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The Silvertonian Sep 29, 1900

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 j HE SILVERTONIAN.
SLOCAN'S BEST
KNOWN WEEKLY.
VOLUME KOUIl.
_. _—__—.—i %
THE SILVERTONIAN.
LOCAL MINING NEWS.
SUBSCRIPTIONS, *2.0
■
BILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 29, 1000.
NUMBER   1.1
.AKEYIEW   HOTEL
S*il vertoix
(gTTHIS HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE BAR IS SUPPLIED WITH REST BRANDS OF
WINES,  LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
2*£m   -EZno-T^rles.   Fxop.
&
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL snillF.S AT
Sjlvcrlon, Nelson, Trail, Ymir. Knslo, Sandon,
New Denver. Cascade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, I). C.
MINES AROUND
THE DISTRICT.
A   SIJA'F.RTONIAN'S IMPRESSIONS
OF CAPE   NOME.
y
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\r>w<*pHw
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Are You Locking For n
Stylish goods?
TIUT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
HIE PRICK SO.MEWIIKRK NOT ALTtMi-'TH-
l-;R (iir of BIGHT.
II- SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE  YOl'R   SELECTION FROM MY SlIKLVKij.       FIT AND FINISH
gi'r \\n:::i)   ov krcoatings just in.
UEIiSIIIHt,   Thc Tailor:   Silvifloii. B. C.
$9
C
t
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5
On Tluiteilny, W. M. Yates, who
has spent the summer at Cape Nome i s
foreman for U. M. Lyman ol New Yoik
•vho took a parly info that country last
spring, letuined lo Silverton. Mr. Yates,
who ia an old lime placer miner, speaks
of the Nome country as one ofthe
Doming Bold producing sections of (he
world and as fully e')iial to the Klondike.
The production for this year he believes
H ill amount to eight million of dollars.
Tlie rush of people into that country,
he says, was something awful, amounting to at least fifty thousand, largely
composed of lhe tough elements of the
larger cities with a big sprinkling of
renegade sailors and longshoremen and
hut few experienced miners. The
country was for a long time in the
contiol of those | eople and crimes of all
kinds including murder were common,
The airival ol the soldiers and the
placing of the country under martial law
j was a blessing to the miners and the law
abiding clement among the people.
The   beach   diggings   are   practically
worked   out,   but,   the   creeks or gulch
! diggings  are  both   extensive ai:drich,
i from !f..'0 to }">0 lo the pan being of common   ocetnrenee.   Genuine rich strikes
' are constantly lieing made in the interior
and  Ihe country  is fully as rich in gold
us reported.     The company with >vhom
: Mr. Yates was interested tried the beach
] diggings for  a  few   weeks with but in-
! different     success.     Meanwhile    they
secured a large amount of rich ground on
I Anvil crick, which they partially opened
i up Ibis season,   securing sufficient gold
| lo niire than   put   'jl.em   even on their
season's   v.,.il».^besides    leaving    llicii
ground in such shape that ft 'aige oinount
of money can ne taken out next season.
The main drawbacks  to   Hie  country
are the rough coast, the lack of harhors
and the sudden storms that inflict great
damage to  shipping  aloiij; the coast, as
Tl IK
VICTORIA f
HOTEL.
2 k llr.-ldljllirlcrs Flff Mining Men :•: wU withe feck "of tfmtoformlnln|<!r
domestic purposes, of which tlu re is not
a   vestige  within one hundred miles of
EVERYTHING NEW, NEAT
AND  IT-TO-DATE.
TABLE UNSURPASSED IN
THE NORTHWEST.
J,iS. Um,   Prop.
SILVER T 0 N,
IV C.
Al. M.  BENEDUM,
^.   S   S   emma   "ST   B
Silverton
B.C
Nome, the people having to resort to oil
stoves to do their cooking. Mr Yates
brought back with htm an issue of The
Nome Daily Chronicle of Sept. 13th,
which gives a detailed account of the big
storm of that date which devasled the
whole water front ol Nome City, wricked
e large ii'imber of vessels lying at nnclirr
off the beach and caused tremendous
damage and a huge loss of life.
During the passage down fiom Nome,
which occupied twelve days, the vessel
he was on encountered one of the worst
storm ever encountered by the sailors
in the Rehrini! Sea. Mr. Yutes predicts
a grand fuluro for Nome as a gold
producing country and believes that
with the weeding out of the vicious
element and an influx of experienced
law abiding miners to lake their places,
Nome will be a gold camp second to
none in the world. 	
\f>
Cudahy's Hams,
WE want to invite your attention this week to our Grocery Department. \Yo have .lust opened out a large shipment of Cudalyr's Hams
and Uscon, an wo can assure our many Silverton customers that we
never lundled anything better. These goods ate Al the world over,
and the simple mention of tho fact that we carry them is in itself
sufficient to draw custom from anyono who appreciates a good thing.
IN Hutter and Eggs we can give you something absolutely fresh.
Dominion of Canada Dairy Butter. Eggs fresh fram tho ranch every
few days.
Wo deliver all Hilverton purchases Free of Charge.
BOURNE BROS.,
New Denver, - H» Q<
The J.lack Princo near Slocan is to be
started np again.
An Important strike has been made in
the new workings at the Rojo mine.
There is a scarcity of miners at the
present time in Silverton, and if 11 e
mines that uro expected to start up do
so the supply wil) be much below the
demand,
The smelter returns on tho Two
Friends' shipment gave 1(10 ounces in
■Iver and 86 per pent lead to the Inn.
For a 20 ton shipment the owners
received'a cheek for |19K}.
11. Thomas, who was expected in
some time ago to becin operations on
the Prescott, recently bonded by Vancouver parlies, hss written that he wil1
bp in Silverton next   .jek.
Some of the assay returns received by
James Lyddon ou the samples of ore he
brought down from lhe Stop and Rest
claim in the Lardeau ran as high as
1500 ounces in silver and $28. in gold to
the ton.
The Emily Edith mines received a
carload of mixed groceries during the
week from Nelson, receiving the goods
through J. A. McKjnnon & Co, of Silverton. The groceiies will be sent up
to tlie mine at once.
TAKING   OUT  RICH ORE.
At the Hewett mine some of the bett
ore ever sacked at that property is being
taken out of tbe lower tunnel. This ore
is being taken out at a depth of oier-400
feet and i.s richer and bigger than that
encountered in the upper workings.
Sptcimens of ore bio'Jght down f;om
this new strike aie full of grey copper
and ruby silver and will assay at least
'000 ounces in silver to the ton. The
management figures on working ft force
of thirty miners on the J property all
winter.
HEWER WAGON ROAD STARTED.
Charley McNiehol of Silverion was the
tenderer of the winning bid for the
H.*»elt mite wr.gin road, and under his
supei vision work was begun iast
Monday. About twenty men are now
on Ihe grade and the work is being
pushed ahead in earnest, A camp near
thu Noonday mine lias been established
and stocked "p. McNiehol expects to
have the work completed within thirty
days.
A GOOD MARKET FOR LEAD ORES.
M. P.   Morris  tbe Chilian
general to Canaca, is making  a
consul-
tour of
the interior and tt Bile at Grand Forks
lutely said that the 1800 tons of concentrates of lead from the St. Eugene
mine at Moyie Lad be. n shipped to a
c pper smelter at Antofagiisla, Chili.
The British Columbia product is used
for fluxing purposes. Mr. Morris added
thut there was au unlimited market in
Chili for concentrates of lead.
Mrs Barclay is said to* bo, seiiuiisly ill
in Spokane.
Win. Horton was under Dr. Rroiise's
care fur a couple ol days this week.
Go to R. ft. Diiigle's for fresh fruits
and confectionery.  Near l'ostot)lce.f
W. F, Anderson, Travelling Passenger
Agentof the C. 1'. R., spent Tuesday in
town.
Divine Service w ill be held fo-moriow
evening, at":>0 o'clock, in the Union
Cliijrih.   All welcome
The assembly room in lhe Miners'
Union Hall will be 24 x 40 feet, and will
be fixed up for concert and theatrical
performances.
The W. Hunter Co's, linsmit^ department is finishing up a lot of ten incli
air pipe for the Queen Bess mine, their
contract calling for 500 feet of this pipe.
Grouse are reported as lieing plentiful
on (he Galena Farm and local gunners
are running themselves poor after them,
und bunging home empty gmiie bags
doily,
IVire Altalfer, who has been laid np
with a broken leg in the New Denver
hospital for the last four months, expects
to he out ond back in Silverton within
a week.
Robert Sutheiland, of Silverton, who
has been timbering in (he Hartney
mine, liad the misfortune to cut his foot
the other day obliging him to lay off for
a f.-.v shifts.
.Limes Lyddon left for the Lardeau on
Wednesday last where he intends to
develope Ihe rich quarts, strike made in
ihat district by himself and partners
last summer.
