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The Silvertonian Mar 3, 1900

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 *»
finable
And Up To Date
Mining News
llLCi
Of Tfie Ricfiest
Camp  Of  British
Columbia?
■-+**>
foJMB THREE.
SILVERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,    MAROH   3,   iDOO.
NUMBER 36
NSIGNMENTS
OF FRESH
Mlltl
RECEIVED
WEEKLY BY
•9
Property.
Xii«3 Roeklaucl's Olalixi. to '.Tliat
I*_roi*a Initio.
Silver tori., S. C.
REVIEW   HOTEL
Silverton
PHIS  HOTEL  IS NEW AND NEATLY FURNISHED,
IP.    BAR   18   SUPPLIED   WITH  BESf   BRANDS    OP
riNES, LIQUORS AND OIGAR&
%£.   aTn-o-wlee.   Prop,
i BURNS & oo
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL
KIND3 OF FRESH AND SALT MEATS
ItK (WIL STORKS AT
Silverton, Nelson, Trail, Ymir, Ksslo, Snndon,
New Denver, Cascade City, Grand Forks,.Sirdar
Midway and Green weed.
.MAILORDERS PROMPTLY AND CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO.
UKaD  OFFICE NELSON, B. 0.
m<***9tr>® A~$w*\^*iw<*9 r>#o#<J
Are You Looking For
STYLISH GODDSr
t
w
C
I
1
5
THAT IS UP-TO-DATE CLOTHING WITH
TIIE PRICE SOMEWHERE NOT ALTOGETHER OUt OF SIGHT.
IF SO DROP IN   AND   MAKE YOUR   SELECTION FROM MY SHELVES.      FIT AND FINISH
GUUANTEEI).    OV KRC0ATING8 JUST IN.
Tlio Tailor:   Silverton, B. C.
w
C
2
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t
Situated within (our miles oi Silverton
is the biggest mining proposition within
the boundaries of British Columbia, if
not the whole of Canada. This mammoth property is situated on Eight Mile
creek ou the western slope of Red Mountain  and  is  known   as  the Rockland
m 4.
Group of claims, owned by .Indue Spinks
of Vernon B. C. and Frank Watson, ot
Spokane Wash., bid in? now under bond
to J.P. Graves of Spokane   Wash., the
general manager  of  the   Kuobhill and
Ironsides  property  in  the    Boundary
country.   It is a pold-copper proposition
aud there Ib now exposed on lhe properly
the largest   body   of   pay  ore ever encountered in the province, not excepting
any of the niggest Rossland or Boundary
mines.   The Rockland  Group  ia composed of throe claims, all of which are
Crown Granted, and   has   had   a  largo.
amount    of  development  work    done
upon it, bnt owing to the immense size
of tho ledge it   has   taken   nearly   four
years to fully demonstrate its values and
explore its mammoth vein.   The present
owners, Judge Spinks and Frauk  Watson, bave fully demonstrated  their  faith
in the property by the large expenditure
of money they   have   male  during   the | run «* kind of ™chinery.
,-ast four years in i.s   development   and'    Some three months ago this property
tl.e   Rockland   stands to-day a inonu- I "" ^nded to J. P. Graves, of Spokane
ment to their miuing lodgement, pluck   Waah., » capitalist and mine manager of
and energy. national reputation,  and since that time
A  large  amount  of surface work has
any expensive purnpios or hoistirtjr
machinery and thus making the cost of
ii iiiing the ore cheap as compared wilh
the sinking propositions in the Rossland
camp, where the cost cf equiping a
mine would make such a proposition as
this a dividend payer.
Naturo has been generous In supplying
all that is necessary to make the Rockland Group an easy and cheap mine to
work. Situated as it is within two miles
of Slocan Lake, a short four miles from
Silverton's whari, with which it if
connected by a good trail, that a few
hundred dollars will transform into a
nood wagon road, and supplied with an
almost inexhaustible BUpply of mining
timber growing upon its own properties
and the adjoining mountains, it Is an
•deal property. Flowing down the steep
side oi Red Mountain directly across the
property is a living stream of water thai
at its very lowest stage contains over 200
miner's inches, sufficient water to supply
any kind of a concentrating or smelting
plant. Tho fall of ihis stream is so great
that it can be picked up at any point on
the ground nnd made to furnish power to
delivered at the mine, besides a large
amount of other mine supplies. Good
buildings have been erected aud many
needed improvements put in. Thia
company ia now employing about 40
men and thia force is being added to.
The Wakefield Is the best developed
and equipt mino tributary to Silverton
and on its capability to keep the big
new concentrator running largely depends (lie future prosperity ol this town
At present everything is running nicely
ar d thn mill, mine and tramway are all
proving big euccossis.
OOOOQOOC ^^^^
TIIE LOCAL LAYOUT.
ooooooc
expected to call and help in tho opening
and all strangers are invited to drop In
and bi come acquainted.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Coiu-
nany has just issued two excellent Im-
miirra'ion pamphlets for 1900—"Western
Canada" and "Britiah Columbia"—
which contain a great deal of useful ant)
accurate information about- tho country
west nf Lake Superior, and are cf special interest to those who contemplate
"puling In the Canadian Northwest or
British Columbia. Large editions of
these pamphlet* are distributed gratuitously in Great Britain and the United
States, as well aa throughout tbe Dominion, and are eagerly read by those who
are seeking " new home and desire to
know something of the heat country in
the world in which to find one."
been d jne upon the ledge in numerous
places, consisting ot open cuts, abort
tuunels and shallow shafts, all of them
being in ore that will pay to treat. The
principal work however consists of a
crosscut tunnel driveu into tlie lodge,
f which at this point rises as a blufl, a
distance of 67 leet, aud is still being
driveu. The whole of this tunnel ij iii
pay ore, the average of which, troiu
working tests, gives $17.37 per loi. in
Hold and copper. Tho vertical depth
ti.is tunnel lias attained is nearly 100
feot and the face is iu ore that iu equal
in value to any heretofore encountered
by it. At a distance in 'in (eet bom tho
mouth of this tunnel a drift has been
diiven on the ledge a distance of CO feel
the wiiole uf which is in good pay oro
with not ono pound of waste In the mine.
The vein shows on tho surface to ba over .
under tho management of Frank Watson
tho property has been rapidly and
systematica'!)' developed, new buildings
erected and trails extended.
There ia nor more than enough ore in
sight in this property to justify the
erection of a smelting plant for the
reduction of its ores, ond the preeen»
management will no doubt erect a plant
in this vicinity in tho near future.
The particulars   of  thia   property are
given just as they are to-day and anyone
who wishes to examine tho biggest   body
j of pay ore in   the  province,   has only to
walk up to the Rockland and examine it.
GOOD STRIKES ARE THE ORDER
OF THE DAY.  .
A new discovery hns been made near
the Noonday mine, and within one  mile
 of town,  on tho   Storm claim which is
100 feet  wide and the suifuco cropping! j one of a group oiyned by a local syndicate,
values   ol   about  ?8. to the ton in ! * Mgo has been uncovered thats runs
parallel to the Noonday vein, and  irs
give
Cold
HE WILLIAM HUNTER
COMPANY.
For
BENNETT'S
Patent
s»i*\ta\*\tm*\i\.
Pope's   S&fetisr
IVffetoli.
X*ie Wm. Hunter Co,, I^tcl.,
Silverton,   _B.   O.
The strike   ol   this   big   lcdi;o is ,       ,   wwwwwwwm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
mmmmW , surface ct'-ippings  phmv  it to be  aliout
northeast and southwest.   Its pitch   has , fonr f(?pt wWe<    Qood 8pecimen8 o{ gi|.
uot yet beeu ascertained, but   it appears j Ver ore can be obtained from these crop-
10 have a alight  pitch easterly   into the j ping:
mountain.
The  character  of  tho   ore  is a true
quartz carrying sulphides of  and native
copper   which   witli   pyiites   of iron is
evenly   distributed   through  tlio   entire
body of the quartz aud dOM uot  occur in
stteaks  or   blotches,   lt   is   so   evenly
distributed   through   the  entire body of
the quartz that it is   almost   an  imposs-
At tlie point of dinroverv on the Storm
claim, a shaft is lieing sunk, which, id-
i hough only just nicely started, ip already
in pay ore, In the bottom of tbo shaft
13 a paystreak 22 inches in width ol
quart*, fui. of carbonuios and chlorides
and occasional blotches of galena. No
Mttys have been ns yet obtained from
this ore, but judging from its character
and the locality from which it comes, it
is doubtless ricti iu both gold and sil-
ibility   to   get   a   piece   of the rock, no j ver.
i GtXSOOOOOCOOGOOOOOOOOOOO^
IUPI LOCALS.
JOOOOOOOOOC
matter how small, that  does   not show
the  presence  of  these  minerals.   The
values arc  also   so evenly distributed
that not oue pound of waste can be found
in this whole   ore   body.   Tho   average
value per ton of tho oro as a   whole, aa j    A property tbat gives promise of eoon
stated belore, is $17.37, and   is  made up I developing into a mine is the O.d Maid
oftwoouncea  in  silver,   three per cent | claim,  delonging   to  D. T. Davis   and
copper and   from $10.   to $15. in gold
Specimens however can be obtained that
will run from $30, to $50. to tho ton.
