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The Silvertonian Mar 24, 1900

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Array THE SttVERTONIAN.
IE THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    MARCH   24, l!IOO.
NUMBER 30
SIGNMENTS
F FR  SH
±t&t*   and    I$££g,*«S
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
-o«9
SilT7-exto_KL, 3S. C.
EYIEW   HOTEL
Silverton	
IS   HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
BAR   IS  SUPPLIED   WITH  BEST  BRANDS    OF
J, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
MINE AND
PROSPECT.
Weekly News Nuggets Of Sloean and
Other Camps.
GENERAL NEWS OF DISTRICT.
ZE^aa-OTxrles.   IPxop.
_BXJ_KKVS tS& oo
HOLF..SALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEAT8
nil. STORES AT
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaslo, Sandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks, 8lrdar
Midway and Greenwood.
|.\IT. ORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD  OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
?
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
to
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY 8HELVE8.      FIT AND FINISH
GURANTEED.   OV ERCOATINGS JUST IN.
t,   The Tailor:   Silverton, 11,(1,
w
K9<***a
I
E WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
We are now showing
a nice assortment of
;n's spring and
summer suits
and the very latest
►ATTERNS IN SUMMER SHIRTs.
kI\g Wm. IXu.n_.te_t* Co., I^ltl.,
bilverton,   ».   O.
Miners Draw Up X Want List.
A Convention of delegates (rom the
Minera' Unions of the Kootenays wax
held in Nelson on Tuesday. Ten Unions were represented and the prospective action of their members in the
coming election was folly discussed.
The most Importsnt work accomplished
by the delegutes was the drawing up of
a platform, which the candidates in the
various Ridings will be asked to endorse
to secure the support of the Unions.
It was further decided that in any
constituency in which the labor vote
was so strong as to controll the election,
the labor party would be asked to
nominate their own candidate.
During the coming campaign and
election the labor party will endeavour
to consolidate their ranks and ascertain
their strength and if possible lay the
foundation for a regular United Labor
Party.
The platform drawn up and ratified
by the Convention was practically tbe
plstform suggestion by tbe Slooan City
Miner*' Union, published in The Hil-
vkbtoNian some few weeks ago. The
changes made consisted in the cancelling ot the plank ask ing for the election
of judges and magistrates and the insertion of two planks asking for compulsory voting and the principles of the
Single Tax.
The   platform  consists   therefore  of
nine planks dealing with the following
qnestions:
Retention of the Eight-Hour law .
Legal recognition ot trade unions.
Arbitration  laws  on   the  pattern of
those in New Zealand.
Initiative and Referendum.
Government ownership ol Railways,
and Telegraph lines.
Exclusion of the Chinese.
The proper inspection of mines.
The Single Tax.
Compulsory voting.
CUT THE TORPEDO LEDGE.
One of lhe cross-cuts, being driven on
the Torpedo claim to tap the parallel
ledge, at a dintance in of 05 feet reached
the vein and is now being driven into it.
Although the tunnel has as yet only
just broken into the vein enough ore has
already been encountered to show that
the vein is a good one. This cross-cut
taps tbe vein at a depth of 75 teet. The
other cross-cut that is being driven to
tap this same vein has not as yet reached
the ledge, which it will tap at a depth of
over 150 feet.
AT THE HEWETT.
• '""—"
A full force of miners are again at
work on tbe Hewett mino nnd the ore
sorters are kept buuy sorting and sacking
up ore that runs from 125 to 600 ounces
in sliver to the ton. The main working
tunnel on this property is now in over
400 feet and in the (see of the tunnel Is
threo feet of good shipping oro. About
two car loadB of ore is now sacked up at
tho mine, awaiting transportation, and
the ore piles on the dump are rapidly
increasing in size.
THE  OLD M AID.
Assays made on the ore being taken
out of the Old Maid tunnel gives returns
of 60 ounces in silver to the ton. The
tunnel is now in nearly 100 feet and all
in ore. The vein is over 12 feet wide
and the Old Maid promises to be the big
strike of the season in the silver bearing
portion of our district. This property is
situated within one mile of town, one
good wagon road and can be safely
worked at any season of the year. Tbe
propeity will now be worked continuously and within a short time a trial
shipment of this ore will be made to tbe
Trail smelter.
Eighty tons of ore were shipped from
tbe Enterprise this week.
A carload of ore was lifted from the
Bosun dock on Wednesday.
Perre Altaffer has just completed tbe
assessment work on the Vortex claim.
Surveyor Bartlett la engaged In making a survey of the nndergronnd workings of the Noonday mine.
Night and day shifts are now being
worked in the tunnel being driven to
Up the ore shute In the Lone Star Group.
During the week experts have been
making an examination of the Queen
Fraction and Adela claims, just below
town, with a view of purchasing those
properties.
Adjoining the Lone Star Group, near
town, is situated the Manitoba claim on
which work is now being done The
Manitoba ve'ii is a large one and the
owners are in hopes of uncovering an
ore shute while doing this year's assessment,
At the Wakefield concentrator tbey
have got through experimenting with
the ore, and the mill has settled down to
a run. Concentrates are now rapidly
accumulating at the mill and before long
shipments will be commenced to the
smelter.
-The Thompson Bros, Al. and Billy,
have gone up to Bad Mountain to work
on their copper-gold proposition. This
property ia another of those big Iron
capped dykes carrying gold and copper
values. Tho boys have a big surface
showing and vxpect to be in it when
Red Mountain booms this summer.
OUR ALMOND EYED BRETHERN
Chinamen have drifted along tn
America during the past half century as
a distinct, aeperate people from our own.
They hare no sympathy for us or for our
religions, political or educational institutions. Tbey refuse to let the bones
of tbeir heathen comrades rest with our
own. They ship them to their pagan
land. They do about as thev please.
They are sheltered by that "man and
brother," namby, pamby, milk and
water, Dorcas society sentiment, which
furnishes blankets and warming pans
for Hotientots, while their neighbors
and neighbors' children are pleading for
work to make tbeir bread This is all
wrong. The American people have
slipped a cog somewhere in the moving*
and workings of their humanitarian
machinery.
When the Creator fashioned and
colored Shem, Ham and Japeth ai.d
sent each to the countries which He in
his wisdom selected for them, it wus intended thev should stay there and enjoy
their holdings. But it appears man
can't let God's work alone. He must
"improve" upon it, so he mixes the
Caucosion, the Alrlcnn end the Asiatic
in one conmsed jumble, ra< li dissatisfied
with his human surroundings, and each
striving to grt tho beet ot the others.
We in America, iu harmony with our
free institutions and our free and easy
way of dealing with the world, offer all
a home and protection. They come and
enjoy tbem. They take and work our
mineral lands, iurnish central figures lor
sensations in domestic circles, touch tbe
chords of sympathy in our courts, and
by "ways that are dark and tricks that
are vain." keep a "closed door" which
the civilised world Is trying to open.
The Chinese are a great people, and
Americans, in their estimation, are
superlative fools. But such is life before
tbe mellennium. When that time shall
come it is hoped the Chinese will bave
returned to the land of Confucius, leaving Caucasians to themselves, where
petty thieving, yo'ing white girl seducing, pestilence breeding, "washee bouses'
and Chinese boycotting are known no
more forever.—Butte Western Mining
World.
Cockney (telling his friend the news
of the fire.)--" 'Jump, yer silly fool I' I
says. 'Me an mv mite's got a blanket!'
An 'e did jump, au there warn't no
blanket, an'e broke 'is bloomin neck I
Laugh? I 'uven't laughed so much for
years,"
INSPECTED     SOME     SILVERTON
PROPERTIES.
Bruno Thomas, formerly auperin
tendent of tbe Comstock Mines of this
place, arrived in town on Wednesday
and at once set to work examining some
of tbe many promising mining properties
adjoining town. Among the properties
visited by him during his stay was the
Noonday mine, Queen Fraction and the
Lone Star Group. Mr. Thomas Is well
and favorably known here by all our
local prospectors and mining men and
alt were pleased to show him their beet
prospects, and it is hoped by all that
Mr. Thomas will again Income interested
in some Silvarlon property.
WATER WORKS
COMPANY
Formed  to Install a System for
Silverton at Onee.
FOURTH ANNUAL OTIMATNI.
Silverion Will  Prepare F»r the
Qaeen's Birthday.
Silverton Is to have a complete waterworks system installed immediately and
a number ot local men have formed
themselves Into a company, to be known
as tho Silverton Waterworks Company,
and will apply at unco for incorporation.