Those gall-u.t. soldiers of the Queen
who rushed tn Stevenson during the late
strike are now rushing to the courts fo
sue for Iheir pay.  The looting must have
been beloy the average.
All   woik   in tho Jewelry  Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drugstore, will
he promptly forwarded  to  Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler.    All re
pairs are i.iuitANTKBr, roil OKI year. *
A meeting of those interested in the
forming of a stock cnmpanv to take over
the plant and husiness of the New Denver Klectiic Light Company and to extend its operations to Silverton was held
lust week in New Denver. Enough of
the new company stock 1 as already
been subscribed for to make certain the
enterprise.
M. Grady Ins been pointing out the
beauties of Silverton this week lo his
two brothers, John and Timothy Grady,
of Peterborough, Ont. The lormcr of the
two visitors.is tli'i father of Wm. Grady
of ihii town, and both aro uncles of another of our citizens, I'M Smith. The
visitors, accompanied by their Silverton
relatives, aro now at the Grndy Springs
on Arrow Lake.
mat™ political.
Thomas Brownlee, of -Kossrand is »
linn of conviction and is not afraid of
spending money lo show his metal. At
,a meeting held recently in Rossland he
declared that if no other labor candidato
was put up in this Riding he would pay
♦250. (the deposit required from candidates) for the privilege of voting far himself as a government owne ship of railroads' candidate.
Sir Charles Hibbort Tupper has sprung
an altogether new one. At a meeting
in Vancouver last Monday, lm accused
the Liberal of abandoning their free
trade principles by doubling the head
tax on immigrating Chinese! There is
no copyright on (he charge, but Candidate Mat-Neil will not find it ot much use
to bin).
WANTS MORE LABOR MEMBERS.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier attended Ihe banquet of the Trades and Labor Congress
in Ottawa on the 22nd inst, and made »
brief address to tho meinbera. Tho
Premier said that he served his political
apprenticeship under a leader who was p
workingman, Alexander Mackensie.
Thero was no aristocracy in Canada except labor. As for himself, he was a
democrat and was a workingman. Kvery
avenue in public and political life was
open to labor, and he hoped to sec inoie
labor i e presents lives in the next parliament.
TIPS FOR   BETTING MEN.
"I am just as positive that we ara going to sweep Canada from (lie western
bounds of Lake Superior to the Pacific
as I wus (hat I was going to carry Man?
iloha."—Hugh John McDonald,Toronto
Sept 19.
"We stand where we did in 1SV8, on
the eve aa great a battle and of as great a
victory."—Sir Charles Tupper, Guelpb,
Sept 18.
"Gentlemen, I do not come here to
make predictions—but lat me tell you
(his: io reply to all the boasting of Sir
Charles Tupper, I have only oue thing to
say. and that is that I am as certain of
the approaching victory as I am certain
of my own existence. 1/ the partisans
of Sir Charles Tupper have any money to
wager upon (he result of the election, I
tell you, my friends, there is money to
make."—Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Montreal,
Sept 20
SURVEY COMMENCED.
It appears now thai work upon the
Ked Mountain wagon road, for which
JjOOO was appropriated by the Legislature, is to be at last begun. Yesterday,
F. 3, O'Rielly, P. L. S,, began an official
survey for the road, and the building will
d.iubtless commence as soon as his re
port is sent in.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE  SHIPMENTS.
Shipments   of   ore   (ram Silverton for
thp year 1890. totaled IG!).'! Tons.
All other Lake points 138")     "
The shipment   ol   ore   from   Sloean
Luke points, up to and Including  Uie
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing.                   Tons.
Bosun 800
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capolla  7
From Silverton Tons.
Emilv Edith 20
Hewett 70
Vancouver 100
Wakefield, (concentrates) 080
Galena Mines        20
From Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 920
Neopawa    7
From Slocan City
Arlington     320
Black Prince    00
Kilo 20
Two Friends 20
Total 30(H
STORM  CLAIM    WORKING.
After a short shut-down woik was
airnin resumed this week on the Storm
claim, near town, A tunnel has been
driven on (1 is properly over 150 feet in
length and a survey i just completed
shows (hat (he face of this tunnel is
within a few feet of being under the
shaft sunk last spring. The Storm is a
silver-lead proposition and cairies a
good grade of shipping ore, ossays being
common of over 2t)0 ounces in silver.
Willi work this properly should shortly
develope into a shipping property,
-BIG   SMELTER    RETURNS.
A short time ago a small shipment of
of oro was made to the smelter from the
Ethel Fraction claim in the Silver Hand
Basin, antl returns were received by the
owiici last week accompanied by a check
for a considerable amount. The smelter
return.) were 500 ounces in silver to Hilton and 20 per cent lead. More of this
same class of ote is lacked at the mine
and lhe owner intends (o develope the
properly sufliiently this winler so that
by next spring regular shipments can be
mr.de to i.io smelter.
The Ethel Fraction is situated about
oi-ihi miles fiom Silverton in what is
known as the Silver linn.I Basin at the
head of Eight Miie creek. The vein
whicli is a fissure lying in a granite
formation varies fron) three to tive feet
in width. The Red Mountain wagon
road, which it is hoped the government
will complete this hill, will bring this
along with several other promising
properties within easy reach of wagon
transportation to our wharf. Nt xt
summer should see a large amount of
ore shipped from that section ol our
(jump.
THIRD    PARTY   CONVENTION.
Joseph Brandon has been delegated to
represent the Silverton Miners' Union at
the Convention of Independents ami
Labor delegates, which will bo held in
Nelson nt^t Wednesday.
The Convention will probably choose a
candidate to stand iu their interest in
the election and local Labor men confix
dently predict his election.
COMMUNICATED.
The Editors do not hold themselves in
any way responsible for the opinions expressed under this head. All communication, intended for this column, must
bc accompanied by lhe name of tho wiiU
er.   None will be published otherwise.
Kiiitor Sn.VKitTo.ii.vN :—
Some natrow minded, canting hi nut
has seen fit to have a letter published in
the last issue of the New Denver Leiige
under (he nomde plume of "Thinkabout-
it," condemning those young men who
played a game ot baseball in New
Denver laat Sunday. He looks upon
this as a grievous sin and calls it a
desecration of the Sabbath. He fails to
appreciate tho fact (hat Sunday is
primarily a day of rest ami relaxation
from labor and that as long as they da
not interfere with the rights of others
tbo young men have an iindcniablo
right to spend it as it seems best ta
them. It is not the canting, sniflling,
loud mouthed bigot who is looked upon
in Ibis western land as the true Christian,
but, r..iln-r n:; one who has a wildcat
scheme up his sleeve, looking for a
chance to cold-deck some pilgrim or
lone widow. The writer evidently belongs to a class which is so narrow
minded thai tin.v would, if they dared
crucify all who do not think as they do.
In this country, where most of our
young men are strangers and without
any homo influences and where so far
the churches have signally failed ta
attract them they have but two chancer
of spending their idle time—by amusing
themselves out of doors o; resorting ta
Borne bar-room and amusing themselves,
there.
Yoi'Ra Tkclv,
Tuocoiit Awft't Iv
i
__■
>J I
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:   I
I    I
f . >
III
i Coal Price l'p
New Vork, Sept. 16.—The prices
of coal known as pea and buckwheat, which are now used for
steam generating purposes, have
jumped up $1 a ton. Pea coal now
costs the consumer $4.50 and buckwheat $4.
TUAN APPOINTED
DESTROYED   CHIWCHBH.
I'aibulle autl Pre»b>lirUn EdIIU-e* are
In Hulas
New Vork, Sept. 26—A mob has
destroyed the Catholic church at
Tokaahang, a few miles from Canton, and desecrated thc American
Baptist Mission graveyard. Rowdies have also destroyed the American Presbyterian church, just outside Canton.
The Prince   Is  Now Grand
Secretary to Emperor
PRINCE ADVANI AGAIN.
TO   HAIL   MI1.IIIKHS.
Trvuble   Between    Hullroml..   Oul   of
(ta* Kmnrl-K-ii.
San Francisco, Sept. 2$—Trouble
is brewing among the transcontinental lines over the division of Ihe
eastbound soldier travel out of this
city. The difficulty grows out of
the fact that the Santa Fe has not
received its twenty-seven per cent,
of the business since the Oregon
Railway & Navigation Company has
succeeded in diverting to the Portland route about forty per cent, of
this traffic.
Howard U.«.uiiiy.
Frankfort, Ky., Sept. 26.—Jas.
Howard has been found guilty of
being principal in the assassination
of Governor Gobel. A verdict was
returned this morning and entailed
a death sentence.
New York, Sept. 24.—A dispatch
from Shanghai says: "Prince Tuan
is declared to have been appointed
grand secretary to the emperor, a
position enabling him to control all
communications to and from the
throne.
The Taotui of Shanghai, who
signed for the viceroys the friendly
agreement with the foreign consuls,
has been removed by imperial edict,
his successor being strongly anti-
foreign. These facts are considered
a defiance of Germany's demand tor
the punishment of Prince Tuan as
the head of the Boxers.
