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The Silvertonian 1898-08-27

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 iiJUo ■<
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Head <T_fcie
jSlLVERTONIA/sTg
Per Annum.
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VOLUME TWO.
^LVJ^TON^RRITiSH^OIlIJJM___VSjATU^ 1898.
NUMBER 9
WIlATU-iSHAfPPED#WTH£
WEEK—"WJAT MAY
HAPPEN NEXT.
Mr. Felt, of Slooan Citv, was in town
on business Friday.
Angus McLean, has retnrned from a
trip to Coffey creek.
Sam Thomas, has gone up to work at
tbo Idaho mine,
Ross Thorbuin, waa down from the
Comstock mine Thursday.
S. T. Walker is doing assessment
work on the Summit claim.
A deal is on for ihe Corncracker claim
which adjoins the Fidelity group.
Allen McDonald, is back from a prospecting trip in tho Kettle River country.
Axel Larson, was down from the Comstock mine, taking in the Bights of the
City.
Mrs. Barclay accompanied bv Miss.
Jeannette Barclay, paid a visit to Slucan
City Friday.
An extension of time has been ccranted
to Mr. Dawson on his bond on the Essex
and Edinburgh claims, above Silverton.
A. McDonald of tjjp Vancouver Miije
spent the first of tbe week in the hospital, suffering from an ulcerated  eye.
L Chisholra, has just completed asses?,
ment work on tho L, II. C. claim, on the
head ol Fennel creek, he reports it as
looking well.
jV plaper excitement has sprung into
existence at Slocan Junction, and several
olaims have hoed staked with possible
millions in them.
Machinery is to be put in at the
Evening Star mine on Lemon creek.
This property is coming to the front
<-!mu-. rapidly and belongs to 11-itli
Sutherland.
Al Wilds and Douglas Darg took to Ihe
hills Friday morning and the discovery
of the mother lode may he looked for as
Joe Connors went along as guide and
interpeter.
Mine Inspector Macgicgor visited tho
Silverton Mines on Tuesday and Wednesday Mr. Macgregor -predicto many
changes for Hit* better in the mining
laws, during tho next session *4 the
Provincial Assembly.
A b-uge load ot lumber' was piled at
the wharf from Hill's Mill on Saturday
lust, A j-ortion of thhr was for the
(itilena Mines but tho main portion il
being packed to the Wakefield Mines to
he used in the erection of their new
bunk-houses. •
Messrs Tinling, Webb and Brant, have
pone over onto Coffey creek to put in a
trail to tho Sellersjgroup, io which they
.ire interested. They have had un offer
to sell this property, but concluded to
luriner developo it before trying to dispose of it.
A sample, taken by parties who examined the Sellers group with a view of
purchasing the property, gave returns ol
1017 ounces in silver and fc.0 in gold per
Ion. It is needlesa to say they made an
'iffer for the property, which so fur has
been rejected by the owners.
Talk of the re opening of the Mountain
Chief mine is again hoard in New
Denver. This property onoe paid to
work when Ihe ore had to bo packed to
Kaslo for shipment and it appears
t'trange that a paying basis cannot be
t cached now witli tlio improved shipping
facilities on the Lake.
The fact that tin, of all the metals in
common use, is only sparingly distributed throught tbe world ia again called attention to by an Australian geoloaistMr.
B. J. Skertchley, who has published a
monograph upon the subject, While the
known gold fields of the world cover
more than 1,600,000 square miles, the tin
fields have an area of less than 12,500
square miles. Thus, tor every square
mile of tin ground theee are 132 square
miles of gold bearing country.
SLOCAN   CITY   BREEZES.
From On, Begu»a- Correspondent.
Editor Bilv-btonun:-
Events of interest in our City
outside of the mining industry were not
Plentiful during tho past week. There
is a general quietness prevaili*-_ in business ami consequently our buMness men
have a good opportunity to take a rest
and take an occasional plunge iu the lake
to cool and refresh themselves. To sse
the wny in which they enlist recruits for
bathintr every afternoon reminds your
correspondent of his boyhood days.
There was a new arrival in town the
other day-a youn_ lady—the guest of
Mr. and Mrs McLeod, and intends making making her home with thctn for
some years to come. We all hope she
will like her home. Mr. McLeod asks
"wbat'll you have?" of all ho meet,i.
Some of our leading citizens enjoyed
themselves by rowing to Six Mile and
eating cold grub on Sunday—calling it a
picnic—and had a good time.
There has been a verv destructive forest fire rauing in Arlington Basin for the
last week aud Brown's Hotel, an old
landmark in the Basin, is burned. No
lives reported lost and no insurance to
collect.
Hugh O. Sutherland is hack again and
will start work on tho trail to tbe Evening Star at once, in order to get machinery to the mine as soon as possible.
Johfc Bosche went up to the Alberta
mine on Wednesday with a pack train
loaded with supplies. He intends to operate tho mine all winter. The property
is looking well and some high grade ore
is being taken out.
Mr. Fergusou is working the Tail Holt
which shows a two-foot ledseof good ore.
The Slocan Ideal Mining Co. are pushing work on the Ottawa Mine and expect
to tap tlie lodge with their cross-rcut tunnel in a few days. \
Thos. Mulvey was down from the Calumet and Hecla in Dayton Basin last
Sunday and reports good progress boing
made in their tunnel.
ARE   YOU  LUCKY?
The raffle for the Thistle Hotel that
comes off in Silverton on Oct. 22nd. is
going to enable some one to step into a
home and business for practically
nothing. 'All of .the bojs with any sporting blood in their veins will have a
chance or ^wo. The sale ot tickets
should be brisk and Tom Clair should
receive the aiipport of the boys, for they
all know that Toin use d them Hquare and
no one ever went Lungary or slept cold
around Tom Cl-tir's. Any one of the
boys can afford to take a chance or two
and some one of them is sure to bocomo
independent through this drawing. H.
H. Pitts of Sandon will assist Mr. Hunter
at Ihe drawing and these t*» gentlemen
lending their names to the enterprise is
aufficent guarantee that it is no fake.
SPOKANE  FRUIT FAIR.
The Fifth Annual Spokano Fruit Fair
will open Tuesday Oct. 4th. and close
Saturday Oct. 15th. The public spirited
citiiens of Spokane have contributed ami
guaranteed nearly $15,000 to insure the
financial success of tha undertaking. The
premium li.-t, at all times liberal, has
lieen greatly added to this year. The
capital prise contest-For finest and most
artistically arranged arranged county or
district exhibit of Fruit. GruiDB, Grasses,
Roots and Vegetables" wiil this year
draw the following magnificent prizes:
First the $100. Dodson Cup (at present
held hy Whitnan County) and $200. cash,
second $200. cash, third $100. cash, fourth
cash $75. fifth, cash $50. sixth, cash $25.
In addition tht-reto there will, this year,
be givon outright in this competition
three Silver Trophies (also dona'ed by
Mr. GeorgoR Dobson, Jeweler, Spokane)
of almost equal value to the Capital Prize
Cup, which will bo awarded as follows:
One for the county or district making the
best exhibit of horticultural products:
one to the county or district making the
best exhibit of agricultural products: and
iiiuvto the county or district which ahal*
most artistically arrant*** its exhibits.
This year's Fruit Fair will lie on a
larger nnd grander Hi':ile than any of its
predecessors, and the musical and other
attractions will be u grand surprise to its
patrons. From an attraction standpoint
the leading features of tbis year's Fair
will bo the moving picTues, on a mammoth scale, of all the latesi war scenes
by sea and land, which havo heen secured
in tlie east at great cost. Many of the
now famous battles scenes at the Philippines, Cuba and Puerto Kico will b? reproduced w lib thrilling effect at each evening performance of tho Fair. A nominal admission of fifteen cents will again
admit the visitor to all the features of
tho Fair. Tbe various transportation
companies centering at Spokane have
put into effect a 2-cent per mile passenger rate effective at all times throughout
the Fair.
MINERAL BEARING  FORMATIONS
Following is an interesting extract
from a lecture by Prof. Arthur Lake on
somo old theories upset by recent discoveries.
But a few years ago prospectors only
panned and placormined on a small and
rude Bcale. Later tho discoveries in
placers led up to the eourco of the ores in
the rocks, principally in fissure veins in
granite, and fissure veins in granito
were for a time th o only fashionable ore
deposits.
The discovery of Leadville with its
lead ores in limestone threw the balance
in favor of limestone deposits. Limestones of all kinds and ages were prospected whatever mat with until   men
realized that limestone alone was not
thegj-eat ore-bearing or ore-producing
rock unless Jt was accompanied by
igneous porphyry. Limestone might be
followed, even those of Lower Carboniferous age like those of Leadville and
Aspen, over wide' areas and be found
quite barren, if there was no eruptive
rocks in the vicinity; limestone was
recognized as the ore receptacle, rather
that! ore-brinuing rock.
Ii was then believed tbat the eruptive
igneous rocks were the ore-bringers, and
attention was deflected to them and to
their zones of contact with other rocks.
This resulted in the discovery of many
a decomposed, ore-impregnated dyke of
igneous porphyry that, without being a
veiu in any true sense of the word, at
any rate offered material for very profitable mining, such, tor instance, as the
gold dyke of the De Lamar of Idaho and
the well known Antioch mine of Leadville.
With the fall in silver and the necessity for gold, prospectors left the limestone alono and paid still closer attention
to the crystalline and eruptive rocks.
The granite and their fissure veins were
ransacked for gold, porphyry dikes were
overhauled and their lines of contact
with other crystalline rocks closely ob-
setved, and shafts were driven deeper
in search of the "more precious metals,
and, finally, attention was turned by the
discovery of Cripple Creek to the hitherto more or less neglected, coniparitive-
ly recent, surface lavae.
Cripple Creek showed how au area
once occupied by a volcano and covered
deeply with unpromising decomposed
surface lavas, called andesitic breccia,
might be disturbed again by moro recent
lavas of au essentially gold-bearing character, commonly known as phonolite
dykes, -ml that generally the whole region was not only penetrated by innumerable gold-bearing fissures, but that the
very country rock itself, whether phono-
lite or ondesite, was more or less impreg
nated with gold.
END OF THE CENTURY PRAYER.
Protect me, Lord, from these Thy saints,
the sanctimonious few;
Oh, save me from their clutched when
mv rrrartgnw come doe;
Oh put -me not into the hands of these,
the men of won,
Who call this earth a ''vale of tears" and
strive to make it eo.
Oh piard me from the blue nosed good
who lend at cent percent,
And take a thousand dollar lien for ninety dollars rent,
Make nie instead, the debtor ot   Bome
man with human taints!
At any rato protect me, Lord, trotn these
Tin- modern saint--.
Their thoughts are far from mortal life,
they never, never sin ;
They strive to bring to righteousness the
very men they skin ;
They never go a step astray; they never
deign to smile;
They sin not and they only aim to castigate the vi'.o.
But oh! wbv should they deem it best
with cold and holy arts,
To rivet sheet-iron shields around their
hard and atony hearts?
Their ears are deaf enough, God wot, to
pleading and complaint,
And bo 1 pray protect me, Lord, from
these, Thy modern saints!
Oh, save me from the sanctified, the too
uncommon good,
Who tell us what wo shouldn't do and
preach ns what wo should.
These saints who squeeze a dollar twice
and wear cheap aure jles
Will take our children's bread and then
attempt to save their souls I
Give me instead a worldly man,  with
some few healthy stains,
That shows he has the common blood of
mankind in his veins.
And heart that swells enough sometimes
enough to overflow constraints,
And in my need protect mo. Lord, from
self-appointed saints!
