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The Silvertonian Sep 8, 1900

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 ti
•j'JJB SILVERTONIAN.
SLOGAN'S REST
KNOWN WEEKLY.
THE
THE SILVERTONIAN.
LOCAL MINING* NEWS.
.SUBSCRIPTIONS, |_>_0
VOLUME FOUR.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 8,   D.QQ.
NUMBER  10
.AKEYIEW   HOTEL
Sttlv©:rto_i_jL	
jJTTHIS  HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
THE   BAR   IS   SUPPLIED  WITH  BEST  BRANDS   OF
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
:&/£„   Kxicwles-   E^xop.
. J3XJRIVS <& co
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KINDS OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
RETAIL WORKS AT
MINES AROUND
THE DISTRICT.
A   PROMISING   PROPERTY.
Jos. Connors lias just returned to town
from Twelve Mile where he has been
doiug somo work on the St. Lawrence
group, in which he ia interested. Considerable work has already heen done on
this property and a first-class showing
o( mineral has been made. The lnte.it
work consisted of a tunnel driven directly on the ledge, which has now reached a
depth upon it of over 50 feet. The ledge,
which lies in the granite formation, varies from seven to eight feet in width and
carries about three feet ol a good quality
of concentrating ore and from two to
three feet of iron and lead carbonates.
Tbe property is situated about fix
miles up the creek.
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Kaslo, Sandon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks, Sirdar
Midway and Greenwood.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
HEAD OFFICE NELSON, B. C.
9
5
Are You Looking For
Stylish goods?
THAT IS  UP-TO-DATE   CLOTHING   WITH
THE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGKTII-   \
ER OUT OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE  YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      ITT AND FINISH
GURANTEEI).   OVERCOATINGS .Il'ST IN.
IJEBSMHi,   The Tailor:   Silverton, I. C.
5
i
WILL   WORK.  THIS   WINTER.
During the week provisions and mining supplies have been packed up to the
South VV ales Group, a Granite creek property, and mining in earnest is nbout to
commence there. This group of claims
ii staked on a strike lately mnde about
three miles up Granite creek, consisting
of a six loot ledge lying in the granite
formation, having a strike north ar.d
south and a dip east. This ledge has
been traced a long distance and numerous open cuts made upon it. Tlm vein
Harriet a paystreak varying in width
from one to ts., feet of a mixed iron
carbonate, nine and galena ore. Buildings haye lieen put up on the property
and a tunnel ia being driven that will
tap the vein at a depth of over 80 feet.
6
*****
«
THE
VICTORIA |
HOTEL.
{:•: l!ai)(|iiiirt«s For Hiitins; M :•:
i —
EVERYTHING NEW, NEAT
AND  UP-TO-DATE
TABLE UNSURPASSED IN
THE NQETHWEST.
1   JAS. BOWES,   Prop.
•* SILVERTON,   B. C.;
J-
m. m. raraamrnTfri,
ASSAYE
Silverton
B.C
PREPARING A SHIPMENT.
Another property that the Red Mountain Wi'gon road will lie of grent benefit
to, is the Ethel Fraction a properly that
has but lately sprung into immune nee.
Th.j claim is situated in the Silver
Baud Basin at the head of Eight Mile
creek and adjoins the Silver Band
liroup. It is lhe property of Robert
Ewin who is rapidly developing it into a
shipping p-opoaition. The ledge which
varies from three to four feet in width
lies in the granite formation and has a
Mrike running nearly north and south
and stands up nearly straight having no
perceptible dip. A tunnel ia being
driven directly on the vein and has now
reached a depth of over 50 feet. The
ore encountered so far has been dry, but
aa depth is gained upon it more galena
is encountered and it is to be presumed
thnt wilh depth it will develope into a
wet ore proposition. The ore taken out
is being sacked and a trial shipment
will soon be made to the Binelter. The
ore is very rich carrying quantities of
brittle and native silver besides grey
copper giving assay values running as
high as 81)0 ounces in silver. An average
sample taken across the whole ledge al
the face of the lunnel gave an average
value of 370 ounces in silver to tlie ton.
A fifty foot tunnel is being driven on
Ihe SLvcr Eagle claim on Alpha Mountain. Tina ia a silver-lead property
belonging to C. Copp and C. McNichol
and adjoina the Standard claim one of
the Suprise Croup.
YES!
i^If you do not get your CLOTHING
From BOURIV^ BROS.,<l
:
REMEMBER
—■■»■
WE ARE AGENTS FOR ONE OF THE BEST TAILORING ESTABLISHMENTS IN MONTREAL. WE TAKE YOUR MEASUREMENT RIGHT HERE
AND IN THREE WEEKS WILL TURN YOU OUT WITH AN ELEGANT
SUIT. 7 5 0    SAMPLES    OP  SUITINGS,
l-SflMitoril PANTINGSA OVERCOATINGS TO
SwFiSS® I&OR1MNAUY.)        CH00SE ™*-
lilVF, IS A TRIAL ORDER.
BOURNE BROS,,
gooooooooooooooooec
The Emily Edith force is being gradually increased.
SeveiW important deals are about to
be closed in the Slocan City district.
There mining ia going ahead systematically and rapidly.
New ofllcers have been elected lo.-
the local Miners' Union. Those chosen
are.I. R. Roberts, President, and J. C.
Tyree, Financial Secretary.
Forty five minera rolled their blankets
and asked for their time at the Queen
Bess inioe this week as a protest against
the milliner of preparation of the board
supplied them bv the company. As a
consequence a new crew and a new cook
i r! now at the mine.
WHAT IS A WILDCAT   MINE?
Will some croaker or cent percent
money loaner who thrives on the ready
circulating money of a mining cnmp, aud
who is everlastingly cniiiionir.g people j
to beware of "wildcat" mines,, have the
good grace to define the term, i et him
do so and every condition he applies will
bo met by producing a great mine which,
at one time, possessed the alleged
attributes, la amine a "wildcat" because Ihe stock in the company owning
it is selling at a nominal figure? If so,
then the Granite Mountain waa a
"wildcat," for its stock was sold ior less
than ten cents a sh.ire. yet it paid over
$13,000,000 in dividends, and is still
feting profitably operated. Iron Mountain was sold as low as eight cents snd
has paid over half a million in dividends
These mines were once only prospects
with ten-foot holes, and so was everv
other great mine. The fact is a"wild-
at" is only audi when time and
development whow it cannot be made
a mine aud yet it may, as a prospect,
have had great promise and worthy the
expenditures made in an effort to make
it a mine—Western Mining World.
SLOCAN LAKE ORE  SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of  ore   fr.ini Silverton for
tye year 1890. totaled 1603 Tone.
All other Uke pointa 1385     "
The shipment   ot   ore   from   Slocan
Lake points,  up  to and including   the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1W0.
From Bosun Landing. Tons.
Bosun 740
From New Denver
Hartney  20
Capella  7
From Silverton Tons.
Emilv Kdith 20
Hewett 70
Vancouver    80
Wakefield, (concentrates) 080
Galena Mines        20
From Enterprise Lauding
Enterprise 88J
Neepawa       7
From Slocan City
Arlington     .100
Black Prince    60
Kilo 20
Total
2904
New I>^riV©r, B, C»
DON'T  KNOCK.
A good natured traveling man who
makes this territory for a prominent
wholesale house, says the Revelstoke
Herald, carries a card on the back of
which appeara this wholesome advice:
"If there ia a chance to boom business,
boom it. Don't be a knocker. Don't pull
a long face and look as though you had a
sour stomach. Hold up your head, smile
nnd hope tor better tilings. Hide your
little hummer, and try to speak well of
others, no matter how small you may
really know yourself lo be. When a
stranger drops in, jolly him. Tell him
this ia the greatest town on eaitli—and
it is. Don't iiisciiiirage him by speaking
ill of your neighbora or opposition firms.
Lend him to believe he has at last struck
n place where whiie people live. Don't
knock. Help yourself along by becoming
popular, ar.d push your friends with you.
It's dead easy. Be a good fellow and
aoon you'll have a procession of followers. No man ever helped himself by
knocking other other people down in
character or buainess. No man ever got
rich by trying to make others believe he
waa the only good man in town, or the
only man in town who knew entitling.
You can't climb the ladder of success by
treading on other people's corns. Keep
off lhe corns.
"You're not the only one. Tbere are
others and Ihey have brains as well aa
v.iu. There ia no end ol (un ln minding
your own business. It makes other people like you. Nobody gela stuck on a
knocker. Pou't be one, or two."
Mrs. Barclay returned on Wednesday
from Moyie.
Frank Ryan and Phil Wallers returned
from tlu, Smuggler on Monday.
(io to R. G. Daigle'e for fresh fruits
and  con leet ionery.  Near  Postoffice.*
On Tuesday next the Second Annual
Ball of the Slocan City Miners' Union
will be given.
