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The Silvertonian 1900-03-10

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 Ind Up To Date
Mining News
OHtie Mm
Camp Of British*
Columbia!
IE THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA. SATURDAY,    MARCH   10, isJOO.
NUMBER 37
SIGNMENTS
F FRESH
ami
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
s IM'l&xtiLriiOTA
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Weekly News Nuggets Of Sloean and
Other Camps.
<0*9
Sllvertoan., 23. C.
EVIEW   HOTEL
 Silverton
GESER.IL ItEWS OF DISTRICT.
THE   LONE  STAR.
HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
JAR   18  SUPPLIED   WITH   BEST   BRANDS    OF
LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Work is being pushed on the Lore
Star Oroup of  claim*,   near town, and
that promising prospect may ret figure
on our shipping list   this season.    A
tunnel  is  being  driven  to cut the ore
body, exposed on the surface, at a depth
of over 100 ieet.   Tbis tnnnel is now iu
some 00 feet being about  one half   the
distance that Ihe owners Qgure will need
to be driven to tap the ore showing.   Au
the ground is aow comparatively easy lo
drive, rapid progress will he made and
ft will be no surprise to Silvertonisns if
this property  developos   into  anotuer
Bosun this season.
i >00000000090000000000
i HffiQ LOCALS.
0009
1
i MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOOO
The Bosun made a 20 ton shipment
last Tnesday.
Tho Turria, a promising Goat Mountain property, is sending 170 sacks of ore
to the smelter as a trial shipment.
As work progresses and depth is
attained on the Repeater claim on Red
Mountain, the value of the ore encountered steadily improves in value in both
gold and copper. This property ranks
amongst the best showings on Red
Mountain and it is only a question of
work to make a mine out of it, and a
big one.
:.   STia-OTTT-les.   SPxop.
IBUIfcIVS tSe co
fOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
WORE* AT
Silverion, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaslo, flandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
|f. ORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEaD  OFFICE NELSON, 11. C.
<?
Are You Looking For
STYLISH GOODS?
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OCT OK SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEEI).   OVERCOATINGS JUST IN.
LIKBSCHER,   liie Tailor:   Silverton, B. C.
t
i
RAWH'DING FROM THE  HEWITT.
Rawhidor are now busy at work
bringing do»n ore from the Hewett
Group. Tbis property which is about
four miles Irom town Is now a fairly well
dev, loped mine. A large amount of
development work h is heen done upon
it aud some rich bodies of ore have been
"docked out readv to slope. The ore
being rawh'ded down for shipment
M.'.mples 160 ounces in silver lo the ton.
The Hewett is now nn assured mine and
will soon be looked upon as another one
of Silverton's steady producers.
THE MEN IN THE   ROCKLAND.
WHAT THEY WISH BELIEVED.
The following extracts from the Win-
j ripng Commercial and the Nelson correspondence of the B. C. Mining Record
are gems in iheir wav. They assay high
in falseness, exaggeration, vinilh.live-
nees and ignorance and are only grub
samples from the many lying reports
going tho newspaper rounds. Those
who desire to Strangle the Minera' Un-
ious find the following sample extracts
good thing to spread abroad.
The Commercial—"The miners' strike
in tho Sloe in has been called off at the
instance of the men themselves. They
bave iigreed to go back at the mine owners terms, namely, at a wage of $3.25 for
an eiulit hour day. Tho nnion which
formed the basis of the strike bas been
dissolved, as its members were not all
miners—an objectionable feature to the
mine owners—and a new one will be
formed, composed strictly of miners em ■
ployed in the district The men will
petition for the repeal of the eight hour
law."
Mining Record—"From tho miners
thomnelvPS and especially from union
men one hears nothing hut expr ssions
of relief and gta <ne*s at. the turn events
are taking.   The bulk of tiie men bad no
love for the nnion and ita  leaders	
The miners' ■ unions oi Kootenay were
organized hy men  from across the bor-
HEADMAN'S
SLIDE
Claims the Lives of A. HeFarlane and
Fred Sheppard.
KILLED MM LEAVING WORK.
The Miner Graves Syndicate haa tlm*
far expended approximately $400,000 in
their mining ventures in tho Boundary.
This Syndicate holds a bond on tbe Rockland, whoso mammoth ledge of pay ore
lias created a sensation in provincial
mining circles. It will be seen what an
offect it will have upon the welfaio of
.Silverion to have such a property in the
hands of such a company in tho district.
HAS NOW A PRACTICAL FOREMAN.
At the Enterprise mine, which the
owners undertook to operate with scab
labor, ground that formerly cost $12. per
foot ti drive lias been costing, wo sre
informed, $35 per foot. Whe'hsr this i-.
oi account of scub labor or the incompetency of the foreman it is hard to say.
Within the last few days however n
change has taken place at that mine and
a competent min ing man is now in charge
and ski led labor is taking the place of
the former scrub employees.
t
T
WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
W
BENNETT'S
J
F»atent
l£lns«tii-ift£   Ftise
And
Pipe's   Safety
Mntoli.
if& Wm. Hunter Co*, Ivt.cl.,
«?iilvert<ni,   B. C
SLOGAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of ore from Silverton for
tho year 181)9. totaled 169S Tons.
All other Lake points 1385     "
The shipment   ot   ore   from   Slocan
Lake points, np  to and Including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                   Tons.
Bosun 60
From New Denver
Hartney  20
From Silverton Tons.
Emilv Edith    20
Vancouver    20
From Slocan City
Arlington     160
Block Prince       60
der. There was a sufficient leaven of
miners from Montana and Idaho here to
spread tho propaganda amongst our I ion -
est but somewhat easily led Canadians,
and so they fell beneath tlie baneful yoke.
Now they aro rejoicing in their freedom.
A miners' union in itself is a good thing
and hem-fits, dwnere and men alike.
Could one Only be formed oo proper
lines and not under the leadership of ruffians from thc Coeur d'Alenes and other
desperadoes, ii would lead to the best
understanding between the men and
their employers."
The writer of this last quotation would
havo a unior. officered by nominees of tha
Silver Lead Mines Association, their
membership roll revised and their correspondence censored by the eamo men
Iii this wav tho "objectionable leaturcs"
might be eliminated.
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, Feb. 22.-Bar Silver, 59%n
Lake copper,  $16.50,
Lead—The firm that fixes the selling
price for miners and smelters quotes lead
at $4.45 at the close.
If some of the poor duffers rustling
hard in the hills trying to make both
ends meet, had just, a small slice of tho
money wasted by English mining companies in unnecessary high-salaried
directors, officers, clerks, etc., and
lengthy cablegrams, they could do more
towards developing a prospect than the
"company" does with the main pile.
Thore's too much "mining" done in
London.—Ferguson Eagle.
Through The Week.
The first two numbers of the Lardeau
Eagle have reached this office and Editor
Pettipiece is to bo congratulated on thc
excellent beginning bo has made. We
wish the Eagle the prosperity it deserves.
The lady of a large house one dsy snid
to her gardener: "Tatuuias, I wonder
you don't get married. You've got a
nice house, and all yon want to complete
it is a wife. You know the first gardener that ever lived had a wife." "Quie
richt, missus," said Tamilian, "quite
richt. But he didno keep his job lung
after he got the wife."—Chicago Standard.
THE   LAST   SHIFT.
In the early light of Thursday morning, three itiners coming off shift at the
Nob'.e Five mine at Cody were caught in
the deadly embrace of the Headman's
Slide and only one escaped.    •
The three miners were Fred Sheppard,
A lick McFarlane and Farney McNeil,
the last named being the only one spared
by tbe avalanche,
Under tbe auspices of the Union, a
double funeral wilt take place in Sandou
this morning at ten o'clock.
Both the victims oi the cruel accident
were members of the Sandon Miners'
Union, McFarlane being also a Forester.
Sheppard was a married man.
Tliesu are the first among Slocan miners to fall victims to the snowslido this
spring, aud let us hope they will be the
inly ones. Wherever he is the miner
exposes himself to continual danger
while underground, but in the Slocan
Death iurks evetywhere in the bills.
/
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ
8      TUE LOCAL LAYOUT.      §
° 8
uoooooooooooooooooooooooo
We have roceived a book of much, im-
portince at the present time, from the
Poole Publishing Company, Toronto,
"Tlie Lifo of D. L. Moody." The book
is attractive and is well printed on good
white paper. Thirty three pages of il
lustrations embellish its panes, covering
the outstanding features in Mr. Moody's
career, home life and religions experience. The book is published at 25 cents
In heavy paper cover, or 50 cents bound
in cloth, for sale at all bookstores or by
the publishers.
Tbe story is told about Senator Simpson, of a western state who saw a boy
peeling the bark off one of. his choice
trees with a hatchet. He tried to eat -h
the boy, bnt tho latter was too quick for
him, so the pursuer changed his tactics.
"Come here, my little son," be said with
a soft, natural voice, with conterfeited
Iriendlinei-s; "come here tor a minute, I
want, to teli you something." "Not yet,'>
replied the urchin; "little boys like me
don't need to know anything."
The town is full of strangers coming
in looking for work in the mines.
Choice Flower and Garden Seeds just
/eceivod at tbe Silverton Druj Store.
M.-asloa have appeared in town and as
a conBeqaeneo the home of Mrs Barclay
has been quarantined.