Should official confirmation reach
Washington it will have an important bearing upon the attitude of all
the powers, as Prince Tuan is regarded as one of the officials responsible for the anti-foreign outrages.
"Minister Wu said that   he   was
inclined to  doubt  the  report.     In
my time, he said   that a  prince  of
the royal blood has not occupied the
office  of   grand   secretary.      The
position is not  now  important.    It
is a sinecure. Belore the present dynasty   entered into power the grand
secretaryship was a very important
post, all of the communications  to
the  emperor  passing  through  the
hands ofthe incumbent."
A special dispatch from Ottawa
announces that "Prince" Advani
has been committed for trial on a
charge of obtaining jewelry by false
pretenses. From this it appears
that Alvani is still playing the same
game which he tried in Victoria,
Vancouver and Seattle with temporary success, but with final and
ignominous failure.
A man of the better class   of   Indian extraction, of fine physique and
fair English education,   Advani  has
a penchant for women and for  jewelry which has kept him  in  almost
continuous trouble for several years.
His career iu Seattle was a meteoric
one.    Boarding at the most  expensive -hotel,    he   fared  sumptuously
and dressed like a real prince.     He
claimed to have a generous letter ol
credit, and showed a document purporting to be   from   his   uncle,   a
wealthy Indian prince.    He claimed
to have been a member of the  famous cricket team  which  had just
come across the Atlantic and   won
fresh laurels at Philadelphia. When
I his pretenses  were   unmasked   he
begged pitifully  to  be  spared   th
disgrace   of   newspaper   notoriety;
but his story  was sent  widespread
through the country, so  that  is   is
really marvelous that he is still able
to find victims.
FEELING IS TENSE
Situation  in Pennsylvania
Collieries Not Relieved.
THE KLONDIKE AND NOME
FOREST   PIKES.
flood* are MulMidlug.
Calcutta, Sept. 24.—The floods
following the recent tremendous
rains, inundating the country for
miles are slowly subsiding.
HUMID IN   SBKi»
A HERO
IS BURIED.
Bugler in  the  Famous
Charge at Bala-
klava.
Now   Vork,    Sept.     26.—Alex
Huston, bugler of the  first section
of the Light  Brigade,   which made
the famous charge upon the Russian
guns at the Crimean battle of Bala-
klava,  on October 25,   1854, was
buried yesterday at Maspoh, L. I
Huston was   69   years   old.     He
sounded the call for the charge of
the Light Brigade, and at Lord Cardigan's command sabred a Russian
gunner at the foot of him and managed to get back to safety with the
195 survivors of the gallant 673.
He saw Captain Nolan killed by
a shell while leading Sis command
and heard his wild shriek, since immortalized in England's military
history.
Huston's horse fell dead near
Nolan's body. He was wounded
in both legs, but soon recovered
When he came to this country, he
would, according to the English
law. have forfeited his pension, but
parliament continued it by a special
act.
Ilallaa Ooal Miser* Engage IN a (on-
Kin  al Mblcr
Sii an ton,   Pa.,   Sept.   26.—The
first bloodshed which may be laid to
the  strike    of the   Miners   in  the
Lackawanna region,   was  reported
this morning from Sibley, a mining
settlement    about   six  miles from
Scranton.    Three men were wounded in a row in which   about  20  revolver shots were  fired.    The  participants were all Italians and were
mostly men   who  had,   before  the
strike began, been working as non-
unionists,  but who became  members of the United   Mine   Workers
two   weeks ago.      Last night the
men got into a fight  oh   the   roadway   near    Barbertown.     Several
arrests were made.
Information this morning in effect
is that the big companies are prepared tomorrow to grant concessions, provided that at the same
time the men are practically working, and iii their employ, but there
is an understanding that, come
what may, the compromise must
not be affected through the United
Mine Workers. V
While many miners are anxious
to settle the strike and return to
A'ork regardless ol the means by
which an amicable settlement is
made, there is quite a strong senti
ment to remain out until the union
is recognized, and until -the organization is satisfied that work can be
resumed advantageously to the
union.
***** EMlinaled  at   a   Till lion   aud
Half Hollar..
Santa Rosa, Cal., Sept 25.—The
lire that has been  burning  for the
last few days near Occidential has
covered 150 miles and the damage is
estimated at $1,500,000. A stranger
who has been fighting the flames is
missing and several volunteers have
had  narrow  escapes from suffocation.  The fire was started by a man
who  was burning  brush  at  Freestone.
Shenandoah, Pa., Sept. 24.—
There was great excitement here
last night and the strikers made assertions that may lead to trouble
when attempts are made to open the
mines in the Schuylkill district.
Boasts were made that any miners
who should go to work this morning would not return to their homes
alive.
The aim of the Reading company
officials is to break the force of the
strike in the anthracite coal  region
by getting a fair supply to  market.
The trouble as  it now stands  has
cut off 85% of the product of all the
mines.    The Reading company's allotment is 21%,and this can be filled
with the collieries only on part time.
With the aid ol the military it ;s intended to push work at every mine
if possible, but this  can  hardly  be
accomplished at  the   beginning   of
the trouble.
The officials assumed that because
their men had few  grievances,   excepting in   the   matter   of wages,
tliey could continue to operate their
mines.    The action  of the  rioters
here and   a   change   of sentiment
among some miners have cast doubt
on this point;*but it is  well  known
that many  of   the   miners   in   the
Schuylkill region want  to continue
at work.    A majority   who  do  not
belong to the union   may   be   kept
from going back  to  their   employment today by the dread of assault.
Ul   HOI   ORB   <A8B.
The latest and most   reliable  reports from lhe  Klondike seem   to
show that it is   passing  through  a
period very similar to  that  experienced by the older gold  producing
territories.    It has  had  its  period
ol wild excitement,   corresponding
to the   '49  period   in   California.
Now it has sobered down to  steadier work.    Men   no  longer  expect
to go there and pick  up  a  fortune
in a single season or less time; they
are   mapping   out   their   work  to
cover a period of years.    They   are
developing   properties    that    were
passed  by   with  scorn   two  years
ago.    They are reducing the  waste
of production and the cost of operation.     They   are improving the
conditions   of   living    so    that  a
residence in the Klondike no longer
amounts to a banishment.    Among
the certainties  of the  region   now
appears to be gold   bearing quartz.
With   its       proper     development
will begin the period* of permanent
gold mining.
Judging from reports from Nome,
such   as   that   published    in    thc
Record from  Mr,   Reagh,  similar
conditions   are   going   to   prevail
there,    The   di.covery  of gold   in
the ravines demonstrates  the  presence  of another formation  besides
that  found    on   the   beach.    The
coarse gold which moves only with
the earth iu which   it  is  imbedded
indicates its  home in  neighboring
ledges of gold-bearing quartz.     So
that both at Nome and in the Klondike  it appears that people  were
mistaken    who  believed  the   only
mineral resources were to be  found
the  surface  gravel    or  on   the
lOWA'SJTORNADo
A Town Struck By a w
Spout.
Des Moines, Ia„ Sept. 26   *,
people were killed and several(>
severely injured inawa.erspj,"
tornado    at    Ferguson,   CH
county,   last  night.     The 13
agent and telegraph opera,or^
badyhurt  The railway s,ati0;;
badly wrecked, several car, J
blown from the tracks and Jj
less   damaged   and   mjl        "J
were destroyed.    Wire coo„ec«2
with Ferguson are interrupt
it is impossible to learn t.,e      "
of those killed and injured.
Several   waterspouts   and m
wind and ram are reported fro*3
vicnity   ol   Redfield   and   M2
where   tracks are washed ou, |
many   places.     Towns   ,|on- ..
Great Western   road   alio   Jj
hard   wii.d and  rain thi, side <rf
Marshalltown.     From all sM'm
of this quarter of the state, a hear,
property loss is  reported,  but ]
loss of life is known except it Fw.
guson.
OF   INTRRKNTTOniiVKH,
A BAD BATTLE
WITH BANDITS
One Killed and the Other
Fatally Wounded by
Officers.
THRBB   CANADIAN*.
'tumbled Acro„ B T0mm Wfc,,.h nurm
reaaerom im Them.
London, Sept, 26_^A dispatch
from Pretoria relates an incident
concerning three Canadians of the
Mo„n^;irtfantryi     Durjng    (he
occupdmfr Pretoria the trio lost
*he,r .Wf and wandered through
the Bqer lines, unperceived by the
enemy. They eventually arrived at
Heb|bn and felt considerable sur-
pri^hen the inhabitants surren-
;!er*T*     them«    Th«    burghers
The city of St. Catherine's is
angry with the government and is
charging jobbery in connection with
a water supply fiom the Welland
canal.
The system of registered letters
which does  not  make  the government responsible  far  loss  is defective.    It   has  been   remedied  by a
form of insurance in British Guiana,
Ceylon, Falkland, Hong  Kong, India and other colonies.  Why should
it   not   be    extended    throughout
Canada?
