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The Silvertonian Mar 31, 1900

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Array ex*
VOLUME THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    MARCH   31, h)00.
NUMBER 40
and
CONSIGNMENTS
OF PR  SH
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Weekly News Nuggets Of Sloean and
Other Camps.
GENERAL HEWS OF DISTRICT.
A Rig Mining Deal Goes Through.
SilTrertoxi, 33. C.
LAKEVIEW   HOTEL
Silverton	
HfTHIS HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE BAR IS SUPPLIED WITH BEST BRANDS OF
WINES, LTQUORS AND CIGARS
L.  2v£.   3Sn.o-wi.ei3..   Prop,
P. BURIVJS & oo
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RE ('All, STORES AT
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaslo,  Sandra,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forksj
Midway and Greenwood.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
*
t
t
3
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT 18 UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OK SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY 8HELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GUR YNTREO.   OV ERCOATINGS JUST IN.
The Tailor:  Silverton, B. C.
J
5
3
5
t
THE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
Tlie  biggest  mining: deal  yet made
tills year, in the Slocan, lias just been
consummated by   Frank Watson  and
jndfK Spinks turning over the Rockland
Group of claims, on Red Monntain, to J
P. Graves, of New Yoik, wbo has held a
bond on the property which he haa now
taken up for the syndicate he represents.
Mr  Graves lias interested with him in
the proposition sufficient New York and
Philadelphia capital   to  mnke the com-
[ pany oue of the strongest mining syndicates  that  has ever  operated  In  the
Province.
Thn Rockland Group, which is to be
operated by this new company, ia the
best developed property on Red Mountain
and has one of the largest bodies of pity
ore ever encountered in Canada. Tbe
diameter of the deposit is what is known
as a sulphide ore and carries average
values in gold and copper ot about f 17 60
to the ton. The deposit has been cut at
h depth ot over 100 feet and is shown to
be over 100 feet wide. Considerable
work has been dope upon the ledge and
enough ore is now in sight to justify the
erection of a plant tor tbe treatment of its
ores at or near the mine
The new company will commence
work on a big scale just as soon as the
season permits of outside work beinif
dose, and a full force of minera will be
employed. Amongst the many other
outside improvements Ihe company
contemplate doing tbis spring ia the
building of a wagon road to connect the
property with Silverton.
Tho opening up and working of thc
Rockland Group by a strong company
on a large scale, meanB the commenci-
ment of a new era in the history of
mining in the Slocan. Heretofore this
Slocan has been noted as the richest
silver-lead country in Canada, but it will
not be 'long now before it will abo he
noted for its rich deposits of gold-copper
ore.
The o|ieuing up of the gold copper
deposits on Red Mountain means everything for the town of Silverton, aa it
necessitates a large amount of supplies
and the employment ol a large number
of men for years to come, and as Silver-
ton is the supply point for nil the Red
Mountain properties, it means n big
thing for this town.
Bert McNaught la doing assessment
work on the Anacortes claim near town.
Alex. Dodds, foreman of the Wakefield mine, waa down on Thursday engaging mora miners.
Assessment work is being done on the
Echo claim, u sold property lying just
below town on the lake shore.
At the Emily Edith mine a little work
Is being done, but just when tbis big
property will start up Is not known.
There is 'but little if any change
around tbe Galena mine, but it is reported .that the new nwnety will erect a
mill upon the property this spring.
The Bosun mine, which has a mine
manager who is not a politician, is working full blast snd making money for its
owners. The stockholders of the Bosun
are to be congratulated on both their
mine and manager.
The lower tunnel on the Noonday
miue has now reached a depth ot 300
feet and uu upraise is now being driven,
at a point near its face, to connect with
the tunnel above. The Noonday mine
although temporarily under a cloud is
mill as good a mine as ever and it is
hoped will soon resume shipping.
PACKING FROM THE HEWETT.
Owing to the rapidity with whicli the
snow is going off, raw-hiding ore from
the Hewett mine has had to be suspei.d-
ed and the ore is now being brought
down to the wharf by pack trains.
Some fine ore is being sacked up at the
mine and samples that will easily go
600 ounces in silver to the ton have
lately been brought into town. In thc
face oi the main working tunnel is 13
inches of high grade shipping ore. The
Hewett is our only dry ore mine, the ore
carrying Utile lead but plenty of native
and ruby silver.
April foolsday to-morrow.
Bonn; In Silverton, on Monday tho
20th inst., to the wife of Archie D. McDonald, a son.
Divine Humes will be held in Silver-
ton next Sunday afternoon at 8. p. m.,
everyone is cordially invited to attend.—
John G. Duncan, Presbyterian Minister.
Frank Watson came in from the south
on Thursday and is here completing the
turning over nf the Rockland to J P.
Graves of New York, who represents the
new company.
The Silverton Waterworks Company
are applying tor incorporation and receiving bids for a BUpply of water pipes
for their system. They are letting no
grass grow anywhere nruund them.
All   work   in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silveiton Drug Store, will
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler.    All re
paira are guahantekh for one year. #
Through Tho Week.
Extracts  From   Various Sources.
The Somers Family, which appears is
McKinnon's Hall to night, will be remembered by many of onr playgoers aa
a Company which gave good shows on
their last visit here. They appear thia
season with an enlarged company.
"That hoy ol mine," said tha portly
personage with the large watch chain
and sent, "writes me from college that ho
has just connected himself with another
club, composed exclusively ot gentlemen.
I wish some club wonld connect itaelf
once with bis head just hard enough to
hammer a little sense into it."
Purely Personal Paragraphs.
wilji
8LOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of  ore  fr.ipi Silverton for
the year 1899. totaled 1693 Tons.
All other Lake points 1383     "
The shipment   ot   oro   from   Slocan
Lake points, up  lo and including   the
preaent week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                    Tons.
$osqn 100
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
From Silverton Tons.
Eniilv Edith 20
Vancouver    '20
From Enterprise f.onding
Enterprisu 140
From Slocan City
Arlington      160
Black Prippp...,    60
Mrs. Bear, of Ro!ihmii, is visiting
Mrs. Carey,
Bert. Wilbelm. who has recently spent
three weeks in the Slocan Hospital, has
gone up to the Antoiuc mine i.cur Sun-
don.
E. M. Brindle, tho jeweler, leaves in
a few days for Fire Valley, where he is
interested in some good mining prospects.
Now is the time-to start your garden.
Now is the time to seed your lawn. Cull
at the Silverton Drug Store and select
your seeds. t
W.  Kyte returned on Monday  from
A scientists says thnt "if the earth wm
flattened the sea would be two miles
deep 111 over the world." After serious
meditation a Kansas editor gave ont the
following: "If any man Iseaught flatten*
ing out the earth, shoot him on the spot.
A great many of us can't swim."
"Never hit s man when he is down,'
is good sensible advhp, because It's a
poor chance .to land a good one. What
is required is a complete change of tactics. If you san't kick him in tbe lace,
jump up and down on Uie boneless portion of his iinntoinv below his belt buck*
le.
Over one-half of the reserved seat tick"
ets for the Fisk Jubilee Singers, who
aro billed /or Wednesday, have been
sold.    A good housu is now assured.
"Flying Fox." the winner of the laat
Derhy, has been sold to a Frenchman
for 37,500 guineas. We understand tbat
this high priced son of Orme and Vara-
aii extended  tour   of the middle   nnd j pi re will be pijt into training ior the
northwestern states.    He looks well af- j "Free for-All" here on Mav 24th.
ter his trip.        _      ,_.      _»
Percy Dickenson, ol tl.e firm of Dick- j   ,„ art eMtern p8ckjng boKm, one of
enson& Felt, tbe mining operators.of | lhe emt,ioyeefl  carefully inscribed hia
.i.une and address upon an egg, whic^
was crated np with others and shipped
New I
TIIE   METAL MARKET.
We
showing
are now
a nice assortment of
MEN'S SPRING AND
SUMMER SUITS
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
PREPARING TO SHIP.
The wagon road between Silverton and
the WakvfleM mill is fast drying up and
as all tbe snowslides are down that interfere with it, the hauling of Wakefield
concentrates to town for shipment will
be commenced next week. About 70
ions of ore a day are being put through
the mil'., which is running smoothly,
and the concentrates are piling op
rapidly, there now being over five carloads ready to ship. More jigs are lo be
added and the capacity of the mill increased so as to be able to handle all the
ore the tramway can bring down f oni
tl.e mine. Pete Sinnott, who bas the
contract for hauling the concentrates
from the mill to our wharf, expects tn
commence hauling shortly. The Wakefield will ship about a carload a day and
will be by long odds the biggest shipper
on the Lske this season.
T*
*e Wrxx. Hunter Co., I*tdU*
STRIKE ON THE STORM.