The mineral In this ore makes it a fine
concentrating proposition nnd it would
easily concentrate about  six tons  Into
Malcolm Nicholson. This property is
situated about ono mile from Silverton
by tho Alpha wagon road, which crosses
tlie property. A abort distance below
the road a tunnel is being driven on the
vein and is now in a distance of 77 feet.
The vein shows on the surface to be a
^^^^^^^^^^^^. very large ono and it is (he intention of
one, with very littlo, if any. loss In its ,|)(_ 0,nm tQ drive tho tunnel another
values, lt is also one of the easiest, hundred feet before cross-cutting. The
freest and cheapest ores to smelt known | tunnel at present is following the
to the smelting world. | hanging wall and ita   whole  face ia in
a   .„_ „  , | .    „     iiinrtz  and   somo   duo ore is being en-
Situated as tho property   ls,   high  up   ' il_l,0„^
on the side of a steep mountain,   it   ran
countered.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_. Since the completion of the tramway
be drained and worked to a great depth ! Rt |he Wakefield Mines, a few days ago,
by a system of  tunnels,   thus  avoiding j over 60,000  feet  of  lumber  has been
John Tinling returned from Tacoma
the first of the week.
School Inspector Burns paid a vieit of
inspection to our achoo' on Monday.
Choice Flower ond Garden Seeds just
received at the Silverton Drug Store.
A. C. McDonald, representing The
Commercial of Winnipeg, wns in town
yesterday.  •
Chas. Brand, who has been spending
n few weeks among hia relatives in
Washington, returned on Monday.
New Denver celobrated the relief of
Ladysmith by fixing flaga and burning
up all the packing boxes tint could be
command red.
Divine Service will be held in Silver-
ton next Sunday evening at 7.S0. everyone is cordially invited to attend.—John
G. Duncan, Presbyterian  Minister.
A good picture should he suitably
framed. Cha*. Baker, the New Denver
upholsterer, does the work well. All
styles of frames and mouldings kept.
All work in the Jewelry Repairing
line, left at the Hilverton Drug Store, will
be promptly forwarded to Jacob Dovei
the well-known Nelson jeweler. All repairs aro GUARANTEED FOR ONE YEAR.*
The members of the Literary Society
had a very pleasant time at their Social
Meeting last Wednesday evening. The
new officers elected for the coming term
are: J. M. M. Benedum, President; R
O. Matheson, Vice-President; Jas. Otto,
Secretary-Treasurer.
Wm. Hunter, who lias been in Victoria lobbying for the Pba'iiix Incorporation Bill, returned to Silverton Thursday. Tlio Itghtining changes an und
the Parliament Building proved too
much for him and lie returned without
accomplishing the incorporation ot the
would bo city.
D. Dirg, who had been emploved until lately at the Towser mino near Ferguson, returned to town on Thursday.
lift reports Iho tlirowing up of tho Loud
on the Towser, the owners refusing to
grant an extension of time. \o mail
had gone into Ferguson for three weeks
before Mr. Darg walked out over the
ice.
To-dav the Thistle Hotel will be reopened under its new management,
Jack Thompson, who is in charge, has
been boty daring the Week in fixing up
the house and superintending iho an'
packing nnd stowing away ef the barrels
of imports.     All Jack's old  friends nre
SIX LICENCES GRANTED.
The Board ot Licence Commissioner*
for the S'ocRn met in New Denver last
Monday. There were six applications
for licences considered, all of which were
granted. These were granted to the Arlington Hotel, Slocan City, Thistle Hotel,
Silverton, Taylor's Hotel, Enterprise,
K. k S. and McGuigan Hotels, McGnig-
nn, and tho Newmarket Hotel, New
Denver.
ST. PATRICK'S DAY CONCERT,
What promises to be an excellent concert will be given here In McKinnon'*
Hall on the evening of St. Patrick'a Day,
in aid of the Roman Catholic Church.
The member) of this Church here intend
furnirdiing a room for church services,
and tho proceeds of the concert are ex*
pected to go a long ways towards making
tbis possible. An excellent program I*
being arranged and n good turnout Is
looked for. The price of tickets ban
lieen put at 50 cents.
Through The Week.
"Sausage," the canine attached to Thi;
Silvertonian, reads all the exchangee
nnd keeps posted. At his request we put
the following conundrum. Who ta tho
laugh on: Sausage, who refuted to run
with a can on his tail, or the biped who.
lied it there?
Tbe smallpox, which has been visiting various towns to the south, haa executed a flanking movement and appears
to thp north of us at Nakusp, Although
the disease appears in a. very mild form,
it is nono the less to be dreaded. We
advise all our readers to use plenty of
disinfectants as ihere is a possibility of
the disease breaking out on the Lake at
any time now.
An exchange truthful'.; romarke.
"The man who complains most of the
preacher pays tho preacher the least;
the man who runs down his town doea
the least to build it up; the man who doe*
not support his homo paper, does tho
lea-t to make the paper a success. He
nsya the town is no good and that it la
dead. But ho ia iristaken—ho ia tho
corpse."
UNITED LABOR
,/ PLATFORM.
The following platform Im been drawn up bv the Slocan Cily Miners'
Union, and endorsed by their members last Wednesday evening. It
will be submitted for tl.e approval cf every Miners' Union and Labor
Organization In Britiih Colombia within the next few weeks.
1st.    We demand of the Provincial Legislature the   enforcement ot
the Eight Hour Lav, and its application to all branches of matiual labor.
2nd. Legal recognition by incorporation of Labor Unions and tbe
extention to them of the same rights enjoyed by other corporate bodies'
3rd. To provide for adjustment of wagi. disputes by arbitration on
plans similar to that now in force in New Zealand,
4th. To provide for settlement of public questions by direct vote
under tho Initiative  and Referendum.
5th Government ownership of all Railway, Teloqraph and Telephone
lines to be constructed, and tho acquiring of those already in use ai a.:on
as practical; and to prevent extortion as far as possible by the control of
all Railway, Telegraph and Tib phone lines for publio use and to fix a
reasonable maximum rate which they may charge for service.
fith. An act to prevent employment of Chinese in any rainei, factories, or public  works within the Provinc?.
7th. An not to provide proper safeguards to life and health, and to
provide an i llicit nt mine inspection system to procure these results.
8th. An Act to establish County or Local government throughout
the Province; all officers of such, both judicial and executive, to he el-
eoted by tho popular vote of their respective localities.
>c HE SURRENDERS
*
Gen. Cronje Finally Gives Dp the Long
tnd Weary Siege.
London, Feb. 27.—The war office has received the following dispatch from Lord Roberts:
"Paardeberg, Feb. 27.—General
Cronje has surrendered unconditionally. Cronje is now a prisoner
in our camp."
Canadians Ve* hatt Charter.
London, Feb. 27.—5:52 P- «•>•—-
The war office has received the following dispatch from Lord Roberts:
"Paarderberg, 11 o'clock, Tuesday morning.—From information
issued daily to me by the intelligence
department it became apparent that
General Cronje's force was becoming more depressed, and that the
discontent of the troops and the discord among the leaders were rapidly increasing. Tnis feeling was
doubtless accentuated by disappointment caused about the Boer
reinforcements, which tried to relieve General Cronje and were defeated by our troops on February
"At 3 a. m. today, a most dashing advance was made by the Canadian regiment and some engineers, supported by the First Gordon Highlanders and Second Shropshire's, resulting in our gaining a
point 700 yards nearer the enemy
and within about 80 yards of his
trenches, where our men entrenched themselves and maintained their
positions until morning—a brilliant
deed worthy of our colonial comrades, and which, I am glad to say,
was attended by compartaively
slight loss.
Cronje Nn rrender*.
"This apparently clinched matters, for at daylight a letter signed
by General Cronje, in which he surrendered unconditionally, was
brought to our outposts under a
flag of truce.
"In my reply I told Gen. Cronje
he must present himself at my
camp and that his force must come
out ot their laager, after laying
down their arms.
"By 7 a. m., I received General
Cronje and dispatched a telegram
to you announcing the fact. In the
course of conversation, he asked
for kind treatment at our hands,
and also that his wife, grandson,
private secretary, adjutant and servants might accompany him wherever he might be sent. I reassured
him and told him his request would
be complied with. I informed him
that a general officer would be sent
with him to Cape town, to ensure
his being treated with proper respect enroute. He will start this
afternoon, under charge of Major
Gen. Prettyman, who will hand him
over to the general commanding
at Cape Town.
"The prisoners, who number
about 3000, will be formed into command under our own officers. They
will also leave here today, reaching
the Modder river tomorrow, when
they will be railed to Cape Town in
detachments."
Parliament Chaars Canadians.
The above dispatch was read in
both the house of lords and the
house of commons today. The ret>
erence to the Canadians evoked immense and prolonged cheering. On
all sides the gallantry of the Canadians was much  commented upon.
Nearly 4000 Prisoners.
London, Feb. 27.—It is now announced that Lord Roberts has notified the war office that the number
of prisoners approximates 4000, of
whom 1150 are citizens of the
Orange Free State. The remainder are citizens of the Transvaal.