J. McMurray will spend the winter in
Ontario. He left for hia old home in
Douro, ou Thursday.
Divine Service will be held to-morrow
evening, at 7:30 o'clock, iu the Union
Church.   All welcome.
J. Donaldson, Sandon's aide-awake
druggist, spent Labor Day in town, and
conspicuously held down third base in
the ball game.
The Secretary of the Rossland Miners'
Union »anta information of the whereabouts of "Kid Allen," formerly ol Victor, Colorada.
Those who intend joining tbe Club
Swinging club, now being iormed in the
town, are requested to stnd iu their
names by Monday, the 10th inst.
The Slocan City Miuers' Union is
seekiog incorporation under the provisions of the Benevolent Society Act, a
notice to that effect having appeared io
the Provincial Gazette.
B. Calbick is having hia house considerably enlarged. Others are busily fixing up for the winter, a suspicion o;
which is already beginning to creep into
thn early morning air.
A Vancouver paper comes out with
Ihe probable new Cabinet at Victoria
after the promised shaking up has taken
place, Iu the forecast Robert E. Green
ia down as Minister of Mines.
Khaki medallion portraits of the Britiah
generals now serving iu South Africa are
for sale at The Silverton Drug Siore>
price 25c, as well aa a few copies of "Our
Commauders" at the aame low price.
All   work   in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Silverton Drug Store, will
be promptly forwarded  to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler.    All re
pairs are onauantbei. roit oisa YK-Ut. *
The "Birthday Social*' given here laat
Saturday waa a gratifying success all
round. The ptograin, although much of
it was extemporary, was excellent and
was enjoyed fully by the large audience
present.
The Toronto World has increased its
circulation by thousands during the past
few years. One reason for this advance
is found In the fact that it publishes the
most accurate and fullest market reports
of any Canadian  paper.
Geo. A. Jackson and Geo. Fairbairn
are spending a few days on lhe prairie,
having left here on Monday laat fir
Calgary. Mr. Fairbairn is contemplating
acquiring a ranch In that neighborhood
and going into stoclcraising.
A. P. McDonald was the unlucky recipient of a telegram on Wednesday from
his home in Ontario, announcing tho
serious illness of his mother and sister.
Miss McDonald, who has heen here with
ber brother, left for the East on Thursday,
During the week Pete Sennott disposed of his freighting outfit, here to C.
Cameron of Slocan City. Mr. Cameron
has the freighting contract to deliver at
tbe Chapleaii mine on Lemon creek
350,000 feet of lumber and over 300. tons
of machinery.
Ralph Gillette, C. Snyder and C. L
Copp returned Irom the Lardeau on Monday where tbey have been doing considerable work upon their mining claims.
Copp is still suffering fron- his late accident, rcaultiiig in a split foot, although
he is able to get around with the help
of a  cane.
Baseball matches were played here on
Sunday and Labor Day, the players
showing a great improvement over their
showings in former games. To-morrow
a game of more than usual interest will
be played, a Canadian nine having been
arranged to play all comers. Two teams
will be chosen from ihe following players: Canadians; Jackson, Bowes, McNichol, Thompson, McLaughlin. Watson,
Thorburn, Collison, Muthoson, McFarlane, McKinnon and Brandon: All
Corners, Tinling. McNaught, Mel).maid,
Culver. Smith, Byron, Patrlcan, Brand,
Davis, Finlay and Fletcher,
MATTERS FOUTICAi,
THE     LIBERAL    NOMINEE-CONSERVATIVES CONVENE.
HV. .1     Oul liber  After   Hoatoetfn   .»«b.
At Uie Liberal Convention held at
Revelstoke on Wednesday W. A. Gal-
liber received the unanimous nomination
as the standard bearer of the party in the
Riding. Hewiti Rostock, the present
member, will retire from active politics.
Mr. Galliher is a prominent lawyer,
senior member of the firm of Galliher &
Wilson, of Nelson, and is a man well-
known and popular throughout the Riding. In him the Liberals believe they
have a strong candidate.
rrnrliirJmt Comtstrvatlyet Preparing.
The Liberal Conservatives ol the Prov.
ince met in Convention on Thursday and
Friday of laat week at New Westminster
ami drew up a provincial platform of
sixteen planks for the guidance of the
party in the approaching campaign.
Tiie following officers were elected for
the Provincial Association : Honorary
President, Sir Char'es Iiibbert Tnpperj
President, Hon. H. McBride; Treasurer,
F.S.Barnard: Secretary, C. J. South.
Charles Wilson Q. C. was chosen Leader
of the party in the Province.
In this Riding the three most talked of
Conservatives as probable candidates for
the party nomination are Hon. C. Mo
Intosb, T. Msyne Daly and ex-Mayor
Gocdeve, all of Rossland. Ro date has
yet been set for a local Conservative convention, but such a meeting will probably be called in the near future.
Tha Ttem Liner* Will Amu Me In It.
From Toronto comes word of the
launching-of a uew party, the "Peoples*
Party," which comes out with a straight,
socialistic platform. Thia partv will put
up candidates wherever possible. As an
agitation haa already been begun among
the labor papers for ench a candidate in
this Riding it is within the realms of
probability that a third candidate will be
endorsed hy the various labor .unions of
the district.
THE   METAL  MARKET.
New York.  Sept.   fl.—Rar Silver, 61,^
Lake copper,   116.50,
Lead—The firm that fixes the selling
price (or miners and smelters quotes lead
»t $4.00 at the close.
PICKUPS.
The highest point reached hy any
railway in the world is at the Galera
tunnel—15,678 feet—on the .line from
l.inia,to Oroya, Peru, South America
The A'aska Treadwell mill at Douglas
Island, Alaska, is a splendid evidence
of Ihe improvement of machinery and
the advance of science ic quarli mining.
Its mill tailinge assay but 12 to 15 cents
to the ton.
A curious instance of liie irony of late
may lie witnessed just now at the Calcutta Jocks, whero hundreds of Chinese
carpeuters, etc., are busily engaged preparing the transports to carrv the enemies of their own country to their
destination at Hong Koug.  -
In a humble home in Lancashire au
old man Hiy dying. His wife was tend-
inn something cooking over the fire, and
the old man, after amiling ostentatiously,
remarked: "That's a gradely smell, lass"
'"Ay," she replied, "but it's noan for
thee, lad ; it's t'hain for thy Imrying."
NOT OX EAR1H AS IN HEAVEN.
TWO babies were born in  the selfsame town
On the very same birthday ;
Tbey  laughed and cried   in  Iheir
mothers' arms
In the very self-same way;
Ami both seemed pure and innocent
Ae falling flal.es of snow,
But one of them lived in a terraced house
And one in the street below.
Two children plaied in the selfsame ion u
And the children bo»h were fair,
But one had curls brushed  smooth  and
round,
The other had tangled hair.
The children two grew up apace
As other children grow.
But one of them lived in a terraced house
And one in the street below.
Two maiden wrought in the selfsame town
And one was wadded and loved;
The other saw through tlie curtain's part
The world where her sister moved ;
The one waa smiling, a happy bride,
The other knew care and woe,
For one of them lived in a terraced house
And one iu the street below.
Two women lay dead in the selfsame town
And one had tender care;
Tlm other waa left to die alone
On her pa Hot aothin and bare;
One had many to mourn her loss,
For the other no tears wonld flow,
For one had lived in a terraced  Uquso
And one in the street below.
If Jesus, who died for rich and poor,
In wondrous holy love,
Took both the sisters in His arms
And carried tham above,
Then all the difference vanished qiite.
For in Heaven none would know
Which ol them lived in the terraoad hoixaa.
And 'vlil__.li iu the atretit twlu\»:,
1
:» SHIPPING AGAIN
Centre Star Sends Twelve Cars of Ore
to Trail.
The Centre Star is making its initial shipment of twelve carloads oi
ore this afternoon to the smelter at
Trail. The cars will average about
30 tons, giving a total of 360 tons
for the shipment. To a reporter
for the Record, Superintendent
Davis stated this afternoon that this
would be followed by regular shipments.
Death by Suiclile.
Chicago, Sept. 5.—The body of
Archibald C. Haynes, supposed to
have been connected with a New
York Life Insurance company was
found lying in a bed in a room at
Stafford's hotel last night. He is
supposed to have suicided.
THK  BlllSIIHV  QIKKTIO.1l.
QiickiIou Between Venezuela an* Columbia la Kettle.].
New Vork, Sept. 5.—Francis S.
Loomis, U. S. Minister to Venezuela, said:' "I learn that the joint
commission of Colombians and
Venezuelans appointed by Ihe queen
of Spain to decide the boundary line
between Colombia and Venezuela,
has advanced the boundary line to
the Negro river. This gives to
Colombia a slice of Venezuela
which reduces the size of the latter
about one eighth. The land in
question is barren country.