Messrs. Tom Lawrence and Sam Watson, win. left here a few days ago for the
Boundary, have started a laundry io
Phoenix.
At the regular election of officers for
the local Minera' U.-.ion, W. Horton was
elected president und Chas, Tyreo as
Financial Secrotary.
Dr. Brouse used the lancet oil about a
score of our younger citizens la6t 3u nday
iu obedience to the mandate requiring
vaccination for all school children,
Divine Skiivick will be held in Silver-
ton Dezt Sunday evening at 7.30. everyone is cordially invited to attend.—Jobu
G. Duncan, Presbyterian  Minister,
Remember tho St. Patrick's Day concert one week from to-day. A good
program is being arranged and several
Now Denverites and Sloeaners will take
part,
All   work   in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at tho Silverton Drugstore, will
be promptly forwarded  to Jacob Dovei
the well-known NeUon jeweler.    All re
pairs are ouaii\nti___[> fob onu year.*
The beautiful has goue into a decline
and the reluse thiOwn out during lhe
winter is left by thc receding snow hare
to the light of beaven. Now Is the time
to oil up tlie rake aud lay low the lusty
microbe with the springtime odors of
chlorid.. of lime.
Thc third number of The Searchlight
was giveu to the members of the Literary
Society at their lust meeting. It contained a number of excellent articles.
The next meeting of tho Society will he
held in Mr. W. H. Brandon's residence.
Only two more meetings will be held by
tho Society before they disbsnd for, tbe
season.
Men   coming down from the Enterprise mino s ay tbat the management aim
now employing all the miners who apply
for work.   A change of foremen I* expected if it has not already been made..
About 300 sacks of ore are now at  the
Enterprise  dock   ready for shipment.
Tbe   rather   sensational   repdrt comet
down from the mine that the Scabs are
about to go cn strike as they only receiye
from $2.50 to $2.75 per day, while thn.
local miners receive $3.25 per Shift.
There are several newly made British
subjects In this camp, and although thay
do not all declare as Windy Young did.
when first he unfurled the Union Jack fla
his own proud flsg, "this ia tho
proudest moment of my life," nevertheless they are proud of the step they hare
taken and will work for tbe best interests of the country of their adoption. Tha
new citisens are: A. E. Teeter, V. 0.
Rackliff, A. Bradwood. W. Brasch, Geo,
E. Stull, T. Romano and J. Dudjinski.
Purely Personal Paragraphs.
Wm. Hunter left for Phoenix et)
Monday.
Robert F. Green M. P. P., has returned
to bis home in Kaslo.
A large shipment of "5 Drops" bafl
just been received at the Silverton Drag
Store.
On-the-wing Wilkinson of tbe Van-t
couvcr Province, dropped into our sanctum yesterday.
Proi. Zimmerman, who makes Silver-
ton his headquarters, is touring ths
Kootenay with the Nelson Minstrels,
George McLean, who has until lately
been gastronomies! commander at th«
Wakefield mine, haa removed his Jurisdiction to the Arlington.
On Thursday Joe Connors and Jack
Chism left with supplies for Twelve Mile
when tbey intend to do considerablo
work on their silver property th*
Olympia.
TIT FOR TAT.
He'd poppod tbe vital question, her an-,
swer had been  prompt,
And on his breast had glued her littlo
head,
While through their lovt-thrlI!od  bosoms tlu> god of rapture romped,
And swiftly ou tbe happy momenta
sped.
Then turning up her glances to mingle
with liis own
This  query   at  her   darling one she
ehoved,
Her accent half a love  coo  aud half a
doubtful moan;
"Am I the only girl you ever lovedT">
He sva'.lowed a lump that arose in bia,
neck,
His face wore a second band  blush.
His  voles  seemed  a sad, unavailable
wreck,
Refusing tn banish  the  bush.
And  into  her  eyes  came   a flicker oi'
pain,
Her lips pursed  in questioning pout,,
And quickly sbo   tired tho same query
again,
Her bosom all riddled with doubt.
Then came an inspiration liko lightining
from the skies;
His heart retreated  to its usual place,
He sent his counter glances deep down
into her eyes j
The hot,  rose-tinted  blushes quit hln
lace,
Like retributive music tbo painful sentence ran
And struck her pinky ears with cruel
spat.
As quickly ho answered her: "Am I the
onlv man
You ever fired  that  old conundrum.
at?"
She snuggled   again  awful close to hia
bresst;
Thu beat ol her blushes lie felt,
Clear through his shirt iront and reversible vest.
Till be thought tbey would blister his.
pelt.
And ho grinned like a fiend from adown.
the dark stairs,
Where   the  red   fire    unquenchsbly
burns,
And  they    handled    their subsequent
Sparking affairs
Without going boiiind tho returns.
—Denver Evening Poet.
Skim (lily Happenings.
"Ah, Senoras, the Araeri .ano talk ever
of the bravery of tho man behind the
gun—but, Senoras, what of the granit
I travel v of the man in front of the Amer-
icano gun?"—Life.
(From our own  Correspondent.)
Slocan City dancers are preparing for j Ron.—Ex
a big masquerade ball to be held here .
next Frldav evening.   New Denver and
Silveiton are expected to be represented
| among the maskers.
Mike—Me Lusher passed twenty-live
salo ns yiitvrday, widout fhtopplu' ia.
inn iv tbim, an' him wid a pocketful av
coin. Pat— H lv inn I Wor he In a trance ?•
Mike—Naw; lie war in tb' pathrol wag-
"Only a littlo whito ago she waa
claiming "he had boeu born again, bat
now she is as cross and baleful as over I"
•* v\ ell, perhaps she is teelhb'g again '*•
ft i
BEATS THE BOERS
Robert Outflanks aod Drives Them
From Osfontein Northward.
quickly   recovering
Many of   the  vol-
been   granted   fur-
LcWon, March 7.—Lord Roberts
telegraphs from Osfontein!
"Advanced March 7, enemy in
full retreat, followed by our troops.
Casualties few."
London, March 7.—The text of
Lord Roberts'- dispatch is as follows:
"Osfontein, March 7.—4:20 p.
m.—Our operations today promise
lo be a great success. The enemy
occupied a position 11 miles south
of the Modder river. I placed Gen.
Colville's division on the north bank
and Gens. Kelly-Kenny and Tucker's division with the cavalry on the
south bank.
"The cavalry  division succeeded
in beating the enemy's  flank, opening the road for the sixth  division,
which is advancing without  having
been obliged to (ire a shot up to the
present time. The enemy are in full
retreat toward the north  and east.
"They are being closely followed
by the cavalry, horse artillery and
mounted infantry,   while   Tucker's
seventh division,   Colville's   ninth
division  and   the   Guards   brigade
under Pole-Carew are making theii
way across   the  river at   Poplar's
drift, where I propose to  place  my
headquarters this evening.
"Our casualties will, I trust, be
few, as the enemy were quite unprepared fur being attacked on the
flank and having their communications with Bloemfontein threatened."
Tlie Traiikva.l luradrd.
London, March 7.—4:16 p. m.—
A special dispatch from Durban
snys:
"A flying column of troops from
Zululand has entered the Transvaal
and will be daily skirmishing with
all parties of Boers. The force consists of mounted infantry, Natal
scouts and artillery, all commanded
by Major Prendegast. The column
first crossed the border Feb. 26. It
now occupies an entrenched position on C'atasi hill, nine miles within the Transvaal."
the troops are
their strength,
unteers   have
loughs.
The Rebel* Stay tto Home.
Cape Town, March 7.—An undated dispatch from Colesburg
says the Australian regiment has
been honored by a visit frwrn Lord
Kitchener. The Arundel coiumn
has been largely reinforced.
An official notification has been
issued that the Queenstown proclamation of Feb. 23, regarding
certain terms offered the rebels by
Gen. Brabant in the event of their
surrendering, has been withdrawn,
but those in arms against England
may Return to their farms upon
surrendering their weapons and receiving a pass, but they are liable
to be called to account later on.
A WAR EAGLE SUIT
McCuaig Wants 29,500 Shires From
George Gooderham.
Htillir lo Hit Troop*.
Durban, March 6.—General Buller, in a general order regarding the
relief of Ladysmith, says:
"The two forces duriag  the  last
few months have striven  with  conspicuous   gallantry and  determination and are ar. honor to the Queen
and the country.   ■ The   Ladysmith
garrison for four months  held  that
position against  every attack   with
complete success,and endured many
privations with admirable fortitude.
The relieving force had to force  its
way through an unknown  country,
across unfordable rivers and on almost  inaccessible  heights,    face a
fully prepared, well armed and  tenacious enemy.    By the exhibition of
the truest   courage,   courage   that
burns steadily besides flashing  brilliantly,   it  accomplished  its object
and added a glorious  page  to  the
history of the country.     Ladysmith
was successfully held and  relieved
and the sailors and soldiers,colonial
and homeborri, who had done   this,
were united by one  desire  and   inspired by one patriotism."
The order congratulates both
forces on the material qualities displayed and thanks them for their
determined effort. General Buller
also sympathizes with the relatives
and friends ol the gallant comrades
who have fallen.