Cronje Had 3000 Men.
London, Feb. a7.~4_38 p. m.—
The secretary of state for war, thi
Marquis of Lansdowne, announced
in the house of lords this afternoon
that the prisoners captured with
General Cronje number about 3000
men. General Cronje will be tent
to Cape Town.
Canadian Casualty Mat.
J-ondon, Feb. 27.-7:51 p.  m.—
The war office has received the following dispatch Irom Lord Roberts:
"Paarderberg, Feb. 27.—In a
very successful attack made by thc
Royal Canadian contingent on one
of the enemy's trenches this morning, Major Pelleter was wounded,
eight men were killed and 29
wounded.
"General Macdonald is expected
to return to duty In a few days."
How the Canadian* Fought.
New Vork, Feb. 27.—The Herald
this morning prints the following
special cable:
"London, Feb. 27.—A Daily
Mail special dispatch says:
"Modder River, Feb: 25.—At the
battle of Paardeberg, otherwise
called Slinkfontein, on Sundap, the
principal feituyes were the fighting
and self-sacrifice of the Highland
brigade and the impetuous charge
on the Boer trenches by the Corn-
walls, Canadians and Gordons.
These troops, with two brigades of
the ninth division, bore the brunt of
the fight and suffered the lion's
share of the losses. The battle
commenced at dawn, when the
mounted infantry, which formed a
screen for the advance of the ninth
division on the left bank of the
river, came in touch with the
enemy, occupying positions of advantage, and engaged them. General Smith-Dorrien crossed the river
at Paardeberg drift, with part of
th»> ninth brigade, the other portion
continuing the attack on the other
bank.
"Fighting their way along the
right bank, the Cornwalls and Canadian came within reach of a Boer
laager. Charging the trenches together, they captured the first row,
but had to retire. Here Ader-
worth fell with a bullet in the head
as he was leading his regiment.
But at the close of the day, though
the British losses were severe, success was achieved, the Boers.were
cleared from all positions where
they could hamper the British
movements, and forced into positions upon which British guns could
be brought to bear.
Mejolela* In -London.
London, Feb. 27. — "Majuba
avenged," "Cronje surrenders,"
"great British victory." These are
expressions being shouted all over
London today, yet there are few
outward signs of the national joy that
Lord Roberts' dispatch has really
caused. The capitulation of General Cronje had been looked upon
as almost a certainty for a week
past, and now that it has come, enthusiasm finds itself discounted by
anticipation. The magnitude of
the success of "Little Bobs" is almost overlooked in the satisfaction
at the fact that the anniversary of
Majuba hill *-iped out a score of
19 years standing. While the afternoon papers all comment upon this
happy coincidence, they do not forget the bravery of the enemy. The
St. James Gazette says:
"The splendid courage of the
Boers has not been able to withstand any longer the bombardment
which few modern soldiers have
supported for so many days. The
influence of the surrender, not only
upon the situation at Ladysmith,
but on the whole conduct of the
war, will be immense. If the news
of the relief of Ladysmith reaches
England today, and it is quite
possible that this may be the case,
the cup of national happiness would
be full."
Further details of the dramatic
surrender of Gen. Cronje at Paardeberg are eagerly awaited. The
Boer commander's forces are van
ously estimated at 4000 to 8000
men.
The news of Gen. Cronje's surrender was received with unbounded satisfaction at Winsdor. The
queen immediately telegraphed her
congratulations to Lord Roberts
and the troops.
Casualties Among Canadians.
London,Feb. 27.—The war office
has issued a list of 721 non-commissioned officers and men, wounded
in the fighting at Paardeberg, Sunday, Feb. 18, including 64 Canadians and 273 Highlanders.
UNDER ONE HEAD
Captain Troup to Superintend All Rail
and Steamer Lines.
A decided change in the management of the C. P. R. rail and steamer lines in the Kootenay country
will take effect in a lew days. Capt.
J. W. Troup, superintendent of the
water tines in the district, is to be
superintendent of all the rail and
steamer lines in the Kootenay
country, including the extension of
the Columbia & Western railroad
to Midway. He will be assisted by
J. S. Lawrence as trainmaster on
the Columbia & Western, and by
John Hamilton as trainmaster of the
Columbia & Kootenay, the Nakusp
& Slocan and all other branches
east of the Columbia river. A. H.
Lewis will be chief dispatcher at
Trail.
F. P. Gutelius, superintendent of
the Columbia A Western railway,
has been offered the position of resident engineer for the lines in the
Kootenay country, but has not yet
decided whether to accept it. His
ability as an engineer has been
proved by his success in locating
and supervising the construction of
the line between Rossland and West
Robson, and in revising the line and
standardizing the guage between
Rossland and Trail without interruption to traffic, as well as in its
operation up to the present time.
posed the longer sentence, though
the prisoner pleaded not guilty.
Derision lu the Pair Will Case.
San Francisco, Feb. 28.-—By the
decision of the supreme court yesterday, upholding the trust clause
of Senator Fair's will, the estate is
now left foi distribution in the hands
of three trustees.
Charles Fair gets nothing but a
one-third interest in the income during his life. His issue, should there
be any, are disinherited. If he
should die, the income awarded to
him poes to his sisters, or to their
issue. In case of the death of the
three children, the estate is to be
divided as follows: One-fourth to
the issue of Mrs. W. K. Vander-
bilt, one-fourth to the issue of Mrs.
Herman Oelrichs, and one-half to
the heirs of Mrs. Fair's brother.
TAKEN BY BULLEB
He Captures Pieter's Hill, the Main
Boer Position on the Tugela,.
MAJ'IBA HILL AVENGED.
THK PBDEBAL PABLIAHBNT.
New Phase of Pacific Cable  Scheme—
.Why Button Lea.
The Victoria and New South
Wales governments have made arrangements with the Eastern Extension Cable company to lay a
cable from the Cape of Good Hope
to Australia. A vigorous protest
has been made by the leaders of
both parties in the Dominion parliament on the ground that this
action is a breach of faith on the
part of these governments as partners in the Pacific cable enterprise.
The truth as to Gen. Hutton's
departure has at last come out. Sir
Wilfrid Laurier said in parliament
regarding his dispute with the government: "The causes of difference were that Gen. Hutton was
insubordinate and indiscreet,and deliberately ignored the authority of
the minister in the administration
of the department."
A bill has been introduced providing that eggs shall be sold by
weight; one and one-half pounds to
equal a dozen.
Mr. Flint has given notice of a
motion, in the house of commons,
that prohibition laws should be
passed in accordance with the
plebiscite of 1898.
Mr. Moore will move, in the
house of commons, that the duty on
petroleum and its products be
abolished, in order to break up the
coal oil combine.
fcATKUT STOCK QUOTATIONS
Artistic Job Printing of every description at this office.
4 IK ID
Athabasca   81
b C. Gold Fields  SU
Big  Three  r
Brandon k Uolden Crown. 'ib
Canadian Gold Fields  A%
Cariboo [Gamp McKinney] 83
(irow'K Nest Pass Coal... $86 00
Dardanelles   6w
Deer Trail No. 2  0%
Deer Park [newj  1
Dundee  16
Kvenimj Star  hu
Fairmont.	
Giant  6*4
llomeitake  3
Iron Mask  40
Iron Colt.  10U
I.X.L  18
Iron Horse	
Jim Blaine  21
Jumbo  22
KIdk (Oro Denoro)  18
KnobHUI  65
Lone Pine Consol  in
Minnehaha  14
Monte Christo  4W
Montreal Gold Fields  7
Morrison  tu]
Mountain Lion $ 1 00
Noble Fits   10j£
Northern Belle	
Novelty  "H
Okanogan  .... ft
Old Ironsides  01
Palmer Mountain    28
Peoria Mines  m
I'miiiMs Mi,iiil  8
Rain bler-lurl boo  41
Kat li nuillcn  tu
Bepnbllc  98
lit. Klino Consolidated.... 4
Smuggler  \y.
Tamarac [Kennethi  7
Trail Creeli Hid. Trsas... tu
Van Anda  6W
Victory-Triumph  su
Virginia ."  ft*
War Eagle Consolidated..* 1 86
Waterloo  •
WhlteBear  $u
Winnipeg  28
Wonderful     3
BID
24
20
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130 Oo
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11
iy.
On the anniversary of the slaughter of the British soldiers at Majuba
Hill, which the Boers are celebrating by Thanksgiving services
throughout Boerdom, the Boer
army of 3000 men commanded by
Cronje, "the Lion of Africa," has
surrendered to the British. It is a
most poetic revenge, which will
compensate Britons for 19 years of
humiliation and contempt, for four
months of reverses in the field, for
the stings inflicted by jeering, jibing
enemies on three , "itinents. It is
an earnest of victories to come, for
experience shows that, when British generals and British soldiers
have once turned the tide of battle
in their favor, they keep it rolling
up and up until it finally overwhelms the foe.
