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The Silvertonian Mar 17, 1900

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 (tellable
id Up To Dafe
Mining News
,1
Of The Rioijest-:^
Camp Of British, -
Columbia;!
t
IE THREE.
8ILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    MARCH   17, 1000.
NUMBER  38
mmmuma
SIGNMENTS
P FRESH
&xx&
s
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
'o«9
Silver toxx, 33. O.
MINE ANO
PROSPECT.
Weekly Hews Hoggets Of SJown sad
OUier Camps.
GENERAL HEWS OP DISTRICT.
******
EYIEW   HOTEL
 SHlv©i»tori.	
US HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
BAR   IS   SUPPLIED  WITH  BEST  BRANDS   OF
I4QUORS AND OIOARS.
BURNS & co
IOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
Pail stores at
Silverton, Kelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaalo, Sandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grsnd Forks, Sirdar'
Midway' and Greenwood.
lAILORDBKS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HBaD OFFICE    NELSON, B. q.
Are You Looking For
STYLISH GOODS?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF 80 DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED.   OV ERCOATING8 JUST IN.
UEBHC1ER,  The Tailor:   Silverton, B. C.
E WILLUM HUNTER
COMPANY,
We ara now showing
a nice assortment of
;n's spring and
summer suits
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
BLOWN INTO ETERNITY.
At the Enterprise mine, on   Friday
night, a man by tho name ol Kennedy,
working aa a miner,  was killed.   As
near aa can be ascertained the unfortunate man was engaged in picking out
a missed shot, when it exploded and
killed him.   Tlie company apparently
refuses  to  niak.-  public jnst how this
man was killed and  whether this ia the
result of putting a green man underground, alone, or whether ihis additional death anionic tbe Slocan miners, lor
the month ot March, is to be classed us
an accident,   suicide   or murder, rests
with   the  government    authorities to
decide.   The government owes it to tbe
cause of  humanity  and  tbe people ol
Biith.lt    Colombia  to show ou  whose
shoiders, if any, rests tho responsibility
o( this unfortunate's untimely death.
Jas, A. McKinnon, who haa bean
spending some time in Nelson trying to
arrange a deal by whieh tbe tangled affairs nf tbe Nnonday-Curley Company
might he straightened out, returned on
Wednesday in a hopeful frame of mind.
New and extensive buildings are being
erected at the Hartney mine (or the
accommodation of ha emplojae'. Anew
bunk-house to accomodate 60 men, bathhouses and all modern Improvements
are being added.
SNOW AND
MUD SLIDES
Row Running Everywhere in the Hills
Smashing and Killing.
FOUR HEN BITS FALLEN VICTIMS
Sinking on tbe Storm claim, near
town, haa been suspended for the time
being owing to the large amount of
surface water encountered, caused by
the melting snow. The showing In the
bottom of the shaft, when work was
suspended, was an excellent one and
some fine ore waa being extracted.
The making of another mine in the
Silverton district is the Old Maid claim,
whicli Ih'H within one n ilo of town.
Tha Old Maid vein, which is a contact
between slate and granite, is over 13 feet
wHe and a tunnel which Is being driven
on the vein is now in some 90 feet.
This claim Ilea on the old Alpha wagon
road and adjoins the Silverton Boy one
ot the Emily Edith Group of claims.
BANDON'S FATAL MUD-SLIDE.
TI|E ROCKLAND EJCPERTED-
W. T- Willigms of Rossland, tbe head
miuing expert of tbe Miner-Graves Syndicate, accompanied by Judge Spiuks
and Frank WftWon, arrived bere ou
Wednesday and made an examination
of tlie big Rockland group next day.
Mr. Williams made a tboruiien sampling of the enormous ledge, taking a itli
him seme hundred pounds of ihe ore on
Ids return on Friday. We ware unable
to learn just what conclusion Mr. Williams cauie to in regard to this mammoth property but it is known that tbe
party .eft here highly pleased with the
result ol their visit,
TURNED OVER BY THE CONTRAC
TORS  THIS   WJJEK.
Tlie Wakefield concentrator was turned
over to tlie Wakefield company, the first
of the week, by the contractors, White,
Rogers k Co, of San Francisco. This
mill has been run by the builders for a
•ufticent length of time to aliow that it
« au inlly up to the requirements for
which it was built and peifect in ev.rv
respect, and an the company fe'.t justified
lu ti'king the mill over. Mr J. R. McRae under whose management the mill
was erected and tlie machinery installed,
l.-ftlaxt Wednesday for San Francisco.
The mill being now aider the management of Mr. Kellen, an experienced mill
man.
AROUND THE VANCOUVER.
The pmal' force of men at work at the
Vancouver mine are driving an upraise
for air frrm No. I tnnnel. The raise Is
now up 60 feet and will be 880 feet long
when It breaks through at the surface.
Lealie Hill, manager of the mine, Is
expected to return from England at an
early date and it is expected that on his
return a large crew will be put to work
at tha Vancouver.
T*10 Wm; FIi«iit.e.r Co., I^tcl,,
Hllverton,   »,  C.
UNIONS WILL CONVENE.
A minera' convention will be held in
Nelson on Thursday tho 22nd. at which
delegates will be preaent from all the
different Miners' Unions and Trade
Unions of the Kootenaya.
' At this meeting it will be settled just
what stand labor will take in tbe ensuing election.
Work ia again being pushed on the
Cornoracker claim. This property,
which is situated near the Bosun, haa an
excellent showing, and the owners
Intend to develope it into a mine this
season.
A  SUCCESSFUL   CONCERT.
Tlie concert given here ou the evening
of Mt. Patrick's D_ty was a decided success, the audience enjoying the varied
program given and tbe box office receipts
s. pwing a substantial surplus lor tbe
Roman Catholic building fund, for which
the concert waa given. The management had worked haid In decorating the
hall ior the occasion and very pleasing
was the result.
The various t.umbers on tbe program
were well received and hearty encores
were given. Mr. Butitheringale's two
solos were much enjoyed. "The way
things are not." a local song bv Mr Har-
ri< made a hit. The various selections
played by. tha Orchestra, composed of
Miss Duncan and Messis. Webb and
k Inlay, weie especially good. The juvenile performers covered themselves
With glory aiid Misa McKinnon main,
tained her reputation as a pleasing reader. The Ki'V. Father Cote tn a short
ad.lress thanked the people of Silverton
for the encouraging turnout, and promised to dedicate Mio new Roman Catholic church to St. Patrick. B. O. Math
eson filled the chair.
Successful as this concert was, it would
h ive been much more ro had it beeu
poa-dble to replace the small organ, on
which all accompaniments were played,
by a more suitable instrument Silver,
ton could well afford to have a piano for
public use and an effort should be made
to get one.
The program was as follows:
Address Cbsirman.
God Save the Queen. Audience.
Selection Orchestra.
IVmriiB Children.
Solo      Mr. Smitheringale
Rending Miss McKinnon.
Solo    Mr. Harris.
Solo Miss Brandon.
Recitation  M«ry H. land.
Solo Mrs. Matheson
Selection Orchestra
Solo     Mrs. tiardiner
Instrumental Duet	
Mra. Yates and Mr. Webb.
Recitation  Bertha Barker
Solo  Mr. Smitheringale
Duet Measra Webn and Finlay.
Redta'lon Miss K Delaney
Solo Mr. Whitlock.
Selection   Orchestra.
The Emily Edith mine is receiving an
overhauling vreparatory to the starting
up of that big property.
BEADY  FOB THE FRAY.
A well attended meeting ot tbe loaal
ball kicker was held at the Victoria Hotel on Thursday evening for tha purpose
of reorganising the Football Club. Tha
treasurer's report showed a balance in
favor of the club, and everything was
reported ready for a successful season.
The following officers were elected;
President, James Bowes.
1st. Vice-President, W. H. Wilson.
2nd Vice-President, H. J. Matheson.
Secretary-Treasurer, Jno. Barclay.
Captain, R. O. Matheson.
Executive Committee,    Measra, B.
McNaught, Bowes and R  Walker.
The Secretary was instructed to correspond with the secretaries ol the football clubs in Slocan City, New Denver,
Three Forks and Sandon in regard to the
formation of a Slocan Football League.
lt is to be hoped that tbe clubs named
will favor this idea and join In giving
what would certainly be an Interesting
serie-i of matchee during the coming
season.
The abowsllde season, now in (nil
sway throughout the Slocan and Lardeau districts, baa been a particularly
fatal one thia year,
Daring the last ten days four minera
have met with sudden death from anow
and mud elides; several others have
been injured; six houses in Sandon are
wrecked aud work haa been temporarily
suspended on some of tlie properties
adjacent lo Silverton and tha crews driven into town.