T* * *T*.*.».*.+ .*.*:•*.*.a.
THE LOCAL LAYOUT.
*.***.*   *.**.*!*.
Tho Knights of Pythias of New Denver
will hold their Annual Ball on Thursday
next, Sept. 1st. in Clever'a Hall.
Millward'sOrchfBtra will be in attend
anceand thc supper will be served at the
Newmarket Holel. The balls given by
the New Denver K. P's. aro nlwayB
looked forward to aud this one promises
to surpass any before given by that
order. Everybody is welcome and everybody should go.
CHURCH   SERVICES.
Commencing on Wednesday June 1st.
Services will be held every alternate
Wodnesday evening in the Union Church
Silverton, by the Rev. C. F. Yates
Episcopalian minister.
Service will bo held in the Silverton
Church on Sunday next at 3 p.m.
Rev. R. N. Powell, Preacher.
Ladies, Take the best. If you aro
Troubled with Oonstipation. Sallow Skin
and a Tired Feeling, take Curl's Clover
tea, it is pleasant to take. Bold hy Tha
Silverton Drug Store. t
Karl'B Clover Root Tea is a pleasant
laxative. Regulates the bowels, purifies
the blood. CleaiB the complexion. Easy
to make and pleasant to take. 25cts.
Sold by Tho Silverton Drug* Store,     t
If you would lean on the staff of life
use Mulvey's bread. Always good-
Fresh Duily,
II. Clever, spent Tuesday in town.
A Sister of Charity was around during
the week collecting for an Orphans
Home.
Bert Mcintosh, who is employed at the
Alamo Tramway, visited his brother in
Silverton, Monday.
Dave Fairbairn. left Silverton on
Tuesday for Edmonton N. W. T. He
expects to return in the spring.
The wife and family of W, I. Barker,
foreman of the Vancouver.mine, arrived
Friday from Butte Montana and will
make their home in Silverton.
Private, bath rooms, at Tom Mulveys.
J. I. Mcintosh, has resigned as manager of Pitts Bros, store in Silverton and
has teen succeeded by E. H. Stubbs of
Sandon, who will havo charge from now
on.
An enterainmont described on the bills
as a grand musical and literary treat was
given last evening in McKinnon's Hall
by Prof. St Lawrence.
A camping party from Slocan City
have.taken possession of the mouth of
Gold creek and expect to stay there for a
week—bears and porcupines excepted.
Louis Larson, who Una been absent
ior several months visiting friends in the
Statea, has returned to"Silvertoi) and
went up to see his brothers at tbe
Comstock mines Thursday.
Laundry, neatly and quickly done at
Mulvey's Laundry.
Word was received Thursday of tbe
marriage, at Spokane on Wednesday
evening at 5 p. m., of Luther F. Holtz
and Cecilia Williamson, youngest
daughter of Andrew Williamson of Silverton.
Bills are ont for the appearance of the
Cosgrove family on Saturday and Monday, September 10th. and 12th. This
company has an excellent reputation as
entertainers and should receive full
houses.
Jobn Tj. "Wilson, a ©weqe e_j-pwyetlr_ir^r
the Robson-Penticon construction was
killed oii the 0th. inst. He was struok
by rock, loosenedjby ajhlsst, and thrown
down a cliff 400 feet high. Wilson was
the first to lose his life ou this part of the
construction.
If the C. P.R. extend their railroad to
Whitewater, it is rumored that the K& S
R. R. will extend their road to Slocan
Lake, and compete with the C. P. R. lor
the freight of this section. This move if
carried out would bring railway com"
petition into this section and bo a good
thing for the whole lake country.
Swimming is becoming quite fashionable, and it will not be long before
nearly all the ladies as well as gentlemen
of Silverton will be expert swimmers.
Swimming is an ocomplishment that any
lady may be proud of and besides being
sometimes the means of saving life, is an
enjoyable and healthy exercise.
UNDER   CANVAS.
An embryo city has sprung into life on
Slocan Lake and the steamboats plying
on its blue waters haye a new port of call.
At the mouth of Six Mile creek is located -'Dewey Camp", boasting a population of thirty Bun-burnt picnicers, all
sleeping under canvas and dining in the
company oi the social yellow-jacket and
tho festive ant. A merry camping party
gathered from the length and breadth of
the Slocan form the personnel of Dewey
Camp and an extensive camp-sito with
Schley Avenues and Sampson Streets has
been platted.
Woe to the unwary member of tho finny tribe who seeks, to gain a livelihood
in hie old Six Mile haunt, for have not
the Nimrods of the camp the very latea1
thing in jointed fishing poles and gaudy
flies to lure him to bis doom aud on the
bill of fare?
Here the4Summer Girl holds'sway and
the sands of Narragansett have no longer
the monopoly on the maiden' fair who
dons her bathing garb and dallies on the
beach, timid of the raging surf.
With music, laughter and song, life at
Dewey Camp glides gayly on. Who
would not be a camper?
OREj SHIPMENTS.
A car load ot oro from the Emily
Edith mine was loaded Friday evening,
and billed to the Aurora Smelting and
Refining Oo. 111. This is the first carload
of ore shipped from the Slocan that
contained the four minerals, in commercial quantities, gold, silver, copper and
lead.   This ore is valued at $5000.
J. A. McKINNON & CO.
-$ilv«ei*tori.
B.   C.
CARRY A FCLL LINE OF
General
l\L*&rtjla. nr-cllse
AND
mirx-er's*
Supplies
wWemsfwwwmfwm\mmmmm$ymw
J
Silverton.
B.C.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
 SHve-rtox*
(g-THIS  HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THU    BAR  18   SUPPLIED  WITH BEST   BRANDS   OF,
"mW'-t'-v'ttQUORS AND CIGARS; *— - ■■—»»->"■
XLi.   3iv£.  Klrxo-wles.   JFxop,
t   Pax's   Sarsaparilla   $
£ MADE FROM THE ACTIVE PRINCIPLES OF       *
A     SARSAPARILLA AM) OREGON .RAPE ROOT k
£ The  Best  Spring   Medicine |
making Pure Blood
Bee that you get the GENUINE
£    ^razs'is Sarsaparilla
FINE TAILORING
'_>»C<»C»C«Ce*C«C«CeC«»(»(«C«CeC«CeCe('K»fe** C«C«Ce&C«Ce(«*C««»*»»*C»C«**C» C** .C-»«**|>
i
I
I
I     Spring Suit Patterns Now on Hand,
W      I would respectfully invite gentlemen to an early inspection of my
§   selections in Spring and Summor Suitings.
1
&      My prices will bo found moderate.    I make it a point to",teep them as
\   low as is consistent with good material, good workmanship and the care
*   and attention requiste to get up thoroughly satisfactory garments.
1
1
os»_ji--*^-ji3rjjjics-*c»j-cs»»-*-«os
Cure that Cough with Shiloh's Cure
The best Cough Cure. Relieves Croup
promptly. One million bottles sold last
year. 40 doses for 25cts. Sold by Tho
Silverton Drug Store. *"•
Liebscher* The Tailor,
mm. SiIvert_jiJ,C.*£
*«)»)»-*!«)«>*'««i*i*->**a»j^^^
Hotel Selkirk:::
Brandon & Barrett, Props.
LARGE AND COMFORTABLE ROOMS.    FITTED WITH ALL THI}
MODERN IMPROVEMENTS.   TABLE UNSURPASSED
IN THE NORTHWEST,
Fine View of the Lake. Up to Date Service.
CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
COURTEOU8 TREATMENT.   CALL AND _Ef US
Opposite the SILVERTON WHARF-
B
II
I
|
';• THE SILVERTONIAN,
R. 0. and Harry Matheson, Editors
SILVERTON,
B.C.
The Calumet nil- Henla Is Nearly
SOOO Feet Deep—The Ve Hoi Mine
Sale Still tn "Litigation—Rich Gold
Field* In Montana—Brief Mlnlns
Note*.
The Denver Republican publishes some
very interesting details of the famous Calumet and Hecla mine of Michigan, which
now has the deepest mining shaft in the
world.   The shaft is now 4900 feet-deep-
deeper than any of the deep mines on the
Comstock, Nevada, and deeper than the
deepest mines in Austria, which have been
worked for centuries.    The main shaft
haa si_ compartment-, each of which is aa
large as an ordinary shaft, one for thc
ladderways and the sixth for the wires
and pipes, which are necessary  for the
telephones, light, power, waiter and compressed air.   The remarkable feature of
this great mine is Uiat the course of the
vein is so undeviating that the engineers
can plan work ahead for thousands of feet
with absolute certainty that the actual
working will agree with the plans.   As a
result the underground workings are laid
out   with  mathematical   accuracy.   Tlie
great pumps that hoist thousands of gallon* of water every hour areOperated interchangeably by compressed air and electricity.   There are 300 power drills constantly in operation, each of them doing
the work of six men, operated by compressed air, and these are kept at work
night and day.   Every ton of ore hoisted
is automatically registered in the office.
The Le Roi Trouble*.
The British America Corporation can
not buy the majority of the stock of the
Le  Roi   Mining  k   Smelting   Company.
Judge Richardson of the Spokane superior
court has signed a restraining order which
prohibits the holders of the majority of
the stock from  selling to  the  British
America. Corporation, and likewise prohibits the big syndicate from buying, the
stock and the Le Roi company from transferring it.   After reviewing the testimony
and arguments presented, the court said
in preface to its order: "The court is of
the opinion and holding that under the
laws of this state one corporation may
not acquire shares of stock or any stock
in another corporation, and further, that
under the constitution and laws of this
state the acquiring of a majority of the
shares' of stock in a domestic corporation
owning realty within the state of Wash
ington by an alien corporation, such as
the British America Corporation, would
subject aaid domestic corporation to a for
feKurc "f its real estate, and to a forfeiture -t iU,    i,>t to do "Bt-un-w within the
state."
The case has not been tried on its merits and will come up in the regular order
for final settlement The stockholders affected by the injunctions were at a Ions
to know last evening what step would be
next taken. The suit for damages in the
aum of $780,000 is yet to be heard, and
the case involving the appointment of the
receiver at Rossland is to come up for
hearing some time this week in Victoria.
There ia prospect for much tedious litigation.
Hew Gold Field*.
Reports from the Sheepeater district, in
Montana, indicate that that portion of
ftirk county's gold fields rivals the famed
Klondike, says the Livingston Enterprise.
While it offers none of the hardships to
the gold hunters endured by the Alaskan
argonauts, the find promises to involve a
legal  contest  that may  temporarily at
least interfere with the continued produc
tion of the yellow metal from the pockets
or veins which produce almost fabulous
yields. The discovery was made some time
since by P. Dougherty, Felix McCarthy
and N. C. Henderson, who began opera-
tions and were making good wages by
employing the primitive method of taking
. out the rock and treating ft in a rocker
I located some distance away on a mountain stream.   Later they made a discovery
upon the Legal Tender at a point where
the heavy rains of the past season had
caused a slide from the old opening in the
mine, exposing a formation much resembling the formation about the park geysers.    This rock when  handled by the
rocker process yields readily to treatment,
a greater portion being dissolved by the
simple action of the water, while that
which is too hard and resist- this primitive treatment ia. thrown on a dump for
future milling process.   The entire force
employed ln taking out the decomposed
rock, moving it from the mine to the rocker and washing it ie not to exceed eight
men, and it is authoritatively stated that
ibe daily yield is from $125 to $200.
Canyon Creek Strike.