Toronto, March 7.—C. J. McCuaig, a mining brokerof Montreal,
has instituted proceedings against
George Gooderham, of this city, to
recover 29,500 shares of mining
stock in the Wnr Eagle mine at Ho
cents a share.
McCuaig claims that he and two
other parties named Volny and Williamson were partners in the acquisition of the War Eagle mine
and it was agreed that they should
get $212,000 worth of stock at 80
cents on the dollar. He sues for
the amount necessary to make up
that total.
The defense declares that the
plaintiff was paid 37,000 shares in
full of all claims, but complained
that he had sold 212,000 shares for
delivery. Mr. Gooderham agreed
to supply these, hut McCuaig only
showed sales up to 183,000 shares.
The case is likely to last a couple
of days.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
times when such  records may  be
made before a certificate of improvements for a mineral claim may be
issued;    'On the  recommendation
of the minister of mines, the lieutenant-governor, by the advice of his
executive   council,  and under the
provisions of section 143 of the mineral act, has been pleased to order
the said sections 5 and 36 to be interpreted so as to permit a free miner who has applied by  affidavit  for
a certificate of improvements, to receive and record a certificate or certificates of work for all  or any  assessment work done by him or his
predecessor in title since the recording of the mineral  claim in  excess
of the value for which  he   has   already obtained certificates of work;
provided that at the time of applying for such  additional  certificate,
such claim is still in good standing
and has not lapsed or otherwise become invalid, and provided that in
this particular case above referred
to, the affidavit required shall  state
the total amount of work done in
each year since the date of record
of the mineral claim and the value
thereof, for each of such years; also
the value of the work as well as the
years for which he has already received and recorded a certificate of
work."
COMBINE FORGES
Boers Driven Out of Oape
Across the Orange River.
Sir William Van Horn has been
looking for investments for Canadian capital in land mortgages in
Cuba, and in reply to his statement
that a change in the mortgage laws
was needed, was assured that a
commission is at work on such a
revision as will give security to investors.
MI'.nKK    Wl>*   AT   SRATTJ.K.
Huller Resume* the Advaare,
London, March 7.—For lack of
all news from Field Marshal Roberts, public attention turn? to Natal. It is reported that General
Buller has pushed forward a force
along the Harrismith railroad line.
It appears that the Boers intend to
take up a strong position in the Big-
gnrsburg range and contest the
Glencoe passes, although  it  hardly
B seems likely that General Buller will
attempt to force these for the  pres-
■?,*, ent.    Bui his plans are kept almost
as secret as those of Lord Roberts.
Should Declare lu roll. j.
While waiting for the important
developments which are daily expected in the Free State, rumors of
p.'ace recur. The second edition of
thc Times this morning contains a
dispatch from Cape Town, which
says there is a crying need for an
explicit statement by the British
ministry that nothing short of annexation is intended, in order to
"damp the mischevious agitation
that i.s going on under the pretext
ol a demand for peace."
I'MHil Rullrr'* NNeeeu
Another list   of   casualties   sustained by   General   Buller's   forces
from February 14   to  February  ^7
shows:    Killed   123; wounded, 5^3;
missing, 54.    Of these,  the losses
of  fnniskillings   were  as   follows:
Killed. 54; wounded, 162; missing,.
22.     Dublin  fusiliers—Killed,    15;
wounded, 97;   missing,   15.     Con.
naught rangers—Killed, 19; wounded,  105; missing  8.      Royal   Irish
fusiliers—Killed, 11; wounded, 63;
missing 2.    Scots  fusiliers—Killed,
18; wounded, 68; missing, none.
With the list of casualties issued
on Monday, this makes the total
cost to the rank and file m the final
relief of Ladysmith 1859 men.
fciillri-   llrpublli an Tl'ket Blerled  by
JLargr Slajorllir*.
Seattle, March 7.—Humes and
and the entire Republican ticket
were elected at the municipal election by majorities ranging from 1500
to 2500. Paul for comptroller led
the Republican ticket. The fusion-
ists elect three councilmen by small
majorities.
Carnegie says it is a disgrace to
die rich, so Frick is trying to help
him out a little.—Montreal Herald.
The trial of the 41 Cape Colony
rebels taken prisoner by the Canadians at Sunnyside began at Cape
Town on January 18. That probably accounts for the failure of the
rebellion to spread and shows the
extent of the service rendered by
the Canadians.
A     PHII'K     ON     LAWTON'S     HK.tD
Filipino.    OMrroi! a  Reward  for Iho
General'* A**a**inafloa.
New York, March 7.—A special
from San Francisco, relative to
the death of General Lawton, says
that the New Orient, a Manila
newspaper, in an issue brought
by the transport Warren, declares
that the killing of General Lawton was
the result of the placing of a price
upon his head by wealthy natives
of Manila,. It says the killing ol
Major Howard in a river boat previously was due to a mistake, Howard being mistaken for Lawton.
Kallroad Hank, Two Dru Killed.
Pittsburg, Match 7.—The westbound track of the Pittsburg Fort
Wayne & Chicago railway, which
spans Robinson street, Allegheny,
sank under the weight of a heavy-
freight engine at 1 o'clock this
morning, letting the engine and
the freight oar drop into the street.
There were four men on the engine
at the time, two of whom were
killed outright and a third possibly
fatally injured.
A committee of Welshmen has
been investigating the opportunities
for Welsh immigrants to Canada
and has made a strong report in favor of this country.
General Ricciotti Garibaldi offers
to raise a corps of Italian volunteers
to aid the British in South Africa.
Britain helped Italy to gain freedom and Italian patriots remember
it.
How is it that so many Germans
who are offended if you call them
Dutchmen feel that the bond of
blood binds them to the Boers ol
the Transvaal? — Kincardine Re-,
view.
FUMIGATING THR ORR
Hnnicrr Soldier* Verdtop Vp.
Ladysmith, March 7.—There are
no Boers  within  30 miles of here.
Plenty of supplies are available and
Tka Canadian Won the Mate*.
San Francisco, March 7.—The
first of the five nights of boxing
and wrestling matches for the amateur championship of several classes began last night in the Olympic
club. The principal bout was between J. L. Scholes of Toronto,
Ont., champion amateur bantam
weight of Great Britain, Canada
and the United States, and Frank
McDonald, of the Reliance club, of
Oakland. In the third round, McDonald's seconds threw up the
sponge.
midway    Health   Antharltlaa Guard
Aaalnat Auclent Smallpox Germ*.
The health authorities at Midway
are so extremely careful to shut out
smallpox germs that they have compelled the teamsters who are hauling ore from the Zala M. mine in
Sheridan camp to have it fumigated. The ore has to be unloaded
on the American side of the boundary, fumigated there, and reloaded
on the Canadian side. This costs
$1 to $1.50 a ton.
Apparently Midway people think
that smallpox germs have a peculiar
affinity for gold-bearing ore and, if
they were not buried with it at the
time of its formation, may have
clung to it from some infected miner's touch.
rmumeefote Popular lu America.
London,     March     7.—The  St.
James Gazette this afternoon  while
declaring that the extension of Lord
Pauncetote's stay at Washington as
ambassador of Great Britain is due
to the coming presidential election,
and "all that   goes   with   this  recurring   commotion"    says:    "To
Americans, Lord Pauncetote's  stay
will b« acceptable   because he   has
achieved the feats of making   himself popular, with   a   success   for
which  there is  no precedent  since
the first   British  minister  was accredited  to   the   United  States  a
century and a quarter ago.    To us,
his continued tenure ol office is acceptable,   because  he  has  pleased
the Americans, and it is highly desirable from   a  -business   point of
view, as well as grateful to our feelings, that they should continue to
be pleased."
A Seaaeleoa Tell.
Seattle Tiroes.
And now  all Europe  are yelling
because General Roberts compelled
General Cronje to go into the  English camp to agree to terms of surrender.    We don't see  a  little   bit
in the proposition.     To  the  victor
belongs the spoils, is a good maxim
in politics,   and   we   haven't   any
criticism to make   of  the  methods
adopted by the head of  a conquering army to the terms which it dictates to the conquered, provided always, that the terms do not impose
physical pain, humiliation or mental
torture.
Worda af Fraternal Greeting.
Montreal March 6.—Wm. C.
Cornwell, president of the City
National bank of Buffalo, N. V.
has sent the following message to
the managers of the principal Canadian banks.
"We beg to extend congratulations on the grand success of British arms, aided by Canadians.
The right thinking American
people are wilh the mother country."	
LATEST STOCK QUOTATIONS.
Athabasca	
B 0.Gold fields...
Bl*Thfee	
Brandon k Oolden Crown
Canadian Oohl Fields.
4SKSD
81
'it
IN JI'STICK TO miNRRS.
Order Relating to CertlSeatea of Work
.'Amended by HlnlaUra.
The injustice worked by the action of the late government in regard to the assessment work on
mining claims has been undone by
Hon. Smith Curtis, the new minister of mines, by the issue of the following order:
"Whereas, There is doubt as
to the intent of section 5, mineral
act amendment act, 1898, and of
section 36, as amended, of the mineral act, regarding the record of assessment work and the payment of
money, together amounting to the
value of $500,   and   the   time   or
SOaribpoJOenrip McKinney] 85
rOw'»j|j_ttPasiCoal..''J»8«00
ard«n«lle«         6
li*
»*s
Deer Trail No. 2..