The accident at Sandon, which happened last Sunday at Uoon, was the most
serious. A huge mud slide buried six
houses in the Lovatt addition, five of
which ware known to be occupied. A
large rescue party at once began the
work of rescue. Mra. Fjgg and ber
daughter were first rescued, little tbe
worse for their experience and Rev. 3.
A. Ferguson waa also got out uninjured,
having bad a miraculous escape. Mra.
Naah waa severely injured and is ln a
critical condition. Wm. McLeod waa
found in tue ruins of bis cabin, buried
under twenty feet of debris. He must
have bean instantly kitted.
McLto I waa the third member of the
Saudon Miners' Union who has met with
a sudden death wiibin the laat lev days,
the other two hemg the victims . ot the
Noble Five slide as reported last week.
From Trout Lake comes the news of
the burying of a cabin near tbat town by
a snuwslide. Oue ot tbe three men a-
sleep in tbe cabin at the time, William
Floneck, was killed.
A mud slide on Suudav did some considerable damage to tue Wakefield flume,
taking out a portion. Thia has siu-.-e
been repaired and the concentrator ia
running aa usual.
At Uie Rockland mine, a anowalide
covered tbe workings and filled the
mouth of the tunnel. Another one
swept away rome of tbe outnoildings
around the Hewett mine near here and
the men spent part of tho week in
town. The crew at w irk ou the Repeater also came down the hill as tho slides
were running dangerously nesr their
camp.
The main Four Mile road is undergoing the usual spring blocking-up from
mud slides, but men are kept at work
continuously keeping the road clear as
far up as the Wakefield concentrator. A
few email mud slides hare inado tlie
Silverton New Denver road nearly impassable.
Walter Smith bas gone Into the lime
trade and is building a kiln at hia quarry
about two milos north of Rosebery.
Short school sessions a>e the oraeTSt
the day, nearly ail the pupils being off
shift aa a result of recent vaccinations.
Master Harry Carey has forwarded
seven dollars towards tha School Children's Patriotic Fund, the proceeds of •
subscription circulated by him.
Divine Rbrvicb will be held in Silver-
ton next Sunday evening at 7.80. everyone ia cordially invited to attend.—John
(i. Duncan, Presbyterian Minister.
All work in tha Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drug Store, wil
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelaon jeweler. All ro -
pairs are ocaba_ctb«d roa ova ykab.*
Several from thia camp attended tho
entertainment given by the Nelaon Minstrels in New Denver on Monday. Tha
show waa one of the beat ever given in
the Slocan and well deserved tbe good
boose whieb greeted the performers.
Tha Liberal-Conservatives of Weat
Kootenay met In Convention In Nelaon
laat night to consider tbe advislbility of'
putting up a party ticket in the -coming
provincial elections. Tbe delegates from
Silverton wero Messrs. Wm. Hunter, W.
H. Brandon and Chris. McDdtnell.
MAGERSFONTEIN.
KICKEBS BEGIN EARLY.
The football season waa opened on
Saturday afternoon by a hotly contested
match between the Drill Pounders and
the Counter Hoppers. The town boys
went on the field one manahortbut
managed to hold down the burly minera
during the first half, neither side scoring,
and in the lut half scoring the only goal
made during tbe fifty minutes play.
None of the players had any wind but
fortunately the spectators had plenty to
spare and kept tbe game going. It
afforded excellent practise for the players
and showed that with the new material
in tbe town Silverton would be able to
pat a strong eleven in the field t his year.
The players were divided in tbis
manner:
Drill Pounders.      Counter Hoppers
Brand Goal. Gilbert.
I.uldon       Backs.    Thorn peon
Smith McNaught.
Otto      Half Backs.
A. Stewart
Labey
Darg Forwards
McDonald
Jackson
Whitehonse
J. Stewart
Bowes.
Wilson
Thorburn
Matheson
Reeve
Walker
Barclay
(Written by a private in the Black Watch)
A York gentlemen haa received from
a soldiei of the 2nd Black Watch, Wbo.
took part in tbe battle of Magersfontein,
the following lines descriptive of tha
night march and the disaster Ihat befel
the Highland Brigade. Tbe linos wero
written in cam patter the battle: '
Tell you the tale ot the battle? Well,
there ain't »o much to tall,
Nine hundred went to the slaughter, and
nigh tear hundred fell.
Wire -..d the Mauser rifle, thirst and a
burning sun
Knocked us down by the hundred ero
tbe day waa done.
Wet was tbe night, oold and dreary, chilled were the men to the bone,
Biovooackod there in the operf, thinking
perhaps of their homo.
Midnight—they came to awake us, form*
ing ua up in the dark,
Officer* whispered their orders, never o
light or a spark. .
Onward we went till the morning dawned"
in the east, gray and drear.
While,' in the front ol ua looming, tbe
kopjes' bold skyline showed clear.
Away on the  left of the kopjes' we'd
noticed a light burning bright,
And jnst as  the column had halted it
suddenly vanished from sight.
Then, ere we knew what had happened,
two shots on our left ringing out
To the Boera in their trenches gave signal
and rifi" balls answered our shoot.
Someone yelled "charge" and wo started,
rose up and rushed on their fire,
Meaning to give them the bayonet, but,
checked, and stopped by the wire.
Bullets and  shells  ne'er appalled ue,
trenches nor boulder-strewn bill.
But  just  a   few   strands of the fencing
caught us, nonp'ossed, standing still.
Over the wire, men, or through Ul Drive
the charge home tn tbe hilt I
Vain were the straggles and climbino,
barbs sticking deep to tha kilt,
stromt grows the light of the morning,
hotter tbe lead on us rained
Still   we remained  there, before them,
holding the ground we had gained.
But down on our faces and seek cover,
nothing could live in that fire,
"Off to the right, men, and flank them;
forwaid, lie down, men. retire."
Then we looked back, and cursed them,
took home the truth with a gioan,
"R««t of the brigade are retiring,    now
we muit stand it alone.
"Form a line here men, wo'll bold them,'
McFarlane'atali form stood erect,
Volley and volley we gave them, until
their fierce fire waa checked.
Then round the adjntaut rallied remnants
of different corps-
Some of the Black Watch, Argyll*, and
some of the gallant Seaforths.
All the long day in position, watching
their own shells burst,
Lying with dead men and wounded, Una
swollen blbe-black with thirst;
Not thirty yards from the trenches Gen•
eral Wauchope lay, dead,
The Colonel, too killed, lay beside him,
their lives by tho Boer bullets sped.
Nigh on eight hundred our losses—Englishmen, Irish and Scotch;
Half of them fell oo one regiment—God
help them—the noble Black Watch.
Such is tbe Uie of the battle, easy for
tongue to tell, -  -   *.
Nine hundred   men  in ,a death trap-
nearly four hundred fell.
■• -.v.'",
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, Feb. 22.-Bar Silver, 90#o
Lake copper,  f 10.60.
Lead—The firm that fixes tho soiling
price for miner- and «m -Iter* quota*lead
at (4,45 at tbe close. •fc
A GREAT OVATION
London's Reception to thi Queen Was
Without Equal.
London,March 9.— The editorials
in the morning newspapers admit J
that yesterday's demonstrations
were quite without precedent, and
they teem with patriotic expressions
of gratification at the Queens's opportune and tactful contribution toward the unity of tho empire. The
Times says:
"Th.e Queen has had many royal
greeting*, but it is doubtful whether
the exuberant enthusiasm of yesterday has ever been equalled.    There
was no pageant, but  there   was   a
constant exhibition of genuine popular feeling, which is itself the most
impressive of all pageants."   Commenting on the Queen's visit to Ireland and the speech of  Mr.   John
Redmond in the house of commons,
the Times says:     "Mr.   Redmond
performed his difficult task, with excellent judgment and tact."
The Daily News, which describes
lumbia that will be opened up is not
unlikely to prove as.rich in resources ot every kind as the portions of
the province now accessible to prospectors and agriculturists. The
connection of the new road with
sections ol line already constructed
and portions yet to be built will
eventually make the railway a transcontinental one.
BULLER ADVANCES
Mum Not Badly Wounded.
Toronto, March o.—Captain Mason, the Canadian who was wounded in the battle of Paardeberg, has
cabled his father here that the
wound is in the left shoulder, the
bone being only slightly injured.
He hopes to be able to join his regiment in a fort nigh» or so.
L>val Mndrnls Heltixe to Join.
Montreal, March 9.— Despite the
efforts of Mayor Prefontaine and
Principal Peterson, of McGill university, to have the students of Laval join the former in the demonstration to the Strathcona Horse,
the latter have positively refused to
be identified in any way with the
demonstration.
Prom Ladysmith   Towards
River.
Sunday
the demonstration as an "improvised jubilee in some ways even
more impressive than tho diamond
jubilee," says: "Its significance is
beyond question. Nor can it be
doubted that her majesty's visit to
Ireland will also be a great success, providing care is taken that it
is not exploited for political purposes. Mr. Redmond's remarks in
the house were well conceived and
well expressed."