There waa a good strike made in the
Black Bear, on Canyon creek, near Wallace, Idaho, a few days ago.   The ore is
eight feet wide and assays show it to contain 65 per cent lead and 30 ounces of silver.   The Black Bear was worked quite
extensively some yearn ago and yielded
good returns ito the owners.   During the
financial panic it was mortgaged and has
kin idle most of the time since.   There ia
a concentrator on the property, and aa do-
.  velopment work progresses it should pay
well.
The Hon n lain  I.I on.
The Mountain Lion ledge at Republic
haa not yet been .crosscut and it ia the
wonder of mining men who visit it. The
ore in the ledge along the aides of the tunnel measures 40 feet. It ahould be remembered, however, that the tunnel ia cutting
the ledge at an angle of about 30 degrees,
hence the true width of the ore body is
considerably leas than thc figure mentioned, but present ind'eationa an that there
will be no lea* than 40 feet ot ore.   It is
still the universal belief that the east
ledge has not been reached. There is three
feet of thia ore that assay* $80 per ton.
Bltv Strike In Idaho..
E. A. Parisot and Stewart Woodaide
have returned to Florence, Idaho, from
Buffalo Hump, and they say" that Rigley
and Robbing, the proapectore who made
the recent discoveries, did not exaggerate
in the least when they said they had "30
feet of solid quartz." The ledge is even
wider and there is sufficient ore in sight
to last a lifetime. Mr. Woodaide ia an old
mTner and ifiillraan with 25 yeare*~experi-
i'iiit, and was one of the first, in 1870, to
go from Virginia City, Nev., to the Bkck
Hills, and from there to the Coeur
d'Alenes. When asked what lie thought
of it, he said that it was simply wonderful, the biggest thing in the shape of
quartz he hud ever seen. Twenty-four feet
of tlie vein gave $34.81 in gold, nine feet
$458.17, and three feet $712.17. The two
latter assays carry about one-eighth in
silver. This is evidently one of the great
est strikes ever made in Idaho, with possibly the exception of the Custer mine at
"onanza City in 1877.
Mining   Ilrli-r*.
The mines of Butte and Anaconda yield
11,(KM) tons per day.
The assay office at Boise shipped $23,-
041.53 in July.
The bullion receipts at the branch mint
at Denver during July were $2,001,349.48.
It is reported that the thermometer at
Dawson City has registered aa high as 110
F. this summer.
"Cemsite" is the name given a lead ore
in the form of small white needles or
fibers, slightly resembling asbestos.
The De Lamar mine in Nevada has
tried a steam wagon for transporting ores
and the result linn been so satisfactory
that a larger one has been ordered.
The highest price for silver in the lust
10 years was on August 20, 1890, when it
reached $1.19.} per ounce. It is about 50
per cent lower today.
The Hope mine near Salmon City, Idaho, is reported sold to the English syndicate which operates the Drum Lunimon
mine at Maryaville, Mont. The price waa
$75,000.
Application for a patent will not hold a
mining claim. The requisite annual assessment work must be done until final
entry ia complete and the purchase money paid.
Hon. Charles H. Mackintosh of the British America Corporation lias purchased a
residence in Vancouver, and his family
will reside there, while he will spend most
of his time in Rossland.
In ita report for the year ending June
30, 1898, the Victor (Colo.) Gold Mining
Company estimates that the cost of producing each dollar of gold value during
the year was 40 cents. '
It is said that the North .Star company
in East Kootenay is doing assessment
work on 21 claims in the vicinity of the
mine. Tlie shaft on the property is to be
sunk to the 300-foot level.
ITEMS FROM EAST AND WEST.
Fact* and Occurrence* From All
tluarter*—Matter* Curious and
Peculiar—Person* Talked About—
Accident* and Crime*.
Puerto Rlcan Commission.
Madrid, Aug. 23.—Tlie Puerto Rican
commission, it is announced, has been appointed. "Ut is* composed of Admiral Vnl-
lerino. General Ortega and Senor Carlos de
Laguilla.
ALL ABOUND MASKET BEF0BT
Wheat   (Quotation*,   Wool   Flan re*,
and   the   Price   of   Produce,
Following are the Bpokane quotations.
Wholesale prices are given unless otherwise quoted:
Wheat at the warehouse—Country
points: Club, bulk 45c, sacked 40c; blue-
stem, bulk 47c, sacked 48c. At Spokane:
Club, bulk 50c, sacked 52c; bluestem,
bulk 51c, sacked 53c.
Rye—Country point-, f. o. b., 70c per
cwt
Barley—Country points, t a b., 70®
75c per cwt
Oats—At Spokane, f. o. b., 95c per cwt
Flour—Per barrel—Gold Drop, $4.25 ;
Big Loaf, $4.65; Bauer, $4.00; Plan-
sifter, $4.50; Superb, $4.25; Spokane, $4;
Snowflake, $4.25; whole what, $4-25;
lye. $5; graham, $4.
Feed-Iran and shorts, $11 per ton;
shorts, $12; imin, $10; rolled barley, $20;
chicken feed, $18fel9.
Hay—Timothy, $8 yr ton; baled timothy, $10; wheat hay, ,"7.50@8.50; oat
hay, $7.60; alfalfa, $10.
Eggs—Ranch, $4.50.
Corn—Whole, $23; cracked, $24.
Wool—Fine medium, 6@7c per lb; medium, 5@6c per lb.
Produce—Fancy creamery batter, 40
and 00-lh tubs, 24c per lb; 5, 10 and 20-
lb tubs, 25c; prints, 24c; California butter, 25@20o lb; country butter in rolls,
13c per lb; cooking butter, 10c; eastern
creamery, prints, 23c; cheese, twin, full
cream, 12Jc; oheese, twin, skim milk, 9}
@10c
Vegetables— Potatoes, $1_» per cwt;
cabbage, $2 per cwt; turnips, $1.25 per
cwt; cucumbers, 75c per box; onions,
$1.60 per cwt; beans, 1_@1|0 per lb;
carrots, $1.25 per cwt; beets, $1.26 per
cwt
Poultry—Chickens, live weight 10®
lie per lb, dressed 12@13c; spring broil-
era, $3.00@3.50; turkeys, live, ll@12c;
dressed 12@13c; spring ducks, dressed
$4@4.50 per doz,; geese, lire 10@llc,
dressed 12®12 l-2c.
Meat*—Beef cowa, live $2.85@3.10 per
cwt; dressed $8@7; steers, live $2.85®
3.50, dressed $8@8.S0; hogs, live $4.60®
4.75, dressed $6@6.50; mutton, live 4®
41-2c, dressed 8@8 l-2c per tbj dressed
veal, 7@8c per lb; lamb, 121*- whole-
'Margin et —Fulton; - buried—hurt
Thursday, at King's Ferry, N. */., was
said to be 117 years old.
The Texas State Horticultural Society
enumerates and names 119 varieties of
plums raised in the Lono Star state.
California is preparing to establish an
experiment station and school of instruction in the grafting and planting of vines.
Governor Barnes of Oklahoma spent a
short time in the guard house at Fort
Reno last week for failing to give the
countersign.
Violent storms and floods in the Island
of Formosa resulted in the loss of hundreds of lives and great damage to property.
Denmark has placed the seaport of Copenhagen in a state of military efficiency
in fear of a conflict between England and
Russia.
The list of poetofficea in the United
States now includes Hobson, Va,; Sigsbee, Ark.; Dewey, N. C; Sampson, Fla.,
and Manila, Ky.
Prof. George F. Barker of the United
State geological survey will go to thc
Philippines to examine the coal and petroleum deposits.
Charles Poppe, an electrician, while
working with street railway wires in New
York, received a shock of 2000 volts and
escaped serious injury.
Gold has been found between London
and Manchester, on the line between Clay
and Laurel counties, Ky. A sample has
been forwarded to New York for analysis.
Late advices from Sitka, Alaska, state
that large and extensive coal deposits
have been discovered at Whale bay, on
Baranoff islands, about forty miles from
Sitka.
The superintendent of the mint at San
Francisco estimates the gold output of
the Klondike this season at not to exceed
$6,000,000. Food rioU are feared at Fort
Yukon.
Senator H. M. Teller and wife of Colorado have been spending a week in Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho,
making their headquarters at Spokane,
where on Suiurday evening a reception
was given for them by Senator and Mrs.
George Turner.
Emperor William of Germany has extended an invitation to representatives
of Evangelical churches in the United
States to attend the ceremony of dedicating the Church of the Redeemer at
Jerusalem on October 31.
In view of the success which has attended the use of dynamite guns in Cuba,
the Russian minister of marine is arranging to mount such weapons on four Russian warships. Their use will be extended
if they turn out to be satisfactory.
 The West Indian weather service was
practically inaugurated last Wednesday,
when reports were received at Washington from the observation stations established there. The system is now in complete working order, and the signal service
department will be enabled to forecast
the terrible Weat Indian hurricanes that
for years have swept the Atlantic ooast
without warning.
Sampson and Schley have been made
rear admirals; Captain Clark of the Oregon has been advanced more numbers
than any other captain, and Wainwrig'it
goes up higher than any other officer.
The war department has under consideration the establishment of army camps
as Lexington, Ky.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and
Tryon, N. C, to which the troops now ut
Chickamauga may soon be sent
Krupp is building 5-centimetcr (2-inch)
paper field guns for the German infantry.
They are so light that a single soldier
can easily carry one, while tho resistance
of the paper is greater than that of steel
of (lie same caliber.
Col. W. F. Cody received the name of
"Buffalo Bill" from the fact that he had
the contract to supply meat to the men
A laborer working on the Guerrero railroad in Mexico dropped a lighted cigarette into a cask of giant powder, and a
lo.irful explosion followed, killing three
Mexicans and tearing olf the leg of a
fourth.
After covering Michigan and Ohio attempting to obtain a marriage license,
Harry Lewis and Dora Cross of Malinta,
Ohio, were married by Squire Hague at
Napoleon. Tlie girl's parents objected to
ilie marriage.
11. Cluus of Nanaimo, B. C, who was
TO-vteted- "-f~ranrdertng -hiV~ p-rtmrs,
Burns and Henderson, while on their way
to the Klondike, cheated tho gallows by
committing suicide with strychnine, furnished by his wife.
Alias Ashing Larsen, a professional
nurse in New York City, was bitten by a
mosquito at Mystic, Conn. The insect's
poison baffled all medical traitmcjit, and
sho died in great agony. Her face was
greatly swollen and disfigured.
The pen which was used by (Secretary
Day in signing the peace protocol wus
given to Chief Clerk Michael of the state
department, who had bespoken it. M.
Thibeaut, secretary of the French embassy, secured that used by the French
ambassador.
The Michigan peach crop is much better
and larger than last year. The early varieties are ripe and the peach season in
that state will 'be fully open next week.
Michigan peach growers say they can
make money selling peaches ut 20 cents a
bushel this year.
Alexander La Duke of the Second Wisconsin has been convicted by court-martial at Ponce, Puerto Rico, of killing
Thomas Stafford, a regular army private,
in a wine room at Ponce, and sentenced
to life imprisonment in the penitentiary
at Leavenworth, Kus.
At the sugar conferences in Brussels the
delegates of Great Britain, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Belgium and Holland were
ready to propose the abolition of bounties, while those of France and Russia insisted on their retention. Sweden and
Spain would agree to anything.
Vigorous measures will be taken in
Madagascar to prevent the extinction of
the population. After next year every
man 25 years of age who can not show
that ho is the fa t her of a child, legitimate
or illegitimate, will pay an annual tax of
$3. Childless women over 25 years of age
will pay $1.50.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson of Brooklyn, N.
Y., left their home last week for a visit to
New Haven, Vt, leaving three little children alone in their residence, witli but Id
cents for food. The children were rescued
from starvation by the Children's Society,
and an order was issued by the court for
the arrest of the parents.