Those having this scheme in hand are
Messrs. Bowes, Jackson, Hunter, Thorburn, D. Brandon, Knowles and McKinnon.
Yesterday the waters of Bartlett creek,
a splendid stream within a hundred yards
of the townsite, was staked by tbe new
company.
Tbe names of those who propose furnishing Silverton with water are those of
our most progressive citizens and guarantee the success of whatever they undertake.
The street hydrants will unfortunately
not be in position by May 24th, otherwise a wet. test hose reel race would be
among the features of the celebration,
but in next year's celebration Silverton
will enter her own team for that event.
THE FOURTH ANNUAL.
Rilverton will this year, for the fourth
time in her history, celebrate in a fitting
manner the anniversary of the birthday
of our Queen.
Such was the decision arrived at at a
meeting of the citizens lied on Wednesday evening at the Victoria Hotel.
No definite action was taken at the
meeting beyond the resolution mentioned
as the meeting merely indulged in sn
informal talk after the great question,
'to be or not to be," was decided.
A second mass meeting of Silvertonisns will be held on Tuesday, April 3rd,
when it will be decided what this year's
program will be.
It has been suggested that the main
feature of our coming Celebration should
tie a Football Tournament (or souie valuable trophies and medals. Should tbis
idea be adopted, tho athletic gronods
vill >>e enlarged and leveled np.
The Celebration Committee would like
to receive suggestions from the vsrious
football clubs likely to enter for tbe event
should 'ho Tournament suggestion be
acted upon.
Whatever course this year's program
takes, visitors know from the experience
of the lust few years that Silverton's
Fonrth Annual Celebration will be both
enjoyable and successful.
Silverton Is at present without a baker
and the staff of life is becoming scarce.
Tbe receipts of the St. Patrick's Da
concert netted over f80. for tbe R. G.
Building Fund.
While football games are being played
and gardens are being planted in Bilverton, In Bandon tbey are still playing
hockey.
Tbe soda water fountain In tbe Fruit
3tore baa been put into comm lesion for
tbe summer. Oue swallow makes a
hummer.
A letter addressed "Mr. James Rudd,
1 Rossland, B. C," bsa been returned to.
ibis office. The writ er may have same
on application.
The Wm. Hunter Co. bave di spoeed
of tbeir Phoenix branch to Michael lie-
Bean, late of Walkei, Mt Bean k Co., of
Georgetown, Ont.
For the sake of some of our citizens
tf.'s, the veil that bides tbe future waa
pulled aside this week by a traveling
disciple of tbe black arts.
Hill Bros' barge unloaded some lum -
ber bere on Wednesday for local parties.
The barge will make regular trips .to
Silverton each week for some time.
Divise Service will be held in Silver-
ton next Sunday evening at 7,30. everyone is cordially invited to attend.—John
G. Duncan, Presbyterian Minister,
All   work  in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drugstore, wili
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
tbe well-known Nelson jeweler.    All re
pairs are guahantkbh fob osb year. *
Purely Personal Paragraphs.
Jack Thompson, manager of the Thistle Hotel, spent psit ol the week in Sandon.
J. McMillan of Sandon. brother of Miss
McMillan of this town, spent 'iuesday
hero.
J. M. It. Benedum represented the
local Union at the Nelson convention on
Thursday.
Ralph Gillette has gone dawn to
Twelve Mile to look after his mining interests there.
Frank L. Byron returned on Thursday
from Nelson where he has heen visiting in connection with his mining business.
Now is the time to start your garden.
Now is the time to seed your lawn. Call
at the Silverton Drug Store and select
your seeds. t
Fred Urban, who bas just returned
from tho Boundary, has gone up the hill
to take charge of the range at the Wakefield mine.
C. D. McRae, the heavy kicker on the
New Denver football team, has cut himself in tho leg and will be out of the
game for some time.
The warlike |W.s sing about tbe man behind the gun.
The fiiiinv fellows tell us of the man behind the pun,
Bnt the gunning and the panning
Never start a fellow running
Like that ogre so Satanicul, the man behind the dt\n.
BLAME IT TO THE  UNIONS.
Some bar-room brawls and street
fights in Sandon are being cited aa conflicts between Union and non Union
men. In mining towns such occurrences
ss these affairs appear to bave been are
unfortunately too common and were
frequently witnessed long before tbe
present Unions were organised. Why
tbe Union men should want to resort to
violence now after tbeir fight is over
is strange. We suppose however that
every breach of tbe peace made between
now and tha elections will be quoted aa
violence on tbe part ol the Unions, aa
every mine tbat closes down ia said to
do so on account of tbe Eight-hour law.
In regard to the report circulated that
one of the Payne scabs bad been waylaid
and beaten ny Union men, the facta at
the matter show that the man received
his injuries in an altogether different
way. He and some comrades were returning to the Payne from Sandon. having indulged freely while in town. On
the trail bis load of liquor proved too
much for him or, what is more likely, a
disagreement arose between him and
his companions and he was thrown or
fell off the trail, receiving several wounds
and braises as he rolled down the steep
hill. He returned to Sandon and laid
information against one of the Union
men, who appeared for trial on Thursday
At the trial the truth was brought out
and the Union man acquited, it having
been proven that he knew nothing of
the matter.
AN   ECONOMIC MISFIT.
Tho farmer turned in hfa easy chair,
"I paid mv taxes to-day," said he,
"An maybe you think it's right and fair
But darned If it looks th t way to me.
Since 1 fixed the place, haint they bad
tbe faoe
To tax me as much again, by gee!
"Of course I kicked! and I said.'by darn'
I'd like to know if it's sulbin' new,
When a man can't fix up his house and
barn.
'Thout payin' the town and tho painter too.
It don't seem 'air and it don't look square
To have to pay for the good you do!
"Now Lizur Jones, his fence came down,
An he burnt it up (as I alius s'pose),
An his cow got loose and ranged the town
An' they taxed him less 'cause his
land w'ant closed.
It's like givin a prize fer the crassest eyes,
And thefrecklestgal and tbo snubbest
nose I
"Ef tliats tbe way tbe country's run,
To tax a man for bis tbrivin' ways,
It 'pears to me that the more that's done
Towards iiuprovin' things the lent it paya
Let your place tun down and disgrace
the town,
An' your cows go into tbe road to grass.*
-Panl Paetno wtssmstmaam**m
BRITONS ANGRY
America's Olfer of Mediation Not Kind
ly Received.
London, March 17.—Between
the lines of the politely worded editorial comments on President McKinley's expression of willingness
to aid in the restoration ol
peace between Gi at Britain and
the Boer republics can be discerned
many evidences of an inward irritation, which the less responsible
public does not hesitate to outwardly express, while even members of
the government privately display
pique that of all the powers America should have consented to assume what one official desiganted
;is the "ungracious role of suggesting some form of interference,"
to which he added the expression:
"Englishmen cannot help contrasting the perfect correctness of
the attitude of the openly unfriendly France with the offer of the
United States, which, had it come
from a less disinterested source,
could only have been regarded as
an unfriendly act."
There is no doubt that the overtures of the United States, even
though so carefully worded have
sensibly irritated Great Britain as a
whole, while circles especially
friendly to the United States express open regret at the opportunity offered for critics to compare the
refusal of M. Delcasse, the French
minister of foreign affairs, to gratify the hostile sentiment in France
by making proposals to Lord Salisbury which were sure of rejection,
with what they testily call the "interference" of Washington and
which, though only tentative and
clothed in words of perfect friendliness and courtesy, camejat an inopportune moment when the supreme
self sufficiency of the British empire
was the predominating feeling of
the day. Everywhere one hears
expressions of satisfaction that,
while the answer to the proposal
was clothed in words of perfect
courtesy, the language of Lord
Salisbury in "brushing aside" President McKinley's proffer was so
extremely definite as to kill all possibility of the repetition of the offers
from aoy source, unless those proposing them are desirous of being
recognized as openly antagonistic
to this country.
Emphasis is laid on the fact that
Great Britain has declared at the
outset her unwillingness to consent
any outside interference and, therefore, as according to the welt established principle of international law,
that the right of intervention is
conditional on the willingness of
both parties to the quarrel to accept the good offices of a mediating power, such interference, was
in this case, outside the bounds of
diplomatic possibilities and gave
Lord Salisbury full justification for
his "retort courteous."
of Spain and his judicial murder of
the duke d'Enghien, there is a certain similarity between the two
men.
It was Cronje who xaptured
Jameson and his raiders at Dorn-
kop, and he it was who in the last
Boer war succeeded in penning up
a small British force in Potchef-
stroom, whose surrender he secured
by suppressing the truth that a general armistice had been arranged.