The Daily Telegraph says; "The
demonstration has never been
equalled in tbe annals of any other
nation. Not e\en the queen herself has' ever known a demonstration of love and loyalty so deep, so
inexpressible in solicitude and tenderness, and so thrilling. The
bonds between the empire and the
queen today are those of living,
breathing, chivalrous devotion."
All the papeis express commendation of Mr. Redmond's attitude.
A Boy Patriot Krai rallied.
Toronto, March 9. — Joseph
Welch, a boy of fourteen years of
age, of Clinton, Ont., who left that
place with the intention of joining
Strathcona's Horse as a bugler at
Montreal, has been stopped here
and sent home it the instance of his
parents. Young Welch had a school
bag full of sandwiches slung by his
side, and was ready to stand a long
siege.
Died at a Curling Match.
Goderich, Ont:, March 9.—R.
M. Fraser, a well known young
business man of this place, died
suddenly while witnessing a curling
match here last evening.
Franc* Will Punish tha OOtudar*.
Paris, March 9.—M. Delcasse,
minister of foreign affairs, is said to
have written a private letter to Sir
Edmund J. Munson, the British embassador, expressing deep regret at
the Bordeaux disturbances on Wednesday, and promising that the necessary measures will bc taken to
punish the offenders and to prevent
a repetition of such an incident
He port *m lassal Treaty.
Washington, March* 9.— The
senate committee on foreign relations to-day agreed to report the
Hay-Pauncefote treaty, adding the
Clayton-Bulwer treaty to grant authority for the defense of the canal
by this country when  constructed:
An Aid ta the Celebration.
London, March 9.—In the house
of commons, Patrick O'Brien, Nationalist member for Kilkenny,
asked whether the government will
give a shilling to each Irish soldier
on St. Patrick's day, to enable him
fittingly to celebrate the occasion by
"drowning the shamrock."
IN FAVOR OF THR DEMOCRAT*
U< rultlng to Fill tha tiap*.
Montreal, Mar. 9.—Recruiting of
135 officers and men to take the
places of the members of the first
Canadian contingent who have died
from disease or been killed or
wounded in South Africa, began today. The .recruiting stations are
confined to Eastern Canada. No
difficulty is expected in obtaining
the required number.
Decision In Kentucky Contest Krpub-
Means Will Continue Appeal
Louisville, Ky., March 10.—A
decision sustaining the contention
of the Democrats that the legislature is the tribunal for the determination of contests for the offices of
governor and lieutenant-governor
was handed down in the circuit
court this morning by Judge Fields.
The Republicans will appeal the
case to the state court of appeals
and, if the decision there is against
them, will try to get a hearing before the United States supreme
court.
Boer Headquarters, Biggarsberg,
March 9.—Shots were exchanged
this morning ne;u Helpmakaar with
a small body ol British, who retired hastily. Scouts report that
the main British advance is coming
from Ladysmith toward Sunday
River.
Kroner Returns to Pretoria
Pretoria, March 9.—The president has returned from Bloemfontein. Gen. Joubert is expected
here shortly. Fighting commenced
in the direction of Helpmakaar this
morning.
London, March 10.—The only
important change in the general
situation in South Africa indicated
by the news received up to noon today is that General Buller is again
on the move. The news comes in
la dispatch from the Boer camp at
Biggarsburg, dated Thursday, saying:
"Twelve    thousand   British  are
threatening the   Boer position from
the direction of Helpmakaar, while
a party  of British scouts was   encountered at Waschbank March 8."
This force was  probably General
Hunter's division, and  it is considered quite possible that an  attempt
may be made to traverse the neck of
Zululand into the  Transvaal,   thus
effecting the double purpose of outflanking the Boers at   Biggarsburg,
and  threatening  Vryheid and   Utrecht.    The Boers are  reported  to
be at  Biggarsberg jn  considerable
numbers,   but   it is said that   they
are already sending  their stores   to
the rear.
Jon ben Preparing tor a siege
Gen. Joubert appears to have left
active service to take charge of the
war office at Pretoria. Lorenzo
Marquez stories attribute his action
partly to the alleged fact that
he has lost both control
over and confidence in the burghers,
and partly to his wish to push preparations for the siege, which are.
supposed to be being made at the
capitol.
French After Big ttatue
The   earth   is   literally  filled with
gold.
The murder of Clayson and
Relfe on the Yukon has been traced
to the arrested man. Human
blood and paper money were found
in the sled. __
UK. M.I IH: ON Till. < ■ P. H.
Track Carried Ana) and Business  Diverted to \clson Home.
A great landslide on the main
line of the C. P. R. near Donald occurred on Saturday. It "carried
away quite a stretch of the track
and his blocked trallic for several
days at least. All through business
is being carried by way of Nelson
until the damage is repaired.
NEAR THE CAPITOL
Roberts Driving Boer Fores Before
His Advance.
THE DOOR IS OPEN
Uncle 8am Unlocked it With the Key
of Diplomacy.
Kelehatac Acta on the Meat Bill
Berlin, March to.—The reichstag
adopted paragraphs three to seven
of the meat bill without debate.
MACKBNHB 4c. MANN'S RAILROAD
Will   Dun trom Rdmonton  Tbrangh
Northern British Colombia.
Victoria Timet.
It is announced   from   Montreal
that Mackenzie & Mann have completed their financial arrangements
and that a port in British Columbia
will be   tht   terminus   of another
transcontinental railway much sooner   than  was   generally   expected.
The line will be called the Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific railway,  and
will run from South Edmunton in a
northwesterly direction through the
Yellowhead  pass,   through  British
Columbia, and terminate on the Pacific ocean at Port Simpson.    The
new arrangements look to the completion of a great part of the  road
the coming season.
The country around Edmonton is
well known to be extremely valuable, while the section af British Co-
PKAKKO THK ANAK< HINTS
Whr (he Queen  Went to London  Instead of Italy.
London, March 10.—Queen Victoria's decision to stay in her own
dominions instead of going to Italy,
and all the jubilations in England
in consequence, are not entirely due
to the causes attributed by the
press. It is learned that the Italian
government has been daily growing
more nervous as the date of the
Queen's visit approached, and finally notified Her Majesty's government that it would not accept the
responsibility of the sovereign's
safety, owing to the strong recnir
descence of the anarchistic movement throughout Europe. Reports
frqjji other powers confirmed the
Italian impression.
Despite the claim that canals can
no longer compete with railroads,
canal schemes are as numerous as
ever. Besides the great Nicaragua
canal, others are projected to connect the Ottawa river with Georgian
bay, Lake Erie with the Ohio river,
and Puget Sound with Gray's Harbor.
Lord Roberts has not reported
up to this hour today, but the military authorities are of the opinion
that General French must be Hearing Bloemfontein. In some quarters Gen. French is credited with
the design to corral both presidents,
whose exact whereabouts, however,
are difficult to ascertain at this distance. The war office is unable to
confirm the rumors of the relief of
Mafeking, but the trend Of the belief is that the relief of Mafeking
will be effected within a   few days.
San Francisco, March 12.—
President Benjamin Ide Wheeler of
the University of California, in an
address last night at the Monticello
club, gave the details of the negotiations which Secretary of State
Hay has had under way for some
time relative to the Chinese open
door. President Wheeler Lamed
of the negotiations while in conversation with Secretary Hay, during
his recent visit to Washington.
President Wheeler said:
"In the course of this week, Secretary of State Hay will announce
to the people a victory, not of war,
call it diplomacy if you please, by
which the ports of China will be
opened to the commerce of the
world. He has reached an understanding with Great Britain,
France, Russia and Germany,
which does away with territorial
spheres of influence. According to
the terms of this agteement, there
will no longer be any spheres of
influence in the flowery kingdom.
Customs tariffs will be abolished, as
well as all other imposts upon shipping. The idea is to make the
ports free to the world's commerce
and give all nations a free hand in
exploiting their markets. It is the
consummation of the British ideal
of the 'open door,' which was so
long advocated by Lord Beresford."
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
MTRIKK ON THK HIGHLAND.
Ainsworth Kx peels a   Lively Summer
—A Patent Air Compressor.
Alexander J Dick has returned
from Ainsworth where he heard of
a good strike on the Highland,
owned by Mr. Carter, of Spokane,
and Scott McDonald, one of the
former owners of the Payne. A
long tunnel was driven and crosscuts in several places struck ore
bodies. There is very little work in
that vicinity, and Mr. Dick says
there are many men out,of work,
but it is expected that there w«ll be
considerable  activity this summer.
Mr. Dick says that the Taylor
Air Compressor Company has put
up one of its patent jjtxi-hor.se power
compressors on Coffey creek, near
Ainsworth, and expects to deliver
air to the neighboring mines this
year. The air is compressed by a
column of water falling into a shaft
sunk in the btd of a creek.
mORK TALES AF KICHKN.
