, to provide
for the re-election of Turner and
Eberts, were at once issued and
signed by his honor. These elections will be held on July *, Bye-
elections for the return of the other
members of the cabinet will be set
for a later date.
A meeting of the executive will be
held to day, when it may be arranged that the house will be prorogued
to a later date than July 5, in order
to arrange for the re-election of all
ministers previous to the opening of
the session, the brief interval rendering this step necessary.
Mr  Heart Joll   Start*    We»t   Monday
Ottawa, June 22.—Sir Henri Joli
will probably leave for British Columbia on Monday.
MH    WOHTHY   OK    THK   NATION
tauaiR 1 r uh Uui ol American Paaitlou
at Pari* Kxpo*ltiou.
By Aaaociated Fttm.
New Vork, June 22.—The Paris
correspondent of the Tribune says:
"This is the sixty-seventh day
since the exposition was opened and
the patriotic Americans have so far
refrained from caustic criticism of
their national pavilion in hope that
something would be placed in it to
put it on an evenfooting with other
countries.
"But after President Loubet's
visit today, it is impossible to conceal the fact that, in the opinion ol
ninety-nine out ot a hundred Americans who have seen it, the United
States pavilion, as far as its contents are concerned, is unworthy of
America, and causes unpleasant impressions when compared with the
lierman pavilion."
years secretary of the Roval Yacht
squadron, has stepped' into the
breach, and though she has not
gone   so   far   as,o   tie|i bI.c
speeches  for  "Capt. Jack," as he
•s familiarly designated, she appea.s
on the Conservative platforms and
with silent eloquence appeals for
her absent husband.
Not only is she using her influence at public meetings and canvassing the electorate, but her pen
has been employed in her husband's
behalf. By post a few days ago the
electors received the following letter in her handwriting:
"My husband is away on active
service in South Africa," she wrote,
"and cannot personally ask for your
vote at this election. I know how-
very much he would appreciate the
honor of being selected by his
friends and neighbors as membei
for the Isle of Wight, and you will
realize how anxious 1 am for his
success. May I hope that you will
make every effort to come and vote
for him on Wednesday next?"
A telegram from Mr. Chamberlain was read at a meeting in support of Captain Seely's candidature
at Newport.
"Best wishes for the success of
the Unionist candidate now at the
front," Mr. Chamberlain wrote.
"His return to parliament will encourage the government in the determination that the loss and sacrifice of the war shall not be thrown
away."
TO   HI LK TILL JOLY AHHIVI.S
tiller Janice .tlrt'oll  Adiululktrator-
»li luura Uolua to Taeonia.
Soccial to :tic Record.
Victoria, June 23.—Hon. Henri
Joly leaves for here Monday, Chief
Justice McCole to act as administrator until he arrives.
R. E. Gosnell has been appointed
private secretary to the premier.
It is reported on good authority
that GOV. Mclnnes is going to Tacoma for a time.
THE CHOICE MADE
McKinley and Roosevelt Nominated by
the Republicans.
Ke*eti ot Tin ra Writ *• lira Hi.
New Vork, June 52.—The sudden
death of Count Muravieff is a startling incident, which has an important bearing upon the China question and the Russian policy, says
the London correspondent of the
Tribune. He was the most pacific
minister of foreign affairs Russia
had known during recent years, and
exercised a restraining influence
over the ambitious genetals.
Koeh ran fare Malaria
Berlin, June 22—Dr. Koch, reporting from German New Guinea,
under date ol April 28, regarding
his investigations respecting the
origin and cure of malaria, says:
"We have already established be^
yond doubt that by prophylactic and
subsequent treatment with quinine,
even the worst infected districts
can be cleared of malarial infection."
A   I NIQIK   KLKtTION
Ida of Wight Candidate In Amra,Hla
Wife right* at Home.
"Hamlet" without Hamlet would
be easy compared with fighting
such a constituency as the Isle of
Wight with a candidate 7000 miles
away.