Hon. Arthur Ncwall Dead.
Bath, Maine, Sept. 5.—Honorable
Arthur Sewall, democratic nominee
for vice-president in 1896, died at
8 a.m. today as a result of a stroke
ofappopiexy suffered several days
ago.     	
Pell From a Window.
Windsor, Ont., Sept. 5.—R. M.
Fitzgerald, an old British pensioner,
while leaning out of his bedroom
window, overbalanced himself and
fell to the ground thirty-five feet below, dying shortly afterwards.
Haa Dleappeared.
Toronto, Sept. 5.—George S.
Clutton manager of the city and
county loan association of this city,
has disappeared. He is alleged to
have been short in his accounts.
MUTINY ON BOARD
Muleteers Did Not Like Their Food-
and Rebelled.
CROSSED IN
A BALLOON
Aeronaut  Had  Nothing
Under Him But the
Water.
A Notable wed (Una
Hamilton, Sept. 5.—Harry Led-
yard, son of president Led yard of
the Michigan Central railroad,
Detroit, and brother of Baroness
Von Kettlt-r, whose husband was
murdered by the Chinese in Pekin,
was married today to Miss Maud
Hendrye, daughter of W. Hendrye,
the well known railway cartage
agent aad horse fancier, this city.
Paris, Sept. 5, — M. Jacques
Faure, has successfully crossed the
channel in a balloon, He left the
Crystal Palace, London, at 8
o'clock Saturday night and arrived
at Alette, Pas Oe Calais, at 3
o'clock Sunday morning. The
crossing of the channel occupied
four hours. During this time the
aeronaut kept his balloon at a
height of 700 metres.
PRINCE AS A  DEMOCRAT.
New Orleans, Sept. 5. — The
British transport Montcalm with
1400 mules for South Africa, has
been anchored in midstream a few
m'!es below this port for 48 hours
with a mutiny on board. English
stokers refused to work alongside
Danish stokers and Chicago muleteers rebelled against thc quality
of food furnished. Last night scores
of the ringleaders of the mutiny
were placed in prison.
tfeuaea *t the Trouble
Sunday, however, the British
stokers refused to go to work.
They had learned that four Danish
stokers had been given places on
the ship's crew and they refused tc
handle a shovel of coal until they
had been displaced.
Then a complication developed in
another quarter. Seventy old
muleteers had been shipped, 30 of
whom hailed from Chicago. The
Chicagoans had had one meal from
the ship's fare and went on a strike.
Forty ofthe ringleaders#were placed
in jail, but the muleteers made their
escape.
Archdeacon mile
Kingston, Ont., Sept. 5.—After
several ballots had been taken in
this morning's session of the
Ontario synod, Archdeacon Mills
of Montreal, was elected Co-adjutor
Bishop of Ontario.
DRINK DID IT.
A latwyer'* i'lerk Hhoote Two IWeu.
New York, Sept. 5. — Martin
Wellman, a lawyer's clerk, in a
drunken frenzy, to-day shot James
Allen and John Kane, tha former
will die. Wellman had to be
clubbed into unconsciousness before
he would surrender to the police
who effected his arrest.
Are Holding Oil*.
Toronto, Ont., Sept. 5.—The
evening Independent, conservative,
publishes an interview with George
Taylor, sonservative, to the effect
that the liberals are'in bad condition
in Eastern Ontario and Quebec and
are holding off the announcement of
a dissolution on that account.
A UNIQUE
LAWSUIT
Damages for the Violation   of   Religious
Doctrines.
BRAVE DEED
OF A 6IRL
Stopped a Runaway and
Saved Five Persons
From Death.
New Vork, Sept. 5.—Five persons were saved from injury or
death last night by Miss Ada Mayo
Railey, daughter of Col. Charles L.
Railey, a well known horseman of
Lexington, Ky. A party of five,
including Miss Railey has driven in
an open bus from Sea Bright to
Pleasure bay, and were returning
when, after having gone some distance, they discovered that the
coachman was not on the box and
that the horses, a pair of powerful
animals, were running away.
Miss Railey, who is known
throughout Kentucky as a horsewoman of remarkable skill, climbed
through a window scarcely large
enough to admit her slender body
sidewise, managed to get hold one
line, and threw one oi the horses,
bringing the vehicle to a sudden
stop on the edge of a ditch near the
approach to the bridge across the
bay. The frightened occupants
climbed out and wilh the assistance
of passersby untangled the animals
from the broken harness.
Thoroughbred Stoek
Toronto, Ont., Sept. 5.—Hon,
Sydney Fisher, minister of agriculture, speaking at the exhibition
yesterday, expressed the opinion
that just so long as interest in stock
breeding was maintained, prosperity
would attend the breeders. He
favored English as against American thoroughbred stock.
HiinlUf-*. Trotiblea
Wilwaukee, Wis., Sept. 4.^—Ja-
cob Gross, treasurer of Gross Bros,
company, shot himself Monday
afternoon and died last night.
Business troubles caused death.
A very remarkable scene occurred
in the recent national Democratic
convention at Kansas City. The
first man of royal blood to sit in all
the rights and privileges of a delegate in any convention ever held in
the United States was there—and
it was a Democratic convention.
He was Prince David of Hawaii.
Strager still it was his vo.e at the
meeting of the committee on resolutions that put the free silver plank
into the platform:
Apparently no one knew his views
as he sat silent in the meeting—a
meeting which lasted all night, because of opposition to the free silver. When the time • came for
him to vote, the ballot stood 25 to
24 for free silver. If he voted with
the majority, the resolution was
lost. But he did not. And today
the newspapers are commenting on
the singular balance of power held
by a delegate from the youngest of
the territories, especially in view of
the attitude ot the Democratic party
toward the admission of Hawaii.
President Cleveland for a time prevented annexation, and leading
Democrats opposed it. Yet the
first representative from the "Dara-
dise of the Pacific" is placed in a
position to cast the deciding vote
on the most important plank in the
party platform—a platform upon
which the entire election may easily
hinge.
Hutu id Pbralclana
Watertown, N. V. Sep. 5—Mrs.
Wm. F. Rose, of Copenhagen,
whose case had baffled the medical
fraternity of the state died yesterday. During the past few years
she had had fifty operations performed and nearly three thousand
pounds of fluid taken from her
body. 1
BROKE HER
PROPELLER
Transport California, ten
Days Overdue, at
Manilla.
Washington, Sept. 5.—The war
department today received a cablegram saying that the California had
reached Manilla, having been delayed by a broken propeller.
The California was about ten days
overdue. It is reported that 700
tons of sommissary stores which
she carried have been damaged or
destroyed. How this occurred was
not stated in the brief cable received
by the war department.
The Death Roll.
Toronto, Sept. 4.—John Rankin,
collector of customs at Bowmanville
from 1871 to 1899, is dead here,
aged eighty-five.
Chatham, Ont, Sept. 4.—Robert
O'Hara, local master in chancery
died here yesterday morning, aged
seventy-seven years.
Sarnia, Ont., Sept. 4.—Cha.les
McKenzie, ex-M. P. and brother of
the late Hon. Alexander McKenzie,
is dead.
Liberals are Hopeful.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Sept. 5.—
At a political picnic held here on
labor day. under the auspices of the
liberal association, Hon. Mr. Tarte
predicted that the liberals would
carry 51 out of 65 seats in the province of Quebec. Hon. Mr. Mulock
also expressed the opinion that the
public would support the Laurier
administration for what it had done
during the last four years.
King moat Die
Ottawa, Sept. 5. — Alexander
King who shot and killed one
Davenport at White Horse Rapids
must die at Dawson City on October 2nd, a commutation of sentence
having been refused.
A Conservative Nomination.
Meretville, Ont., Sept. 5.—North
Leeds and Grenville conservatives
have chosen J. E. Lavell, of Smith's
Falls to oppose F. T. Frost.
la Renomlnatea
Durham, Ont., Sept. 4.—Liberals of South Grey have again nominated Dr. Landerkin.
An Even Hcore
Toronto, Sept. 4.—The result of
the lacrosse games between Toronto
ond New Westminster clubs, four
to four, was naturally a surprise,
taking into consideration the man*
ner in which the westerners defeated
the Montreal, Quebec and Ottawa
teams.
Accidentally Drowned
Perth, Ont., Sept. 4.—Willie,
son of G. G. Publow, of this town
was drowned while playing on saw-
logs at Allan's sawmill yesterday
New Yoik, Sept. 5.—One ofthe
laws of Judaism society, regarded
by the more pious of the faith, is
that no one of the faith shall handle
fire on the Sabbath. The pious Jew
does not light his fire nor gas.
Above all things he does not smoke
tobacco. Samuel Froomkin avers
that he is one of those |who lives
strictly to the tenets of the faith.