They Outdo Htorles of Nome-Murderer
of Clayson and Relfe Caught-
Victoria, March 12.—Two arrivals from Nome tell a story of what
i.s claimed to be the richest find in
the north, too miles from Nome;
also wonderfully rich gold fields opposite Nome, on the Siberian coast.
Recent developments on the lower
levels go to show that the chief resources of Montana are copper and
liars.—Boston Herald.
Amid all this shock and din of
battle in South Africa, what has
become of our sweet, amiable, pom-
padourador friend, Aguinaldo?
Instead of building a competing
railroad to Puget Sound, the Union
Pacific has arranged to run trains
over the Northern Pacific track from
Portland, and to allow the Northern
Pacific trains to run over its track
from Wallula to Portland. That is
cheaper for both and just as  good.
Count de Castellane was going to
sue the editor of Paris Figaro for
saying hegambled away his wife's
fortune on the stock exchange. Now
he is going to sue for dama ; So
cash will be a more acceptable salve
to his wounded honor than a sword-
thrust.
A boom in emigration from the
British Isles to South Africa will
probably follow the war. This
would turn the balance of population and keep the question of British or Dutch supremacy settled for
all time.
Admiral Watson is accused of
giving married officers on the Manilla fleet shore-leave at night and
keeping the bachelors on duty. This
is given as one of the reasons of his
removal. The bachelors evidently
have a pull, whateverelse they lack.
Johannesburg still has 43,000
peoplf, despite the Outlander exodus. The Boers commandeer supplies from tne closed stores and
leave them open to be plundered,
and Boer families take up their
abode in closed residences. There
will be some accounts for Kruger
to settle.
London, March 12.—At the present rate of progress, Lord Roberts
should be in Bloemfontein March
14, though all calculations may be
upset by the development of more
strenuous resistance than the Boers
have thus far attempted. The distance between Roberts and the
Free State capital is now so small,
only 25 miles, that it is apparent
that the Boers either contemplate
making a determined stand on the
outskirts of the town or, for strategic reasons best known to themselves, are allowing Lord Roberts
to occupy it after merely harassing
his advance. The numerical superiority of the British troops leaves no
doubt in the minds of critics here
that Lord Roberts will accomplish
his immediate objective, the occupation of Bloemfontein.
dSatarre Soon to Join Roberta.
The commander-in-chiefs latest
dispatch announcing that General
Gatacre is at Bethulie bridge and
the specials saying Gatacre commands the bridge approaches, put
the Boers in that vicinity between
two British forces, Asvogel Kop,
whence Lord Roberts sent his last
message, being 100 miles almost
due north of Bethulie. However,
there is a large plain between them,
and the main body of the Boers,
now confronting Lord Roberts with
its ceaseless activity, may be quite
able to cover the retreat of the burghers confronting General Gatacre.
Once the British are in control of
the railroad from Bethulie to Bloemfontein, the junction at the Free
State capital of Generals Gatacre
and Roberts would be a matter of
a very few days.
Commenting on the fact that
Lord Roberts found the Boers holding a position in a part of the country supposed to have been left open,
the St. James Gazette says: "No
more damning indictment was ever
preferred against any cavalry."
Humors About Mafeltlnjt.
Rumors of the relief of Mafeking
continue to circulate, but fail of confirmation.
From Natal, which General Buller so erroneously declared was free
of Boers, and from Cape Colony,
where General Kitchener's stern
hand is upon the rebellion, there is
no news ol any importance.
Boer* Resist Advance lu Vain.
London March 12.—A dispatch
to the war office from Lord Roberts
dated Deyfontein, March 11, 7:15
a. m. says:
"The enemy opposed us throughout yesterday's march, and from
their intimate knowledge of the
country gave us considerable trouble. Owing, however, to the admirable conduct of the troops, the
enemy was unable to prevent us
from reaching our destination. The
brunt of thc fighting fell upon General Kelly-Kenny's division, two
battalions of which, the Welsh and
Essex, turned the Boers out of the
two strong positions at the point of
the bayonet."
The Casualty List.
London, March 12.—A dispatch
to the war office from Lord Roberts
dated Deyfontein, March 11, 9:15
a. m. says:
"I cannot get (he  precise   number of casualties   before' I march,
but will communicate it as soon  as
possible.    The Boers suffered heavily, 102 of their dead being  left on
the ground:     We captured about
20  prisioners."   Among the killed'
are Captain Eustace, of the   Buffs,,
Captain Lomax, of the Welsh  regiment,    and   Mr.   McKartie,   a  retired   Indian   civilian  attached to
Kitchener's    force.    ' Among-  the
wounded       are:      Buffs—Colonel
Hickson, leg,   severe;   Lt. Ronald.
Welsh   regiment—Lieuts. Torkipg-
ton, Pope, Wimberley. Esssx   regiment—Captain Broadwood.    Field
artillery—Lieut Devenis.li.    Medical
corps—Major Waite, Lieut   Berne.
Australian artillery, Colonel Umph-
ey, abdomen, dangerous."
Oatacre at Bethulie Bridge.
London, March 12.— The war of
fice this morning issued the follow
ing dispatch-.fronvAsYOfe! Kop u«.
der date of March ia, 5:30 a. m.—
"We were unopposed during the
march yesterday. The officers left
at the last camp to recordthe list
of casualties have not yet arrived.
The following additional list of cas.
ualties are known, however:' Killed—Lieutenants Parsons and,Cod-
dington, of the Essex regiment.
Wounded—Lieutenants " Berkeley,
Lloyd an.I Raleigh.
"Gen. Gatacre reports that he
was within a mile of the Bethulie
railway bridge yesterday. The
bridge was partially destroyed and
the enemy was holding the opposite
bank."
Will Nat Recognla* White Fla*.
London March ia.—The war office has received the following from
Lord Roberts, dated Deyfontein,
March 11, 9:45 a. m.
"The following telegram has
been addressed to their honors the
state presidents of Orange Free
State, and the South Africa* republic.
" 'Another instance having occured of gross abuse of the white
flag, of the ot holding up of hands
in token of surrender, it is my duty
to imform you that, if such abuse
occurs again, I shall most reluctantly be compelled to order my
troops to disregard the white flag
at all, entirely. The instance occurred on a kopje east of ^Deyfontein farm yesterday afternoon, and
was witnescd by some of my owa
staff officers as well as my self, and
resulted in the wounding of several
of my officers and men.
" 'A large quantity of explosive
bullets of three different kinds waa
found io Commandant Cronje's laager, and this has been the case in
every engagement with your honors' troops. Such breaches of recognized usages of war and of the
Geneva convention are a disgrace
to any civilized power. A copy of
these telegrams has been sent to
my government with the request
that it be communicated to all neutral powers.' "
Ghastly neanee or War.
London, March ia.—For real
ghastiiness, for a glimpse into the
gory realities of war and the horrors of the battlefield, a private
letter of a young medical officer at
Spion Kop, pnnted in the Daily
Graphic, can scarcely be beaten.
"I selected a pass," he writes,
"overhung by^teep clay banks, on
top of which I got up the red crosa
flag.   Cases   now began  to   pour
from   tbe   Spion   Kop   stretchers.
The   Boers   opened fiie on us and
three bullets   went   into   the   fire,
knocking   the sticks about.   The
reason for this fire was not the Red
Cross flag, but owing to some Tommies, who were strolling over to it,
but I promptly ordered them away.
A few minutes after, the  Boers let
fly five shells in quick succession
in my direction, but they fell short
and did no harm.    From this   time
to 1 o'clock next morning; wounded came through my dressing station, as the pass was the only  exit
from the hills.
"I saw every case and some of
them were, mutilated beyond description. Full 330 wounded and
dead passed through my hands.
Many a poor chap shot in the morning in front of the trenches, wbo
could not be reached, lay in the
blazing sun all day.
"One old Colonial in Thorney-
croft's Horse walked down, leaning
on   a   rifie.    He   war   a   mass of
wounds, one ear shot through  by a
bullet, his chin, neck and chest shot
through by others, and his back and
-legs torn by   shells.    He   came in
and said he just dropped   in   to let
mc take a finger ioff, as it   was ao
shattered he could not pull the trig*
ger of his rifle,* as it got in the way
of the next finger, which  he could
use, for he wanted   to get back up
the hill to pay the Dutchmen back.
Of course I would not  let   him go
back.  The bullet wounds are beautifully clean, just a round hole, and
as a rule, do not do much damage,
as they often go through the bone
without shattering it, and do not
bleed   much.     Shell   wouads ar*
hideous." IORE SUCCESSES
Captures    tiie  Free State
*ondan,   March  14,-9 P-
-It is officially announced
|t Lord Roberts has occu-
Bloemfontein and that the
Itish flag is flying from the
of the capitol.