The Boers had to agree to an English force being allowed to march
up from Natal and re-occupy Pot-
chefstroom, as a formal acknowledgement of Cronje's treachery, but
inhumanity marked Cronje's conduct of the siege of Potchefstroom.
He forced prisoners of war to work
where they were exposed to lire,
and were shot down in ignorance
by the besieged garrison.
WILL FIGHT AGAIN
General Roberts'  March >'<" .iiward
|Will Be Unopposed.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
A WAR FOR FREEDOM.
Speaking at the Ohio society's
dinner in New York, President McKinley said of the relations of the
United States to the Philippines:
"The liberators will never become
the oppressors. A self-governed
people will neverjpermit despotism
in any government which they foster and defend."
That statement applies to the relations of Great Britain to the Boers
with equal force. Freedom follows
her flag and Britain enters the Boer
republics, not to oppress the Boers,
but to secure for her own people
equal freedom with the Boers. The
history of a century's battles for
freedom gives the lie to those who
say she is waging a war of conquest
and oppression.
SOME OF CRONJE'S FEATS.
Cronje and his men will be today
on their way to St. Helena. Some
may be inclined to moralize on the
similarity of his fate to that of the
of the last great occupant of the
prison     isle. When    one   re
calls the  treachery by which Napoleon kidnapped King Ferdinand
The Orange Free State is dead,
but as a British colony it will secure
wider liberty to all its people than
when it was independent.
The cheers with which the people
of Bloemfontien greeted the hoisting
of the Union Jack are an evidence
that they are sick of the Transvaal
alliance. As a factor in the war,
the Free State forces no longer exist, though a few irreconcilables
may trek to Pretoria.
So long as French loyalty is
strong enough to contribute soldiers
who fight and die for the flag in
South Africa, it ought to satisfy
the most exacting imperialist, who
should remember that the strength
of the empire consists in unifying
the races, not in perpetuating sharp
racial divisions.
The Boer soldiers are not the only
impediments to the British armies in
South Africa. The burning sands,
the hot dust that is continually floating in the air and swarms of Aids are
reported to be nearly as wearing on
British humanity as are the Boer
bullets—Seattle Times. But the
British get there just the same.
The small hot shot and the large
cold horse took the place of the bitd
and the bottle in Ladysmith and
Kimberly before the relief.—Tacoma Ledger.
Beaten in the held, the Filipinos
have started a campaign of assassination of American officers, at
which the Malays are adepts. A
fund of $200,000 has been raised
and a schedule of rates has been
fixed for the murder of officers o
various grades.
The Finnish delegates have reported in favor of the Red Deer
district of Alberta as suitable for
their colony.
The Boers are preparing for their
last stand by taking a census of the
non-combatants who can be senf
out of Jahannesburg.
The Kentuckians are not to be
disappointed of a fight. The rival
governors have each organized a
militia to contest possession of the
state house.
The Vancouvei World receives
Joe Martin's platform as though it
were to be taken seriously. Does
it not know that platforms are made
to get in on, not to stand on?
The Cape TiiMes says that a novel
method is adopted for guarding the
Boer prisoners on land at Simon's
Town. Round the camp two lines
of electric wires run—the first to
apprise the guards of an intended
runaway, and the second, called the
death "line," to arrest the ptogsess
of any prisoner who might have
succeeded in passing the first line.
If our neighbors do not hurry
and get a move on themselves, we
will have finished our war long before they have concluded theirs.—
Victoria Colonist.
Saturday was the last day the
Topeka Capital was run "as 'Jesus
would," and it paid well as a journalistic freak. Today it goes over
to the opposition.
The dividend of $750,000 declared by the Le Roi mine, with a
balance of half that sum carried forward to the new year, is the best
advertisement British Columbia
mines could have, lt is worth tons
of prospectuses.
London, March 17.—The peaceful conquest of the Orange Free
State progresses so evenly that it is
now believed there will be little or
no fighting until Lord Roberts
reaches the Vaal river. How soon
he intends to start out with this
objective, is not. yet hinted at. The
pacification of the Free Staters
seems now engaging all his attention. When the move shall come,
it will doubtless be accomplished
with the secrecy and swiftness which
have characterized all the British
advances since Lord Roberts assumed command.
In the meantime, the fate of Mafeking is unknown.
The revolt of the Cape Dutch in
the northeast seems to have had its
back broken and it is likely General
Kitchener will soon resume his place
beside his chief.
A Canadian Huns the Railroad
The lull that lets the British troops
in Natal and the Free State recuperate brings no rest to the engineers
and transport. Girouard, the young
Canadian officer, who rules supreme
over the railroad, is now putting his
system to the most severe test in an
endeavor to pour supplies from
Capetown into Bloemfontein.
Commandant Oliver, after leaving
Burghersdorp, went to Rouxville,
where he is now reported to be with
only a small force.
Dr. Leyds, the diplomatic agent
of the Transvaal, has disappeared
from Brussels. According to a
Globe special, he is believed to have
come to London, but nothing is
known here about his arrival.
The Railroad Reopened
Vansyl, Friday, March 16.—The
railroad has been reopened from
Bloemfontein to Norval's Pont.
General Pole Carew and the grenadiers have just arrived at Norvals
Pont.
Uataere Take* Springfonteln.
Bethulie, March 16.—Gen. Gat-
acte's scouts have occupied Spring-
fontein. The country is clear of the
enemy. The main column is following the scouts.
Oliver Abandons HI* Hill.
Burghersdorp, March 17.—Commandant Oliver evacuated his position on a hill in front ot the British
during the night. Several Boers of
his force surrendered.
Mr. Dewett, a member of tlie
Cape parliament, and his brother,
have been arrested.
Rumor* of Mai eking'* Relief.
London, March 17.—It is persistently reiterated that Mafeking has
been relieved, but the war office has
no information concerning the
rumor.
The Pa**e* Are Reconnoitred.
Ladysmith, March 16. — Lord
Dundonald's cavalry patrols reconnoitred the Free State border of
Basutoland to De Beers pass, where
a slight skirmish occurred, in which
two British were wounded. The
Boers were also encountered in
strength at Van Renen's pass and
Tintwar pass.
Kaffirs arriving here report that
the Boers are manifesting a very
vindictive spirit under defeat, and
that many farms hitherto respected
have been burned.
The German ambulances attached
to the Boer forces were found near
Modder spruit, abandoned by the
Boers. The physicians in charge
were unable to drive and were
brought into camp, where the
wounded were cared for. Transports were subsequently supplied
and the ambulances were sent to
the Boer lines.
ON TO PRETORIA
Plans for Converging Falls  From
Three Directions.
•1,000,000 Tax on Vanderbllt  __c.i_.ir
New York, March 19.—The heirs
of Cornelius Vanderbilt will within a
few days be called upon trt pay into
the state treasury an inheritance tax
estimated at about $1,00(1,000. It
is announced that all the Vanderbilt
bequests have been paid.
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
London March 19.-2:15 P- m.—
Neither the advance by way of
Fourteen Streams nor Plumer's
movement has yet resulted in bringing news of Mafeking. From
Bloemfontein and Natal here are
apparently no serious developments
and public interest remains centred
in Colonel Baden-Powell's force,
unrestricted by events of greater
military importance.
However, it appears likely that
the converging of the troops toward Mafeking indicates a much
more serious purpose than merely
its relief. Judging from Lord
Methuen's presence at Warrenton
and the capture of the nearby passage of the Vaal at Fourteen
Streams, keen observers believe
Lord Roberts meditates an advance
in force on Pretoria by way of
Rustenburg. This might start
either from Fourteen Streams or
Klerksdorf, and would probably
coincide with an advance via Bloemfontein and Natal. Thus Lord
Methuen may be given the chance
to renew his reputation, as has been
done with General Gatacre.
Commandant Oliver has accomplished another step in his retreat
from Northern Cape Colony, evacuating Rouxville and going towards
Kroonstad, where President Steyn
is.
Rebel* Will Flee Refore Hrlil-.li.
Cape Town, March 18. — The
mounted force from Kimberly proceeding to the relief of Mafeking
has arrived at Warrenton. As the
force neared Winsorton, the Boers
evacuated the town, blowing up the
bridge, and it is reported that the
rebels who refused to accompany
the Transvaalers when the latter
vacated Taungs and Vryburg are
preparing to trek into Damaraland
on the approach of the British, but
thai the Hottentot chief are getting
ready to bar their escapes.
Roer* Laying Down Arm*.
j
London, March 19.—The war office received the following dispatch
from Field Marshal Lord Roberts,
dated Bloemfontein Sunday March
18:
"The guards brigade returned
yesterday from Norval's Pont.