BUILDING OUTDOOR FIBES.
NO ^AY FOR THE INSURGENTS.
Witli tlie Sponl»li Army Out of Cuba,
•Mere I* No Hea*ou for the Cu-
hiuix to Ilenmln Under Arins-A
1'Ikii for Future Payment.
THE  UNIFORMS  OP  SOLDIEBs
Austrian  Umy  la  the   Least   Fatal
Color on the Battle Field
Seasonable     Suggestions    for   Proa-
pectlve Campers.
The camping out days have come and
the person who can make a good lire under disadvantages has a proud position
and is likely to be the star of the camp.
There is a widespread idea that It takes
deep occult lore to build a good camp
fire in the rain, knowledge that must be
learned from gypsies or Indians. Gypsies and Indians know how to do it, but
there is nothing mysterious in tlie accom-
plisliment. Any one can learn it To
begin with, you must learn to keep your
matches dry—and before that, to be sure
you have matches. Leather match cases
are likely to let the matches get damp;
carry a metal one. Then always make a
'habit of having some old newspaper in
your best protected- pocket You can
get on without it, but it is good woodcraft to do things the easiest way, and
the paper makes firebuilding easy. Select a place for the fire where it won't set
either timber or tents ablaze.
Clear the ground around it of inflammable trash; a few stones roughly piled
up between it and - the wind will often
save more time than it takes to gather
and place them.
If everything Is soaking look for a
fallen tree or an old stump; shave off the
surface at one spot and then you can get
good dry splinters from the old wood beneath; often a little "grubbing" in the
-^hnygor-AHgv-_2r^-W4i_l_-«to_-_lt
patehto the Inter Ocean sayu:
President McKinley and the members
of Iii8jcahinct arc unanimous in the determination that one of the first official acts
toward bringing about a restoration 61
peace und order in Cuba ahull be the dis-
bandij*.i'iit of the Cuban army. As there
is no longer a Spanish army in the field
in Culfa, there is no longer any reason for
the wjiatenoe of tlie Cuban army, and it
is therefore to be regularly mustered out
of seriiie. The government has no idea,
however, of adopting the quixotic idea of
paying the Cuban soldiers fur their services luring the war or assuming the responsibility for their payment. If the
idea were not in itself altogether a fanciful one there are at least three good reasons Why, in the opinion of the president,
it would not he wise to adopt it:
1. 'Die United .States would not under
any cmuii-sUiiices bo justilied in paying
a debt it does not owe.
2. There i.s no appropriation out of
which such payment could he made, and
it would he necessary for congress to first
appropriate the money.
3. To place such a large sum of money
as would lie required in the hands of the
destitute and impoverished rank and file
of the insurgent army would result in
their utter deiiuirali/.atinii and be responsible for nil sorts of disorders.
IMiui for Payment
The president has, however, a plan in
mind by which the insurgent army cun
be disbanded without the necessity of
turning the soldiers adrift witli no sort of
recognition of their services. The plan
contemplates tbe grunting of an honorable discharge to each soldier, accom
panied by a certificate of service and i
promissory obligation, signed by the Cuban general in chief, to be made good out
of the public resources when the Cubans
shall have established the stable government which the United States has pledged
itself to help bring into existence.
In addition to thus providing for the
soldiers of the Cuban army, the plan under consideration by the president con
templates the mustering into the United
States volunteer army of a large number
of Cuban soldiers who are American citizens. Their services could be used to good
advantage as members of the various immune regiment- to be maintained on gar-
rison duly in Cuba.
Tho plan above outlined has the approval of some of the highest officer's of
the Cuban army, nnd is likely to be put
into operation very soon. '
THE   PRESIDENT   AT   OMAHA
Wheat.
Tacoma, Aug. 22.—Exporters quote
club wheat at 54c and bluestem at 57®
58c. For milling purposes club wheat ii
quoted at 57c and bluestem at flOe.
Portland, Aug. 22.—Wheat,  unchanged; nominal export value; Walla Walla,
57c; valley and bluestem, 00c.
Metal*.
San Francisco, Aug. 22.—Silver bars,
581c
Mexican dollars, 46|@40}c,
Lake copper—Quiet; brokers', #11JW.
Lead-Firm, |8.80.
stump or underneath the log will bring
who were constructing the Kansas Pacific! forth a handful of good" dry wood with-
railroad, and that he almost always gave out any use of the knife. Gather dead
them buffalo meat. twigs from the trees,   not     from    the
Our war with Spain lasted three months 'ground; build your pile witli care; hurry
and twenty-two days. I makes worry 'here and it is to be hoped
A plague of roaches infest* the northern ' you wear a broad hat so that you can
portion of West Philadelphia. | protect the infant blaze   from   untimely
The Piccadilly Club of Cincinnati will  breezes with it.
present a loving cup to Admiral Dewey.  •
C. XX. Clifford, a legless man, and who Will Do Double Duty.
only hae one arm, v-ns arrested at Au-      Washington, Aug. 23.—Admiral Samp-
burn, Ind., charged with horse stealing.      son will retain command of the north At-
Bunnock Indians who have 'been slaugh- hmtic fleet, notwithstanding his service on
tering elk near Jackson's Hole, Idaho, the Cuban military commission, and Ad-
will be driven back to their reservation.      miiul Schley will continue in his present
Divers in Lake Huron have recovered naval command, although serving tem-
000 tons of copper from a wreck 100 feet porarily on the Puerto Rican commission,
deep, after it had lain there for 32 years. This statement was made authoritatively
While cutting tobacco near Lancaster, at the navy department yesterday.
Pa., Henry Ban* stopped to pick up a
He   Will   Attend   the   Peace   Jubilee
There ln October.
Omaha, Aug. 22. —President G. W.
Wattles, of the trans-Mississippi exposi
tion, has received a dispatch from Afan
agcr E. Rosewater at Washington stating
that President McKinley has given a positive assurance of his consent to be the
guest of the exposition during the grand
peace jubilee, which will be the feature of
early October.
Mr. Rosewater has not received acceptances from the cabinet officers, but from
private sources it is learned that there is
little doubt that a majority will uccom-
pany the president to Omaha in October.
The peace jubilee will bc the "big week
of the exposition. Kuch day of the week
will be marked hy some special demonstration. One day will be president's day,
another governors' day, another nrmy and
navy day, and so on throughout the week.
A number of the greatest orators and
most distinguished statesmen of the United States will contribute to the oratorical
features of the celebration, and efforts are
being made to have a grund review of volunteer troops.
FIERCE FOREST FIRES   RAGE.
Deatroylng   Forty  Square  Miles
Moods in California.
of
stalk and gouged one of his eyes out with
his cutter.
Father Kozlowski,  recently excoinniu
Died From Suffocation.
Berlin,   Aug.   22. -The   Berliner   Post
says that during a recent voyage of tlie
nicated, filed his threatened suit against Siberian convict ship Angara from Tcum,
Archbishop Feehan nt Chicago for $50,-  Siberia, to  Tomsk, capital  of the gov
000 damages.
A trolley car on the Nassau line of
Brooklyn jumped from the track in New
York city. Thirty persons are reported
to have been seriously injured.
Italy is the first of the powers to learn
a lesson from the war. The navy department has given orders that wood shall not
be used on battleships.
Thb American colony at Sydney, New
South Wales, has cabled to Washington
praying the government to retain posses-
won of the Philippine islands.
Princess  Kaiuhini of Hawaii and Cap
tain P. Bradley Strong, son of ex-Mayor! has promoted Captain Charles D. Sigsbee,' year
Strong of New York, are engaged to be j U. S. N., now commanding the St Paul,
married.   The   announcement   has   been by advancing him three numbers on the
made in Honolulu. list of captains in the navy for "cxtraor-
A Hong Kong dispatch says that the dinary heroism."
officials of the Manila cable are anxiously
I eminent of Uie same name on the Tom,
West Siberia, 35 out of 300 prisoners died
from suffocation and overcrowding.
Fierce Forest Fire.
Pasadena, Oil., Aug. 22.—The fire in
the mountains is already twice as great
as that of July, and is still gaining. It
haa held its own for six days and has
devastated a territory 40 square miles in
extent.
Pasadenn, Cal., Aug. JM.-The Ore In
the mountains la already twice as great
as that of July, and Is still gaining. It
haa held Its own for six days and baa
devastated a territory 40 square miles In
extent.
Tonight the flame* are gaining headway
every hour. They are preying upon the
best waterheads of the San Gabriel reservation, and lt is almost appalling to think
of the rulr. they may wreak. The men
who are lighting the fire will work all
night.
A call for reinforcements haa been made
and a desperate endeavor will be made
to protect the San Gabriel canyon, Baton's canyon and the Tejunga, all of which
are endangered.
The 40 miles of woods overwhelmed in
ruins can not be summed up ln dollars
and cents, as they are Inaccessible, but
hundreds of thousands of dollars would
be required to represent Its worth to this
valley aa a conservator of moisture.
The ideal uniform should be suitable
for the season and tlie place and circumstances under which it is worn. The color should 'be that which mostly resembles
that of dried grass, so tliat soldiers wearing it should be as little in evidence as
possible. Tho red and glaring uniforms
°1 tlie British soldier of years ago has bean
entirely discarded by that government
for the reason that it too clearly indicated
the wearer to an enemy. It proved
to be the most fatal color that haa yet
been devised. On the other hand, statistics provo that the Austrian gray is the
least fatal. Where seventeen soldiers
wearing the British red fell by the bullets of an enemy only seven who wore
rifle green, six and a half who wore
brown, and five who wore the Austrian
bluish-gray fell. General Robert E. Lee
who made an investigation into this matter when he was in charge of West Point,
before the war of the Rebellion, made a
report in favor of gray as the color for
uniforms, and ever since then the cadets
at West Point have worn uniforms of
that color, lt was also for this same reason that General Lee adopted the gray-
colored uniform for the Confederate army.
The crack regiments of the country, the
Seventh regiment of New York, the Fifth
regiment of Maryland, and others wore
gray uniforms before the war in consequence of General Lee'a report. There is
no doubt that soldiers are hit in battle
according to Uie color of their uniform.
In the last war the union cause lost many
a thousand men who would not have been
lost had the uniform been less decided in
color. The dark blue uniforms worn by
officers the first two years of Uie war
were especially fatal, as they gave sharpshooters an easy way to distinguish officers. It is needless to say that the dark
blue waa very generally discarded by
officers before the war was over, especially
for real engagement uniform. Any color
will do for parades, practice and the like,
but when it comes to fighting Uiat which
makes the soldier less conspicuous is the
least fatal for war. The new canvas uniform affords less opportunities to an
enemy than any other which has ever
been designed, and from a distance an
approaching army can hardly be distinguished by the naked eye, because the
color is so allied to that of the dried grass
over which the army is marching.
Powder Mill  B-plosloa.
Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 23.—A tremendous explosion at the plant of the
Chattanooga Powder Company at Oolte-
wah station. 18 miles from here, killed two
white men, Lucius B. Angiin and Harton
Mortchke, and wounded seriously, if not
fat-ally, six others. Tlie plant was destroyed by fire.
In   all   Spanish-America the   Indiana
form the great mass of the population.
Kaslo & Slocan
TIME CARD NO. 1.
Subject to change without notice.
Trains run on Pacific standard time.
Going West Going East
Leave Daily. Arrive.
8:00 am Kaalo 3:50 p. m.
8:30 iu m... South Fork ...3:15 p. m.
0:36 ii. m   Sproule.  ....2:15 p. m.