..ondon, March 14.—-The follow-
is  the text of   Lord Roberts'
Ipatch to the war office, announces occupation of Bloemfontein:
["Bloemfontein,    March  13.—By
help ot God and by the bravery
majesty's soldiers, the troops
ler   my   command   have   taken
■session   of  Bloemfontein.    The
itish flag now flies over the presi-
scy evacuated last evening.    Mr.
11, late president of the Orange
State, Mr. Fraser,  member of
late executive government, the
jror,   the   secretary to the late
ernment, the landrost and other
cers met me two miles from the
and  presented me with the
fs  of  the   public   cffices.    The
cmy   have   withdrawn from  the
jhborhood  and  all seems quiet,
habitants of  Bloemfontein   give
troops a cordial welcome."
above dispatch, though dated
Tuesday, was not received  at the
ir office until 7:30 p. m,. Wednes-
lay.     It was made public a few
ninutes  before nine o'clock.     The
(delay is attributed to the field telegraphs  not  being connected  with
[ Bloemfontein on Tuesday   evening.
Extra papers are already out on the
streets and to night  the crowds of
London are singing patriotic  songs
and engaging ia demonstrations.
Free Mate Government Uf ar   Move
Pretoria, March 13.—A dispatch
from Bloemfontein says that, in
view of the military situation, the
seat of government may be moved
to Kronstadt.
A   Valiant  Dispatch-Writer
Commandant DeLarey's report of
ie fighting at Abrams Kraal on
Saturday says: "The British were
estimated to number 40,000 men.
'Their first assault was repulsed,
the second assault was made on the
hills to the left of our position.
These hills were of great strategic
importance. Appreciating this, I
and three hundred men defended
the position from nine in the morning until sundown. The burghers
fought like heroes and three times
repulsed masses of British, who
kept relieving their tired men.
Every attempt to storm the position
was defeated. At sundown there
was not fifty yards between us. The
British lost heavily. No accurate
returns of our loss are available."
Flnm*!"*  Advance to  HlBlVkliiB
Capetown, March 14—C61. Plu-
mer is now within 40 miles of Mafeking.
Lobatsi, Thursday, March 8.—
Col. Plumer's force reached here
Tuesday, March 6th. It is believed
that only a single bridge southward
has been destroyed and that otherwise the railroad is intact within
five miles of Mafeking, Col. Plu-
mer has already dispersed several
police posts in the neighborhood,
aad is actively pushing his advance
southward.
■mall  Hope for Msleklng
London, March 14.—Private advices have set forth that Colonel
Plumer had almost given up hope of
accomplishing anything towards the
relief ot Mafeking more than harrassing the Boers, though since
those were written it is possible
that the diminished number of the
Investing forces may have rendered
Plumer'a task more feasible.
Judging from the lack of news,
everything is quiet in Natal, while
from Herchel comes the ■ statement
that the ' total collapse of the insurgent colonists is imminent.
Oeneral Cronje,  according to a
Capetown special, sails for St. Helena March 15th, accompanied by
all the Paardeberg prisoners.
Cecil Rhodes is suffering from
catarrh of the stomach and is
unable to sa'l for England.
I.f at Hallsbiiry's Reply
Natal dispatches recount that the
greatest satisfaction is felt there at
Lord Salisbary's reply to the Boer
presidents' overtures. A dispatch
from Pietermaritsburg published in
the second edition of the Times
says: "The reply, especialy that
paragraph relating to independence,
has been received in Natal with a
feeling of great relief and is dispelling all doubts."
The Wines Not Flooded
A private dispatch from Johannes-
berg has been received in London,
dated Saturday, March 10, contradicting the report that the mines
there are flooded and the machinery
broken, and asserting that all is
well.
Dr.   Jameson's Noble U'ork
London, March 14.—A private
dispatch says that Dr. Jameson,
who was critically ill at Ladysmith,
is better and likely to recover.
Dr. Jameson was anxious to have
a military command in the campaign, but as the leader pf the raid,
he was excluded from the service
for political reasons and was not
welcomed when he arrived at Ladysmith. A few days before the investment of the town, his opportunity came. When the garrison was
fever-stricken, he reverted to medical practice, and did ten men's
work in caring for the fever patients
and the wounded soldiers.
Plot to Free Boer Prisoners
Capetown, March 14.—It has
just transpired that another
plot has been discovered to free the
Boec prisoners at SimonstownJ
The remarkable quantity of watermelons received by the prisoners
aroused comment and investigation
discovered that compromising letters were contained in the melons,
the writers planning the escape of
the captives.
Great satisfaction is felt here at
the fact that the transports with the
bulk of the prisoners sail for St.
Helena tonight.
A  War to the Death
Paris, March 14.—The majority
of the French papers content themselves with printing tht text of the
communications exchanged between
Lord Salisbcry and Presidents Kruger and Steyn, without comment.
The Temps in a leading article,
deals with the subject and expresses
the opinion that Lord Saisbury's
reply means "a war of cmquest
and annexation, but also a war to
the death, for iu President Kuger's
message appears a resolutim to
resist a toute on trance.". The
Temps concludes "after the ecam-
pie given by the United State, it
would be vain to place any hoie of
intervention in the foreign pow.rs."
U.S.MAYMEDIATE
Claimed That the First Step Has Been
Men.
Appointments on Kootenai Una
Superintendent   J.   W,.   'Troip,
of the Kootenay division of the C.
P. R., has made the following a-
pointments:    Captain J. C.  Gor,
port   captain of all the steames
with office at Nelson; D. O. Lewi.'
C. E. roadmaster of the Columbi.
& Kootenay and  Slocan  branches
with office at Nelson; J.  S.   Law
rence, trainmaster of Columbia &
Western   system    with   office   a
Smelter junction:   J.  T.   Sullivar
roadmaster of the Rossland branch
with   office   at Smelter Junction;
H. I.. Johnston, C. E, roadmaster
of the Columbia & Western branch
(West  Robson  to   Midway),   with
office at Robson;  P. G.  Gallagher
roadmaster   of   the    Nakusp   and
Slocan branch with office at  Rosebery.
To Work Burnt Basin Claims.
The fine weather is. tempting
miners out to their claims in the
Burnt Basin. Mr. Cooper is taking
five or six men out today to work
on the Solid Gold group, adjoining
the Mother Lode,and George Green
is about to start a party out to
work on the Tammany.
New York, March 13.—That the
eyes of the world are turned toward
the United States as the only power
that will at least make an effort to mediate between Great Britain and the
South African republics is evidenced
by the many specials to the morning papers. The Herald's Washington correspondent declares positively that the first step has already
been taken by President McKinley.
He says:
"Upon the receip: yesterday of a
dispatch from Constl Hay concerning the Boer appeal, it was immediately communicated to London,
and it is anticipated tiat the British
government, which has been expecting such proposals, will be able
to give an immediate inswer. The
administration has beet stating that
it would decline to ue its good
offices in the interest ol peace, unless asked by both powers to
mediate, but it has chaiged its attitude to the extent of laying before
the British government the proposals which United States Consul
Hay received from Presidents Kruger and Steyn.
The Appeal to MeKlnlev
"It is understood that Mr. Hay
reports having attended the conference, when Presidents Kruger and
Steyn appealed to ail nations to use
their good offices in the interest of
peace, but it is stated that he received a special communication as
to the proposals that should be
made, the Transvaal well understanding that the United States, as
the next best friend of England,
would be the best channel through
which to appeal for peace. It is
believed, however, that the administration did not commit itself,
leaving to Great Britain to determine, without representation on the
part of the president, whether it
should accept or reject the propossl
of the Transvaal in the interests of
peace."
White makes a Threat.
Montague White, in a signed
Washington telegram to the World,
says: "I have already expressed
the desirability of a friendly neutral,
preferably the United States, mediating in order to bring this deplorable South African tragedy to a
peaceful termination. It is absolutely indispensable that a third
power shonld be a party to a settlement, in order to give a basis of
permanency thereto. There is so
much jingoism in conflict with local
patriotism and there has been so
much tieaty breaking in the past,
that South Africa needs, more than
anything else, lasting peace. There
is also the danger of destruction of
the Johannesburg mines, which
will involve the loss of $150,000,000,
or the entire amount of the British
war loan. This, I imagine, will be
a strategic necessity, as the Boers
could not defend it, nor could they
allow it to remain as a base for
military operations against Pretoria."
Kruger Fall .t Religion.
The London correspondent of the
World says that he learns on trustworthy   authority   that the   appeal
sent last Saturday  to  England  by
President Kruger   was  remarkable
in both   manner and   matter.    The
language  of the  document    fairly
pulsates  with   religious  fervor and
the appeal for peace is made in solemn phtases, such as "in the name
of the triune God."    It is   not improbable that   the   ministers   are
awaiting the occupation   of Bloemfontein before stating the conditions
under whi-h proposals forpeace will
be consideied, and  the declaration
if a policy, when published, is more
ikely to describe the conditions un-
4er   which peace cannot   be made
than it is to tirmulate the basis  for
a settlement if South African  complications.