Because, as he alleges, Harris flyman has circulated a report that
Froomkin smoked a cigar on the
Sabbath, Froomkin has brought
an action in the city court, contend-
tending than Hyman has injured
him in his business and good standing in the community to the amount
of $2000. The care is anique in
the history of jurisprudence.
USEFUL PUBLICATIONS.
Through the courtesy of President W. H. Burman of the Historical and Scientific Society of Manitoba, The Record has received
copies of recent publications issued
by that body, We must congratulate the society on the useful work
it is doing, The annual report for
the past year, while showing that
the society is far from the ideal at
which it aims, demonstrates that
good work has been done. But it
is of the two pamphlets accompanying the report that we wish to speak
particularly. One of these is a
clear and succinct statement of the
progress and condition of natural
science in Manitoba and the Northwest. It is from the pen of President Burman, and contains a deal
of valuable information relative to
explorations, agriculture, meteorology, geology, botany, entomology,
and zoology.
The second of the two pamphlets
will prove far more interesting to
the average reader and at the same
time hardly less valuable in promoting the aim of the society. It is
entitled "On the St. Paul Trail in
the Sixties," its author being W.
G. Fonseca, a pioneer of the old
Red River days. A native of St
Croix, he found his way to the Red
River settlement in 1859, engaged
in business, married one of the
Logan family and settled on Point
Douglas, now a part of the city of
Winnipeg. His paper is a well
written series of reminiscences of
the old cart trail from Fort Garry to
St. Paul in the days when Winnipeg
had not yet come into existence.
The value ot such papers, apart
from their interest as reading matter
is beyond estimation. Too often
the people of a city or province
allow early historical matter to
perish, and then lament vainly after
it is irrecoverable.
The pamphlet is illustrated with
a number of rough but valuable
wood cuts, perhaps the most valuable being a picture of the first
newspaper office of Winnipeg in
i860. Another shows a group of
early settlers in camp by the roadside.
The national democratic convention cost Kansas City $66,253.
SIEGE IS RAISED
Town  Of Ladybrand Is  At Last
Relieved
Capetown, Sept. 5.—The seige
of Ladybrand has been raised after
several desperate attempts to capture the town and its little garrison
of 150 British troops. The Boers
who attacked Ladybrand are estimated to have numbered over 2,000.
The British were summoned September 2, but refused and from that
time on were subject to continual
rifle and cannon fire. The burgers
twice tried to rush the British position. Probably the approach of a
relief force saved the little garrison.
War Practically Over
New York, Sept. 5—The London
correspondent of the Tribune says
Lord Roberts' annexation of the
Transvaal is generally regarded at
home and in South Africa as an
indication that the war is practically
over. The stock exchange take
this view. The effect of the proclamation will be to cause the
Transvaal burghers now in arms to
be treated as rebels and forfeit
belligerent rights. It is hoped that
by this means the hoplessness of
further resistance will be speedily
brought to the Boers. But the experience of the Orange river colony
is not altogether encouraging.
Loal In tbe Calai-ombe
Rome, Sept. 5. — Two young
Americans, students at the university of Eichstadt, visited,the tain-
combs yesterday with their Iriends
and up to a late hour last night no
trace of them had  been discovered.
Later.—The lost students Harry
Fengel and George Laughey were
found at 3 o'clock this morning by-
German student friends, who carrying torches and guided by the -irch-
aelogist Signor Marucchi, had
searched for them all night long.
HIS THRONE
IS NOW SAFE
Shah of Persia has Captured Ali Mahomet
Bey.
Chicago, Sept i;.~A dispatch
from Moscow says: "After a desperate fight Ali Mahomet Bey, the
rebel who has been trying to get
possession of the Persian throne,
has been defeated by the Cossacks
hastily summoned to oppose his
march on the capital and has been
thrown into an underground dungeon."
TODAYm NTtMH   aAltWM.
II
Ml
Following is a summary of the
sales on the local exchange today
together with the quotations:
...    . «8KID
Athnbasoa	
B C. Oold Fields ' su
Him* Tail '.  ...."-' j/j
Brandon A Oolden Crown _ In
Calilurnla  jo
Canadian Oold Fields.  hi/
Cariboo [CampMcKinney] m *
Centre 8tar  $ I 01
Crow's Neat Paw Coai" " i.'W m
Deer Trail No. 2... "7        ' L
Dundee             "" .»**
Kveniim Htar .'.'   ' "* L
oiant ;;;;;;  !;p
Homestake {Attest, paid) 2
Iron Mask  ass
Iron Colt ,.,,, „,_,; 3
I. X, L  141/
Jnmbo  £,)
KIiik (Oro Iii-iiui-ii) ..','.'.'" 7
KnobHUI  w
Linn- l'i ne CoiiMiil        .' 11
Muinebalia ....,!
Miinli' Cliri-ilii      ' »•/
Montreal Oold Fields.,... 48
Morrison  !~
Monntain Mon         '" n'i
Noble Five           'V,.
NoTeUylar<KMt Ko<i,«'"»y»l 00
okanoKMi ikmet, 'paid},' \ '£'*
Old Ironsides  J,
Vevne    2?
1'eorla Mines    ".
I'lineesa Maud '  »,.
«uiiP ::;:;• „•«
Kainliler-Curiboo ..          ' T,..,
Republic        jjn
Bt. Klmo Consolidated."" k
Sll Hi vim                 '• .?
Tanmrar, [Kennethj;"' J,.
Tom rhumb. ...    '  JH
VanAnda      *
Virxntlu         *
White Hear......  '£%
Winnipeg '.'._'.'.'."..'.' ,f*
\ )
11
1(1
V*
Vi
m
W
00
»X
I
1
28
18
18
4
60
«X
3
I2*
3%
HI
1
1
(IX
til
1
-%
2:1
72
m
4
IH
60
1
*%
8fi
*•»•*.*APmnttt
Ottawa,  Sept. s<_An
council passed this morning
"V John  V. Ellis,   M pS!lpN.
Johns,    N.  B., ,0   ,he ; olK
place of Senator Burne* ""U,e *\
P  ' resi8»H
Kertou.l, Woun^
Ottawa, Sept. s §•
Milne cables from CaPL>
nouncingthe serious Wo ""*
private C. C. M. YV.itts, „fv'V
Man., (Strathcona's HonelJS
fontein on September ist. '
Richard Harding^-
the Boers have just as much^
of winning as they ever had t
no doubt. Ir%
The  new   king of |,a,y ^
th^n five feet in height.
THE WAR
The Dowager Empress is Still iotJ
for Trouble
London, Sep. 5.-There is |j4
indication that the dowager tm*t*,
is ready to treat for peace, even*
the allied powers  reach an ap»
ment in regard to the best n*
of opening  negotiations.   On |
contrary many rumors gathered 1
Shanghai suggest that she is cam]
log on her anti-foreign policy n
increased zeal.    The latest rei
impel ial decree from Tsi !
is said to be defiant and unrepem
and to contain  the  statement
the   court  fled   lest the  em
might be killed during the figl
between the Boxers and  Christia
and thus leave no  one to contw
the "celestial worship." The deem
is also said to exhort a union of tin
viceroy's to "avenge the injuries*
flicted on China" by the powea
Rebellion   Npreatflaf.
New Vork, Sep. 5. —The flaw
of rebellion has been fanned in lie
southern provinces and a tremendous conflagration is predicted lid-
in a month, says a dispatch to (it
Herald from Hongkong. Placards
and pamphlets are being circulate!
in Canton and the province inlio*
ting that the allies are thoroughly
routed. The feeling against foreip-
ers is bursting the bounds of offlal
control. The majority of missioi
stations in Kiang Tung have eitte
been destroyed or looted. Natin
Christians are terribly abused. A
systematic looting of houses a
English speaking Chinamen h*
taken place,
Several reform parties who ha«
their headquarters in Hongkoef
have signed an appeal tc the Bririsfc
minister imploring the assistance
a reform government in establish*
Making as the capital and the*
election of enlightened Chine*
ofllciials to administer the government with foreign advisers. The*
people are disheartened at the i*
ported intention of the powers»
vi iifidraw from China.
Intensified Peeling
The practical cessation of tra* |
with the north has thrown thousw*
of Chinese in each port out of «•*
ployment. They are ready to j«p
the rebels. The French wgfftm
at Swatow and Japanese 8gg«**
at Amoy, intensify the hatred 0
the foreigners.
The Imperial Edlel.
Washington, Sept. S.-The L*""'1'.
ed States government have not p
been informed about any further responses being made by the P°w'rf
to the Russian note respecting «N
withdrawal of troops from l'e",a'
Therefore the negotiations on ll"'
point cannot be said to have W I
marked by any formal advancement.
though it is known that uno^
exchanges are in progress W*
doubtless are preparing the way '
a formal agreement between "*
powers in the near future.