Ou the Storm claim, which lies on the
Galena Farm Flats about one mile from
town, a discovery of clean ore has been
made on the surface, that looks as if a
strike of some importance is about to be
made on that property. The new discovery consists of about a foot of
carbonate and galena ore, which was
encountered at grass-roots about 75 feet
east, on the vein, from where the present
shaft is located. Every Indication goes)
to show that this is the Hpex of an ore
shute cropping up to Ihe surface ul the
ground, and It is equally as promising as
the Bosun was, wheu first uncovered.
New York, Mar. 29.-Bar Silver, 59%o
Lake copper,   f 10.50.
Lead-Tho linn that fixes the selling
price for minns and smelters quotes lead
nt $4.45 at the close.
The "Drill" is being sharpened and
tempered and will make its appparanc-
in Slocan City shortly.   Success to it!
Slocan City, is expected buck from
York this week.
R. Malloy, who has been spendine the
winter among relatives in Ontario, retorned on Sstnrday. His home-coming
had been epgerly looked for hy Uie toot-
ball fraternity, among n bom "Bob" inspires confidence when he ptill.i on bis
jersey,
A   PUBLIC   MEETING.
A meeting of the citizens of
Silverton will be held in the Victoria Hotel next Tuesday evening
at 8 o'clock, to discuss plans for
Silverton's Fourth Annual Celebration of tho Queen's Birthday,
and to elect officers and committees. Everyone is requested to
be present.
SANDON IN LINE.
west, being finally purchased by one  of
Silverton's fair daughters.
The young lady wrote him a nice little
note and received a reply, parts of w liicb
she allows us to publish, thinking that
it might bo of interes*.
"I was deliirhted to receive your letter
j especially when I saw a lady's signature,
for I was always under the impression
I that Chinamen were the only substitutes
! they had there for women.    You say
Silverton is -the place for eg_rs und I
think it must be judging by the price.
They aie only 15c a dozen here and only
the small ones are shipped to B. C.  Tho
best are all sent to Liverpool and  Glasgow.    You say that Mr.  McFarlane**
name is John.   Well there is not very
much iu n n^me ."
Tbe Brehany Concert Company which
will appear on the boards of the Bosuu
Opera llon-e on the 12th prox., has tho
i reputation of being a thoroughly first-
> class company of artists.     They appear
: in New Denver under « lar_»e guarantee
! and tickets are being subscribed for in
Silverton nnd New Denver to justify it.
j The "Alert" will take tbe concert goers
j from here to Now Denver.
THE HERO OF LADYSMITH.
When it comes to praising hemes
For the valor they've  displayed
i here is one to be remember, d
For the gallant stand he made,
He is Ladysniitli's trim hero,
Well doseiving wido renown
For his patience and his courago
In the long beleaguered town.
Four long monthe ho grimly battled
With a I'miro and eager foe,
Seeminu doomed tn slow starvation
Or a sudden overthrow,
But he fought from dawn till nightfall,
And lio watched from eve till dawn,
Baffling schemes of strong besiegers
As he stubbornly held on.
Though on every side encompsssed.
Though with shot aud shell assailed,
He kept Britain's colors flying
And  his spirit never quailed,
Long and trying were bis vigils,
Peril faced him night and day,
But hi' watched and fought and guarded,
And he kept tbo foe at bay.
Famine's spector rise to plague him
And still ever closer crept;
Every day brought new privations
And disease about him swept.
Rut though tried bv sore afflictions
Ever brighter grew his fame,
And he held at bay the foemen
Till the longed for succor came.
To the valur of this soldier
Is the greatest honor due,
For in four Irng months of buttle
To nil duties be was true,
And when Boer and British heroes
Are accorded laurels bright
There'll ho none found mnre deserving
Thau bi'AVoSir Gnorge Stewart White.
—Pittsburg Chronicle.
THE PREMIER SPEAKS FIRST.
Last Mondsy evening thc Sandon
Football Club was organized for Ihe sea-
sou and delegates were chosen to attend
nny meeting that should he culled for the
forming of a League. Tho secretary of
the Silverton Club has leen notified to
this effect and has been requested to extend an invitation to Kuslo to send dele-      .,.,., ,, ,    ,
., ,.        ,r,.    ,      . The Hon. Joseph  Martin opened the
gates to the convention.   This  hns been '
done. As yet no replies hnve been re- j campaign in Victoria last Tuesday, nd-
ceived to the circular letter sent out by : dressing a large audienco in tbat citv.
tlie Silverton secretary frnni Sloean City, I Ho announced the date for the elections
New Denver or Three Forks.     Each ofjas lieing on or about Jure 15th, and
in , promised tbat the House should meet
these towns could put strong teams
the field and should not hang back
the way they are doing.
in
'BOB" GREEN VISITS US.
Robert F. Green M. P. P. has been
visiting bis constituents iu this end of
tho Riding and sizing up tho political
situation for the coming election. He
spent Saturday and Sunday in town and
appeared to bc in u very hopeful frame
of mind.
When seen by The Silvkhtoman, Mr.
Green said it was much too early to talk
for publication. He declared his inten-
j tion however of being a candidate. He
will run as a supporter of tbe Eight-hour
law, whieh lie considers to be the paramount issue iiefore Slocan electors. In
tho course of tho conversation it was
shown that Mr. Green did not have any
great admiration for Premier Martin.
Mr. Green will begin his campaign in
a few weeks. He was unable to stute by
whom he would be opposed and was unwilling to guess, although be appeared
Certain that one or more candidates
would be out in the field against him.
early in .Inly.
Regarding tbe Eight-hour law, tha
Premier is reported in the ColoniBt as
follows:
"While he was not prepared to say
that he agreed with the eight-hour law
implicitly as it now stood, he (Mr. Martin) wished to go on record as unqualifiedly nf opinion that in the underground
workings of the mines of gold or silver
or coal, eight hours a day's labor was all
that could reasonably bo asked of any
man."
SOME   DIVIDENDS,
The Homestake mines oi Dakota havo
paid 1875.000 in dividends last year.
They have paid since starling the sunt
of $8,088,750. The Boston k Montana.
distributed among tlie shareholders laat
month $2,225,000. which makes $14,500-
000 in dividends Irom the start. The
Anaconda compauy has paid 112,150,000
The entire dividonds paid last month
hy tho mines of the United States and]
British Columbia was $5,690,889v TREATYAGREEDTO TO VISITGOLONIES
China HasAcquiesced in Conditions Demanded by the Powers.
Washington, March 27.—Secretary Hay submitted today to Congress the correspondence had with
the governments of other nations
respecting the maintenance of an
"open door" in China. The correspondence began on September
6 last, and March 20 marked the
successful completion of the undertaking. The nations addressed
on this subject by the United States,
were Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Italy and Japan.
The specific propositions in which
the acquiescence of the other powers was desired, and eventually
obtained, were as follows:
1. That each, within its "sphere
of influence" or leased territory in
China, should pledge itself not in
any way to interfere with any treaty
port or vested right within the
"sphere" or territory under lease.
a. That in all ports within the
"spheres of influence" except free
ports, all merchandise landed or
shipped, irrespective of nationality,
shall pay the Chinese treaty tariff
for the time being and the duties
shall be paid to the Chinese government.
3. That, regarding imports in
the "spheres of influence," the government controlling that sphere will
levy no greater harbor duties on
vessels of any nationality, and that
on railroads built, controlled or
operated within these "spheres,"
the citizens of other nationalities
shall pay no higher charges for
transportation of merchandise than
are paid by the citizens of the powers controlling such "spheres."
The Prince of Wales Proposes a Tom-
After the War is Over.
(New York, March 26.—The
Prince of Wales, it is said, may
make a tour of the British colonies
when the war is over, for the purpose of crystalizing the sentiment in
favor of imperial federation, says a
London dispatch to the Herald. He
will probably include the United
States when he visits Canada, if he
finally decides to make the trip. He
looks with approval on the idea of
an Anglo-American entente and
wishes to do as much as his dignity
will permit to promote it.
It is thought that just one thing
may be looked upon as likely to dissuade the heir-apparent from undertaking the journey, namely, the condition of his aged mother. This
war has been a tremendous strain
on the queen.
TAKEN AND LOST
Boers at Ladybrand Prove Too
for the British.
British Prisoners Well Treated.
Durban, Match 26.—William
Cox, a newspaper correspondent,
who was released from imprisonment at Pretoria, has arrived here.
He adds his testimony to the stories
of the good treatment of the prisoners by the Transvaal authorities,
though the subordinates sometimes
subjected the captives to annoyances. Mr. Cox saw Secretary Reitz
and says he has evidently worried
at the turn of events.
Rebel* Did Not Come to the Front.
