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The Silvertonian Apr 21, 1900

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 VOLUME THREE.
SMERMIAN.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,     APRIL   21, i!>00.
HH9
NUMBER 43
IONSIGNMENTS
OFFR   SH
find
r
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
JM9
•9
Sil-vertoaa., S. C.
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Weekly News Hoggets Of Slocan and
or Camps.
GENERAL NEWS OF DISTRICT.
ILAKEYIEW   HOTEL
Silverton
0TTHI8 HOTEL IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE BAR IS SlI'l'Lir.D WITH BEST BRANDS OF
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
2s£.   KlrLOTxrles.   Prop.
CO
THE E.MII.Y EDITH TO RESUME.
The big Emily Edith mine is to be
•tailed up, witli u full force, on tlio first
of May. This property is one of the
biggest concentrating propositions in ihe
Slocan and ita suecesslul operation will
uecesltate the erection of a mill in the
mar future,
The Emily Edith, whicli is situated
within two miles 61 town, haa somo of
tho largest bodies ol ore blocked Oil!
j Uiat lias ever been encountered in tins
camp. There was erected or. tins
property Ust sum&er tin- most complete
and modem set ol buildings, for ihe
accommodation of tbe employees, in the
district. The mine has been developed
by a system uf tunnels, under tlio management ot E. Kamnielmeyer. and tbere
bas been nearly one mile of underground development work accomplished,
most of which has been diiven directly
on the leiUe. The Emily Edith has
shipped to Iho smelter considerable
clean ore, but is looked Uuoti here rath, r
as h bin concentrating proposition than a
shipping mine.
this to _>sy:
' All the same (he Senate, which is not
no elective body, and does nst contain
probably more than fifteen or twenty
men who could bo elected under any
circumstance to anything more important than hog reeve of a hill township,
has interfered with the electoral rights
of the people and and endeavored to
c uim! the grouping of voters who are
to choose the nest House of Commons.
The attitude of tho Senate is intolerant
nnd intolerable. If Canadians cannot
take cane of themselves without helnw
dry-nursed by the fidgety politic.il
fanatics in the Senate, tbey ought to bo
permitted to go to the dogs in their own
favorite way, whether that bu bv the
voting of their property to railroad corporations, or the giving away of their
liberties by some deliberate act of their
own or of their chosen representatives
Unless this country is composed mainly
of people who are too young to know
when and how to blow their own nose,
or too Idotio to lie aware of the appropriate time to take nourishment, there
should be a unanimous refusal to have
the foolish and shaiiietinted lace of the
Canadian public pushed up for Bafeiy
and succor against the withered breast
of a barren Senate.
CLIFFE UP AGAINST IT.
and secured subscriptions to the amount
To many whom Mr. Cliffe has seen fit
to appeal against us voters, the following
letter from Premier Martin will prove ol
interest. Mr. Cliffe will fiad before he
is through with the Voters' List that bis
meddlesomeness has made moro trouble
for himself than it has for other.-,.   We
publish the letter lor general information i mnU,,( ,or a foJlraM iqO yards or longer
through the kindness of Mr. Foley, «u | wit|, Jack Gusty of Sandon ior 1100. to
whom it was sent. j ne  nm  here  on   May  24th.   If   Mr.
Premier's Ollice, Victoria, April 11,'00 j Gusty   will   commnnieate    wirth    this
3. A. Foley Esq.,                              o,"'t:0 wa w"\ arranR° the naatcb.
Slocan City, I',. C,  ,
oCtboutt   $500.   This  is an excellent
beginning.
A few enthusiusts have beeu wlel ding
pick and shovel on tbe lover end ot Ihe
football Held during tbe week. It is a
pity that more of those who delight in
kicking the pig-skin do not enthuse when
it comes to rolling boulders.
A local runner ia anxious to arrange a
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OP FRESH AND SALT MEATS
BE TAIL STORES AT
Silverton. Nelson, Trail, Ymir. Ksslo, Sandon,
New Denver. t:as.-.i.le City, (irantl Forks, Sirdar
MltlVlV m.'l Greenwood.
...UAlLOUDF.lt? PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD  OFFICE NELSON, B.C.
9
t
t
5
Are You Locking For
Stylish goods?
THAT is UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRIOR SOMEWHERE NoT ALTOg-'.TII-
BR OUT OF SIGHT.
IF BO DKOP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AM* FINISH
QURANTKRD.   oV fkcoatings .tCST IN.
Hie Tailor:   Silverton, B.C.
w
t
5
5
t
THE VANCOUVER TOO.
I/eslie Hill, manager of the Vancouver
Group of mines, Hrrived in Silverton on
Saturday last and spent Sunday going
over that property with the foreman \V
J, Barker, As a result of Mr. Hill's
visit lhe Vancouver mine will resume
active operations and a crew of miners
will be put to work.
Tho Vancouver mine which lias 1h..:i
practically closed down since .fune nf
last year, has always been considered
ono of Silverton best mines and has
been one of our big shippers of high
grade galena ore.
The first work contemplated by this
company, besides putting miners under-
giound. will be the repairing and improving the wagon road that connects
the mine wilh the main Silverton road.
This wil I keep a force of men busy for
about two weeks. As soon as the road
ia repaired stoping will be commenced
in the mine, the force of miners Increased
and steady shipment! of ore will be
made from this property to the smelter.
BLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments   of   ore   from Silverton for
the year 189!). totaled l«9;i Tons.
All other Lake points .1385     "
The shipment   ot   ore   from   Slocan
Lake pniuts,  up  lo and  including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing, Tons.
Bosun 220
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
Fiom Silverion Tons.
E.nilv Edith 20
Vancouver    20
Wakefield, (concentrates) 60
Frjm Enterprise Landing
Enterprise 300
From Slocan City
Arlington     2«0
Black Prince    00
Your oi nth Inst, at hand.
Mr. Kurtz, Collector g| Votes nt Kaslo,
has written me fully with regard  to thej
000 appeals and I have advised  him  us.
to the law.    It is  not at  all necessary;
that persona appealed against should up-j
pear personally al the Court of Revision. I
It would of course be advisable to have
some lawyer there to represent the right
of electors, but the onus is entirely upon
the objector lo prove that lhe name upon
the list should be struck olf.    L'nless he
TO-NIGHT'S    CONCERT.
With one exception the various entertainments given on Slocan Lake bave of
late beer. good. The dav bus passed
when a four'h class farce compauy could
a lior .11 titer lain me nt to a Slocan sudionce
and well it is that this is so. Among
the lirsiclass entertainment being riven
this season few are as pleasing ns tbat
given by Miss Ethel Webb, elocutionist,
' B'v ■■>""> > '  ■land W. Graham Hodsdon, tenor soloist.
Mi-s Webb is a gold meda'.ist and grad-
whose najiie is upon Ihe list 1.8 not entitled to have it there, it is the duty of the
Collector to retain it.
I am very sorry indeed that the mine-
owners shook! have Attempted in this j
wholesale wav to disfranchise so many
electors and 1 hope that no man who
really has the rii;lit to vote will bo struck
Off.
I have the honor to Vie, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
JOSEPH  MAKTIN.
uato of the Toronto Conservatory of Music, which is a guarantee of her training.
Reserved Beat tickets fr.n bo secured at
the Silverton Drug Store for their appearance in McKinnon Hall to-night.
INJURED AT THE WAKEFIELD.
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York, Apr. 18.— Bur Silver, Offfi
Lake copper,   flfl.iiO.
Lead—The firm that fixes the selling
price for miner* and smelters quotes lead
at (4.48 at the close.
OOOOOOOOOO 30 300 3D33
MINIM LOCALS.        8
0033303030900 OOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOSCXSOOOOOOO
TIIE LOCAL LAYOUT.
Wanted to Kent, u sewing
Apply at this Ollice.
machine.
Jack' Nesbtt, one of Silverton's old-
timers who has been employed at the
Wakefield Mines, met with a painful
accident at that mine last Sunday
evening. He was working in one of the
slopes, had just gone on shift snd bad
started to pick down the shattered rock
made by the blasts of tbe shift just gone
oil'duty. In pryiug on a big piece of
rock, weighing ovei a ton. it cam" down
Lumber is being delivered here everv I ««»«» unexpectedly and although Joek
1 jumped back snd thus saved bineseu
from being crushed to death,itcaMgtit
one of his (eet crushing part of it au4
making a painful wound. He was taken,
down to the mill on the tramway and
ihu manager sent a team up and had
him brought down to town, where Dr.
Brouse dressed the wound. Ho was re-
| moved to the hospital at New Denver oo
Mondsv's boat where it is hoped he will
week for local builders.
Local dancers enjoyed  themselves on
Monday evening iu MeKiniion'a Hull.
Dr. H. Burgess, of Vancouver,  visited
the town professionally during the week.
Getting up with the "son" is a common
practice   when   thero isu teething baby [
in tlm tamily.
