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The Silvertonian 1900-04-07

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Full Text

 SILVERMAN.
\\jV\AA_ttnJl
VOLUME THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    APRIL   7, 'dOO.
NUMBER 41
CONSIGNMENTS
OFFR  SH
ft nil
«
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
: A.* M'Kinnon
& Co.,
SilTrextoaa., 33. C.
T
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Wholesale Dis-! celebration, i Piir* A"**"**
franchisement.
Weekly News Nuggets Of Slocan and
Other Caiii|is.
NEWS OF ftimU'T.
THK HEWITT BONDERS KXAM1NK
THAT  PROPERTY.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
Stilvertoxi
«^TTHIS HOTEL IS *JEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE BAR 18 SUPPLIED WITH BEST BRANDS OF
W|NE8, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Li.  !v£.   n^rLOTxrless.   ZF.xop.
-*—-
IP. BXJRIV» «5 co
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
HINU.-5 OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
REIAII. SHIRKS AT
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Ksslo, Snnilun,
New IVnver, Cusrnile Cily, Grand Forks, Sirdnr
Midway ami <iri-t*iiwopd.
...MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD  OKFICB NELSON, B.C.
W, A. Rout, ot Lakewood, N. J., snd
R, Insinger and F. I. Holnvtn, of Spo
kane. visited the Hewitt Croup, on which
they hold a hond, last Wednesday.
They expressed themselves as lieing
more than pleased with the way the de
velopment woik has been carried on and
the splendid showings of rich ore ext
IHiacil and opened up in the property.
Thcie is now no douht but thst the
bond held by them will bo taken np and
one effeit of their inspection will be nn
immediate increase in the working forco
at the mino. The trail is also to be Improved.
The Hewett ia making a record for itself as a producer of very high grade ore
and as being one of the richest proper-
ties of the camp. A large amount of ore
ha* Wn blocked out during Inst session's
work and some now being sacked at the
mine will run up into tbe hundreds of
ounces of silver to the ton. A trial shipment is to bo sent to tho smelter within
the next few days, fifteen tons of width
has already beeu delivered at the d'ick.
As We go to press we learn that an
attempt will be niado to disfranchise
over 000 voters iu the Slocan, chit fly
ii|i«nrs. Appeals have been entered
with the Collector of Votes Ufaintt
the appearance on the Voters' List of
the names of nearly one half the voters
of the Riding. This impertinent and
disgraceful niovo has been dono by
Cl.fi'j of Bandon, tlio paid too) of the
Silver-Lead Alines Association. This
Ciifie has expressed himself in his
paper, the Mining Review, as in favor
of limiting tbo fi'anchiso, and takes
this way of doing it.
Laboring men who-ie names appear
on tho list bhould see that tbeir name
is not removed at the Court of Revision and new applicants for the List
should sen that they are not included
in Ciitft-'s appeal list.
39393303
Has Keen Hone at The Cili*
zens' Heeling*.
COBNCR ACKER LOOKING WELL.
The CoriiCi-acker claim, which lies a
shoit distance from town, adjoining the
Bi-Hi'.n Group, is having considerable
Work done anon it. Tho main working
tunnel, now in 210 feet, is lieing diiven
ahead and has a good showing of ore,
mainly concentrating, in the face.   Tnis
showing consist of two feet of miiier.i'>i'.id J vein encountered in Iho cross-cut tunr.el
mitler, lying next lhe banging wall, and i driven on the Torpedo claim.   This vein
OOO0<
Work bas been resumed in the tunnel
on the Queen Fraction.
The tunne' bciutr driven on the Lone
Star Group is now in over 100 feet.
A sin ull force ol men are employed on
the wagon road between towu and the
Wakefield mill keeping it open for the
ore and freight wagons.
The cross-cut being driven in the
tunr.el on the Old Maid claim has r.ot
yet reached the footwall, but it bas
proved the ledge to be over sixteen feet
wide.
Diiftlng   is   now  being  done  on the
Preparations for Silverton's Fourth
Annual Celel ration arc now well under
way and a program has been drawn tip
that should make this yoar's celebration
a brilliant success.
During tho week, two meetings have
been held by the chiisins nml tho work'
of preparing the town for the holiday
will soon he eonunencad.
The feature of (his jour's Celebration
of the Queen's Birthday will bo a Football Tournament, 0|ien to all West Kootenay teams. A generous appropriation
has been made to secure prizes for Ihis
event and a set of gold medals will be
struck off for the players of the champion team.
Arrangements have been made lor o
series of Caledonian Snorts and Boat
Races, and Lake Ave will again bo converted into a race track, on which the
owners of the fast horses of the Slocan
will be invited li compete will, their
steeds,
dry's sport.
The officers of tbo Celebration Committee are: Jas. Howes, President | Wui.
Hunter, Treasurer; R. O. Matheson,
Secretary; and Messrs. McKinnon, D.
Brandon, Thorburn, Thompson and B.
McNaught, Extentive Committee. The
Finance Committee consists of Messrs.
Knowles, Hunter aud Bowes,
Further particulars regarding the pro.
gram will be given at an eaily date.
C. K. Hammond was down from San-.
don on Saturday enjoying a sun bath.
Al. Reeve, who has lieon in l'lionni-t
tor some months, i.s hack in town.
Now is tbe time to start your garden
Now is the time to seed vour lawn. CaH
at the Silverton Drug Store and select
your seeds. ♦
A CORONER To BE  APPOINTED,
W. II. Lilly h.is been recommended by
Mr. Green as a Coroner and we have
I een informed by the Premier that ho
will be gazetted at once. The appoint*
ment of Mr, Lilly will do awav with the
inItation felt here over fhe fact of thei»
living no coroner in ihe district.*
Through The Week.
Extract*   From    Vaiious  Source*.
Slocan City has filed a pre emptioa
upon Dominion Duy and will entertain
the outside world upon that date, lt hae
been some time since Slocan City has
indulged in celebrn tions and all welcome
A Grand Ball will wind up the | this sign of returning prosperity at tli*
foot of the Lake.
Lovers ot good music will have an opportunity of hearing Miss Louise M.
Brehany next Thursday evening in New
Denver, Miss Brehany, who Is one of
America's foremost conjert singers, in
supported by Miss Jessie Monroe, alto
soloist; I,ouis J. Min»z, a tenor, with a
voice of rare quality; Forei._, D. Carr, bas.
j so contents; and Miss Olga Schmoll, «
; talented violinist.
The "Alert" will leave Silveiton otj
the evening of the concert and will return afterwards with those who attend
: from here. Tlie reserved scots are rap»
1 idly being taken up aud those who wish
i Eeats should secure them at once.
fi
fi
:■!
■y
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS l'P-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
TDK PRICE SOMKWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT <>'_•' BIGHT.
IE SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR    SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      KIT AND FINISH
GUIUNIT.KD.   ftV KRCOATING8 JUST IN.
Thclitilr.   Silverton,B.C.
w
5
t
5
3
5
fi
BRINGING DOWN CONCENTRATES.
The hauling of concent rates from the
tt ok e field concentrator, fir nhipment to
the tmelter. tonimenced dining the
week and already some thirty tons hnve
been delivered at our wharf. Pete
Siniiott, who has tho o nt act for the
hauling of lhe ore from the mill to the
wharf, is delivering about eight ton! a
day, Ult ho ixpects singly to tut on
another team whieh will ciable him to
bring down nearly a full carload daily.
At the mill everything is running
smoothly and nearly ten tons ot concentrates arc lieing msdo doily. More jigs
are being installed and will be lunniug
by thu flrst of next week, this will
largely increase tbo capacity of the mill
and allow of about a carload of concen
(rates being turned out every twenty-
four hours.
THE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
We are now showing
a nice assortment of
MEN'S SPRING AND
SUMMER SUITS
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs,
*pt%& Wm. Mimter Co., I*tc*..
HUyerton,   B.' C.
a ten inch paystreak on the footwall. The
ore i.s increasing both iu quantity ami
quality as depth is gained uiHin the
ledge and the owours are confident thnt
they have the making of a mine in the
Carncmeker.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of  ore  fr.>m Silverluii for
the year 189!». totaled 1608 Tons.
All other Lake points 138.')     "
The shipment   ot   ore   from   Sloean
Kake points, up lo and  including   the
present week, from Jan. I, 1'jOO.
From Bosun Landing.                     Tons.
Bosun.... 1*)
From New Denver
Hartney  $0
Capella  7
prom Silverton Tons.
Emily Edith 20
Vancouver    20
Kr.uu Enterprise I.onding
Enterprise 140
From Slocan City
Arlington     160
Black Prince      60
is   shown   to  le over six tret wide and
filled with concentrating ore.
liround sluicing is being done upon the
Clara UoOr claim, the water from Cild
ereek having been diverted for that purpose, and a system of cuts are being
mala to expose the led^o in several
places,
A good strike of clean galona ore is
reported as having been made at the
Two Friends mine, near Slocan Citv.
It appears that the tunnel had been
diiven along side of this new ore body
for sone di.-t.inee before accident discovered it.