"Several burghers have laid down
their arms to General Pole-Carew
at Edenburg and elsewhere.
"The officer commanding at Belmont report that some deserters
have come in with a maxim, a nine-
pounder and another gun.
"Another nine-pounder has been
brought into Colesburg.
"The cavalry brigade has gone
to Thabana Neuh in order to reassure the inhabitants of the district
and to distribute copies of the proclamation to the people of the Free
State. The proclamations • are
being eagerly sought after.
The Advance to mafeking.
"Lord Methuen reached Warrenton on March 16. He was in time
to prevent the deviation bridge from
being completely destroyed and to
secure the pont on the Vaal. Tomorrow the regular railway service
with Cape Town will be reopened.
Mafeking reports that all was well
on March 6."
Free State Force* Disappear.
New York March 19.—Isaac N.
Ford, London correspondent of the
Tribune, cables as follows:
"The Orange Free State is the
queen's domain. General Gatacre
has occupied Springfontein, and
General Pole-Carew, with theGuards,
has joined General Clements at Norval's Pont. The Free State commandos have disappeared in the
south and their guns have been
probably buried or concealed. No
resistance has been offered to the
British columns in the southern district, and the burghers are everywhere returning to their home.
"Hob*" Popnlar at Bloemronteln.
"There are many press dispatches
from Brabant's Gatacre's and Clement's columns, but there is only one
story.   The Free State forces are
disbanding and the rebellion in the
Dutch district of Cape Colony 1$ a
an end. Bloemfontein is likeacapital
which has been under siege and
been relieved by a friendly army.
The British troops have been welcomed as allies, and not sullenly, as
enemies. The farmers are supplying
the army with meat, vegetables,
Ik and eggs  and  making good
mi
bargains. 'Bobs' is almost as popular at Bloemfontein as he would be
in London. The Free State is virtually out of the conflct.
Rebuilding tbe Bridge*.
"The advance,of General Robert's army northward is now dependent upon the establishment of a
new line of communication for supplies from Norval's Pont, and this
cannot be deferred many days.
Bridge builders are at work at Norval's Pont and Bethulie, and onJy a
small force will be required to guard
the line of communication.
Appeal to King Humbert.
New York, March 19.—Isaac N.
Ford cables the Tribune as follows:
"President Kruger has sent a
personal appeal by telegraph to the
King of Italy to use his influence
with the object of putting an end to
the war.
"Assistant Secretary Webster
Davis has arrived at Naples from
Pretoria. Although he considers
the Boer cause hopeless, he believes
a desperate resistance will be offered
to the British troops when they
cross the Vaal river.
"The deportation of General
Cronje and his staff to St. Helena
is being protested against by the
Dutch element in Cape Colony. Sir
Alfred Milner says the reason for
sending the prisoners away from
South Africa is that the British authorities are unable to find sufficient
guards for them at the Cape."
Canadian Rifle* at the Front.
Carnarvon, March 19.—The Canadian mounted rifles, under Colonel
Herchmer, and the Canadian artillery, commanded by Colonel Drury,
have arrived here with a contingent
of yeomanry. The presence of this
force here has had an excellent effect
in the district. It is reported that
a large force of insurgents is in the
vicinity of VanVrkveli.
Schlel wa* too Quarrelsome.
Capetown, March 19.—Owing to
the quarrelsomeness of Colonel
Schiel, the German officer in charge
of the Boer artillery, who was
wounded and taken prisoner at the
battle of Elandslaagte, he has been
removed from the prisoners camp to
a transport.
A Lot of Hard  Fighting Ahead.
Montreal, March 19.—The war is
by no means yet over. Lord Roberts is quite likely to have a lot of
hard fighting yet before he reaches
Pretoria. Such was the opinion expressed by Mr. Finlayson Johnson
to a newspaper representative this
morning. Mr. Johnston has just returned from Johannesburg, South
Africa, where he experienced all the
disagreeable features which have
(alien to the lot of an Uitlander in
the Transvaal
8THATHCONA HOHSi; SAIL*.
Halllax People  Glre Them  a  Great
Send-on"- Final Inapectlon.
Halifax, N. S.. March 16.-5:10
p. m.—The Monterey just left the
dock.
The Strathcona Horse was accorded an enthusiastic send-off by
the citizens of Halifax prior to leaving on the Monterey this afternoon.
The troops were inspected by Lord
Seymour, commander of the British forces in Canada, Hon. Dr.
Borden and Lieut. Gov. Daly.
A   YF.I.LOW   JOURNAL   FAKB.
Ollicial Denial that America I* Sending
A Fleet to China.
London, March 19.—Being asked
a question in the house of commons
today regarding reports of trouble
threatening in China, the parliamentary secretary of the foreign office,
Mr. William St. John Broderick,
said Her Majesty's government had
taken and continued to take all
necessary steps to protect British
interests in this connection. He
also denied the story published in
the United States that the American
government was sending warships
to China.
WHAT LABOR ASKS
Changes in Law Proposed by Dominion
Labor Unions.
Ottawa, March 19.—A deputation
composed of Mr. Puttee, labor, of
Winnipeg, Bremmer, of New Denver, B. C, and others representing
the Dominion trades and labor
council, waited upon the premier
this morning. They urged legislation to prevent the importation of
Americans under the contract
system, the appointment of inspectors to enforce safeguards for loading and unloading vessels; the exclusion of Chinese or raising the
entry tax on them to $500; eight
hours a day for all government
works; a special label on all goods
turned out oi the penal institutions
of the Dominion; a labor bureau to
deal with all questions of statute
labor and questions similar to those
arising in the Slocan mining districts of British Columbia. The
sweating system in vogue in some
parts of the Dominion was also referred to.
The premier, in reply, thanked
the deputation for the valuable information furnished the government. He assured them that the
government was already working
on bills respecting the Chinese
question, the sweating system and
fair wages. The premier also stated that the government was looking into the Slocan mining troubles,
intimating that the class of laborers
imported into that section was inferior to Canadian labor.
Regarding legislation preventing
the importation of Americans, the
premier said there was a tacit understanding between the United
States and this country that alien
labor laws should not be enforced
on either Americans or Canadians.
He was of the opinion that the understanding was being lived up to
by Americans on the whole, only a
few over-zealous American officials
having so far apparently ignored
the understanding.
TO    1 UIIIV     A     SPANISH     DIKE.
Hetty Green'* Daughter Find* a Has*
hand-Not Wealth) BenelT.
New York, March 19.—It is given out by a close friend of the Duke
dc la Torre, of Spain, that Miss
Sylvia Green, daughter of the
"richest woman in the world," Mrs.
Hetty Green, will soon wed the
duke. Miss Green, although an
heiress of "the richest woman in
the world," has little property of
her own. It is said that, while she
and her mother are on good terms,
there has been very little communication between them for several
years. The Duke de la Torre's income is said to be about $4,000 a
year.
To Help Striking «Igarmaker*.
New York, March 19.—Twenty
thousand cigar makers were represented at a meeting held yesterday
in this city. It was decided to give
$10,000 a week to the a,200 striking men and women employed by
Kerbs, Wertheim & Schiffer. The
money for the strikers will be taken
from the cigarmakers' strike fund,
which amounts to $250,000, and
every man who is working will contribute fifty cents each week to the
strikers.
Wounded Boera to Oo Home.
London, March 16.—General
Roberts reported that he found
seven British officers and 43 men
wounded in the hospital at Bloemfontein, and that they had been well
cared for. He adds: "I rejoiced
the wounded Boers by telling them
they would be allowed to proceed
to their homes instead ol being
made prisoners, as soon aa they
can leave the hospital."
Baaeball magnate* Agree.
Chicago, March 19.—The American baseball magnates have made an
amicable arrangement with James
A. Hart for a club in Chicago, and
passed the deal up to the powers of
the National League for approval.
Artistic Job Printing of every *\t*
scripiion at this office. WILL RE SUPREME
[Britain Will No Longer Recognize Acts
of the Boer Republics.
Cape Town, March 20.—Sir
Alfred Milner, the governor of Cape
:olony and British high commissioner 0f South Africa, has issued a
proclamation declaring the imperial government will not recognize
Ls valid or effectual alienations of
[property, whether of lands, rail-
Iroadsor mines, within the Trans-
Jvaal or the Orange Free State, or
[any interest therein or encumbrances
[or any concessions granted by the
Laid governments.