The   United States governm*
have not yet recieveda copy °'
imperial edict   referred   to W '
Shanghai despatches  naming   '
Li with several other Chinese n°"'
bles as plenipotentiaries to negotlS
for a settlement  with the po"**
but the state department is »dvlS
of the existence of such an edict.
01 IELD THE PASS
low Bight Volunteers  Routed the
London, Sept. i—A Queenstown
dispatch describes the  capture of
ken. Olivier,  during the Boer at-
nck on Winburg.    Eight   Queens-
nwn volunteers sortied from  the
own and took up a position in the
longa   through   which    the   road
lassed and behind the Boer position.
Is the  Boers retired in single file
hey were taken one  by one, and
Lt out of sight, until the colonials
lad captured   38,  including   Gen.
blivier and  his three sons.    Two
hundred  Boers   were following in
lose   order.    The  colonials   then
egan a hard volley firing with the
Jesuit that they killed six Boers and
lightened off the others, who had
idea of the actual number in th
onga-	
CHINA'S OWN TROUBLE.
While   China is having   trouble
lith the'powers,  her greatest treu-
|e   arises from her own  internal
pndition.    We speak from person-
observation when we say that
ie state of affairs in China is de-
|orable so far as it relates to gov^
nmental and  administrative mat-
rs, and unfortunately the country
ems  incapable of correcting  its
tn evils or prescribing an efficient
riedy for its own diseases.
The chief aod radical difficulty in
kina appears  to be  the lack of a
Jong central government. In some
pects China is a mere collection
Independent provinces,   each   of
lich habits own tautai  or gover-
Ir.    This   officer   closely resem-
|s, in his   functions and  powers,
ruler   of  a   principality    who
elds   feudal   homage to his over-
Jrd only so far as suits his advance or pleasure.
To illustrate this point.    When
lie writer  was  in   China   several
ears ago, part of his mission counted in  investigating the  subject
' cotton  supply and manufacture.
Trough   the courtesy of Messrs,
trdine,  Matheson & Co.,  one of
largest firms  in the Orient, we
^re   afforded   every    facility   for
iking this  investigation,   one of
eir superintendents,   Mr.   Ainee,
odly giving  us his time und ser-
be as chaperone and guide.    The
^sult  convinced  us of several im-
brtant facts, and  it is in the bear
of these on  the present serious
Hsis   in   Chinese   affairs that  we
pish to speak.
In the first place we were amazed
) find the lack of coherence among
ie  states   or provinces of  China.
'I  course   we   were   prepared to
nd   them   speaking  various  dia-
«ts,  the speech of one province
eing utterly  unintelligible  to the
eople of another,  and the written
r classical language being a sealed
lystery   to   the vast mass of the
opulation.    But  we had not been
repared to find the general   organ-
mi of the ^Empire so invertebrate
nd impotent.    Finding that there
a large territory in the interior of
Nna,   admirably   adapted to the
reduction of cotton,  we inquired
fhy the  mills at  Shanghai, which
)'  the   way    are   of   the    most
lodern   type    and    magnificently
juippei)  with the latest improved
achinery, could not get their sup-
y from   these interior provinces.
'e found  that an  insuperable ob-
acle was presented in the fact that
eh province had the power to levy
separate tax upon any commodity
ssing  through  its borders,   and
;" this tax or likin, as it is called,
pended solely  upon the whim of
J   governor   of   that    particular
Jvlnce, ' In other words he could
y  tribute as  freely  as any Arab
ef who ever  exacted  booty from
mssing caravan, and in most in-
nces  he was  fully as  much in-
ied   to   do   so.    This   o.ie fact
;aks more than volumes as to the
ernal  relationship in  Chinese af-
s-    It is as   if every state from
une to  California, or each prov-
e in the  Dominion had power to
V a separate  tax  upon any com-
dny passing through it, and this
tax were regulated solely by the
despotic whim of an absolute and
arbitrary ruler.
Another startling fact in connection with the administration ot
affairs in China is the ignorance
and isolation of the vast and unnumbered multitudes by which the
country is populated. Japan is
justly proud of her victory in the
war with China, but the fact remains that Japan, thoroughly
aroused and imbued with a spirit of
martial pride and national unity,
fought only an inconsiderable part
of China. When we were in China
we were reliably informed that mil-
lions of her people in the interior
were still in ignorance of the fact
that a war had been fought with
Japan.
China is still living in the darkness of the middle ages, while the
rest of the world has made centuries of swift and marvelous progress since those days of feudal ignorance, barbarity and superstition.
STEAMER
IS SINKING
StrCutch Has Foundered
in Northern Waters-
Refused Help.
Port Townsend, Wash, Aug. 30.
—The sreamer Topeka has arrived
from the north with 150 passengers and $100,000 in gold dust.
The British steamer Cutch is ashore
on Horse Shoe reef in Stephens passage, 25 miles from Juneau, and
badly damaged. The sea was
smooth when she struck on
August 24, and passengers and crew
succeeded  in   reaching  the beach,
where they were  camped  when the
Topeka passed.
The Topeka offered assistance,
It was refused, but the cargo was
being thrown overboard. The
steamer Treadwell was despatched
to assist the wrecked vessel, but it
was thought she would become a
total loss, as she was full of water
aft, and settling.
ARE HOME AGAIN
Wounded Volunteers Have Reached
Quebec.
Quebec, Sept. 1.—The steamship
Tunisian, from Liverpool, arrived
here last evening with a number of
invalided Canadians from South
Africa, among whom are the following British Columbians: A company, Royal Canadians, Private W.
H. Brooking, New Westminster,
Fifth regiment. Private C. W.
Gamble, Victoria, Fifth regiment
Canadian Artillery; Private W. S.
Mackie, Vancouver, Fifth regiment.
C. A. Brooking was wounded in
the knee while engaged in the battle at Paardeberg and was shortly
afterwards stricken with fever. He
is still lame from the effects of the
wound. He and all other invalids
who arrived on the Tunisian speak
in high terms of the treatment accorded them in tht hospit-ils in
South Africa and England and also
of their treatment while on the trip
homeward,
FACTS ABOUT OURSELVES.
YEARBOOK OF CANADA.
The statistical year-book of Canada for 1899 has just been issued,
and the Rkcorp takes pleasure in
acknowledging the reception of a
cop).
In this era of periodica! literature
all kinds of "annuals" are issued,
from the yellow-covered pages devoted to setting forth the claims of
a quack medicine, up to the recondite investigations and proceedings
of scientific and philosophic societies. In all the long list none perhaps will be found more practically
useful to a resident of Canada than
the year-book, now in its fifteenth
year, issued by Alfred Hewitt of
Toronto. It has come to be a recognized authority, and finds a
place in every good reference
library. Among its principal features are the following:
A succinct historical sketch, well
worth publication as a separate
pamphlet and a place in the schools
as a text-book. It is supplemented
by a statement of physical features,
condition and government, treaties,
lands and land regulations.
The statistical matter, which is
almost overwhelming in its comprehensiveness, and which is methodically arranged, embraces agriculture,
mines, fisheries, trade and commerce, currency and banking, railways and canals, marine, postoffice,
finance, insurance, telegraphs, telephones, electric lights, militia, social, churches, population, education, libraries, the insane, chanties,
lepers, temperance work, divorce,
patents, vital statistics, penitentiary
and criminal, immigration and governmental.
The extent of the book may be
judged from the fact that it contains
606 closely printed pages, supplemented by an analytical index of
18 pages.
The year book of Canada just issued gives the following facts
about British Columbia:
British Columbia was admitted
by imperial order in council, May
16, 1871, on address of the legislature and address of the Federal parliament.
It contains a land area of 382,300
square miles.
Its average mean summer temperature is 61 degrees; winter, ^2.4.
Following is the density of population of the several provinces, the
figures givan showing the average
number of persons to the square
mile:
Prince Edward Island  51.5
Nova Scotia  22
New  Brunswick   It.4
Ontario    10
Quebec     6.5
Manitoba     2.4
British  Columbia 3
Tot-il average, Canada,.. 1.5
An interesting batch of statistics
in the year book is that concerning
the educational returns for British
Columbia. In 1877 the total number of pupils in common .schools
was 1938, the average attendance
being 1210. In 1899 the total attendance was 7430, the average being 4280. In 1878 there were only
50 common schools in the province;
in 1899 there were 244.
The graded school system was
inaugurated in 1884 with 7 schools,
22 teachers and 1745 pupils. Last
year there were 32 graded schools,
169 teachers and 11,165 pupils. In
1877 there was but one high school,
with three teachers and 60 pupils;
in 1898 there were four with 12
teachers and 490 pupils. In 1877
the total expenditure by government for schools in British Columbia was $45,350; last year it was
$336,016.