Several of our prospectors have already
been up into the higher portions of the
district lo see whon it would be advisable to move up. All have returned satisfied that this wiil be the earliest season
for prospecting on the higher levels ever
known iu the district,
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, Mar. 20.—Bar Silver, S9»8c
Luke copper,   $16.50.
Lead-Tho firm that fixes tho selling
price fur minor* ond smslters quotes lead
nt $-1.4) at tho close.
ti round sluicing to uncover the vein
on the Littlo (Jiant claim, near the Torpedo, is being done. Thn Ouribao creek
water m being me I.
LEGISLATION   FOR CAPE NOME.
Congress has passed a bill to regulate
beach mining st Cape Nome, snd it is
said 10 be satisfactory to representatives
of Alaska interests who have heen trying
to get some kind of legislation under
which minion camps may be organised
and order preserved during the rush
next summer. Tho act of 1898 reserves
along the const nnd ibores of all waters
in Alaska a highway of CO feet in width
and tie riparian righ's as the property
of the goveirment. Last year the
richest deposits of gold were lound upon
this reservation and the beach between
it and low water, which is termed "tide
land''. Although forbidden by a strict
interpretation of the law, no power on
eaith can prevent the miners from
washing the sand along the seashore,
and in order that they may do so peaceably it is necessary to make some kind
of regulations under which it may be
pcrmittod. Congress has been convinced
ot tills by the testimony of every person
who has appeared before tbe committee
in support or opposition to the bill, and
the effect of the passnge of the measure
is to legalise what the miners at Cape
Nome havo already done on their own
account, and to give the forco of statutes
to the regulations tbey adopted for their
own government. It allows individual
miners to locate claims upon the sea
beach, which is u government reservation, twenty five feet in width, and min-
crs'mcetings may on their discretion en-
lurgo thorn to a maximum limit oi o00
feet in width. It is lielieved that this
will prevent lawlessness in tho struggle
for wealth that is expected at Capo
Nome during the coming summer.—
Modern Machinery.
\V. M. Yslcs is building himselt a
hcuse nerr the school house.
Gns Webb is putting tbe finishing
touches on his netd cottage on Lake Av.
The football platers nie now getting : set by their former appearance here
down to systematic practise on 1 begiu-
uing to talk if matches.
Hill Bros, aro doing a good business
in Silveiton witli iheir lumber. They
arc sending down their large twice a
week now.
Divisk RtBTics will be he'd in Silver-
ton next Sunday evening at 7: HO p. m.,
everyone is cordia'.ly invited to attend.—
JohnG. Duncan, Presbyterian  Minister
AH work in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left al the Silveiton Drop Store, will
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler. All ro
pairs are uuauantkei. kok one veah. «
As will be seen  from  our advertising
columns this week   E. M.  T>iindie, tbo
New  Denver Jeweler,  will  discontinue
■ _._.__..        ,.t       u_.b-_i_.ji_.   Singers, whose reputation bad ptacceded
business for a few months.    Mr. Brindle
his mining interests in 1'iic Valley which
will require Ills attention during the summer.
H. Wilson, of the Wm. Hunter Co
left on Wednesday for iho East, where
ho will purchase a full line of this season's dress-goods, niiliineiy etc., for his
company. Mr. Wiison will also engaeo
u first-class dressmaker  lo take charge
Tho Somers Family appeared here last
Saturday evening, giving a clean show.
Owing to defections frum their ranks
the show was away below the standard
"Whnt is it George?" tenderly asked
Mrs. Ferguson, ''Is it the toothache ft-,
gain?"
"Ye.-." groaned Mr. Ferguson.
"Shall I sing for you, dear?"
"I wish you would, Laura."
And while she thumped lhe piano and
sang lhe old songs of their courtship
days he lay on the longue and took advantage oi the opportunity to swesr in a
subdued voice, unheard.
There was an unusually large audience
present at the concert given heie on
Wednesday  night by the Fisk Jubilee
; them to Silverton. The program given
by the Singers was a delightful oue, appreciated fully by those present, as was
shown in the hearty applause and the
i, numerous encores given. Silvertoniane
owe thanks for this musical treat to Rev.
Mr. Roberts, who Induced the Singers to
appear in Silverton.
of the ladies' d
ipartinent in their store
here.
SILVERTON PUBLIC SCHOOL.
The   filandin
g   oi the pupils for Iho
month of Man
11 is as f illows:
V Reader.
1. Alice Calbick ,
'2. Addle Horton,
It. Inez Calbick,
4. Marie Cross.
IV Reader.
1. Fay Elliott,
_}. Mamie McDonald
3. Janet Barclay,
Ill Reader.
1. Maggie Barclay
2. Patrick Kelly,
3. Harry Wheeler
U Reader.
I. Harry Carey
H Primer.
1. George Horton
2. Annie Kelly
3. Jeanie Barclay
4. Bertha Batker
1 Fritner.
Willie White,
Evelyn Horton
Grace Cross.
Chart Clasi
Mary Hyland.
•limiiiie Hyland.
May QttTKUnn Duncan.
Teacher
The Aide- Command ■> of the Faithful
there is an unbelieving Dago at the gates
[ who demands Immediate audience with
your majesty.
Tha Sultan—Bishmillah! What as-
surance I Art sure it is not a reporter?
The Aitie—Quite sure your majesty.
Reporters always offer mo bad cigars.
Besides the smell is different. It's garlic this limo.
Tlie Sudan—Great macaroni! What
' does he ward ?
The Aide—He has come to Bay that un«
' lees you at once deliver up an Italian
! young woman who is in one of the har-
lemB at Brnsa, bis country will immedi.
> ately declare war Against you.
The Sullau—Uoing to war about a harem girl, eh?   D'ye kuow whose harem
litis?
Tho.Aide—Yes, your majesty.
The Sultan—Well tie a tag to it, and
' send thc w hole push to the Italian throne-
i warmer. Theres nothing small, my boy,
' about your Uncle Abdul.
Silverton is awaiting with interest tho
promised boom at New Denver, and will
do what it can to help it along. Whatever helps the tributary towns helps Sil-
verton.
The force of miners at tho aketiehl
mine has been increased and that property is now the largest employer ot
labor in this section. C. P. R. MEETING
Good Results Prom General Prosperity
of Canada.
•ui.
Montreal, April 4.—The annua)
meeting of shareholders of the C. P.
R. was held today. The report was
adopted and the old* boand reelected unanimously.
In moving the adoption of the report, President Shaughnessy said it
was gratifying to be able   to congratulate the  shareholders  on  the
excellent results of operation during
the year and the prospects of continued  prosperity.      The  improvement in the revenue was largely due
to the growth of traffic in every section of thc Dominion.    Government J
reports indicate  that  in   Manitoba
and the   Northwest   there   will  be
under crop this season about half a
million acres in excess of 1899.
The rate  per   ton  mile for the
carriage of freight  had been   still
further reduced.    In view of the remoteness of eastern  markets  from
some sections   of the system,  the
policy of the directors has  been  to
reduce rates in order to encourage
the maximum  development of the
counlry for the purpose of securing
increased revenue from the growth
of tonnage rather than the maintenance of high rates.    Long distance
haul traffic, because of the situation
of the railway and the  economy of
working, was an  important  factor
in the successful   carrying   out   of
this policy.
Apart from some short lines required to serve growing communities
in Manitoba and the Northwest
territories, the directors do  not at
sponsible for another serious British
reverse in South Africa.  The Boers
are up to  their old game of lying
in ambush and  Britith officers have
co-operated   with   them    by   their
carelessness.    It    is  inconceivable
that   the   disaster  to Col.   Broad-
wood's force could have  happened,
if the country to  be traversed   had
been properly scouted.    It  is small
comfort that the pluck and coolness
of  the   troops   prevented it   from
being worse, but at least it is some
comfort.
It is  apparent that  the  pacification of the Free State is only superficial and   that   information of the
movements   of   the    British   must
have been carried to the Boer lead- I
ers by some of the inhabitants who
had   outwardly submitted   to Lord
Roberts.    The British will  have to
watch not only the foe who is in organized force before  them, but also
the foe  who  lurks  on all  sides  in
pretended friendship, always ready
to carry   information  to   the Boer
generals.
It is not  likely  that this last reverse will have any  permanent  results, though it may delay Roberts'
northward advance.    He is in such
overwhelming force,   with such   a
large   body of  cavalry under such
able lieutenants that he should have
no difficulty in retrieving this disaster and clearing the country around
Bloemfontein of hostile forces as a
preliminary   to   the march on   the
main objective point, Pretoria.  But
he will find the Canadian cowboys
handy to prevent a repetition of such
affairs.
•_Yi.i.VM-'y-- -    '- ?■
PURSUIT GIVEN UP BELGIAN BAD SHOT
Generals French and Colville Return I How the Half-Crazy Boy Prepared to
to Bloemfontein.