Prominent persons at the Transvaal capital bitterly accuse Mr. Hof-
meyer, the Afrikander leader, and
Premier Schreiner of deserting
them. They say they expected a
hundred thousand Cape Colonists
to join the republics
Gen.   Joubert is  apparently  sus-
The powers making  the  demand   pected ot half-heartedness, aim Mr.
were Great Britain, Russia, Germany, France, Italy, Japan and the
United States.
AN APOLOUY TO I'NCLK SAM.
British Government Sorry the Ceusor
Opened Consul marram's Letter.
New York, March 27.—The
Journal and Advertiser in a Washington dispatch says that Lord Salisbury has made an exculpation to
the United States for the opening
by the British censor at Durban of
mail addressed to ex-Consul Charles
E. Macrum at Pretoria, and the
apology will be sent to the house
committee on foreign affairs by
Secretary of State Hay, when Mr.
Macrum's case against the state department is heard.
According to the dispatch, the
facts leaked out through Representative Berry of Kentucky, one of the
Democratic members of the house
foreign affairs committee. Mr.
Berry had called at the state department relative to the Macrum
hearing, and afterwards said:
"I saw Secretary Hay at.d he
said the whole ground of Mr. Macrum's charges rested upon the
fact that three letters had been
opened by English oflieials in South
Africa. Secretary Hay said that
England's attention had been called
to this violation of international
law and that Lord Salisbury had
made an investigation and then sent
apology  to this country."
■BCBBTABV POWBBI  ABRBRTBD
To Be Tried for Conspiracy   to  Kill
Coventor Ctoebel.
Frankfort, Ky., March 37.—
Judge Moore today oidered Secretary of State Powers held for the
grand jury without bail. The
judge said that, in his opinion,
Powers had not fired the shot, but
had been connected with the con-
spiricy to kill Governor Goebel.
WAKLIKK    ACT   BV    HUHNIA
■he Mends Fleets to Chemulpo to Ex*
tort Concessions of Land.
Yokohama, March 27.—A Russian squadron has arrived at Chemulpo. It is believed this presages
a de mand for a concession of land
at Masango, and it is arousing uneasy comments io Japan.
Cox gathered that his life would be
in danger at the hands of the irate
burghers if Pretoria should be besieged.
At Delagoa Bay, Mr. Cox siw
well known Transvaal secret service
agents purchasing and forwarding
all kinds of goods to the Transvaal.
All Well At fflafeklng,
London, March 28.—7:20 p. m.
—A private telegram received from
Mafeking reports that all are well
there on March 20.
Humor of mafeking Siege.
London, March 28.—A dispatch
to the Daily Mail from Mafeking,
dated March 16, describes the
humorous side of the siege. It appears that the Colonials set up bottles, inviting the Boers to shoot at
them, and chaffed the enemy when
the shot got wide.
Another trick of the Colonials is
persistent concertina playing to lure
tne Boers, excited by curiosity, to
raise their heads from trenches
when they are promptly sniped.
Heroism at Ladysmith.
Cape Town, March 28.—Gen.
White has related several instances
of the courage of the British troops
during the Ladysmith siege. He
said: "During the attack on Caesar's Camp, a remote corner was
held by sixteen Manchesters, who
fought from three in the morning
until dusk, when the Devonshires
reinforced them. Fourteen lay
dead, but the two survivors, one of
whom was wounded, still held the
position.
"The same day a sergeant with
one of the guns had a leg and one
arm shot off. He fell across the
trail of the gun, and said: 'Roll me
out of the way and go on working
the gun.' "
Belgians Vlscuss the War.
Brussels, March 28,—In the Senate yesterday, M. Kenisin, referring
to the late peace conference at The
Hague, said it could be regarded as
having aborted, because it had
been followed by the South African
war, "in which numerous lives had
been lost for gold."
M. Montifire Levy then protested
against the attacks made by the
Belgian press on Great Britain.
The minister of foreign affairs, M.
Defaferea, said he concurred in this
protest. "The press," he added,
"forgets what England has done
for our country, which owes it a
debt of profound gratitude. I
deeply regret these attacks."
Maseru, Basutoland, Monday,
March 26.—A small British force
commanded by Col. Pitcher entered
Ladybrand today, after driving in
the Boer outposts. A considerable
body of Boers then attacked the
British, who retired after capturing
the landrost. The British had
three men wounded and the Boers
had eight men wounded slightly.
It is understood that the Boers are
trying to check the British, while
their convoy of wagons pushes on
to Senekal.
Preparing to Abandon Natal
Ladysmith, March 27. —It is reported that the Boers are massing
in their entrenched positions at the
Biggarsburg, and it is added that
their transport trains are packed at
Newcastle in readiness to facilitate
their retreat, in case necessity
should require such a step.
A   Beconnalssance Blade.
London, March 27.—Reconnaissances of slight importance continu-
to be the only feature of the war in
South Africa. Lord Roberts wires
to the war office as follows:
"Bloemfontein, March 26.—Captain Sloane-Stanley, of the ifiih
Lancers, was slightly wounded in
an affair of outposts north of Modder river March 25."
This bare statement is all that
comes from the commander-in-
chief.
An .tflklr ofOof posts.
A dispatch from Bloemfontein,
dated Monday March 26 and published in the second edition of the
Times, amplifies Lord Roberts' dispatch as follows:
"A cavalry reconnaissance was
made yesterday towards Brandfort.
The 16th Lancers, by skirmishing,
drew the Boers from their position
inth the open, when the 9th Lancers
attempted to outflank the enemy,
while they were engaged from the
front by a dismounted section of the
16th Lancers. The casualties were
reported to be few."
Preler Farming to Fighting.
A dispatch from Maseru, Basutoland, dated March 26, says:
"The Basutoland government is
busy collecting natives to be employed at Bloemfontein in repairing
and laying railroads. The natives
report that the Free Staters on the
borders of Basutoland have refused
to go to Kroonstadt and are staying
on their farms. It is now the
ploughing season and they are inclined to keep their land
rather than give it up and submit."
Boer reports from Natal show no
developments of importance have
occurred there up to Merch 23.
Boera Deny Heavy Losses.
A dispatch from  the   Boer  camp
at Glencoe, dated March  23,   says:
"No   attack   is   expected  to be
made on the Boer forces  in   Natal.
Generals   Botha   and   Meyer have
been joined by their wives.   General
Botha denies thc reports that Transvaal women were   wounded  in  the
Tugela trenches. General Buller has
sent the Boers a list of their wounded, stating that he buiied  60  men.
General Botha says this is  impossible, as his rolls do  not  show   any
such loss."
A Ladysmith special says:
"Boer patrols endeavored to trap
a   party   of  the   13th Hussars on
March 25, at Waschbank.     A   hot
chase ensued.     Several Boers were
wounded."
The same dispatch says:
"A   printed  document  has been
found, giving  the   Boer   losses   at
Spion^Kop at 2500,   but   this   can
scarcely be credited."
Heavy Halns Flood  Rivers.
Advices from Cape Town say:
"Rains are general throughout
South Africa ind rivers which have
been dry for years are being flooded. Many camps are transformed
into swamps. This will still more
militate against an immediate British advance.
BOER CHIEF DEAD IBRITAINISRIGHT FORCES GOMBIN
Sickness Carries Ofl Gen. Joubert at
Pretoria.
Pretoria, March 28.—-Gen. Joubert died last night at 11.20 o'clock.
He had been suffering from stomach
complaint. The town is plunged in
mourning for this true patriot, gallant general and upright and honorable gentleman.
General Petrius Jacobs Joubert,
commander general of the Transvaal forces, better known is Slim
Peter, was born about 68 years ago.
He was descended from the old
French Huguenot family, which settled in South Africa. He was bom
in Cape Colony, but was taken by
his parents to the Orange Free
State, where he was taught from
childhood to shoot straight and
hate the British. Of schooling he
had but little, but his ambition
prompted him to read the few books
he could obtain and he succeeded in
obtaining a fair knowledge of history and languages. Soon after
the acqaisition of Natal by the British ha became a burgher of the
South African Republic and a daring
fighter. Hs was so feared by the
natives that tha knowledge that he
was at the head of a punitive expedition usually resulted in their surrender. He was elected president
of the Transvaal in 1876, defeated
Sir George Colley at Majuba Hill in
1881, and acted as President of the
republic in 1883-4, during Kiuger's
absence in Europe.
General foubert was always in
favor of the use of force instead of
diplomacy and President Kruger on
several occasions had great difficulty
in repressing his hot headed friend
and colleague, notably in 1879,
when Joubert, with Kruger and
Pretorius, was planning the rebellion
to overthrow British rule io tha
Transvaal.