The growth ofthe maritime commerce of British Columbia is shown
by the following table of registered
sea-going tonnage carrying cargoes
into and out of the province, by periods of five years: 1874-78, total
tonnage 1,439,817; 1879-83. 2,358,-
885; 1884-88, 4,089,788; 1889.93,
8.927.979:r,894-98. 11,052,109.
in 1880 there wasbui one Board
of Trade in tha province; now there
are 14.    ________„,
Onr Marksmen
Ottawa, Aug. 29.—Shooting this
morning was for Kirkpatrick's cup.
Three British Columbians were in
this competition and won money
prizes. Sergt. Major Richardson,
Victoria, won $5, with a score of
60, Sergt. Major McDotigall and
Sergt. Bodley each $5, with scores
of 59 each.
s«»t Til  NORFOLK   NOMINATION
T   H.  Atkinson will Oppose Tlsdale
■t Cowing  Uleetlon
Simcoe, Ont. Aug. 29.—South
Norfolk liberals have nominated
T. R. Atkinson to oppose Hon.
David Tisdale at the next general
elections.
A THAI TOWS' SENTENCE.
Deserted     Americans    and    Fought
Against Them
Chicago, Sept. 1.—Henry Vance,
late of the United States Volunteers,
was brought from the Philippines
on the transport Thomas under
sentence of 99 years imprisonment
at Alcatraz. This man, it was
proven, not only deserted the rank
of the American army, but took
arms against his comrades and
while serving as a major with the
Filhpino's, attacked wagon trains
and escort parties. Vance was captured, court martialed and sentenced
to be shot, but owing to the clemency of President McKinley his punishment was commuted to 99 years
imprisonment.
Cannot Be Found.
By Associated Press.
London, Sept. 1.—The gunboat
which has been searching lor the
m'ssing boats with part of the crew
ot the wrecked British steamer India has returned to Aden without
meeting with any success.
FHIZB   FIOHTINM.
Uale   Receipts   Which   Big    Contests
Yielded.
New Vork, Sept. 1.—It is estimated that since the passage of the
Horton Law in 1896, 3350 fights
have taken place in this state the
majority in Greater New Vork.
The total receipts are placed at
about $8,805,000. The Erne-Mc-
Govern fight drew the biggest
crowd and Corbett-MeCoy fight had
the largest receipts, about $60,000.
BIG STEAMER
IS OVERDUE
Fears   Entertained
Safety   of   the
California.
for
San Francisco, Sept. 1.—The big
steamer California, bound from this
port to Manila, with nearly 6000
tons of supplies for the army in the
Philippines, is now out 45 days and
20 per cent reinsurance has been
offered on the vessel. The steamer
is overdue from Honolulu to Manila easily fourteen days and the
general impression among shipping
men here is that she has broken her
shaft or met with some other accident. The California was launched
May is and this i.s her maiden
voyage, She is 488 feet long and
her measured capacity is 15,000
tons. Her captain is Geo. D. Morrison, uho wis sent here from New
York to take command.
The Globe urges that the British
government oppose to the uttermost the idea of the evacuation of
Pekin, in which course, the paper
adds, it will be supported by Km-
peror William of Germany.
Russia Has Been Misunderstood
New Vork, Aug. 29.—"Russia's
attitude has been greatly misrepresented. Her operations in northern
China are conducted solely for the
purpose of restoring peace and order, are absolutely unselfish." This
statement, says the Washington
correspondent of the Herald, was
made by De Woolant, the Russia
charge d' affaires. Russian oiliciais
have felt keenly the aspersions
lately cast upon their country.
The It. C. Lacrosse .Hen
Montreal, Aug. 30.—The New
Westminster lacrosse club yesterday afternoon defeated the Shamrocks of this city by a scoi 2 of six
goals to two. The Gizette this
morning, commenting on the result
says:
"The more we,see of the western
men the better we like them." The
British Columbian's play the Capitals of Ottawa on Saturday and the
Torontos, at Toronto, on Monday,
labor day. The Gazette says the
probabilities of the results are one
less, one win.
RUSSIA'S  PLANS
The Emperor Defines the Chinese
Situation.
St. Petersburg, Sep. 1.—The emperor has directed the acting foreign minister to address to his representatives abroad, the circular
which follows. "The immediate
cbjects which the imperial government had in view at the very outset
of the Chinese trouble were as
follows:
"First—To protect the Russian
legations at Pekin.
"Second—To assure the safety of
Russian subjects against the criminal intention of the Chinese  rebels.
Third—To render help to the
Chinese government in its struggle
with these troubles in the interests
of a speedy establishment of the
legal order of things in   the empire.
"As a result all the powers interested, with the same object in view,
sent troops to China. The imperial government, therefore, propose
the following fundamental principles
to guide the powers in China:
"First.—The maintenance of a
common agreement among the
powers.
"Second—The maintenance of the
former state of organism in China.
"Third.—The removal of everything that could lend to the partition of the Celestial empire.
"Fourth. — The establishment
with the united powers of a legal
central government at Pekin, able
alone to preserve order and tranquility in the country. On these
points agreements prevail with
almost all the powers. While pursuing no other objects the imperial
government will continue steadfastly to adhere to its former program
of action."
Ureal Britain's Position.
Londop, Sept. 1.—The foreign
office here is not ready to make
public Great Britain's position in
the recent Chinese situation, but all
indications tend to confirm the belief that Lord Salisbury favors the
principle contained in the American-
Russian proposals, although he may
have some   modification to submit.
TIIK   SHOOT   < I.I.M-S.
Award of Frizes Its    Doiulnlou Rifle
Association
Ottawa, Sept. 1.—The Dominion
Rifle Association meet was finished
yesterday. In the governor generals match, Sergt. Major Richardson,
fifth regiment, Victoria, won $10
and Sergt. Bodley, of same regiment $6 with score of each of 182.
Sergt. Major Letlice and Driver J.
L. Beckwith,also of same regiment,
with score of 178 and 177 respectively, won $5. Sergt. Major Mc-
Dougall, with score of 173 won $4.
Lieut. Col. Anderson of 43rd. Ottawa, as stated yesterday, won the
cup and Dominion Rifle Association
medal and S200, with a score ot
189.
In the extra series (B-800 yards,)
the following Hritish Columbians
won prizes: Gunner Bodley and
Sergt. Major Richardson, fifth regiment Victoria each $4, score 24
each. In extra series 900 yards:
Sergt. Bodley $11.82 score 2;; gunner J. L. Beckwith, same regiment
$5, score 23. Gibson Match, 500
yards, five shots in one minute
Sergt. Bodley $3.64, score 24.
Kiii>»iii'* Notification
London, Aug. 20.—A special dispatch from St. Peterburg contains
the somewhat remarkable assertion
that Russia will notify the powers
that she considers the relief of the
Pekin legations as the final accomplishment of the military task ofthe
alliei1 forces.
Tbe afternoon papers, however,
regard the activity of the allies at
Pekin and the difficulty of discovering a responsible Chinaman, with
whom to treat, unless Li Hung
Chang is able to secure crerdntials
satisfactory to all powers, as indicative that the solution of the problem will be more prolonged and
more difficult than previously hoped.
KHERSON   REGIONS.
Mar Contest Constituent-)   for House
of Commons.
(By Associated Press.)      ' **)
Fredericton, N. B,, S;pt. 1.—•
Hon. H. R. Emerson, premier of
New Brunswick, handed in his resignation to Lieutenant Governor McLennan last night, intending, it is
stated, to either go to the supreme
court of the province or contest the
constituency for the house of commons. Emerson is succeeded by
Hon. L. J. Tweedie as premier and
provincial secretary.
Will Oppose Hols
Goderich, o»t., Sept. 1.—West
Huron Conservatives have chosen
Robert McLean to oppose Robert
Holmes, the sitting liberal member.
Accidental Death
Belleville, Ont., Aug, 30 —Miss
Tillie McCrudden, was crushed to
death by a train this morning. She
attempted to alight after the train
started.
SHE BREAKS
THE RECORD
The Deutschland Makes
Remakarble Speed
Aross Atlantic,
New York Sept. 1.—The fame-
ous express steamer Deutschland of
Hamberg American line has again
eclipsed all previous records for
fast trans-Atlantic travelling. She
has broken the eastern and western
records. Her time on the voyage
just ended is 5 days 12 hours 2c;
minutes between the Mole at the
entrance of Cherbourg harbor and
Sandy hook lightship. At noon on
the 31 she passed the record for the
fastest days run, making 584 knots.
Her average speed was 23.02 knots
per hour.
Imperial Mummer Palace Balls
St. Petersburg, Aug. 31.—(ieneral Linevitch, commanding the
Russian troops at the Chinese capital, reports that the Russian detachment on August 19 captured
without loss, the Imperal summer
palace. The Russian artillerymen
have also unearthed at Pekin thirty
cannons and many rifles, A large
quantity of silver was found at
Tsung Li Yamen.