To Form a Military Colony
New York, March 20.—A Lon-
jdon cable says that a part of the
■British plan for the pacification of
[south Africa is now apparent in the
{announcement that all the British
[authorities there will make every
[effort to induce the reservists, the
Itime expired men, the volunteers
land the colonials from abroad to
(settle there as soon as the war is
lover, by giving them 240 acres of
[land each, provided they will oc-
jcupy the land for ten years.
Will Warn the Boer*
London, March 20.—In the house
lof commons today, the parliamentary secretary of the war office,
[George Wyndham, said the secretary of state for thecolonies, Joseph
[Chamberlain, was about to issue a
[proclamation on the subject of the
(alleged threats of the Boers to destroy Johannesburg, and as to
that the Boers might expect in the
event of wanton destruction of
Hritish property.
Boer* Blow Ip the Railroad.
Bloemfontein, March 19.—The
Boers blew up the railroad bridge
over the Modder, 14 miles north,
last night.
The law courts were re-opened
today.
Blew np Bridge* and Betlred
Cape Town, March 20.—The
Boers have blown up the bridges
north of Bloemfontein, including
those at Winburg and Kroonstadt,
and are now returning to the
north.
Rebel* Submit to Kitchener.
London, March 20.—2:30 p. m.
—For all the news received here
yesterday and today, Great Britain
might almost as well be at peace.
It is reasonable to believe that the
relief of Mafeking may be heard of
at any hour.
General Kitchener has entered
Prieska, Cape Colony, without opposition, the insurgents laying
down their arms. This confirms
the previous reports of their willingness to submit.
Generals Roberts and Buller are
still inactive, pending developments
at the theatre of war.
Kruger Say* "You're Another."
London, March 20.—7:10 p. m.
—The following dispatch has been
received at the war office from Lord
Roberts, dated Bloemfontein,March
19:
"I have received the following
reply to my telegram of March 11
to the presidents of the Free State
and South African republic:
"Your Excellency's telegram
reached me yesterday. 1 assure
you nothing would grieve me more
than that my burghers should make
themselves guilty of a deed such as
laid to their charge by you. 1 am,
however, glad to say you must have
been mistaken. I have made personal inquiries of General DeLarey,
who was was in command of our
burghers at the place mentioned by
you. He denies entirely that our
burghers acted as stated by you,
but he says that on Saturday, the
date being illegible, the British
troops, when they were about fifty
yards from our position, put up
their hands as well as a white flag,
whilst at the same time your cannon bombarded the said troops,
with the result that Commandant
De Beer was badly wounded. Yesterday morning, the head commandant wrote in his account of the
battle as follows: 'The soldiers
hoisted the   white flag,   but   were
then fired at by  the  British canno
and compelled to charge.' "
What Kruger Would Demand.
New York, March 20.—An interview had by a correspondent of the
Herald with President Kruger,Feb-
uary 10 at Pretoria, is printed today in the Herald. At that time
the president was described as
showing but little evidence in his
countenance of the tremendous
strain he was undergoing. The
complexion of South African affairs,
however, has changed considerably
since then.
He was dressed in a rusty frock
coat, the front of which was sprinkled with tobacco. He smoked a
pipe during the whole  interview.
"This war was farced upon us
by Cecil Rhodes and the mining
millionaires,who want the country,"
said the Boer president.
"The Boers yielded as far as
possible, until they saw that nothing but complete surrender of their
independence would satisfy England. Having been forced into the
war, the Boers will conquer or  die.
"I expect no aid from other nations, but we are glad of sympathy
and friendship. The Transvaal
is willing to make peace at any
time. But we want no more conventions. Only absolute independence is possible. We do not want
any more territory, but are content
with our present frontier, if we are
permitted to live peacefully. This
is all we ask.
Kruger'* Bin ft- Was Called.
"The Transvaal will stipulate in
the peace terms that the Natal and
Cape Colony Dutch now fighting
with the Boers shall be regarded as
belligerents and suffer no loss of
property. I recently learned that
some of these men had been captured by the British and were being
tried at Cape Town, charged with
treason, and cabled Lord Salisbury
stating that, if such men were not
treated as prisoners of war, we
would make reprisals on the British
prisoners here.
"Lord Salisbury replied, threatening that if we injured a single
British prisoner, they would hold
me person-1.!')' responsible. 1 suppose he meant the British would
hang me. The Transvaal government replied today, imforming Lord
Salisbury that they despise his
threats.
"There is no truth in the story of
a conspiracy among the South
African Dutch. This is not their
quarrel. The Orange Free State is
bound by  treaty to aid us.
"Mr. Schreiner repeatedly urged
us to yield. It is too early to
prophesy the outcome of the war or
its duration. The Boers are in
God's hands and he will not let us
perish. Our total fighting strength
is forty thousand, but with God's
aid we can prevail. I have two
hundred blood relatives fighting,
and would rather «e; them ill perish than yield. It is liberty or
death."
A Weird Yarn by Lcyd*.
Considerable interest is attached
to the fate of Johannesburg.
Commenting on the reported consultation between Secretary Hay
and the German ambassador at
Washington, Dr. von Holleben, regarding urging both belligerents to
leave Johannesburg alone, the Pall
Mall Gazette says:
"This time Dr. Leyds has, as we
may without impropriety assume,
put about the tale to the effect that
the German ambassador at Washington and the American consul at
Pretoria are concocting a little
scheme of German intervention.
That is really a glorious yarn, and
one which shows to what desperate
straits the enemies of this country
are reduced. Just imagine a government, which has formally declined all outside intervention, permitting Germany to dictate the
couiseofLord Roberts' march to
Pretoria. The German foreign office knews better than to invite the
snub it would infallibly receive if it
ventured to offer so preposterous a
proposal in Downing street."
TRUETOTHE FLAG
Patriotic Speech of the Premier of
New Zealand.
AN ALL DAY FIGHT
Wellington, N. Z., March 20.—
In bidding farewell to the fourth
contingent of the New Zealand
corps, leaving today for service in
South Africa, Premier R. J. Geddon
emphasized the determination of
Australians to support the imperial
prestige. The country had 400,000
male adults, mostly drilled, prepared to defend the colonies, and if
an emergency arose, to send enough
to South Africa to release the imperial troops to deal with any unfriendly powers daring to meddle
with the settlement.
Lord Salisbury's reply to the
Boer presidents and the friendly
note of the President of the United
States, and the announcement that
Great Britain would not assent to
the independence of the republics
were all endorsed by New Zealand,
who, the premier added, should
maintain  that position at any cost.
THE COttllOl S IN FINK TKIAI
No Sooner Landed at Cape Town Than
Thejr Win Honor* In Sport*.
Toronto, March 20.—The Globe's
correspondent at London, England,
cabled yesterday the summary of a
letter received from John A. Ewan,
the Globe's correspondent with the
second Canadian contingent, dated
Cape Town, Feb. 27. Mr. Ewan
says:
"The Pomeranian, with the Canadian cowboys, arrived here yesterday. Nine horses died on the voyage, but the men are all well, in
splendid spirits and delighted at the
prospect of acrive service.
"At the sports held here today
the Canadians entered a team in
the tug of war contest, being the
only non-naval team in the event.
They surprised all by reaching the
semi-final, having had to contest
against strong teams. They were
beaten in the final by a small margin. Their victories over sailors in
the qualifying tugs were vigorously
applauded by the great multitude
present. Williams, a Canadian,
won the half mile race. These contests indicated the fine physique of
the Canadians, especially in view of
the fact that they had only just
landed after a long voyage.
"Since Paardeberg, praise of the
Canadians is on every tongue."
ROBBKD   OF   *80,000
French Ballroad ____4.ee* Bag of Money
Through Clerk*' Careleskneas.
Paris, March 20.—An audacious
robbery of 400,000 francs was committed to day from the Northern
railway. The company, which three
times weekly deposits large sums
with the Bank of France, sent today 630,000 francs, of which
amount 400,000 was in small bills.
This was placed in a satchel and
the money was conveyed from the
station to the bank, which was in
charge of two clerks.
Before they started, one of the
clerks placed the satchel beside the
coachman. Two men approached
and engaged the attention of the
clerks and coachman, while a third
man picked up the satchel and bolted away with it. The loss was not
noticed until it was too late to apprehend the robbers.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
Now Champion Trap Shooter.
Hot Springs, Ark., March 1.9—
Bogardus, the veteran trap shot of
this country, was defeated in a live
contest yesterday by C, Delong, the
champion trap shot of Arkansas.
Russia has 160,000 troops massed
on the borders of Persia and Afghanistan, ready for a movement on
India. No doubt she hopes Kruger
will keep the British busy while she
gets ready to act.