London, April 4.—Gen.  Colville
and Gen. French have given up the
movement agamst the Boers east of
Bloemfontein and have rejoined the
main army.    It doubtless seemed to
Lord Roberts a vain thing to send
from) 10000to 12000 ofhisbest troops
into the   wilderness   with   a field
transport, in the direction of a right
angle with his chosen line of ad
vance
moved
Kill the Prince.
Brussels.April 5.—The attempted
assassination of the Prince of Wales
was the sole topic of conversation
on the streets and in the cafes and
theatres last evening. Everywhere
regret and deep indignation was
manifested, and satisfaction at the
failure of the criminal attempt was
universally expressed.    It is stated
        ,,„_,  w  ..w-.'hat,   when   the crowd   rushed  at
t.    The  Boers  have  probably  Sipido, he received  a   blow  in  the
d   elsewhere   and,   if  to  the"ace ^rom  some one's  fist,  which
south-west, Gen. Colville could as
easily strike them from Bloemfontein as by following them up across
the plains.
These inferences still leave the
situation bewildering  for the  time
being.     The enormously  superior
British   forces   appear   inactive  in
every part of the war field,  waiting
probably for the accumulation   of
material for a swift advance on the
Transvaal frontier.     The  London
military  commentators,    and   the
public also to some extent,  are irritated and confused by   the situation.
FROM BOOMING NI._nrT.KK.
present contemplate construction involving an important expenditure of
capital.
The present earnings of the M.in-
iroba & Northwestern and the
Great Northwestern Central railways, to be released, were already
sufficient to pay interest .>i> the liability involved and contributed
traffic to the main line which will
be permanently secured.
A gratifying feature of the company's aflfairs is the fact that during
the past year there has been an addition  of 150  per cent to  the  list
of shareholders  on  record in Canada, and the number i.s still increasing.    The return to a basis   of five
per cent dividends is  an  assurance
of the   conviction of   the   directors
that, in the  absence of unforeseen
commercial     disaster,   no     lower
standard will be necessary.
The annual meeting of the board
of directors wns held at noon  today, Sir William Van Home, chairman,  presiding.    The   annual  report having been taken as read, Mr.
Shaughnessy, president, moved its
adoption, following which the president   in a brief speech  referred to
the   general prosperity of   the system, the low  rates prevailing,  and
how it was proposed   to   overcome
their effect by building  larger locomotives,  cars,  etc., the extension
of  the   company's   system   in the
west, etc., and other matters pertaining to the welfare of the road.
A resolution was   passed authorizing the expenditure of $3,266,489
I upon   the   maintenance of the system; also providing  for the election
of the chairman of the board of directors, who should not hold office
as president.
A   resolution  of condolence, expressing sympathy with the family
of the late Sir George Kirkpatrick,
a colleague, was also passed.
Furthermore, a series of by-laws
was   authorized,    having   relation
Frank Oliver Tells of tbe Growth of
Oregon'* Great Camp.
Frank  H.   Oliver   has  returned
from a trip to Sumpter, Ore., where
.  r.--.,   viv,,   WIICIC
he found everything booming, with
six dividend paying mines in operation. "The population is about 35-
00 and is growing rapidly, with
building in progress in every direction," said Mr. Oliver. "The three
main streets are being planked until the town can afford to buy permanent pavements. Gen. Warren
is working  the  Diadem   mine and
Prlemer Sebrelner mobbed.
Details have been received of the
scenes on   Green   Market square,
Capetown, Tuesday, when  Premier
Schreiner encountered an  English
demonstration, show that the premier, fearing personal violence, sought
refuge in a   restaurant.    He   was
hooted and tried to reach the parliament house protected by police.
The people shouted   "traitor,"  but
he succeeded in reaching the house.
Lord Roberts did  not   meet  his
1 wife at Capetown.    She will proceed to Bloemfot.tein.
Modder  River Bridge Finished.
The permanent   bridge   at    the
Modder River station has been  finished.    The first train passed over
it Tuesday
drew blood. One version of Sipido's
statement is that he declared that
he committed the act because he
was an anarchist and that he did
not allude to South Africa. It was
believed that the chamber of deputies and the senate would today
adopt resolutions expressing indignation and reprobation of the attempt upon the prince's life.
The Patriot says:   "Investigation
proves premeditation.    The interrogation  of the prisoner lasted four
hours, and  it  showed   that he was
instigated by an unknown person,
who persuaded him to buy a pistol
on Sunday in the old  market for
three  francos.      Accompanied   by
this person, he went on Tuesday to
a meeting in the Flemish theatre,
and then to the Maison du  Peuple,
where they had drinks.    Then they
went to a wine shop where Sipido
wrote      a      letter,      saying     he
had    obtained    employment.
He then went to the railway station and asked the hour of arrival
of the train. Later he entered a
neighboring cafe and loaded the
gun.
MINK   CONTRACT*.
— The British  garrison  at  Spring
has a shaft down 68 feet, from which   fontein was roused at midnight Mon
a general sample, taken the day be-    "
fore I left, assayed $360.    A great
advantage is that all the lodes show
increased   value    with  depth.     A
small pyritic smelter with a capacity
of 35 tons a day is being erected by
some St. Louis people  and  several
more stamp mills  will  be  installed
this spring."
PRINCE   OF   W4LKN   SHOT   AT
Attempted Assl nation at  Brussels,  on
tbe Way to Copenhagen.
Brussels, April 4.—As the train
was leaving the Northern station for
the Southern railroad station, an in-
individual fired a revolver at the
Prince of Wales, but missed His
Royal Highness.
London, April 4.—The Prince
and Princess of Wales started for
Copenhagen this morning for the
purpose of attending the celebration
of King Christian's birthday which
occurs April 8.
_LATKNT NTOCK QUOTATIONS.
day by the information that the
Boers in force were about to make
an attack, but not a burgher appeared.
Troopa Retain 10 Bloemfontein.
Bloemfontein, April 2.—General
Colville's division and French's cavalry have returned here. Everything is quiet.
Webiter Davis, Views.
New York, April 4.—Interviewed
by the correspondent of the Herald,
ex-assistant secretary Webster
Davis said in part with reference
to his visit to Pretoria. "I viewed
the defenses of Pretoria and I consider them impregnable. The line
ot hills surrounding the town bristle with high power Krupp and
Creusot guns.     Pretoria lies  in a
basin surrounded by a ridge of rug
 1 I....      **
Conditions   Under   Which    Manager*
Are Willing to Operate.
The manager of the War Eagle
and Le Roi mines have presented
to the executive committee of the
Rosstand miners union, the following conditions for the reopening of
the mines on the contract system:
"That the companies are prepared
to open up their mines under the
contract system to theii .'ull capacity,
as rapidly as ciraim.-.tances will
permit.
"The contract system, putting
it generally, provides that the contractors are to be paid for all the
work they do and the companies
pay for all the work done, at a price
agreed upon and determined by both
parties.
"The two simplest systems will
be adopted viz., (a) contract by
lineal foot of hole drilled and (b)
contract by lineal foot of completed
working.
"In slopes, the method  of hole
I ed for any contract  will  vary with
the mine, and the existing conditions, and is a matter of free arrangement with individual contractors.
"When through fault of the companies contractors   find  themselves
obliged to do work not properly included in their   contract, the   time
spent in doing such work, in excess
of one hour, will be paid for  at   the
standard scale of wages.  When, by
special      agreement,     contractors
assume the chances of such occasional extra work, the  price   agreed
upon will be made to cover it.
"The companies will furnish all
explosives to contractors at cost
from distributing stations, or they
will furnish this material free of
charge when agreed upon between
them and the contractors in any
particular work.
"The companies  will  furnish  all
machine drills, tools and implements
necessary   for   the   work   free   of
charge to contractors, and no charge
will be made to contractors for drilling machines broken while at work.
"The companies will   arrange, as
far as practicable to have all holes in
sfopes blasted between the hours of
1 and 7 a. m.,  and  they   will   also
endeavor to have all timbering done
when required so as not to interfere
with the work of drilling.
"Companies will furnish and pay
for the service of engineers and
pumpmen when such are required.
'•Mucking or barring down of
rock will be done by the contractors
or the companies, as may be agreed
upon at the time of making contract.
"It is expected that the price
agreed upon, based upon ordinary
working conditions, will cover all
delays which are inseparable from
and incident to mining work.
"It has been made clear that it
is the desire and intention of the
companies to afford the contractors
AN IRISH GREETING
Dublin Bubbles With Joy 0ver the
Queen's Arrival.
Dublin, April 5.—Queen Victoria
yesterday   was   received   with   an
enthusiasm  exceeding that   which
marked her recent appearance in
London, and which well nigh eclipsed  the   vaunted   glories    of the
jubilee.     The   lord lieutenant has
been taken at  his  word,   and   the
whole country has risen superior to
political   prejudices.       No   single
circumstance marred the royal entry
into Ireland's capital.    In fact,  the
most optimistic loyalists  expressed
themselves surprised at the warmth
ot the greeting.