Tbe Pleet at Taku
"Inquiry of Admiral Remey, concerning our fleet at Taku, was
answered that no such resolution
had been adopted. He now cables
that the admirals have agreed to
write to the Dean of the Legations
at Pekin, instructions in case Li
Hung Chang snould arrive at Taku,
and meantime not allow him to
communicate with Chinese shore
authorities. Remey      dissented
from the last proposition. We take
the same view expressed in the Russian note. It seems important that
the Chinese plenipotentiary should
be able to communicate both with
his own government and the United
States military commandant. The
Chinese minister here is without
power or advices. Li Hung Chang
is prima facie, authorized by imperial decrte to negotiate, and i.s the
tiiIv representative of responsible
authority now in China so far as we
are advised.
What with bloody race riots in
New Vork and Louisiana, followed
by incendiarism and general
slaughter in Ohio aid Illinojs, the
question as to where the center of
Boxerdom in America i.s located
seems still an open one.
The Amalgimated Waiters' Society of London has started a
movement to do away with the tip '
custom. The members of the so-
ciaty say that tips are a less reliable scource of income than the
salaries paid other workers in the
same establishments, and that they*
detract from their personal  dignity.
w
1 s
I i
*4
§1
J:r**-*-*T*7mr?5Z
1_*HJE&
'." -'A.
THE SII,VERTO.\I.U.
{SELKIRK
JL%*Q\97^I*^m
war
TIIE
LARGE     AND   COMFORTABLE
RQOMS TABLE    UN8JTR-
J'AgSEI)    IS    THR
NORTHWEST.
JtRAM&IIAIUtETT- - -PROPS
SILVER1W. B. p.
S-attrday,  Si.i-tkvhi-H   8. 1900.
fought out
Now let   the   voted   estimate*   lie
applied at once and all will he well.
rl'lll.lKHKIi  KVERY   HATUBDAV   AT
SILVEKTON, B. 0.
MAIIIKSIIN mtos..    lUIitorn t Prop*.
'I ' '        I
8UBS0RIFTION RATES:
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
__ ua,- *..i^v— - -L'l'S-iULr.
m siiny MVl-Uf.-'Vi:'..'.'P l^^-'l'lJi!!'.'!. yj* ^r
*-Mfr-pe*j*
'S-V-T
f»«r^ntt.
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this ollii-e.
OS5»««0
f 9
Watches,
Clocks and
Jewelery.
IF YOUR SUBSCRIPTION IS DUE
OR IN ARREARS A
BLUE CROSS WILL
5*9*»«S BE FOUND iN THIS
SQUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. PRICE
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
UUi UU8UUUUSUUUI
i editorial oumomm
f'toe Itit* Repairing a Sperialt y.
All Work Lelt at The Vafttyjew
Hotel, Silveiton, will by forward,
ed ami promptlv attended to.
jGSt. H. Knowles,
8ANpO$, 11. C.
THE
ARLINGTON
 _♦	
Conveniently Situated neur
Railway Station and Wharf.
jGOOp SERVICE—comfortable
ROOMS.
i.ii,..t*.,.sti»i..i'.i.i,
TfJE LATE SESSION.
On Friday August .'list the first
session of tbe Ninth Legislature was
brought to a close and the House was
prorogued by Lieut-Governor Jjly.
During its session of twenty-six days
tbe members delilierated upon and
passed some sixty odd measures, many
of them of much importance. In
addition to these the Estimates were
put through and arrangements made
for the appointment of a commission
to enquire into the workings of the
Mineral Act Regarding this com -
! mission it may be said tbat as we now
have the jyord of the Minister of
I Mines that no tampering will be
allowed   with the  8-Hour law, much
A LONG RANGE CRITIC.
An article appear; in the last
number of the British Columbia
Mining Record, that treats ofthe
closing down of the Wakefield Mines,
ita management, manager and the
mine itself. &ow the writer of this
article evidently acquire-! his information at second hand, hating his
opinions on the value of tlie mine
from hearsay or is drawing on his
imagination for his information. |>i-
that as it may, and leaving out his
critisism of the manager and management, which we venture to sny was
neither better nor worse than that of
several other companies operating in
the Kootenay's, his expressed opinions
in regard to the mine am at variance
with the truth, misleading to the
public and harmful to the *hol«
mining interests of the country.
If is statement that tbe mine never
was or never would justify the erection
of a mill for the concentration of its
ores is utter poppycock. He evidently
taj.es credit to himself for being able
to look a mile into the ground and as
a mining expert, if he were employed
at bis own estimation of his abilities
in that line, he would be cheap at
about $)000 a minute. The writer
in all probability never saw the
Wakefield mine and has but a hsxy
idea as to where it is situated.
The tramway too come-i in for lii3
sweeping condemnation although it is
as necessary for the economic handling
of the ore as is the steamship line
vhich carries the cres from our dock.
Even in the
tramway   was     of       mceeaity     for
PUBLIC   SCHOOL   RETORT.
The Btanilirijr of tlip pupils of the  Sil-
verton Public *ooool for Die month   of
August is an follow* :
V Reader.
Ine» Calbick.
Alice Cal'm-k.
Adelaide Horton.
IV Remler.
Fay Elliott.
Mamie McDonald.
Janet Barclay,
HI Reader.
Maguie Bandar.
surah Lawaon.
May Lawson.
II   Primer.
lii'.irni- Horton.
Annie Kelly.
Jeanle Barclay.
I Primer.
Evelyn Horton.
William While.
Emlora Tyree.
The   following   pijpils   obtained   the
highei-t mark 111 ilie various subjects v\-
aniinetl iiltrit)g the month.
A1 IrlHi.ii' Horton, in Anatomy, 100.
Alice Culbiek, Canadian History,  101).
ifaggle Barclay, (ieinira|iliy, 100.
Evelyn Horton, Rending, 100.
Fay Elliott, Composition, il").
Inez Calbick, Map Drawing, 97.
BATH
HOUSE
AND     Mr
LAUNDRY
___ ■» -L.    ,  1  ,
Prop,
UP-TO-DATE IN EVKRV BRANC„
tHPfiysruialHua
  SILVERTON, r - r - -  fi. C.
(Laundry Work Called For and Delivered Weekly.)
Solomon no longer holds Ihe record
(or church building "without (he pound
of Ibe hammer." lt has been done
again in Chicago, where, BfCOtdlog to
"Invention," a vitrilieil clay chinch hns
been built without au inch of timber
in the whole structure.
good     may    be     accomplished,    the!   ___       _,__,
Minister's   word having  removed tin-   Maudlin" the clean ore
suspicion excited by the proposal. jhe   fact   ia   that   the   Wakefield
Of the measures approved of by the \ Mines has large bodies of ore  exposed
j Lieut-Governor there are five or six I in it that will pay well to rpn through
I of direct importance to the Kootenays. j»  concentrator   and these  without a
The first of these, No 14, is an Act to| n,jH   w00|d   ^   0f  ,)Q va]UP( g0 that
A pretty story is told among narratives of farewells to l.a,lv Robertson Imr
departure for the Cape. One ol the
friends iroing to see her oil' is the mother
of a youth who recently Hiiccewled to n
dukedom snd fo-tliwitli went out to the
war. "I am so glad." she said, "that,
j Lord Roberts bas put tbn duke on hi- ;
absence of the mill, the; g,air." "Yes"' suid Lady Robert.!,
"they are a mixed lot."
b matsAAA mm m ___, *t 'iVyy^i^,
Advertisers
"Will fiaaoL tliat til©
Txra37-  to   reaclh.   tli.©
anciinexs o±   tlie   SI©.
can is tiixo-uLgrla, tliq
col\a_.m.n.s of
THE SILVERTONIAN
Tli© snciiriers' trad.©
is tlie trad.©. Ett©x3t
tt7"©©1s: one tli©-ULsa:nd,
Slocaxi nnciiners read,
THE SILVERTONIAN
Dining Room under the charge of
MiM Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with all the delicacies
of the seaaon.
HEWDBB80N A GETHING, - Props.
SLOGAN CIT.Y,   ....   R C.
A*
Pine
Line
Of
Incorporate the Western Telephone
and Telegraph Oonipany, by which
telegraphic competition will be had
for ■ he Slocan us well aa telephonic
connection with the south.
The Immigration Act,   No AG, will
do much to   check   Japanese    iu)ii)i- ' [^  0ne
gration and as such will he welcome.     | payers.
to successfully operate this mine a
mill was necessary. After a mill was
arreted on this property, it was a
paying institution, and there is no
doubt but that the Wakefield Mines
under a practical management will vet
of Slocan's steady dividend
It is   manifestly unfair for a
Sandon  Miners'
HOSPITAL.