J. A. Kirkpatrick, who has l«een revis- I goon recover from his accident
iting his home on the Atlantic seaboard, |  -
returned on Mon.hi v.
THE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
We
showing
are now
a nice assortment of
MEN'S SPRING AND
SUMMER SUITS
and the very latest
PATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
TUo Wm. Hvttiter Oo., T**yt**\.*
Silverton,    13.   C
LACK  OK TRANSPORTATION.
The Hewett company is busy putting
in a system of trails from thnt mine
down onto the Galena Farm flats. Thev
bave a lot of ore sucked up at tbe mine
and a huge amount piled upon tli-
dumps ready for sacking, bnt havo no
way of bringing it into town for shipment to Ihe smelter as there is no road
across the tints and the trail is hardly
piusable. This company if thcycuid
get a littlo help from the government
would build a good wagon road to their
mine, which would not only tap ihe
Hewett property but would I.e a main
road to the niiinv other promising
properties In that part of our district.
This toad if built Would be a paving investment for our government, fiom the
day it was built, for outside of the other
pro|>ertioH the royalty paid by the Hewett
would   more   than   pay   interest on the
Investment. With o wagon rood the
Hewett would employ a much larger
forco of miners and ship a large amount
of ore, thus adding to the prosperity and
wealth ol the whole country.
TO UK REPAIRED AX ONCE.
A letter received by Mr. J. A. McKinnon fiom the Chief Commissioner
ot Lands and Works authorises liiin to
engage a force of men for tho immediate
repairing of the font Mile wagon road!
nnd to expend the sum of 4 <*i0. on ihe
work. This favorable news is the
result of the effort made by Mr M.-
Kiiinon nnd others to impress upon tl •
uew Government the desirability of
keeping thin road iu repair.
A force of men are again at work on
the Storm claim.
Assessment work is being done on the
Ke\ stone claim, near town.
Considerable work is being: done on
the Little Giant claim uear the Torpedo.
Hill Bros, boat brought in a load ol
luinlicr, on Friday, for the Van-ouvcr
mine,
Two carloads of ore from Bosun Landing was the output of the Bosun mine
forthe week.
W, C. E. Koch shipped a wagon anil
six horses from here yesterday for the
Enterprise,
The Thompson Bros,, W. and A'.., aro
encountering some line gold-copper
ore. in their claim the Golden NN edge on
Red Mountain,
A new tunnel has been started a short
distance above the No. t tunnel st tlie
Kinily Kdith mine and is now in a
di-tanco of 50 feet.
A mud slide hns cariied away about
111.1 feet of tho Enterprise wagon road
and has stopped the ore shipments from
that mine until the brook can be
repaired.
W.F.Yates   will   leave   Ott the 37th.
inst  for Cape Nome, where he itoes for a
! company   which   is   taking   up  a    big
j dredge   let operate  in   the Capo Nome
pincers.    Mrs.   Yates   will    remain   in
I Silverton.
K. Uammelineyer, superintendent of
the Emily Edith mine, is having some
woik done on tbo Dutchman claim, bis
Ten Mile property. The work is lieing
done by Charley Larsen, former foreman
of the Comstock.
A handsome addition to the row-boat
fleet has just been launched by the
builder, J. Mcltobbie.
Hazel wood's ice-cream is a delicacy
now within the reach of all. Mcintosh
imports it every Friday.
Phil Kowe is building an addition to
his house whicli will make it oue of the
cosiest cottages on tie bench.
The loothall players here have elected
delegates to confer with the League delegates from Ksslo and Sandon.
Many a man makes 11 mistake by
going around telling his troubles when
lie ought to lie advertising his business.
Those who giggled in tho hai k seals
of the church a few years ago are now
snoring in the front seats. How time
does flv.
WOMEN AND W.vlt.
We women teach our little   sons how
wrong
And how ig noble blows aie; school audi
church
Support our precepts, aud inoculate
The   growing  minds   with  thoughts of
love and peace.
"Let dogs delight to bark and bite,"
we say;
But  human   beings with immortal souls
M11.1t rise above tbe methods ol thn
brue
And walk wilh reason and with self-
control.
And
you  men,  yon
then—dear   God I
wUe, strong men,
1 Our selt-Hiiuoiinceil superiors in brain.
. Our peer- in   judgement,   you  go forth
to war!
Yon leip at one another, mutilate
Now Is the   time to start your  garden ; Al„|   Blarvo   ttnii   kill your fellow-men.
Now is the time to seed vonr lawn,  ('.ill and  nfk
at the Silverton Drag  Store and  select  The   world's   applausti   for such heron-
deed*.
You
your seeds. i
Man is an animal,  but  there is something of the vegetable abool him, uith   \\,
an apple In his throat, corns on 1 is Feat
and a heart full of beats.
On  Wednesday G.  H. Dawson, who  he promptly forwarded  to Jacob Dovet
ias   heen   spending   the
SAYS WE AHE "DRY NUKSED."
In roferiiig to tho recent action of the
Senate in advening the Hed'stubo Ion
BID) the Saturday Night of Toronto haa
winter in the
east, returned to Silverton. Mr Dawson
who is manager of the Essex Group and
Silver Wedge properties will no doubt
soon start them up.
Ou Tuesday the Wakefield Minns
shipped two carloads of concentrates to
the smelter at Trail. There sre now-
lying on our wharf, ready for shipment,
two eiiiloinis  of  concentrates  undone
Divini: Rirvtcb «i;l be held In Silver-
ton n>xt Sunday evening a! 7 ."0 1 M,
everyone is eorttlfttly Invited to attend —
JohuG. Duncan, Presbyterian Minister,
Adam and l_ouis Boale, left on Toes-
day for the Fire Valiev country wb ue
they will put in the summer developing
their mining prospects.
Officers of the Bilverton Waterworks
Company were observed busily going
over the streets with a laps measure
during the week. The tirst sod will soon
bo turned.
On Tuesday, last 11. Kneebone, Al.
Wilds and Perrie Altiill'er left for their
property on Dayton creek. They expect
to do considerable work nn tho Uoyal
claim one of their pri-perlies.
All work in tho Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drug Store, will   And
Oil,
Is
the well-known Nelson jeweler.     All ro
pairs are oi'araxtkkd kor onk year. _■
Premier Martin will pass thiOOgh
here next Monday morning on his rosd
to Nelson where ho will address the
electors. As far ns can h« learned, the
Premier will not stop oft' anywhore in
the Slocan.
Yesterday the Finance Committee of
the    Celebration     Committee   made a
mr ofclean ore from the NV'aki field mine, | preliminary    canvass    of    the      tcv ii
boat!  and strut: and if on song is
sung
laudatory epic *rit in blood,
rolling   how   many   widows   jou have
made,
Why then, perforce, yiM say our bards
are dead
And   inspiration    sleeps   to   wake   no
mote.
And we.  tlm women, we  whose   lives
yuil are—
What  can   we   do   but   sit   in silent
homes
And  wait   and sulfor?   Not tor   us tha
hi.ire
Of   trumpets  ami   the  biiRle's  call tu
anus—
For us no waving banners no, supreme,
Triumphant   hour'of   conquest.   Ours
the slow-
Dread   tot lure   of   uncertainty,     each
dav
The bootless battles with the same despair.
And when at best your victories  reach
our ears,
Thero  reaches   with them to our pitying hearts
The thought of countless homes   msda
ilesoiato
other  women   weeping   for thoir
dead,
men,  wise men, supeiior beings.
pay, ,    ..
there  no  substitute   lor war in this
Great  age   and   era?   Ii   you answer
".No,"
Then   let  us   rear   our  children tu bn
•volves
And   teach them  from the cradle how
to kill.
should we woinou waste our time
and words
In talking  peace,   when  men  declare
for war?
—E1U W'ueekr  WL'.to*.
Why READY TO MOVE
Activity of the Boer' Renders My
Movement Wise.
London, April 17.—At last Gen.
Roberts seems to be on the eve of
making his main advance towards
Pretoria. Unless all the usually
reliable sources of information are
a t fault, the British army will in a
few days march northward. After
the many reports that have purported to tell of this movement, there
is naturally, even in the best informed quarters, considerable hesitancy in definitely settling upon the
day, but it is now thought Lord
Roberts is likely to leave Bloemfontein at the end of this week, or the
beginning of next.
The long weary wait in the Free
State capital has apparently effected a much needed rest, though it is
possible that Lord Roberts would
still further have delayed his advance, had not the Boer activity
forced him to put his forces into
such a position that today, unless
they quickly proceed northward,
tbe strategic advantage will be lost.
The advance will be made with 75,-
000 men, it is thought.
Hough ou Duller and Warren
London, April 17.—The war of-
' fice tonight publishes in the Gazette
a dispatch from Lord Roberts,
dated February 13, submitting Gen.
Buller's dispatches describing the
Spion kop and other operations
from January 17 to January 24.
Lord Roberts deals severely with
General Warren and some others.