0:51 a. m... Whitewater ...2:00 p. m.
10:03 a. in.... Bear Lake ...1:48 p. m.
10:18 a. m.... McGuigan ....1:33 p. in.
10:38 a. m— Junction ....1:12 p. ra.
Arrive. Leave.
10:50 a. m  Sandon  1:00 p. m.
CODY UNE.
-e*v« 11:00 s. ro...  Sandon  ..Arrlv* 11:15 p. m.
An-lv* 11:10 a. m.... Cody ....L*sv* 11:8 ». m.
ROBERT IRVINO,
Gen. Freight and Pass. Agt
GEO. E COPELAND, Supt
Cable Now Works.
Washington, Aug. 22.—Major General Merritt has notified the department
that the cable from Hong Kong to Manila is again in operation.
Painter Mrulraso Is Dead.
Madrid, Aug. 23. — Thc death ia an-
Cnpt. Slg*bee Promoted. no'unced of Don  Frederico Madiiuso, the
Washington, Aug. 23. —The president  celebrated Spanish painter, in  his  84th
awaiting permission to repair, and a cable
steamer is now waiting at Singapore for
instructions.
The loftiest cliff on the coast of England is Beachy Head, the height of which
j is 504 feet.
Parisian barbers are legally compelled
to wash their hands after attending a
customer and beforo waiting on another.
They must also use only nickel-plated
combs.
Powdered rice checks bleeding from
cuts.
Navigation and Trading
Company,
LIMITED.
Steamers "International" and "Albert*"
on Kootenay Lake and River.
Five-Mile Point connection with all
passenger trains of N. k F. 8. R. R. to
and from Northport, Rossland and Spokane. Tickets and baggage checked to all
United States points.
Leave Kaslo for Nelson and way points,
daily, except Sunday, 6:46 a. m. Arrive
Northport 12:15 p. in.; Rossland, 3:40 p.
m.; Spokane, 6 p. m.
Ijeave Nelson for Kaslo and way points
daily, except Sunday, 4:35 p. m.   Ijeave
Spokane, 8 a. m.; Rossland, 10:30 a. m.j
Northport, 1:60 p. m.
NEW SERVICE ON KOOTENAY LAKE
Ijeave Nelson for Kaalo, etc., Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday
at 8:30 a. m.; arrive Kaslo, 12:30 p. m.
Leave Kaslo for Nelson, etc., Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,
4 p. m.; arrive Nelson, 8 p. m.
BONNER'S FERRY AND KOOTENAY
RIVER SERVICE
Leave Kaslo Saturday 4 ji. m.; arrive
Boundary midnight; arrive Bonner's Ferry Sunday 10:30 a. m.
Leave Bonner's Ferry Sunday 1 p. m.j
arrive Boundary Sunday 6 p. m.; arrive
Kaslo Sunday 10 a. m.
Close connection at Bonner's Ferry with
trains eastbound, leaving Spokane 7:40
a. m., and westbound arriving Spokane
7 p. in.
O. ALEXANDER, Gen. Manager.
Kaalo, B. C, Oct 1, 1897.
timmmmmm n» j miniw** Not Ready for Sacrifice.
"The doctor would like to see you  Inside,"
lam  lh* nmld  to  th* caller  ln  the reception
"Not much," said the **t_rtled pntlent, " he
can't try any X ray on me."—Boston Traveler.
Of the 143 holders of the Victoria Cross
no fewer than 14 are army surgeons.
I Have
NaStemaeh-
Said a Jolly man of 40, of almost alder.
nianio rotundity, "since taking Hood's
Sarsaparilla." What he menus was that
this grand digestive tonio had so completely cured all distress and disagreeable
dyspeptic symptoms that he lived, ate and
slept lu comfort. You may be put into
this delightful condition if you will take
parillb
dlclne.
Hood's Sarsa
America's Greatest Mei
When Other Remedies
Have Failed
to give relief in Rheumatism, Constipation, Kidney Troubles, etc., try Thermal
Baths with Electricity and Massage
Treatment, by male and female attendants, at the
Alhambra Baths
Company,
(Iranlte Block. SPOKANE.
You will lie satisfied with the result
SIX KILLED TWENTY-SIX HURT
lerrllile AeeMent In Hallrond Station ut Nh,m,„, M-.*.-'!*,-,, see-
• Ion* of B Trn|n 8miul|lM| ,n(o
Each Other, Telescoping Curs.
Founded
1870.
Bishop Scott loidemy
A 1 oardlnx snd Day Bobool for boys,
j-llliury discipline In charts ot 6. 8,
Araiy o llcer. l'runary, preparatory
and ncmleinW: departments. Manual
Training or dlo-'d b*s recently been In.
stalled. Boys uf sll age* received.
Special Instruction In music, modern
language*, stenography. Through college preparation * s|>eclalty. Tbe
Cbristinas term will open Hepieinher
mill, ISIM. C'alaliuiue on appiicatiou lo
tbe principal, J. W. IIII.I.. M. 1), P.
O.   Drawer 17. Port land. Or.
THE NEW GCNZAGA COLLEGE.
-I'OKANR, WASH.
Conducted    lij    the   Ji-xnlt    Father*.
KICV.   JAMK8   IIKII1I \N\,   8.  J.,
President.
Cla**e*  open  8eiit.  7th.
rjr/ifi/S/<ifr ^
(lives* training that qiialllles the student
fur a practical business Ilie, at buokkeeier,
aleuofrapher, teacher, or general accountant.
HKND roll ('ATALOtiU-.
II. C. BLAIR, A. II., Ma.
Cor. 1st and Post. HPOKANK, WASH.
BUY THE GENUINE-
SYRUP OF FIGS
... MANUl-AtTnjRED   BT ...
CALIFORNIA FIO SYRUP CO.
OT NOTK TBE MASK.	
li It Wroof
Get It Right
KeepItR!|ht
YOUR LIVER
MssiVi I*«sds4 a*medy will do K. Thr*
Inn will ■--• yea ImI better.    «.t It !*••
Cdruiflst ee aay w-«l**-Udrat moam, m
Stewart A _•*_-.** Dr o* 0»- maaHuk.
Cutler's Garbolate of Iodine.
Guaranteed cur* Tor Catarrh and Consumption.
All Urugglsls. 11.00. W. H-Buntb, Buflslo, N. Y..
Sole proprietor.
OPIUM
IMOBPHINS
COOAINB
I LAIDAM *•
isdston.
Da. J.C. Horrm-i.tM Isabella «ld«,-aicago.i;
S1rfti*on7-Sru~9_, Aug. 22.-A frightful
rear end collision occurred in the Sharon
Btation of tlie Now York, New Haven 4
Uuitford railroad at 7:30 o'clock last
night, when an express train which was
running us the second section of a long
tram crashed into tlie first section, com-
posed of locul cars. As a result six persons were killed and 20 seriously injured.
Tlie injured were nearly all removed to
Iloston on a special train, which was met
hy ambulances und surgeons. The rear
cur of the locul train wus completely demolished and a portion of the second
car, while the engine of the express train
was crippled.
The Ueud.
Tho dead are: Franklin M. Waters,
Somcrville, Matt; Mrs. W. J. Fitzpatrick.
Boston; her granddaughter, Mary KHz-
Dfltrick, a 10 year-old girl; her grandson,
15 years old; a woman supposed to he
Mrs. Watson of Westerly, It. Lj Mrs. 11.
C. Briscoe, ltovere.
The   Injured.
The injured urc: Junies If. Fitzpatrick,
18 years old, Boston; J. H. Whitcomb,
Boston; Mrs. J. if. Wliiteomb, Boston;
Mrs. James Ruy and her aged mother,
Jamaica Plains; Mr. Crockett, Somcrville, Mass.; Mrs. Alice Urainan, South
Boston; Mr, und Mrs. Ericsson and child;
Daniel C. Cantor, D. C. McOann, South
Boston; Fred Tudor, South Boston; J.
Ogden, Lowell; Mrs. J. Qgden, Lowell;
Mrs. Muggie O'Connor and two children;
Ueorgo Quinn, Providence; Miss Fitzpatrick, Boston, 8 years old; Mr. and Mrs.
John Cordon, Boston; O. W. D.iduiau,
Boston; Mrs. Ida M. Walker, Wultham;
J. I'liilipps, Boston; A. K. Newark,
Pittsburg; Joseph M. Mann, Providence;
Mrs. Delia V. Brennnn, South Boston;
Marguerite M. Crimsliaw, Somerville.
AIDED BY MRS. PINKHAM.
Mrs W K Pax-ton, Youngtown,
North Dakota, writes about her struggle to regain health after the birth of
her little girl:
" Dear Mas. Pinkhai*"*.—It is with
pleasure that f add my testimony to
your list, hoping that it may induce
others to avail themselves of your valuable medicine.
"After the birth of my little girl,
three years ago, my health was very
poor. 1 had leucorrhcea badly, and a
terrible bearing-down pain which
gradually grew worse, until I could do
no work. Also had headache nearly
all the time, and dizzy feelings. Menstruations were very profuse, appearing every two weeks.
" I took medicine from a good doctor,
but it seemed to do no good. I waa
becoming alarmed over my condition,
when 1 read your advertisement in a
paper. I sent at once for a bottle of
Lydia E. Plnkham's Vegetable Com-
poimd, and after taking two-thirds of
the bottle I felt so much better that I
send for two more. After using three
bottles I felt as strong and well aa any
one.
"I think it is the best medicine for
female weakness ever advertised, and
recommend it to every lady 1 meet suffering from this trouble."
Maternity is a wonderful experience
and many women approach it wholly
unprepared. Childbirth under right
conditions need not terrify women.
The advice of Mrs. Pinkham is freely
offered to all expectant mothers, and
her advice i.s beyond question the most
valuable to be obtained. If Mrs. Pax-
ton had written to Mrs Pinkham before confinement she would have been
saved much suffering. Mrs. Pinkham a
address la Lynn, Mass.	
-Ulllllll IIUIHiTTTT 	
A Beautiful Present
I. order te further Introduce ELASTIC STABCB (Flat Iron Brandy,
the inaB-facturers, J. C. Hubinger Bros. Co., of Keokuk, Iowa, hart
decided to OIVB AWAY a beautiful preaent with each package* el
Warn told.  These presents are in the form of
Beautiful Pastel Pictures
Th_y an ijai* Inches *n alxe.and arc entitled ai followet
Lilacs and
Pansies.
Pansies
and
Marguerite*.
m$3az*m H
f wvw/e
--lip*
Wild
American
Popples.
Lilacs and
Iris.
tv... -im alctares. four In number, by the renowned Mitel ertf-it,
R?_Rov o7 f?ew York, have been chosen from the very choice* aubjecti
I." m- 2S-U *ndI are now offered for the first time to the public
Mctur« are accuTatcly reproduced In all the colore -ed in the orig
i.Ia._„Ji .«Tnronounced by competent critics, works of art.
fetef Dicing are the cyorrectPthing for the home, oethi-f nrpu-bf
JilnbK"chnese ofcolor and artistic merit.
w,Kipp: Elastic Starch
with e.cj R^?^ "7," rtTbest laundry starch on th. market, and
CSWioffiVlSW. 3 your grocJfar this starch and f< .
mi.,' J, .u__i- . m. fSJSi
iionTi*ie~Acei_e_t ue-nrre-.	