"I had to cut down the rations,
but, thank God, we kept the flag
flying."—General White after the
relief of Ladysmith.
In Paris $1600 has been raised to
purcha.ee a sword for General Cronje. It will trouble the donors just
now to present the sword.—Salt
Lake Tribune.
The total value of mineral products of Canada for the year 1899
was $47,275,512, as compared with
$38,661,010 last year and $28,661,-
430 in 1897.
Boers Driven From Warrenton By Mafeking Relief Column.
London, March 21.—The only
news from South Africa showing
activity on either side comes from
Warrenton, north of Kimberly,
where desultory fighting occurred
all day Sunday, resulting in the retreat of the Boers towards Christi-
ania under shell fire. The progress
of this column towards Mafeking
has either almost entirely ceased or
is forbidden to be mentioned in the
dispatches. Nothing new comes
from Col Plumer, and Mafeking
apparently still awaits relief.
Switzerland Will not Mediate.
Berne, Switzerland, March 21.—
Thc federal council has answered
the Boer appeal for meditation as
follows:
"The Swiss federal council would
have been pleased to co-operate in
friendly mediation in order to end
further bloodshed, but, as the presidents of both the South African republics have directly approached
the British government in order to
conclude peace on a basis indicated,
and the British government has
shown itself against the proposal,
and as furthermore lhe British government has declared to the cabinet
at Washington that itdidnot propose
to accept the intervention of any
power, the Swiss federal council, 10
its regret, must also renounce the
idea of taking any steps on the lines
of the request made by the presidents of the South African republics.
There remains for the federal council, under the circumstances, nothing but to express its sincere wish
that the belligerents will have succeeded at no too distant date in
finding a basis for an understanding honorable to both parties."
Brldgc-Kmakher* Foiled.
The Pretoria account of the skirmish at Fourteen Streams on March
16 says that a Boer command was
preparing to destroy a railroad
bridge and that the engagement
lasted half an hour, with the result
that one burgher wa« wounded.
The same dispatch announces the
arrival at the Transvaal capital of
Gen. Schalkberger from Natal.
The second edition of the Times
today publishes a dispatch from
Bloemfontein, dated March 19,
which says: ,
"Tha blowing up of the bridges
by the Boers is an evident sign that
the Transvaalers intend to abandon
the defense of the Free State."
All is quiet in the south and west.
A corps of young Boers from the
larms surrounding Bloemfontein
under an imperial officer, has been
detailed for police duly and to prevent the further looting of abandoned farms by the Kaffir!..
Nteyn'* Farewell to K rimer.
It is said that, when President
Kruger left Bloemfontein after his
recent visit there, President Steyn's
parting remark was: "Mind the
British do not catch you, or you
will get belter quarters at St. Helena than I."
Rudyard Kipling had gone to
Bloemfontein.
The Boers at Aliwal North are
reported to be still holding a position in the big hills on the Free
State side.
The Boer* Ml*under*taiid.
From a Pretoria dispatch, it appears that some misunderstanding
regarding Lord Salisbury's reply to
America's offerjof mediation exists
there. It had been quoted to the
effect that Lord Salisbury said he
could accept the intervention of no
other power, which leads to the belief that the American representations would bc listened to in the
final settlement.
Private Cole, the Canadian, whom
thc queen visited at Netley hospital,
returned to South Africa today, fully
recovered from his wounds.
New* of Canadian Contingent.
Kingston, March 21.— Gunners
I.awler and McGregor, of B battery,
are reported as deserters.
Lieutenant Caldwell, of Lanark,
who was  wounded  in  buttle  with
other members of the first Canadian
contingent, is reported as recovering
at Wynburg hospital.
A It. C. Man Wear* Shoulder Strap*
Ottawa, March 21.—Lieutenant
Ackroicl, of British Columbia, has
been appointed to subaltern rank in
A company of the regiment which is
being formed to replace the Leins-
ters at Halifax.
EVIDENCE IN SNOW
Trying to Save William*' Neck.
Toronto, March 21.—Counsel for
Williams, the murderer of Varcoe,
the grocer, is making every effort to
have the sentence commuted to life
imprisonment. Hon. David Mills
has notified counsel that a decision
will probably be reached this week.
Imprlaoued lu an lee Field.
Cleveland, O., March 21.—After
a terrible battle with ice, the fire-
boat Clevelander, carrying a large
supply of provisions, succeeded today in reaching the two fishing
tugs and the fireboat Farley, imprisoned in an icefield off this harbor.
Patriotic Fund.Nearly $20O,OOO.
Ottawa, Ont., March at.—The
Canadian patriotic fund to date
amounts to $196,773.56, included in
which is $434.25, the proceeds of a
concert in Dawson City given on
Washington's birthday, to which a
large number of Americans contributed.
The Hero of Plevna Dead.
New York, March 21.—A dispatch from Constantinople to the
HeralJ says that Ghazi Osman
Pasha is dead. When the Sultan
learned of the death of the famous
general, he exclaimed: "Allah is
unmerciful. He has deprived me of
my holiest, true friend and most
valiant supporter."
Injured by Elevator'* Fall.
Chicago, March 21.—Thirty persons were injured shortly after six
o'clock this morning by the falling
of a freight elevator in the rear of
the building at 126 Market street,
where the victims of the accident
were employed by the Blakely Printing company. It is not thought
any of the injured will die, although
some of them are badly hurt
BAID ON THE HIGHBINDERS.
Police  Capture Six,   Each  of Whom
Ha* Committed murder.
San Francisco, March 21.—A police raid on the Highbinders last
night resulted in the arrest of six of
the most notorious members of the
Suey Sing Tong. Each of the men
in custody is accused of at least one
murder, and several are suspected
of having assassinated two or more
members of rival tongs. The supposed leader of the gang is Su Ho
Mun. He is charged by the police
wirh four murders.
Su Ho Mjn attempted to draw his
revolver when the officers attempted
to arrest him, but was disarmed.
Other arrests will follow, but the
police say convicting evidence will
be hard to secure in all cases.
LATENT STOCK QUOTATIONS.
-.BKK.n BID
Athabasca  '28
b O.tlold Fields  -t'i
RigThree  10 »u
Brandon A Oolden Crown. 23 ID
Canadian Oold Fields  n% &M
Cariboo [CampMcKinney] HI 72
Crow'« Nest Pass Coal.... $38 80    $32 M)
Deer Trail No. 2  12 11
Ueer Tark [new]  t  %
Dundee  15 11
Kvenliii? Star  *X 1%
Fairmont	
Ulant  2^ 1%
Homestake  2 1
Iron Mask  45 25
Iron Colt  10
I. X. L  17
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  19 14
Jumbo  25
King (Oro Jjenoro)  16 1.1.4
KnobHill  60 40
Lone fine CoiiboI  20 16
Minnebaba  9 fiX
Monte Christo  4 2Xt
Montrenl Cold Fields  7 b%
Morrison  4 3
Mountain Uon  93 86
Noble Five   10 6
Northern Belle  3
Novelty  2Ji IU
Okanogan  3 21.,
Old Ironsides  55
Palmer Mountain     16
I'eoriB Mines  2 1
t'nncess Maud  8 6
Raiiibler-Ciiriboo  22X4 20
Kalhiiuillen   3% SH
Republic $ 1 t»        $ 1 02
St. Klmo Consolidated  3', 2
Smuggler  l?i
Tamarai' [KennethJ  7>» 7
Trail Creek Hid. Treas ... 3
Van Ando  6
Victory-Triumph  3
Virginia  4 2V»
War Fugle Consolidated. .$ 1 35     $ 1 30
Waterloo  IH &
WhileBoar  8 X%
Winnipeg  10 \X%
Wonderful  3 1*
Bodies of Clayson, Me and Olson
Hare Been Located.
Victoria,March 21.—The steamer
Amur brought news of the rinding
of the bodies of the Clayson-Relfe-
Olson party that was murdered on .
the way out from Dawson some
time ago. The Skagway Alaskan
of last Saturday says:
"The bodies have been definitely
located and the whole mystery
cleared up, Six days ago tbe Pinkerton detective and Captain Scarth,
of the mounted police, were sending
messages from Minto to Fort Selkirk in hot haste to fetch ice saws.
They had located the hole in the ice
through which the three murdered
men had been thrust and are confident they have at least one of the
murderers in jail at Selkirk, in the
person of the man O'Brien, who
was so long in custody at Tagish
and a few weeks ago was removed
to Selkirk to be tried on a charge
of stealing scows.