Even General Buller does not escape. Lord Roberts complains that
the plan of operations is not clearly
described in the dispatches. After
stating General Buller's intentions,
as communicated to Sir Charles
Warren, who commanded the
whole force, Lord Roberts points
out that Sir Charles Warren seems
to have concluded, after consultation with his officers, that the
flanking movement ordered by
General Buller was impracticuble
and therefore so changed the plan
ot advance as to necessitate the
capture and retention of Spion kop.
Belief Approaching Wepener.
Maseru, Basutoland, April 16.—
The Boers for two days have been
displaying great activity along the
Reddersburg and Rouxville roads.
Their scouts report that the British
are advancing on these places to the
relief of Wepener, and the burghers
consequently are divided whether
to remain or tp retire. A majority
of them desire to abandon the investment of Wepener, fearing to be
cut off, while the minority, led by
Commandant Olivier, are reluctant
to move as long as there is a chance
to capture Colonel Dalgetty's garrison.
Scouts have just reported rifle
firing in the direction of Thabanchu.
Another 4hiihc1I__.ii Bead.
Ottawa, April 17.—A cable was
received this morning from Lieut.
Col. Otter announcing the death of
Private W. J. Adams of the Seventh fusiliers, of London, Out. Adams was wounded on Feb 18.
THE DRIFT OF EVENTS.
How fast events are tending towards the realization of what was
once considered the visionary.dream
of imperial federation is plain to
one who watches developments in
c .nncction with the South African
war. The ready giving of aid by
the colonies to the mother country
met with its response in the compliments bestowed on the colonial
troops by Lord Roberts before his
departure from England; in the
confidence he showed in the Canadians by placing them at the post of
danger arid of honor at Paardeburg;
in the praises showered upon them
both by him and by the whole empire for the manner in which they
aaquitted themselves on that occa-
s:on; in the granting of commissions in the imperial army to 114
Australian officers and to a number
of Canadians. All these evidences
of appreciation are in strong contrast to the contempt with which
officers in the imperial army have
been accustomed to treat colonial
troops.
At the same time, the imperial
government is considering measures
to put lhe idea of federation in
practical and permanent shape.
Mr. Chamberlain has gone so far as
to propose giving the colonies seats
in the imperial council ''hen it is
considering matters of imperial
concern, and Lord Salisbury is said
to have such a scheme under seri-
ious consideration. The Liberal
leaders, with few exceptions, have
expressed themselves as in hearty
sympathy with this movement.'|The
I New Zealand government has already assumed its right to a voice
in the South African settlement by
entering a protest against the continuance of Boer ind°pendence.
Such an act on the part of n colony
a few years ago would have been
regarded as the highest presumption, but it has passed without objection.
One has only to look back ao
years to realize the vast change of
sentiment which has come about on
this subject. Twenty years ago
this Aionth the British Liberals
had been returned to office by an
overwhelming majority after an
oratorical campaign in which Lord
Beaconsfield had been condemned
by Mr. Gladstone for every step
taken to maintain the interests ot
the empire abroad. The Liberal
leader condemned the steps taken
to check the Russians at the gates
of Constantinople; to prevent Afghanistan from being made subservient to Russian designs on In-
dit; to ensure the security of the
route to India by the acquisition of
the Suez canal and the island of
Cyprus; to protect the settlers in
Natal by the destruction of the Zulu
power, and to secure peace
and     British supremacy in
South Africa by the annexation of the Transvaal republic. The
government of India and the protection of the colonies were represented by the Liberal leaders to be
such a burden that it was a matter
for serious consideration whether
those countries should not be turned loose to shift for themselves.
The- Little Englanders were then in
control and the imperialists were
scoffed at as jingoes.
Now Herbert Gladstone, the son
of the greatest of these Little Englanders, and Lord Roscberry are
vieing with their political opponents
in their earnest advocacy of imperial unity and federation. The few
opponents of the war are being
driven from parliament by their indignant constituents and the shilly
shrilly sentimentalists who cry
"Stop the War" cannot get a patient hearing.
Federation is in the air, and it
will come, not by the cut and dried
methods oi a constitutional convention, which crystallizes national as-
pirations with pen, ink and paper,
but by that spontaneous mutual attraction and community of purpose
which constantly adapt the means
to the e id in the light of the emergencies of the hour until a good,
working plan is perfected. There
are many difficult problems to solve,
but they will be solved, because all
the parties interested are determim d
to find a solution.
THEVERCEOFWARMADE BLUNDERS
Fight Impending Between Japan and
Russia in Korea.
Failure of Buller and Warren the Sole
Topic of Discussion.
Yokohama, March 31. via San
Francisco, April 18.—If the quick
and steady dispatch of telegrams
from Korea means aught of a
really serious nature, the inference
is that Japan and Russia are on the
verge of war. Outwardly, however,
there is absolute calm, and the tone
of the press is but slightly bellicose.
Japan, with her great fleet, would
make short work of Russia's naval
force and command the situation for
the lime at least, with all the advantages which an added prestige
would confer.
IN MKIHOHV OP THK Hill VK.
< -lliiHtl.ill   Soldier- It, < ..lliliieml   Ifloll-
■uncut lo Fallen Comrade*.
Toronto, April 17.—The Globe
correspondent with the first Canadian contingent at Bloemtontein,
under date of April 16, cables as
follows:
"There is a very strong feeling
among the Canadian troops here in
favor of some action by the Dominion government looking to the erection Of a monument to the memory
of those from the Dominion who
have fallen in battle.
It runnel Please Them Both.
Toronto, Ont., April 17.—The
Ontario government is in a dilemma
to know in which county, North or
South Oxford, to place the boys'
reformatory school, now located at
Pentanguishene, which it contemplates moving. Both members for
the above counties are Liberals and
are both determined to have the
new buildings located in thei respective constituencies.
PROITI THK SOLDIERS' WIVKS.
PIHKMKN IN POLITICK.
Mimv    Ailiiili.   He    Gave     Kx-Cbler
Thompson money at Kle_-n.ni.
Toronto, April 17.—A t the inves
tigation by Judge McDougall into
the charges that lhe Toronto fire
brigade is organized as a species
of civic Tammany, ex-Mayor Shaw
yesterday deposed that he gave
deputy chief, now chief, Thompson,
$300 in the mayoralty election of
1899, when he (Shaw) defeated McDonald and McMurrich. This
money was intended to cover
Shaw's expenses in two of the civic
wards.
Bouquet   lor   lh<-   <luc.ii   A    Vlult   to
Donnybrook.
Dublin, April 17.—After her morning drive, Queen Victoria received
in audience the daughter of Ser-
geant-Major Hartigan, now at Colenso, Natal, who presented her
majesty with a bouquet from the
wives and widows of the non-commissioned officers and men ot the
Irish regiments in South Africa.
The Queen's afternoon drive included Donnybrook.
LATENT STOCK QUOTATIONS.
-HKKI)
Athabasca       28U
B C. Uold Fields         4
BlRTliree         »
Brandon & Oolden 1 'row 11.      23
Canudian Oold fields  7',
(,'ariln-i. [Camp Mi -Kinney \t 1 03
f'r.tii   '_.   V_l__>.    I'....,   I'....I *'I7    __il
Crow's Nest Fuss Coal .... $37 60
Deer Trail No. 2  10J4
Deer Park [newj  2
Dundee.  15
Evening Star  0%
Kiiiriiiont..  	
Olant  2U.
111 miesliike  2
Iron Mask  34
Iron Colt  7
LX. L  17
Iron Horse	
.Mm Blaine  iiu.       ]j
mn
21
8
7
21
«X
83
*:» ou
a
11
»y*
i*
31
Jumbo  25
Kill). (Ur.. lien.....|  17
KnobHlll  75
Lone Pine (,'onsol....'  18
Minnehaha  51^
Monte < Win ,111  JU
Montreal Oold Fields  7
Morrison  :;yt
Mountain Lion  m
Noble Ktvt   5
Northern Belle  2%
Novelty  g
Okanogan    2li
Old Ironsides    97
Palmer Mountain   21
Peoria Mines  2
Princess Muud  n
Itmiil.lor-CurilxHi  2K
Itnl Inn ul leu  4
Republic $ 1 12    $ i OH
St. Klnio Consolidated  3^-
SniUfrgler  1^
Tnimir;n. I Kenneth j  11
Trail Creek Hid. Treas ... 3%
Van A min  4^
Victory-Triumph  3
Virginia   4
War Kagle Consolidated..I 1 in
Waterloo  t\u
White Bear  2%
Winnipeg  ]6
Wonderful  s%
10
(16
14
8
8
*%
•A
74
•2y.
iy.
2
Ti
10
3
20
ay.
2
3
2
2
$ 1 30
13
1%
London, April 18.—The publication of Loid Roberts' dispatch, describing the Spion Kop and other
operations from January 17 to January 24, is severely criticised by
Spencer Wilkinson in the Morning
Post today. He characterizes it as
ill-advised, "The effect of it on the
army in Natal," he says, "must be
positively demoralizing, Utiles! great
changes are made in the commands,
changes which, if necessary, should
have been made without any preliminary public ventilation of mistakes and censure. Since the publication of Lord Roberts' dispatch, the position of Sir Redvers
Buller is untenable, and his resignation or recall is a matter of course.