THE   "FULL  DINNER   PAIL."
Spokane, Sept. 26.—A desperate
battle between two brave officers
and a pair of murderous highwaymen is repcrted to have taken place
yesterday morning near the town of
Addy, -\o miles north of Spokane.
One bandit is dead; the other crip-
pied and a prisoner, with death
staring in his face.
Up to this hour neither robber
has been identified; but there is a
strong suspicion that one of them
may be tie bold bandit who held
up the Northern Pacific train near
Athol last Friday night.
Fun nd Thirteen Hunt.
London, Sept. 26.—Lord Roberts
reports that General Ian Hamilton
found at the Crocodile river, near
Mectors Fruit, thirteen guns, including several lost by the British.
They were mostly destroyed.
for the mineral Exhibit
The exhibit from Rossland at the
Spokane Industrial Exposition, is
to be set off by a number of large
and handsome photographs giving
views of the various properties on
Red Mountain. They were made
by Carpenter.
v*.    fwA.M ""'Biiers
\ Vm*tht tbe Canadians   were   the
V fore-runners  of the  British  forces
thought it was better to give up
rt than last.    Not only was the
tovKj surrendered, but the rifles and
ammunition, all of which the Canadians accepted and  returned again
passing througl the Boer lines.
Mayor Jones of Toledo recently
hit the "full dinner pail" a rap when
he said thai-   in   slavery   days   the   the first
in
--,        —,w       W.I
slave always had a full dinner pail,
merely because his master knew
that he would work best when well
fed. The laboring man needs three
good meals a day; but that isn't all
he needs. He has a brain and
heart to be cared for as   well   as   a
At Ike Seven Devils.
Work   will   be    continued   this
week on the S.   F. &   N.   road at
the Seven Devils which is  intended
to keep the embankment from coming into the track  every  spring as
the first thaws have  set in.    The
excavating which  is  now in  progress is done by hydarulic pressure,
the loose   material   being carried
into the river.
ProgreM or the Hearing Before Mr.
Keen Thia Pureuoou
The legal struggle between the
Le Roi Mining Company and the
government is continuing today before Mr. Keen and is likely tu last
two or three days longer. The case
is one on appeal by the minim;
company.
The first witness in Ihe case,
Shadwell Curry, whose testimony
was noticed yesterday concluded
his evidence without adducing anything further of material interest.
This forenoon   Hon.  T.   Mayne
Daly counsel for the  Le Roi company,   occupied  the  witness stand
and was questioned  at length as to
the relations  and terms of contract
between  the   Le Roi   Mining company and  the  Smelting  company.
According to his evidence the Le
Roi Mining & Smelting company,
sold its interest in the smelter last
year to the  Northport  Mining &
Smelting company,   and its interest
in the mine to the British America
corporation, limited, the latter subsequently conveying its interests to
the Le Roi   Mining company, limited, which now owns and operates
the mine.    The alleged conveyance
of  James   Breen's   interest  in the
smelter to the  B.  A.   C, witness
testified, is in escrow in  the Bank
of Montreal   in  this city,   and is in
reality made to the Northport Mining & Smelting company.   Subject
to   the   terms   of   agreement   the
Northport Mining & Smeltieg company is today owner of the smelter
at Northport, though the terms of
the transfer are not to be completed
till  next  year.     Witness  testified
that the smelter was under contract
to treat ore at $8 and the company
to pay that amount per tor.    He
is president of the smelting company, but known of no other contract than that adduced in evidence
at this hearing.
tundra, a.id that these would be
exhausted within a year or two. In
other words it looks now as if both
districts are added to the permanent gold producing lerritery ofthe
world.
SHOT WHILE
OUT DRIVING
Strange Story of a Pleas
ure Jaunt that Led
to Tragedy,
Hamilton, Ont., Sept. 24,—Miss
Griffin of Dundas was shot and killed last night while out driving with
George Pearson of this city,
According to Pearson's story they
were passed by a rig from which
two shots were fired. One of these
struck Miss Griffin in the head. He
carried her into a farm house where
she died.
Tbe Alexlraa Prealdent.
Chicago, Sept. 26.—A dispatch
from the city of Mexico says:
General Portfirio Diaz wns unanimously elected president and will
be inaugurated next December.
The president has entirely recovered
from his recent indisposition,
CAPITAL AND LABOR.
The Poller an* view, or .„ Kmitm
Leaal Light
Gordon Hunter,   who is in Rod
land in connection with the Ll Raj
Mining company's  assessment aW
peal, as counsel for  the crown, I
some   vigorous    and   independeg
ideas as   to   the true policy mm]
should be  pursued  by  the govt*
ment in encouraging  the indjridd
prospector.    To a  reporter ford
Record he said today:
"The idea must occur to evny
man who visits the mining camps
of this province as thev are today,
that the man who actually discovert
the property, as a rule, profits noth-
tog I'V his d:scovery. Invanabhit
ultimately becomes the property«
the werlthy capitalist.
"It seems a great pity that ta]
man who risks his life and suffm
personal privation in these mouo-
tains should not be assured (hi
greater part, at all events, of bb
energy and enterprise.
"My opinion, based on clou
observation, is that it is the duty of
the government to brinj; about 1
radical change in the whole matter,
and to introduce some measure having for its object the guaranteeing
to the discoverer of the beneficial
ownership of his claim.
"I see no reason why a mining
fund should not be established, sa»
$5°o.ooo, to be devoted to the development of promising prospect*.
The   government  should   establish
competent mining experts at variow
points in   the  province, whose duty
it would be, upon application ofthe
prospectors, to examine the properties and in the event  of the expert
coming   to    the    conclusion    (hit
tbe prospect should  be  developed,
the   government   would,   on  he
recommendation,   advance   out of
this  fund,   on  the  security of th«
claim itself, and for a smnll interest
ol say ten or  fifteen  per cent., re-
served  to cover the possible mil-
takes of experts, whatever sum he
recommended to be expended.
"In   this   way   the     prospector
would retain 85  per cent of his in-
t __»__*__» ut      Im      el.-      _i_* 1      ____•__*
It is to be hoped  that  one,   ner ,               -v   ••-     r—r—
haps the only one, Kood out™   \ W°U,d retain 8S  percent  of his in-
thegigantic  batte  h..        T°f ,ereSt   in   »*•   chim,   and  .none/
and capital in th!n            '"  'ab°r could e™'v be advanced  from time
msdJrStt u      ? Penns>,v«nia col- -o   time  if the expert   considered
Mlili   '.il.-.,.     ___.____•
The demand for manufactured
articles is reported as having fallen
off in the United States.
. _.....> 11.1111,1   col
lieries, will be a better understanding between the independent forces
of labor and capital. It seems a
sad outcome of our boasted civilization that meh who   are   willinc   to
1 ior as   well   as   a And now Maj.   Pond has openi
body, and all  three need adequate negotiations  with  Oom Paul for
consideration. lecture tour in America.
1
Mr. Bryan, in his letter accepting the Democratic nomination for
the presidency, takes strong ground
not against corporations themselves
but against the evil of corporations
intermeddling with politics.
work  nav  «,_,                         "g   to "trance that  if he  struck a jjc
work, nay, whose, very  subsistence PurosPe« ^ would be able to sec,
s dependent from day   to   day   on , frU'ts of ,,is  enterprise for hi
the fruit of their toil.should he com Se" and   no-  have to yield up 1
the fruit of their toil.should he com
Pel,   to strike in order  to obtain,
small measure of justice,      This  i*
the pathetic, the tragic side   0| „ .
-situation in the coal fields of Pen„
-ylvania.      ,ts  practica| «J"
since obtained at a sacrifice on bolH
sides, will be awaited will,    ,
by the world. mterest
Corbett and McCoy appear to
have overlooked woman's proverbial
weakness in the matter of keeping
secrete.
,'»-r,r^ pof
jUnited States i,I>8o8(40o
i«   Ihe
such advances warranted.
"In this way every able-bodied
man in the province would have an
opportunity to try his luck in ll>«
mountains, if so disposed, with •«*
a^ance that  if he  struck a good
secure
im-
   .rn   H.n i- i0 yield up "it
greater part in order  to keep even
a small interest.
"' feel sure that  if such a policy
were adopted an  enormous impel"'
would be given to  the  prospecting
°f our   mountains,   and  that   n«w
mining  camps   would  open up °n
every side, with the necessary consequence of a great  railway nnd industrial development, as it is a we'1
known fact that the business of our
shipping  mines  is  worth  more to
the railways than numbers of farms.
"The true policy, in my opinio0'"1
s»ort, is to encourage the poor hut
thrifty and energetic prospector and
not to give a bonus to people who
ar» already independent.'' i^TaND THE  ORIENT.