Deer Park [newj
Dundee	
BvenlHf? Htar. .
Fairmont.	
Giant         fl
Homaatake        1%
Iron Mask  37
Iron Colt  8
LX. L  i;
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  21
Jumbo  22
KlnslOroDenoro)....,... 11%
KnobHHI !... 04
Lone Pine Consol  18
Minnehaha  6
Monte Christo  tu
Montreal Gold Fields  7
Morrison  t
Mountain Lion f 1 00
Noble Fit*   ld%
Northern Belle	
Novelty  2%
Ukaaofian     4
Old Ironside*  97
Palmer Mountain    15
Peoria Minea  2
I'nnoew Maud  7
Bainbler-Cariboo  33
Kathtuiillen  tu
Republic  98
St. Blioo Consolidated.... 3%
Srou**»«r  \u.
Tanisrw: (Kenneth J  i)v
Trail tinsel Hid. Treas ... tu
VanAnda	
SID
24
»
21
72
$30 0u
*M
11
28
15
14
41
IS
»X
3
80
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27
4
Dordrecht, March 6.—Following
yesterday's success, Gen. Brabant
again engaged the Boers today with
advantage, holding the position
captured yesterday. There was
some sharp fighting this morning,
the British los'ng five or six men
and capturing the Boer fort, thus
vastly improving their position.
The Boers fought tenaciously, contesting every inch of ground, but
ultimately they retreated suddenly,
carrying off their guns and wagons.
A mounted force pursued them, but
the result is not yet known.
British casualties during the last
two days were 30 wounded and 1 a
or 13 killed.   Boer losses unknown.
Throughout arduous fighting and
severe fatigue, the Colonials behaved splendidly.
Rebuilding tha Railroad*
London, March 6.—The war office has received the following dispatch from Lord Roberts:
"Osfontein, March 6.—General
Gatacre reoccupied Stormberg yesterday. The lines of railways north
and west will now be repaired. Gen.
Clements is at Joubert's siding, beyond Colesberg.
"The Duke of Marlborough, with
the Oxford company of the Imperial
yeomanry, has left Cape Town for
Naauwport.
"Gen. Buller reports Natal as
practically clear of the enemy and
that he cannot hear of any formed
bodies of them anywhere. The
Boers left some ambulances full of
their sick and wounded, from which
the mules had been taken for transport purposes."
The Force* Can Now I ult*.
London, March 6.—2:50 p. m.—
The Boers in northern Cape Colony
are   in   full   retreat to the Orange
Free   State.     The   possession  of
Stormberg   puts   Gen. Gatacre   in
railroad communication  with  Gen.
Clements at Colesberg for,  though
the   Boers   partially   wrecked   the
railroad, it is understood that it can
be quickly repaired and   thus the
entrance of additional British troops
into the Free State will be greatly
facilitated.
From Osfontein, where Lord
Roberts is opposed by a good sized
body of Boers, there is still no news
except reports of minor skirmishes.
Hrabaul'* Poalilou Strong.
The position gained by General
Brabant at Dordrecht is reported to
be exceedingly strong. According
to the Times correspondent, the
Boers' numbers alone enabled them
to retreat from Dordrecht practically unhindered. He also reports
a violation of the white flag by the
Boers, and they deliberately fired
at close range on a stretcher party.
Ac eur* or Horror In Natal.
Gen. White's garrison has begun
to leave Ladysmith and is arriving
at the Mooi river camp, where the
troops will remain several days,
after which they will go further
south. They are emaciated and exhausted, and say the road tb Colenso presents scenesthat exceed the
horrors depicted in Dante's Inferno.
Dead men and animals are lying
mutilated and putrified in the
trenches formerly occupied by the
Boers, and fill the air with a sickening stench. In cases where hurried
burial had been attempted, the
rains had washed the earth away
and out of the earth stick ghastly
legs and arms of dead burghers.
Lord Roberts good grass, Copi
supplies have reached him and n.Wg
of his advance is eagerly awaited
Roar Pneltloa at Oafbateia,
Osfontein, March 3—The Bo*
position has now been fairly located
as about four miles in front of tht
British and extending about tight
miles.   The Boer right consist* 9
a high long mountain on the north
side of the  river,   which Generii
French shelled thie morning.    Ap.
parently  the space    between the
mountain    and    the   river    hu
been    fully     entrenched.    South
of the river, the Boer lines cover
more ground. A few days ago their
left rested on the high kopjes stand
ing in the middle of the plain. Th#y
have now been extended two miles
further south, while six small kop.
jes stand on the plain between the
center and the left and between the
center and the river, and form .
ridge behind which the Boers move,
The weakness of the whole posi.
tion, however, is that it can easily
be turned in either direction,    The
country is flat and water abounds,
the recent rains having nearly filled
all the dams.
Skier* Retreat I(mb ■.aiysartib.
Ladysmith,     March    3.—Three
regiments of cavalry,  reconnoitring
northwards today, saw • body of
Boers behind Pepworth hill.   Two
long    trains,    which were ready
to leave, promptly moved before the
troops reached them, and the Boers
blew up a culvert behind them is
they went.    The British passed a
large body of Boers in the vicinity
of Pepworth.   The Boers opened a
heavy  rifle   fire,   the British  field
guns replying.   The British did not
press the attack, and the Boar firs
ceased on the British retiring.
Auction oTRaer Bailee.
The Boer camp showed many ts.
idences of the presence of women.
An   auction   was   held on   things
brought from the Boer camp.   A
bunch of grapes sold  for a$ shillings; a plate of tomatoes,  18 shillings:   a  dozen matches, 18  shillings; a package of cigarettes, 15
shillings; 50   cigars,   j£io, and a
quarter of a pound of plug tobacco,
40 shillings.
Bk*4M 9mr ««"• Traa bl*.
London, March 9.—The Morning
Leader says today: "Of one thing
we may be certain, Cecil Rhodes,
who knows South Africa, has made
up his mind that the annexation of
the republics will not bring the lasting peace which our imperialists
propose. Mr. Rhodes is so surs
this will not happen that he is prepared to set to work at once on the
fortifications of Kimberly.
"We incline to think Mr. Rhodes
is preparing for a possible armed
conflict with the imperial faction,
which he fought at the polls and in
parliament until 1895. He is preparing to resist any attempt on our
part to interfere actively in South
African affairs, either in the interests of the Dutch elector, whose
vote is already threatened, or of the
Kaffir laborer, who seems doomed
to virtual slavery. This is not, indeed, an extravagant hypothesis.
Rhodes has consistently maintained
a policy of 'Africa for the Af.ikan
der' and on his lips the latter word
is synonymous with financier. He
will be loyal to the English flag just
so long as it continues to be a valuable asset."
  0
Victorj-Trtamiih  SU.
Virginia  5
War Ka*l* Consolidated. .$ 1 ,'is
Waterloo     7
WftlteHser  3
Winnipeg  21
Wonderful  *,
$ 130
**'4
**
Preparing lor tke Laat Stand.
A dispatch from   Osfontein says
that, according to the Boer prisoners, another important British  success  will  cause President Steyn to
flee   to   Pretoria, leaving a   provisional government at Bloemfontein,
which is likely to make peace over-
tures, thoue Free Sisters hot wishing
for peace trekking into the Trans-
v». ri and there helping to make a
stand, which  most of the British
military critics now point out  will
constitute the most difficult and deciding feature of the war.
The recent rains  have   afforded
teeme* In _Ladr.»itfc.
Durban, March a.—The news-
paper correspondents who have
reached here from Ladysmith say
that the enthusiasm of the garrison
and inhabitants of the besieged
town was intense when the relieving
column entered. Men left the hos-
pital, and even the women and children went forth to greet the new-
comers. It was noticeable that the
latter were even more demonstrative, cheering the women and children, whom they were proud to
have saved. The correspondents
believe that the garrison could have
held out until April, though rations
had necessarily been reduced to a
minimum. The men of the garrison will require a rest and the
horses are much wasted.
The Northwest mounted police is
to be recruited to its full strength
and mounted rifle companies are to
be raised in the Northweel and
British Columbia. IRCEO TO MOVE
it Drives the Boers Northward
and Captures a Position.
■irdrecht, Cape Colony,   March
■ 9    a.   m. — General     Bra-
colonial   division,   after   a
fs march,  is   now attacking
ioers in a strong position  at
uschagne's Nek,  on the road
I Dordrecht to Jamestown.
Iter—The engagement  is  pro-
ling with great vigor,   and   the
rs are gradually retiring  before
Hritish shell fire from their pos-
A heavy  rifle fire is  being
hanging, where the  British are
aged the   Boers   on   the  right
so the   liners have  no  big
Is in action.
Jvening—General Brabant's   ad-
i to-day was most satisfactory.
marching   and   bivouacking
■ night,  the force reached  the
ng entrenched positions,   which
occupy   and   now   hold, the
irs being on   the   opposite   hill.
[British will remain  tonight  in
captured   positions,   although
oers brought   two  guns into
i and made determined efforts
lake them.    The British losses
six killed and 18 wounded.
Took Orange River Hrldicc.
lesburg, Cape Colony,  March
A   reconnaissance,   with   two
s of Australians and two guns,
_ wagon bridge over the Orange
r found it  intact.    Fifty   Boers
the othei side were taken by sur-
se and the British galloped to the
ger, some miles on the Free State
de.      Price's command has moved
ven miles north of Colesberg.