But the government cannot be credited with arranging the matter with
consideration or generosity. There
was no need to trumpet these things
to the world. The dispatches might
have slept in the archives for the use
of future historians, and General
Buller's recall might have been arranged with diplomacy and delicacy.
"General Buller was appointed
by the government, and by the government he should have been recalled without exposure. Can it be
that thc government shrinks from
taking the responsibility and seeks
to shelter itself behind Lord Roberts
and behind the expression of public
opinion which the dispatches are
sure to occasion? If that be the
case, the government i.s certainly
not setting an example to its generals in the field. The government
is in supreme command and ought
to assert its authority without first
appealing to the man in the street."
Commenting on the same subject, the Times says: ',Lord Roberts' severe condemnation is justified only too clearly by the official
narratives of what took place. The
story is painful, but it is well for
the nation and for the army that it
should be told clearly, without concealment or exaggeration. It is
not the least of the great services
Gen. Roberts is now rendering the
country, that he exposes with judicial impartiality an.l wise, wholesome severity, errors and omissions
in high quarters which have cost
us so very much."
They All iliiimi Buller
London, April 18.—Lord Roberts' criticism of General Buller,
General Warren and Colonel Thor-
nycroft continues to be the chief
topic of interest. All the afternoon
papers comment at length on the
strictures of the commander-in-
charge in South Africa, taking the
same lines as the morning pipers,
praising Lord Roberts for his frankness and speculating upon what the
publication of the dispatches at the
present moment portends. Some
of them maintain that there is nothing left for General Buller but to resign. In referring to General Buller's report, the St. James Gazette
is particularly scathing. The Globe
declares that a "more pitiable record of indecision in plan and confusion in execution we have seldom
read," and adds that what little
reputation General Buller has left
has been scattered to the winds.
Disturbed the Trench Digger*,
Practically no developments have
been reported so far in today's
South African cables. A dispatch
from Warrenton, dated Tuesday,
April 17, says:
"Finding the Boers busy making
A Railroad 10 Mahomet'* Tomb.
Constantinople, April 18.—The
Servia, the organ of the palace, announces an imperial decision to
construct a telegraph and railway
from Danuscus to Mecca.
TO NEWSPAPER MEN!
FOR SALE.
A Paper Folder, a Washington Hand Press,
a Cylinder Press.
Also the "Trail Creek News" and plant.
For particulars, address
WILLIAM K. HSI ING, Rossland.
. w trenches, we exploded a few
lyddite shells, following these up
with thc Maxims. The ambulance
was   afterwards observed   on • the
spot."
From Wepener there is nothing
later than Lord Roberts' message of
yesterday, and presumably neither
side has gained any particular advantage at any point in the theatre
of war since the last official dispatches were received.
How the Blunder Occuered.
London, April 18.—General
Warren sets forth the fact that the
Spion Kop operations had not entered into his original plans, as his
instructions were to occupy a plain
north of it. On consultation with
the commander in chief on January
31, however, when the question of
of retiring from or attacking Spion
Kop was discussed, Warren expressed his preference for attacking. This was successfully accomplished by General Woodgate.
Then came the order of the commander in chief to put Thornycroft
in command of the summit. In the
meantime, Warren had sent General Coke up to reinforce him, with
orders to assume command. Ineffectual efforts were made to heliograph Thornycroft, and ask if he
had assumed command. Towards
sunset, he was finally enabled to
get orders through and concluded
the position could be held the next
day, if guns could be provided and
shelter obtained. Both those conditions were about to be fulfilled,
when, "in the absence of Coke,
whom I had ordered to come and
report in person on the situation,
thc evacuation took place, under
orders given on his own responsibility by Thornycroft. This occurred
in the face of the vigorous protests
of Coke's brigade major andothers."
In the conclusion General Warren said: "It i.s a matter for the
commander in chief to decide
whether there will be any investigation into the question of the
unauthorized   evacuation of Spion
Kop."
Boers at Wepener In a Flight.
Maseru, April 17.—Col. Dalgetty's casualties since he has been
besieged at Wepener have been 20
killed and 100 wounded. The Boer
losses are reported to have been
considerably heavier. After the
night attack on April 12 the dead
were left on the field, where they
still lie unburied.
There is a conflict of opinion
among the Boer leaders. Some
want to (attack again, while
others refuse to do so. Desultory
cannon firing and sniping continues.
The Caledon is rising, which
alarms the Boers, who are now on
both sides of the river, and might
be cut off if the stream was to become flooded. Five Boer guns are
believed to be disabled.
Boer Appeal to Afrikanders.
Capetown, April 17,-—The Boer
governments are circulating the
following manifesto to the Afrikanders in southeast Cape Colony:
"We feel that our fate and the
fate of the whole of Afrikander is at
stake and we appeal to you to stand
and fight shoulder to shoulder with
us. You cannot, you may not, allow the tyrant to extinguish forever pur finest traits of character as
a nation. With you on our side,
the issue cannot be doubtful. We
must conquer. God grant that
love for your country and your liberty and the noble virtues of men
truly free may induce you to join us
in the hour of our supreme strut--
gle." K
■lope Boisterous  Weather Continues.
London, April 18.—The Bloemfontein correspondent of the Daily
Telegraph, in a dispatch dated
Wednesday, says:
"It is hoped that the boisterous
weather now prevailing may delay
the Boers and afford us an opportunity of capturing a number of
raiding bands, as only a few drifts
are passable."
Will Adhere to Neutral Poller.
Berlin, April 18.—A high official
of the German foreign office, in the
course of a denial of a number of
sensational statements that have
appeared in print here, said today
to a correspondent of the Associated
Press: "Germany sees no reason
why the Boer special mission should
come to Berlin, as in all the circumstances, Germany will adhere to her
policy of neutrality and non-interference."
ALIVE WITH WORK
The Whole Slope of Red Mountain i
Scene of Activity,
The bulk of the work on the War
Eagle «nd Centre Star mines is still
connected with the installation of
the new machinery, for only three
mining contracts have been let j„
the War Eagle and one in the Ceo.
tre Star.
But the whole slope of Redmoun.
tain from the Centre Star to the
War Eagle shaft is alive with work.
men.    On the Centre Star
(found,
the foundations for thehoist are being
laid, the building and gallows frame
are in course of completion and will
be finished by the time the machin.
ery i.s installed. Grading is in progress for a timber framing building,
which will be an annex to thc main
hoist house. Plans are being pre.
pared tor its equipment with a timber framing machine and all the
saws necessary for the purpose. It
is estimated that in four w.-tks this
new plant will be ready to take out
ore.
The building and foundations for
the 40-drill compressor are read;
and a tower 40 feet high is being
erected to cool the circulating water
for the c.uideiiser. This will serve
to economize water during the dry
season.
The eight-inch steam pipe which
extends 1000 feet up the mountain
from the boilers on the Centre Star
ground to the War Eagle hoist hai
been enclosed in a wooden box, four
feet square. This is being filled in
with fine sifted coal cinders to prevent the radiation of heat and is
protected from water by a drain underneath.
The new engine room of the War
Eagle is being fitted for the new
hoist. The electric compressor ii
being overhauled and some changes
are being made to put it in good
shape.
Plans are being prepared for a
crushing and sorting plant for each
mine, and these will be installed
and in operation during the summer.
l INMIT OO TO HKLFANT.
Thr queen Brgrela Her Inability  *•
Kndurr thr Journr).
Belfast, April 18.—-At a meeting
of the corporation yesterday, the
lord mayor read a letter from
Queen Victoria expressing her
heartfelt thanks for the invitation
to visit Belfast, and her great regret at being compelled to abandon
the idea of making any journey
during her stay in Ireland, on the
ground that the risks of fatigue
would counteract the benefits derived from change and re«t, which
her majesty finds necessary for
her health.
The Expedition to Knniasslr-
Accra, British Gold Coast Colony,
April 17. —The relieving force,
which started recently for Kumassie
in consequence of the tribal uprising
in Ashanti, is probably well on its
way toward its destination, but it i»
reported that thc Ashantis will attack the governor before it  arrives.
Four Italian* Burned to Death.
Newcastle, Pa., April 17.—A
large tenement house occupied by
Italian and negro families near
Rock Point was destroyed by fhe
last night. David Abiatte, an old
man, and his three young nephews,
Joseph, Pastelle and Erwin Abiatte,
Were burned to death.
The si.-.:. 1. on-1.» Kurope.
Teheran, April 17. —The shah
started from here yesterday on his
way to Europe.
Bubonic Plague In Persia.
Teheran, April 17 An outbreak
of bubonic plague is reported in the
Javan Rood district, near the Turk-
he frontier. Since the disease appeared, three weeks ago, 195
deaths have occurred.