„ some respects the interests of
[ia differ radically from those of
other power engaged in the
with China, and we beg to as-
wiil, some degree of confidence,
(for years Russia has  not  been
Itse to a war with China. The
on!j are not far to seek.
Ly do not consist in mere con-
iVy tW territory. If that were
ca'se, Great Britain would be
sia's natural foe; for the gov-
nent at St. Petersburg has for
j sought an outlet by way of
[a nr lhe Black sea for the com-
\e crowing out of its vast wheat
0UTL00KATN0ME
Story of Present Work and
Indications.
ACCOUNT OF J. D. REACH
Some  of the Claims Both  There
and   at Golofnln Pay.
Ing Well.
THE   GALVESTON    H«RR0R.
either is it because Russia, in a
! ol liiimanitarianism, wishes to
nk the prison doors of Chinese
Uion and carry to the benighted
■ous there the light   of civiliza-
lussia has a different object in
>, and it is this: At an enor-
i expense she has constructed
frans-Siberian railway, reach-
nun the Pacific coast, only to
as it neared completion, that
uhor ol Vladivostock, the pro-
; terminus of the railway,
li it lias a good harbor, is ice-
cil tor more than half the year,
is, of course, during that period
Ilically useless as a port,
jnsequently,   Russia   wants   a
further   south.      She  tried   to
re such a  one   by   negotiating
|,.pan in  reference  to   Korea,
lie negotiations came to naught.
I she hopes to secure something
|is nature as the  result   of   the
ilc  in   China   can   hardly   be
|ted.   Ihi.- statement of William
I that the  Russian  czar  de-
Ipo_ice in order to complete thc
enteiprises now under con-
ion, is absurd.
His   fire   H a a I ne.
eiv Vork, Sept.  21.—The large
|i warehouse! and thc elevators
Atlantic dock  at  Brooklyn
ning and it is feared  thnt  a
I ol at least a half a million dol-
a ill ensue.
ISASTER IN
THE RAPIDS
Irgc Martin Is Struck
'Wid  Sunk by the
Steamer Yuma.
Despite the thousands that   have
returned from the Cape Nome rush,
diappointed and penniless, that portion of Alaska may yet turn out as
predicted, a Mecca for a large number of gold hunters.    As  the  summer season is closing the results of
mining on  the   different   creeks  is
being   heard   of and  a number   ol
rich strikes are being  reported.   J.
D.   Reagh of this  city, who is  in
Alaska in the interests of the Cape
Nome   Mining   and    Development
company, has written a letter  from
Elkhorn City, in  the  Golofinn  bay
country.    Ue says,    "I   have just
returned from a trip over to Thorp
and Dry creeks.     There  are some
very rich  claims   in   this   vicinity.
There are creeks for ten miles  each
the claims on which are paying well.
On Ophir creek it is  reported  that
they are taking out  with a  rocker
thirty ounces to the man.     At  the
mouth of Dog creek tbey are taking
out $25 a day to the man.
"Every creek and the tundra in
this country is staked for one hundred miles from the beach, and the
claims lie in every direction. We
have traveled over 500 miles of the
country, prospecting, and have
found stakes everywhere, and any
claim that is any good is developed
or assessments done.
"I have a lease on part of a claim
on the Elkhorn and Gardner that
the owners want $60,000 for a half
interest. We are now hunting for
the pay streak, but in ditching the
dirt his paid from $5 to $8 a day
to the man. We expect to do better as there is a party below us on
the same claim making from $25 to
$75 per day to the man. We think
we are just about on the pay streak
now. I have secured an option on
some good claims. I am coming
out this fall.
OUR   MINERAL   EXHIBIT.
The terrible flood at falveston
is almost without a parallel among
the tragedies of modern times.
The details of the awful catastrophe
have been set forth in the telegraphic dispatches as printed in the Record from day to day, and they are
all the more appalling and heart
rending from the fact that they attempt no word painting or fine writing, but confine themselves in the
main to bare statistics.
The wreckage of property alone
would constitute the event an
epochal one in the disasters of the
eentury. No one who has visited
Galveston can have failed to admire
the magnificent drive along the
gulf, one of the finest in the world,
and the stately residences and solid
business blocks which have been
the pride of the eity. As if by the
wand of some evil genius these
have been blotted out of existence,
and the financial loss entailed takes
rai.k with the great Are in Chicago
as one of the greatest of the age.
But the pall ef gloom would be
less deep il the hungry waves of the
gulf had swallowed only brick and
mortar, piers aad buildings and
homes. This were bad encugh indeed. But it is in the loss of human lite that the flood appeals most
strongly to the world which has
read of its ravages with a shudder.
Many a decisive battle of history
baa been fought with smaller loss of
life. One mn uot rea4 the press
dispatches, which struggle vainly
to give an adequate conception of
the calamity, without the deepest
sympathy.
Indeed, the   one bright  ray that
shines   across    the    wreck-strewn
beach of   Galveston   today is   the
sympathy that  has gone out to the
sufferers from all parts of the world.
In many instances,   especially  from
cities  like  New  Orleans,  close at
hand, this expression has taken the
practical shape of money to aid the
needy.    Seattle,   at the far   northwest corner of the  union, has sent
a substantial   sum,   and other cities
are   not   backward.      Indeed   the
word would only have  to be passed
across the line for Canadians to join
in the relief.    But as the citizens of
the United States  are  doing everything necessary to care for the destitute, the government itself having
taken   up the   matter,  nothing  remains for us at this far distance except   to   express   our sorrow   and
reach out a hand of brotherly sympathy   for   the   distressed and the
bereaved.
AMONCTHEMINES
Large   Construction   Work
Now Going On.
CASES OF SMALLPOX.
TROOPS ARRIVE
m
THE CENTRE  STAR SHOP
New Compressor and Other Machinery-Tramway for
War Eagle.
The health report of the  United
States up to September 1, for some
unaccountable reason includes Daw- r^mm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
son within Alaska and  records six j Aiartfa, Law preValls In the
cases of smallpox there on July 20. '   ■
C0N6RESS
OF TRADES.
f"rt Huron,   Mich.,   Sept.   22.—
I'wirge  Martin,   in  tow of the
|mer   Maurice   T.   Grover,  was
in the rapids  at   the  entrance
*•*' St. Clair river last  night   by
straight  back  steamer  Yuma.
""" Jas.    Lawless  of Loring;
Ross, of Toledo; Mrs. Bacon,
;. of  Toledo;  nnd   one  sailor,
•e unknown, are missing,
hvigation through the channel is
ipletely blocked.    Tugs are  out
Like   Huron  notifying    down
M boats to anchor. The wrecks
J""   schooner  Fontain  and  the
■'i'ii lie quite close together   and
l"r both  will  have  to be blown
•"order to clear the channel.
\LL OF KRUGER.
cv" perhaps in all the range of
"rV was a popular idol more
npletely shattered than the fetish
||ch 1 |,c Hoers and their sympath-
lrs Ht up and adored in the per-
" "f I'aul Kruger.      The  closing
|P'« of his life wi|| form a disap-
",lnK anticlimax to those who
•"""■ed his earlier acts into the
fn\ and heroic resolve of a patriot.
lr'"iism cannot well be ascribed
:I ",,n who, in the hour of a
l,,v".e crisis to his people, nban-
"N lh>"' and flies to a iTaven ol
"Kei taking with him a vast
"""" "I treasure, while he leaves
s "'voted but misguided followers
11',"!^ -,,,B  PanK's   and   privations
We beg lo suggest that at the
close of the Paris exposition it
would be a good plan to transfer
the British Columbia mineral exhibit, for a time at least, to London,
where there would he. little or no
difficulty in arranging (or a suitable
place. The exhibit has already attracted the most favorable notics.
At the same time, comparatively
lew English people are gong to
Paris, for reasons that have been
pointed out by Mr. Goodeve and
others. We feel sure that a vast
number of people in England would
see the exhibit, aud the result
would be that this province would
receive a good hit of advertising.
Ralph Smith   is   Made
President—Executive Committee
SIFTON TRIAL
POSTPONED
Ottawa, Sept. 22.—The trades
congress yesterday re-elected Ralph
Smith, M. P. P., Nanaimo, B. C,
as president. The following were
elected British Columbia's executive
committee of the congress: Vice-
president, James Wilkes, Nelson,
B. C.; John McLaren, Rossland;
George Bartley, Vancouver; and
Thomas Twigg, Victoria.
HE TALKED   TOO MUCH.
lhe 1
IMi
ab|..ct poverty to which his
J.-'HMdwl statecraft has brought
• ; As they linger today amid
. V '''^i wilh the crepe of per-
j; ber.e"vement as their only dec
;,';'"- I  would be  interesting,   if
lii.t \\   ,0   hear ,h0   OPJWOM
'He Hoers are  expressing   oi
'"ely reverenced Oom PauL
Will Probably Come Up
for Hearing at the
Next Assizes
Toronto, Sept. 22.—Counsel for
thc defence in the Sifton murder
trial, which was to have opened in
London, September 24, says the
trial will hnve to he put back to the
next assizes, owing to the failure of
the defence to get the required
medical witnesses.