Captain John Seely is occupying
this unique position, says the Daily
Mail. He is at the front fighting
the Boers, while his friends at home
are fighting for him in the political
arena. He has been chosen by the
Conservative party as the figurehead for the fight. Telegrams
which have been sent to him by his
family to announce his selection and
seek his views have not, so far as
can be ascertained, yet reached him.
Jn his absence, his wife, a daughter   of Richard   Grant,   for   many
By Aaaociatcd Yrrt*.
Philadelphia, June 21.—William
McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt
were unanimously nominated Republican candidates for president
and vice-president respectively.
Philadelphia, June 21.—The last
session of the Republican convention opened with the immense hall
crowded with delegates and spectators.
When nominations for president
were called lor, Senator Foraker of
Ohio took the platform to nominate
McKinley. The first mention of
the president's name was the signal
for a tremendous outburst of enthusiasm. The nomination of McKinley was seconded by Governor
Roosevelt of New Vork, Governor
Mount of Indiana and others.
When the roll call for the vote
was completed, Chairman Henry
Cabot Lodge announced that McKinley had received the unanimous
vote and declared him the candidate of the Republican party for
president for the term beginning
March 4, 1901. The announcement
was received by the vast concourse
of people with unbounded enthusiasm, delegates and spectators, men
and women, standing on chairs or
rushing about the hall like so many
wild people. A huge counterfeit
elephant, the emblem of Republican
strength, was brought into the hall
and carried about amid shouts of
laughter and applause.
Theodore Roosevelt, governor of
New York, was nominated for vice-
president by General Lafayette
Young, ol Iowa, and the nomination was seconded by United Slates
Senator Chauncey M. Depew, of
New York. Roosevelt, like McKinley, received every vote ol the
convention and Chairman Lodge
announced the nomination as unanimous. Another scene of uproar
and excitement followed the announcement and at 12:47 p- ni. the
convention adjourned sine die.
WILL JOIN HANDS
Roberts1 and Buller's Troops to Make
Junction Saturday.
By Au»ocial«d Preii.
London, June 22.—-Lord Roberts
reports that General Ian Hamilton
reached the Springs yesterday en
route lor Heidelberg to join hands
with (ieneral Buller, who isexpected
to reach Standerton tomorrow.
The di.spatch from Lord Roberts
in full is as follows:
"Pretoria, June 22.—Ian Hamilton's column reached the Springs
yesterday en* route to Heidelberg,
where they will join hands with Buller's troops, who reached Paarde
Kop yesterday and will be at Standerton tomorrow, thus opening up
communications between Pretoria
and Natal and preventing any joint
action between tbe Transvaalers
and tbe people of the Orange River
colony,
'■Baden-Powell reports from Rus-
lenburg that he found the leading
Boers verv pacific and cordial on
his return journey hence. Commandant Steyn and two actively hostile
field cornets had been captured during his absence.
"Lord Edward Cecil,the administrator of the Rustenbtirg district,
bas to date collected 3000 rifles.
"The commissioner at Kroonstadt reports Ihat 341 rifles have
been handed in'at   Wolmarinstad."
READY    FOR   MORE   WORK.
If Russia has stirred up the Boxer
uprising in China, she has done so
a little too late ta gain the advantage of Britain's pre-occupation in
South Afiica. The break iu Lord
Roberts' line of communications via
Bloemfontein has been quickly repaired and Buller will today join
forces with those of the commander
in chief. This will give Roberts a
new and shorter line of communication with a new base at Durban. It
cuts off the remnant of the Free
Staters still in the field in the north
eastern corner ol the Orange River
colony from the main body of
Transvaalers who have retreated
eastward from Pretoria. The rapidity with which the Boers are giving
up their arms shows that the country west of Pretoria \s practically
pacified. The British forces can
thus be concentrated in a comparatively small area, leaving garrisons
in the conqueied towns and patrols
for the railroads and outlying districts. The conquest of the territory still held by the Boers can
therefore be accomplished the more
easily and swiftly, with several
strong lorces converging upon it
from the east, south and west.