Adventures or Shipwrecked Crew
Victoria, April 18,—The steamer
Clayoquot broke her shaft off the
west coast and was abandoned.
The crew, after a hard time in the
woods, found a sloop, with which
they searched the coast and discovered the steamer in a sinking
condition, and towed her to Uculet
n time to save her.
I.,.I. —■' ■ in. im CLOSING IN
forces Will Corner the Assailants of Wepener.
Ion, April 13.—The only de-
jent reported up-to 2 p. m.
[in the cable dispatches re-
[here from South Africa was
avy bombardment of the
trenches  at Warrenton  on
I^_ which resulted in no dam-
e Boers apparently getting
he impression that the Brit-
jitated an attack,
br Gen. Sir Frederick Car-
L accompanied by detach-
[of Bushmen and Scotch
sailed today from Capetown
Ira.
re Adolphus of Teck has re-
I to Bloemfontein after a short
1 Capetown.
Boer sources it is learned
en. Botha has returned from
hting lines and reports that
tish have removed their camp
direction of Elandslaagte. As
tish camp has been situated
; place for some time, the sig-
i-i- .if Gen. Botha's statement
quite clear,
reassuring    reports     from
!fontein published in this
ig's papers have done much
tore confidence in London.
: correspondents seem agreed
ord Roberts knows what he
.it.
I critics  of the afternoon pa-
gerly speculate on the possi-
of the, Boer commandos at
er being cut off.   This seems
possible, as  the   force from
bntein  is  advancing by way
vets Dorp, Gen. Chermside is
hg the objective with the third
on   by way  of   Reddersburg,
en. Brabant's force is moving
Aliwal North by way of Roux-
nd Bushman kop, while across
arder a strong force of Basutos
plosely watching events.
1 the meanwhile, Gen. Rundell's
lion is concentrating at Spring-
tin,   Lord   Methuen's  force   is
K t0 K't to Hoopstadt, and it is
tved that Gen. Hunter's division
1 strengthen   the   British  left at
rteen Streams.
he  weakening of Gen. Buller's
by   the   withdrawal   of   the
and   Irish    brigades,   now
Gen. Hunter, is attributed to
[act that the general command-
n Natal  has  decided that tbe
ng of the  passes  by his troops
npracticable,  and  that  he will
|ely  attempt    to    maintain  the
us   quo   until     Lord   Roberts'
advance  shall  open his road
kugh Laing's Nek.
fcyond the mysterious Capetown
regarding  the early  expecta-
1 of good news about Mafeking,
fe is  no further  information at
in connection  with  that be-
fuered  town,   which  now must
|n great straits.
Wrong   both times.
the cocksure military cities of the
ndon papers are now revising
ir opinions in the light of facts,
few weeks ago, when Roberts
ered Hloemfontoin, they said the
r was virtually over and talked
f'y of the advance to Pretoria as
augh it would be a triumphal
^cession. Now they are ready
[turn and condemn Roberts for
|ting the enemy break through to
rear.
They were wrong  in the first in-
»nce and are only half  right now.
Pberti used  up his  transport and
Dfe out his  horses in  his advance
Kimberly,      Paardeberg     and
foemfontein.    He had to stop and
ait equine rc-inforccmcnts, bring
supplies,   repair   the   railroads
W put matters in such shape tbat,
hen he once resumed the advance,
could  keep  going as rapidly as
advanced    from   the   northern
pi.tier of Cape Colony to Bloem-
]>ntein.    Even   were all these pre-
linaries  completed,  he could not
nfely advance until Gatacre, Gemots and Brabant, had cleared from
its rear the Boer forces which they
N   dislodged    from   Stormberg,
Jordrecht und Colesberg and driven
[cross., the Orange river.    It was
assumed, when Olivier retreated
with these forces, that they would
remain in one body and might be
caught between two British armies.
When it was learned that Olivier
had worked his way past Bloemfontein towards the main Boer
army, it was again assumed that
he had taken the whole force with
him. The fact now appears to be
that he scattered his army into
small raiding parties, designed to
worry the British line of communications, and only took a small force
as an escort to his convoy of provisions &c; or that he returned
southward on his raid.
The only serious mistake Roberts seems to have made is in placing too great confidence in the new
born loyalty of those Free Staters
who have surrendered their arms
and taken the oath of allegiance.
He appears to have simply scattered in his rear a host of men who
will act as spies to the enemy,
guiding the latter, posting them as
to the movements of the British
and treacherously leading the latter
into traps set ready for them The
Boers have been trekking for sixty
years to avoid British rule and
would not easily become loyal
subjects through the effect of an
oath. They know now that British victory means British rule for
all time and that the gate is closed
against further trekking to escape
it, for they are surrounded by
British territory on three sides and
can only flee into the na~row strip
of Portuguese territory on the remaining side. Thus Boerdom is at
bay and it will fight to the death.
Under such circumstances, it is
probable, sincerely as we may hope
otherwise, that no Boer can be
trusted to remain even neutral until
he is either dead or a prisoner.
PAIR OF THIEVES!BEATS OFF BOERS
MISCELLANEOUS   NOTES.
The Boer order relating to furloughs betrays anxiety on the part
of some to suspend fighting while
they attend to their crops.
Some cheerful optimists thought
the Strathcona Horse would only
arrive at the Cape in time to join in
tiiumphal parades, but they will
find plenty to do in chasing the
Boer raiders out of the southern
Free State.
The arguments of those who
have attributed the relief of Ladysmith more to the diversion of Boer
forces in consequence of Roberts'
advance than to Buller's generalship receive strong support from the
savage , criticism of an officer who
was with Buller. This involves no
reflection on the soldiers, who won
in many instances in spite of bad
generalship, but it means that their
bravery was often wasted at an
enormous sacrifice of liie.
At his own request Gen. Otis
has been relieved of his command in
the Philippines. The worst criticism made on him is that he has
attempted to do too much himself
and underestimated his task, but in
practically pacifying Luzon, he has
accomplished much in 15 months.
WORK   ON   THB   IXL
A Lower Tunnel to Be Hun O K Mill
Bay Be Leased
President John S. Baker, of the
I. X. L. mine, is in Rossland from
Tacoma and speaks well of the condition of the mine.    He said:
"We are drifting east on the
ledge on No. 3 level, and are in
about 70 feet and have drifted 30
feet west, which brings us to the
end line. The ledge holds its
width and value, though there is
considerable variation in the value
on the several levels. We are
still shipping ore from the stope
above the No. 1 tunnel. The average of the ore we have shipped
is over $40 and it would average
$25 without sorting.
"We are just about closing arrangements to run a tunnel through
the Midnight ground, which would
give us fully 150 feet more depth,
or as much as we gained by all the
three upper levels combined. We
are also negotiating with Mr. Glyd-
den for a lease of the 0. K. mill
with a view to milling the ore."
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
Father and Son Captured for Robbing
Cabins on the Coast.
Victoria, April 16.—The provincial police have made an important
arrest today. Complaints have
come for some time from residents
ot the islands and along the coast
that cabins were being pilfered, and
suspicion settled on Bayless and
his father Edward, who live on
Cadboro bay, the former having
served a year at Nanaimo for stealing furs and traps a year and a half
ngo from Gabriola island. A search
ot the cabin disclosed an immense
stock of stolen property, a lot of
which was identified.
The boy was arrested, but the
father hid in the woods till last night
when he attempted to escape to
San Juan island on the American
side. The police descried him far
out by the aid of^glasses and overhauled him before crossing to the
American waters. Tiiey wilt come
up for trial shortjy.
GENERAL ILK HUN IN TBE FALL
Sir Charles I* Confident That Conservative* Will Win
Montreal, April 16.—In an interview this morning, Sir Charles
Tupper, who is here on party business, declared that the general elections will most probably be held in
September or October. As to the
result, Sir Charles said he was
more than ever convinced that the
Conservatives will be returned by a
good working majority.
THE NEW HOIST AHBIVED.
The Centre Star nine at Bossland I*
Now Splendidly Equipped.
The new hoist for the Centre
Star mine, at Rossland, has arrived from Hooperstown, Ohio. It
[eft that place on March 30 and
came through from Chicago by the
C. P. R. in the fast time of nine
days. It will be immediately installed at the new main sh-ift,
where preparations have been made
for it. It has a capacity of hoisting
from a depth of about 1500 feet and
will greatly expedite the development of the mine.
The B. A. C. has received two
carloads of pipe and fittings ovtr
the Red Mountain road for the new
system of power installation at tbe
Black Bear. Word has also been
received of the airival at Spokane of
three 100-horse-power boilers built
by the Jenckes Machine company at
Sherbrooke, and they are expected
here today.
Work has bien resumed on the
tramway from the Josie and No. I,
which was suspended on account of
deep snow, and the ore bins for
those mines ire also being completed. The two upper bins at the
mine terminals, one at each of the
mines named, will have 500 tons
capacity each. A double bin of
1000 tons capacity will be built at
the railro-td terminal, one to load
Josie and the other No. 1 ore.