The extent of Dublin' orderliness
can be guaged from  the fact that
the police made no  arrests during
the entire day, and, although about
one  million  persons crowded   the
narrow streets,  only   a   couple of
accidents occurred.    Until midnight
the   crowds   suiged   through   the
thoroughfares watching the illuminations.    But by   1 a.  m.  Dublin
was as quiet as any country town.
Along the march from Kingstown to
the vice regal lodge stretched 7,000
troops, chiefly militia.     These had
little to do and, instead of creating
the hostility that the military sometimes creates, they were at various
points the   subjects   of  wholesale
kissing and hugging by the women,
who, after catching a glimpse of the
royal procession, could find no bet*
ter way to express their enthusiasm
and excitement.
Nine-tenths of those   in  Dublin
yesterday had never seen the queen
   before, and they characteristically
every facility for carrying out  their   expressed themselves upoo her ap-
. ....        „ - m •-*,   1 •     •        -—   -■   *sww*
gea mils, affording most admirable I measurement has been selected, be-
nnnArlnnl,:..    c        .   _•   I  _____■•.
4 SKID
Attinbasca  30
b C. Cold Fields  A
BlgThree  M%
Brandon k Oolden Crown. 23
Canadian (iol.l Field*  ft
Cariboo [Camp McKinney] 80
Crow'n Nest Pass Coal....$37 75
Deer Trail No. 2  \OU.
Deer Park [new|  1%
Dundee  IS
KYenint. Htar  »\i
Fairmont.	
Giant  3
Home stak «  2
Iron Mask	
Iron Colt	
LI L	
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  n>{
Jumbo  20
King (Oro Denoro)  16
85
9
.1%
 r,   t wau   «/CIItMH|  15
    Knob Hill       sjg
chiefly to routine, and which provid-   {£{^abaCon,°l      'su
ed that the annual meeting shall be   Mori* ntn-i../.
held for the future  upon the first
Wednesday in October.
At a subsequent meeting of the
directors, Sir William Van Home
was appointed chairman of the
board, Mr. Shaughnessy, president,
and Mr. McNicoll second vice-president and general manager.
■ID
8
19
7
60
$.'8 00
9
2
11
1%
2
iy*
23
10
55
ts
AT IT AGAIN.
Over-confidence and consequent
neglect   of  the precautions which
Should   have   by   this   time   been   	
learned by many>harP lessons is re. I w!K4.Ev;:;;;;•;;;     l\
Mor to Christo , -\yA
Montreal Oold Fields         7
Morrison         3&
Mountain Lion  94
Noble Five   6U
Northern Unite  2
Novelty         3
Okanogan ,        'iy.
Old Ironsides  80
Palmer Mountain    25
Peoria Mines         2
Princess Mand         8
Rambler-Cariboo  20%
lUthiniillen         'Ay. .%
Republic $100    $ 1 02H
St. filmo Consolidated,... 3W 2
 =a*t*a**t*
IK
2
10
6
2\
opportunities for defense. While
there I learned enough to know
that the city is one vast storehouse
of food stuffs and ammunition."
A (fenadlao No Idler Bm«.
Ottawa, April 4.—The militia
department received a cable from
Bloemfontein this morning announcing the death from enteric fever
of Private H. Forest, of the sixty-
first battalion, Montigny and Lislet,
who went with the Quebec company
of the first contingent.
Why should not Canada make
the rails for the Cape to Cairo railroad? By the time Cecil Rhodes is
ready for them, the projected Canadian Steel company might be
grinding them out.
cause of its extreme simplicity—
contractors not being obliged to
take any chances on the breaking
qualities of the ground, or the powder required, the cost of mucking or
loss of time from smoke.
"Blasting will be done, except
where otherwise arranged, between
the hours of 1 and 7 a. m., so that
the probability of loss of time will
be reduced to a minimum.
"As to having all development
contracts measured by the lineal
foot driven, instead of by the length
of holes drilled, it is understood that
most of this work will be let by the
lineal foot. It would not be satisfactory to contractors or the
companies to be confined to this
method of measuring the quantity
of work done.    The method select-
m. Binno Consolidated ' 3%
SmuKRler  1%
Tamarac [ Kenneth |  6
Trail Creek Hid. Treat.... 3%
VanAnda  1'%
Victory-Triumph  8
Virginia  i
War Kagle Consolidated..! 1 65
Waterloo  8
WiiiteBear  2%
Winnipeg.	
2
$ 1 50
5
TO NEWSPAPER MEN!
FOR SALE.
A Paper Folder, a Washington Hand Press,
a Cylinder Press.
Also the "Trail Creek News" and plant.
For partlcnUra, add ran
WILLIAM K. BSLINQ, Roaoland.
contracts to the end that all parties
concerned may be mutually benefited.
"The fact of an employe being a
member of the union will be no bar
to his employment, nor will the
companies place any obstacle in the
way of non-union men becoming
members of a union.
"The companies reserve to themselves the right to employ such men
as they see fit, whether they are
members of a union or not.
"It is the policy and intention of
the companies to treat their employes fairly and not to discharge any
employe, whether he be a member
of a union or not, without just ind
sufficient cause, it being cleaily understood that membership in a union will not constitute grounds for
discharge.
"With respect to matters wherein the employes ot the comp any
may consider themselves aggrieved,
the companies will, at any reason-
onable time, receive a presentation
of the case, and consider the same
in a fair and impartial spirit and endeavor to remove the cause, when
any is found to exist.
"It is expected that the union
will at all times use its good offices
and exhaust all conciliatory methods, before permitting and strike or
stoppage of work. And further,
they will not seek to interfere with
the companies in employing or discharging employe-., or interfere
with contractors."
The acceptance cf the proposi-
sition is stron^lv urged by R. C.
Ciute, the Dominion labor commissioner, and Ralph Smith, M.P.P.,
in a letter to the union. They appeal to the men in favor ot the settlement of the difficulty by reason
instead of force, in favor of mutual
confidence instead of distrust, and
they analyze the managers' proposition in detail, showing how every
objection to the contract system has
been met by concessions. They say
in conclusion:
"The result of these negotiations
is before you. We regard it as a
great advance to anything that has
hitherto taken place, in restoring
and promoting that mutual trust
and confidence between employer
and employes which is so absolutely
essential to the best interests of
both parties, and without which no
permanent settlement can be obtained. In view of all the /acts and
circumstances known to us, and believing these to be the best terms
that can possibly be obtained, we
strongly recommend its adoption by
thn union "
pearance as, "my, but she's grand."
When she passed, all bared their
heads. On every side it was admitted to be a great day for Ireland,
the loyalists saying under their
breath: "Pity it did not come sooner," and the nationalists partaking
sufficiently of the prevailing
enthusiasm to subordinate political
considerations, which officially and
by the queen's own declarations,
had no part in the greatest day in
the history of Ireland.
ONLY   LIVED IIP TO THK TREATY
Why Portugal Allowed British Troopa
to Croaa Her Territory.
London, April 4.—The question
of the transport of British troops
across Portuguese teritory from
Beira, Portuguese East Africa, to
Rhodesia, having being brought up
in the chamber of deputies, the
foreign minister, Senor Beira, made
the following statement.
"The transport of British soldiers
by railroad  from   Beira  to  Umtali
was requested by Great Britain and
consented to by  Portugal,  because
the   British   government   thereby
only exercised a right  recognized
in   the  treaties  between  the two
countries.     The outbreak of war
has  not abrogated  these treaties,
which were concluded and signed
prior to the war by  Portugal in
spirit of loyalty.    I have   informed
the Transvaal of this reason.
"Portugal has loyally adhered to
its duties and neutrality, and its
reasons have been communicated to
all interested parties. There could
occur no more solemn occasion than
the present to declare that the British cabinet has maintained with
Portugal relations of cordiality and
loyalty, for which there is reason
for congratulation, Please God
that these good relations shall always be maintained."
t'RUKD TO ATTACK CHILE.
Argentina Want* Pern and Hollvla to
make War on Her.
Lima, Peru, April 5. — Recent
dispatches from Chile say that considerable alarm exists in official circles there regarding the relations
between Peru, Bolivia and Chile,
and that it is believed Argentina is
urging on Peru and Bolivia to attack Chile.
Artistic Job Printing of everv de-
scnpKon at this office.    Iev"7 de- RAN INTO A TRAP
Colonel Broadwood Loses Guns, Baggage and 350 Hen.
London, April 2.—The war office
has received the following dispatch
from Lord Roberts, dated Bloemfontein, April 1st.
"I received news late yesterday
afternoon from Col. Broadwood,
who was at Thabanchu, thirty-eight
miles east of here, that information
had reached him that the enemy was
approaching in two forces from the
north and the east. He stated that,
if the reports proved true, he would
retire towards the waterworks, 17
miles nearer Bloemfontein, where
we have had a detachment of
mounted infantry for the protection
of the works.
"Broadwood was told in reply
that the ninth division of Murtici's
mounted infantry would march at
daylight today to support him, and
that, if he considered it, necessary,
he should retire from the waterworks. He moved there during the
night. At dawn today he was
shelled by the enemy, who attacked
on three sides. He immediately
dispatched-two horse artillery batteries and his baggage toward
Bloemfontein, covering some of
them with his cavalry.