The detachment of 10,000 men
Irem Buller's army should not, under these circumstances, greatly impair Roberts' ability to bring the
war to an early conclusion and, as
he progresses ia this wark, still
further bodies of his troops can be
detached, il a serious emergency in
China should require it, until an
army ol 100,000 men is landed in
the celestial empire,
This is an army which even Russia, with her huge military power,
can hardly match in tbe field. It is
composed of veterans, seasoned
with an arduous campaign and with
all the weaklings weeded out. It is
fully equipped, has all its transports
ready to hand and is already half
way to the new scene of operations.
The incompetents among its officers
have been found out and put where
they can do the least harm, and the
best men, who have stood the test
of a campaign, have been put in
command.
Itiscertaintli.it the suppression
of the Boxers, the exaction of indemnities from their guilty accomplices at the head of the Chinese
government and the settlement of
affairs in such a way as to ensure
the safety of foreigners and their
property in China hereafter will lead
to sharp dissensions among the European powers, whose forces nre
now acting together in a temporary
emergency. That some of them
will endeavor to take advantage of
thc situation for their own territorial
aggrandizement there can be no
doubt. Only by having close at
hand nn overwhelming force can
Britain guard her interests. The
only other nation with whom she
has thorough community of interest
is Japan, for Germany's schemes
may run counter to British inlerests
and a conflict of interest with Russia and France is certain. Britain
can therefore rely only upon her
own strong arm, and that strong
arm is fortunately in splendid condition to strike a telling blow.
HEAVY CASUALTY
WILL THADK WITH «'ANA HA
Trinidad Heftuaa Bxteualon ol  Heelp-
r.Mlu Treaty With lulled stale*.
Ottawa, June 23.—Word has
been received at the trade and commerce department that the Trinidad
government has absolutely refused
to extend the time for the ratification of the Trinidad and United
States convention. The convention
expires in August and the I'. S.
asked to extend the time for one
year to permit of congress dealing
with the matter. This Trinidad ha .
declined to do, and it is expected
that, when the convention expires,
Trinidad will renew negotiations
with Canada.
Chinese General Leads the Boxers. Garrison in Desperate Straight.
If 10,000 of the men who fought
their wav with Buller through the
mountains of Natal are sent to
China, how long will it take them
to cut their way through a horde of
Celestials?
Fear of Russia is the solid rock
upon which Japan's friendship for
Britain is built. No British Columbia law for the protection of Canadian labor could remove Japan's
fear of Russia and could not, therefore, weaken the alliance between
Japan and Great Britain. There is
no imperial reason why British Columbia should sacrifice the interests
of Canadian labor on the altar of
British interest. — Toronto Telegram.
ANXIOUS TO YIELD
Botha Wishes to Surrender but Krnger
Is Obdurate.
Lor.don, June 23.—All the news
from South Africa continues satisfactory from the British point of
view. Trains ought soon to be
running between Durban and Johannesburg.
According to a Pretoria dispatch
General Botha possesses full powers to conclude peace, and it is reiterated that he is willing to surrender, but President Kruger remains
obdurate.
The fact that a deputation from
Pietermascer, in the Northern
Transvaal, has approached Lord
Roberts with an invitation t.i send a
force to receive the submission of
the town is regarded as   important.
AMKHH'ANN TAK UN IN   til HI MI
Hr< ouuollrlMt:   f_.rn    In   Philippine*
KepulMd With Never* Lo**
Washington, June 2}.—The war
department has received Ibe following cablegram from CJener.il McArthur:
"Manila, June 23.—A detachment of four officers and 100 men
of the Fortieth volunteer inlantiy,
Captain Miller commanding, left
Tagayen June 13 on a reconnaissance up the Tagayen river. In the
morning they were ambushed by
insurgents in a strong position.
Fifty men sent to reinforce them
from Tagayen did not take the position and the troops withdrew to the
coast port."
Then follows a list of killed, of
which there are seven, also a list of
11 wounded and one missing.