The sloping of ore in these mines
will begin when the 40-drill compressor ordered last September, but
not yet received, has been installed.
Brabant Defeats the Enemy at Wepener
and Captures Their Guns.
The trial of the three men who
tried to blackmail Munnik, the state
mining engineer of the Transvaal,
brought out the tact that attempts
will be made to blow up the mines
when the British invade the country. But that will only increase
the indemnity the Boers will have
to pay.
Hon. Hugh John Macdonald proposes to accept the Northern Pacific's offer to sell its Manitoba lines
by buying them for the province and
thus to make a beginning of government ownership of railroads.
The Ontario government is accused of having granted monopolies
in the pulpwood of great blocks
embracing thousands, of square
miles of country and of trying
to do it again. The Globe defends
it, but the World calls it a grab.
Capetown, April 16.—It is reported that Gen. Brabant has defeated the Boers at Wepener and
captured their arms.
Brltl*b Losse* at Wepener.
Aliwal North, April 16.—It is officially reporhd that the British
losses at Wepener in four days
fighting were 18 men killed and
132 wounded.
Fighting the Belief Column.
Brandfort, April 13, via Lorenzo
Marques, April 16.—Fighting with
Brabant's Horse at Jammersberg
Drift continues. Commandant Pe-
tous Dewet is reported to have engaged the troops sent from Bloemfontein to Brabant's assistance.
There was also a brush with a
British column advancing towards
Bultfontein, but without decisive
results. All the foreign attache
are now here.
Will Advance with 80,000 men.
New York, April 16.—Isaac N.
Ford cables from London as follows:
"Optimism is the note of the
meagre dispatches received from
the front during the last 24 hours.
The long halt is nearly ended and
preparations are making for an irresistible march northward. It is
intimated that General Roberts can
leave 20,000 men to guard the railway behind him and still have 80,-
000 men available for an advance to
the Vaal river.
No Gra«* lor Boer Horse*.
"One reason for the British confidence is the lack of pasturage on
the veldt, "which will deprive the
Boers of the use of their wiry,
hardy ponies. General Roberts' inaction has brought nature into the
field as an ally against the Boers.
The high veldt leading toward the
Transvaal will be without grass
alter a few hard frosts during the
next fortnight, and as President
Kruger's warriors will not have any
orderly system for the transportation of forage, their raiding operations will be lendered more difficult
as the southern winter sets in."
Contllellng New* from Wepeuer.
London, April 16.—2:10 p. m.—
Conflicting reports regarding the
conditions at Wepener continue,
but at this hour there is no
definite or important news from the
front.
A Capetown dispatch says nearly
3000 horses have been landed there
since April 13, which indicates that
every effort is being put forth to
remedy the great defect in the British organization.
Boer Delegate lu Holland.
The chief Boer delegate, Fischer,
accompanied by Dr. Leyds, visited
the president of the Dutch cabinet
today at the Hague. The doings
of the Hoer delegates create little
speculation in England
Frederick Villiers, the veteran
war correspondent, who arrived at
Southampton today from the front,
said he believed the work of the
war was over, but that guerilla warfare  would continue for some time.
Uoer New* Irom Wepeuer
An official bulletin issued at Pretoria, April 13, reports that the
burghers captured 500 slaughter
oxen at Wepener and that General
Freneman that day defeated the
British, causing them to retire in
the direction pf Wolver Poort, apparently over the Orange river.
The Irish-American .ambulance
arrived at Pretoria April 13.
The Boers report no casualties
during the recent fighting at Warrenton.
Boer* Botlre lu Natal.
London, April 16.—A special dispatch from Ladysmith, dated April
16, 5:40 a. m., says:
"Native scouts have just reported
that the Boers in  the   Elandslaagte
district have   retired   beyond   Biggarsberg.
I     "Other information tends to con
firm the report that the Boers have
succeeded in blowing up three important collieries near Wessels
Nek, completely destroying the engine house and plant."
Heaths Among Canadian*.
Toronto, April 16.—The Globe's
correspondent with the first Canadian contingent at Bloemfontein
cables under date of April 14 as follows:
"Captain Beattie, Toronto, formerly of the Queens Own Rifles,
and Private R. Harrison, Montreal
Garrison artillery, died today of enteric fever. Beattie had been ill
since March 29. Just before he
was stricken he was transferred to
"A" company as acting color sergeant.
"The following sick and wounded
have sailed for England, in addition
to those mentioned in previous dispatches:
"By steamer Doune Castle,
March 24.—T. Peppeat, RCA,
Quebec company; Corporal T. E. R.
Baugh, RCA, Montreal company;
Private H. J. D. Andrews, 5th R C
A, Western company; Privates R.
H. M. McLaughlin, R C R I, S. M
Ward, Queens Own, and James
Kennedy, Queens Owti, of the Toronto company.
"By steamer Oratavia, March 31
—Corporal J. Smith.Twenty-second
battalion, London company; Private
A. S. Batson, Fifth RCA, Western
company; Private J. H. Sutton, Q
U O R, Toronto company; Private
MacAuley,Forty-third battalion, Ottawa company.
"Lieutenant McDonald arrived
here today from Canada aud is posted with the Quebec company. , The
whole regiment is being outfitted
with new clothing and accoutrement."
To Hu) Horses for the War.
Toronto, April 16.—Major Dent,
of the British army remount service,
and Veterinary Inspector Phillips
are in the city for the purpose of
purchasing remounts for the British
army in South Africa.
TARTEBREAKSOUT
He Expresses Opposition to the War
in Paris Interview.
Quebec, April 16.—Le Soleil, in
its issue of Saturday night, reproduced an interview with Hon. J. I.
Tarte published in the Journal de
Paris, in which the Canadian minister of public works is quoted as
saying that it is quite possible 99
per cent of the French Canadians
disapprove of the present South
African war and think that Canada
could have put the money spent in
sending contingents to that country
to better practical use. "But, as
good citizens, we have to submit to
the opinion of the majority, otherwise no progress would be made,"
says Mr. Tarte. French Canadians, he added, were loyal, because they were obliged to be, for
reasons economic and social.
The interviewer remarked that
some of the Ftench Canadian papers humiliated themselves before
the British in a manner painful to
observe.
To this Mr. Tarte replied that
that was not the case with La
Patrie, published by his two sons
but under his supervision. He
declared that that paper would
continue to defend the tri-color,
"that unique and holy relic which
still binds our hearts to France."
THE TBOOP8 CALLED OCT.
1111 111-, to Subdue Croton Rioters, Who
Threaten Dynamite.
Croton Landing, N. Y., April 16.
—Vague rumors of dynamite being
used by the strikers to break the
old Croton dam and flood the Croton
valley were noised around during the
night, but up to an early hour this
forenoon everything was quiet and
orderly.
When the result of the conference
at New Vork was circulated among
the men last night, and they knew
that the militia had been ordered to
the scene, there were growls and
murmurs of increased discontent,
and the recognized leader of the
strikers made no secret of the fact
that the fight would be continued
until the men got what they demanded.
The full quota of squadron A,
under command of Major O. B.
Bridgman, assembled this morning
at their headquarters. The troops
prepared for field service and will
march all the distance, going into
camp ut Ardley tonight and proceeding to Croton Landing tomorrow.
It was learned that applications
for warrants for the arrests might
soon occur.
At 8 o'clock about 150 of the
strikers gathered on top ot the hill
near what is called "Little Italy"
and they were addressed in Italian
by the leaders. The purport of this
talk could not be learned. About
40 of the men on the hill were
armed with rifles and shotguns.
Many of the others carried revolvers and some of them carried
hatchets.
THE   EXPOSITION OPEN
President   Loubet   Inaugurated    the
Ureal   Pari* Show
Paris, April 14.—The Paris exposition was opened at noon today
by President Loubet, with the
words. "I now declare the exposi-
! tion of 1900 open." Shouts of "Vive
; Loubet" and "Vive la Republique"
arose from his 4,000 hearers and
high hats were waved in the air.
The crowds outside the hall took
up thecheering.|
A SURPRISE FAILS
Tagalos in  Mindanao Attempt  to
Storm the Barracks.
Manila, April 17.—Twelve hundred Tagalos attacked Cases, the
battalion headquarters of the Fortieth regiment at Cagayan, Island
of Mindanao, on April 7. The
Americans had 15 casualties, while
the attacking force had 50 killed
and 30 wounded or taken prisoners.
The enemy, numbering 150 riflemen, their commander being bolo-
men, archers and mounted spearmen, swooped down in a howling
mass at daylight, surprising and
killing three of the sentries. They
swarmed the streets in small parties, some bringing scaling ladders,
by means of which they attempted
to enter houses.
The Americans tumbled out of
their barracks and formed in the
plaza and the companies began
sweeping the town, the subsequent
fighting lasting 20 minutes. Twelve
of the wounded Americans are now
on board the hospital ship Relief.