"Some two miles from the waterworks the road crossed a deep
nullah, or spruit, in which during
the night a force of Boers had concealed themselves. So well were
they hidden that our leading scouts
passed over the drift without discovering them, and it was not until
the wagons and guns were entering
the drift that the Boers showed
themselves and opened fire. Mary
of the drivers of the artillery horses
were immediately shot down at
short range and several of the guns
were captured. The remainder galloped away, covered by Roberts'
Horse, which suffered heavily.
"Meanwhile, Lieut. Chester Masters, of Rimington's scouts, found
a passage across the spruit unoccupied by the enemy, by which the
remainder of Broadwood's force
crossed. They reformed with great
steadiness, notwithstanding all that
had previously occurred.
"Broadwood's report, which has
just reached me, and which contains
no details, stated that he had lost
seven guns and all his baggage.
He estimated all his casualties at
about 350, including 200 missing.
"On hearing this morning that
Broadwood was hard pressed, 1 immediately ordered Gen. French,
with the two remaining cavalry brigades, to follow in support of the
ninth division. The latter, after a
magnificent march, arrived on thc
scene of action after 2 p.m.
"Broadwood's force consisted of
the Royal Household cavalry and
10th Hussars, 'Q' and 'U' batteries
of the Royal Horse artillery and
Pitcher's battalion of mounted in
lantry.
"Ths strength of the enemy is
estimated at from 8,000 to 10,000,
with guns, the number of which is
not repotted."
Uoer* (lathered Along Hip Vaal.
Kimberley, April 1.—There is
great Boer activity along the Vaal
River. About 6,000 burghers have
assembled at various points between
Fourteen Streams and Christiana,
occupying Witrand, north of Klip
Dam, and 600 men are laagered
at Boetsop.
Bloemfontein, March 30.—The
attack upon the Boers holding the
kopjes near the Karee Siding station, a few miles south of Brandt-
fort, was made by Tucker's seventh
division with the co-operation of
French's cavalry. The attacking
troops included a large force of
Australians. Colonel Knight, with
400 New South Wales mounted infantry included in Legallais' brigade, attacked the right flank.
A long line of kopjes was held by
the Boers and there was severe
fighting all along the line of attack.
The approach was very steep, like
a fortress, and the troops were unable to make headway until thc infantry made un attack on the front.
The cavalry went around the right
flank of the Boers and used their
Vickers-Maxim freely. An army
hospital was established in a cottage under the shelter of a large
kopje: The Boer shells came right
over the kopje and landed near the
hospital, which it was found necessary to evacuate.
The HuersNIowly Retreat.
The Boers slowly retreated upon
Brandfort, taking their dead and
wounded with them, Meanwhile
the cavalry,Including the Australian
horse and the Sidney lancers under
Captain Cox, brigaded with Por
ter's brigade, the Carbineers, Scots
Greys and the Inniskillings received
a severe shell fire. The Boers had
evidently marked the range, as,
when the troops advanced, the enemy's fire was less accurate. The
Colonials displayed great coolness
under fire. Many horses were killed
in the cavalry's flank attack.
The Boers fled and all our troops
pushed forward and now hold an
excellent position upon the large
kopjes recently held  by the   Boers-
I'armem Pear Boer Vengeance.
The farmers are in the laager
fighting, leaving the women and
the children upon the farms, which
they are confident the English will
not touch. Many of these farmers
would surrender their arms, but for
the fear that the Johannesburg police would attack their farms in revenge for their so doing.
The Boers are known to hold
Brandfort in some strength, probably 5000. Reinforcements are afraid
to move direct to their support and
are content with holding their position, which is threatened by the
cavalry advance. The whole action
was rather insignificant. Many
regiments received their baptism of
fire and showed splendid coolness.
We have now secured a fine natural
position facing the huge plain before
Brandfort.
Rudyard Kipling was present during the fight.
Ho im Moved to New Position.
London, 'March 31.—Even the
details of the engagement yesterday
at Karee Station siding, a few miles
south of Brandfort, fail to instill
much interest here. It appears to
have been a one-sided affair, although the Boers stoutly held then-
ground lor about three hours, when,
foreseeing the danger of the British
cavalry enveloping their flanks, the
burghers withdrew on their main
body at Brandfort, which, according
to Lord Roberts, they seem to have
decided later to relinquish, with the
view doubtless of occupying a pie-
pared position further north. There
will probably be a general shifting
of camps on the part of the British,
the new position being made the
base of a further advance as soon
as the railroad shall have been captured.
All  Well at .tlalrklng.
Lord Roberts today reported to
the war ollice that he had received
news from Col. Baden-Powell at
Mafeking up to March 10, when the
general health of the garrison and
its spirits were good. The food
was holding out well and the paper
currency which thc British commander had issued was satisfactory.
The locally made gun, ammunition
and searchlights were good.
Driving lhe Burghers to War.
From Cape Town it is reported
that President Steyn has gone to
Pretoria, after issuing an order that
all British burghers refusing to join
the Boer army shall be shot. The
stories of refugees, however, are
notoriously unreliable. The news
from elsewhere is meagre, though
the last reports from Natal indicate
the speedy clashing of the opposing
armies.
VISIT TO IRELAND
RUSSIA   Bill   WHAT   SHE   ASKS.
Cores    Hakes    tho   Concession*   "he
l>. 11    at fflaiaiipho.
Yokohama, April 2.—It is reported that the government of Cor-
ea has granted the Russian demands for ground within the settlement of Mazanpho.
The Queen Leaves Holyhead for the
Emerald Isle's Capital.
London, April 3.—Queen Victoria, who left Windsor Castle at
9:30 last evening enroute for Ireland, arrived at Holyhead at 1:15
p. m. today. The authorities of
the place, the officers of the warships in the harbor and a guard of
honor awaited the arrival of her
majesty. The general public was
excluded from the station.
When the queen alighted, she
was presented with the usual address of welcome. She gave her
reply to Lord Denby, who handed
it to the oflieials.    It read;
"I thank you for your loyal
welcome and for your expressions
of devotion to my throne and person. The practical and generous
sympathy for those who have suffered, and who are likely to suffer,
in consequence of the present war,
which has been shown by all classes
of my subjects, has been a great
consolation to me during the time
of suspense and anxiety through
which we are passing. I join in
your hearty prayers that peace may
soon be restored and that the other
blessings of heaven be iong continued to my empire, and I wish all
prosperity to the country you represent."
The queen then walked across
the platform, leaning on the arm of
an Indian attendant, to the royal
yacht Victoria and Albert which,
piloted by the Irene and escorted by
the royal yacht Osborn and the
cruisers Galatea and Australia, then
steamed ont of the harbor for
Kingston.
Kingston, Ireland, April 3.—
Queen Victoria arrived here at 2
o'clock.
1 ii.»ii\i:n  Fit on   1101: it no it.
A viceroy for the Dominion of
South Africa is said to have been
already selected in the person of
Lord Reay, who has Dutch blood
in his veins and speaks Dutch.
Two H. l_i-.li OHI. cr. Tell ol'Sufferings
Alter Escape from Pretoria.
London, April 3.—The dispatch
from Lorenzo Marques dated yesterday, announcing the arrival
there of Captain Haldane, of the
Gordon Highlanders, and Lieut.
Le Mesurier, of the Dublin Fusiliers, who made their escape from
Pretoria, is followed today by further details of their perilous adventures after getting over the
railings and   reaching   the   street.
"The moon was full," continues
the narrative, "and our untimely
appearance attracted the attention
of the police, but we managed to
clear the town and to strike the
Delagoa Bay railroad. We followed tlie-railroad, hiding by day in
ditches. Many narrow escapes we
have had from the Botr patrols.
In one instance, we were compelled to take the river and swim
some distance, alter having alarmed a patrol, which was searching
for us along the bank. We spent
a miserable night in a clump of
bracken.
"The morning sun brought life
to our chilled bodies, but we found
our small supplies of meat, lozenges and,chocolate had been spoiled
by water, with the exception ot one
tin of army emergency rations.
When night came on, we left the
railway track, it being too risky,
and wandered far to the southward,
only striking the railway again at
Flands river near daybreak. We
were so tired that we were obliged
to rest at the first available cover,
which proved to be in the centre of
a Boer farm. Again we had a
narrow escape from discovery by
farm hands, but we got away safely
at night fall, riding a short distance.
All the following day we lay in an
antbear hole under the broiling
sun."
Bridge and Train Hoth M reeked.
A bridge on the Spokane Falls &
Northern railway near Springdale
collapsed Monday morning and 24
freight cars fell through, as the
northbound train was passing over.
One brakeman was slightly injured.
The cars took fire and everything about them was destroyed,
including   a   carload   of   whiskey.
•trar
GALLANT EFFORTS
How General Broadwood Tried to Save
the Guns.