The Chinese are fighting for the
independence of their country—for
liberty, if you please, and the right
to run China in a way to suit the
Chinese. But no resolutions of
sympathy with the Chinese will be
offered at Philadelphia or Kansas
City. Not in a thousand years.—
Spokesman-Review.
The troops of the European powers are practicing on the Chinese
for a subsequent fight among themselves,
London, June 23.—Special dispatches from Shanghai, dated yesterday at 7:20 in the evening, state
that Tien Tsin has been incessantly
bombarded for tbe last three days.
The entire British and French settlements have been destroyed.
Heavy casualties are reported.
No word has been received  from
Admiral Seymour and it i.s  believed
that the relief column  fared  badly.
The BealeKed In Blre Slrull*.
New York, June 23.—The Journal and Advertiser today prints a
copyrighted dispatch from C. B.
Frederick Brown, presiding elder of
the Tien Tsin district of the Methodist church,dated at Chee Foo June
22, as follows:
"I have just got away from Tien
Tsin in a great gunboat. The city
has been bombarded for several
days by the Chinese. Lieutenant
Wright, of our navy,and 150 others
of the white residents, marines and
sailors sent up to our assistance
were killed outright or wounded.
The American consulate building at
Tien Tsin has been destroyed. The
ammunition is almost gone. -The
garrison is suffering terribly and
needs help."
lift unia t'rulner Whip* t'hlneme.
Kiel, June 23.—A rumor is current in naval circles here that a
German cruiser has forced one Chinese ship ashore and captured
another, and Ihat 20 Chinese were
killed.
f.erniaii milliliter Alive aud   Well.
Berlin, June 23.—The Chinese
minister here today informed the
foreign office that Ihe German minister at Pekin, who was reported to
have been killed by Boxers, was
safe and well.
A Deelnratlon of War
Londonjune. 23.—The announcement that Prince Tuan has assumed
active command of the Chinese
troops and the bombardment of
Tien Tsin seems evident that the
dowager empress has declared war
on the combined European powers
and that the whole military strength
of China is to be employed in behalf
of the Boxers.
Hard lighting at Tien Tulu
The Chinese number at least 15,-
000 inside the city. Their emissaries crowd the foreign quarters and
set fire to the buildings. The Chinese guns are being worked steadily
from tbe walls of the native city.
The assistance of reinforcements is
implored. The Russians are now
intrenched in the depot. They are
resisting the advance, which the
enemy is making in overwhelming
numbers.
No word has been received from
Admiral Seymour, and it is feared
that the relief column   fared   badly.
There is an exodus of foreigners
from the Yang Tse Kiang to Shanghai and Japan. Many consider
Shanghai unsafe owing to the absence of foreign troops.
It iiMlan Troop* t'omluK In
Chee Foo, June 2^,.—A dispatch
from New Chwang, at the head of
the gulf of Lino Tung, says:
"Foreigners are concentrating
here. The British consul has telegraphed for a gunboat, but has received no reply. The port is apparently under Russian protection,
Russian troops are arriving from
Port Arthur and the North. The
residents are safe and business :s
not likely to be seriously interfered
with."
London, June 22.—In the house
of commons today, Mr. Broderick,
under secretary for foreign affairs,
said the foreign ollice had no news
from Pekin, or from Vice-Admiral
Seymour. Hi added that news by
runner June 18 from Tien Tsin, arriving at Taku June 21, announced
that several attacks had been made
and repulsed.
On June 17 the Chinese shelled
the foreign settlement and the Chinese military college was attacked
by a mixed force of 150 Russians,
British, Germans and Italians.
Tbey destroyed the guns and  burn
ed the college, which contained a
considerable store of ammunition,
and killed its defenders.
The Russians, with four heavy
field guns, did excellent service.
The British loss was one man killed
and five wounded. The Germans
had one mun killed, the Italians had
five men wounded and the Russians
had seven men killed and five
wounded.
During the night of June 17 the
Chinese tried to seize the bridge of
boats, but were repulsed with loss,
including, it is reported, a Chinese
general.