It was Joubert who organized the
army of the South African Republic,
dividing the country into 17 military
districts with commandants, field
cornets and lieutenants. To such a
point of perfection was the system
carried that when the present war
was declared Joubert, it is said, only had to send 17 despatches and
within 48 hours the Boer nation was
under arms. It was due to General
Joubert that the South African Republic succeeded in amassing the
immense stores of war munitions
and provisions which have stood
them in such good stead during the
conflict now in progress. Although
known as"Slim Peter" he was nearly six feet in height and of stout
build, his nickname being given
him on account of his shrewd military tactics. The wife of General
Joubert, who was a Miss Fraser,
had been devoted to him throughout
the campaign, frequently sharing
the dangers in the field.
White's Eulogyy oa Joubert.
London, March 28.—In connection with the announcement of the
death of General Joubert, it is interesting to note that Sir Georg
White, the British general who
commanded the garrison which defended Ladysmith, in a speech at
Cape Town yesterday evening, declared that Joubert was a soldier
and a gentleman and a brave and
honorable opponent.
An American Methodist Bishop's
of the Boer War.
Ths Delagoa Bar Arbitration.
Paris March 28.—-The Gaulois,
in an article dealing with the Delagoa arbitration, says: "Thc
Americans and English show impatience to receive the indemnity.
In case England desires money
complicated with a political arriere
pensee, everything indicates that
she has not lost hope of persuading
Portugal to relinquish Lorenzo
Marques, and to sell the remainder
of her colonial empire."
Paris Exposition Opens April 14.
Paris, March 27.—At a cabinet
council today, M. Loubet presiding,
it was decided to officially inaugurate the Paris exposition on Saturday, April 14.
New Vork, March 28.—Bishop
Hartzell, who has been in charge of
Methodist mission work in South
Africa for four years, is spending a
fortnight in London before sailing
for America to attend the mission
and general conference at New
York and Chicago, says a cable to
the Tribune from London. He has
been studying racial and political
questions during a series of journeys in the Dutch, English and Portuguese possessions, ahd has met
Sir Alfred Milner, Cecil Rhodes,
Presidents Kruger and Steyn, Dr.
Leyds, Dr. Jameson and other conspicuous men in South Africa. He
talks about the war in a most temperate way, gives to the Dutch
leaders and people credit for many
excellent traits and robust virtues,
but does not hesitate to express his
deliberate conviction that the English cause is just and commands his
sympathy. Bishop Hartzell bases
his opinion that England is in the
right on three grounds:
"First. There i.s the broad argument from the interests of general civilization. England, with her
ideas of civil liberty, stands against
the Dutch countries with their inferior progress, their retrograde
ideas and their stagnant conservatism.
"Second. There is the overshadowing importance ot the native problem. The bishop describes
the increase ol the black races in
Africa is something almost incredible. That which he considers to be
the overwhelming problem of the
whole continent is the development
of the black races under the tutelage
of the white man.
"Third. The welfare of the
Boers themselves. Pious, robust,
and patriotic as these are, they are
also narrow, superstitious and ignorant, '.-nd the best thing that can
happen is for them to be overwhelmed by the superior numbers
of British and be brought under the
broadening influence of education
and of English ideas of liberty."
I II III i:   11 \Tll.i: WITH   BOXERS.
Chinese Troops Fall to Overcome Persecutors of missionaries.
Pekin, March 27.—The "Boxer"
movement in the north is assuming
alarming proportions. News has
been received here that an indecisive, but fierce, fight has taken
place between the Boxers and the
imperial troops at Yen Chin, piov-
nce of Chi Li. Each force num-
beied about 1500 men and there
were heavy casualties on both sides.
LATEST BTOCB MlllliT IONS.
tease
Athnhsiirs  3t)U
b C.Gold Klclds  4
Big Three  Qu
Brandon A Oolden Crown. 23
Canadian (told Field*    ,,, 7
1'iirilHMi [I'nniii McKinney] SI
Crow's Nest Push Coul ... $3, AO
Deer Trail No. 2  llu.
Deer l'ark [new]	
Duiideo  15
Kviuiii-jbLar  (1%
Km1 mum.	
Hianl  e%
HimieMnke  2
I run M«..k  Jfl
Iron Coll  0
I. X. L  16
I rmi Horte	
.Inn  Maine  \n
Jnmlxi   25
King (Oro llenoro)  15
Knob Hill     67
I." 11 ■ ■ 1' 111" i'i 111 _.■ 11  jf)
Minnehaha  8
M onte Christo  »
MOh!real (told Fields...., 7
Morrison  \u\
Mountain Mon. ......I 1 00
Noble Five   ...\  eU.
Northern Belle  8
Novelty  *
Okanogan ,.,, 2%
Old lronnldes  go
Palmer Mountain     15
Peoria Mines  2
rnnos-M Miiiid ,tl< 7
Itiiiiihler-Curiboo '..'.,. 20
Balliiniillen ,, *,y
Republic .....I 1 oil
St. Klmo Consolidated ju-
Hnmgglcr  j»J
Taniarac [Kenneth ... 7
Trail Creek Hid. Treat *u
Van Anda .... 4w
Victory-Triumph ,...,", »
Virginia   4
War Kagle Consolidated .1 1 40
Waterloo  *
White Bear  r)u
WIlllllIK'B .....'.'.' .V*
Wonderfnl         3
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12
Artistic Job Printing of every de-
scription at this office.
Not only the sand on the Cape
Nome beach is to be washed for
gold, but sand under the ocean off
the Alaskan coast is to be dredgod.
Boer Generals Hake Good Their
From Roberts.
Pretoria, March 28.-—Accord!
to a dispatch from KroonstadJ
Commandant Olivier has jojnJ
Generals Grqebler and Lemner, WhJ
are safe. General Delarey J
still sick at Pretoria, but he will
proceed to the front Sunday. TraiM|
are frequently leaving with burgj
ers for the fighting line on the sij
of Bloemfontein.
The Standard and Diggers Ne„.|
learns that Generals Olivier, Groe-I
bier and Lemner hnve arrived at J
point sufficiently far north to relieve!
all apprehensions of the possibility]
of their being cut off. It is expect.!
ed that they will arrive at Wlnbgfl
in a few days and effect a juncttoal
with General Dewett, when the 1
federal position, it is declared, *M
formidably oppose Lord Rob.1
erts.
Reports received from the varioi»|
bank of the republic sho\v that the!
cash holdings amount to £»fina
057 or ($11,165,285)
Destroying tbe Coal mines.
A    dispatch   received  here frojl
Boer   headquarters   in    Natal aJ
nounces that  the  destruction co»
tinues of   coal   mines likely to
useful to the British.    The Dundet
colliery    has  been  blown  up, th
machinery has been  destroyed
the mine has been rendered usele
for three months.
To Represent America.
United   States consul  Hay ad]
his secretary  have gone  to Kro
stadt to  make  necessary arrange-!
ments for United  States  represen
tation in the Free State.
milner al Bloemronleln.
London,  March   28.—The   Brill
ish high  commissioner,   Sir Alfred
Milner,    arrived    at   Bloemlontcia
last night  and   was  met  by  Lorw
Roberts  and his staff.    According
to a dispatch from the Orange Fr«
State cap tal, published in   the
ond    edition    of the    Times, th
high  commissioner's  visit is of 1
private nature,    It is  thought  thisj
can scarcely be anything but an of-l
tidal subterfuge.    The question
the pacification   of the   Free  Staitl
and the treatment of the insurgenti]
is   doubtless  being discussed
tween Lord Roberts and Sir Alfret
Milner.
According to the same  dispatch
General French, previous to retur
ing to Bloemfontein,   occupied tt|
flour  mills   near  Batter,   which
considered   an    important   acquis
tion.
Clements Takes Fanresmllb.
General Clements' column ente
ed Fauresmith Tuesday, March i'i
occupying Jagersfontein on its
there. Magistrates were appoint^
ed, the proclamation was read,!
bands of music met the troops wl
flags were flown. Among t"|
spectators at Fauresmith eee
President Steyn's daughter. Hea<J|
rains made General Clements'marnl
hard and caused sickness amoof|
the troops.
may be ■■ Fight at l_*djrbrand,
A despatch from Maseru, Baifj
toland, dated March 27, says r*|
ports that the Boers are re-enteriofj
Ladybrand cause the presumpti<*|
that the British troops have croswl
the line of the Boer retreat towafll
Kroonstadt, and that a fight or sitf-l
render near Ladybrand is imminent!
Maseru advices are not distill
guished for their accuracy.
■lege or mafeking Helaxed.
Further advices from Mafekinfil
dated March 16, reiterate that **l
was well there and that the cordotj
was not so tightly drawn, the Boerfl
allowing natives to pass throuM
their lines, which they had previou»|
ly forbidden. The native rcfug^l
are reported to be too stupid aD'|
la/y to work or take cover from tNI
shells. They gather in cro#<"|
around the soup kitchens and havfl
to be driven away when the warni»l|
bell rings.
Artistic Job Printing of every *j
scription at this office.
J<~J SALVATION WAR
«r Conflict Between Salvation and
Volunteer Armies.