Union
Tlxeir Tirade'? ,
CiiOJCE
PORTED
AND
J^OAJESTlp
CJlgars.
... I 1—.-■—    -•  ■■   ...oiiiumi, uinair tor a
Aa well as arranging  for  telegraph : p.,*, ,ike th(J R 0 j^.      R
tl f_jl__._-.h_A.. n ...._„ __....:.: r .____..,
and telephone competition for Southern
Kootenay   tbe   legislature   has    in
condemn  in one sweeping  charge the
Wakefield mine, mill and management
Confectionery.
FRESH AND DELICIOUS
fresh Fruits
COMING   IV   DAILY,   THE
BE8-J. ON THE MARKET.
I will be glad to quote
prices on crate lota of
Fruit for preserving.
£§ttatip*ie_rsr«
fULL LIKE CARRIED IN   STOCK.
Hr H. Reeve?,
Silverton. B. C.
PACIFIC
AND S00   LINE
1" »
fA\yiO\JS
"IMPERIAL   LIMITED"
JVitli In proved Connecting Service Via
Rcvklhtork or Caowa Nest Ronte to
 or trotp. -    ■
KOOTENAI   COUNTRY
Eirat-claM Sleepers nn all trains from
^RRqWHJUD A KQpTEl^Y LVG.
Tourist Cars pass Medicine Hat
daily (or St. Paul, Saturdays (or
Montreal and jiosiQii, Mondays
Mid Thnrsdaya (or Toronto.
Hame earn pasa Revelstoke ono
•lay earlier.
passing  the   Kettle   River   Railroad j without a careful investigation pf that
Bill, No 50, gone a long ways towards j property.
providing railroad competition for the      fhis country is too full of men wbo
Boundary.   This measure had  against  vhen any mine  gets   into trouble are
CONNECTIONS.
Ea Snn.  To& From the North.   Ex Sun.
11:00 lv. SavKBTfiK Arr. 15:40
Ex Sun. To k From the So\ith.  Ex Sun.
16:40 lv Silverton Arr 11:00
For rated, tickets, and (ull infonnution
apply to Q. B, Cuakdlbr, AKent, Silver-
fyi, B. C, or
W. F. ANDERSON,
Tray. Pass. Agent, Nelson
{_. 3. COYLE.
^_ A. G. P. Agent, Vancouver
it tbe Premier with three others of
his cabinet, as well as a vigorous
C. P. R. lobby, and it was only on the
morning of tbe last sitting that it was
finally carried by a close vote of 18 to
15.
Tbe roost important measure from
a prospector's point of view is an
amendment to the Mineral Act, Biil
No (50, whicli provides for the advertising out of a delinquent co-owner.
As this measure has been before dealt
with in these columns we Mill not
agajn quota the Bil',
The remaining two measures, particularly affecting this section of tho
Province, are Bills No's (i) and 63,
dealing with the taxation on metalliferous and coal mines. In the former
measure small producing properties,
or properties the or, from whicli pays
only development expenses, escape
the two per pent tax, aa five hundred
tons a year from a mine (mineral) and
$2000. per year from a placer mine is
excepted from the increase, paying
one per cent only as formerly. A"
Other producing minea will pay hereafter two per cent of the value of
tbeir output. The latter law imposes
a tax of five cents a ton nn all coal
mined, except that aold for coking
purposes. Upon coke a tax of nine
cents a ton is levied.
Taken a|l together the past sitting
ofthe Legislature has done a great
deal towards helping on tho mining
interests of the Province. Tbe
increased taxation an the mines is
perhaps thn only act about which the
mine owners have to complain,
but as the Government is apparently
prepared to aid the minea by road
builJing, and has excepted the smaller
properties from the increase there is
not so much room for complaint upon
that score.
The expressed determination   of the
Legislature not to re-open the vexed
question of   the 8-Hour law should
(have 11 reviving effect upon  mining ip
those sections where the question   w^i
al\vays ready to shout "I told you so,'1
but who are always found discreetly
silent before any such events occur.
~T""»      uui ii' 1
GETTINO THE WORST OF IT.
In the Province there are only two
constituencies in which was cast a
larger vote in the last election than in
the Slocan. Theae are Rossland and
.Nelson. The Slocan cast 1221 votes,
being thrice that of Cariboo, of Cassiar, of North Etst Kootenay, and of
combined Lillooet vote, twice the vote
in Ohilliwhack, pewney, and Richmond, five titpea ipore than fs'ortli
Victoria, six times the vot'i of .-\lbeiiii,
and so on.
In thn Dominion election how do
we fare! Iu the Y,l'e- Cariboo riding,
according lo (he latest figures, there
were 11,29-J voters who voted on July
9th. laat. In the Province there were
27,068 voters, who return six
members to the Dominion House.
The figures then are; Yale-Cariboo,
one lni'iiher for 11,2'J_J votes; the
remainder of the Province, live members for 15,776 votes.
Tbose redistribution bills cannot
come too soon for the Hlocan, which
seems to be receiving^the worst of it
from all iidea at present,.
OPEN   TO   THE   I'lTULIC
Subscribers, fl. per month.
Private I',.tieniH, f3. per day
exclusive of expense of physician or surgeon and drills.
Dk. \V. E. (ioiinii. Attendant Physician
Mm , S. M. Ciimiioi.v. Matron.
J. I). MiLaii.mlin, President.
W. L. If.>.t-i.i:K, Secretary.
Wm. Donahik.   J. V. Martin, R. J
McLean, A. J. MrI)<iNAn>, Mike llu. »»v.
Directors
AH
TUE MAIN TRAIL BPH8 PAST THK DOOR OV
Wilson   F*
rs
E
\. e. mm, tm,
Fresh   Bread
Ties aod Cakes Nad* to Order,
MM*?.]. ■ Silverton, 15. C.
MLiERTov mm ml
NO. 95. \V. F. Of If.
Meets every  Satnrdny in  the  Union
Hull in Silverton, ntJr.lOi-. m.
J.  It. l'.olll.lll »,
Prealdent.
J. C. Tyree,
Einnncial-Sfrtelnn
"Five
PATRONS AKE WELL TAKEN CAKE OF.
A KIRST-CI.AfrS BILLIARD RO«>M ON THE PRKMISI S.
MAR   KURMSHKD WITH THE   REST   KSAXDH Of   \VINI S. 1 HjinU
AND CIGARS.
HEADQUARTERS FOB MINING MIX.
MAIN STRKET,    -   -   - M.OCAN, 11. C.
Drops.
*>
!'___.; \ ui i.-'iik p in Niih.n "IH.si.
It is nothing   I
*   but fair
To Irt my Klocun RhtMMI know
Uint I have just retareed fmiii a pnr-"
rlnisiiiir trip in thc \'M. I aii
I |ilc;iscd In lit yon know Itial I toic
s titled (he viiy lutes! up-to-date goods n iewdeiigiu,iieh a* sever k*
'iK-ebwn sk.uiin thin wimilry, All goods bought here ire gnaniM
Al i|Uility an I prices are snrh ns will compete with Eastern Bidet.
f*^*^^ WIIKNIJINEL80N
$   PINE WATCH       5
REPAIRlNi-
SPECIALTY
1 INVITE YOU TO CALL
AM) INSPECT MY STOCK.
MAILORDERS
PKOMITLY ATTENDED TO.
Fine
Laundry Work
OfThjT
Best
DONE BY
r'Silvertqn, p. C,
FOR
A  RHEUMATIC CURE
THAT CUREH
WE   ARE  THE  AGENTS
J HIS    ALTO FOR
Lilac Cream, Aislley's Hair Renewcr,
Canadian Corn Cnre and Nyrap
of lloicliDiiiiil and Tolii.
Prescription Department Coiuidete and
Up  .To   Date
*>
Jaool> Dover, • TIIE JEWELKR, # HEIJIOl 11
SILVERTON  DRUG   STORE,
SILVEKTON. B. C.
f I O. GORDON.
MIXKS, REAL ESTATE, <C0ft VKYilIV(;KR
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      B. o.
General
Mining
Supplies.
Full Line      Lumber,
Dry  sc Mixed,' Sash and
Paints. Doors.
MpCaUnmACo.,   SIoow B.O*
J.M. McUREGOR
PROVINCIAL   LAND"   SUBVEYOR
AND MINING ENaiNEEK
BLOCAN CITY, 3 0
StaTole
BA^ iSSffiSg.»0^  FOirHIRE   AT   BEASON^'^
A u^UtUj.ii,:lfi|IT AN1) THAK8KKK BBSINEH8 DONE.
Onlaide Partial,. i.-iriiK n'rK,.H in J.   ', -   »■*-
Cau  H«v« ti,o»,  i> TZr™ ln ''"VMton
i-en^iuve Bum  Reserved By Writlnn To-,
a. v. Mcdonald,
8ILVERTO.N, - • b-c-
1 i

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