This great event is the culmination of a series of successes won by
the military genius of Lord Roberts,
aided by the organizing power of
Lord Kitchener. It proves that the
man who made the wonderful march
to Kandahar is as great a general
when fighting white men on the
high plateau of Africa as when fighting Afghans among their rugged
mountains. It proves that the man
who by patient, persistent effort
organized the army which overthrew the Khalifa is able to defeat
white men as well as savages
and semi-savages. It proves
that the military genius of
Britain is not dead and will serve
as a warning to her enemies that
the old lion's teeth are as keen, his
claws as long and sharp as when he
alone defied the armies of Napoleon
while all the rest of Europe
crouched before him in terror.
For the fallen foe every true
Briton will feel sincere admiration.
What though in the heat of conflict,
the Boers forgot some of the laws
of civilized warfare. Still, they
fought a good fight, they were foe-
men worthy of British steel and
they hated to acknowledge that they
were beaten. This last quality is
so thoroughly British that it compels respect for the enemy. It is a
happy augury that the struggle will
inspire each party to it with respect for the other. This will serve
as a basis on which, after the war
is ended, the two nationalities can
unite for the development of the
great empire for the control of
which they are now contending.
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Why Boiler Fonuht at Spion Kop
London, Feb. 27.—A letter has
been received from a man in the
First dragoons, now in South Africa, confirming the report that a
supply transport reached Ladysmith during the engagement at
Spion kop. He say* the dragoons
were the escort of the transport,
which was several miles long, and
adds:
"That is Why Buller1 engaged the
enemy at Spion kop. Old Buller
knows what he is doing, and all
are willing to follow him in spite of
his reverses."
Attempt to BUI President Castro.
Caracas, Venezuela, Feb. 28.—
During the carnival yesterday, a
Venezuelan Afed two shots at President Cipriano Castro without effect. Tne president was afterwards
acclaimed by the populace. The city
is quiet.
London, Feb. 38.—The war office has received the following dispatch from General Buller:
"Headquarters, Hlangwani, Feb.
28.—s a. m.—-Finding that the passage of Langewacht's spruit was
covered by strong entrenchments, I
reconnoitered for another passage
of the Tugela. One was found for
me below the cataract by Colonel
Sandbach, Royal Engineers, on
Feb. 25. We commenced making
an approach thereto, and on Feb.
26, finding that I could make the
passage practicable, I crossed the
guns and baggage back to the
south side of the Tugela, took up
the pontoon bridge on Monday
night and relaid it at the new site,
which is just below the point marked Cataract. During all this time
the troops had been scattered,
crouching under hastily constructed
small stone shelters and exposed to
the galling shell and rifle fire, and
throughout they maintained the
most excellent spirits.
"Tuesday, Barton, with two battalions of the Sixth brigade and the
Dublin fusiliers, crept about a mile
and a half down the banks of the
river, and, ascending an almost
precipituous cliff of about 500 feet,
assaulted and carried the top of
Pieter's Hill. This hill, to a certain extent, turned the enemy's left,
and the fourth brigade, under Col.
Northeote, and the eleventh brigade, under Col. Kitchener, commanding, the whole under command of Gen. Warren, assailed the
enemy's position, which was magnificently carried by the South Lancashire regiment about sunset. We
took about 60 prisoners and scattered the enemy in all directions.
There seems to be a considerable
number of them left on and under
Bulwana mountain.
"Our losses, I hope, are not
large. They are certainly much
less than they would have been,
were it not for the admirable manner in which the artillery was
served, especially the guns manned
by the royal naval force and the volunteers."
Hot Plght at Railway Hill.
London, Feb. 28.—Richard Harding Davis sends the following dispatch to the Daily Mail from Pie-
ters, describing the desperate fight
at Railway Hill. It is dated Feb.
24th.
"Last evening the Inniskillen fu-
siliers, mixed with some of the Dublin fusiliers and the Connaught
rangers, attempted to carry Railway
hill from Pieters. They were under a continuous fire, through which
they passed up the heavy broken
ground to the first Boer trench.
Half way up the hill the Boers retreated to the crest and then came
back on either flank of the Irish
troops, enfilading the captured
trench with a savage cross as well
as direct fire.
"All night our men held the position under ceaseless fire and at terrible cost. At roll call only five officers and 100 men answered to
their names. Colonel Thackeray
and Major Sanders of ths Inniskil-
lens, Colonel S!twell of the Dublin
fusiliers, and Colonel Thorold of the
Welsh fusiliers, were killed. One
hundred and fifty-two of the rank
and file were killed or wounded.
General Lyttleton's brigade relieved
them at 12 o'clock this morning,
when the Boer artillery pounded the
troops holding the center kopje
without pause, but with little effect"
Prisoners*! Moddnr Hirer.
Cape Town, Feb. 28.—There are
now 600 prisoners at Modder River,
most of whom surrendered Friday
and Saturday. They are under
guard between wire fences.
How Cronje Was Rrouc.li t to Time.
Paardeberg, Feb. 26.—(Delayed
in transmission.) — On this, the
eighth day of General Cronje's resistance, General Smith-Dorrien has
worked up the river bed to within
200 yards of the Boer  laager,  sur-
rounding the enemy in a mor|
and more confined space. The st
of the British advance has not been
due to General Cronje, but i„
order to get supplies and to rest the
troops, which had become absolute.
Iy necessary. Now there are daily
arrivals of convoys, allowing fuij
rations to the men, which had at
best been intermittent during the
last three days,
A heavy rain has caused great
discomfort to the British,but greater
to the Boers, and the cold winds
have killed many sick animals.
Last night the river rose and
brought down a great number of
dead Boer horses.
A Wonderful march.
When the history of Lord Rob.
crts' movement is written, it will be
found that the marching power and
magnificent endurance 0/ the British
soldier is as great as ever. The
march itself, as seen on the map,
would be nothing very marvelous,
but it must be remembered that the
whole original plan of march wag
changed when Gen. Cronje made
his magnificent night trek on the
15th. The whole army swung to
the left in hot pursuit, and some of
the regiments marched 27 miles in
24 hours, outstripping transport
supplies and living for days on almost quarter rations. Vet the fatigue and incessant hardship were
borne with wonderful cheerfulness.
There has been a drenching rain
for the last three days, the men lying fully exposed to the rain and
cold winds, which proved the admirable pluck of them.
Nat Cke Sans Preneh.
Ths Province.
Several Canadian newspapers
have fallen into the error of describing the leader of the Kimberly
relief force as having been oncecon-
nected with the Northwest mounted
police One paper says his training
in the police force may partly account for his late successes. The
fact is that General French, who
was once in Canada, is now commandant in New South Wales. His
name is George Arthur FrencK The
hero of the Kimberly march is J. D.
P. French, who has heretofore
ranked as a brigadier-general in the
cavalry.
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES.
The Buffalo Express says that if
the Boers win the price that Portugal will pay for its aid to England
may be the loss of its African possessions. Perhaps this is so, but
the chances are ten to one that Portugal is not worrying much over the
probability of such a loss.—Seattle
P.-I.
The United States is now putting
its forest reserves on a business
basis by arranging for the sale of
standing timber of a certain size;
in fact, it will treat them as tree-
farms.
It is now reported that the
dowager empress of China has
changed her mind about deposing
the emperor and appointing a
"kid." The old lady seems to take
full advantage of the feminine license to change her mind.—Vancouver World.
The penalty claimed from Dr.
McKechnie for illegally voting in
the legislature amounts to $33,000
and is still rising.
IMPORTANT POINT OB UW.
Involved In Supreme Oonrt Decision In
John Fetch Case.
The decision of the supreme court
in the case of John Petch involved
some important points in regard to
the jurisdiction of police magistrates. Petch pleaded not guilty
and, after hearing evidence both for
and against him, Magistrate Boult-
bee sentenced him to one year in
jail.
The law provides that, when a
prisoner accused of the theft of an
article exceeding $10 in value
pleads guilty, the magistrate may
impose a sentence as high as one
year. If he pleads not guilty, the
magistrate may either commit him
for trial or hear the evidence and
impose a sentence not higher than
six   months.     Mr.   Boultbee   im- mOSHELTER
a Warren in the River
nk to Escape the Shells.
Ion, Feb. 26.—The latest dis-
from Paaderberg show that
Cronje's   forces   have   more
ion from Field Marshal Rob-
fieavy fire than the first discs indicate. A special dispatch
'aardsb*'.,   puoi.aned  in the
edition   of  the Chronicle,
Feb. 23, says:
balloon  has discovered  the
well covered by a system of
[wing in the river bank, which
lbles a rabbet  warren and af-
shell-proof positions."
is,  perhaps,   more   than  any
; communication, explains why
ral Cronje's death struggle, as
ooked upon  here, is so  pro-
Id.    Thus it  will not be a sur-
if today  and  tomorrow, the
ersary of Majuba   hill,    pass
at being marked by the sur-
or annihilation of the Boers
rwhelmingly hemmed in.
jleneral Cronje is  reported to
jlenty of food, the   plan  of
rig him  out can hardly avail,
rd Roberts   must either  wait
lis ammunition, which  is said
[short,   runs  out, or those  of
^Cronje's forces who are  coun-
surrender prevail.
ihe meanwhile   Lord   Roberts'
Seers   are     sapping    steadily
ird the Boer laager and, accord-
f to a special from  Paardeberg,
ed   Sunday,   February   25,   the
ion is gradually drawing  closer.