I'rsneeMn Not mediate.
Paris, March 13.-1:50 p. m.—
A representative of the Associated
Press has securtj from a responsi
ble mouthpiece of the French government the following exposition of
France's attitude in the matter of
intervention in the Anglo-Transvaal war, which is said to have been
solicited by President Kruger, The
official in question said:
"We believe it is true the Transvaal has sent a request to the powers for their intervention, though,
up to this morning, President Kru-
ger's message' ha£ not reached us.
As far as France is concerned, she
certainly will not take the initiative
in offering England mediation, nor
will Russia, for the dual alliance is
naturally working together in this
question. We (eel that in the
present excited state of public feeling in England, and especially as
regards ourselves, any step taken
by the French government would
defeat its own object and, instead of
opening a way to honorable peace,
would act as oil on the flames aad
probably only create fresh complications.
"We consider that overtures for
mediation can emanate from some
power whose cordial relations with
England prevent such a suggestion
being construed as an unfriendly
act. The emperor of Germany, for
instance, might take the initiative,
or President McKinley, without fear
of creating friction which stands in
the way of any action on our part,
and after this is done, full reliance
can be placed on the unqualified
support af France and Russia,whose
only desire is to see the end of
bloodshed, and who are eager to
lend their good ofices in bringing
about this end."
•****
k Uim FLEET
Britain and America to Make Dtmon-
fration in China.
New York, March 14.—The
Journal and Advertiser says today
that both England ;.,d the United
States will send wat ships to Chinese waters.
"The British China fleet is being
strengthened," says a Londo. cable
to this paper. "The government
is taking precautions to meet Ku-.
sia in the far east. The cruiser Argonaut has been ordered into commission and dispatched immediately to
Chinese waters and the Terrible has
been ordered to proceed there from
Durban. These are the finest and
most powerful cruisers in the navy."
A special from Washington reads:
"The German ambassador, Dr.
von Holleben, had a long conference with acting Secretary of State
Hill, in which the latter was presumably informed that a demonstration in China might be expected
from Russia shortly. The chief of
the bureau of navigation, Rear Admiral Crowninshield, sought Secretary of State Hay, and found him
at the Hay residence, after which
the navy department announced
that a Chinese squadron would be
established and Rear Admiral
Kempff, now commandant at the
Mare Island navy yard, would be
sent to Manila to take the squadron
for a cruise on the Chinese and
Japanese coasts; also that Rear
Admiral Remy, in charge of the
Asiatic squadron, would maintain a
naval base at Manila."
It is believed here that the formation of the Chinese squadron by
the United States is to be a warning to Russia and France that
American interests are involved in
any change in the conditions in
China. Presumably Germany will
make a similar demonstration.
Lord Roberts' white flag manifesto means, if it means anything, that
no quatter will be given if the white
flag is again abused. Then a howl
will go up from the pro-Boers, in
whose eyes a Boer can do no
wrong.
The key-note of the British reply
to any peace proposals from the
Boer republics will be lound in this
utterance of the London Times:
"This country has made a great
and costly effort to destroy an organization absolutely and irreconcilably hostile to the existence of
Imperial authority in South Africa,
and is fully determined that no
nucleus shall be left around which
such an organization can be reconstructed."
FRENCH IS ACTIVE
Seizes Railway Stock and Destroys
Railway and Telegraph lines.
London, March 13.—Lord Roberts telegraphs from Ventersvleit at
5:20 this morning as follows:
"I directed Gen. French, if there
were time, before dark, to seize the
railway station at Bloemfontein and
thus secure the rolling stock. At
midnight I received a report from him
that, after considerable opposition,
he had been able to occupy two
hills close to the railway station,
which command Bloemfontein.
"A brother of President Steyn
has been made a prisoner.
"The     telegraph    line   leading j
northward   has   been   cut and the
railway broken up.
"I am now starting with the
third cavalry brigade, which I called
up from the seventh division near
Petruburg yesterday.and the mounted infantry to reinforce the cavalry
division. The rest of the force will
follow us as quickly as possible."
Roberts'March Unopposed.
London, March 13.—10:05 a. m.
The war office has received the following additional dispatch from
Lord Roberts at Ventersvleit dated
March ia, 9:30 p. m:
"Our march was again unopposed. We are now about 18
miles from Bloemfontein. The
cavalry division is astride the railway, six miles south of Bloemfontein.
"There were 321 men, and about
60 or 70 killed or are missing. Col.
Mmpholy has died of his wounds.
Lieut. Pratt, of the Essex regiment,
was wounded severely. The
wounds are as a rule more serious
than usual, owing to the expanding
bullets, which are freely used by
the Boers."
Malehlag Sttll Besieged.
London, March 13.—A dispatch
received by a South African firm in
London, dated Mafeking, Tuesday,
March 6, via Lobatsi, March 9,
says: "All well, but town still be-
-ieged."
Ulsease and Hunger at mafeking.
L*odon, March 13.— A dispatch
to tht Times from Mafeking, dated Mo,jav March 5, says the
gairison .< that place are feeling
acutely the -tress of siege. They
are reduced »0 the use of horse
flesh and bread i.ade of horse forage, while the wa»r ;s parasitically
contaminated. Typh,jdt dysentery
and diptheria are epiden;c, but it
is impossible to isolate th. victims.
The sufferings of women ai,| children are terrible, and thereare 'eaths
in the women's laager daily, "he
native population are starving. Th.
military operations progress favor
considerably increased as soon as
the large compressor and" hoist,
which have been ordered and ara
now under construction for this
property, are installed. When this
machinery is in running order, tbe
operation and development of tbe,
mine can proceed with greater
speed and economy.
"In starting up now the company
proposes to let as much of its mining work by contract as conditions
will warrant. This 'system will
afford the miners ao opportunity of
earning wages as high as they received under the'day's pay system.
There is nothing unusual about the
contract system in mining. It is
in more or less-general use in every
mining camp of any importance in
the Rocky mountains, Rossland
alone being the only exception, to
thy knowledge.
"Several groups of. miners  have
already   applied   for   contracts   in
Various   sections of the mine and
are making the necessary investigations   as   to   the   character of the
work,   conditions,   etc., to enable
them to make an  intelligent tender
for contract work.    As   I   said before, there is nothing to prevent tbe
mine from being in full blast within
a few days.    I  see no reason why
miners in this camp object to what
is usual in every other camp.    The
intelligent workman with months of
experience   in   the   mines   of this
camp,  surely   knows   how long  it
takes him to drill a hole a foot deep
or   extend   a   drift one foot or   10
feet, and since there is no desire to
reduce the amount of wages earned,
there is no real difficulty in the system referred to. A  tailor contracts
to make a suit of clothes or a  machinery firm to build an engine or a
compressor or the city to have  its
street and sewer system  constructed.    In other mining camps, drifts,
tunnels and sloping are let  by contract.    Miners   prefer this   system.
Under   it,   they become  their own
bosses and, as a  rule,   earn  more
money.      Progressive,     ambitious
miners prefer contract work to the
day's   pay    system.      Surely   the
Rossland   miners have  intelligence
and   ability   equal   to   that of the
miners of any other camp.    I have
no      hesitation      in       predicting
that the contract system   will eventually give entire satisfaction  to all
concerned."
X
ta
. w
STRUCKC000 ORE
in Unexpected Vein Found in the
Nickel Plate Shaft.
feet
military operations progress favor- f".    K
ably.    They have  extended to the   j ^'PP*™
brick fields, whence the enemy  has
been completely expelled.
Boera Hold Biggarsberg.
Ladysmith, March 12.—The
main body of the enemy is in position at Biggarsberg. Gen. Joubert
is at Glencoe. There is reason to
believe that |a tew Boers are at
Dundee, though the place is well
fortified.
White   leaves;Durban.
Durban, March 13.—Gen. Sir
George Stewart White has arrived
here and embarked upon a transport for East London.
A vein of good shipping ore has
been struck quite accidentally in
the shaft of the Nickel Plate mine,
placing it on the list of prospective
I    Men have  been  cutting a pump
WILI.   WORK   BV   CONTBACr.
LrBol,   War  Eagle  aad Centre Mar
Heart j for Operations.
The Le Roi, War Eagle and Centre Star mines are now ready to resume operation and accordingly the
managers have asked the miners to
make bids for certain work per foot
of hole drilled with machines. The
miners now have the matter under
consideration.
Bernard MacDonald; the manager of the Le Roi, being interviewed
in reference to the starting up
of that mine under thc contract
system, said:
' Although the mine is not in
shape to work economically up to
its full capacity, yet we can give
employment to a total force of about
300.    This   force   at once  will be
statnn at a depth of 460 feet in the
shaft ;>,j at a distance ol about I a
*■*■   soui, „f   the   shaft   struck a
body of soM ore two and one-half
feet wide. _*,ere jj' jn the same
vein a large quality 0f mixed ore,
but its width has not been deter.
mined. The vein se^s strong and
well defined and has ai_,|ie characteristics of permanence.