A PITIFUL PLIGHT
People of Puerto Rico 60 Hungry
and  Naked.
ijew Vork, March 24.—While
I declining to give, except in
|rt, his reasons for wishing to
Inge his son's name from William
Uh to Charles Brandon Booth,
Lnander Ballington Booth, of
Volunteers of America, says in
[Tribune today:
i'A report has been made to  the
gS) which I wish to correct,   viz:
iit everybody thought the   Salva-
|n Army   and  the  Volunteers  o
nerica, of which I  am  president,
the most friendly terms.    So far
■the Volunteers   are   concerned,
ly have sought to avoid  opposite friction and any bitterness, but
■the  Salvationists   could   do   to
Urt our purposes, to  injure  our
|se and to influence our  officers,
1 been done.
I'Not   satisfied   with    the   cruel
Ltment of Mrs. Booth, not satis-
with calling our  people  'trait-
l,' 'devils'  and   'street  walkers,'
Iir commander, Booth-Tucker.has
^nly, in court, led  three  officers
day for our downfall. They have
he over our heads to   the   land-
jls of our   halls,   offering   them
money if they would evict our
^ple   and  rent  them   the   halls.
ry have said that the  Volunteers
I failing and are heavily in   debt,
[ch is not the case.     We   have
every creditor.
I'Apart  from  the   legal  reasons
ch we shall present in court.does
one wonder that our boy should
(it to cease to be associated with
ivenient which  has   so   bitterly
osed his father and  mother?     I
make known more later.      The
Ivationists have  even  given out
It Mrs. Booth's picture should be
■the rogues' gallery."
SHOW    110 ill      roil It I I'liov
Trial   Which   Win Expose Bribery
or Kruger and His Chiefs.
few Vork, March 26.—A  crimi-
case    which   will   attract  the
ntest    interest  in America  and
countries where   the struggle
Itween Great Britain and the Boers
[exciting attention, will  be  heard
June 11 before the Brussels tribal, says a  Brussels   cable to the
fcrald.    It is  a trial   which   will
to   the  test  the  accusation  of
Eruption brought by the   English
Ivernment   against the   Boer of-
lals    in   general  and   President
juger in particular.
|The   parties concerned  are  the
known  financers,   the   Baron
ppenheimer, of the firm ofOppen-
Smer   Freres,   Louis  and   Henry
farant,   Belgian  barristers;     M.
laconier, a wealthy Belgian  capi-
list,  of Liege, and another   Bel-
Jan, M.  Terwange,   all  of whom
tie associated for  some years  as
^sees of the    Transvaal   railway,
Hich was to connect Komati   port
fth Selati.
IThe Transvaal  government com-
ainsthat, by producing  false  ac-
lunts, the company  claimed   from
|em  an amount of interest largely
excess of the  capital subscribed
required. According to infor-
lation given out, the company's
Irectors, who are being prosecuted
this charge, allege that they
lere compelled to make the charge
lljher, in order to conceal the
hbes which they had to pay Presi-
pit Kruger and  his  familiars and
st of the members of the Pretor-
volksraad, including some of the
snerali now engaged in the war.
Boers Slumpede to Snrrcudcr
'-ondon, March 26.—Lord Robots telegraphs from Bloemfontein
Ner date of March 21 as follows:
|So many burghers have expressed
desire to surrender under the
^rms of the last proclamation that
lhave sent small columns in various
prections to register their names
f'd take over their arms.
'A cavalry brigade has gone  to
ie eastward of Thabanchu, and  a
jetachment from   Springfontein has
V'eupied  Smithfield,   where   some
jransvaalers  and   a   wagon   with
|rms  and  ammunition  were    capped.   The   Scots   guards are at
idenburg and Redderburg.
New York, March 26.—Describing the present condition of affairs
in Puerto Rico, the correspondent
ot the Journal and Advertiser at San
Juan says:
"The people are too weak to resist bayonet rule, but their love for
the United States is changing to
apathy or fierce hatred. In San
Juan one can hear on nearly every
street half naked children sing the
American national hymn. The
scene is pathetic. It is almost ignoble.
"But from the district of Cacao
comes a message that more than
1000 women in that neighborhood
cannot leave their huts, because
they have no clothes. The same
reports come from other districts.
There are probably 30,000 naked
women in the mountain districts.
There are thousands of children who
cannot attend school, because the
teachers refuse to receive them
stark naked, as they present themselves."
General Davis is quoted in an interview as saying:
"We shall spend most of the
money furnished by congress in
building roads. We will continue
to feed the incapable and destitute.
If a man is able-bodied, but will
not work, he must starve. If he
cannot work he will be fed. As
free trade and constitutional rights
have become political questions, I
cannot enter into thc controversy
I have given thc government tht
tiue facts and hnve pointed oul
what 1 believe to be the only sound
policy for tne government. That
ends my duty. I cannot take part
in questions of high statesmanship.
The people of Puerto Rico are civilized and more capable than the people of New Mexico, who were given
territorial government fifty years
ago."	
Will'   I'lIM H  M IT   WAN  Mllllll
HO! FORTHE GAPE WAR EAGLE MINE
London Society Prearing to Emigrated
to South Africa,
London, March 24.—The war,
according to average opinion, is
practically over. To be sur", it
may be months before Lord Roberts shall reach Pretoria, but his
going there is regarded as sure and
it is asserted that he is not going
to lose many men in getting there.
A dozen defeats could scarcely
spoil this supreme self-satisfaction
and assurance of ultimate victory.
It is not altogether shared by the
press and officials, but it is what
the great majority of the English
people feel. In society the cry now
is:
"Ho! for the Cape" and the
dressmakers are up to their eyes in
work, making toilets suited for the
climate of the gieat war base.
For those who cannot participate in
the prevailing rush lo Cape Town,
there is any amouut of gossip regarding the probable reception of
the Queen in Ireland and what kind
of a greeting Cecil Rhodes will get
in Kngland alter his scathing strictures upon General Buller and Colonel Kekewich, to say nothing of
curious stories which come from
South Africa about women who
have been out there.
The tremendous Influx at Capetown of English society women and
wives of the more wealthy soldiers,
especially those of the volunteers,
has created many he-irt burnings
among the majority of officers' families, who, through lack of pecuniary
resources, are obliged to stay at
home.
AS   SEEN   BV A   DUTCHMAN.
Carnegie Steel Company KxpeelsCoii*
traet for tape lo Cairo Hallroad.
New Vork, March 26.—Referring
to the   settlement of the differences
between   Andrew  Carnegie and H.
C. Frick, the Press says today:
"As is known to all Great Britain
and to the newspaper-reading public of the United Stales, the one
pet scheme of Cecil Rhodes, 'the
South African Colossus,' is his Cape
to Cairo railroad project. This one
idea has far more to do with the
Boer war than ever has been told.
As all England knows of his great
project, so does all Pittsburg, which
means the steel manufacturing industry of the United Statea, It is
known that the Carnegie Steel company always has expected to obtain
the contract for furnishing the steel
rails, bridge building material and
other construction work for the
great railroad. Thc Carnegie Steel
company went so far last fall as to
form a prospecting party of rival
engineers, draughtsmen and others
versed in surveying and engineering, to go over the proposed route
of the Cape to Cairo railroad. The
prospecting party expected to be in
Central Africa for two years at
least, and it was to start from Pittsburg to Cape Town next month.
"Had the bitter feud continued
between these two millionaire iron
and steel kings, the affairs of the
Carnegie Steel company, possibly,
would have been tied up by litigation, the numerous mills closed by
injunctions obtained by Frick, and
all the possibility of this company
getting the enormous contract for
steel rails for the Cape to Cairo road
would have been off-"
BltlTISII CONNI'L STABIIKD.
Outrage Committed In a  Venezuelan
City.
Kingston, Jamaica, March 26.—-
Advices received here today from
Ciulgad Bolivar, Venezuela, say
that a fortnight ago James Lyon,
the acting British consul there, was
fatally stabbed while leaving the
consulate.
It has been commonly assumed
that race sympathy has enlisted the
people of Holland on the side of the
Boers, but Thomas C. Hutten, a
Netherlander, in an article published
in the North American Review for
March, entitled "The Doom of the
Boer Oligarchies," says that the
Dutch press has been almost neutral. He attributes this to the
fanaticism of the Boers, who are
descended from the bigots who exiled the enlightened men of Holland
and opposed all reforms. Mr.