Buller Fighting His War «•>■
ien. Buller's march on Lady-
ith is being marked by sharp
iting. A Pietermaritzburg dis-
tch of Thursday's date says he is
avilv engaged in fighting.
Boera Talk ofHurrender.
I In Cape Colony the British  arms
steadily  advancing.      Burkley
1st is now in their possession, nc
krding to a dispatch Irom that dis-
ict,   the   Boers   evacuating   the
tace, retreating on Lady Grey and
iring President Steyn for reinforce-
ents to prevent their surrender.
The   Pretoria   government   profiled Feb. 25th and 27th days of
iksgiving and praise,  presuma-
in memory of the battle ot Ma-
hill.
Boer Belief Repulsed.
[London,    February     26. — The
tr office  publishes the following
spatch from Lord Roberts:
["Paardeberg,  Feb.   24.—Parties
j Boers recently arrived from  Na-
attacked our outpost in force
fcain yesterday. They lost a good
any killcd'and wounded and nenr-
100 prisoners, including a com-
indant and three field cornets
jr casualties were four officers
funded, nine men killed, 23 men
funded, two  men   missing.    On
2istand  23rd  one officer  and
men were wounded.
"Six men were  killed  yesterday
hollow nosed mauser bullets,
ie nickel case is slit with four
[is, making the projectile of the
sst expansive and explosive na-
re possible. A wounded Boer
aught to our hospital yesterday
id sixty of these bullets in his
Utets,
"During the advance to  and   at
iberly,     the    casualties   were:
peers, two killed and 13  wound-
Men, 4 killed,   70   wounded,
officers casualties had previous-
ten reported.)
Details of the Plght
Paardeberg, Saturday Feb. 24.—
tre was a most interesting series
Sghts along the British front yes-
lay.    One thousand Boers  com-
Jnded  by  General  Dewitt,   who
known to be  operating  in  the
lediate front at dawn yesterday,
lermined to attempt to break
nigh the British lines and aid
Cronje.    A body of five hun-
Id Boers moved toward the  Brit-
\ left and cantered in the directed a kopje,  with  the object of
(upying it. Unfortunately for
Boers, however, the kopje was
by   a  company   of  Scottish
Borderers, who opened a heavy fire.
The Boers galloped off, but moved
again toward another position with
exactly the same result. They then
made a third attempt to occupy another position, but the Borderers
were again ready to receive them.
The third repulse thoroughly disheartened the Boers, who galloped
away in a panic.
Later, perceiving another kopje,
the Boers moved quickly toward it.
, This kopje was unoccupied, but the
Borderers, not to be beaten, raced
for the position and won, occupying
the kopje and driving off the Boers.
Meanwhile the Buffs were ordered
to reinforce the Yorkshires, in case
the Boers should be reinforced. The
British attack worked around the
right of the kopje, held by the
Yorkshires, where the seventh battery was stationed, the sixty-second
battery being placed at a farm near
the center of the Borderers' position. A vigorous shelling, accompanied by a British fusilade, completely silenced the Boers.
A company of Yorkshires were
sent to clear out the Boers, but the
attempt failed, the Boers opening a
heavy fire and the British having no
cover. The British then again
opened a heavy rifle fire, which
again silenced the Boers. The
Boers made several attempts to run
between the British troops, but the
latter effectually checked them.
Boers Taken Prisoner*.
The Buffs now worked carefully
and cautiously around and got with
in 150 yards of the Boers. Eighty
Boers surrendered, but many, it appears, escaped. Most of the prisoners had just arrived from Ladysmith. They complained of the
bad generalship of their leaders.
Nearly every man carried explosive bullets and five British were
wounded with these missiles. I have
seen the bullet. One Boer carried
50. There is no longer the .slight
est doubt that the Boers are gradually disregarding all rules of civilized warfare. The other day they
poured the contents of a Maxim-
Vickers gun into an ambulance,
which happened however to be
empty, some 300 hundred yards
away from the nearest troops.
Cronje's Position Hopeleea.
Paardeberg, Orange Free State
Feb. 23.—General Cronje's position
is more hopeless than ever. Our
guns dominate the sloping ascent
from the river on all sides, and by
the rush of the Shropshires on
Wednesday night up the river bed
the Boeis lost 200 yards space in
their cover. The deserters say the
British fire has been very deadly
and affirm that General Cronje himself is willing to surrender, but is
overborne by the young Boers
from the Transvaal.
There are women and children
with the force. General Roberts
proposed to let them pass out of
danger, but this suggestion, as well
as the proffer of medical aid, h?s
been rejected.
The kopje captured by the British
last Wednesday, when 50 prisoners were taken, is a most important
strategical position. Its possession should enable us to repulse any
Boer reinforcements from the eastward.
Nine miles Irom Ladysmith.
London, Feb. 26.—The last casualty list from General Buller represented seven battalions in Hild-
yard's, Lyttleton's and the Lancashire brigades and proved that there
has been something more than a
rear-guard action on the way to
Ladysmith. This fighting was described by special correspondents as
occurring near Pieters, the railway
station about nine miles from
Ladysmith.
Rebels Beady to Submit
The effect of Cronje's retreat,
and the retirement of General Jou-
bert's forces from Colenso upon
the disloyal Dutch of Cape Colony
was shown in dispatches printed in
the Saturday afternoon edition of
thc Times. General Brabant had
opened negotiations with rebel Boer
commandos at Dordrecht, who had
expressed a desire to know the conditions of submission."
Major Arnold Diss ol Wonnds.
Winnipeg, Feb. 26.—Col. Otter
reports that Major Arnold, late of
the Ninetieth Winnipeg, who was
wounded at Modder River, died on
the 33rd.
CRONJE'S FATE
Contradictory Reports as to Events at
New York, Feb. 24.—London
cables give a brief story to the effect that General Cronje had fotiiit j pi^y Vf wattrT"
it impossible to longer endure the
murderous fire of his opponents
and had laid down his arms. Up
to an early this morning, however,
there was no official confirmation of
this news by the British war  office.
tion is as strong as could be. It is
from this hill that the farm of my
father-in-law takes its name. I
know every inch of it, and there is
no stronger natural fortification in
that part of the country. It is aboub
four miles long and from two to
three miles wide. Its sides rise
precipitously, with here and there a
leep ravine. Its center is a crater
•vith deep ravines. It offers thous-
uids of hiding places and  there is
Cronje's Bscape Reported
Berlin, Feb. 24.—6:20 p. m.—
Several newspapers here announce
that they learn from private sources
that Gen. Cronje has succeeded in
forcing his way through the British
lines.
Bejolelng Over Bnmored Victories
Durban, Feb. 23.—The rumor
gains credence that Ladysmith has
been relieved. It is also reported
that Gen. Cronje has surrendered
8000 men and that Gen. Kitchener
has been slightly wounded in the
left arm. Crowds thtong the streets,
singing and cheering because of the
supposed victories. Seventeen
hundred Boers have been killed or
wounded; the latter, it is reported,
include Gen. Cronje.
Boer Fugitive* Captured.
Paardeberg, Feb. 22.—There is
little change in the situation. There
was intermittent shelling today and
during the night a large supply
tr in arrived. It is reported that
2000 Boers are operating northward
of this place Yesterday evening,
after the last gun had been fired,
the Shropshires rushed forward 200
yards further towards the bed of the
river and found a number of Boer
dead.
General French captured 75 more
prisoners, who had previously escaped. The cordon and a patrol on
the westward side took 30 more.
Heavy Fighting Still on.
London, Feb. 24.—A bulletin
published in Pretoria Feb. 22, said
communication with General Cronje
was still open on Feb. 21, and that
reports of heavy fighting east of
General Cronje's laager had been
received.
Boers Flogged for Cowardice.
A Sterkstrom dispatch of Feb.
23 says a British refugee from Heidelberg asserts that the Boers admitted the loss of 500 men in the
assault on Ladysmith and that it
was time that General Joubert was
no longer in command. He added
that some Free Staters were badly
flogged for cowardice after the battle of Belmont.
The British casualties at Koo-
doosburg drift Feb. 7 and Klip
kraal Feb. 16 were seven officers
wounded, four men killed.
VI r Scene of CronJ'es Stand.
New Vork, Feb. 24.—Philip
Lauter Wessels, a merchant of
Bloemfontein, Orange Free State,
has arrived in New York to help
the Boer cause. He comes on the
advice of his government and is
making his headquarters with Geo.
W. Van Sycklen, president of the
American Boer council. In an in-
te.view printed today Mr. Wessels
says:
"Commandant Cronje has 10,000
men. As near as I can determine
from dispatches, he is now a few
miles west of the Koodoosrand.
His position is not a very good one.
The dispatches indicate that he is
surrounded by the British and that
he has taken a position on the Modder river. The bed of the Modder
river at that ppint is about 300 feet
wide. The banks rise abruptly to a
height of twenty or thirty feet, and
they are covered with a thick
growth of willows and mimosa
trees. At this time of year the
river is almost dry. In its bed are
great rocks and deep water.