Rear-Admiral Bruce, at Taku,
telegraphed last night the further
information that at Tien Tsin Jun*
20 fighting was proceeding and that
reinforcements were required. Mr.
Hunk-rick also said:
"We have further heard from
Admiral Bruce, dated Taku, last
night, and Chee Foo this morning
as follows:
" 'I am hoping Tien Tsin may be
relieved tonight. No news from
commander in charge. The Terri-
rible landed this morning 382 ollieeis and men of the fusiliers.' "
In conclusion Mr. Broderick announced that he believed various
other troops would arrive in a day
or two, if they had not already
landed.
Keporled Wholesale MaMacre        I
Londonjune 22.—A special from
Shanghai says that it i.s reported
from Japanese sources that 1500
foreigners have been massacred at
Tien Tsin.
tiaod Newa, 11  True.
Brussels, June 22.—The Petit
Bleu states that a telegram was received yesterday by an important
Brussels firm from. China saying
that Admiral Seymour's relieving
force nnd (he Russian column entered Pekin simultaneously. The
legations were reported intact and
all the Belgian residents are said to
be safe.
HE HAS ACCEPTED
Sir Henri Joli de Lotbiniere to Rule
British Columbia.
By  Awociated  J'ri-w.
Ottawa, June 21.—Should Sir
Henri Joli de Lotbiniere accept the
appointment as lieutenant-governor
of British Columbia, the name of
M. E. Bernier, M. P. for St. Hya-
cinthe, is mentioned as the new
minister of inland revenue. Bernier
is recognized as one of the old
school of Liberals and a persoual
friend ol Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
Later. — It is understood tbat
Sir Henri Joli has accepted the appointment and will leave for British Columbia as soon as the governor-general, who is away, returns
aud sanctions the steps that haCe
beeu taken in the matter.
Montreal, June 21.—The Witness this evening', discussing the
reported dismissal of Lieutenant-
Governor Mclnnes of British Co-
lumbi 1, says the Domini..n government should not act npoo the petition of a political ;.«.rty or of political parties of the province, no matter bow respectable ir how slroug,
because in that 'tse they would be
taking political sides against the
representatives of the crown. But
if the government decides not to
dismiss or recall Mclnnes at present, they would be acting wisely.
Continuing, the paper says:
"The responsibility of the lieutenant-governor's course must ba
accepted by the Dunsmuir ministry,
who must willingly or unwillingly
acknowledge their position when
the legislature meets. If the legislature refuses ils confidence in the
Dunsmuir ministry, it must condemn Lieutenant-Governor Mclnnes
also.
In that case, should Mclnnes fail
to find advisers, the Witness contends that the Dominion government would he justified in recalling
him. The paper adds that friends
of Mclnnes would do well to urge
him to resign.
...II
wn
1
Job printing of every description
executed with neatness despatch at
this ollice. 11
iB
' am
*
w
Tli3        •, *   i*fiil
i«i^LKIRK      TIIK
the Kii.n;K.Tim,i.\.
LARGE     AND    COMFORTABLE
K( >0.MS TABU-:    UNSU R-
PASSED     IN     TIIE
NORTHWEST.
IJIUHII.U
SILVERTON,
B. 0.
Watches,
. Clocks and
Jewelery.
-ATl'lWAV,   .Jink SO    liWO.
forcing  themselves   into   each others, j[ou„tam
in
this     district.    The
I'llll.INIIKU  KVKIIV   BATUBOAY    AT
SILVEKTON, li. 0.
MATHKSON HKOS..    Kdltor* * Prop*.
SCBSCRIPTION BATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
British Columbia's greatest! l)ui^jns   0f   this   road  Iihs bt-comc a
horde  of   Chinese that! necessity, owing to the large number
that
Advonising rates will bo made known
upon application at this ollice.
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
OR IN ARREARS A
BLUE CROSS WILL
BE FOUND IN THIS
jQtJABJS, SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. PRICE
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
0****90
•) *>
<• (•
i a)
EDITORIAL OlTCIOPPIJifiS.