$ London, April 3.—The war office
has posted a dispatch from Lord
Roberts reading as follows:
Bloemfontein, April 2, 30 p. m.—
In continuation of my telegram of
March 31, there has been considerable delay in getting accurate returns of the casualties, as the action
took place 22 miles hence. The
telegraph cable has been interrupted several times, cloudy weather
has interfered with signalling aud
although there has been no engagement since, the force is continually
in touch with the enemy.
"There were many acts of conspicuous gallantry displayed during
the day. "Q" battery remained
in action under a cross-fire at 1300
yards for some hours, the officers
serving the guns as the casualties
reduced the detachments. Several
gallant attempts were made to bring
in two guns, the teams of which had
been killed but at each attempt the
horses were shot down. The
Essex, Munster, Shropshire and
Northumberland mounted infantry
and Roberts' horse covered the retirement of the guns from that position to the crossing of the drift
found by the cavalry two miles
further south, and withstood the
determined attack of the enemy,
who, in some cases, advanced within a hundred yards.
"U battery of the Royal horse
artillery was suddenly surrounded
in the drift, and the officers and men
were all made prisoners without a
shot being fired. But Major Taylor
and a sergeant major succeeded
in escaping in the confusion. Five
guns were captured at the same
lime.    Further details   tomorrow."
The ttiins Not He-raptured.
Lord Roberts despatch seems to
finally dispose of the earlier report
of the recovery of the guns, and the
fact that the Boers remain in
occupation of the waterworks is
taken as an indication that they intend to make a stand sufficiently
long to cover the withdrawal of the
guns and wagons to a place of
safety, although the absence of definite information regarding the
movements of Gen. French's cavalry
makes it difficult to estimate their
chances of recapture.
A Noble Serlbe Captured.
A despatch from Maseru, Basutoland, dated Monday, April 2, says
the earl of Rosslin, who is acting as
war correspondent for the Daily
Mail in South Africa, and who left
their April 1 on his way to Taban-
chtli has probably fallen into the
hands of the Boers.
Boers Mill Hold Position.
Boshman Kop, Monday, April 2.
—The Boers are still occupying the
waterworks which the British shelled yesterday afternoon, the Boers
replying.
Caplalu ll. I. liiHini In Command.
New Vork, April 3.—Speculation
is rife in this city and also in Washington, BCCOrdi ng to a dispatch
from that city, as to whether it is
true that Captain Carl Reichman,
an American officer, was commanding the Boers who captured the
British convoy Saturday, and also
whether the officer is Captain Carl
Reichman, the I'nited States military attache sent to the Transvaal
on January 5, last. The latter proposition^ deemed extremely improbable.
If Captain Reichman should join
in the fighting without first resigning from the United State army,
he would be liable to court martial
on his return. An officer would be
dismissed from the service in disgrace, if he joined thc Boers, while
still holding a commission under
the United States.
li,.<t li 11111111 of fight at itlafelkop.
Pretoria, March 31.—There has
been heavy fighting between Brandfort and Bloemfontein. The Wak-
kerstroom and Emmelo commandos
attacked 7,000 British and drove
them   back with heavy   loss.    Ac
cording to the reports of wounded
who have arrived here, fighting occurred all along the line. The federal troops had positions on the
side and top of the mountain, while
the British positions were on the
opposite side of the hill. The British charged repeatedly, but were
repulsed. The latest reports siy
that the federals were holding their
own, but the final result of the
fighting is not known here. The
federal loss was nine killed and
wounded.
Reports from Brandfort icceived
later state that 2000 federals attacked 3000 British successfully,but
that 13,000 British reinforcements
arrived and the federals were compelled to tetire. The federal loss,
according to these reports, was
slight.
The Cost of War.
The lesson of the present war,
that stands out so conspicuous, that
all the nations of the world must
learn it, is that the cost of a campaign is enormous. War is a luxury
in which only the very rich nations
may indulge. There are big
guns is use today, that, every
time they are discharged, waste
the value of a one-hundred acre
farm in Ontario. Such guns, more
often than not, are fired to no purpose whatever, and war, as it is
now, is so expensive that colossal
sums of money would be squandered in any struggle between two
first-class   powers.—Toronto Star.
THE minim; CAMP.
Prom Ellen Marsh's Prize Editorial In
the Spokesmau-Hevlew.
To the effete easterner the first
surprise is the people he encounters
—no place in America is more
thoroughly cosmopolitan than the
bona fide booming mining camp.
It has people with pasts, people
with brains, people with grit—all
prospectively building brown stone
fronts in the not far distant future.
The town teems with energy, hotels
crowded, lodging houses run on the
8-hour shift plan, if the camp is
humming, saloons reaping fortunes,
all night pleasure resorts—for the
miner lives for today; every kind of
store doing rushing business; everything hopeful, happy, busy. Women
working side by side with men, in
business, in the professions, even at
times, in prospecting; and nowhere
is woman more cheerfully accorded
equal rights with man and at the
same time looked uptoin reverential
respect and deference by all classes
of men, than in the primitive mining
camp. Socially these places are
distinctly democratic and a kindlier
fellow feeling is fostered in this
atn osphere than in larger and more
conventional localities.
MISCELLANEOUS   NOTES.
Polygamist Roberts has got
some of his fellow-polygamists into
trouble. The charge that open po-
lygamists had been appointed to
office in Utah by President McKinley led to investigation, which has
culminated in the removal of Postmaster Graham, of Provo.
The South African loyalists are
answering the resolutions of the
Dutch traitors, asking that the
Boer republics be not extinguished,
with other resolutions urging their
extinction. Kimberly has spoken
in that strain and its sufferings give
it a right to be heard.
CAMBRIDGE WINS
The haste with which the Free
Staters expressed their determination to turn against their former allies might create the impression
that they were training to become
members of the British Columbia
legislature.—Nelson Economist.
A London Times dispatch from
Aliwal North says: "Mr. Dewet,
member for Wodehouse, who sat
at Krijgsraad at the trial of Cape
Policeman Marais, made prisoner
at Dordrecht, and ordered his dispatch to Bloemfontein, has been arrested. Marais recently escaped
and returned to the colony yesterday. He had the satisfaction of
conducting Dewet to Aliwal jail."
That was poetic justice meted out
to a traitor.
Light Blue Captures University Boat
Race Easily.
Putney, Eng., March 31.—The
fifty-seventh annual boat race between crews representing the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
was rowed today, over the usual
course from Putney to Mortlake,
and was won by Cambridge.
The two boats took up their positions at 1150 p. m. and started at
1:58. Cambridge promptly took
the lead. At Walden's, about one
mile from the start, Cambridge was
two lengths ahead Passing Crab-
tree, Cambridge was 14 seconds
ahead, and off the Saccharine works
the light blues were leading by six
lengths. At Hammersmith bridge,
less than one mile and three-quarters from the start, the lead of Cambridge had been reduced to five
lengths.
But the light blues maintained
this lead. At the lead mills they
were rowing 35 to Oxford's 34. At
the Doves, one mile and seven-
eighths from the start, the lead of
Cambridge had been reduced to
four lengths. But at Chiswick
Church, about two miles and three
quarters from the start, the race
had developed into nothing more
than a procession. As the Cambridge boat passed Thorneycroft's,
nearing the three mile post,the light
blues led by ten lengths by a score
of 31 to 25, with one dead heat.
Oxford then began to show signs
of distress and at the Devonshire
meadows, over three miles from the
start, 11 lengths separated the
boats. At Barnes' bridge, about
three and a half miles from the
starting place, Cambridge was 40
lengths ahead. The light blues
then eased off and won by about 20
lengths ahead. The Oxford crew
was greatly distressed at the finish.
The race was favored by magnificent weather. The bright sunshine
attracted immense crowds, which
from an early hour congregated
along the course, on steamers, in
boats, on the bridges and the buildups overlooking the scene. Every
point of vantage was crowded, in
spite of the general belief that it
would be a one-sided contest.
Oxford won the toss and chose
the Surrey station. The crews embarked at 1:30.
Cambridge finished very fresh
and paddled past the stand boat at
Mortlake the easiest of winners.
Oxford, however, came in for a full
share of cheering. The official time
was 18 minutes 47 seconds.
Cambridge won last year, but
was defeated in the nine preceding
years. The balance is still in favor
of Oxford.
NO HONEY TO PAV RILLS.
Appropriations  Exhausted, Only  the
Legislature Can Provide Fund*.
New Westminster Columbian.
The situation is just this serious:
That vouchers for payment for contracts perfoimed during the current
year are being returned unpaid
from Victoria, on the ground that
the appropriations have run out—
and there are still nearly four
months of the cut rent year to run.
It was bad enough, on account of
no estimates having been passed at
the late session, to look forward to
the appropriations running out with
the end of the current fiscal year,
on June 30, and a new legislature
in all probability—the way things
are going—not being elected early
enough to meet and put through
the necessary estimates for the ensuing year.
But an even more serious matter is the fact, showns by the returns of unpaid vouchers for contracts performed, that considerable supplementaries for the current
year were required. These not
having been provided for, either,
the necessity for a speedy termination of thc present crisis become the
more pressing.