"Where the bodies have been
definitely located is about three
miles this side of Minto, in the
river, not close to the trail. On the
edges of the hole that was, but
which, of course, has long been
frozen .over, a lower stratum of the
snow is much discolored with what
has proven on chemical assay to be
human blood. Near the spot of
burial were found a broken sleeve
link and a pocket knife, both identified as having belonged to a member of the party. In O'Brien's possession too have been found certain
articles which are known to have
belonged to Relfe. Also a closer
examination of the cabin near Minto, occupied at the time of the
tragedy by O'Brien,has led to other
discoveries. He has evidently
burned up a lot of wearing apparel
and in the tinder have been found
buttons that will probably be identified.
"The officers all the way through
have been reticent. 'We have located the bodies,' said one of them to
an acquaintance who landed here
last night, 'and we have enough
evidence now to hang O'Brien.' "
A Hlin.n SHOOTS STRAIGHT
She Kills Another Woman, Who Took
Her Hu*band'« Love
Chicago, March 30.—Miss Annie
Strother, cashier in a restaurant on
Twenty-second street, was shot and
instantly killed last night by a well
dressed, heavily veiled woman. The
stranger came in the front door
and, walking, to the cashier's desk,
fired four shots point blank at Miss
Slrothers and escaped. No other
person except the cashier was in the
front ol the restaurant at the   time.
Charles Smith, proprietor of a
saloon opposite the restaurant, has
been arrested. The police declare
that he was attentive to the cashier
and that his wife was jealous.
Miss Strother came to Chicago a
year ago from St. Louis.
Three hours after the shooting,
Mrs, Charles Smith, 26 years old,
wife of the saloon-keeper, was arrested aud made a confession, saying she had shot Miss Strother, because the latter had taken her husband's love.
Oppose the Davis Amendment.
New Vork, March 20.—it can be
stated authoritatively that the state
department has be in informed tin t
all of the governments of Central
America are opposed to the Davis
amendment lo the Hay-Pauncefote
treaty, says a Washington dispatch
to the Herald. In the opinion of
those governments, the amendment
places in the hands of the government the right to not only take
measures tor its own defense with
reference to the canal, but permits
it to use force "for the maintenance
of public order."
Dewey t>olu|f lo Kurope.
New Vork, March 19.—Admiral
and Mrs. Dewey, according to a
Washington dispatch, will sail April
25 for Europe, for a year in foreign
travel.
■
,
' om^rrs
THE
mm
LARGE     AND   COMFORTABLE
ROOMS TABLE    UNBURr
PASSED    IN    TI?E
NORTHWEST.
mm& barreh **. • props
SILVERTON,
B. 0.
THE SIIVKRT0S1A».
Saturday, March 24, 16OO.
Ft'BLIBIIED EVERY   BATOKDAY   AT
SILVERTON, B. 0.
MATHI'.SON BROS..     Kdltors * Prop*.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
Advertising rates trill be made known
upon application at thia office.
Daigle's Blacksmith Shon.
Oeneral Maeksmithiiig
•. •      and Repairing Done.
EXPERT  H0R8E   SH0ER ALWAYS   ON  HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
8. DAIGLE,      SILVERTON. B. C.
THERE IS
No Excuse
For Being
Late When
BRINDLE
(THE NEW DENVER JEWELER)
Fixes Your
Ss>»&90&99>9
HE GUARANTEES SATISFACTORY WORK IS ALL LINKS OF
WATCH, CLOCK OR JEWELRY
REPAIRING. EVERY WEDNESDAY HE VI81T8 SILVERTON
AND MAKES THE  LAKEVIEW
EOTEL   HIS HEADQUARTERS.
BAVE YOOR  IVORK  THERE.
fir|t Trip through the Kootenay.
The Original
FISK JUBILEE
Singers *•
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF
THE METHODIST CHURCH.
* eta*}, April 4th., 8. p. n.
at MoKitinon's
Htill.  • • • •  •
TICKETS 76c. and $100
PLAN AT THE DRUGSTORE.
var obiqinal company.
s*tg*mta*e Oct. Bth 1871 at VIBK Va-
Irenlty, Tenn., aad latrly relnrnrd
from a most »«cc«.«ful t*ar la northern
■■rep*.
8INN0TT k (VDONKEU*
FREIGHTERS AND PACKERS.
Contracts large or small taken
And promptly attended to.
SUblei in SILVERTON, B. 0-
OH A8. A. WATERMAN A CO.
Auctioneer*, Customs Brokkus,
And General Real Estate Agents,
OMa* la Bcaler Block    -   -    Bakrr It.
NELSON,   B, C.
annul mm mm.
NO. 9s\ W. P. Of M.
Meets every Saturday in the Union
_(lall in Silverton, at 7:30 r. m.
J. M. JJ. Bensocm,
President.
3.1. McIntowi,
Financial Secretary
I
IF YOU!\ SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
lattveea or in arrears   a
| BLUE CROSS WILL
i $•»*»•$ BE FOUND IN THIS
SQUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. PRICE
*l*iO DOLLAR^ A YEAR.
EASILY   SATISFIED.
I do not want the earth, my lad,
Mv wishes tend some other wny.
For if the whole wide euith I had,
Just think what taxes I must pay!
Oh no! I do not want the earth,
For if 'twas mine I'd bave to pawn it;
But I .\uuiil spend iny days in mirth,
II1 just held a mortgage on it.
—Philadelphia Press.
Through The Week.
Extracts   From    Various  Sources.
Tbe Vi^oria Colonist lias tlie following
crack at the Nelson Convention of last
week. "The Nelson convention party
has evolved a strange sort of resolution.
It recites that whereas the Liberals and
Conservatives united to meet a crisis and
thos formed tbe Liberal-Conservative
party, the Liberals and Conservatives
ought to divide to meet tho crisis in this
prov|uce."
The late little drunken row in Sandon,
that the Hensuiion mongers are making a
tu-do about, makes a person wonder why
it is that, in this free and woolly weat,
the bo.vH can't have a little row amongst
themselves without having the Union
and Eight-Hour law dragged iUo it.
THE FISK MINSTRELS.
On Wednesday, April 4th., our townsfolk will have an oppor tuaity of hearing
the Original Fisk Jubilee Singers In tbeir
program of high class negro songs and
music. This company has a world wide
reputation and have only consented to
visit our town on the guarantee that the
people of Silverton are willing to patronise good entertainments, sucb as the
Fisk singers always iiive. The company
have just recently returned from northern
Europe, where they made a \eo years'
tour, appearing in all the large cities.
They hriug bank many flattering press
notices from the largest Girinan and
Scandinavian papers,
J
Silverton       •      •      *  •
B.C
888888888 888888 88888888 8]
EDITORIAL OUTCROPS.
8888888888888888888888881
The stand taken by the labor convention, held in Nelson on the 22nd.
inst, is the most sensible one yet
adopted by any of the polilii_i.il conventions held lately.
Instead of doing as the other conventions have done, resolving that
they were the whole people and demanding that the country he run for
their political benefit, they drafted a
platform which they will submit to
the different labor organizations for
approval. And if approved, as no
doubt it will be, they will ask any
candidate that runs to endorse it if
they expect the support of organized
labor in tbe Kootenay Ridings.
Where they have little or no faith in
the candidates running they will
doubtless put up an independent man
of their own choosing.
Tbe candidates endorsed by the
labor organizations are going to be
the men elected to sit in our next
provincial legislature.
Tbe rapidity with which the snow
is disappearing from the lower hills,
has already started the prospectors out
looking the already bare ground over
in the hopes of striking a bonanza.
Mining experts have already commenced to come in, and several properties have already been examined,
with the result that there are two
or three good mining deals now pending. Although at present work is
practically suspended on nearly ail of
our biggest properties still everything
points to the fact that tbe prevent
season promises to be the busiest that
the Silverton district has yet seen.
The persistency with which the
mine managers, advertise the Inck(T) of
miners in this country and give
outsiders preference when they apply
for work at the mines, shows how
much they care for Canada and the
Canadian workingmen. And in the
face of these facts, what supreme gall
the show when they ask the miners
to favor their candidate and vote with
them in the enioing election. They
are either ignoramuses themselves or
they take the Canadian workingmen
for the biggest kind of fools. The
workingman's salvation and protection,
in this country, rests with himself and
the way in which he oasts his ballot
Let the workingman protect himself for
he cannot expect others to do it for
him if he neglects his own opportuity.