"While the Boer position is not
a good one, it is not so bad as one
might think. The high banks prevent the British from using their artillery to the best advantage, while
the rocks afford excellent protection
to the Boer marksmen. If .Cronje
has reached Koodoosrand, his posi-
Buller Continues Fl th ting
London, Feb. 24.—The war office has received from Gen. Buller a
list of the casualties resulting from
the fighting of Feb. 22 as follows:
Killed—Lieut, the Hon. R. Cath-
cart, son of Lord Cathcart, of the
rifle brigade; Lieuts. Coe and Parker of the Lancashire regiment;
wounded—14 officers, including
Major General Wynne and Colonel
Harris of the East Surreys. Gen.
Buller concludes: "Owing to the
continuous fighting, it is impossible
at present to give the number of
men killed or wounded."
Diary or Kimberly siege
Capetown, Feb. 23. — Extracts
from the diary of the Reuter correspondent at Kimberly give an
insight into the trials of the garrison. They are, in brief as follows:
"January 11.—Scurvy attacksthe
natives alarmingly. They are dying fast. The anti-scorbutics are
exhausted. Vine cuttings are being tried in lieu ot green food.
"January 12.—Typhoid is very
prevalent.
"January 23.—Fifty typhoid in
hospitals.
"January 16.—The military authorities have commandered all the
food-stuffs and other stores. Leave
has been granted to the inhabitants to shoot birds for food.
"January 20. — Five hundred
shells poured into the town, haphazard. The hospital, scurvy
grounds and residents received the
proper attention due the defenders
each morning.
"Jan. 25.—A family shell-proof
shelter has been dugin nearly every
garden.
"Feb. 14—About 2500 women
and children were lowered into the
mines throughout the night. The
men are also selecting places of
safety."
Canadian Wounded Recovering
Toronto, Feb. 24.—Dr. Ryerson,
Canadian Red Cross commissioner
in South Africa, cables from
Orange River under date of Feb. 22
that Chaplain Almond, Lieuts. Lat
Burstall and Willis, wounded in
Sunday's battle, are convalescent.
He adds that Lieut. Hughes has
been ap pointed deputy.
Rhodes' Vigorous Speech.
Kimberly,Feb. 24 —Cecil Rhodes
presided at a meeting of the De
Beers company today and announced
that the profit for the year was £2,-
000,000.
Speaking of the war, he considered it a puzzle why it had arisen.
The Transvaal and Free State were
not republics, he declared, but oligarchies, and had been long conspiring to seize British South Africa. Each government was simply
a small political gang, who humbugged the poor Dutchmen, appealing to their patriotism and dividing the spoils among their coteries. The Africanders had been
working twenty years for the independence of Africa. He said that
former President Reitz, of the
Orange Free State, had years and
years ago made a vow that his only
ambition in life was to drive England out of Africa.
After showing how Kimberly had
been defended by the citizens, of
whom 120 had been killed and
wounded, and thanking French for
his gallant ride, Mr. Rhodes closed
brilliantly, asserting: "We have
done our duty in preserving and
protecting the greatest commercial
asset in the world—Her Majesty's
flag."
Captain Montmorency Killed.
Sterkstrom, Feb. 25.—General
Gatacre has issued a divisional
orderannouncingthe killing at Shoe-
men's Farm yesterday of Captain
Montmorency, commanding Montmorency's scouts, and Lieutenant
Colonel F. H. Hoskier, of the
Third Middlesex volunteer artillery. ,
A FATAL ACCIDENT
John McMillan, Formerly of Rossland,
Meets Sodden Death.
Spokane, Feb. 24.—By accident
John G. McMillan last night shot
himself through the lower part of
the heart as a result of which he
died less than three hours later.
McMillan was a mining man of
laege interests in Republic camp.
He had been in this city two days
on mining business, and is said to
have all but completed the sale of
interests which would mean much
to htm. On commission for a friend
in Republic he yesterday bought a
45-calibre Colts' revolver, borrowing a revolver from M. C. Karter,
one of the proprietors of the Rankin saloon in order to get one like
it. He was sitting behind the bar
in the front part of the Rankin, and
shortly before 7 o'clock last night
called to Mr. Karter, who was in
the rear, "Max, here is your revolver." The next instant there was
a shot and McMillan dropped from
the chair with a groan. Friends
rushed to him and for assistance,
apparently realizing that he was
fatally injured. The unfortunate
man, who did not lose consciousness, was asked to make a statement, and dictated the following
letter to his wife, who, with their
six-year-old son, is living at Ho-
quiam:
"Dear Sarah—The most toolish
action of my life has just been performed. While fooling with a gun
I accidentally shot myself and I believe I shall soon be dead. You do
not know how I would love to have
you and Dwight with me before I
go. Let this be a warning to the
boy never to play with a gun."
The letter was written by his
friend Karter, and McMillan himself
signed it.
Dr. Luhn arrived a few minutes
after the accident, but feared that
there was no hope for his life. He
was, however, at once removed to
the Sacred Heart hospital and all
tl at was possible was done to save
him. The efforts were without
avail, however, and he died surrounded by friends, at 9:30.
Mr. McMillan, who was 38 years
of age, was well and favorably
known in Spokane,especially among
mining men. His home was in
Hoquaim, but his mining interests
have kept him between Spokane
and Republic most of the time recently. He was a friend ot Officer
McMillan, and told him on Thursday that he expected to die in just
such a manner as that bv which he
met his death last night, mentioning times in his life during crises
when he had premonitiens of evil
fortune. None of those who were
in the saloon when the accident
happened are known to have seen
it, but the supposition is that in
pulling the revolver from his pocket
the trigger caught, cocking the
gun, so that when it was released
the shot was discharged, as it penetrated the body diagonally, going
entirely through and striking the
wall behind.
Volunteers tor Harrison Duty
Toronto, Feb. 24.—E company,
48th Highlanders, has volunteered
for garrison duty as a unit, should
either the Dominion or imperial authorities require it.
A Canadian Naval Reserve
London, Feb. 24.—It is said that
negotiations are in progress for the
formation of a naval reserve in Canada. The difficulty created by the
requirements of six months' teaching on a man of war being one of
the conditions of service in the
United Kingdom, it is thought will
be overcome.
hurried to their relief. The great
mass of British troops, which have
been hitherto helpless to accomplish
anything, have become a match for
the Boers in mobility and have followed them up with a rapidity
which made them despair of getting
away, choosing the alternative of
making a stand and fighting for
life.
The success of this general plan
is a vindication for the arm-chair
critics who have been the butt of
the shallow sarcasm of some writers. They have pointed out the folly of fighting the Boers on their
chosen battle grounds, especially in
Natal, whence it is most difficult to
penetrate the enemy's country, and
have urged the invasion of the Free
State as a sure means of relieving
Kimberly and Mafeking, and indirectly of relieving Ladysmith by
drawing off the Boers to the defense
of their own territory.
The manner in which this general
plan was carried out shows that
Lord Roberts has matched Boer
craft with superior craft. He led
them to believe that his attack
would be delivered at the point
where they expected and where
they were prepared He made
much of General French's movements around Colesberg and pretended to wish to seize Norval's
Pont as a point for his invading
army to enter the Free State. He
made a great show of reinforcing
French, for this ostensible purpose.
Yet all the time he was preparing to
strike, the blow at an entirely different point and when the time was
ripe, he rushed his troops through
De Aai to the Modder river, made
French withdraw from Colesberg
with a great show of resistance, as
though he were be;ng driven, and
rushed him forward to the real
point of attack. Thus the Boers
were fooled into sending large reinforcements to Colesberg and
weakening their forces at the points
where they were really needed.
Skill and cunning have in a single
week changed the whole aspect of
affairs. Cronje, who had fought
Methuen to a standstill, is himself
brought to a standstill, surrounded
by an army at least twice the size
of his own. Kimberly is no longer
besieged and Cecil Rhodes has gone
to Capetown, doubtless laughing at
the price set on his head. The
Boers, hastening from the siege of
Ladysmith to aid Cronje, have been
beaten back. The Boer lines on
the Tugela have been so weakened
that Buller has been able to turn
them and at last has a reasonable
chance of reaching Ladysmith.
Although Cronje's army has not
yet surrendered, and Ladysmith is
not yet relieved, the new plan of
campaign has developed far enough
to prove that a master-mind is at
the head of the British forces.
With such a general in command
ot such soldiers, ultimate success is
assured, however arduous may be
the struggle. Therefore the British nation breathes freely once
more.
OITPIT OF VI IB   _»II>K.
THE TABLES TURNED.
At last the tables are turned on
the Boers. They have had Hritish
soldiers shut in Ladysmith, Kimberly and Mafeking for months.
Now they have been driven away
from Kimberly and the besiegers
have become the besieged, while
the besiegers   of   Ladysmith   have
Over tun,OOO In December aud Nearly
S200,0OO In 1899.
The official statement of the output of the Ymir mine in December
is as follows:
"During last month 2350 tons
milled produced 1333 ounces of
bullion and 135 tons of concentrates. Shipped 135 tons of concentrates and 17 tons of smelting
ore. The total receits for the month
are £3655 ($18,275); expenses,
^"1828 ($9140). Decrease is owing
to a breakdown at flume."
This brings the total for the eight
months during which the 40-stamp
mill has been running to nearly
$200,000, of which $50,000 was
distributed in a five per cent dividend.
JOHN I'liill HBLEASKD.
Court Holds That magistrate Exceeded
His Jurisdiction.