The solid ore is the charai_.„r;st;c
pyrrhotite  ore of the camp, t;n„
solid pyrrhotite and  marcasite, ca..
rying  seven   per cent  copper  and
one and one-half ounce of gold per
ton.
The vein will not be developed at
the point where it was discovered,
but the shaft will be continued to
Ihe 600-foot level, where it is expected that the vein will be on the
north side. On this level drifts will
be run on the vein east and west,
while crosscuts will be run north
and south to intersect the other
veins developed in the upper levels
of the property.
Mr. Casey, M. P., has exposed
the nigger in the woodpile in the
Pacific cable matter. Sir R. G. W.
Herbert, acting under secretary ol
the colonial office, is a director of
the Eastern & Southern Africa Telegraph company and chairman of
the Telegraph Construction and
Maintenance company, which are
rival enterprises of the Pacific cable. acre
j|OTB>r„
OPPOSITE
Til
WHABP
fABOE    AND   COMFORTABLE
BOOMS—TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN    THE
NORTHWEST.
Til SltYttlTttlMU.
Saturday, March 17, i900.
.'.-Jl^j—l_U.'j_.V
-r
ruausiiBO xvxby satuiday at
SILVEKTON, B. 0.
pfcAMI A BURETTE .   PROPS
BILVERTON, B. 0.
MATHESON BK0S..     Editors * Props.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
happened   In   the Coeur d'  Alone* any notion  to the contra-, y of  the
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at thia office,
Dale's Black-
smith Shon,
ftuenl Bbeksnithiug
• • •     and Repairing Dene.
expert hqr9e shoer al-
wats on Hand.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
8.DAI0LE,      SILVERTON, B. 0.
W
atch and]
block]
Repairer."
8i88888888888gf8f88888888°
ENTORlil. Ol'TtWTOS.
8888888888888888888888S8J
Tbe violent death of the man killed
at the   Enterprise   mine,   call   for a
thorough investigation on tho part of
onr government   And if, as it looks,
onr government  is   too   negligent or
poor to support a coroner, to in veatigate
•uch happenings, in this district, then
in the name of decency and common
seme let them keep their month shot
about building railroads and subtidis-
mg cable  lines,  at  least until inch
daring the late trouble.   It is a tale
that brings a blush of shame to every
honest  man,  to   think  that    each
outrages could be committed,   in   the
name of law, in this enlightened  age.
This evidence brands the men that our
Mine Owners' Presr have been applauding, sucb as Sinclair, Merriam
and Steunenberg, as as brutal  a lot ot
scoundrels as this continent oau produce..   Any editor who in tlm faoe of
tbe facts, now brought to light by the
Washington  investigation,  still  persists in abusing these miners is only
a fit running mate for  sueh men as
Sinclair.
Dominion government or G feat Britian
Self preservation is the first law of
nature, ahd we have an ' undeniable
right to protect ourselves, and should
exercise thst right
T.  M. ML. BBNEPPM.
Silveiton,    ..,; •   ' *' ''"•'•
B.C
THROUGH FOR THI { SUMMER.
On Wednesday evenin * the members
pf the Literary Society n «t for their last
meeting of the season In     the parlour ol
The tide of immigration thst is
tting in for British Columbia is
largely composed of Mongolians and
if the present stato of affairs continue
mnch longer the Jxps and Chinese
will soon outnumber the wjjito population of this province. A pretty state
of affairs, truly, when a British
colony is made tbe damping ground for
tbe leprous tainted hordes of A<la, and
the white   men   of tbis
Mr. W. H. Brandon'i
the usual good program
members.   TheSoeiet
successful   toasoo, tl.
work ol thn Society bt
end and the members
■ ert aaed in a way grati
I ders of the society,
next meet io Octobei
i residence, and
was Kiven by the
f has had a very
e interest in tbe
ing kept up to the
lip roll having in-
tying to the foun-
riio members will
• to reorganise.
8L0CAN LAKE t     >Be SHIPMENTS.
THE' MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOQI* 0F|
T   Wilso**   %*<*>
E JIQt^I^      i I Tiim, now.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIR8T-PLAS8 BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PRBMI8E8.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS Of  WINES. UQUOI|
AND CIQAUS, .
tiEADftUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREBT,   -   - . - SLOOAN, B. 0.
Shipments of
tha year 1899. tot
All other Lake
Tbe shipment
Lake points, ut
present week, f
provinoe are' From Boutin Li
ws "lino   wen   or mis   pi
time as we are able tp look after and  torwjd t0 ,u,,j id)r by mnd M(J ^eir        Bo)tun
protect the lives of our own citisens.     «__»»  »«™.   _j-:.«-    ---    »
Tbe po|itica{ situation in Biitish
Columbia is badly mixed, and the self
seekers   amongst our politicians   are
I striving to divide the country amongst
themselves.    Some are for party lines,
^ «pme against its adoption, hut all arp for
themselves and the true interests of the
province takes second place in tbeir
estimations. Toi Silvertonias.
which is an Independent paper and
und er no obligations or bound to any
own  race   driveu out of their own I Frqm New De
Inesdays.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
(Leave Your Orders at The Lam-
riIW)f_!L.
E^.AI. Briii tlie, j
rhe Jeweler,
NEW DENVER B. 0.
ARWNGTOK
tflQJIZlsi
country and are powerless to help
themselyes. One vessel alone, that
arrived at Victoria on the 13th. of
this month, unloaded 150 tons of
freight and 600 Japanese, which is
alone equal to the increase of or/
white population for the last, six
months. Canada's trade with, Japan
for the whole year will nor, be worth
enougH  to   nff-uit   the   damage that
tbis one vessel has do-
.if us, by dump-
ing  this cargo of nndMir,We , mn.
urants amongst s,.    The tjme c,|lU0t
_ "rr,VH t0° "°°n ' when British Columbia
prty or clique, will after the nomi- mn»r P™'»", to prohibit tbi. immi,
nations  support  tbe man   whom it *™U0D»'"",. enforce it too, io spite of
believes    hps  the   interests  of
the
country at heart and is willing (o work
for the good of hia country, regard!
of party.
ess
J-ljfclntosh,
Con'wbiilebtly Situated near the
Railway Station and Wharf.   -'
PQOD 8SBVICK COMFORTABLE
ROOMS,       ^^.B
hiiea Ida Carlislfc^^^^^^^—
Tables supplied with all Ibe delicacies
pftbe-	
The platform given out by Prer
Martin as the one upon which I    / !*f
Stand for election reads we'     & *!"
announced policy is endor       * * 3?"
roajoHty of eleotor) the       * bV  £*
^^^^^^^^^^   raising line being tbat .^j mpbt-
Wntag  Room  under., the charge of It,n •,'«0, hi« «"">•        '" Wb'Ch   %*"
"""' MartinV p|«Uorr       '    Votar*   ,",,"d
squire forthe       ■* bttt fcel  thtt   tbe7*
of his wan-       ' Proof o! ?* »iDCeri'iT
/ promises. / "
_f!ENDER80N4 OETHINQ.J
SLOOAN PITY,   ......   R C
J.M. McCIREGOR
PROVINCIAL
DEALER IN ALL 'KINDS OF
FRESH FRUFt CON-
FECTIpNERY—
CIG'aRS    and
TOBACCOS
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY     LINE
 FISHING TACKLE	
THE LATEST NOVEL8, Ac.
j    Hartney.
From 811 verb
Emily Edi
Vaocouvei
FrqmSlocA.
Arliogl
Black
we from Silverton for
t|ed 1603 Tons.
points 1385    ••
ot ore   from   Blocan
i to ami Including  tbe
rom Jan. 1, 1900.
tiding. Tons.
 180
net
  20
Tons.
 20
1    20
tOity
on     160
Prince    60
Bta"ble.
GOOftSADOLk AND PACK  110RSE8 FOR  flIRE   AT   REASONAB^
RATES-   '■ -A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BVSINE66 DONE.
Outehlb Parties Dealring Horses in Silverton
Ua<, 'Have Them Reserved By Writing To—
■ ♦ •"'    ♦ t t t t t
111   '    9 ,
a. p. Mcdonald,
8ILVFRT0N, • • B.
c.
m
A..
f**l        Personal Paragraphs.
JackC
were ifar
dam.
Mra.
ret tiv
on M<
B*
hare
WM
his
Ws
hf
b'
MINING   AND   COMMERCIAL  MEN  MAKE THE»R
HEADQUARTERS   AT   THE
Thorburn
House
l'p To Date terrier.
noi'SEsrow HMisEir,
IGRANI JTHORBURN,  Puop.