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
I
..,
' rx-T-'.rr.
TIIE
WIIAI! F
LARGE  AND COMFORTABLE
ROOMS TABLE .TJNBUB-
PASSED    1\T    THE
NORTH WEST.
PUDOll & BARRETT ' * *  PROPS
SILVERTON, B. C.
Daigle's Black-
sml h Shan.
Tllli Ml. lb It TO.mi.
Saturday, amii.  7,   itX.0.
l'CllliISIIKIl BVRRY   SATt'IiD.VY    AT
SILVEKTON, B. U.
MATIIKNON IIISOS.,     E.-iIitni-H £ Props.
SinsCRIlTloN BATES I
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR,
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this ollice.
'lg
general Blaeksmitliiii,
• • •      jiwl Repairing Done.
JLKPERT   HOR9E   SHOER  ALWAYS   ON   HAND.
TOOf. SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
8. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON, B. C.
THE
ARLINGTON
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Wlinrf.
POOD  SERVICE COMFORTAI1LF
ROOMS.
Dining Room under the charge ol
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil the delicacies
pf the season.
JIENDERSON& GETIIING, - Pnoi-s.
SLOOAN CITY BO.
J; G. GORDON,
MISES.R8ALBSTATe, C0K1T.Y1XGEK
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      R. C.
i —_______
j. m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     PURVEYOR
AHD( MINLNG ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY, .  _   B.C.
THE GLORY OK WAR.
He fell—this poldier— liiting ibe dust,
(Oil, mother ami pweethoart, weep if
you will!)
lie stood like u ini:ii wbo is true to hid
trust,
lie ilii cl as our I er) fp'diers n H8t,
Who ride in the front, uml Ught to kill
Ilia Rliroml of bine in stiffened wilh pore;
(Oh, mother uml itroetheart, weep If
yon may!)
Where he ilied lie wal trod ami trampled
o'er
By the lirr*es of half a hundred nioie
Who fell  in  the ranks like him.el:
today.
He fought aa men fight for the land they
love;
(Oh,  iiiritlirr  and   (iweetheart, weep
evermore!)
And the carrion btrda that circle above
Shall feed, in the morn, on the man you
love;
And poets shall sing of tho glory of war.
—Iityh Jtfi'iU'linm Slrobridge.
18 it i H a i i i i a i a'»»a 818 j
I   EDITORIAL OUTCROPPINGS.
\.»ammaaa:aana
j.UMclntpsfi,
DEALER IN ALL KIND$ OF
FRESH FRUIT — CON-
EECTIONERY	
CIGARS     AND
TOBACO08
ALL KIND OF
-T?UP!?tlES-INTHE
STATIONARY-  LINE --'■
lUa-A—^ieHlS&TACKLE--
'   THE-LATER*  NOVELS, Ac.
.•:".,i..  .   . - _~
'.'.
Silverion, B.C.
SINNOTT k O'DONNELL.
FREIGHTERS AND PACKERS.
• Contracts largj oratyall taken	
•._...;. ...   And promptly attended to.
Stably iu SILVERTON, B   C.
0HA9.-A: WtfTEftSIAN k CO.
AwmoKKEUH, Customs Bbokejip,  ...
Ani> Gbnkhal R»vi-Estatb AofiNTS,
Otnce, In r.emlcy lllocli    -   -    Baiter Bt.
-       i't   KELSON,   B, 0.
win ti    li   l'i'
mmm wiiiERy mm.
_N0. 9.5. W. F. Of M.
""Mflels ev*ry' Saturday in the Onion
_^all ineilTerton,:nt7:30r. »r. -
J. M. M. Bbnkdi'm,
-- President.  •
1   .       .  . 3, 1. McIntomi,
.     EinancisbSecretary
r
HITttATION     IVANTKT>.
* -A third year st nd.'iit -of the School of
Prattled Science, Toronto, doaircs employment iu some ollice requiring an expert draaghtajnan, Apply to "Draughtsman" care ol Ttyo STlver'tooiati.
"IF YOUR'SUBSCRIPTION 18 DUE
rvsa6-"i^i in arrears   a
«   BLUE   CROSS     WILL
»»f BE EO.i.
:0*»*?*& BE FOUND, IN .THR*
SQUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYj-BLE  IN  ADVANCE/    PRIOR
^ivo■•rof.L.ViL'! A YEAR.
Tho Four Mile wagon road, which,
ii ti government institution, connecting
Silverton with most of tho big mines
of this camp, is in a bad state of
repair above the Wakt field concentrator. Indeed if it were not for the
Wakefield company ond those connected with it, who have done a large
amount of work upon it, the load
would bo in as equally as had a state
between their mill and town. This
road has been a paying institution
to the country ever since the day it
waa built, last veer alone over 2000
tons of heavy freight being haul :d
over it Tt may he taken for granted
that our system of taxation and its
disbursement is worse than rotten,
when the main roads cf the country
are allowed to get into su ch a bad
conditions that individual, who are
big tax payers, receive no benefits
Irom them but have to keep the main
government roads in repair at their
own expense. The bad state into
which the wagon roads of the country
aro allowed to i<et is enough to
disgust taxpoyera and drive capital
a Way from acduntry where Sdch things
are •Bowed.""
British Colombia's system of spend-
ind thu taxi.* collected :-i\ the province,
nest.after hisr .politics, is. probably
about the rankest thing in the Dominion.
«ood long rest from politics and a stop | except their phyiscal infirmities, let
put to these rapid changes in our laws, j them come out with them and lr»va o
all this  absurd   abuse   of  a   man of
tit least long enough for the people to
becouio acquainted with thoso we have
and a chance to find out whether they
aro good or bad beforo any more
changes are made in then).
The lato productions on Iho stage
of British Columbian polities have
mostly been of tho bam storming
variety, light conn fly, farces and a
few specially turns done by "serious
chronics" and lightiniii" change artists.
This may be very amusing to the outside world but it is having a curious
i'Ileet upon the business interests of
the province.
whom they are evidently afraid.    The
present cabinet cannot be,  to say the
least,  any worse  than  some
British  Columbia bus   been
with,
that
cm sed
T\r. at- BENEDUM,
•   	
^   3   @   mime   "ET   S   JR.
Silverton ■ ■      •       ■        B- C
MINING   RECOUPS.
NICW   llKNVHH—-LOCATIONS
Match 24—Eflle, Galena Farm, TM
Clements.
March 28—Wllmer, and Ivan. Goat
Mt., M Mnrcliison nnd M E Young.
ASSliX.XMICNT.S.
March 21—Currant, Detroit, 28—
puymnster, Canadian Boy Fraction,   27
-StCinir.   31-Ki'lianec, .March  Hinl,
March Hinl Emotion.
TltANSI'I.KS.
March 20—Power ol Attorney, Geo 11
THE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THK DOOR OF
j   Wilson  ^..^
tHE "FTOtel* A. R. TEtTEB, ntOK.
Our neighbor towns may bum more.
fireworks over a South African victory j
than Silverton docs, but when it comet)  Crawford to C A Huller, Mar -'.
,,'.., . ,   ,        Bird   Fraction ',i,   Norman McMillan
to celebrating tho anniversary   qf tho >oA 0 Buhn», 8ep 10. 1898.
birth of Her Majesty wo take a,  uaok'    .il—Daisy  No  2,   Eastern,    Detroit,
Oedur, Currant, Clarence, Tliistl
each, Scottish Colonial Hold Pleldi
to Goo W IIukIics, Mar 2
seat for up one.
!
Ltd
The Coast papers ha"e lately devoted a large amount of sp^ce to
Premier Martin, his doings and Ills
cabinet, mostly of a very abusivo cr
uncoiiiplimeiitaiy native. No direct
or actual charges are laid against him,
with the exception of a league with
the Dunsmuirs, nbout which even they
themselves cannot agree, but insinuations hit made and trash about him
and bis cabinet is dished up daily for
the edification of their readers. If
tliey have any charges or arguments to
bring against Martin c? his colleague?,
E, M. Brindle,
While the politicians in B. C. aro
busy evolving Railway planks for their
platforms, ihe pocket-members of the
C. P. R. at Ottawa quietly and unostentatiously choke off competition for
the Boundary district by defeating the
Kettle River.R R Bill. The sooner
thn (Jectors realize that tho 0. P. R.
runs the railroad legislation of Canada,
the sooner, tbey will have peace in
their minds regarding the compaiatire
rterits of the railroad policies spread
out lavishly before tli'ciu.
- '■"'.Tj   ii.r;~ J'TrJT—'.
This is 9i|ve?ton's year to gr9,w,
build up and become the commercial
center and tho distributing point for
the whole Lshe region. Silverton
has Straggled along on her own resources and grown to what ahe is, the
chief ^amp of the Lake, without any
outside help either from the government or her townsite owners.
If tho townsite owners have the
penetration of. a bat, however, or the
spirit of a louse, they must see that
thia is the year, of all others, to put
their shoulders to tho wheel and help
tite enterprising ciriatens of StI vertpn
push tho t,0\Vn Up to lhe top notch,
where it belongs.'