Hutten's article was written before
the tide of victory had turned in
favor of the British and he thus welcomes their expected success: "As
pioneers, as hunters, trappers and
herders, the Boers were more than
a match for all European rivals; as
citizens of an industrial community
they were constantly made to feel
the weight of their mental handicaps. Their feelings towards the
usurpers of their homesteads were
the bitter feelings of humiliation
that make the peons of the Rio
Grande frontier both dread and detest the victorious wi zards of the
north. In the exultation of their
success, the champions of civilization have underrated the physical
prowess of their neighbors, and they
are now paying the penalty of their
mistake. But their ultimate triumph cannot be doubted, and that
most horrible stimulant of savage
passions, a protracted war of races,
may prove a blessing in disguise if
it should result in freeing the entire
reclaimable part of Africa from the
ncubus of a political   anachroism."
CIIIKP   WITNKSN   CALLKD.
i.i.l.l. n   Begins   to Tesliry   lu   tioobel
JTIurder Case.
Frankfort, Ky., March 27.—The
prosecution in the case against
Secretary of State Caleb Powers,
charged with complicity in the Goe-
bel assassination, introdnced its
principal witness today, R. Wharton Golden, of Knox county, an
intimate friend of Secretary Powers,
said to have made a confession implicating a number of  people in the
murder.
Attorneys for thc commonwealth
said that Golden's testimony was
practically the capstone of the whole
structure of evidence and they expected to prove by him not only
that a conspiracy existed but also
who had been implicated in it.
Just what testimony in rebuttal thc
defense would introduce was not
known, but, if Golden's testimony
should not prove sensational, it
was considered probable that the
defense would submit the case
without argument.
Annual Report of the Directors on the
Last Year's Work.
The third annual report of the
directors of the War Eagle Mining
and Development Company, Limited, which was presented to the
shareholders' meeting on February
21 has been printed and received
here. The principal point made is
that the troubles at the mine are
due tothedifficulties with the machinery and not to any shortcomings in
the mine itself.    They say:
"The plant and machinery installed at the beginning of the year
worked so badly that development
was retarded the output of ore fell
below what the mine could have
afforded, and the operating expenses were relatively increased.
"The sum chargeable to operating expenses in the accounts has
been swelled by losses incurred
through constant breakdown of the
machinery, with the result that the
force was rendered idle on the company's time during some portion of
almost every day, and by the fact
that the air pressure fell uniformly
below what was necessary for the
economic working of the machine
diills.
• "Nevertheless, the company was
able to pay its dividend, although
the cash in hand at the beginning
of the year available for the purpose
of completing the installation of the
plant and machinery had to be more
heavily drawn upon than was anticipated. This arose from the fact
that more had been spent upon some
portions ol the plant in an endeavor
to make it efficient than its original
cost invelved; the directors having
determined to spare no expense in
rendering the plant immediately
workable, if possible, for the purpose of maintaining dividends."
Tbe New management.
The report then announces the
appointment on August 1, 1899. of
E. B. Kirby as general manager of
the War Eagle and Centre Star, and
of J. B. Hastings as local director
and consulting engineer. Mr. Kirby
is referred to in complimentary
terms as "a gentleman of wide experience in mining and the installation of suitable mining machinery."
The report proceeds:
"The contracts for the new machinery call for its installation at an
early date; but the delays and difficulties in delivering and setting up
machinery at Rossland are so great
that the directors hesitate to specify
too closely when it ought to be in
place and running.
"In criticising the mistakes that
have been made in connection with
the machinery, it ought to be borne
in mind that this is one of the largest plants attempted to be installed
on the continent, and the first large
one attempted in Canada, and that
the whole enterprise was new to the
owners, contractors and engineers."
The shut-down in consequence of
the machinery troubles and the contract for smelting 150,000 tons of
ore at Trail at $(> lor freight and
treatment is then announced.
In submitting the general manager's report, the directors say:
fio ll. 11.1.11. > ol Ore.
"They desire particularly to draw
attention to the condition of the
mine as set forth in the report, and
to say that whatever disappointments have been met since the last
annual meeting in the curtailment
of tonnage and profits below what
was expected, they are due rather to
the difficulties already referred to
than to any deficiency either in tonnage or values in the mine itself.
BURNED BY BOEBS CAUSES ANXIETY
A Town Destroyed by Flames—Six
Months of Fighting.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
  4
The colonial forces in the field in
South Africa are larger than the
first British army sent to Crimea.
Australia and Canada have furnished 7000 and South Africa 25,000
men.
The latest follower of the Sheldon
craze is a Kansas man who proposes to run for congress "as Jesus
would." Sheldon will have a good
many crankisms to be responsible
for before the fad i.s worked out.—
Tacoma Ledger.
In a few weeks the rains in South
Africa will have ceased, the supply
I of grass and water for the Boer
horses and armies will be scarce,
and thus the weather will be an ally
for Gen. Roberts, who will have
three railroads to bring up supplies
Irom the coast.
London, March 26.—The report
from Kroonstadt, Orange Free
State, via Pretoria, that the Boers
under command of Gen. Olivier had
defeated the British troops under
command of Gen. Gatacre in the
vicinity of Bethulie, is not believed
here. A dispatch to the Daily
News from Springfontein, dated
Tuesday, March 20, says General
Gatacre was "all well" and adds
that he and Gen. Brabant had not
lost a dozen men in a fortnight.
While the Boers and British in
the Orange Free State are taking
advantage of the period of inactivity
to enjoy a rest, those on the borders
of Natal are beginning to show
activity. A special dispatch from
Durban says the town of Pomeroy,
30 miles east of Ladysmith, has
been burned by the Boers. A British detachment, arriving at Pomeroy as the Boers evacuated the
place, shelled the burghers, but
they succeeded in taking up a
strong position in the hills with a
force estimated to number 5000.
The reports of skirmishing near
Lobatsi. while apparently not inflicting any serious loss to Colonel
Plumer's column, cause grave anxiety in regard to his ability to reach
Mafeking Further news from that
quarter is anxiously awaited, for in
the six days that have elapsed since
the last messages were sent off, a
serious engagement may have occurred, though not of Col. Plumer's
seeking. The Boers seem determined not to give up their prey at
Mafeking without a fierce struggle.
In reply to the mayor of Cape
Town's "Mafeking relief day," a
public holiday, Premier Schreiner
wrote: "May the holiday come
soon and may a spirit of general
good will and kindly consideration
prevail later."
The Times in its second edition
publishes a dispatch from Lorenzo
Marquez which quotes President
Steyn as saying at Kroonstadt that
the Boers could continue the struggle for six months longer.
TO PAV DKLACiOA BAT AWABD.
Boer  Agent  ln  New   Vork  Offers  to
Loan Portngal the money.
New York, March 26.—According to a Washington dispatch, the
government has been notified that
the Delagoa Bay award decision
will be announced in a few days and
that the Poituguese government believes the award will not be more
than $4,000,000, though the claimants expect it will be several millions more. The Portuguese government has been collecting the
necessary funds with which to satisfy the award as soon as it is rendered.
In this connection,it is announced
that George W. Van Syclin, of this
city, who is president ot the American council of the South African republics, has sent an official letter to
the Portuguese minister at Washington offering to loan the government of Portugal the sum necessary
to pay the Delagoa Bay award.
While he admitted that the offer
was made with the ultimate purpose
of helping the Boers, Mr. Van Syclin said that the money would not
be loaned by the Boers.
London, March 23.—It is officially announced that the Delagoa Bay
award will be given Monday next,
March 26th.
Boer Threats Are  No Bluff".
Montreal, March 26.—A Houghton, Michigan,dispatch says leading
mine managers and engineers from
the Transvaal who have visited that
country since the beginning of hostilities, sav that the threat to blow
up the mines is something more
than a mere bluff. These managers
are in the United States to place
orders, for new equipment immediately after the destruction of the old
machinery. One v Johannesburg
mine manager here now has full
plans and specifications for a complete new equipment, which will
cost about $1,000,000.
Retreat of Plumer's May
Reoief Supplies.
London, March 24—General Roberts' dispatch saying he had nothing
special to report is generally interpreted to mean that lie hopes speedily to announce some intelligence
gratifying to the British. The
optimists even deduce from the
number of minor items of news received that Lord Roberts has satisfactory news of the advance of the
flying column from the southwards
by a detour towards Mafeking.
Pears and Hopes for Plumer.
In the meantime Colonel Plumer's position is arousing anxiety.
He has with him the long trains of
supplies for Mafeking, the loss ot
which would be serious, and further
information about Commandant
Eloff's movements is awaited with
trepidation, in view of the report
from Pretoria tljat'he was isolating
Colonel Plumer's force near Gaber-
ones, but welt informed people in
South Africa are more hopeful than
the inhabitants of this city. The
former are preparing all kinds of
celebrations to take place on the
announcement of the raising of the
siege of Mafeking. A sword of
honor is in readiness for presentation to Colonel Baden-Powell.
Boers Bullying on all Sides.
A dispatch from Maseru, Basutoland, under yesterday's date, seems
to dispose of the story that General
French was fighting yesterday, but
it indicates that a battle isimminent.
From elsewhere come stories of the
Boers rallying at various points.
