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The Saturday World Nov 14, 1903

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 THE SATURDAY WORLD
Vol.I,   No. n
ROSSLAND, B. C, SATURDAY, NOVEMBE   14 1903
Price Five Cents
NEWS IN A
NUTSHELL
Items of Interest Round
the World.
LATEST TELEGRAPH BULLETINS
The Doings of Conspicuous Persons
Affecting Canadian Interests.
IMPERIAL
Cape Colony is offering Canada
all manner of privileges if this
oountry will make a good exhibit
at the Capetown exhibiton to be
opened next November.
Premier Seddon of New Zealand
is insistent in bis defenoe of bis
colony. He declares there is no
truth in the stories imputed to certain anoymous returning emigrants
from Australia.
Chamberlain is steadily winning
his way in Great Britain.
Churchill and Ceoil have been
delivering speeches against "Joe"
to the Birmingham public who
greatly resented the importance.
The offioial celebration of tbe
King's birthday, whioh oocurred
last Monday, will be on Empire
Day next.
FOREICIN
A small rebellion has broken out
among the Hottentots of Cape Colony.
The Kaiser's yacht Meteor will
compete for the Emperor's cup next
year.
Itjis reported that late emigrants
to the United States, disoouraged
by present conditions, are returning in large numbers to their former homes.
A street oar strike has just been
called in Chicogo.
Democratic senators in CongresB
will oppose the Panama oanal
treaty.
New York is importing goldlarg-
ly from London.
UnoleSam is actively support! ng
tbe new republio of Panama despite Colombia's vigorous protests.
The Kaiser bas had an operation
performed on his larynx. He is
forbidden to talk so muoh in future.
Ten thousand coal miners are on
strike in Colorado.
An [anti-anarchist bill has been
introduced into tbe United States
congress.
The publio feeling in Japan is
daily more and more in favor of a
war with Russia.
The revolutionarie are gaining
ground in San Domingo.
The mines have again opened up
in Butte.
CANADIAN.
John Charlton is the only Canadian of eminence now talking reciprocity with the United States.
The Fernie reoount bas been
postponed until November 17 at
Fernie. The ballot boxes are still
withheld.
Major Leckie has been wounded
by a leopard in South Africa.
Lord Dundonald has started upon a tour of the west.
The trade returns for the year
shows a large inorease.
Captain Duff Stuart will oppose
the reelection of Attorney General
Wilson in Vanoouvet.
There has been ten seats pro
tested in the late provincial eleotion.
Tbe superannuation of Judge
Walkem bas approved.
The Clergue works have been
reopened.
The Granby is to devote a part
of its profits to dividends,
The preferential granted Great
Britain is driving Germany out of
the shipbuilding trade.
HIS METHODS ARE STRENUOUS
Mayor Daan, Driven  to Desperation.
Goes to Extremities
One of the latest vagaries of the
genial mayor is to make up for
the overdraft. Months and months
ago tbe World pointed out the
economies advooated by hia streu-
ous worship were not nearly adequate. The revenues of the oamp
only amounted to just so much, tbe
expenditures amounted to just so
muoh more. That much abused
man, the late mayor, saw that this
was the case and tried to make up
the deficiency by winking at
gambling. The city, however,
witnessing that sadly immoral aot
(which was vigorously condemned
by those who were not running the
oity) distinctly disapproved of any
such d««eliotion of duty. The prevent mayor, therefore, had no choice.
He had to discontinue that immoral winking. (It pas discontinued for him, by the way, by
the immoral winker of the
first instance.) He had, therefore,
no alternative but to reduce the
expenditures. Refusing to begin
at home he went further afield but
his initial laok of oourage (not to
say his desire of paying eleotion expenses) prevented him being as
strenuous as perhaps he might
have been. Henoe he found or is
finding, that his expenditures overlapped bis inoome. The huge de
fioit is facing him. He wants to
draw on next year's revenues to
bri ng himself straight in the way
of this year's taxes which are
not paid aooording to the cue
torn of the oamp, for the most part,
until the year following. He does
not ask. He demands. He has a
oity solicitor who is also police magistrate and Small Debts Court man.
As he draws no salary as stipendiary magistrate but as oity solicitor he is under the control of the
Chief Magistrate, or of him and his
oounoil, whioh is muoh the same
thing. The publio had better pay
and extricate the mayor from his
difficulties financial. If he has
not precedent it is quite arguable
hat he has law on his side.
Similarly the water department
has been out down. The result
has been that water rates are in
arrears and efficiency bas been sacrificed to the false economy.
The oity solicitor who is also
stipendiary magistrate without a
stipend has been instructed to coiled those water rates and to collect
those taxes for this year, usually
not payable till next. He can proceed to distraint and all kinds of
nasty things. The wisest thing is
to pay and then elect Mayor Dean
for a shortened revenue for next
year. Something (next year) will
torn up and things will turn oat
ight anyway.
WAS A DISASTROUS FIRE
Empey Brothers Store Destroyed
Last Night.
ORIGIN OF FUjE IS MYSTERIOUS
Flames Broke Out Twice in the Night and Did Heavy
Damage—Insurance Was But
Partial.