The case, it is snid, will likely excite even greater interest among
medical men than the famous Hen-
derschott trial at St. Thomas a
few years ago,
Damaged   by   Llgblulug
Montreal, Sept.   11.--Considera
ble dumnge to   farm   property   by
lightning   is   reported   from   New.
market, jCoburg,   Port   Hope   and
Lindsay, Ont.
William Woodville Rockhill,
United States special commissioner
to China, appears to have been
quietly retired for his indiscretion in
talking too freely to a newspaper
correspondent. With his first arrival in China he became the special
victim of the correspondents to
whom ha talked with the utmost
freedom. Among other things he
said that the anti-foreign movement
in China was practically successful,
and that if the powers could come
into harmony among themselves
they might as well withdraw. His
views thus freely expressed through
the press found their way to the
state department, and Mr. Rockhill
was suddenly confronted with a request to acknowledge or repudiate
the interview. His reply is said to
have been entirely too evasive to
suit Mr. Hay, and certainly has
spoiled Mr. Rock^'ll's reputation
for discretion.
The New York Tribune publishes
a special dispatch from London stating that President Kruger has resigned, It would seem to be merely a question of the proper auxiliaiy,
is or has,
Rossland, B. C, September 23—
The construction work at the
Centre Star is progressing rapidly.
The framing shop is approaching
completion. 'The building at the
head works i.s receiving a new coat
of paint, and will make a handsome
appearance. The new machme shop
and blacksmith shop, on the north
side ol the hoisting works, will be
ready to set up next week. The
old carpenter shop has been moved
over on the dump, One end of it
will be used for a change house for
the men, and the other will be converted into a fire hall and room for
hose carts.
The new compressor at the Centre Stir i.s going night and day and
it, as well as the other new machinery, is giving good satisfaction.
The first s'tep toward the new
tramway for the War Eagle has
been taken by ordering the machinery and equipment, which is expected to arrive soon.
The yards at the Centre Star are
being extended clear out to the
road, thus giving a good deal more
space lor piling lumber, as well as
for ordinary work.
Alli-i-   Big   Game.
Mr. Blackstock and Manager Kirby left yesterday, accompanied by
J. C. Drewry, for a hunting trip.
They will make their headquarters
at Crows Nest landing, ten miles
Irom Klko, on the Crows Nest division of the C. P. R., and expect to
remain a week or ten days, as tliey
have the promise of rare sport in
both fishing and hunting. Big game
is said to abound within easy reach
of the landing.
The   Mi Iul Plait-
Work  has   been   started, on   the
foundation for the new compressor
of the Nickel Plate, which is located
just north ol the bridge. Some of
the stone work is already in place
and a large quantity of material is
on the ground, with a good force of
workmen engaged.
t oliiiubia-Kootrna)
A good lot of work is in progress
at the Columbia-Kootenay The
new foundation for the compressor
i.s nearly completed. A considerable extension has been made to
the engine house, which is finished
except the fishing touches of cement
on the foundation.
War  Fault- Hold
The War Eagle hotel, formerly
run under the management of the
mining company, has been leased,
building and business, to C. E.
Crittenden, who took charge of it
yesterday morning.
The toMl number of cases in the
United States from June 29 to August 31 in given at 3,585, of which
105 were fatal. \n the same period
for last year there were only 826
cases and four deaths. Ohio is
credited with 1359 cases. There
were 23 cases at Nome up to August 8.
The report also shows the weekly
mortality in cities in the United
States during rhe last two weeks of
August to have been 3,446. Of
these 294 were from tuberlocis.
For some time an agitation has
been going on to have an increase
made in the wages paid the compositors in the printing bureau at
Ottawa. The men asked an increase from $12 to $15 a week, on
account of the increased cost of living. Hon. R. W. Scott, as secretary ol state, has charge of the bureau and made an offer of $13.50 a
week, which was accepted by the
typographical union.
Toronto's technical school has attracted the attention of the United
States authorities, who have sent
Walter Gillman Page of Boston on
a tour of inspection on this subject
throughout canada.
Prof. Craig, formerly horticulturist at the central experimental farm
at Ottawa, has been appointed to
a position in Cornell university,
where he will be associated with
Prof. Baily, one of the most prominent men in this line of work.
Liberal papers in the east are
enumerating the good crops as one
ol the public blessings due to the
Laurier administration. It must be
a trifle embarrassing to the premier
to be thus accredited with powers
that are usually ascribed to the
deity or to nature.
From a ghoul to a ghost is the
quick order of transposition in Galveston since the flood. The citizens
attend to the change without any
order of court or process of law.
Shenandoah.
MANY  SPECIAL   OFFICERS
Citizens Sworn In to Protect the
Peace—Almost a Complete
Shut Down.
ATTACKINC FORTS
Movement Against Peitang
Is Begun at Early
Dawn
NO REPLIES ARE YET MADE
6EN. METHUEN
ROUTS BOERS
Captures Wagons.  Ammunition, Guns, Cattle and Men.
Afterward  There Is Sharp Firing
Until the Guns Are
Silenced.
London, Sept. 22.—The following
is from Pretoria, dated Sept. 21:
"Methuen completely routed a
Boer convoy west of Kloilsdorp and
recaptured a 15-pounder lost at Colenso. He also captured 26 wagons,
800 cattle, 400 sheep, 20,000 rounds
ot ammunition and 28 prisoners."
It is the Mail and Empire that
pays the Westminsters this compliment: "The western people, in
any kind of shape, have proved tnat
they are equal to anything. In Ottawa they showed they eould either
play lacrosse or chop wood. They
are the kind of people the public
admire—all-round sports who came
three thousand miles to play the
game."
Taku, Sept. 20.—Four thousand
Russians, three thousand Germans,
and one thousand French troops,
with a detachment of Austri in
marines, began the attack
upon the Pei Tang forts al
daylight. The attack was answered
briskly, from the lorts, the bombardment continuing until noon,
but it was noticed that the forts did
not reply after ten o'clock.
The allies sent forward at noon to
discover the reason ol the cessation
of firing Irom the forts, and found
them deserted, there being only four
dead Chinamen within the walls.
The allies were much chagrined, as
they believed they had the place
completely surrounded, making escape impossible, yet over three
thousand men got away in broad
daylight.
The Russian artillery fire proved
effective and the forts were badly
damaged. The British and Italian
commanders had decided to join in
the attack but their troops had nol
arrived in time. The entire line between Tien Tsin and Taku shows
reinforcements were heading for the
forts. Three members of the allied
forces were killed and fifty wounded, through explosions ol mines
laid along their line of march.
Hazelton, Pa., Sept. 22.—No disturbances of any moment are reported from any part of the district.
There was still a tension on the public mind but the sending of troops
to Shenandoah, 45 miles away, was
generally regarded as bringing matters to a crisis and the situation
here has been somewhat relieved.
Armed deputies are distributed
among most ot the collitries and
along several of the public roads
leading to mining property. There
was the usual number of strikers
out early this morning trying to persuade workers not to go to the
mines, but they did not meet with
as much success as on previous
days ol the week. The strikers
were careful not to carry their persuasion to the point of intimidation,
thus avoiding a conflict with the
deputies.
Troop* Arriving.
Shenandoah, Pa., Sept. 22.—
Troops began arriving soon after
daylight and shortly after about
2500 soldiers were on the ground.
Saloons are all closed and martial
law prevails. The collieries were
idle, having been closed by the
Reading company at the request of
Sheriff Toole in order to avoid
trouble.
Special I'oll, riiu-ii.
It developed this morning that
one person, Mike Yuckavage, was
killed outright in last evening's
shooting here. Following the scenes
of turmoil and riot yesterday, everything was quiet today. The town
council appointed over 300 special
I policemen. No crowds were permitted to congregate in any of the
streets. The commander of the
third brigade, which arrived early
this morning, made the statement
that he would distribute the soldiers between Shenandoah, St.
Nicholas, Maloney City and other
points after he had looked over the
field.
The Deputies.
Fdwin Clarke, who was shot below the heart, had a remarkable escape, the bullet having been extracted and he is improving today.
He had gone into the street to take
his children out of lhe way when he
received the wound. All the collieries around Shenandoah, Lost
Creek and William Penn were
closed down. Not a mine in the
region was wo. king today, The
deputies who were with Sheriff
Toole last evening and did the
shooting were all selected from the
best citizens of Shenandoah.
N. P. TRAIN
IS HELD UP
Masked Robber, Siugle-
Handed, Loots the
Passengers
Seattle has sent $1500 as a first
installment in the way of a contribution to the fund for Galveston
sufferers, and has received a cordial
message of thanks frum Gov, Sayers.
Spokane, Sept. 22.—Single-handed a masked robber held ua the
westbound passenger train 911 ithe
Northern Pacific at 1 o'clotflt IbAt
morning and succeeded in getting
away with about $500 in cash, several watches and a quantity of
jewelry.