Jeweler   &c.,
esires to inform
. his many cus-
THAT    IIE     WILL
tomers ,_,_s(.u,_ „_:s.,___ss
IS    THE" SLOCAJ,7   DURING   THE
SUMMElt,   AND   THVNKS    TH31|
OR THEIR l'AST PATRONAGE.
Lilac Cream
I . .-   e
FOR CRACKED OR BORE
HANDS. FOR USE AFTER SHAVING. AN FXCELLEXT HKALER OE
CUTS OR BURNS,   Price 25c.
THIS PREPARATION IS
BKYO>'D DOUBT TIIE FINEST OF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET.' ALL
LIKE TT WHO TRY.   Trice __5c
St Lawrence, nil, D K McDonald to
A M Mcintosh and J Mlohol, March  17.
22—Nut ice of leisure and sale of Cody
and Joker Fraction is withdrawn and
Iihs  no oilier effect; S P Tuck sbaiil
Notice of fhIo i f Cluis Cidlaglian'a interest in Cody and ,!oker Fractions, Apr
3, S l'Tuclt.'
27-Mowicb, )i, C E Fielding to 0 IV
Greenlee, Dec 15.
Aurora, .Miniicliiiliii.'4', R George to
VV H U.ianilon, March 111.
Minnehaha, :iu, Bobeit George to
Richard lieoice, Sept 10. 1898.
28—Power of Attorney, Fr.u.k Jobsoii
ti Wm lltinlcr, Jan IS.
Kervatis, }±, Frank Jobson to J T
Kelly, March 29.
Sweet (irass, M E YbODg to I) Mc-
Licblan, Marc bin.
cEitmriCA^aa of iutbovswekti
March 17—Twilight, Omega.
Goodman—The wicked stand in t!i|i
peiy places.
BadodR—Well vby don't tbo Chris*
tians |ut nsliea on tbe sidewalkst
SPRING   POEM.
l.iillo lioy
Public street,
ley water,
Wi t feet,
Conahl;
Worse I
D.u.lor!
Hearse'
Perhaps
^'bat  \lritisli  Columbia needs is a
THE MAKY SUDDEN |
CHANGES IN TIIE WLATIIEK HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD, TRY HORE-
UOUND AND TOLU.   Price 25.'.
SYRUP OF HOREHOl.'ND
AND. TOLU IS KNOWN' TO. MANY
WHOM IT HAS CURED. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES. SOLD I'N-
DER A GUARANTEE. Price 25c.
Sold
AT  THE
Silverto-tx  Pure
Drug Kings And
Store.     G'licniiedlf Kept,
LAKE AVE,  SILVERTON,   B. C
-—________
axative
c
old Cure.
To'Cure n  Cold In   One Day.
Contains   The New  Ingredient.
 TRY   IT	
PKiCK |tyv       AX AiyOrimhtt.
CERTIFIOATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE:— "Tkiimi'ii," "Dii'itKosa-
BOP'and "R.iiniiiiw Ot7AHT8" Mineral
Claims; situate in lhe Arrow Lnkc
Minim; Divisigii of VNe.it Kootenai
Diatrict.
Where  located:—On  Cariboo   creek,
adj lining'    tbo    Millio  .Ma-'li    Mineral
Claim.
Take notice tli.il I, J. D. Amlernon. P. L.
S , of Trail, II C, action as nsrem for the
Kiiiril.j«>|ia Mining uml Dttvelopineiii
Company, Limited, Free Miner's Certi
Hc.iteNo. iiM415, intend sixty davs fiom
tha dale hereof, lo a|i|,ly to tlio Mining
Recorder for Ccrtitie.ites of In.|irov-
eiiieiitf-, (or ihe pmpose of obtain!i,)..
Uiown Grants nf Uie ubove clainv.
And further take noiio that action
under section :i7,'n,iiHt r>e coiiitrionceH
XH'.tore tbo issuance of sivh CortificateH
of Improvements
Dated this Slli dnv of September, A. D.
IS'!**.
J. D, AxnK«sr,N',
24 | 2 | 00.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN (ARK OF.
A FIR8T-CLA8S BILLIARD ROOM <>N THK PRBMI8ES,
BAR   FURKIRHED WITH TIIE   REST   BRANDS OE  \V1NI P,  LIQUOR
AND CUiAUh,
HEADQVARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -    -   - PI.OCAN, R 0.
2v/C£3DorLald.'G Xmil^rox-y _
StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK   IIOKSKS   TOR   HIRE   AT   BEASONAM.i;
RATES A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSIT!: I.US1M.SS COKE.
Outside Parties Deniring tlorwa In Silverton ,,  ,m,,,h
t'anMLive Them   Eei-e.vcd I',v   Wilting To--    »'  r'  i1"'l,U'>AUI'
" + + t t + t + SILVERTON, ■ • B. t:
THE WM. HAMILTON M1NUFACTING CO.,
LIMITED,
MININGMACHINERY
F*eterl3oro«^|_^, Ontnrlo,
CANADA.
l«^vv^v^^^_^lVwvv^^v^l^»v^flA^v^^v^l^^^^l wvww»ww» vv
Syrup of Horehoind & Tolu
FOR COUGHS   AND COLDS,
o
•1
\ \-\ li'tiiilqiiiirliis Fur Siuju^ Men:-.
M.\T
THE
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.
l \ i.^'ilii><; M\v,
AND   IT 'IC-liA'lE.
lAl'.lE  I NM LP.\)-MT> IX
THE NOLTIlWlsT.
pWtSMWRBMt.1,   I'nfs.
I SI LV KR TON,    11.
K,
Hie Strike L* Off SwATm«a,
Ind Wt- are now
ilvady fur
l!iD.ilH'SS.
l'ir.M!i if it: it in Ni i ros "IflJO."
Jawi
cn''
'• .ItulUMM,   SrKUI. Ml
{t IXIi   I'l A :i;i> NOVXI-
•K
i*
riEH.
PlVNO  Lamps
•   \NI> O.wz TlIII.K,.
•/      Ol'lll:lt      AhTKLKM
eil't'"     Nl MDIUH'H
— (*\   C.i
try  Koot-SnXR Tm.M.
Ml
lo
l''..\ I \l-
Aml now
euiiy Fi iemla I am •
prepured to reeiiveV
your      oiil.rH      1 ••' l» ■
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAIIyWAY-
and SOO Line-
THE DlltlXT ROUl'K If ROM
KOOTENAY QOUN'TY
'IO ALL POINTS
EAST ami WEST
First-Clnai-* Sb-eperB on nil Trains from
REVELKTOKI'.   ,in<l KOOTENAY LD
TOURIST CARS   piihh Medicine Hut
Daily for St. Pin,. . .
fcixiMvs and Wednkhiuys for Toii-
ONTO.
EmiiAYi for Mosriir.ii. and Ronton.
— Same ears pats Revelstoke one day —
.■■'   ,:lt..,<>. \J%.<
IE
^WAV. V»A«W»/W>AOAA^^WiV\
*     OUR   WA'HII  AND .H'WELEUY "
REPAlRIMi I.'EPARIMl Nf IS AI.
As wa o.dy einploy lhe inoft ox|e •
ienciil nun, iiIIhoiIi  is r.l'Ali.iMiili
^   Mnil and lixjireca Oideri Receive Onr
> Prompt Attontiun.
^^AA*v^A.^A^Al^A/^/^/lA^vvvvs_vv^^
DON'T I'OROET THE PLAOE.
JACOI? DOVER.   "Tine Jewklkh.";
NELSON,  li. 0.
CONNECTIOJXS.
■»°oihl'''N:,""l,'lieVf!,,,(,,lp' "i'1 Ma''i '-hie
l»:30ex' fliinday lv. Silverton,
ar. ex. .Sundny, 10:20
Tor   Rowland,  Nelson      Crows   Nest
Br.mch and  Donndnry Country.
10:20ex. Sunday lv. Silverton;
ar. fit. Bp'n'day 13 CO
To snd from Sandon.
13:00 ex Sundny lv Silyerton,
ar, ex Sunduy, 10:20
TlCKKTK l_._-_l.Eli THBODOH   AN.)   BaOOAQB
 CiIl:tKi:l) to imsTiNATio.N-. —:
For rates ami full information e.pply to
neniest local agent or
If. II. REKVE8, Ajent, SllveHor
W. P. ANDERSON,
Trav. Puss. Akcih, Nelson
E.J, COY LE.
A. G. 1'. Agont, Vttiiceuve
GREi
Georgetown
CANADA.
K&   FUR POWER KNITTING MACHINES AND   VlSiaLE
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRITE UH    CATALOGUES' FRKK
The THISTLE HOTEL
NOW REOPENED
DEDEU A NEW
MANAOEMENT.
ITOU.SEj.UENOVAXED
AND THE RAR EULLY
RESTOCKED
Thompson Broi
LAKlr: AVE,,   SfLVKKTON, B. o.
. ..
-

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