The Boers, during the occupation,
enied   themselves  rather than see
the British suffer.
To Slarrh Through '/.uUlaud
Durban, March 2.—Yesterday a
[number of horses were sent into
Zululand with the object of marching a British force through Zulu-
> land and intercepting the Boers
north of. Biggarsberg. A complete
system of heliographic communication is established between Weencn
and* Eshowe.
Clearing the Way Northward.
London, March 5—The war office
as received the following dispatch
n* Lord Roberts, dated Osfontein
nday March 4:
'•General Cronje, on behalf of his
arty, and Commandant Wolmar-
ns on behalf of 4,900 other prisoners, who have all left Modder river,
asked the British officers to thank
me for the consideration and kindness with which they have been
treated.
' Gen. Clements reports that his
advanced troops hold Achtertan and
that railway communication would
b.' opened to Joubert's Siding today.
The enemy is still in force at Nerval's Pont bridge.
. "Gen. Gatacre telegraphs the
number of Boers at Stormberg is
daily diminishing.
"Col. Baden-Powell reports all
well at Mafeking on February 15th
and the enemy's activity was being
met everywhere by equal activity on
the part of the defenders.
"The position is unchanged at
Ostontein, except that frequent
showers have materially improved
grazing, to the benefit of the horses
and transport animals."
Roara Acknowledge Defeat.
Bloemfontein, Orange Free State,
I March 2, via Lorenzo Marquez,
[March 3.—The federals have resolved to abandon the territory
Uround Rensburg, and the retreat
• has been effected under the protection ot mounted burghers.
It is officially announced that on
Friday General Cronje with 2000
or 3000 men surrendered, owing to
a scarcity ot food and ammunition.
The president (Kruger) is issuing
a .stirring address to the burghers
in Natal, who are falling back on
Biggarsberg. The president will
return to Pretoria Sunday.
The Future Flan of Campaign,
London, March 5.—The air of
myst er'y which covers the movements
pf the main British army in South
Africa continues, though what information leaks through indicates
that the campaign is being carried
on with steady progress. There are
now practically three British armies
in the field, one in the Free State,
one in Cape Colony and one in Natal. All that is known about the
lirst and most important, is that it
is in close touch with a body of
Boers. Speculation as to the direction and method of Gen. Roberts'
advance into the Free State is quite
worthless, so carefully are the plans
concealed. In Cape Colony, Gens.
Barabant and Clements command
the two horns of the army, while
General Gatacre holds the main Boer
force in check. Gens. Gatacre and
Clements will probaby combine and
advance on Bloemfontein, with Gen.
Brabant guarding the right flank
with the mobile colonials. The
movement will be subsequent to
securing a line of communication
along the Orange Free State railroad, which, according to the latest
despatches, seems almost accomplished,
The third army, that in Natal, is
comparatively inactive and, with the
exception of sorties, a serious movement can hardly be expected from it
this week. When it shall be ready
to advance, its movement must depend on how much distance the
Boers put between themselves and
Gen. Buller.
Haautoa Mar loin In.
The unexpected activity of the
Cape Dutch and the reported likelihood of fighting between them and
the Basutos, aided by other tribes
having a grudge against the Boers,
is regarded as rather ominous. The
only other untoward phase of the
military situation that the British
military critics can discern is the enforced temporary inactivity of the
Natal army, an instance of which is
contained in the dispatches announcing that the flying column which attempted to intercept the Boer retreat
only succeeded in driving the enemy
further north. Gen. White's men,
according to the Times correspondent at Ladysmith, will require a
ortnight's recuperation.
Humor* or Peace and War.
London, March 5.—A special to
the Times from Lorenzo Marquez
dated March 4, says that persistent reports continue to prevail that
the Transvaal government has opened negotiations looking to the securing of peace. On the other
hand, it is asserted that the Boers
will make a stand at Glencoe and
Laings Nek, and that in the meantime, the entrenchments at Pretoria
arc being extended in anticipation of
a siege. A conference between the
Boer presidents, it is added, and
the general commanding the Boers
in northern Natal was arranged on
receipt of news of General Cronje's
surrender. Until then the official
comfirmation of the surrender was
withheld  from the public.
President Kruger sent a fervid
religious appeal, with orders that
it should be read by all the officers
of the burghers, urging them to
stand fast and strive in the name of
the Lord, for unless they had faith
in him, cowardice would set in and
their position would be hopeless the
moment they turned their backs on
the enemy. Their past victories,
he declared, showed that the Lord
was on their side. The president
beseeched ths burghers not to bring
destruction on their progeny.
Continuing, the special says that
a high authority in Bloemfontein
declares that, in the repulse of
of Free State forces, the latter will
retire towards the Transvaal and
unite with theirjbretrhen there,maintaining the struggle to the last.
Thc Boer casualties at Colenso
during the week ending February
25 are reported to be 31 men killed,
and 130 wounded.
A War Loan ol Over #100,000,000.
London, March 5.—It is said on
good authority that the government's budget proposals will include
a war loan of between $100,000,000
and $150,000,000, extending over a
period of ten or twelve years.
CAMETOTHELAST
How a Party of Boers Was Captured
On the Tugela.
London, March 3.—For a delightful description of individual action, nothing can excel Mr. Churchill's account of a chase and capture
that fell to the lot of Lord Dundon-
ald's men the first day of the fighting on the north side of the Tugela.
The column of straggling Boers was
seen retreating towards the Free
State.    A squadron of Dundonald's man  who had lhought it a\\ out>
oners that they would be shown
courtesy and kindness worthy of
brave men and a famous quarrel.
The Boer dead were collected and a
flag of truce was seni to the enemy's
lines to invite a burying and identifying party at dawn.
"I have olten seen men killed in
war, thousands al Omdurman,
scores elsewhere, blade and white,
but the Boer dead aroused the most
painful emotions. Mere by the'rock
under which he had fought lay the
field cornet of Heilbronn, Mr, De-
mentz, a gray-haired man of firm
aquiline features and a short
beard. The stony face was grimly
calm, but it bore the stamp ol
unalterable  resolve, the look of a
men espied them, galloped to the
hills, reached there first, "with just
five minutes to spare."
"The     carbineers,"  writes   Mr.
and was quite certain that his cause
was justified and such as a sober
citizen might give his life for. Nor
was I surprised   when the Boer pti-
Cronje does not wear diamonds
as he had hoped. It is doubtful
whether he even ware a good-humored smile as he sniffed the lyddite
fumes in the bed of Modder river.
Churchill, "and the Imperial light 1 som.rs U)U, me that Demenlz h;id
horse held their fire until the scouts j re(us,d a„ sugge«tiahe6f surreoder-
walkedinto their midst, and then L,^. lhat, wh#0 his left leg was
let drive at the main body, at 300 S1,iashec) by „ billlet> he had C0Iltin.
yards range, mounted men on the j ued t0 load and fire unti, he b|ed t0
smooth, open grass plain. There j dcat|l> and) when fo^d, h« was
was a sudden, furious snapping | paIe and Wood|CSSf ho,d|ng his
fusilade. The Boer column stop- j wile's ,e|ler in ,,is hands
ped, paralyzed, and then broke and „lt cou|d no(. be denied that m
rushed for cover.  The greater num- cavalry had scored  a  bri)Iiant suc.
ber   galloped   fast   from the  field
Some remained on theground, dead
cess.    Moreover,   wc  had seen the
retreating Boers dragging and sup
er   wounded:   others took   refuge J porting their injured friends  from
among the rocks of the  kopjes and  the fieId a|)d might  fa,,y c|aim  ,
apparently proposed to hold out until dark. The adjutant of the light
horse galloped over to Lord Dun-
donald for reinforcements, so that
they could 'bag' the lot.
knocked out of the fine bag, which
we had to pay scarcely anything
for. Two soldiers of the mounted
infantry were killed, one trooper of
the   imperial   light   horse   slightly
"Off   galloped."    continues   the  woundedf    and  one  officer)   Capt
correspondent, "the mounted infan-,^hore_the   23fd#    ofiker   of   (his
try and one squadron of the South
African light horse and later on some
of the Thorneycrolts, and later on
the brigadier himself. I arrived in
time to see the end. The Boers—
how many I could not tell—were
tenaciously holding the black rock
of a kopje and were quite invisible.
The British riflemen curved around
them in a half moon, firing continu
regiment hit  during the  last  three
months—severely wounded."
PACTIONS Attl!   IIi:0   HOT.