The enemy withdrew to the mountains in great contusion.
DOl WLAB LEFT A PAIHILY..
Murder ol Ihe Soldier AlienatesUympa
th>- for Croton Strikers.
New York, April 17.—Sergeant
Douglas, of Mount Vernon, shot
last night at the Cornell dam, leaves
a wife and two babies. He was a
Scotchman, and had served in the
British army.
Croton Landing, N. Y., April 17.
—Prior to the treacherous and mysterious shooting of Sergeant Douglas last night, the striking Italians
had a good deal of sympathy among
the people in their fight with the
contractors for the construction of
lhe Cornell dam. Since the soldier
was shot all sympathy with the
strikers has disappeared.
The Shah Is on'io Europe.
Teheran, April 17.—The shah
started from here yesterday on his
way to Europe.
The Queen's Day lu Ireland
Dublin, April 16.—The queen
took her customary morning drive
today. She will visit Kilmainham
hospital this afternoon and thence
will go to the castle, where she will
take tea with Earl Cadogan, the
ord lieutenant of Ireland, and
Countess Cadogan. I
Tl*e OPPOSITi
SELKIRK      TIIE
HOTBI.,     * WHAIF
TUG NIL V t R1' 0 A' 1.1 \.
Saturday, Aran. 21,   i900.
LARGE     AND    COMFORTABLE
BOOMS TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN     THE     ,
NORTHWEST.
IMMUMUETT".
SILVERTON,
mors
B. C.
Daigle's Blacksmith Shon.
General Blaeksmithiug      •»•
• • •     and Repairing Done.
EXPERT   HORSE   SIIOKE   ALWAYS   ON   HAND,
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
8. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON. B. C.
THB
ARLINGTON
HOTEL,
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Whnrf.
GOOD  SERVICE COMFORTAIILI'
ROOMS.
IM'I'.I IKllhll  EVERY   SATURDAY   AT
SILVERTON, B. 0.
ment, who^'vr they may
they will loavo our luinii
nnd
roads and trail.'
mathl son «i-(is.,   l.ilitom a Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application nt this office.
........................ I
EDITORIAL OirnWMGS.   j!
Imaxaaamaaa.mi
A SPLENDID OUTLOOK, IF	
Dining Room under the charge ol
Mira Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied witli <ill Ihe delicacies
of the season.
HENDERSON* GETHINO, - Props.
SLOOAN CITY B. 0.
Ji G. GORDON,
MIMS, ItEAlESTATE, COMYANGER
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      B. C.
j. m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITV,     B. C
J-1-Mcintosh,
DEALER IV ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT CON-
FECT10NERY	
CIGARS     AND
T0BACC08
ALL KIND OF
8UPPLIE8INTHE
STATIONARY     LINE
 FISHING TACKLE—
THE LATEST  NOVELS. Ac.
Silverton, B.C.
SINNOTT k O'DONNELL.
FREIGHTERS AND PACKER8.
Contracts large or small taken
And promptly attended to.
Stables in SILVERTON, B. 0.
CHA& A. WATERMAN k CO.
AUCTIO.VEKKH,  Ut'STUMS BrOKEKR,
And General Real Estate Aobnts,
©■rr la VanUy Him >k     -   -     linker Bt.
NELSON,   B, 0.
Within a few weeks, if nothing occurs to change thn plana of the ni.u..i-
get*, nearly allthe shut down mines
in the Silverton district will bo acain
at work and the camp will once mort-
feel the gratifying effect of a substantial pay-roll.
All that is needed now to assure tin
niar prospeiitv of this cnmp is a guarantee that the Mining Laws are to be
left alone. The 8-Hour question more
especially must not be reopened. All
interests bhould combine on this niat-
ti'i- to force the politician." to regard it
as nettled and beyond controversy.
With the knowledge that this question has been decided there will be an
influx of capital into   the Blocan foi
legitimate  mining   purposes,  greatet
than ever before in its history, and the
Silverton district  will come in  for a
large share   of  it.       The  numerous
strikes made  by  the  prospect owners
around the camp have excited considerable attention from capital and have
proved to the outside world that there
is room   here  for many times  more
companies to operate than are at present in  thc field.    .Silverton's citizens
arc, too, of the right kind, and investors   can rest  nssurrd   that   here  no
busy bodies will  try to interfere  with
their investments or   throw  obstacles
.in their way when nuking deals,
With the mines on Four Mile creek
in full blast and tho beginning of work
upon the Red Mountain properties by
the companies now investing in that
district there can lie no doubt of the
onward growth^of the town, and the
establishing of a bank here, now practically certain, will remove the only
inconvenience now felt by mining companies locating here.
be,   is   that] of monopolies; the other   ro presenting
laws  aW«>* PWPle in defence of good sovern-
I ment and Provincial resources, backed
ive us back part ol'our taxes for ; 1)V t|.., frauohi8e, disguise it how they
If tliey will do this  mny.
.„ ,     , .     Uiwrers, we nre just passing througli
we will do the rest. ,. fl ^ jn ^ m(jry ol „)e ywhest of
The Slocnn 1ms borne the brunt   of ! provin(...H_   you wj|] be called upon on
the last year's labor troubles,  and   al- | tj,e nin 0f June to terminate tliat strug-
though there has not been the whole- j gle for existence which is becoming B0
' acute ns to mean starvation or subjection
in the near future.    Your ability to do so
J
JM. M. JI*15]yKI>lJ3Mr,
PT*
ASS A
Silverton
B.t
■ale failure predicted, yet the effeot has
been keenly felt in business circles.
To give the merchants time to recuperate a long rest is needed.
COMMUNICATED.
imposes a urave, let me say, an awful
responsiuillty. On that day vour wive
and your families demand the faithful
performance of that trust that is placed
in your keeping; on that dsy you cannot
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I help being either recreant or true to your
The Editors do not hold themselves in duty hs ii citizen in hsiulinii the sacred
any way responsible for the opinions ex* heritage of freedom and equality to the
pressed nniler this head. All oummun- | risiiif. uenoratjon ; on that day your (el-
iciition, intended for this Column, must j low workman demaiidjthot you a.nk all
bo accompanied by the name of tho writ- ! personal aiui party considerations in or-
er.   None will be published otherwise.    I der tliat you may be able to do your
  ' whole duly,
Tlniiiking yon, Mr. Editor, in anlicipa-
I'-iHTOK Sh.vkhtonian; ; tj0Uj [ alll
Dciir Sir, j Yours,
Now  that dissolution bus i j   .^ j,'0IKV-
taken place ami n date fixed for the el- ;    g,0(,an Cdy< B c _ Af,ri| l6_ 1900_
ection, a lew remarks on  the political '■
THE MATN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF
TH  'Wilson   *%»<"*
E HOtelj      a. i mra, mn.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES,
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THE   REST   BRANDS OF   W1NIS, MQUOR|
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOB MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET, - SLOGAN, B. C.
ituation should not lie'Considered out of
order, nnd especially  from a  laborer's
standpoint—the point so ueneinlly avoid
eil when discussing politics on the eve
of an election
LINES IN THK HANI).
An  Dtnuslng   episode ooenred during
From out the chaos and turmoil of the the  recent sleighing  when onoofiui
late political muddle, two parties, regardless of old parly lines, each representing
one or oilier of the two predominant
classes in the struggle, have taken definite shaic on tho political horizon,
One, led by Chas. Wilson, (« C. P R.
lawyer) is composed of tli,) old Turner
party, C. F R. attorneys and agents of
tin' Mine Owners' Association In fact
it is a concentration of the enemies of
young men was out driving with his
most particular lady friend. Tlm coo-
ver.-ution having turned upon fortune
telling lie sski'd her if she believed i
palmistry. She looked up demurely aito
naively said: "Well, I don't know,
but I thick I could forfoll more pleasure
in tlio drive if I saw the lines in one c
your hands," The fellow sat with
howwl head   and   wrinkled   brow until
Latioraud   -'cod government, organized Ia{   |,,ast two miles had  been traveled;
iu defence of Chinese labor to prevent | tnen  an  expansive smile illumined his
features.   Ho   took   the   lines   in   one
vhite men from'earning a living on the
p'nblic resources handed over (with a
'•onus) to private rorpnr'tioi s, nnd such
other I'lnss enactments as have disgraced
the Provincial Statutes for the lust ten
years,
The other led hv Fighting Too M.iriin
in defence of the 8-Honr law, govern-
menl ownership ol railways maintain*
ance of public resources and a record
that is a guarantee of good faith and
ability to command success.
There will, of course, be a few straight
Labor candidates, who will no doubt coalesce with the latter, and also a smalt
independent Conservative party as au
adjunct to the former.
The above is tlio only logical outcome
of the tyrannous efforts ot Capital to
crush labor organizations out of existence and deprive them of the spirit to
seek legislation through the hallot box,
even conspiring in their desperation in
wholesale disfrnuchisment. The result
is two cnrap.i, tl.i-one representing Capital in the most offensive form, the Trist
and the Combine, backed by the greale.-t
E. M. Brindle,
hand— unl
the other..