........................
The editor of The Sandon Mining
Review does not know tho difl'erence
between revising the Voters' List openly now after the election nnd revising it underliandedly j»st before the
election, but os there are so many
things that that editor doesn't know
this will not surprise anyone.
Fine Watch Impairing a   Rpwttll?
All Work Left at Tlie I.ukeview
Hotel, Silverton, will be forwarded and promptly attemle.l lo.
O. B. Knowles
SANDON, R C.
THE}
HOTB^
It is only fair that just now when
all over the British Empire they are
celebrating the victories of the Irish
over the Dutch, that in Slocan City
they should soon celebrate the victory
of the Dutch over the Irish some two
centuries ago at the Boyne water.
countries,
curse is   tne
are finding Louies nud employment
within Iirr Imundaries, to the detriment of all Canadians. Up to the
present time the Sloean hns been free
from this yellow pest, but lately there
has been somo talk of a few selfish,
unpatriotic, ignorant upstarts, who
are but little better than the Chinese,
being about to import a batch of
Chinamen into the Slocan, presumably
for servants but more likely because
their society would bo congenial for
their Women folk. We sincerely hope
that they will desist from any such
attempt, as the importation of Cliinesi
into the Slocan will not only bring
trouble upon the whole community
but for the man that brings them in
direct trouble upon his own family.
SLOCAN'S MEMBER.
of prjperties being opened up in
portion of our camp It would not
be for tho benefit of any single mining
company, but for a whole community
of miners and prospectors, who, at
the present time, have no wny of
diking up supplies or bringing down
ore except by packtrains. The road
needed will bo some three miles long,
from the end of the premt Galena
Mines road It is nn easy road t"
build and if onoa built would require
but little to keep it in repair, it being
freo from both mudslides ..nd
snowslides.
J\r* TM* 1S3£1K13J**UML*.
a p s -a* rsr ****** jr,
Silverton        -     -       >; *_
"Five
Drops.
*J
At the present time tho member
for the Slocau is hiding liiiiis.lt"
independent of both parties in tin-
Legislature. It is agreed by all that
had he desired to accept office in the
new Cabinet, the Portfolio of Mines
could have been Iii.-, bnt true to bis
pledges, he will not unite with either
Martmisin or Turnerisir. After tie
reconstruction ef the Cabinet, a
radical change in the make up will
doubtless he found, and we prophecy (j|af (,'lYiMI,* Aislfl'j's Ifilil" IN IK fffl
that R F. Green will be Minister of
Mines in a government, that will be
tainted with neither Ihe charte.-
monijetifg of - Tarceristu nor the
demagogic propositions cf Martin.
A RHEUMATIC CURE
] THAT CURES,
j WE   ARE   TIIE   AGENTS    FOR
THIS.    A I/SO FOR
Canadian torn Cure and Syrup
of iliirelioiind and loin.
Prescription Department Complete and
Up   To    Dalo
Conveniently Situated near tlio
Railway Station anil Whnrf.
GOOD  SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
We have rec.ived since onr last
publishing day the first three copies j
of the "Outcrop,"'published in Peter-!
borough, in the Windemere district,
by W. P. Evans. Mr. Evans is putting out a good publication, one that
should help materially in pushing the
Windemere country to the front.
FROM THE GRANDSTAND.
In the political   playground all  is
quiet at present and will probably re-
under tl.e charge 0/j main so until the 19th prox , when the
Dining   Room
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil the delicacies
of tbe season.
HENDERSONk GETMING, - Props.
SLOOAN CITV B. C.
YOU
Win have a
postcard from
me
as soon as Fruit reaches its
lowest figures.
Don't   preserve   any  until
then.
J. I. Mcintosh,
Silverton, B.C.