The two trains which were in the collision wero usually combined into one
long train, but as the trullic today wits
so heavy it was divided, the first section
running as a local accommodation, while
the second, whieh started from Mansfield
15 minutes later than the first, ran as an
express. The local train due at Sharon
at 7:0*2 was 13 minutes late, lt left Muni-
tield on time, making two stops, and had
lost 13 minutes between Mansfield and
Slumm. lt woe due in (Vinton Junction,
the uaxt station beyond Sharon, two minutes ahead of the express train, which
should huve passed it there. Slumm is
situated on a eurve and both the outward
and inward tracks are protected by electric block signals. After the accident
it was thought the block signals protecting the inward track were set at danger,
showing, as it was intended, that thsre
was a train in the station.
There was no warning given by the
conductor of the Mansfield local to show
the track was not clear at the station,
and it woe not until he was within 300
feet of the station that the engineer of
the express noticed anything wrong. He
immediately set all brakes and whistled
a warning, hut it was too late to stop
the express, lt crashed into the rear
car, splitting it asunder and completely
demolishing it with the exception of the
roof. Its speed was not slackened until
the engine had penetrated fully five feet
into the rear of the second car. Thc es-
euping steam entered the car and badly
scalded a number of the occupants. The
roof of the last car woe forced on top
of the engine of the express and remained there, as the only portion of the car
intact.
Thr   Engineer'*   Story.
Engineer Getchcll and Fireman Holmes
of the express train both jumped. Getchcll was cut and bruised about the head.
He stated after the accident that he left
Mansfield promptly on time, and there
was no incident until he was within 400
feet of Uie Mansfield train. Then he saw
the red lights of thnt train and shut off
steam. Meanwhile he hud whistled for
brakes and used every effort to stop his
train.
Kvery one of the killed and injured was
on the Mansfield local, and the only explanation of tlie fact that the number of fatalities is not larger is that the
passengers were all in the forward end
of the car in the act of alighting it
the station.
There were about 30 people in the last
car, and most of them at thc time of the
accident were either upon the front platform or standing by thu door.
Mary Fitzpatrick, 10 years old, was taken from the wreck unconscious and died
just ns thc special train bearing the injured started for Boston. Twenty-one of
the injured were taken on this train and
four others whose names they refuse to
disclose remained in Sharon.
The seene about tlie little station nt
Sharon was a terrible one. A huge corps
of surgeons and two undertakers arrived
soon after the accident and immediately set to work to relieve the suffering and
care, for the bodies of the deuil.
There wero few lights about that portion of the track where the nccident occurred and the surgeons were compelled
to do their work in almost total dark-
WATEE SUPPLY IS CURTAILED.
The I illi.Hum Limit tlie Water nl
Manila— They Are I isIIt to Govern TheiuNelve*—New (.nverntir uf
l.uimi Till.i-n I"rl*»ner nnd Carried to Manila.
MILES COMING HOME.
Arrangement*   Made   for   Wurk   of
the ('ominl**lon.
LIME, BRICK, AND POTTERY.
HendtiH your order for I'reaBeilI Brick, Co-        i
-Mm, Pottery, Plaster. Hair, Cement, o
Ihe buKg^ine, and ,'t will teattemle,
Washington Brick, Lime and Mfg Co.,  -
Common Brick
or anything in
1 to promptly.
SPOKANE, WASH.
Ponce. Aug. 22.—General Miles bai de*
elded to leave with his stuff for Washington in a few days, possibly tomorrow,
lie will turn over the command to (ieneral
Brooke.
Miles has arranged matters generally
with Captain General Macian, preparatory lo the meeting of the pence commission ai San Jinn. Mucins, while maintaining the outposts, is steadily retiring
his forces to thc capital preparatory to
embarkation.
Mail communication between Ponce
and Snn Joan has been re*00tabUe_ed, and
the overland telegraph wires, which have
heen severed, will he connected immediately. All that will remain to do, Miles
says, will bc to secure nn inventory of the
government property there to be transferred to the I'nited Stntes.
Mucins has shown the best spirit. Be
is noxious to co-operate in bringing about
the evacuation at the earliest moment possible nnd is placing no obstacles in the
wny of the volunteers returning home.
Order  Prevail* at  Han  Juan.
New York, Aug. 22.—A dispatch to the
Herald from Sun Juan snys:
Order prevail*, all hough some evilly disposed persons are trying to stir up racial
nnd religious differences among the Ignorant portion of the people. The sooner the
commission in rives to settle matters aiid
dispel doubU the better for the future.
The streets arc filled with fiiiniture-
laden carts returning from the suburbs.
At the palaM and other government build
ings the work of packing the archives i".
going on. Telegraphic communiiiition wns
opened yesterday with a.l parts of thc island.
lt is still impossible for large ships to
enter the harbor and there have been no
Importation*. Bona scarcity of food supplies exists. The mines in the hnrlior have
lieen railed so as to allow the ships to enter.
Woman   Aeronaut   Wn*  Killed.
New York, Aug. 22.—Addie Christiansen, a balloon performer, was killed at
Bergen beach by a fall of several hundred
feet.     Her piinichnle fniled to open.
New York, Aug. 22.—A dispatch to the
World from Manila eays:
The natives control the water supply
of Manila and refuse to allow the wuter
to run except for a few hours each day.
They have demonstrated that they are in-
cujiuble of self-government.
The fourth American expedition, whieh
left Sun Francisco July 15, in coinmund of
General Otis, arrived today.   All are well.
The monitor. Monadnock arrived August 10. On the way over she stopped at
the Lndrone island of Guam, which had
heen seized by the first expedition. She
found that a Spaniard had repudiated the
American rule and set up a government
on his own account. Captain Whiting of
the Monadnock promptly upset this new
government, made the usurper a prisoner
and brought him here.
Brigadier General McArthur has appointed as provost marshal Colonel Over-
shine of the Twenty-third regulars, and
for deputy marshal Colonel Smith of the
California volunteers. Brigadier General
Greene has been appointed fiscal administrator and Colonel Whittier collector of
custom-.
The total number of denths in the campaign is 25 and of the wounded 100. Private C. Dunn of the Astor battery and
Captain Bjornestcd Burscn of the Minnesota volunteers have died of their wounds
since the buttle. The other wounded ofti-
«ers and men are doing well.
Paymaster General tiinnton has ordered
three paymasters with funds to go to Manila to pay the troops there. They will
sail from San Francisco in a day or two.
Adjutant General Corbin has cabled
General Merritt to send a list of the
wounded at Manila.
DEAFNESS CAN NOT BE CURED
Bv local applications, a* they can not reach th*
diseased portion ot the ear. There la only one
way to cure deafness, and that' Is by constitutional remedies. Deafness Is caused by an Inflamed condition of the mucous lining ot the
Eustachian Tube. When this tube Is Inflamed
you have a rumbling sound or Imperfect hearing, and when It Is entirely closed, Deafness Is
the result, and unless the Inflammation can be
taken out, and this tube restored to Its normal
condition, hearing will be destroyed forever;
nine case* out of ten are caused by Catarrh,
which Is nothing but an Inflamed condition of
the mucou* surface*.
We will give One Hundred Dollars for any
case of Deafness (caused by catarrh) that can
not be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. Bend for
circular*; free.
F. J. CHENEY ft CO., Toledo, O.
Bold by Druggists, 75c.
Hall'* Family Pill* are the best
The Belfast Irish News has declared
a dividend of 12} per cent and that in a
city where in previous years no Nationalist organ was ever able to make ends
meet.
ST. MARY'S HALL--*. BOARDING AND
day school for girls. Primary, preparatory
and academic course. Music, German, Ftench,
drawing, painting and elocution taught by
spe'.lalliits. For Information address W) Pa-
cltto  Ave.,   Bpokane.   Wash.
Wine-tasters eat a small piece of bread,
with a scrap of cheese, between samples,
to insure an unprejudiced taste.
riff Permanently Cured, No fits or nervouaaes
■ llo after first day's use or Dr. Kline's Ureal
Nervr rlestorer. Bend for Flti-.K •-coo trial
bottle and treatise. DR. It. 11. -.'jINB, Ltd., wo
Arch street, Philadelphia. 1 _
Great Britain's volunteer force of 240,-
000 is maintained at a cost of under
$4,000,000 a year—less than $20 a head;
We will forfeit 11000 if any of our published testimonials are proven to be not
genuine.     The Hso Co., Warren, 1'a.
The average walking pace of a healthy
ni.in or woman is said to bc 75 steps a
minute.
Try  Schilling's  Best  tea  and  baking powder.
There is some talk of starting a daily
paper in Jerusalem.
WI
xus*.w+*l>+*u**'u*****V*'M*+>w+****>»***
••A Perfect Type of the Highest Order ef
Excellence in Manufacture."
WalterBaKer&Gols
Breakfast
gcoa
Absolutely Pure,
Delicious,
Nutritious.
, ..Costs less man QUE CEirr a Cop..
He sure thai you gel the Genuine Article,
made st DORCHBSTBR, MASS. by
WALTER BAKES & CO. Ltd.
ESTASUIHID 1780.
^Isu/h^s\\weiaa1m\l^tml0m^0aaai
CURE YOURSELFI
l -■* Hn: -"-J for iiniiiii in ui
ill-. Inn r- -\ in tin ri m nit i.-n->.
111 iliiti'-u-1    .-I    ul--I'tiili..nn
<-f     III  tlrn UF*      IIU'TlllirilNi'M.
I'uinl.'H*, ftii-l nut i.Mt 1111 -
Ith-EvansCh-MicalCo. *''nt ,,r M«««u».
Nold by DrnffffUU,
'or Mil •» pii»l 11 wrnppfir,
l»y UEprwii   irtfud. for
•n«i. or 'A bottl.*, I'.,-..
I'm ul vr   h. nt rm   i-!--ni--Mt.
X.   v   t'.
No. :..-., -!>s.
ui   PISO'S  CURE   FOR
CURES WHtRl All ELSE FAILS. _
He*ti:ouKh Byrup. Taste* Uood. Use
In time,   Hnlit by drugslsts.
^    CONSUMPTION
CONSUMPTION
CAN BE CURED
Doctor SlocumrSystei
Proven Beyond Any Doubt Its
Positive Power Over the
Dread Disease*
EXTERMINATING   THE   CURSE   OF   AGES
By Special Arrangement with the Doctor, Three Free Bottles
Will be Sent to AU Readers of This Paper.
The Doctor Slocum System,
aa the name implies, is a comprehensive ana complete system of treatment,/ which attacks every vulnerable point
of the disease and completely
vanquishes it. It leaves no
point unguarded; it leaves
no phase of the trouble neglected; it cures, and cures
forever,Weak Lungs, Coughs,
Bronchitis, Catarrh.
CoiiHumption and all
other throat and lung
diseases by absolutely mm
obliterating the cause.
Editorial Note.—The Doctor Slocum System is Medicine reduced to an
Exact Science by the World's most Famous Physician. All readers of this paper,
anxious regarding the health of themselves, children, relatives or friends, may
have three free bottles as represented in the above illustration, with complete
directions, pamphlets, testimonials, a-rice, _to-, by Ko_«Ain-< their full addresa to
Dr. T. A. Slocum, the Slocum Building, New York City. This is a plain, honest,
straightforward offer, and is made to introduce the merits of The New System of
Treatment that Cures, and we advise all sufferers to accept this philanthropic
offer at once. When writing the Doctor please mention this paper. All letters
receive immediate and careful attention.
If You Suffer
From Epilepsy, Epileptic Spells, Fits,
St. Vitus' Dance, Falling Sickness,
Vertigo, etc., have children or
relatives that do so, or know
people that are afflicted,
My New Discovery,
Epilepticide,
Will cure them, and all you are asked to
do is to send for a Free Bottle and try it.