There was a disastrous fire last
night at the corner of Columbia
avenue and Washington street, and
damage was done to an extent that
some $20,000 will not more than
oover the losses. The whole of the
building owned by Empey Bros.
was extensively damaged, some of
it being practically destroyed and
that not hurt by tbe flames was
ruined by water. Empey Bros,
clothing store was swept by the
flames and little remains of an
excellent line of goods which were
not insured to anything like their
value. Tom Embleton'e grocery
was" Also considerably damaged, tl-;
bakery of Petch & Sohwartzhauer,
and the stock of Daniel & Arthur,
paperhangerB and decorators were
all sufferers.
The fire originally broke out at a
little after midnight in the rear of
places of business of Daniel & Arthur and was apparently quelled
within a short time. By the time
the theatre-goers bad left the opera
house the conflagration was seemingly black out. Within two
hours however the flames again
broke out in tbe rear of the building adjoining, the bakery of Petoh
& Schwartzenhauer, and although
an alarm waB promptly turned in
and the firemen quickly on tbe
scene the creeping flames had
gained so muoh headway that control waB not had of the conflagration for the best part of half an
hour. By tour o'clock the fire was
out but the damage had been done.
Just how the fire originated seems
to be unknown and it is thought
that the second fire was no part
of the first. Everything seemed
absolutely secure when the firemen
left the premises.
THE HUNGARIAN CRISIS
Czechs    and   Bohemians
Dictate Terms to
Austria.
use of the Czech language in the
army. The signatories are pledged
to employ "the sharpest Parliamentary means" against the present system of government.
Sloosn Shipment*.
Vienna, Nov. 14,—The Czechs,
who have been awaiting the end 0!
the Hungarian crisis in order to
demand for Bohemia the equivalent of whatever should be granted
to the Magyars, have just launohed
a full-sized programme ofnational
requirements.
The document pledges the signatories to seek first the federalization
of the Hapsburg monarchy, secondly the application of the principle
of the equality of the Czech and
German languages in tbe central
administration, and the whole of
tbe public lands of the Bohe
mian Crown; thirdly, the foundation of a seoond Czeoh university
in Moravia, the creation of technical and secondary schools, and the
reform of the primary schools of
Silesia in order to assist in the development of the Czeoh national
spirit, and the organization of tbe
publio schools for the Czeoh population in lower Austria, especially
in Vienna; fourthly, the protection
of the national minorities in order
that their civil, national and economic rights do not suffer harm.
The programme further demands
electoral reform, and proclaims
hostility to all attempts to include
Bohemia economically and politically within the German Empire, and demands  the extended
TOTAL
729
210
43
7
12
The total amount of ore shipped
from the Slocan and Slocan City
mining divisions for the year
1902 was, approximately, 30,000
tons. Since January 1 to Nov. 7,
1903, the shipments have been as
follows:
WEEK,
American Boy	
Antoine	
Arlington	
Alberta	
Black Prtnce	
Bondholder	
Bosun	
Bluebird	
Cripple Stick	
Dayton 8
Dolly Varden	
Empress  20
Enterprise 40
Fisher Maiden	
Hartney	
Hamilton	
Hampton  5
Highland Light	
Idaho  86
Ivanhoe  59
iackson  17
.ucky Jim	
Mercury  21
Monitor  20
Mountain Con	
Meteor	
Nansen	
Ottawa	
Payne  20
Queen Bess	
Rambler	
Reco	
Republic	
Ruth 4*
Rio	
RedFox	
Rouse  20
Slocan Star  54
Slocan Boy   .
Silver Glance	
Sunset	
Surprise	
Vancouver	
Wakefield 40
Wonderful	
Total tons 494
WITH  THE   NELSON COMPANY
Quo Vadio and  Hamlat at the Opara
House
1057
52
2
12
20
20
280
42
4
5
2
400
845
37
>°3
125
720
20
52
2
126
1862
204
1448
153
70
725
9
119
20
2109
16
55
4'
5
20
40
23
Harold Nelson has received an excellent reception in Itossland and
there is no manager that deserves
it better of all that take iu Roasland in their Western tours. Harold Kelson is comparatively new to
the oamp but be has already securely established himself and his
companies in its good graces.
The first play staged, that of
Quo Vadis, was quite up to the
expectation. The setting, both as
regards, soenery and costumes was
excellent and tbe rendition of the
play artistic. There was no absurd
starring each occupying the stage
as the part called for prominence
rather than the actor or actress.
Easily the finest part in the play
is that of Nero and F. Roland's
idea of the character shows subtility
of conoeption. Nero, the persecutor of tbe Christians, suffered in
his latter years from mental and
physical degeneraoy brought about
by the unbridled indulgence of his
passions. The burning of Rome iB
no act of a sane man and the recitation of doggerel emphasises the
royal buffoonery still more. Mr.
Roland never once obtruded hiB
personality. He was Nero from
his first entrance to his last appearance. PetroniuB was well
played by C. L. Bruce whose "business" was aptly conceived and added a brilliancy to a rather verbose
part. To be the glass of fashion
and yet not be a fool is difficult
but Petronius solved  the problem.