PACIFIC
"Imnerial
lately elected members will don their
uniforms and line up for thc kick-nil'
Mclnnis Sr. has been put out of the
game, and an imported referee, Sir
Henri Joly, will use the whistle. Under his supervision there will be fewer
off-sides and less fouling, it is hoped,
and the rules of the game will be more
strictly lived up to. The home team
captained by Dunsmuir, with Turner,
Ebert, Wells, McBride and Prentice
on the forward line, is the stronger
team, but Captain Martin has a combination worked up that may score,
in spite of the fact that so many of
his stalwarts were laid out on June
9th, Green, Houston, Kidd nnd Smith
have chosen the post of rooters with
sympathies nt present for the home
players.    A good game is expected.
V NEEDED TRUNK KOAP.
When the appropriation are luecc^
made by the Legislature tie the
necessary public works to U> undertaker, by the government this m-*soo,
it is to be hoped that they will appropriate a sun of money to bnild tbe
long   talked   of   wagon   road to Red
SILVERTON  DRUG   STORE,
SILVERTON. 1$. C
Fresh   Bread
J; G. GORDON,
MIM.REILESTATE, COSIHiWtt
NOTARY PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      .      n. C.
l'i' n and Cakes Made to Order.
A. CAREY, • Silverton, B.C.
3.U. MoGRKGOR
PROVINCIAL"~LAND"   SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY,     «  c
mu:im>\ gggy i \io\,
NO. 9.ri. W. F. Of M.
Sleets every Saturday in the  I'nion
Hull in Silverton, nt 7 :.'I0 p. m.
\V. Hohtii.n,
President.
J. I. McInti'hii,
Financial-Secretary
1867
♦5*4
1900
GRAND CELEBRATION
OF    .
:domi:ivioiv
Limited
•■
RKRVICG     FOK    Tlfr     VEAB      1000
will    lie    commenced    JUNE
tOth.      The "Imperial I.Imi
t*«l"    taken   you     acrons   tlio
Continent In fonr  duy*   without    change. It    In  ■ foil
Ve__.tlt.uted   train,   liaxnrlnualy
equipped   for  the comfort aud
convenience     of    Vutntogert.
Auk   your  frlenilH    who   hnre
Ira elled   on   ll. or atldreaa
\V. V. ANDERSON,
Tray. I'nss. Agent, Nelson
E. J, COYLE.
A. G. P. Agent, Vancouver
OFF THFIR   PERCHES.
In a recent  issue the Slocan Drill
published nn interview with  one who
had tips galore on the  tutnre  actions
of the Silver-Lead Mines Association,
in   which a shut-down of tho mines
was   predicted.    At   about   the same
time in which this interview was given.
J. Roderick Robertron was airing hia
opinions on the Coast and predicting
another general strike in the Rossland
and    Slocan   districts.    However   as
neither   the   mine    owners   nor   the
miners are fools   altogether,   we   can
safely pat one interview   against  the
other and overlook them both.    There
will be   no  general   strike again for
years to come, if art al),  and there will
be no general shut-down of the mines.
If the reporter   who   interviewed   J.
Roderick had   known   his  man,  the
interview   would never    have    been
wired  eatt   aa   news for the Toronto
papers, . It was in so doing that harm
has been   done.
* SLOCAN, B C,
ON  JULY 2nd.
JO ootbnll    1 ouraament.
llorse     l\ac*nfg.
CaivJ5_e>o_k:ia.-iv Sports,
B all Ls: Evoivuvo.
GOOD PRIZES - GOOD MUSIC •• A GENERAL GOOD TIME PROMISED.
SPECIAL TRAIN SERVICE.
NOT WANTED.
The Chinaman has been an object
of suspicion, aversion and trouble
wherever and when ever he has coino
into contact with the white race,
no matter whether in tht Floweiy
Kingdom or in the lands of the New
World. The white man's contempt
for the Chinaman is only equalled by
the Chinaman's contempt for the white
man, and yet with all their mutual
haired   both   insist   on   the  right of
B.C
TUE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF
H
E
A. E. TEETER, PROPS,
PATRONS ARK WELL TAKEN CAKE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES.'
BAR   FURNISHED WITH TIIE   REST   BRANDS OF  WTNFR, LlQTJOjj
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -   -   - SLOGAN, B. C.
/StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  HORSES  FOR   HIRE   AT   REASOJfiBU
RATES A OENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER RUS1NKSS DORR
Train Leaves SANDON nt 0:45 a. H.
Arriving at   SLOCAN at 9:60 a.m.
RETURNING: Train Leaves SLOCAN   at 7 v. m.
Arriving   at SANDON at 10:20 p. m.
Train and Boat Call nt All Intormedinto Points.
SINGLE PARK RETURN,
R. A. liradsliaw, A. I Teeter,
SECRETARY. PRESIDENT,
J. H. HOWARTH
JEWELER ko.,   SLOCAN, B. c'
IS  PREPARED TO   REPAIR WATCHES,  CLOCKS AND JEWELERY
FOR THE    SLOCAN   PUBLIC. AN    EXPERIENCE   OF NEARLY
FIFTY YEAR8 WARRANTS THE GUARANTEE OF SAT-
ISFACTION WITH HIS WORK THAT HE GIVES. ALL REPAIRING IS
DONE AS PROMPTLY A8 OOOD WORK WILL ALLOW.
A FULL LINE OF WATCHES, CLOCKS, FANCY GOODS, kc. INSTOCK.
Outside Parties Desiring Horses in Silverton ,.
Can Have Them Reserved By Writing To—   A- "' McDONALD,
t + + + t t + SILVERTON, • • B. (!.
~~The wm. Hamilton manufacturing co7
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
F»etert>orovtg::_ti, Ontario.
CANADA.
^*VVW*VV*>*_VWV*VWVSVV*_*>_VV>*^^._^^^^VV^WVVV*VVV
LSyr p of Horehoimd & Tolu
FOR ( 0UGH8   AM) (.OLDS.
O
';,:•: ll<.itl<|i..iil.is Fit MillingMil:•
r_n
THE
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.
EVERYTHING NEW, NFATj
AKI»  IP-10-1 AIE.
tame i KsrBPAftrn is
THE NORTHWEST.
f  JAS. R0HE8.   fn*.
8 I L V E R T O V,   li. f.
Estaiii.i.siikh in Nelson "18SH). "
It is nothing
*   but lair
To let my Skan rnstomers know
that I liavc jiisl retorned from a par-
chasing trip in the East. I am
Ileased(oId vim know llial I |„nc      v-      ji    ^ 4
typy **-
st ft tied lb v rj t,it(Ut»np.Mafe goods in new designs, mu.-Ii as never M
fori'lie: ii short ii in 11 Is eoiiiii; y. All goods bought here are gnaniN
AI (jiiilihiiiid prices aroundi is will compete with Eastern market,
^V".t*S*W>A^A'^VV \\||| \ |N NI'I.SON
>     1 I N K   W \ !'i  11 ,,      , ,
\   RKIMIttlXl \    \   I1M1!^vorrocAi.L
>    ANDIN-l-KcrMYSTOCK.
<\   SI'ECl.il.iY.
i
MAILORDERS
PROM I Tl.Y ATTENDED TO.
Jaooi> Dover, • TIIK JEWMLR, mumM
iThe thistle hotel
NOW II KO I'M NED
I'NDEK A  NEW*
MANAGEMENT.
HOUSE RENOVATED
AND TIIE EAR FULLY
RESTOCKED
THISTLE   CAFE.
Under the management ol
Ctrlo Sclmieder
Just Opened.        Good mJ**\
Meals  at  All  Hour*
L
C
Thompson Bros.,   Props.
LAKE AVE,,   SILVERTON, 11. Q.
axative
wwvvww
old Cure.
To Curo a   Cold   In ' One P»I'
Contain*   Tho    Ntw  Ingridim1'
 TRY   IT....	
PRICK 25o. At All DruMi^t,'
General        Full Line     LumbefJ
Mining
Supplies.
MoGnll
D^y & Mixed I Sash anj
Paints.        Doors.
um*Co„   »Iooan,B.<>1

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