Hln. Ague* siniili Dead.
Mrs. Agnes Anna Smith died at
Willsborough, England, August 29,
of apoplexy, at the advanced age of
95 years. She was the mother of
II. Bt Smith of Rossland, and widow
of the late Rev. J. Smith, M. A., of
the Universiiy church, Aberdeen.
1 ci-riiillii-   Noiiiln.ill..11.
Montreal, Sept, 22.—The Conservatives of Kentville county have
nominated Mr, M. Coupel.
it
I ■
. if
TIIE SILU'RHmn.
PATVROAV,   FkITEMUUI 2H   I9C0.
}
mam mm.
Tl'lli-I_!|IED EVKIIT   KATI'BOAV   AT
SILVEKTON. B. 0.
j man's     personality     and     range    of
i acquaintance   does more   to elect him j	
than his party  leaning*. Silveiton leet the ball game  in New
■ —  ' IWver last   Sunday in   lite first three
HO
ANI
Watches,
Clocks and
 Jewelery.
fine Watt* Iffurii; ajpwialh.
All Work Left aCTI.e L»W view
Hotel, Silverton,»ill»e forwarded and promptly attend'"! lo.
O. BTKnowles,
SANDON, H. C
, V, . inning, allotting the iiomt* plavvrs to
One cf the meet disgraceful chapter. cfogs ^ ^ ^.^ _jmcs w|iji(J ,,.„, »
llathKio?* BROS..   IMH.ir« * Prop..   ,n <j,e history  of   Western Canada   \f, were Kwinjc three runs.   In Ilie lu6t six \ 1^41A
1 ,      .'   .        =^^ ! now being disclosed before the  Courts I &•■■*•*■ -he visitors a.Med nineteen run* j
SUBSCRIPTION KATES- ' ' ,,    ' {to Iheir s»-ore, Int vould not oieitnko the j .—_
TWO DOLLARS A YKAR. j in V'ct«ri»-    The i,,side h^ety « now  icad of l|ie |ofai^( „ ll0 |,a,| four rllns an(i
, i  j 'hecanners bioke the fishermen'sstrike)*n innings lo *pare at the end.    The
Advertising rates will be made known j last rummer is a  slur on  oar citiien- | New Denveiites made n couple of line
upon application at this office.
UP-TODATEJN_EVERY BRANCH.?
WoitK LKFT AT   R. AHOMNON'h BAIMi
sun.' in NEW DENVER wiu. a* »''
II
USE
JtfDRY
(L,, rv Work Culled For and Delivered Weekly.)
u
wiu, iik Km
WAKDKI)TO MV AND I'HOIIITI.V   BETI'HSn,
R. 'JThox-tourt],
SILVERTON, ,> G
. ship and a nice nn ss
=■, the world as tho wav (hat boasted ar
to   1* shown to! I'lays ainl the Silvertonims made sev-
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DVF. j tide a "B
OSStaSO   OR   IN   ARREARS    A
$ §   BLUE   CROSS    WILL
5s««»«S  BE FOUND    IN fHIB
SQUARE.      SUBSCKIVT10N    AKI
PAYABLE  I.V   ADVANCE.     PRICE i fclitrmen off tbe Fiawr.
\ eral particularly stupid cues.   Tlie score
! by innings was:
rt   ,s mace 11*|8(4|6|«;7|»|»
Assisted by government officials tfr-: «:lver(on  1   0 | 2 | 3 | 1 | 5 j:! j 4 | 3—£2
coiineiymeii had naturalisation r"} ir»| * Denie   7)4|7|1|0|-»|0|S [x-'2e
I issued unlawfully for scores of newly      The third aame ol the series will bei
i landed Japanese to allow them to hold  P'«vcd here to-morrow
] fishipw jicvi.ces and to crowd the white
CALIFORNIA   WINE
COMPANY, LTD.
NELSON, tt. C.
■wsoi
When   the
STWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
THE
SELKIRK
HOTEL,
mi
TBF
WHARF
LARGE     AND    COMFORTABLE
BOOMS TABLE    OKSUE-
PAS8ED    IS    TIIK
NORTHWEST.
IIIIMJU-B1IIETT •
SILVERTON,
• mors
B. C.
THE
ARLINGTON
HOTEL,
Conveniently Situated near
Railway 8tation nnd Wharf.
flOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS.
IN IT AT LAST.
Ihey imilt a chnn-h a! Ira rcrv doolie wasn't in it.
'Ihey brought him a scheme  for relieving lhe poor-
He wasn't in it.
I«t them work for themselves as he had
done,
They needn't ask help nf anyone
If they hadn't wa_.ted each golden minute—
He wasn't il> it.
He wasn't in it
When men in Ihe hall of virtne met.
He saw their goodness without re«rel;
Too high the mark for him to win it—
He wasn't in it.
So he passed the poor with a haughty
tread—
(No money in it)
A carriage crept down   the street one
day—
He was in it.
I The funeral trappings made a display-
He wus in it.
St. Peter reoived him with book and
bell.
".My friend you hare purchased a   ticket
io hell
Your elevator goes down in a minute"—
He was ii it.
......................... I
CDITORI.il •iTceorriM I
i*s«iti8imss.i8im»mst*
i Canadians riseotcd th»* crowding, thc
j cannery managers nysin called for aid
| from the tfficials and acting in an of-
S sal capacity three of those interested
cbllrd cut the foldiery to aid the Japs,
who had no le-jal right to be there,
against Canadian woik men.
It ri fleets little credit upon Canada
or her < flicial that inch a state of affairs i-.xist.». Peijury n-ust be rife
srun win re to admit of it, and as the
Courts bave declared the Japs inno-
o nt tin- Nome naturally fettles upon
the ether gainers,  their employers.
Someone should be made an example
of. Lot Canadian law, usually most expeditious, s*vni8of late to be falling to
the level of those countiies where a
rich man may dare it with impunity.
Dining   Room   nnder  the charge ol
Miss Ida Carlisle.
' Tables supplied with ill the delicacies
of the season.
Pboi-h.
B. C.
HENDERSON k GErHING,
SLOOAN CITY,   ....
THK   METAL   MARKET.
I
New York.  Sept. 25.—Rar Silver, t>2'8
I-ake copper,   fl&fiO.
J..-ad-The iii;,i that fixes the selling
price for miners and smalters quote* lead
a' (4 00 at the close.
Chas. W. Dill, captain ol tho Nelson
Footba!/ Clnbi has written offering Im
team fur a match here next Saturday, or
for Thanksgiving Day,     He luu lieen
asked t-i I ring the it.in: up next Saturday.
'•Woman" said the lecturer al the in -
foruiul meetinv, "in Iho east is only a
domesticated animal."
"Well," .-.lid ihe foolish man lh.it
wanted to make a couiDliment. "she
lacks a lot of being a domesticated
animal here."
The IhiIiVs present in large r.'imhers
glared at him ama/.cdlv.
PIO-A..E8S,
AGEJSTSFOK
CALGARY BEEI}.
>A_y_%M<_M^M<MVMMVQ
Advertisers
(iWWV^^^^*_M^M^^^^^wVi
Tlh-e rcil:n.ers' trade
Is tlie trade. ETrexsr
^reak one tlio\_xsa,rid.
THE SILVERTONIAN
Call a girl   chick   and die sir. lea: call
a wen.an a   hen and hhp howls.   Call a
y«iinL' woman a witch and she ii pleased :
call an old woman a   witch and   she i.« |
indignant:   Call  n young giil a kitten:
and she rather likes it: call   a   woman a '
cat and she hales you. Women are queer.   ^,^_ - -
If yon call  a   man   a  gay dog it will lj§M,OG&XX   IX11_£19IS   I9&G.
flatter him: call I.im a pup, n hound or I
a cur, and lie will try to alter the map ol! ;
your face,   Ho   doe*n't    mind   being!
called a hull or   a   hear, and jet he will j
Object to hem •   mentioned U a calf or a
cnb.   Mm are queer.
iMMiVAlWWWWV.
I read in a ''yellow" journal the other
| day  bow that Ibe women ol New York
Luring   all   the   pn parations for a \ ner'ed enough muscular power in hcld-
Iljininioti election  the reformation ef j ing up their skirts in cne day to projiel
tbe Provincial Cabinet seems io be
overlooked. How about thoee cauciis
pledges of  the Premiet?
JtJLSt Ttx9
A
Fine
New-
Line
Of
The two lawyer candidates in this
Riding both stend to gain by tbeir
nominations. The fact that they arc
thus   elevated   will   be   an excellent '• figure   it oot
the navies of the woild for one year. I
have been doing some Bgnriog along Ibe
same line, and have found that if the
chappies of Rossland for one day wonld
foieco turning up Iheir panl legs and
instead give their trousers a "hitch" in
th- seat, they would exeit suflicent
power to mn the War Kxgle hoist for
six yea's. If you don't believe it just
for   yourself.—Industrial
C.iOICK
IMPORTKD
AND
DOMESTIC
Oliscir^.
advertisement which one, ar.d peihapsj World.