French Student* Tlireati n Mayor Fre
loulaluc, Kiiitlioh Will li.icii.l liliu
Montreal, March 3.—Thc threatened raid on   McGill   university by
ally at the rocks. The squadron of the tudents of Laval university last
South African light horse had ni*ht did not materialize the in-
worked almost behind the enemy, j fluence of Archbishop Bruchesi and
and every Dutchman who dared |the calli'^ 0llt of the militia havinS
make a dash for liberty, ran a terri- the dcsircJ e*Tcct'
ble gauntlet. Still the surrender) ,n Passil^ »«ntence upon four-
did not come. The white flag flick-iteerl indivkiutIs "Masted by the.po-
ered for a moment above the rocks, jlice last night tot *eat««* a #*****
but neither side stopped firing. Evi-jbance b> Bin6V>g national and other
dently there was a difference of, sonSs< Recorder Weir this morning
opinion among the enemy. condemned  the   police  generalship
"There, there's the white flag in *U°*'ngthe Laval students.after
again. Shoot the devils down," j fair warning had been given, to par-
cried a soldier, and the musketry I lde St'Jamcs streot ;md lraniP'^
crashed out fiercely. j »P°n the Union J«*  >'^tcrday  af-
" What's lo  be done?"    said the : ternoon.
captain,   turning  to  the  brigadier.!     This morning rumors are current
"The white flag has been up off and
that   the   French   students   intend
on for the last half hour, but they '"arching to Mayor Prefontaine's
don't stop shooting and thev've ; house this evening and b""»ng him
just killed two of my men." !in •*#• on account of his  a,titudc
"Give   them   one  more chonce.   in forc"1» the authliritie* to suppress
Cease firing there, will you?" Ilhe tr"ubk last night.
For the men were very angry, | As a counter-demonstration to
and so at last the musketry died lhis'.the ™mbt™ otU,eM' A- A
away, and there was silence.   Then
A., it is said, will march in a body
to protect Mayor Prefontaine. The
M. A. A. A. members are English-
speaking residents of the city.
from among the rocks, three dark
forms stood us holding up their
hands, and at this tangible evidence
of surrender, we got on  our horses I
and galloped toward them, waving , Miaii.<>and Fitz_.iii_iiiou« Batched
pocket handkerchiefs and signalling j NewYork, March 5. - Tom
flags to show them that their sur- sharkey and Hob Fitzsimmons
render was accepted. Altogether g|g^d arUdes of ftgreeinen, todav
there were 24 prisoners-all Boers ^ fc 25.round bout before the club
of the most formidable type—a offerin|f ,he imjmmM puW( d.]ri_,_^
splendid haul, and I thought with |he ^ week jn AxT*{a*et the win.
delight of my poor friends, the - ner to take a„ the purse Marquis
prisoners  at Pretoria.    This might, q( Queensberry   rules  w5U  govern#
redeem a few. j The men and Ihe club  are  each   to
"Then we searched the ground, I p(Jt up & forfeit of S.QOO Rids fof
finding 10 dead or dying, and 20 the fight wi„ be opened ;U a p m
loose horses, and 10 dead and eight Mafch . A, Smit, ftt ,he Hote,
badly wounded men. The soldiers
crowded around these last, covering
them with blanketsormackintoshes,
propping their heads with saddles
for pillows, and giving them water
and biscuits from their haversacks
and bottles. Anger had turned to
peace in an instant. The desire to
kill was gone. The desire to comfort replaced it. A little alert officer came up to me. Two minutes
before, his eyes were bright and
joyous with the excitement of the
man-hunt.     He   had   galloped    a
Delavan in this city
From DiiWHon to the Cape.
The Province.
Four officers of the Dawson
mounted police and a cavalry officer
are guests at the Metropole hotel,
on their way to meet the Strath*
coha Horse at Ottawa. They are:
Colonel W. Roak, of the mounted
police; Captain Gardiner of the
Royal Canadian Dragoons; Sergeant Tohiii,   an     ex-cadet of  the
SEIGE IS RAISED
Boers Admit Tbat They Have Given Up
the Effort to Hold Mafeking.
New York, March 3,—A cable
from Brussels says: "A report hat
been received here, from Boei
sources, announcing that the siege
of Mafeking has been raised, the
Boers abandoning the attack for
strategic reasons."
Believed to Bc True
London, March 3.—The report
that Mafeking has been relieved is
believed to be true. This is the
third point where the British were
besieged.
Fl tilling at Ntormbrrir
Sterkstroom, March 2.—Genera
Gatacre made a reconnaisance towards Stormberg, The Boers opposed liim with two guns
and the British artillery pitched
some shells in the Boer laagers.
Nearly .1000 FrUouer*.
Cape Town, March 3 —The Boer
prisoners captured at Paardeberg to
date number 4660 men. About
3000 of them are on their way here.
The pressure on the rolling stock is
enormous.
Iday Sur Tor Peace.
London, March 3.—2:27 p. m.—
President Kruger is said to have left
Pretoria with the intention of meeting President Steyn. The place
where they will meet is not mentioned, but it is believed to be somewhere in the Free State. Those in
South Africa who are conversant
with the effect the recent reverses
have had on the Boers express the
opinion that the meeting of the two
presidents is preliminary to suggestion of negotiations for peace. But,
it' this is the case, it must bc due to
the pressure brought to hear upon
the presidents by the burghers and
Afrikanders in the British colonies,
rather than to the personal inclinations o( the two presidents.
There is no news of any chanre
in the situation.
Telegraphing from Osfontein today, thanking- the lord mayor of
Liverpool for his congratulations in
behalf of that cily, Loid Roberts
say-,: "I trust Her Majesty's soldiers in this country will gain such
further success as will speedily restore the freedom and prosperity of
South Africa."
Alter the Celebration.
New York, March 3.—The Trib
une correspondent says the war now
opens up on the second stage, in
which heroic garrisons under siege
no longer appeal to the imagination. The military writers are
seeking to forecast the probable direction o( the new campaign, but
the listless public no longer follows
their surmises. "Bobs" plans his
own campaigns, with results highly
satisfactory to everybody in Eng-
and. Tho amateur strategists of
the press have lost their public.
The      streets    of  London    were
tlent was in a condition of intoxication."
Scene* of Wild Delight.
London, March 3.—A dukedofflf
for Roberts, an earldom for Kitch-
e'ne'r and a peerage for Buller. Thus
say the people already busy at this
occupation,
If only the marvellous wave of
enthusiasm and rejoicing that swept
iver the country this week could
find ils prototype in matetial rewards, Lord Roberts and his fellow'
heroes of the hour would be made
dukes forthwith.
Some of the demonstrations
quite outdid those of the people of
Paris. It takes the effort of imagination to picture an ordinary
middlo-class English girl, marching
bareheaded through the street,
singing and shouting and waving
flags, but this is what occurred.
About 1000 male and female
students of the Kensington art
schools, 1 he girls hatless and wearing their morning gowns, with men
in overalls, marched singing and
cheering to the Albert memorial,
and thence to Mr. Joseph Chamberlain's house, where Mrs. Chamberlain smilingly acknowledged the
ovation and Mr. J. Austin Chamberlain, tin colonial secretary's eldest
son, made a speech. The sentries
refused this strange band admis-
sion-to the Klightsbridge barracks,
so they had to sing; "Rule Britannia" outside. At Colonel Baden-
Powell's house they sang. "For
he's a Jolly Good Fellow." It was
a weird procession foi staid old
England.
A number of the Westminster
schools demonstrated somewhat
similarly in front of the offices of
the Canadian high commissioner and
other colonial agents. The scenes
are said to reproduce somewhat
those after the battle of Waterloo.
Boer* lu Full Helreat.
New York, March 5.—Specials
from London to the morning papers
thus summarize the South African
War situation, as gleaned   from   the
correspondents at the front:
The Boei*! are tn full retreat from
Colony to the Orange river,
General Clements has diiven the
rear guard of the enemy across the
Cole iberg bridge, and is preparing
to invade the Free State. The
Boers are in force at Nervals Pont.
General Brabant attacked a torce
ofiebeisinan entrenched position
near Jamestown after a night
march. Storm! erg is still held by
a small Boer force, which is dwindling daily, and General Gatacre is
gradually rendering their position
untenable. British reinforcements
have been received and it is probable that the entire district south
o( the Orange river will bj cleared
of the enemy  and   pacified  in the
course ot a few  weeks.
noun soi.nu.its h-.ivted.
A  lli_.it   to   lti|il:ii-'   the  Killed  und
W.Himlt'.l    1000 lor t.-irrisuu.
Ottawa, March 5. — lt is authoritatively state! that the government
willa! once arrange lor drafting 100
or 12-, men   with   three   officers  to
take the   place   of   1 he   Canadians
quieter last night than on   the   pre-  ki,k'1   or   permanently  disabled in
vious evening, but the display ol
bunting was great, and there were
many illuminations.
The Herald correspondent, writing ol the after effects of London's
enthusiasm over the news of the
relief of Ladysmith, said:
"After the intense and quite unparalleled elation and excitement of
yesterday, there was a very subdued
and    somewhat   penitent     feeling
South Africa.    It  is  Intended that
men wi!1 leave with the Strath-
COna   Horse    on    the   Monterey on
March   15.    It  is  undei stood that
they  will be selected Irom each province as was the lir>t contingent.
lhe minister of militia is engaged
in arranging lor drafting 1,000 Canadians to take the place of the Lein-
Bter rcginvnt, who, when relieved,
will go to South Africa.  •  It is pro-
Kingston military school;  Sergeant
mile, mostly under fire, to bring the   ,       _-    ,
. I _j    ... jJas' Brothers,   an   ex-mounted   po
liceman who left soldiering to make
money in mining and succeeded   be-
reinforcements     to   surround   the
Boers,    'Bag  the  lot, you  know.'