Kroonstadt is well entrenched and
General Joubert is preparing to
make a determined stand, while the
Boers in the eastern districts have
b«en ordered to rally at Ficksburg,
northward of Ladybrand, in the
Orange Free State, doubtless with
the view of attempting lo intercept
Lord Roberts and General Buller.
Another Boer force at Fauresmith,
southwest of Bloemfontein, is in a
defiant mood, so the southern part
of the Orange Free State is not yet
subdued.
Canadians Tn the West.
Sir Charles Parsons, commanding
a column in the western district
composed of Canadians and others,
has arrived at Van Wykslie, between which and Kenhart a force of
insurgents is reported to be entrenched. Colonel Herchmer, commanding the Canadian mounted
rifles, is convalescent at Carnarvon
and will rejoin the troop Sunday.
The Pree State Settling Down.
London, March   24.—Lord   Roberts telegraphs  to   the   war  office
from   Bloemfontein   under  date   of •
March 23rd, evening, as follows:
"There is no special news to report. The country south of this
place is generally settling down.
Numbers of arms have been delivered up and the people are beginning to recognize the advantage of
bringing supplies for sale. The
movement of the troops in the western district is being attended with
good results."
milner at Dordrecht.
Cape Town, March 24.—Sir Alfred Milner, who is on a mission
northward, has arrived at Dordrecht.
Death  ot Gen. Woodgate.
London, March 24.—Advices received here announce the death in
the Mooi hospital yesterday of
General Sir Edward Woodgate,
who was wounded ;n theengage-
ment at Spion kop'on Jan. 24.
nii'iinviM. c. p. B.   11.1.1:1.11 \i'u.
Additional Line to the Coast-movlug
Crow's Nest Wires.
J. Wilson of Kamloops, superintendent of the C. P. R. telegraph
lines in the west, is making a trip
through the Kootenays, and in
speaking of the improvements, said;
"We intend to put a new wire
from Nelson to New Denver where
it will join the one from the main
line of the railroad and give us a
ne.v through line to the coast.
When this is done, we shall US« the
present wire from Nelson to the
coast by way of Kaslo and Sandon
for local business only. This will
give us a duplex system to the
coast. With the main line, the
Crow's Nest line and the connection
at Spokane and Portland with the
Postal wires, wc have practically
three routes from the east and west.
For the last week our service
over the Crow's Nest line has been
hampered by our having to move
the line off 8 miles of the right-of-
way between Nelson and Balfour in
order to be out of the way of construction, but this will be finished
tomorrow."
I Ttie OPPOSITE
SELKIRK      TBE
< ~       ■ ■
LARGE     AND    COMFORTABLE
RO0.US--TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN    THE
NORTHWEST.
mWi\& BARRETT J
SILVERTON,
PROPS
B. 0.
Daigle's Blacksmith Shon.
General Blacksmithing
and Repairing Done.
EXPERT H0R9E SKOER ALWAYS ON HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY.
fjf    '  |tl|
8. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON, B. C.
THERE 19
No Excuse
For Being
Late When
BRINDLE
[THE NEW DENVER JEWELER)
Fixes Your
Timepiece.
ay999Q*>9&»
HE GUARANTEES SATISFACTORY WORK IN ALL LINES OF
■WATCH, CLOCK OR JEWELRY
REPAIRING. EVERY WED-
NE8DAY HE VISITS SILVERTON
AND MAKES THE LAKEVIEW
HOTEL HIS HEADQUARTERS.
LEAVE YOUR   WORK   THERE.
First Trip through tjw Kootenay.
The Original
FISK JUBILEE
gingers *♦
UNDER THE AUSPICES UF
THE METHODIST CHURCH.
Wednesday, April 4th., 8. p. m.
AT MoKinnon^s
Hall. • • • • •
TICKETS 75c. and *1.00
PLAN AT THE DRUGSTORE.
rur   OBIOINAI,   COJIPANV.
orcanlzed Oet. 6th  1871   at FISK University, Tenn.,    and   lalrly  retorned
Irons a mont *ncce«(rnl tour In Northern
bar ope
SINNOTT .t O'DONNELL.
FREIGHTERS AND PACKERS.
CoQtractB large or small taken
v And promptly attended to.
gtablos in .SILVERTON, B. 0.
CHA8. A. WATERMAN k CO.
Auctioneers, Customs Hkokkhs,
And General Real Estate Agbktc,
Offloe in Beater Block   -  -    Baker Bt.
NELSON,   B, 0.
-8ILVERT0M 1HWER8' 1)1101!.
NO. 95. W. F. Of M.
Meets every Saturday in tbe Union
Hall in Silverton, at 7:30 p. m.
1 ...
J. M. M. Benedum,.
President.
J, I. McIntosh,
•   Financial-Secretary
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 18 DUE
g«»^«0   OR   Hf  ARREARS    A
| %   BLUE   CROSS     WILL
0S,9a9*Z   BE  FOUND    IN THIS
SQUARE.       SUBSCRIPTION    ARE
PAYABLE  IN   ADVANCE.    PRICE
"WO DOLLARS A YEAR.
THE SIUKRTOMO.
Saturday, Maiicii31, i900.
PUBLISHED BVEEY   SATl'BBAY   AT
SILVERTON, B. C.
MATHESON BROS.,    Kdltom * Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at tills office.
88S88888888888S8888888888
EDITORIAL OUTCROPPIflfGS.
88888888888888888888888?
The clouds of uncertainty hangine
low on the political horizon are gml-
utilly lifting and candidates can be
seen looming up in tho semi-obscurity.
It appears practically certain now
that the light for political honors in the
Slocan is to be a three-oornered one,
with a Conservative, a Martinite and
an Independent in the fit-Id.
The candidate who will uphold the
banner of Oonservativism is, in otir
opinion, doomed to be ono of the defeated. The majority in this Riding
will not support the candidate of the
party whose principal supporters are
the known anti-Eight hour men of the
Riding. No amount ot platform
planks or pre-election pledges i the
part of the party leaders can a. cr 'lr-
facta of the position. If all else were
in favor of this candidate, the burden
ho must carry in the Bupport(l) of the
Old Man of the Mountains, the Sandon Mining Review, would damn him
in the eves of the electorate.
The 8-hour question is one which
the leaders of t|ia p-rty lines movc-
ment in this Riding are anxious to
bury. They do not want to see it an
issue in the campaign, prffering to
have it regarded as something beyond
controversy. If they would succeed
in this desire they must needs muzzle
the Nelson Miner and the Sandon
Mining Review, and warn their rank
aud file into cautiousness. The party
line leaders have bad a conversion on
the subject but tbeir followers hove
not yet grasped the fact that the least
said on the subject the better.
The Martin party has a few followers in the Riding, and Fighting Joe
will undoubtedly bave a representative
in the field. Martin's Slocan friends
havo been gained through his published
platform and hia reputation as a friend
of che Labor party, despite the significant fact that all the recognize! labor
leaders in the Province are opposed to
liiin. It is within the realms of possibility that the Labor party of the Slocan wiil nominate a candidate to run
in the interests of Martin.
What is much more probable however is that the Labor party, or the
Unions, will endorse the re-nomination
of our present member, Robert F.
Green. This will clinch the question
of his election. Union men owe much
to "Bob" Greco, and unless they give
him their undivided support they lay
themselvps open to tho charge of In-inj;
ungrateful and ioappreciative of all
that has been done for them. They
should consider well before they exchange proved friends for prospective
ones.
support a Coroner in the Slocan.
Under the existing laws uone will
accept the position, but now that the
Premier's attention has been brought
to tho matter, we hope to see something done.
From information received during
tbe weeW, it appears that our publication of the platform drawn, up by
the Miners' Union Convention in
Nelson on the 22nd. inst, was a little
premature. We received our information without being told that the
platform wai first to be submitted to
various Unions for (indorsation or
amendment, ro that quite possibly the
actual platform of the Labor party
will differ materially frbni what
appeared in our last issue. Those who
are familiar with the polioy of Tub
Silvertonian will know that it was
from no desire to enibaross the Union
that we published the paragraph in
question.
During its short but eventful career
as a mining journal, The Silvertonian has persistently called the attention of mining men towards the Red
Mountain showings and has frequently
pfophecied that the mines which are
to make 'his town the prosperous city
it is bound to be lay' to tho south of
the town and that all tl i r__ieral
wealth of the district was m c to be
found on Four Mile creek, rich as that
section undoubtedly is,
Now that the Rockland fyony has
passed into the hands ot a Strong and
progressive syndicate at a figure considerably in advance of the price quoted by any of our exchanges, it appears
A third rear student nf the School of
Practical Science, Toronto, desires em-
pluvnient in some ollice requiring an expert draughtsman, Apply to "Draughtsman" care of 'I'ne Silvertonian.