I am quite prepared to abide by the
result. It has cured thousands where
everything else has failed. Please give
full name, AWE, and postoffice and
express address
WM. H. MAY, M.D., May Laboratory,
" Not to take a cure for en otherwise fatal ]
disease Is to practically commit ■ uicide." 94 Pine St., New York City.
Editor's Note.—All sufferers arc advised to send for Gratuitous Expert Advice and a Free
Bottle of this New Discovery, which is an Unfailing Cur* for any and all of the 1 rightful forms of
Epilepsy and allied nervous diseases.   When writing Doctor May, please mention this paper.
ipw^to svm.s
nivorn   1*   Wive nml  \\ .11.
Madrid, Aug. 22.—Tlie report    onlilcil
from Gibraltar   that Genual   1'iinio  tie
Rivera, former governor gtneral  of  the
Philippines, luiil been shot is without
veiiiioiticiu. General Rivera, it is alleged,
is iii good health.
-lliiilellne   lloiiton    \enr    Il.nili.
s.in Francisco, Aug. 2:1. MadelineBou*
ton, late lending lady of the Frawley Dm*
nuitic Company, ii lying nt the point o'
de_th iis the result of a recent surgical
operation.
Those   WnnilcrliiK   MrthodUta.
BaptW Cl.ricynmn-I ilnn't see how you
Hathodlat uunlMiis can cvi-r lie contented In
beaven.
Methods!- C1*l*IJ*tna_—Well, I'd like to know
why mil?
llHIillst f|. i-Rvman—Yon nren't USM to stay-
|ng iv.T 11  y. nr* In one place.—New York
Journal.
A    WELL   DESERVED    HONOR.
1.lein..iiiiiii   Mill*   liml.- Superintendent at West I'ulnt.
TTtT   Al.I.KN'S   rOOT-KAIB.
A powder to be shaken Into the shoes.
At this sea-ion your feet feel swollen, nervous, and hot, and get tired easily. If you
hive smarting feet or iii;lit snoes, try
Allen's Fo'it-F.ase. It cools the feet ana
makes walking easy. Cures swollen and
sweating feet, blisters and rallous spots.
Relieves corns and bullions of all pain and
fives rest and comfort. Ten thousand tes-
iiiiom.ils ( I 1 -inen. Try it loiiuy. Sold by
all druggists nnd shoe stores for 2fic. Sent
by mail for'.'.V in stamps. Trial package
FREE, .villi.-us Allen 8. Olmsted, Le
Boy, New York-
A DUggel of gold weighing 1,030 ounces
and valued it $82,500 has been found it
Kanownn in West Australia.
The hone) bee wai Imported from Kngland.
New Vork, Aug. 22.—A special to the
Herald from Washington *j_y*ji
For the tlrst time in the history of the
United Stales a first lieutenant will be
made superintendent of the militury academy. The officer to be thus honored ll
First Lieutenant Alfred S. Mills of the
First cavalry, one of the heroes of Santiago, who now has temporary rank as
captain us a member of (ieneral Young's
stair. The president made this selection
per-ton-nlly and tis a reward for gullunt
conduct tut the storming of Ben Juan
heights.
Hurl.   Mini.iin   Sunk.
'Aldcnliurg, Kng., Aug. 23.—The Norwegian hark Nimbus, Captain Nickleaon,
for Sitnsfcl, Sweden, wns sunk off here in
a i-ollision with an unknown steamer. Xo
lives were lost.
Dear Madam:
Your grocer is authorired
to pay you back your money
if you don't like ScAillin/i
Best baking powder.
No questions asked.
o_a Francisc*   A Schilling & Company
■
1
*
'
■____ t h 3
Is;   =:)<:
n
1
1
J
iSrilmi
Mm
i.{ 11
i
i
J,**!"1 I HI 'iii|J«|i'      11        I     I is   '
il.li i. iii. ii.,K>, ..-'  Hi        1    i   ,T  '   .   ... ii
***SS
~^___B-2[jjg'
THt Wm. HUNTER CO., LIMITED
txv&   INTow Prepared
To       po      _Bu»i*|essf
AND CARRY
r^ 0_E* 0_B>-VJBDRAI_/
AT THE FOLLOWING   PLACES
SILVERTON, THREE FORKS,      -
ALAMO    CONCENTRATOR,
&   BROOKLYN   B. C.
MMMIftU
Wilson Hotel.
Teeter  Bros.  -  -  props
£*^  Headquarters For Mining And Comi_eiTi.il Men.
fiverj jg First-efass In AH Respects,   --w
SLOpAN   CITY,
B.   0.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENT^
NOTICE ■—"Nettie Fraction" Mineral
Claim; situate in the Slocan Mining
Division of  West Kootenay District.
Where located:*-- On the Four Mile
Creek bounded on the north by the
Tenderfoot,south, by tbe Head, east,
by the Carnation,
T_ke notice that I, Evan Bailey Frazer,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 5537,  as
Manager for tbe Vancouver and British
Columbian Grand Exploration Co, Limited, Certificate No. :il'621A, intend sixty
days from the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Im
. / provoment8, for tbe purpose of obtaining
& Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take  notice that action
u-_6r Bocvlon- at, a-m-ft *D«-)--co_jniijnceii
before the issuance of such Certificate of
Improvements.
Dated this 4th day-of July 1898.
E.   B.   F-A8ER
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS.
NOTICE,— "Carbonate IIi]l"*Mine**al
Claim,   situate   in the Slocan Mining
Division of West Kootenay District.
Where located:—On the Red  Mountain joining the Baby Knth mineral
claim about four miles from Silverton.
Take notice that I, Jos. A.  Guere of
RoBebery B. C, Free Miner's Certificate
No.926A and A. E. Kennedy of Toronto
Oct., Free Miner's Certificate No. 85010,
intend sixty days from the date hereof,
to apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate nf Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action,
nnder section 37, must be commenced
before tbe issuance of sucb Certificate of
Improvements.
Dated this 16th dav of June 1808.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE.-   "Prescott" and  "Prescott
Fraction No. 1", Mineral   Claims:
situate in the Slocan Mining Division of   West  Kootenay District.
Where   located:— On the North side
of Four*Mile creek about one and one
half miles from Slocan Lake.
Take notice tbat I, Kenneth L. Burnet,
(acting as agent tor tbe Prescott Mining Company Limited Liability,   F. M.
L. No. 6094A)   Free Miner's; Certificate
No.5307A, intend sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to tbe Mining Recorder for Certificates of Improvements
for the   purpose of obtaining Crown
Grants of both the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under .section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificates
of Improvements.
'   Dated this -2nd day of July 1808.
Kenneth L. Burnet
CAIVjA-DIAN
PACIFIC
AND SOO PACIFIC LINE.
Is the most comfortable and direct
route to all points East. To Pacific and
trams-Pacific points. To the rich mining districts of
KLONDYKE AND THE YUKON,
Tourist Cars pass Revelstoke Daily to
St. Paul. Daily (except Wednesday) to
Eabt_i_*i Canadian and Unitisd States
Points. Maenificent,_leeping and Dining Cars on all trains.
Tickets Issued Through And Baggage
Checked To Destination.
Daily connection (excepting Sunday;
via Rosebery; 8:05 a.m. leaves Silverton
arrives 4 :_0 p.m.
Ascertain present reduced rates and
full information by addressing].nearest
local agent, or
W. 8. CLARK, Aj-ent, Silverton.
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson.
E. J. COYXE.
Dist. Pas.. Agent, Vancouver
■,'lw
JUST A MOMENT I
A BLUB PENCIL MARK
IN TI1IM SQUARE MEANS
THAT YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE  AND THAT
THE   EDITOR  IS ANXIOUS TO   WHITE  A RECEIPT FOR YOU.
T-SS'pP
OP,
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE:— "Lorna Doone" and "Prior"
Mineral Claims 'situate in tbe Slocan
Miniug Division of  West Kootenay.
District,    Where   located:—On  tbe
South side of Four-Mile creek to the
West of the Vancouver Group of Mineral Claims.
Take notice that I, Francis J. O'Reilly
of Silverton, B. C. as agent for Frank
Culver, Free  Miner's   Certificate No.
11038 A., intend sixty days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for Certificates of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining' Crown Grants of
both the above claims.
And fnrther take notice that action,
under section 37, roust be commenced
before (he issuance of such Certificates
of Improvements.
•' Dated this 21st day of July, 1808.
Francis J. O'Reilly
Be not deceived 1 A Cough, Hoarseness or Croup are not to be trifled with.
A dose in time of Shiloh Cure will save
you much trouble, Sold at Drug Store.
Dyspepsia  Cured.  Shiloh's Vitalizer
•"-mediately   relieves   Sour   Strmach,
pomlng np of Food Distresses, and is the
great kidney aod liver remedy. Sold  by
"fho Silverton Drug 8tore t '
Blouse
waists
 a JUST RECEIVED #	
oyv*v^03-****°o**rVvvo
A FULL LINE OF LADIES
AND CHRILDREN8
DRES8 GOODS. THE
LADIES OF SILVERTON
ARE INVITED TO CALL
AND INSPECT MY 8TOCK
THEY WILL FIND THE
GOODS AND PRIOES
SATISFACTORY TO ALL.
0**-*%-*VMO-»»c»-»»*«V*0
Mrs.   Matheson,
g S g S 8 i 8 8 8 8 S 8 S 8 8 S g 8 8 8 8 8£ &
EDITORIAL 0.TCR0PPI1VGS.
ggggggggsggggggggggggggg
The appointment of tho Hon. J.
Fred Hume as Minister of Mines will
meet with approbation of the miners
and mine owners through t tho Provinoe
Mr. Hume is n resident of one of our
busiest raining centers, and has an
opportunity of seeing daily the actual
workings of our present mining laws
and hears the talk for and against, and
suggestions for their improvement, by
men who are actually, and not theoretically, following the vocation of
mining nnder our present system.
Thus Mr, Hume is in a position to
study the wants of the miners aud
mining industry as  a  whole.
Mile, L Alexander; Silver Lake, third
east fork Wilson, H F Libby j Homer
L, same, Alice Libby.
Aug 19—Merrimac. Silver Mountain,
Geo. Long; Angrinon, New Denver,
Palma Angrinon.
Aug 22—Lady Albanl. west of Alamo
concentrator, T Leo Peel: Free Silver,
Sandon, John A McMillan; Horn Silver, adj. Cody Star, Ivan E Ward; Rob
Roy, Mowinh slide, relocation North
Star, C F Nicholson; KjUo, Four Mile,
_ -_ich--d-JiunBs;---fl-aw-lide, same,----!
ASSESSMENTS.
Aug 17—Rio, Continental, Daisy,
Province.
Aug 18—Slemwinder No 2, Campsnia.
Aug 19—Brittania, Comet, ForesfcFire,
Jungler.
Aug 20—Smithville, Miner Boy, three
years.
Aug 22-Fitz.
The Kootenay Railway & Navigation
Company, Limited is an organization
formad to take over and consolidate
the K «_ 6. R. R. the I. N. k T. Oo.
and the Nelson and Bedlington line.
It means the opening up of another
outlet for the Kootenay country and
will bring us direct railroad competition, with both the coast and eastern
markets and virtually give us two
more trunk lines. This organization
is a strong one and has the backing to
make it a formidable rival to the 0. P.
R. Ail that is needed -now is for the
K ik S to extend its tracks to some
point on Slocan Lake and we will be
accessible from all points. This new
developement in railway circles will
work untold benefits to tne mining
interests of the Slocan.
NEW DENVER,
B. O
Dreadfully   Nervous.