In the snpreme court today an
order was granted for the release of
John Petch, sentenced by Magistrate Boultbee to one year in the
Nelson jail for stealing William
Woods' overcoat. The court held
that Mr. Boultbee had exceeded his
jurisdiction in imposing the sentence. The application was made
by W. A Galliher of Nelson. XHE OPPOSITE
sei,kirk   the
LARGE    AND    COMFORTABLE
I ROOMS—-TABLE    UNSURPASSED    IN    THE
NORTHWEST.
BRADOU-B.1RRKTT '
SILVERTON,
PRors
B. 0.
Daigle's Black-
smith Shon.
Oeneral Blaeksmithiug
"" .■-     and Repairing Done.
i_XPERT   HORSE   SHOER  AL-
1 WAYS   ON  HAND.
TOOL SHARPENING A SPECIALTY
S DAIGLE,      SILVERTON, B. 0.
TXT'atch and I
Clock
Repairer..
: SeS'e-i'lM'S'eSrf
Visits Silverton
Wednesdays.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
(Leave Your Orders at The Lake-
view    OTEL.
E>. M • Brindle J
rhe Jeweler,
NEW DENVER B. 0.
A^fcl^ISJOXCMV
HOTE^
Conveniently Situated near the
Railway Station and Wharf.
GOOD SERVICE COMFORTABLE
\- .    '   .'■>'     ROOMS.
the mriirtiiir
Saturday, Marcii 3, 1600.
PUBLI6UID EVBRY  SATURDAY   AT
SILVERTON, -.-r li.C.
MATHESON BROS.,    Kdltor* & Props.
SUBSCRIPTION '.BATES:.
TWO DOLLARS A YEAR.
Victoria to'lUo polling booths ot the
country.   A division of counting after
the Ontario mod
al conditions, ia what is required.
"Ve had fondht, we bad fought, we had
failed—they had beaten us back and
back I
altered to *uit  lo- Our ceont^ft*,snd her honor to us
Advertising rates will be made known
upon application at this ofllee.
Dining Room' under the charge of
Miss Ida Carlisle.
Tables supplied with ill the delicacies
of the season.   .
HENDERSON* GETHING, - Pboi-s.,
i BLOCAN CITY,   .'.    .   BO
3. m. McGregor
,atmi'mamaaamc*
EDITORIAL OUMOITIMS.
g88888888888m$? 88888888
It seems to be the genera* impres-
sioh that Joo Martin and his colleagues
will be defeated at the polls within the
next few weeks. He probably will,
but by whom? Strang combinations
and complications have sprung up and
voters are holding their whiiling
beads and trying to find out where
they are politically.
■ Tho supporters of tho Eight-hour
law and tho members of tke Mine
Owners' Association arc both opposed
te thu Premier, at present, the first
because he turned do«r his party who
passed the law, the others b.causu he
is known as an "agitator." Will these
join hands ia the fiijht? Will tlie labi.r
party join the Liberal-Conservatives,
who see a "Grit move" in Mclnnis'
shuffle, or will thi-y join tho Grits, or
will they break ranks and vdte against
each other with on9 or the other of
the grand old parties, like tbuir fathers
didl Are those among our voters, the
vast majority in the Slocan, who applaud Martin's anti-Chinese policy
and shouted when W. W. B. Mclnnis
forced a promise from the Dominion
Government to raise the head tax on
Chinese to a prohibitive figure, going
to vote against them at the first opportunity1! And if they do not do
they not have to vote against Bob
Green, who voted "no confidence" in
Martin, but has lost money and friends
in doing his doty to his constituent*?
Will they choose Cotton, or Turner,
or a combination of both, or Martin?
These aro a few of the questions
voters nre niking themselves and a
great deal of hard thiliking is lieing
indulged in.
PROVINCIAL   LAND     SURVEYOR
AND MINING ENGINEER.
SLOCAN CITY    R. 0.
CANFORD McINTOSH,
e General Freight and Transfer
Orders lelt at  Newe Stand will   be
promptly attended to.
JS G. GORDON,
MU, Rfi.IL ESTATE, CONVMGKR
NOTARY  PUBLIC.
SILVERTON,       -      -      -      B.
i
SINNOTT k O'DONNELL.
It would be a good idea for those
interested in the fast approaching elections to see that as many of the Rossland minera now in the Slocan as are
voters have iheir names transferred
to the list for this Riding. Application blanks can be secured at this office.
Slocan Oily Happenings.
(From our own  Correspondent.)
Bert Wilhelm met with misfortune
while going W to ,1,e 8muffgler mine
lately.   He bad liiB feet frozen bo badly j a™£™ V^edV.'uncultureiL 'unskilled
had been given in t,llBt>,
Uei honor we'd lo_ t on the mornitaii*!
her ft if? «o'd trailed in the dust I
Ah, many  a comrade lying still on that
stark hillside ...  ,
We. envied with hitter lonping; would God
we had also dh'd I
Sweeter wire death than capture, sweeter
were death than shame. . ,.   ,,
Theelmmo that onr pride had yielded to
a foo of despised name.
Tho Chtnp fire Bhone on our captors those
men of the veldt, and farms;
wAiTeuM.    N»    3    mtma*m     "127     t*\**\*     s£C.
Silverton,       ....
B,C
iib to necessitate, the amputation of some
of bis toes. •..
Blocnn City's new p#per will make its
initial appearance on Uie 14th inet., under the management of <•. E, Smlther-
ingale, a well-known and experienced
newspaper writer, bloean sheold be a
good fichl and, as it promisee to keep
going ahead, should be well able to afford the luxury of a newspaper.
On March 1st the management of tho
Arlington mint) leveled its wage scale to
the Union rule. At this mine, as well rn
at the other SI can City properties, 81o-
caii mil ers have always had the preference and tho crows are composed of
some of the best men in the district.
Tbe Miners' Union hre have opened
a readiiiK room, open to the pahlie, on
Main .St., near Bennett's Shop. This
niova is appreciated by the citizens.
THE MAIN TRAIL RUNS PAST THE DOOR OF j
H
E
SLOGAN LAKE ORE SHIPMENTS.
Shipments  of  oro   fr.im Silv i ton for
the year 1890. totaled .    1608 Tons.
Al"l other Lake points 138o     "
The shipment   ol   oro   from   Sloean
Lake points, up lo and Including  the
present week, from Jan. 1, 1800.
From Bosun Landing. Tons.
Bn-nn 40
From Silverton Tons.
Emilv Ediih    20
Vancouver    20
From Stocat) City
Arlington      100
Black Prince    20
THE   METAL   MARKET.
New York, Feb. 22.-Bar Silver, 5DJa'c
Lako enppor,   flfl.60.
Lead—The firm thut fixes the selling
price for miner* ond amjUers quotes lead
at $4.4"5 at the close.
MAC DONALD'S   SWORD.
(From the South African News.)
("Col. Hector Mr.cdonald, who did
such wondcis at Oindiirman, and who
rose from the ranks, and who whb wounded at Pnaideber2 drift, whero so many
Highlanders and Canadians fell, was one
of thc officers who sin vived Msjuiia Hill,
whero be was taken prisoner. The
sword ho wore had linen presented him
by the men of his company when he won
his commission, an 1 bore on its Made an
inscription to that effect. Tho Boer
leaders noticed it among the purrendered
arms and brought it back to Macdonald,
telling him to wear it, as a man who bad
won snch a sword should not he separ
atod from it. Col. Macdouald still tells
the story and tells and says that those
men wero gentlemen."
(save in the use of arms),
Straight from the   plough   nnd   sowing
they had shouldered their  roers for
the fight,
And we had gone down  before  them—
gone down in oir well drilled might!
Oh. well might they look with triumph
upon our grim despair,
As  slowly   within the rod light we filed
before thorn there.
And our captain gave his fiword up—(its
blade to-l.ight was dim),
The  sword   his  oomiivlfl gave to ahow
tbeir pride in him.
He gave it in silence, but we who know
his heart
Could  guess  the   wild  regretting, the
ai.'h'iur pain and -mint :
To   yield   bis  sword is an anguish that
cuts n man full  soie,
And his wore a sting still keener, for he
gave it up to a Boer.
And they took it loo In silence, that
sternly quiet band,
And read of honor thst won it as they
passed it from hand to hand.
And then they turned to ns, standing
still in the dust nnd the glo>v,
With onr thoughts up there on the mountain and black in our hearts the woe,
They spoke in our Knglise language,
their words were few and  plain,
'•We take not the sword cf a bravo mail"
—and tbey handed it hack again.
That night when the stars wero glinting
above the camp fire dure.
As  we lay  around in the shadows, and
thc Boers with their guns watched there
Onr captain spoko to us shortly: "Men,
we have loet thi day;
Yet I hold wo aro not dishonoured, whatever the world nay say;
To Yield to a foe iguobleia a true cause
for shame.
To souls small and ungenerous, no matUi
Un ir race or name;
Our fl « has gone down on  Majuba, our
price is stricken (.ore;
But we've learnt that our foe is worthy,
although that foe be a Boer.
Many a sun o\r llajuha since then hns
risen rttiil set;
Manv a year bas fleeted since Boer and
soldier met.