RILVERTON, l\ C.
lusty and Miss Eleanor Bemls
jnied in Sandon last Wcdnes-
8. Daigle. who has been rffiting
ss in Butte, Moot., returned home
mday.
ikkeeper Sickles,   who   bas been
for some months In the interests of
te Rogers A Co., left laat Tuesday,
flnp ending tbeir connection with the
.kefleld concentrator.      Mr. Sickle*
t made many friends here wbo regret
s departure.
Syrup of Horehound & Tolu
FOR COUGHS  AND COLDS.
W
of
.«__. .      LAMD    8URVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
8WCAN CITY, .
CANFORD McINTOSH,
teml Nckt w
Orders lett at V
B. C
preaspUy attendt
TlO.<K
^Trawfer
j9eK,
.ews Stand wUI  be
4't».- ■ '
JRDON. /
NOTARY PDB^io/
SILVERTON,      -     /    .     B. C
8INNOTT ^O'DONNELL
FREIGin^RB AND PACKERS.
Contract/large or sawU taken
And promptly attended to.
tables in SILVERTON, B. 0.
OHA& A. WATERMAN k 00.
y do not believe that thi(,rB ;l0n(.
the leaders of the Miirlin, Oot-
fia or Turner-Dunsmp:,r Tsu^em who
would not throw opt entirely or man-
gl.! into useless*,,, ^ Eight-hour
law if he dared
8locan's mr „,),„ mutt \w ^y, ,„,_.
ptcion on.t* |U %nhfat and  g^y be
electedp^ f,^ to inpport any of the
leadpr*4 *,b0 prove their deteraiination
to    retain  on  the Statutn  book the
*\ight-hour law iu  its untirety.   The
voters here will not allow  this  main
issue to be clouded in any  way and
nothing that is brought np during the
campaign should be allowed to turn
their attention from this point.
The member who will represent the
Slocan in tbe next Parliament will be
one wbo Las shown by his actions during the past year that he is in sympathy with the miners and their cause.
Silverton.B.f
•.AwcTioirxxus, Customs Biokus,
A*d Guiuui. Real Estate Aohts,
Mm la Baaley Black    -   .    Baker St.
NELSON,   B, 0.
mmn mm\m.
NO. 95, W. F. Of M.
Meets every Saturday in the Union
pall far Silverton, at 7:80 r. m. .
_. J. M. M. Bm-iduh,
President.
3,1.'McIaman,
Financial-Secretary
Lilac Cream
FOR CRACKED OR 8<
HANDS.    FOR USE AFTER 81
ING.   AN EXCELLENT HEALE
CUTS OR BURNS.   Price 25c.
THI8 PRKPARATIO
BEYO>D DOUBT THE FINF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET
LIKE IT WHO TRY.   Prica 2f
_>RE
iAV-
KOF
N    18
ST OF
'.   ALL
it
A third year atudent of the School of
?r_M_tkal Science, Toronto, desires em-
ploytpent in sqme office requiring an expert draughtsman, Apply to "DraughU-
'' care of The Silvertonian.
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 18 DUE
OB IN ABRBARg A
BLUE CROSS WILL
BE' FOUND IN THIS
■5QTURE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
• PAYABLE IN  ADVANCE.    PRICE
*M   ,W*r*r*.
wtWVSU
The editor of the Sandon Mining
Review is one of the few anxious to
introduce federal party lines into the
Slooan election. He is for his party
first at kll times, a follower of those
politicians who would if possible stir
up strife between the French Canadians and tbeir English speaking corn-
put riots in order to gain power through
the country's loss. Tbe party line
movement is iutended to split the miners into two parties to fight each other
and let the politicians, such as the Review editor, get the benefit These
bar* to be taught that party lines can
not be forced upon the people here.
Perhaps
THE    MANY
CHANGE8 IN THE WEATI
GIVEN YOU A COLD.   TF
HOUND AND. TOLU.   Prir
8YRUF OF  HO
AND TOLU IS KNOWN
WHOM IT HAS CURED
KNOWN NO, FAILURES.
DER A GUARANTEE. I
Sold
AT  THE
Sllvertoi
Drug
Store.     '
SUDDEN
IER HAS
;Y HORE-
e26c.
•REHOUND
TO  MANY
.    IT   HAS
SOLD UN-
Wee 25c.
Some of the editors of the papers
wearing the silver collar of the
Mine Owners' Association, who
all through the late strike were busy
calling the miners from tho Coeur d'
Alenes evi.ry dirty name tbey could
devise, should read the evidence now
being given in Washington about what
LAKE AVE,  8IL
A Pare
Drags And
Chwniealu Kept.
VBRTON,   B. 0
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE :—"TaiuiirH," "Impbkoma-
ble" and "Rainbow Quartz" Mineral
Claims; situate in' tbe Arrow Lake
Mintiift Division oi West Kootenay
District.
Where located:—On Cariboo creek,
adjoining   the    Millie Mark   Mineral
Claim..
Take notice that 1,3. IX Anderson. P. L.
8 , of Trail, B C . aotine as agent for tbe
Kanilo'-ps Mining and Development
Company. Limited. Free Miner's Ccrti
Acute No. B14445, intend sixty days fiom
the date hereof, lo apply to the Mining
Recorder (or Ceriiftp<<tes of Improvements, for the pin pose of obtaining
Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notici that action
nnder section 37,* muHt •>« commei.eed
before the issuance oi sucb Certificates
of Improvements
Dated this 8th dav of September, A. D.
1899.
J. D. AUDEkSOK.
24 I 2 I 00.
THE,
VICTORIA!
HOTEL.
:•; fleadqaartm For Minin? Mon :•
EVRYTIIISG NSW, NEAT
AND UP-TO-DAT$
TABLE UNSURPASSED IN
THE NOLTnWEST.
■mWkm*\m*   Props.
8 I L V E R T 0 N,   B. 0
The Strike Is OlfJ mBatches, jkwbmuy
,   , _ Sdiamoxds, STtia.-«o
M We are mw
RcaWr f
Business.
I'STASlUIUtD » Nxuos "1S90."
And now my Koot-
■nKv F^edils  I an
prepared to rec+ivegj
• our     orders     Foi S
amo Plai-xo Novsu-
rir.s.     PitHO Lamis
•>>wn Onyz Tabi.ss.
OniKB    Aimctis
Too  NcMisovs   To
Call /so  Exam-
ink Turn.   .   .   .
CANADIAN
PACIiMO
RAILWAY
Ind S00 LINE
OUR  WATCH AND JEWELKRY
RFI'AIBIKG DFI ABTMFNT 18 AI.
As we only employ the moat e*w*
.eucii mm. ullwork is oo*ba«tbxi)
*   Mail aild Exprese Orders Receive Onr;
l'roinpt Attention.
DON'T FORliET THE PLACE.
JACOB DOVER. "Ta* Jewilu.*.
NEI.SON, B 0.
axativ
ddtt*t*p*******
old
To'Oore
Contains
k
Cure.
i
Is Oold In  One Day.
The New Iogrediont.
..TRY   IT.
PRICE f
At All Druggists.
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
TO ALL POINTS
EAST        • akd WEST
First-Glass Sleepers on all Tralna fro
REVKL8TQKE   and KOOTENAY LE>
TOURIST CARS
Daily for 8t. Paui..   ^^^^^^^^^^
ScsnAVs and Wbdhesoays for Toii-
ooto. B
FaiDAYs for Mohtbkal and Boston.
— Same cars paas Revelatohe one day
^H earlier. >
pass Medicine Hut
IW
CONN EOTIONI i.      M
Fnr the North .Revelstoke, raid Main Lino
,7:30 ex' Snnday lv. Silverton,
ar. ex. Sunday, 18 20
For   Rosshud,  Nelson  '  Crows   /Nest
Brunch and Bounds ry Country/,
10:20 ex. Sunday It. Sii- /crton,
ar. tx. Sunday 13:00
To and (rom Sandon.     '
13:00 ex Sunday lv Si'iyerton,       I
 ar.  ex Sunday, 10:10.
TlCKKTS ISSUED THRC JOQU   AND   Bf.tMAOB
 CHCCKKD TO   DBSTINATION.	
For rates aud fui 1 iuformsdon (apply to
nearest local agen t or
II. H. RET /VE8, Agent, Rilverton
w. f. an' Person,    /
Tr av. Pass. Agent, Nelson
E. Jf. CO" jFLE.
f t\ p. P. Agcjitu Vaqcottw
SOU, PuWEK KNUTINO MAOHINK8 AND   VISIBL^J
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRITE US    OArAMKJUES Pi^BE.
tub THISTLE HOTElj
NOW REOPENED
UFDER A NEW
-'   MANAGEMENT.       '     '
BOUSE RENOVATED
AND THE BAR FULLY
.   BR8T0OKBD.
Thompson Broiif  Propis
LAKE AVE.,   SILVERTON, B-9<
emwWWsPsosssa.

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