{rasped   the  situation with
2v£^3Do_3_aalcL'c Li-vex^
fSta/tale.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK   1I0KSFS  FOR   HIRE   AT   TIEASON.U'.I.K
UATKs -A i,KM RAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER HUSINESS 10N1..
Outside Parties Desiring Horses In Rlverton
Can  Have 'l'liein  Reserved By  Writing To—
+ + + t t t
p. .Mcdonald,
SILVFRTON. - - It. (■
* THE WM. HAMILTON MANUFACTING CO..
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
1 *£> t ei*t>o rout a*!* * On t arlo.
CERTIFICATE OK IMPROVEMENT |
NOTICE:—"Tkiimi'H,"   "Imphboca- I
iii.k" and "Kaimiow CJOABTs" Mint rn)
Claims;   situate in   tlie  Arrow  Lake]
.Mining  Division   of We»t Kootenai
District. I
Where   located:—On  Cariboo   creek
udj   'i;ii'4    the     Millie  .Mack   Minera
Claim.
Take notice thnt I, A. D, Anderson  P. L
S , ot Trail, IX C , tii'tin,' ns agent for tli
ICftluloupa   Mining    and    Developtnei
1 'ompiiny. Limited, Free Miner's Cert'
licateNo. n 114-15, intend sixty days fion
lie date hereof, to apply  to the  Mil in
terorder  for    Certilicates   of  IthproV-
•raents, for the purpose   of obtainin.
'/oivn Grunts of the above claims.
And further take iiotioj   that   aettoi
IDiler section ,'t7,'musi    no  cnuimer.i'ei
.(■fore  the  issuance of such   Certificate-
if Improvements
Dated this Sth dav of September, A. V
1809,
3. I). Anderson.
24 | 2 | 0).
yrup of Horehou^d & Tolu
Iii: COUGHS  .\M» COLOR
fw***W*SA\*sMl<\^ts1tsfi/lAt>^^ **S*M*s*M*4l f
SILVERTON jjgr IIBW,
NO. 95. W. F. Of M.
Meets every Saturday in the Union
Hall in Silverton, at 7:30 p. m.
J. M. M. IJCNEDI M,
President.
J. I. M(I.vrowi,
Finaucial-Secretsry
t  ii    '
MT-PATION WA>TF"i.
A third year student of the School of
Practical Science, Toronto, desires employment in some office requiring an expert draughtsman. Apply to "Draughtsman" care of The Silvertonian.
IP YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
r*9«0 OR IN ARREARS A
| BLUE CROSS WILL
■ SmtAffZ BE FOUND IN THIS
.-.OUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
FAYfi-ULH IN ADVANCE. PRICK
?\VO UO'.L.VRS  \ YEAR.
LOWERY IS THIN-SKINNED!
In our issue of March 24th last, we
referred rather plainly to the methods
then employed at that time by R. T.
Lowery to force local advertisers into
patronising the columns of his sheet,
tho Ledge. The article in question was
much appreciated by our New Denver
reuilers, several of whom took occas-
sion to thank us for coming to their
aisistanoe. Mr. Lowery, however, imagining thst his reputation had been
damaged, threatens to take action
against us in the courts unless we a-
poligi.se, and this week we are in receipt of a letter from a firm of solicitors repeating the invitation to tender
an apology,
For one who has shown so little rn-
gard for the feelings of otheiR and who
has so often invited attack, Lowery is
wonderfully thin-skinned. As for his
reputation, wn would not deprive him
of it Wc would not take it although
a ('. P. R. bonus were thrown in. The
reputation of a man who would drag
the sacred name of "mothor" into the
columns "of bis paper in ordor to festoon it with coarse humor and cheap
wit most be a valuable asset.
D
Jeweler   &c,
esires to inform
tomers
his many cus-
THAT HE WILL
RFSUME BUSINESS
IN THE SLOOAN DURING THE
SUMMER, AND T1UNKS THJM
FOR THEIR PA9T PATRONAGE.
Lilac Cream
FOR CRACKED OR SORE
HANDS. FOR USE AFTER SHAVING. AN EXCELLENT HEALER OF
CUTS OR BURNS.   Pries tots.
THIS PREPARATION IS
BEYOM) DOUBT THE FINEST OF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET. ALL
like it who try.   price ifSo
CAXADlAN
PACIFIC
RAIIvWAY-
and S00 Line.
THE
VICTORIA!
BOTE I,.
llrndqCBrirni lor Mining Km :•
i v-i.yiHi.Vii 11 w, > i .t
AKU   I P 'M -PA'IK
i AI I E I NM LI'.\_-_-KI> IN
THE NOKTHWK6T.
jllOMFSHtlHlMlia.   rr«|is.
? s l LV RRTOK,   B. C
rite Strike Is Off
lad Ut; arc imw
; Rcarfv for
i Business.
0*0
*, iV.iri iii..-., .Irwi.i i:nv
'*, DUMONM, Siijii su
(• IM)  I'i.aikii Niivi:i.-
1 ri inutHi d iv Ni i^iin "1M0 "
i*
ALL WE NEED NOW IS A CHANCE
What is hoped nnd prayed  for by
Perhaps
THE MANY SUDDEN
CHANGES IN THE WEATHER HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD. TRY HORE-
HOUND AND TOI.U.   price25c.
SYRUP OF llOUEHOUND
AND TOLU IS KNOWN TO MANY
WHOM IT HAS CURED. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES. SOLD UNDER A GUARANTEE. Price 25e.
Sold
AT   THE
Silveirtoix  Fure
J>rti££ I!rugs And
Store#     (iliemifiils Kijit.
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
'10 ALL POINTS
EAST anij WEST
Ffrst-Clsss Sleepers on all Trains Iron
REVELSTOKE   and KOOTENAV LD
TOURIST CARS  pass Medicine Hal
Daily for ST. I'ai'l.
Simiavs and  WbdKHDAYS for Ton-
ONT0.
Friday* for Moxtkkai. and IIosthn.
— Same cars pass Revelstoke one day —
 earlier. ■■
CONNECTIONS.
For tbs North.Revelstoke, and Main bine
,7:30 ex' Sunday lv. Sllv«non,
ar. ex. Sundny, 16:20
For   Rowland,  Nelson     Crows   Ne i
llr.uicli and   lioundiiry Country,
10:20ex. Sundny lv. Silveiton,
nr. ix Sunday 13.to
To nnd  from Sandon.
18:00 ex S.md.iy lv Silverion,
ar, ex Sunday, 10:20
Tickkis ih.sui:d 'riiKonui  a.\i> Baooaoi
 CIIKCKKI) TO DKSTIN'ATION. 	
For rates nn I full information apply t<
n"aiest local njjeiit or
II. H REEVES, Agent, Silverton
W.F.ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson
E..I.COYLE.
A. G. P. Agent, Vancouver
axative
old Cure.
To'Curc a   Cold In   One Day.
Contains    Th"  Now   Ingredient.
lU.eK<H.te..nvnfrom»l,o  new (lovorn-! LAKE AVE,   HILVEUTOV,   B. 0   PRICE ^
TRY   IT.
At All Druggist*.
rue.    Piaxo Lamps
•am. Os-^z Taiii.i:i.
•,     Oriii.u     Ainiii.rs
*|ro<i    Nimi;imiim    'III
(•'     CaI.I.    . Nil     F.XAM-
And now   my Koot-SuxR Tiii:m
enay  Friends   I  am *'
piepared  to   reet Ive ••
vour     ordi'rs      Fw *
'fur,*,*, * * -.-_.-.-.-_.-.
e*r*w*r*r*r* *****tt*t*st*i     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
OUB   WATCH  AND .1FWEI.KRY
RI IMIR1N(JDE1ARTMINTIS.M.
As we only employ the most exi* •
lemvd men, ollwork is (Haiiantiiu
Mail nnd Exprwa Otders Receive Onr
, Prompt Aileuliun. »
DONT FORGET THE PLACE.
JACOB DOVER.   "Tub Jnwri.ni.'
NEIWN,  H 0.
YOU CAM
MAKt
12 TO 20
PAIRS
PtRMV,
Klondike
nittcr.
ATTACRMOm
AODRtS
\CREL	
GtORCtTOWN
CANADA.
\9m\rStA tvpi- vv,U,''U KNI'n',N» 'MACHINES AND  V»IBI*
Wltl.11N^Ph-wtt'TK'W WHITE US     CAlALOtJUES FREE.
*^^*™M*^*"""»»Maaii__iSii5aB^w^^^,^gigg_8
The THISTLE HOTEL
Now REOPENED
II'IJER a  NEW
MANAGEMENT,
HOUSE RENOVATED
AND THE BAR PULL*
III 'STOCK F.I»
Thompson Broi.,   Props.
14KB ave„   BILVERTON, B c.
BM

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