Iioth, will have leisure to take ad van t- j
| age of   after  polling day.    And if, aa '
the Nelson    Tribune  reiterates, there
is no ' bar'l"attachment to the candidacy of   either,   the   advertisement   is
coming at half rates.
Sandon Miners'
HOSPITAL
Union
Oo You Wont
OTheir Trade?
Cs***tr*wAsy*sA**Ais*w*w^
0PE»   TO   TIIK   PUBLIC.
s
t euac srapi: cnuii or tartar poa_.c.i
Confectionery<
FRESH AND DELICIOUS.
Fresh Fruits
COMING   IN   DAILY,   THE
BEST ON THE MARKET.
I will be glad lo quote
prices on crate lots of
Fruit for preserving.
^tatloner^r.
' FULL LINE CARRIED IN  STOCK.
DR
H. H. Reeves,
Silverton, B. C.
PANAD1AN
PACIFIC
AND SOO   LINE
FAMOUS
"IMPERIAL   LIMITED"
With li. proved Connecting Service Via
Revblstokk or Crows Nk.it Route to
 or from	
KOOTENAY   COUNTRY
First-claw Sleepers on all trains from
ARROWHEAD A KOOTFNAY LfXJ.
Tourist Cars pass Ik.'edicine Hat
daily for St. Paul, Sat unlays for
Montreal and Boston,' Mondays
and Thursdays for Toronto.
Same cars pasc Revelstoke one
day earlier.
The Government has appointed the j
proniim d Commission to enquire into |
the w hole qaestion of Chinese and Japanese immigration into Canada and
the method to be taken to regulate it.
The Commission will be coniposid of
Ralph Smith, M L A, Nanaimo, Mr.
Munn, New Westminster, and R. C.
Clute, Q C, Toronto.
Thn Commission can be, and po -
silly will be, productive of much good,
hut with ten good reason the electors
regard with snspicion any sudden move
in a popular question just on the eve
of an electbri.
Subscribers, fl. per month.
Private Patients, $2. jier d.iv
exclusive of t xpense • f phy-
fciiian or surgeon and diuns.
Dn. W. K. Comm, Attendant I'hybician
Ails  S. .M. Ciiim!.ii.ii, .Matron.
3. I). Mt-I._tt'(_iiuM, President.
Vt. I.   Ii.Uii.icB, Secretary.
Wji. Don .un k, J. V. M.unis, R. J.
McLkax, A. J. Mi Ddnai.d, Mike Bi ly.
Directors.
TttE MAIN VRML IU'NS PAST TIIK HOOH OF'
TH  Wilson   ^>.#^
E HOtelj       .'.F.Timt.rtitii. ,
PATRONS ARK W II I T.\KI N ( ARK OF.
A FIIIST-CI.A.'S BILLIARD BOOM ON THE ri.'iMMs.
BAB   I-TKMslII D Willi Tin:   Bl >'I    HUMS (iU   KIM <-.  I H.i « V*
AND CIGAKb,
HKADQUj l;TIIS FOR M1MNU MIN.
Fresh   Bread
Mais street,  -
I.< CAN   /:   O,
rics and Cakes Mt) io Order.
^"MlSr, • Silvrloii, B. ('.
>i un i.-iii ii i\ Ni in n "WM
mmm mm mm.
NO  95. W. F. Of M.
it is nothing
*   but fair
. I CONNECTIONS.
/ Ex Son. To & From (he North.  Ex 8uo.
/        11:00 Iv. Nii.vkhton Arr. 15:40
Ex Hun. To k From die South.   Ex Sun.
15:40 Iv Sii-Vebton Arr 11:00
For rates, tickets, and full inhumation
apply toG. n, Ciiamplcr, Agent, Silver-
tin, B.C., or
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson
E..I.COYLE.
A. (I, P. Agent, Vaneouvo
The time is not far distant when the
narrow views held by some Sunday
observers will be smiled at as are today many of the views held by the
early founders ofthe Protestant church
among their own followers. How
many of the followers of Wesley, for
instance, regard in a serious way Ins
condemnation of tea-drinking? Th"
world moves, and all must keep pace
Those who would stop healthy and
h-irmleits outdoor recreation on the only day in the week free for many are
preaching a gospel which has no foundation except in a narrow mind.
It has been taken for granted by
nearly all parties concerned that tho
elections will be pulled off before the
middle of November. This being so
there is a fe, ling of curiosity among
local electors for a nearby inspection
of the candidates among * horn they
will have to chcose. Few in Silverton
or indeed in the whole Slocan, know
anything whatever of either Galliher
or MacNeil. Whether thii is an advantage to them or not, we don't know.
Any one of tbe half dozen or moro of
ihe labor leaders is known throughout
tie Riding much moro widely than
either of the old line candidates, and
where party lines are felt so little as
they are ia the  mining districts, a
Highest Honors, World's Fair
Oold Medal, Midwinter Fair
Avoid Daklng I'm: ili-rri containing
•lorn.   Tli-.-y-ir._- injurious lo health
NOTICE    TO   DELINQUENT
COOWNEi:.
To Ja.mks Andehnon, Ynn nie hereby
notified thnt we hnve expended One
Hur.dred Dollars in labor and improve-
menta upon the Oakland .Mineral Claim
on Four .Mile Creek in thegl'vati Minim
Division, located on tho %t*h, dav of
Ang11.1t ISiW and recorded at lhe record
oBice of Slid Division on the I2ih. dav of
Septe.nber 18IK5, in order to hold siild
claim under the provisioiiK of ihe
Mineral Act, Mng the amount required
lo '<ld the Hiinit. for the year ending
Bepiember lab. 1900 And if within
ninety days Irom Ihn date of this notice
you fail or refuse to contribute your
propoilion 61 such expenditure together
with all coat of advertjaing, your interest
in said claim will become the property
ofthe subscribers under Section 4. nf
An Act to uuiond the Mineral Act 11)00.
F. F. 1.IR8S0HBR.
T.  tt.    WILSON
,..,,. W. It: GoaiHiM.
"ated this fifteenth  day of  September
1900,
Fine
Laundry Work
Of The
i
Best
DONE BY
O. Tyree,
Silverton. B. G.
Meets every  .Saturday in  tlie Union
Hall in Silverton, at7:.°,() p. m.
L.   3. ll. I.oincinv, , ...
1'iMldent.    irN^ <r!P l»   I'''
' pSrasdf {» N )!.i;i kiwi iliii
XaWf^i w/A
i'ii ai
"Five
Drops.
/>
FOR
RIIEImMATIC DURE
THAT CURES
WE   ARE  THE  AGENTS
THIS    ALIO FOR
Lilac 6'rfliini, Alley's Hnir Renoircr,
Canadian Corn Cure and Sjrnp
of lliir^ioniid and Tola.
T:> III iii) Men (';!s_!.:ii r.x k:i>*.v
lliiil !Iliiwjust.ri'lnriim!lro::ia \)W'
Cast.   \ an
I ililVC
wKcted tiro vmj i.il«s( ^*\oU, m^ m m^\mt m^ a8 nm &
lew hm kI;o;vh in (Ms mit):   AIJ goods kugut here are gHJiiHI
Al qnaJity and \ rices p si:c!i as ivill ooipe^ ,vii|, fM\m „*&*[.
^v/vwvw^w^vv       \vhi-:mnnI':i.s(»n
MM: H'A'li H        v
BKPAIR1H0 A      5    ',INV'r,': VOl? TO CALL
M'KCIAI/n. I   AND (NM'Kt'TMV STOCK.
Joooli Dover, • THK JEWm, # IEL8W, B. 9.
H-A.RD"WARa
Prescription Department Complete and
Up   To   Date
SILVERTON DRUG   STORE,
BILVERTON, B. C.
Jj G. GORDON.
MIXES, RIAL ESTATE, COIYVKMGB
NOTARY PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      B. C.
General
Mining
Supplies.
Full Line     Lumber^
Dry  & Mixed Sash and
P
aints. ooors.
MoCallum «& c
o-»   Slooan, 13. O*
RATE8
©tsa*"bl_a
GOOD SADDLE AND VAt-r  ,._-,„       "*'W"
*^.P^npR8Efl  FOB   IIIRK.AT   REAdON^
g«T AND TKAN8fKIt HUSINESS DONK
Outside 1'artii.B
' --inin; HorecB in Silverliin
Can  Have Then,  KeHerved B, WlfilSC
J.M. McGKEGOlt
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
:  AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOOAN CITY,'..  B.C.
A. Y. Mc J JON AM),
Kll-VERTON, ••!». 0.
**vvvv***vw**%
Syrup of Horehound & Tolu
" ; C,"s  '   0COLMS.
nrwwiiw^nnrwnnrrT

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