Love your enemy! but practise trne
diplomaoy towards him, which is, find
out what he wants and then buck him,
for that is just what you do not wantl
9}
The Financier of the Ledge has hit
upon a novel scheme to forci people to
advertise in his paper. In most conn
tries his scheme would come under the
head of attempted blackmail; but evidently an unsuccessful financier in order to get out of the hole which he has
financed himself into mnst resort to
schemes and tricks tbat would make
any legitimate newspaper man ashamed
pf himselt.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments of oro  from Silverton for
thn year 1899. totaled 1693 Tons.
All other Lake po.nts 1983     "
The shipment   ot  ore   from   Slocan
Lake points, up to and including   tbe
present week, from Jan. 1, 1900.
From Bosun Landing. Tons.
Bosun ,,.....1^0
From New Denver
Hartney  20
C.ipelltt 7
From Silverton Tons.
Emilv Edith 20
Vancouver    20
From Enterprise Londing
Enterprise 143
From blocan City
Arlington v      180
Black Prince    60
THE   METAL MARKET.
New York, Mar. 22.—Bar Silver, 80 c
Lake copper,   $16.50,        .
Lead—Tlie firm that fixes the selling
price for miners and smelters quotes lead
at |4.43 at the close.
J. I. Mcintosh,
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT — CON-
FECTIONERY	
CIGARS     AND
TOBACC08
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES IN THE
STATIONARY    LINE
 FISHING TACKLE	
THE LATEST  NOVEL8,  4c.
Silverton, B.C.
Litec Cream
FOR CRACKED OR SORE
HANDS. FOR USE AFTER SHAVING. AN EXCELLENT HEALER OF
CUTS OR BURNS.   Price 25c.
THIS PREPARATION 18
BEYOND DOUBT THE FINEST OF
ITS KIND ON THE MARKET. ALL
LIKE IT WHO TRY.   Price 25c
Perhaps
THE MANY SUDDEN
CHANGES IN THE WEATHER HAS
GIVEN YOU A COLD. TRY HORE-
HOUND AND TOLU.   Price 25c.
SYRUP OF HOREHOUND
AND TOLU 18 KNOWN TQ MANY
WHOM IT HAS CURED. IT HAS
KNOWN NO FAILURES. SOLD UNDER A GUARANTEE. Price 25c.
Sold
AT  THE
Silverton Pure
Drug: Drop And
Store.     (I'licmifitls Kept.
LAKE AVE,  SILVERTON,   B. O
Bubonic plague has again broken
out in its most violent form in Aus
tralia. It is .not known yet for
positive fact whether the Eight-Hour
law in British Columbia is responsible
for this fresh outbreak, but no doubt
siieDia'i will besont from Victoria to
iuy.-stigato.
t
c
axative
MINING  RECORDS.
NEW   DENVIIB—LOCATIONS
Al. Reoves is expected to return from
Phoenix next week.
Har6—Four Mile, Four Milo creek, J
C Butler.
10—Four Mile No 8. same, F V Liehscher.
AHSKSSSlItNTS.
Mar 5—Teauinseh. 13—Rover. 16—
Mercury, Silver Bill, Amazon, High Ore
Ir, Thistle. Baldwin, V fr, Cafe fr,
19—Mineral King, N._oob, Pamlico aod
Bell.
TRANSFERS.
Mar 12—Keystone &, Goo II Davis to
David Matheson, May 23,1899.
12—Congo No-2, Comminder, Brutol,
1-10 each, Frank L B.vron to S Daigle,
Mar lg.
16-Minor Boy %, Chas W McAnn to
C Schoeuberger.
19-Four Mile No 2 }i, J C Butler to
F F Liebscher, M*r 17.
Four Mile No 3 X, F F Liebscher to
J C Butler, Mar 17.
^*4**»*t*\r***t*t*W
old Cure.
To'Oore a  Oold \n   Qne Day.
Contains   Thn New Ingredient.
• TRY   IT.
PRICE 25c. At All druggists.
THE'MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR .OFj
■Atffe
THE
ARLINGTON
HOTE^
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Whsif.
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
ROOMS,
Dining Room nnder tlie charge of
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with nil the delicacies
of the season.
HENDERSON* GETHING, - Props.
8LOOAN CITY B. O.
j.m. McGregor
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
8LOCAN CITY,    B.C.
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NOTICE:- "Triumph," "Imfreona-
di.k" and "Rainbow Quartz" Mineral
Claims; situate in the Arrow Lake
Mining Division of West Kootenay
District.
Where located:—On Cariboo   creek,
adjoining   the    Millie Meek   Mineral
Claim.
Take notice that I, J. D. Anderson. P. L.
S , of Trail, B C, acting as agent for the
Kamloops Mining and Development
Company, Limited, Free Miner's Orti
Acute No. B14445, intend sixty days fiom
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for Certificates of Improvements, for tbe pin pose of obtaining
Crown Grants of the above claims.
And further take notio that action
under section 37,'must te cnmmer.eed
before the issuance of sueh Certificates
of Improvements
Dated this 8th day of September, A. I).
1899.
3. D. Anderson.
24 | 2 | 00.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY —
and SOP Line-
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY OOUNTY
TO ALL POINTS
EAST AKP WEST
First-Class Sleepers on all Trains (rom
REVELSTOKE   and KOOTENAY LD
TOURIST CARS  pass Medicine Hat
Daily for Sr. Paul.
Sundays and Wednesdays for Toronto.
Friday* for Montreal and Boston.
— Same cars pass Revelstoke one day —
earlier. ——
T
H
TOTilsoia
E
A. E. TEETER, PROM,
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISES,
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THK   BEST   BRANDS OF WINES, LIQUORS
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,   -   -   - SLOOAN, B. C.
5v£eiDox5.ald_.'C3 X.Itt©X3T _
StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  HORSES  FOR  HIRE   AT   REASONABLE
RATES A GENERAL FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSI.NESS DONE.
Outside Parties Desiring Horses in Silverton
uuisiue rumen j-mt-mmhh «.«/.nv». ,  p   M.nnwAin
CsnfHave Them  Reserved By Writing To—    A> l' McDONALD,
t t t t t t t SILVERTON, • • B.
THC WM. HAMILTON MKNUFACTING CO..
LIMITED,
MINING MACHINERY
J^etertoo-roingtif Ontario.
CANADA.
THE \
3
{:■; ll.a<_i|.i!ii-lm Fur Dining Iln :.
I
i
hYRY'JIilNG MAV, MAT
ANI> Cr-TO-DAlE
VICTORIA!
<•
idOl-fej-Le IlionEScHAIBBIIRJi,  frojK.
TABLE PK8l7fcFAMftD IN
THE NOLTHWEST.
The Strike ls OET. m watches. jbwSS*
i j nr ,-* Diamoxdb, Sterl.no
And We arc iio\v*$ind plated Novelties.    Piano Lamps
SILV EII T ON,   B. C,
FsTAHiifiirtiis Nnsox "]PP0.:
Rcadjfor
•JJASD Onye Table i.
Onus    Articles
Too   Numerous   To
-    Call /nd   Exam-
And now  my Koot-ltfixE Them.   .   .   ,
enay  Friends  I aniW
prepared to  rect ive •>' ►!_,
vour     orders     Foi
?#»
OUR   WATCH AND JF.WELERY
RFI'AIRING DEI ARTM1NT IR AI.
As we only employ the most espe •
lencfd men, allwork is guauantied
Mail and Express Orders Receive Our
Prompt Attention.
DON'T FORGET THE PLACE.
JACOB DOVER.  "Tut Jkwei_eh."
NEL80N, B. O.
CONNECTIONS.
For the North,Revelstoke, and Main Line
JT:80 ex' Sunday lv. Silverton,
ar. ex. Sunday, 16:20
For   Rossland,  Nelson     Crows   Nest
Branch and Bonmlsry Country,
10:20 ex. Sunday lv. Silverton,
ar. e*. Sunday 18: CO
Taoml from Sandon.
13:00 ex Sunday lv Silverton,
 ar. ex Sunday, 10:20.
Tickets issued through and Baqoaoe
—cueckcd to destination. ——
For rates aud fnll information apply to
nearest local agent or
H- H. BEEVES, Agent, Silverton
W. F. ANDERSON,
Trav. Pass. Agent, Nelson
E. J. COYLE.
\,. G, P. Agent, Vancouver
f#-   FOR POWER KNITTING MACHINES AND   VJSIBLE-
WRIT1NG TYPE-WRITERS WRITE US    CATALOGUES FREE-
The THISTLE HOTEL
NOW REOPENED
UFDER A NEW
MANAGEMENT. ,
I10U8E|BENOVATED
AND THE BAR FULLY
RESTOCKED
Thompson I3ro«.,   Props,
LA^ AVE,,   SILVEKTON, B. ifc

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