Tho winds of this life have scattered
them, scattered them wide  and far;
Tho men alio came down from the mountain carried a heart deep scar.
Yet, wherever our paths may wander,
wherever our winds may blow,
To ns that stood around the camp fire,
that faded so long ago,
No scornful speech may be uttered of the
I'.oor, nor eontmiip.uom Word,
Fur long nH onr life is with us, we'll remember Macdonald's swerd!
A. E. TEETER, PROPH.
PATRONS ARE WELL TAKEN CARE OF.
A FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM ON THE PREMISE8.
BAR   FURNISHED WITH THE   BEST   BRANDS OF  WINES. LIQUOR8
AND CIGARS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR MINING MEN.
MAIN STREET,    -   -   - SLOOAN, B. C.
StaTole.
GOOD SADDLE AND PACK  HORSES  FOR   HIRE   AT   REA80NABLK
rtATES A GEN KRAI. FREIGHT AND TRANSFER BUSINESS DONE.
Outside Parties Desiring Horses in Silverton
Can |Have Them ReBerved By  Writing To—    A' *• McDONALD,
* + + + + t t SILVFRTON. • • B. C.
MINING   AND   COMMERCIAL   MEN   MAKE THEIR
HEADQUARTERS   AT   TIIE
Thorburn ***«&>■
OUS© Mi^&ftuw iiwrni
i       GRANT JTHORBURN,   Tttov.
MITER!ON. IV C.
Syrup of Horehomd & Tol
n
FOR COUGHS   AND ( OLDS.
1 *^sy-A4lt*w*VSJSAr*^
A third \eai student of the School of
Practical Science, Toronto, desires employment in some ollice requiring an expert draughtsman, Apply to "Draughtsman" cure of The Silvertoniau.
FREIGHTERS AtiD PACKERS.
Contracts Urge or small taken
, And promptly attended to.
Stables in SILVERTON, B. 0.
OH AS. A. WATERMAN k 00.
avctiokekrs, customs brokers,
And General Real Estate Agents,
O'tUee In l'.oulcy Block    -   -     Baker Bt.
NELSON,   B, 0.
mmm mi» mn.
NO. 95, W. F. Of M.
Meets every Saturday in tbe Union
Hal) In Silverton, at 7:30 r. »i.
i J. M. M. Benedi'm,
President.
J. I. McIntobii,
Financial-Secretary
emmt***w*e*m**m9**mtm*m*m*mmmmmmmmmm
,/Ht VOUU SUBSCRIPTION 18 DUE
gSS***0 OR IN ARREARS A
$. ' % BLUE OROSB WILL
i J*»*»*<$ BE FOUND IN THIS
SQUARE. SUBSCRIPTION ARE
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. PRICE
T*vO DOLLARS A YEAR.
We publish this week the proposed
platform of the United Labor Party,
which has been adopted by one labor
organization and bid fair to be adopted
by like organizations throughout the
Province. The platform is one which
tho majority of fair minded men will
endorse. The reforms asked for are
directed against enieting faults in Unlaws of the land aud no plank is fitted
in simply as a vote catcher. The elector* can be depended uuon to frame
a better platform, than the politician to
be elected could do.
Planks 1 and 2 embody the determination of the miner* to hold what
they have Plank o has already been
adopted by the Cotton wing among the
present members, and teems in a fair
way of being adopted by tho Dominion
House and made law. Plank 6 will
have a host of supporters, this principle having gained popular favor lately
Member Bostock is sn enthusiastic
supporter of government ownership of
railways aud has often expressed bi*
views ss such st Ottawa.
Tbe Sixth Plank endorses Premier
Martin's plan to fight tbe dissllow-
of the Provincial legislation regarding
the employment of Mongolians and
Plank 7 ask* for what is badly needed,
the proper inspection of onr mine*.
Our one inspector cannot be expected
to be ubiquitous and bis duties are
necessarily neglected,
Tho last plank is one which asks for
County local government, with the last
clause of which we cannot agrea It
is improbable tbat the present high
standing of the provincial judiciary
could be improved or even m aintained
by transferring their appointments I
from  the executive* at  Ottaws     tr^
The camp fire was red on our faces, but
despair iu our hearts was black :
J.I.Mcintosh,
DEALER I\  ALL KINDS OF
FRESH FRUIT CON-
1'ECTlONERY	
CIGARS     AND
TOBACC08
ALL KIND OF
SUPPLIES INI 11B
STATIONARY     LINK
 FISHING TACKLE—
THE LATEST   NOVELS,  Ac.
Silverion, B.C.
Sliver on Pore
Drug Drugs And
» ore.      Ohemicnl-* Kept.
LAKE AVE,   SILVERTON,   B. C
CERTIFICATE OF IMPROVEMENTS
NoriCK:— "Tnii'Meit," "Impkeova-
hi.e" and "Kaixiiow IJuaktz" Mineral
Claims; situate in tut Arrow Lake
Mining Division of Uest Kootenny'
District.
Where  lorated:—On Cariboo   creek,
adjoining   the    Millie Mai it   Mineral
Claim.
THE.
VICTORIA!
HOUSE.
%:-', !k(|f|.iir!i>rs Tor Mining M :-
NEAT
i V]
Y 111 ING KEW,
IT-TO  DATE.
TABLK 1 M-ILl'ASSED IN
THK NOI.THWEST.
mm kt\\mm. m*.
I SILVEUTON.   H
5
ct°
The Strike Is OITj % tfaxow, J»f«ww
And Wc, arc now
Ready jur
Purines*.
SDUUOMOS,   HTEia.NU
■5K.ND   i'LA.ED NOVKI.-
!vw-u
Take notice thnt I, J. D Anderson. P. L  j enay Frienda
S , oi Trail, B. O, action as acent for lhe   ,„.-,.._.m_l  m
And now mv  Koot-Sim Tin
I um,?
ago
Kamloups Minim; and Development
Compuny. Limited, Free Miner's Oerti
Urate No. uH-l'-O, intend sixty days fiom
the dale hereof, lo apply to the 'Mining
Recorder fnr Certificates of Improv
enieiitR, for the pnrpOSS of obtaining
C.'own (.rants of the ahove eluims.
And furtlie' tako notiOl that action
nnder sevtion 87,'mnst e nnnimeiieed
before the issuanco of such Certificates
of Improvements
Dated this 8th dsv o( September, A.D.
1899.
2-1 | 2 | 00.
J. D. Anderson.
W axative
■vvvvvvvvw
G
old Cure.
To'Cure a  Oold ln   One D*y.
Contain*   The New   Ingredient.
 TRY   IT,
1'HICE 25c. At Ail "rn^lBH.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
A nd SOD. LINE
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
KOOTENAY COUNTY
'10 ALL POINTH
EAST asd WEST
First-Claw Sleepers op ail Trains from
REVELSTOKE   and KOOTENAY LD
TOURIST OARS pass Medicine Hut
Daily for Sr. Pavi..
Sukdavs and Wepntsdavs for Toronto.
FsiDAYi for Montreal und BoSTOI.
— Sumo cars pass Revelstoke one day —
prepared to   reciiie*.)
vour     orders      For1*
ynzA. Piano Lamps
*and Onvz Table i.
•> Other Articlks
S.T00 Ni'MEnoi'8 To
w! Call /nu Exam-
~"t.   .   .   .
*
IVTA'.ll.il'.'Ur; in NRisen "UW."
6}A_
Wk4vM
-is©
d^4*Jtt*M*4*sfl y^W^WMAW^
0   R   WATCH  AND JF.WELEKY
RKPAIIMNG DEPARTMENT 18 AI.
As we only employ the most e*P* •
iei.iud men, allwotk ia ovarantsko
y   Mail and Express Otders Receive Onr
. Prompt Attention.
DONT FORGET THE PLACE.
JACOB DOVER.  "T«« Jiwbleb."
NELSON, B. 0.
■earlier.
CONNECTIONS.
For tho North.Revelstnke, and Main Line
|7:30 ex- Uunday iv.  8ilverton,
ar. ex. Sunday, 16:20
For   Rowland,   Nelson      Crows   Nest
Branch and   Hoiindary Country
10:20ex. Snnday Iv. Silverton,
ar. <x. Sunday 13. CO
To and from Sandon.
13:00 e.x Sunday Iv Silverton,
ur. ex Sunday, 10:20
TlCKRTS ISSIKI) TllltOUOII    AN.)   RaOOAOE
 CIIEI'KEI) TO DESTINATION. 	
For rates and full inloimstion apply to
neateM local agent or
H. H REEVES, Ag*nt, Silverion
W.F. ANDEHSON,
Trav. Pass. Ag.-nt, Nelson
i:..I,COYLE.
A, Q. P. Agont, Vancouv e
£3T    Full POWEil  KNITTING MAU1I1NK3 AND   VISIBLE-
WRITING TYPE-WRITERS WRITE US.    CATALOGUES FREE
A REOPENING"*
TO-DAY
The THISTLE HOTEL
WILL  THROW  OPEN   ITS DOORS
TO THE SLOGAN   PUBLIC.      ALL
ARE   INVITED   TO SUE IT DONE.
Tiiompson Bros,,   3P_rpp»»
•v
...   .'•

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