Gents:—I was dreadfully nervous
and for relief took your Karl's Clover
Root Tea. It quieted my nerves and
strengthened my whole'Nervous System. Iwas troubled with Constipation,
Kidney and Bowel trouble. Your The
soon cleansed my system so throughly
that I rapidly regained health and
strength. Mrs. 8, A. Sweet, Hartfort
Conn. Sold by The Silverton Drug Stow
Tbe selection of the Hon. J. Fred
Hume as Minister of Mines, has
caused the Trail Creek News to break
out into a wail of indignation because
Mr. Martin of Rossland was not
selected for that important position.
This looks a little inconsistent on the
parts of thc News, when we cennider
the amount of space that but a few
weeks ego the News devoted to mud
throwing at this sami Mr. Martin.
The principal argument put forth is
that Rossland district was entitled to
the appointment, as it was virtually the
only mining district in the province,
the others being small and cutting
but little figure, at least this is what
one would be led to beleive by reading
the article in the News. Now as a
matter of fact, for the amount of
money expended, blow and advertising the Rossland district has had it
has produced far less than other camps
which are no older. The Slocan region
alone has paid more in profits than
Rossland haa produced. Rossland is
without a doubt the making of one of
the greatest mining camps on earth,
but it is a well known fact^hat up to
the present time nearly 90 per cent of
the money expended in the Roaslar d
camp has gone into the hands and
pockets of wildcat stock manipulators,
and the crop of wildcat companies
produced by Rossland fnr exceeds that
of any other camp on earth, not even
excepting Cripple Creek. As far as
tin appointment of Minister of Mines
is concerned, Mr. Green of Kaslo had
as much tight as any one and
represented as big a mining country
but as the choice has fallen upon Mr.,
Hume, we do net see why any one
should feel slighted as Mr. Hume
also represents a big mining community and is certainly ftble to ably fill
the position.
TRANSFERS.
Aug 18—Fidelity Fraction Jj, L F
Holtz and A S Williamson to F J Finu-
cane, Aug 17.
Broken Lock 1-6, Cracker Jack >., same
to same, Aug 17,
Keno 1-6, M B Merritt to L K Larson,
Mav 28.
Summits, C B Taylor to S T Walker,
Oct 28. Same >., S T Walker to II M
Walker, Aug 15.
Aug 19—Jehovah Fraction)^, John B
Martin to Jos A Martin, Aug 15,
Syndicate, C H Brindle to the Mount
Mable M & S Co. Aug 19.
Twickenham % to each, FMPurviaoce
to D W Moore and F E Clute, Aug 18.
Aug 20—Nancv Lee %   M E Brugdon
to Norman McMillan, Aug 15
Congo No 9. Commander, Bristol, Power
of Attorney, Donald K McDonald to Gus
Kruger, May 30.
Congo No 2, Commander, Bnstol, four
months option, Gus Kruger to F L Byron
■rS.050.
Aug 22—Jehovah Fraction^,  John B
Martin to E J Matthews, Aug 15.
Kitto. Richard James to C K Melbourne,
Aug 22.
Edinburgh 1-6, John Smith fo David
Bremner, Aug 10.
ABANDONMENTS.
Aug 4—North Fork, David Sloan and
Jkmes DRvan.
Aug 15—Hibernia,   J I Tipping,   J L
Jurks, J W Donnelly.
P T, W S Taylor, by Attorney.
SLOCAN CITY—LOCAflONS
Aug 12—Beno, Lemon, Jno. Bnlko;
Silver Mug, glocan river, W 11 Downdine
Rose, 7 miles south-east of Slocan City,
Frank Dick; Kentucky, Lemon, Henry
Reichart and Pat Nolan.
Am: 13—Eastmont, Ten Mile J A Baker; I X L, 10 miles from S'ocan Lake.
Samuel Thomas; Talim, Ten Mile, R
W Thompson; Silvertoniun, Ten Mil**,
John Wilson; Sender. Dayton, Jno. McKinnon ; Josie, Brendu creek, L Knowles
Auk 15—Mamie. Slocan L_ke, C E Miller and .las II Wallace: B C No 2,
Twelve Mile, P O Chapman; Gwendoline No 2. same hy same; Brooklyn, Lemon, Mark Manley ; Wlmiccni, Lemon
Patrick Nolan.
.\ng 16-Silver Crown, Dayton, Hugh
Sutherland.
/   | A^.IESSMB.'.'TS.
Aug 11—Calgary,  Star of Hope.
Aug 12—Mono.
Aug 13—Qneen Bess, Whip.-norwill,
Violet No 3, Three (JoardPinen, Clipper:
Auir 15— Matrawa, Gold Crown, Saddle Rock, Ontario.
Aug 15—Sunny Side.
TBANSFBBS.
Aug 18—Ottawa No 4. % interest, T.
Mulvey to Daniel Mowat nn I C F Wich-
m an.
JMr_-_VE>R® «S» -PROfil-PJE&CTOHji
THE SILVERTONIAN IS ALWAYS
WILLING TO HELP YOU BY PUBLISHING RELIABLE REPORTS ON
ANY    PROPERTY    OF    MERIT.
IKVE8TQRS,
THE PUBLISHED REPORTS APPEAR
ING IN THE SILVERTONIAN ON THE
VARIOUS MINES'AND PROSPECTS OP THIS
SECTION ARE WRITTEN AFTER PERSONAL
INSPECTION OF THE PROPERTIES AND CAN
BE RELIED  UPON   AS  BEING  SUBSTANTIALLY CORRECT.
sent to any address, $2.00
a year.
CROSS* & CO,,
General Agents and  %%%     %%%
%%% Minf ng Broker^.
MINE OWNERS  WILL DO WELL TO LI8T THEIR PROPERTY WITH US.
THE 8ALE9 WE  ARE   MAKING   PROVE   WE   HAVE   THE   BUYERS.
»*•»»•*••
Sole Agent. For
••»»••*••
SILVERTON  TOWNSITE.
ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE WRITTEN.
OFFICE OPP08ITE THE WHARF,   SILVERTON, B. C.
FLIES,
_F_IvI_E$»,
Fllr*.
GET SOME  FLY-PAPER  AND  THERE   WILL BE
NONE ON YOU.
9t^e^e***4^>e*^*MeMe^e«e*APww*is^As*er>9i
IV YOU WANT A PAIR OF
B. LAURENCE'S SPECTACLES
CALL AND SEE US AND WE
WILL FIT YOU.
»»^^^M^^rV**^^AA*^W»
SILVERTON   DRUG
STORE
..:_.-_.-jl
VICTORIA
f*0'JTJ-_>J_,
JAMES BOWES
PROP.
O•• J • • • • A• _ • 5 • t»• 9■•i■_.»« 9 O
<P. •»
g
i
IDIREC TOR U
CERTIFICATE OF THE REHISTRA-
TION      OF     AN     EXTRA-
PROVINpIAL COMPAN Y.
"Comi'anisb Act, 189,7."
"■iaperlor Mining   rf-ompsiij .
SUCCEEDED.
Hecker—What became of that ambitious servant you once had. who said ahe
was bound to rise?
Jew elr-She rose all right; she light the
fire with kerosene.
MINING RECORDS.
Following is a complete list of the
mining transactions recorded during the
week for tbe Slocan Mining Division:
«
NEW DENVER*-LOCATIONS.
Aug 16-Klondike, Fennel Creek. J R
Roberts and J H Bartlett; Welchman
Fractional, Granite Creek, A L Roberts;
Aug 17—Archie Fractional, divide between north fork Carpenter and Wilson
creeks, John Potter and R J MeMillai;
Red Star, south fork Carpenter, C B Tip-
pine ; Santiago, Sunshine Mt., Sunshine
Mining Co.
Aug 18—Robin Hood Fractional, Four
Registered the 3rd day of Januarv,
1898.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that I have
this day registered the '•Superior Mining
Company" as an Extra-Provinrial Company under the "Companies jVct, 1897."
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects hereinafter net forllit/* which the
legislative authority ol tbe I. 'L-inlaturc of
British Columbia extend**.
The head office of the  Company is
situate in the City of Spokane,  Htate  of
Washington.
The anion nt of the capital ni the Company is one million dollars, divided into
one million shares of one dollar each.
Tbe head office of the Company in this
Province is situate in the Town of Sandon
aud William Hunter, merchant, whose
address is Sandon aforesaid, is the
attorney for the Company.
The time of the existence of tbe Com, >
pany is fifty years.
The objects for which the Company
has been established are:—
To work, operate, buy, sell, lease,
locate, own, acquire, procure, hold and
deal in mines, metal -and mineral claims
of every kind and description within the
Province of British Columbia. Canada,
and the United States of America:
To carry on and conduct a general
mining, smelting, milling and reduction
business.
To purchase, acquire, hold, erect and
operate electric light and power plants
for tbn purpose of mining and treating
ores, and for the purpose of furnishing
lights and creating power for all
purposes:
To bond, buy, learn, locate and hold
ditches,flumes and water rights:
To construct, lease. buy,sell, build,
operate and conduct railroads, ferries,
tramways or other means of transportation for transporting or«, mining and
other material:
To own, bond, buy sell, leaso ami locate
timber claims, and finally to do everything consistent, proper and requisite
for tho 'carrying out of the objects an d
purposes aforesaid in their fullest and
broadest sense, within tbe territory
aforesaid.
Given under my hand and seal of office
at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this 3rd day of January, one
thousand eight hundred and ninety-
eight.
In] 9. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint 8tock Companies.
EVERYTHING   NEW,   NKAT J   OF LEADING BUSINGS MEN. f
AND CLEAN.    FINEST AP- * ei'.wt******;********-^
POINTED HOUSE IN
THE KQPTENAY8.
SFLKIRK
:•; Headquarters For laing Men :•: victoria
- • * •>• 9 • »_S -<?<S -•$?_'4 _9S.9i
HOTELS.
SILVERTON
B.C.
Tj G, GORDON,
MIJVES, REALE8TAT£,C01fVEYANGKR
NOTARY PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,      -      -      -      B. C
CHAS A. WATERMAN k OO.
Auctioneers, Customs Brokers,
And General Real Estate Agents,
Office In UoalST Blpck    -   -     Uakcr Bt.
NELSON,   B, 0.
I
WANT
TO
C.U.B.A
Customer.
I HAVE A FINE LINE
OF BOOKS A STATIONARY.
<i;&9>8&.S,9&&9/99/9<.)
JIM. McINTOSH.
SILVERTON,
LAKEVIEW
Brandon St Barrett.
Jamen j-owos*
L. Knowles.
OENERAL   MERCHANTS.
THE WILLIAM HUNTER Co.
J. A. McKINNON St Co.
GENT'S
furnishing:
PITTS BRQS.
TOBACCO k  CONFECTIONERY.
J. I. McINTOSH.
REAL ESTATE  k INSURANCE
CROS8 St Co.
J. G. GORDON.
ASSAYER8.
J. M. M. BENNEDUM.
MEROH ANT   TAILOR
F. F. LIEBSCHER.
SURVEYORS & ENGINEERS
F.J. O'RIELLY
FREIGHT, PACKING<_ LIVERY.
ANDERSON* BRADY.
A. P. ftlcJfjpNALD.
PHARMACISTS.
SILVERTON DRUG STORE.
B. C.
NOTICE.
Forties cutting wood on tlie property
of tho Silverton Townsite, or removing
same will be prosecuted. Squatters are
also warnod not to trespass on said pro-
pwty-
SILVERTON TOWNSITE,
by Cross, A Co., Agents.
.MEAT <fc PRODUCE
CONRAD BILL.
BARBER
H. C. WHEELER.
BAKERY
T. U, MULVEY.
i	
MM
mm
WPfflMM
*•***>

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