He was very sad.    'There's a poor,
'.., , 'yondhis   fondest expectation,   and
boy dying up there, on v a boy, and  . _.■.._.„
so cold. Who's goi a blanket?'        I inspector ol   police,    F.    L.   C.„t-
"So the  soldiers  recovered the | wright, a son ot   Sir Richard Cart-
Boer wounded and we told the pris- wright.
posed to select the 1,000 men in the
among   the  men,   while the   ladies ,.     c    .   „ ,■ .
'. I same manner as the lust contingent
summarized the situation bj em- U|1S selected.
phatic suggestions to their erring
In; h»nds, brothers and other male
rel s that it was lucky for them
that 'he relief of Ladysmith was
i not a common occurrence.
"The police courts were full of
gentlemen with white ties,who fa ed
the grayish morning light with as
much antipathy as an owl does. Almost all put down their troubles
very honestly to Ladysmith. The
magistrates were lenient, but generally charged the mysterious seven
shillings six pence for doctors fee,
the doctor apparently certifying to
the self-evident tact that   the   pa
ne Took Ilie U roOK doNC.
Halifax, N. S., March 5.—Rev.
N. B, Dunn, Baptist minister at
Deerlield, Varmouth county, took
carbolic acid hy mistake yesterday,
resulting in almost instant death,
ft  >   ,■.' -i.ii 11.
Ottawa, March 5, The Canadian
Patriotic fund to date amounts to
?«$i, 158.11.        .
Artistic Job Printing pf t\
SOrlptioo at this ollice. m
~*"^—,
HE
ttOXJB>l^n
orrosiTE
THE
WHARF
J
LARGE    AND   COMFORTABLE
'  ROOMS TABLE    UN8UR-
1 '    PASBRD    IN    Tim
' NORTHWEST.
'■   SIEVBRTON.
B. C.
jfaigle's Black-
• smith Shon.
flneral Blseksmitttiog      •  •
•. •"   and Repairing Done.
EXPERT  HORSE   SHOER AL-
(
WAYS   ON  HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING/ SPECIALTY.
S. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON, B. 0.
TXT^tch and
GJock
III epairer.
Visits Silverton
xa*.
Wednesdays.
:" ALL WOflK GUARANTEED.
(Leave Your Orders at The LAKE-
VIEW    0TCL.
£>• Aft* JBr lixclle,
rhe Jeweler,
NEW DtfiSVER B. C.
5ttHE_>
apOti$r«
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway SUt Ion 'aridW liar I.
TUE SILVKRTOUAA.
i "
Saturday, March 10, 1900.
ri'BI.IHHED EVERY   SATtlRDHY   AT
SILVERTON, B. C.
MATHESON BROS.,     Kdltors & Frop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
of it are so much better here, that we
advise our prospectors to stay right
"where they are ond prospect. The
present season promises to be the best
that the Slocan haa seen since the
early boom days.
Advertising rates will bo mado known
upon application at this office.
8888888888888888888888888°»
EDITORIAL ©UTCltdrPIXGS.   §
888888888888SS88S88888888
The shutting down nf some of the
Boundary mines and the giviug as a
reason "the Eight-hour law" reminds
ono of somo of the manufactured
excuses made in oth»r rumps. wher*
they hsd not tho Eight-hour law to
fall back upon. As far as our
knowledge extend* in no camp we*
% mino openly ever closed down on
aocount of tho mine not beinj; n mini!
but only a h"lc in the ground in a lot
of low grade mineralized country rock.
Oh ni-l It was always, "lack of
transportation," "failure to secure
funds,*' "excessive smelter charges,*
etc. etc Ni'vcr thn fault of tho mino
Oh nol And now we will have added
to these old excuses tho now ono of the
Eight-hour I aw.
GOOD
SERVICE COMFORTABLE
7 ». .' ROOMS.
Dining   Room   under  the charge ol
Mb* Ida Carlisle
.' Tables supplied with ill the dollvacles
of the seasop.  >
.   .       t .    '    I*-*— .-**,     :     -1 .     WW-     ,,      —
HENDERSON* GETHING, • Prom.,
! SLOOAN CITY, EC.
3.U. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
. AND .MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY ,,...'.    R. C.
The papers that wear tho silver
collar of thc Mine Owners' Association
are now busy howling patriotism at thc
numbers of the Miners' Union, unci
urging them to break away aod cut
loose from all affiliation with (he
American branch's of thc Western
Federation of Miners. This is ono of
their many dodges to create disoord
among the ranks of the Miners' Unions
and thus weaken them, so that they
can be easily beaten by ihe capitalists
As it is, united labor in British Columbia presents a solid front which
inspires confidence in their friends and
dismay to their opponents. Organized
labor is and should bo in affiliation with
tbeir fellow workingmen of all callings
and countries and it is only thus that
they can man tain themselves in tbo
face of organized capital, which is
working together regardless of race,
religion or nationality. Organized
labor roust do likewise.
L«t them stretch out thc hand of
fellowship to their fellow workingmen
tho 'world over, regardless of the imaginary boundary lines or diffureuccs
of language or religion, ( The fight is
(he same the world over and only in
union is strength. Any workingmnn
so narrow minded aa to refuso to
concede thn rights of his fellowman in
other countries and to affiliate with
him, is only lit to bo where his narrow
roindednnsa and cowardly nature places
him, at the beck mid call of a master.
_ •-. *m*4A*t
CANFORD McINTOSH,
8 Gfttfil Freight and Transfer
BisiwHs Done.
Orders left at  News Stand will   be
promptly attended to.
I i t        ,..-,,,■,.
Tj a GORDON,
UKMEUemTE.
NOTARY
BILVERTON,
PUBLIC.
II. C.
' IBINNOTT k O'DONNELL:
FREIGHTERS AND PACKERS.
If      t    fe ■ ■ ■    i     -*-,*-.-.
Contracts large or small taken
I And promptly attended to.
Stables in SILVERTON, B. 0.
Several Slcanites have become
naturalized and a large number of
Silvertonians and New Dcnveriles are
preparing to follow their example.
This is as it should be. A country
good enough to live in and do business
in U ;:or.d enough to become a citizen
of, to put the matter on the very
lowest plane.
dHtAB. A. WATERMAN k CO.
Avctiottaatm, Customs Brokers,
A»d GbneraL Real Estate Agents,
Mm la Boalcy Bl**U    -   -    linker St.
,  i.NELSON,   R, C.    i .:
mmm miuers' mm.
NO. 95, W. F. Of M.
Meets overy Saturday In tbe I'nion
Hall in Silverton, at 7:30 r. m.
' J. M. M. BrNKM'M,
President.
3.1. MclKTOSH,
Financial-Secretary
. hf yoursubsobiption is due
or "in arrears a
Blue cross will
be found in thi8
square. • subscription are
buyable in advance.   price
'SKi} DOLLARS A YEAR.
i
The problem of squaring the cirole
or of proving black ts white is simplicity itself compared to the task tin-
editor of ihe Mining Review hat
begun of proving to tho minera that
his notion towards them ond their
cauio was not born in malico, nursed
in spleen and'suckled by mine owners'
pap.
At this time the political atmosphere has cleared but slightly, if at
all, compared with what it was at the
close of last week. Premier Martin
has not sucoeeded in filling his cabinet
and has not announced at what date
the general elections will bo held.
The coast papers place the election
time at the middle of May or the first
of June, the revising of the votors list
being dated for May 7th.
Local politicians aro busy cauvasing
tho chances for (he nomination of this
or that man. The Unions promise to
take an active part in tho election and
their ohoieo among the candidates
wli<,;i'.d win out.
It scorns hardly probable that tbe
advocates cf tin introduction of
Federal party lines into our local
contests will press for tbe adoption of
their plan hnre in the taoe ot the great
opposition to auy such thing they are
meet ins;.
As was thc case iast week, the bulk
of tho voters are resting on their oars
and watching developments.
Brand-
abbessmkntf.
Feb 20-Tonka fr, Morn fr,.   22—Opa-
tnnka.    26-Vict or.    Mar 1-Hopefui.
3—Summit.
CERTIFICATltS OF IMPROVEMENTS
Feb 22-Morn Fraction, Tonka Fraction.
24—Legal Tender.
28—Slocan Belle, Victor.
M«r 2-tody Star, Tip Top,
TRANSFERS.
Feb2S—FW Wright to Emily Swan,
revocation of power of attorney, on Feb
23.
23—Estato ot E C Pease, letters of ad-
ti inistratiuu to J Wilson, Sep 18.
26-8t Clair Hi J Moran to C Greenlee, Feb 24,
Random, same to same.
Grand Stand, Iroqouis, % each, C W
Greonleo to J H Moran.
A E, all, W S Clark to J G Clark, on
Fob LS
Juno Bird, mime to came.
Snow Cap, SRine to same.
Texas Boy (r, sumo to tttttne.
C P R, name to B.ltmt.
Silver Tip, mme to same.
27—Notice of Sheriff's Bale, on March
6, all of t'lms Callauhan's interest in
Cody aud Jjker Fractious, Feb 2tt.
28—Clara Moor, Mrs Clara Wereley to
A 8 Reed, option to purchase .*£ interest
for |300. Fob 21,
•   -" ! ' -
4. i -
Silverton,      -
B.C
T
THE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OFj
H
E
\. E. TEETER, PROPS.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISED.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THE   BEST   BRANDS OF  WINFS, LIQUORS
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,   -   -   - SLOCAN, B. 0.