J. I- Mcintosh,
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT CON-
FECTIONERY	
CIGARS    AND
T0BACC08
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY    LINE
 FISHiNG TACKLE	
THE LATEST  NOVELS.  Ac.
Silvern* li.
certain that the truths of our predictions will soon bo made plain, and
such claims as tho LE, the A.E,
the Repoater and the Congo will ty
eagerly sought for by capitalists,
While wo are in the horn blowing
humor we want to inform our readers
that The Silvertonian has dono moro
for the mining interests of tho ^loean
—its truo and vital interests—in publishing tho mining news of tho district
than if it had turned its attention to
second-class imitations of Bill Nye or
written its articles after the style of a
quack medicine almanac. As a local
raining paper, i>s articles are reproduced ih all the biggest mining journals in North America. Our mining
news is fresh and original and we do
not steal Slocan mining news from
Boundary papers, as a Slocan paper
did only this week.
Tho business men of Silverton show
their appreciation of our efforts in
helping to build up tho camp and have
patrorir.ed our advertising columns
liberally.
While we never expect to livo long
enough to see Silverton a second St.
Louis, at the same time wehave thrown
in our lot with Silvnrtonians and expect to stay with them and help mako
this place what it will be, thi principal uiiningcamp of the Slocan. (b y o li)
Jttf. JM. BENEDUM,
Silverton
II
ARLINGTON
HOTEMv*
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Whsif.
GOOD  SERVICE COMFORTABLK
ROOMS,
Dining Room under the charge o!
Mi.-s Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil the delicacies
of the season.
HENDERSON & GE THING, - Pboi-s.
SLOOAN CITY,   ....   B. 0.
T* G. GORDON,
MltaS, REAL ESTATE, -■OMVEIANEI
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -       II. 0
j.m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY,    B. C.
Lilac Cream
FOR CRACKED OR SORE
HANDS. FOR USE AFTER SHAVING. AN EXCELLENT HEALE ' OF
CUTS OR BURNS.   Price 25c.
THIS PREPARATION 18
BEYOND DOUBT THE FINEST OF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET. ALL
LIKE IT WHO TRY.   Price 25c
The true interests in a good roany
S'ocan mining properties are being
sacrificed, at the expense of ihe stockholders, for the political advantage of a
lot of jimcrow politician.!. There are
more mine managers who are politicians
than mine managers who are mining
men in this country, much to the
detriment of our mines.
At some of the mines where the
managements are employing scab labor,
mon that are poor miners, who could
not hold a job in any mine under
ordinary circumstances, tbey are
keeping track of the amount of work
accomplished and its exact cost, with a
view of submitting the figures to the
government as a reason for the repeal
of the Eight-Hour law. This is
manifestly unfair to the Unions, who
champion the Eight-Hour law. Tbis
work being done by scab miners and
not skilled ' workmen tbe cost will be
much higher than it should be.
Premier Martin, in a letter addressed to this office, takes exception to
our remark that the Government was
either   too   poor   or too negligent to
TI_{E MaNY SUDDEN
CHANGES IN THE WEATHER HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD. TRY HORE-
HOUND AND TOLU.   Price 25o.
syrup of t:orehou:- i
AND TOLU If- I-aCWN TO MANY
WHOM IT HAS CUhED. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES. 30LD UNDER A GUARANTEE. Price 25c.
Sola
AT   THE
{SllvertoiT Pore
E>:ri*fg Il/ogs And
Store.     Chemicals Kept.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE:— "Triumph," "Impheuna-
ble" and "Rainbow Qt'.urrz" Mineral
Claims; situate in tlie Arrow Luke
Mining Division ol West Kootenaj
District.
Where located:—On Cariboo   creek,
adjoining   the    Millie Mart   Mineral
Claim.
Take rtutice that I, J. D. Anderson. P. L.
S , of Trail, B O, actiru as agent for the
Kaiu_o"pj M.:>ing and Development
Company, Limited, Free Miner's Certi
fi'.'.-to No. B14445, intend sixty days fiom
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for Certificates of Improvements, for the pm pose of obtaining
Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notice tliat action
under section 37/must ne commotiied
before the issuance of such Certificates
of Improvements
Dated this 8th dav of Septemtier, A. D.
1899.
J. 1 . Anderson.
24 | 2 | 00.
LAKE AVE,  SILVERTON,   B. 0
L
axative
vwvwww
c
old Cure,
CANADIAN
JRAOIITIO
RAILWAY	
and SQO Line.
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
'10 ALL POINTS
EAST and WEST
4
First-Cl.iHS Sleepers on ail Trains  from
REYEL8TOKK   and KOOTENAY LD
'TOURIST CARS   pass Medicine Hat
Daily for St. Paul.
Sundays and Wednesdays for Toronto.
Fridays for Montreal and Boston.
— Same cars pass Revelstoke one day —
 earlier. 	
Tu
H
THE'MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR Of,
E
A. K. TEETER, PROPS.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CAKE OF.
A FIRST-CLASrS BILLIARD ROOM ON TIIE PREMISES.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS OF   WINF8, LIQUOR*
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS EOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -   -   - SLOCAN, 8  C
StaTble-
GOOD SADDLE AND TACK   HOUSES   FOR   HIRE   AT   REASONABLE
RAtSS- A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS I ONE.
Outniile Parties Defiling Herpes in Silvcrtrn
Can f Huve Them   Received By  Writing Tow-
't ♦' + + t + t
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON, - • B. C.
THE WM. HAMILTON MARU FACT ING CO..
t   III     i •
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
CANADA.
Syrup of Horehomd & Tplu
FOR COUGHS   AND COLDS.
THE
Victoria!
| :•; HiutfyiKirtiTs For Mining Mcu :■
T.Vl.Y'llllNG M.W, KFA'I
AKH   IP-TO-DA IE.
TABLE UNSt'IiPAWED IN
THE NORTHWEST.
HOTEL.      I
^BOttESHAIRB.UR.V,   Propx.
silv \i n t o n, b. p.
0»)0
The Strike Is Off ^v,,,^,,rgmua*
JJDUMOSDS,  Stkki. NU
Ind m arc DOW   m un pla n» novkl-
Snn.    1'i.vxo Lamps
Ready lor I«U»oPiit«tab«s.
lunttt.
rS'f-UII.IMIHl in NiUKiM "1SC0."
And now my Koot-§
i-ii.iy Friends I am •
prepared to receive ||
vour orders Foi,
1 *i3
TOO     NciEllOl'S       11,
Cam. /.sn   Exam-
ink Tunc.   .   .   .
*
^V»WiAWVW\WWWMW
OCR   WATCH  AND JEWELER Y
REPAIRING DEPARTMENT IS Al.
Ah WA o.ily employ the most ©xpe
teooed men, nil hoi k is guauanteed
»   Mail ami Express Orders Receive Onr
> Prompt Atteution.
^M_*^M%j>i*¥¥l<¥W¥¥IM_M<lfl
DON'T FORGET THE PL'AOE."
JACOB DOVER.   "Tn« Jkwblib.",
NELSON,  B 0.
-
EED J
J
To'Curo a Oold ln  One   j.vf.
Contains   The New It.i'nu .nt.
TRY   IT.
PRICE 2&c. At All DraugisU.
CONNECTIONS.
For the Nortli.Reveletnke, snd Main Line
J7:80 ex- Sunday lv. Silverion,
ar. ex. Sunday, 18:20
For   Rossland,   Nelson     Crows   Nest
Branch and Boundary Country,
10:20 ex. Sunday lv. Silverton,
ar. ex Sunday 18: CO
To and from Sandon.
13:00 ex Smiday lv Silverton,
ar. ex Sunday, 10:20.
Tk'kkth issubd nmoi'iiii and Baooaok
——CUBCKBD -tb DESTINATION. ——
For rates aud loll information apply to
nearest local agent or
H. H. REEVES, Agent, Silverton
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson
t„ J. COYLE.
A. G. P. Agent, Vaucouver
YOU CAM
MAKE
12 TO 20
PAIRS
MA OHW,
Klondike
nittcr.
you can on
10,15,1,20*
• \ ne Mm.
30
A***       OO
O   ao
Si**
3  S
IMIIIHIIU'H*
•___     w
i   3   E
i||
  n
t&   FOR POWER KNITTING MACHINES AND    Y*SIB.I'B"
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRIl'E US    CATALOGUES frftflf. "
MM
£?ffMv Bjfos.    FREE
GlORCtTOWN Cfl
CANADA
The THISTLE HOTlLf
NOW REOPENED
UFDER A NEW
MANAGEMENT.
HOUSElRENOVATEp.
AND THE BAR FULLV
RESTOCKED
ThompsonBros.,   Prop^
LAKE AVK„   SILVERTON, B. 0.
_■_■
________■_____■
__■■__■_■■■ ,

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