Maud—Tell me all alioutit. Mabel—
Well, when it began, ho was on hir knees
Milicl—Ami how did it eud'T i\..oud—
In the end I was—er—I was on his
knees.
MINING  RECORDS.
NEW   DENVER—LOCATION'S
15— Snowbird fr, Carpenter ck,
Feb
I). McLeod.
23—Coosie, Goal
Forrester.
26—Oversight, near No.v
E Smith.
March 3—Spokane, Ked Mountain, C
mountain,   Robert
Denver, G
J. I. Mcintosh,
DEALER IV ALL KINDS OF
FR-PSH FRUIT—rCONFECTIONERY	
CIGARS     AND
TOBACCOS
THE SCOTCHMAN'S PRAYER.
"Gracious Provideiici. plc'is sll tu McDonalds an (er McD maids' children, ter
soup' sons an ter daughters' daughters
for thousand years lung syne. Po gracious to send us. mountain* uf snuff aud
rivers of whiskey—tu fory finest whiskey I
Oh yes! And send US bits of potatoes
and pread and cheeses ah pig as all ta
Howe of Slratlni-oro. Aud, moreover,
send ns floods of water, tat tere may pe
grass for plenty for man and peast, and
somo to spare for !a perish. Send us guns
and pistols as more as ta sand on ta seashore and hwords too likewi.-e, to kill
all la Grants and ta Mcl'hersnns evermore. Bless ta wee stirk and make him
a biz coop 'f.re M.iitiiiuiiis. Bioss ta wee
soo tO) and make him a pig pose likewise. Oh yes! Pm tu strength of Sara|i-
son into Donald's arms and send us barley, k_.lt: and corn prodigious. 1'less all
ta bairns—Duicanand Rory and Flora,
and yon Donald, and yon Lauchie, And
if you hno onytliiu,'t> nie, dimia ({ie'I
ta the Irish, but gie 't ta thine uin people, t.i Scooich.'"
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY     LINE
 FISHING TACKLE	
THE LATEST NOVELS, Ac.
A third year student of iho School of
Pruetie.il Science, Toronto, desires employment In somo office requiring an export ilra'ughtsman. Apply to "Draughtsman" c_»re of The Silvertoniin. •
Silverton, B.C.
Lilac Cream
FOR CRACKED OR SORE
HANDS. FOR USE AFTKR SHAVING. AN EXCELLENT HEALER OF
CUTS OR BURNS.   Price 26c.
THIS PREPARATION IS
BEYOND DOUBT THE FINEST OF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET. ALL
LIKE IT WHO TRY.   Price 26c
Perhaps
The late warm weather has been
settling tho snuw in the hills and
already the ground is comparatively
bare around the Lake shores. With
ths near approach of spring our many
prospectors are beginning to get restless
end a genera) overhauling of outfits
is going on amongst them, preparatory
to a season's campaign among tho
hills. Ah usual some.nro casting their
eyes towards distant fields and wishing
themselves in Oregon or Cape Nome,
hut i he majority will pursue the sensible
plan and confine themselves to thn
Slocan eouutry. In the Slocan and
within a radins of ton mil, h of Silverton there is a butter field for
prospecting, and without any of its
attending hardship?, than can he fonnd
at Cape Nome or any o'her of Alaska's
boom camps. Tho chances for a poor
man fiudmg something and  disposing
\
THE MANY SUDDEN
CHANGES IN THE WEATHER HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD. TRY HORE-
HOUND AND TOI.U    Price 16c.
SYRUP OF HOUEHOUSD
AND TOLU 18 KNOWN TO MANY
WHOM IT HAS CURED. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES. SOLD UNDER A GUARANTEE. Price 35c.
Sola
AT   THE
{Siive_rto«  Pare
J > i*ti g: If rugs And
Store.     Mi'inifiiN Kept.
LAKE AVE,   SILVERTON,   B. 0
IStaTol©,
GOOD 8ADDLE AND PACK HORSES FOR HIRE AT REASONABLE
RATE8 A 'GEN LEAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS DONE.
Outside Parties Desiring HorBtB in Silveiton
Can  Have Them  Reserved By Writing To—
t"    ., t t t f        1
a. p. Mcdonald,
SILVERTON. - • B. C
MINING- AND   COMMERCIAL   MEN   MAKE THK'R
HEADQUARTERS    AT   THE
ThOrJ3Ur.il      * T" Wf ^niff'
GRANT JTHORBURN,   Paop.
HLVER'JON, li C.
1
2
THE.
VICTORIA!
HOUSE.
£ :•; HoRdiiayrlprs For Mining Hen :-
LVl.YTUJNG NEW, NEAT
AND  IP-TO-DAli:
TA1H L INHVLPAi-SFP IS
*>
THE NOl.THWLHT.
Die Strike b Off;0*0
•1
I
i
tVIMHimV   (Yep*.
8 I I. V E R T 0 N,   D. C.
Ready for
Buxiiifss.
CERTIFICA TE OF IMPROVE VIENl'S
NOTICE:-"Tkiimi'ii," "iMrniaWA- ,
dle" ami "Rainbow Qcahtz". Mineral i Ind V* ..ra ninv
Claims; situate In tbo Arrow Luke ',uu lfc,u, " ;
MiiiinK Division of tt'est Kootenay
District.
Where located:—On Cariboo creek,
adj lining   tbo    Millie Ma"k   Mineral
Claim.
Take notice thot I, J. D Anderson. P. L.
S , ot Trail, B C . actio j as agent for tbe
Kamloops Mining and Duvelopmcnt
Company, Limited, Freo Minor's Cirti
ficate No. 814445, intend sixty days fiom
the ilato hereof, lo apply to IIik Mining
Recorder for Certificates of Improvements, for the pmpnso of obtainii.g
Crown (irmilM of tho above claims.
And further lake noticj that action
under nection 87,'must te commoi.reil
before tho issuance of such Certificates
of Improvements
Dated this Rth dav uf Septembor, A. D.
1890.
24 I 2 I 00.
J. D. Anderson.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY-
And SOO LINE
L
c
axative
^r*******s*t/Suts*s/*t
old Cure.
*r*4*P*4*¥^t*VW*t*t«u>
To'Ouro a   Oold In   One Day.
Contains   Thn New  Ingredient.
.   THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
10 ALL POINTS
EAST and WEST
First-Class Hliepers on ail Trains from
REVELSTOKE   ami KOOTENAY LD
TOURIST CARS 'Josh"Medicine Hal
Daily for St. P,vn,.
Sundays and Wi.tiNESDAYB for Toronto.
Fridays for Montreal and Boston.
— Same cars pass Revelstoke one day —
 earlier.	
SWITCHES, .Iewei.i:hy
HDumonds, Shu. to
. IM)   I'lAfEP Novbi.-
EFrAn.iiHf n in XijVx ,*ttW."
it
riKM.    Pmno Lamp*
•  V.N'0 OXVS 1'llll.E .
a,    Other    Artkiks
*jr0O    Nl'MEROt'S     To
i*|   Call . nd   Exam-
»l    1>ALL   . ND
And now my Koot- (.\\sy- Tiir.M.
enay Friends I um*
prepared to  reciivc*;
vonr     orders     For
*,*$
__A___<______.___>.a-______.______. _______ _____■______._______-____■_____________. ^AAAAAAAAAA/.)
*A ^^WWW^swWm**^l*WmF*mWW^9 W WW TV WWmwWWwl
OUR   WATCH AND JEWElERlf
REPAIRING DE I ^1 TMKNT IS AL
As we only employ the most espe •
ioncid men, allwork is ouakasitekd
Mail nml Express Orders Receive Onr
Prompt Attention.
M*¥V¥Wy_¥»¥¥¥¥¥W-<¥¥¥¥W*!*f
DON'T FORGET THE PLAOE.  '
JACOB DOVER.  "Tm Jewilkr.'
NFJ_PON. B. 0.
TRY   IT. .
PRICK 20«,
At All Druggists.
CONNECTIONS.
For ihe North.Revi'lBtoke, and Main Line
,7:30 ex- Sunday iv.  Silverton,
ar. ex. Sunday, 16:20
For   ltosHland,   Nelson      Crows   Nest
Branch and  Bonndnry Country,
10:20 ex. Sunday Iv. Rilverton,
ar: ex. Sunday 13:00
To nnd from Sandon.
13:00 ex Sunday lv Silverton,
ar, ex Sunday, 10:l1I.
Tickets issued through and Baooaoe
 checked to destination.	
For rates and full Information apply to
■earest local agent or
H. H. REEVES, At,'«nt, Silverton
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agant, Nelson
E. J. COYLE.
A. G. P. Agnnt, Vancouver
f_y    FUR HOW Ult KN11TINO MAUHINR8 AND
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRITE VS.   CATALOGUES FREE.
Thk THISTLE HOTEL\
NOW REOPENED
UFDER A NEW
MANAGEMENT.
HOUSE RENOVATED
AND THE BAR FULLY
RESTOCKED.
ThoinpMon JiroM.,   PropBe
LAKE AVE,
SILVERTON, B, C.
v   \ 1

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