Vinicius (Harold Nelson) was
good. Mr. Nelson can hardly fail
and a rather thankless part was
well taken yet it must be confessed
that Mr. Nelson could and does
greater justice to a stronger part.
All of these parts were taken by
old favourites of Rossland but Mr.
Desmond in taking the part of
Chila made his debut before a
Rossland audience and succeeded
in making friends.
Among the ladies Poppaea
(Miss Helene Scott) was the only
one who was here last summer.
She did well as did also Miss
Kathryn Stuart as Eunice and
Miss Florence McLeay as Lygia.
Muoh was made of a small part
Aote, by Miss Idalia Jowett, and
she would doubtless do justice to a
better role. But the men certainly oarried off the honors in Quo
Vadis even to the extent of a faint
hissing greeting Tygellinus, Arthur
Cecil, which was certainly the
greatest compliment he could have
received.
WITH THE CITY FATHERS.
Chilly
Meeting   Held  Tuesday   Night
Last.
12,892
When washing greasy dishes or pots ano
panB, Lever's Dry Soap (a powder), will
remove the groxio v/ith tho greatest ease.
MINES OF
KOOTENAY
Rossland  and   Boundary
Shipments.
LATEST RETURNS OF OUTPUT
What the Mines Are Doing Over the
District—Rossland   Doing
Well.
The particular news of the week
would seem to be the experiments
that are being oarried on in Spokane with the Hendryx process
and its applioablity to the iron ores
of this camp. Should these be
demonstrably sucoeBsful there will
be a renewal of activity on many
low grade iron ore properties whioh
will rival that upon the silicious
properties, created by the suoess of
the Elmore prooess, in importance.
All the mines are shipping well
and there are upon the list than
have been for an long time past.
The Le Roi is doing well and the
late discoveries on this mine at
depth are proving to be at least
equal to that which was expeoted of
them.
WEEK
Le Roi    4055
Centre Star     1500
War Eagle     1210
Le Roi No. 2       540
Kootenay        80
Velvet        50
Jumbo       225
Giant	
White Bear	
Spitzee        30
Silica concentrates	
Homestake	
I. X. L	
O. K	
TOTAL
170,064
66,052
5'.°99
J 8,122
6,638
4.770
2.983
714
250
300
85
80
60
20
Totals 7,730    322,855
Boundary ship,1.nuts.
If you want to bowl try the Alhambra
Best ally in the city.
The City Mathers foregathered on
Tuesday night last, but little or
nothing was done. All serious business seemed to have been discussed
beforehand so that there was noth
ing but the most beautiful harmony
prevailing. Even the mayor's
scheme of reducing light was not
taken seriously. In fact it was not
taken notice of at all except to turn
it down. The room was cold and
the contemplation of darkness visible was too much for the city fathers, who hastily adjourned.
Phoenix,   Nov.    7.—Special.—
Although snow has come in  the
Boundary, aparently to stay for the
winter, it has not as yet affected
the ore output  from  the several
shipping mines, whioh thiB week
sent down to the different district
smelters, over  seventeen thousand
tonB, with a prospect of being materially increased next week, owing
to the full battery of six furnaoes at
tbe Granby smelter being in commission.    The   tonnage   from the
different mineB for the week were
as follows:
Granby mines to Granby smelter,
9,095 tons; Mother Lode to Greenwood smelter, 3904 tons; Snowshoe
to Montreal & Boston Bmelter, 2010
tons; Athelstan to Montreal & Boston smelter, 210 tons; Oro Denoro
to Montreal & Boston smelter, 825
tons; .Emma to Greenwood,Granby,
Trail and Nelson smelters, 192 tons;
Winnipeg to Montreal & Boston
smelter 280 tons.
The Granby smelter this week
treated 8857itonB, making 290,245
tons for the yea r.
The following shipments were
made by the different mines:
WEEK
Granby    9,095
Mother Lode    3,904
Snowshoe    2,010
B.C	
Emma     792
Sunset	
Oro Denoro        825
Morrison	
Athelstan        210
Winnipeg        280
Providence	
Elkhorn 	
TOTAL
3'3,070
n 1.767
66,862
■9.365
18,089
14.921
"',254
3.339
3.495
TS
213
Totali 17,116      56642; •..-."'.•'.
THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C. NOV  14, 1903
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the   Magazines are
Saying
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
-Topics Interesting- General Readers.
Up-to-Date   Ravolutlonary  : Methods
Inside Information
The Royal Magazine for Novem-
bei is a fair number and has a decidedly good story about snakes,
which is quite as wonderful as most
snake stories are, but is far more
original than is ordinary.
Cassell's iB more than usually a
bright number and haB quite a collection of good short Btories which
clearly show that tbe genius for
telling these is no longer confined
to one side of the Atlantic as was
at one time popularly BuppoBed.
Tbe Wide World has its monthly
contribution of evidence to the oft
repeated assertion that truth is
stranger than fiction. Tbe strangest of all strange stories is that of
tbe holdup of a car in northern
California. The reader of the
Wide World must often wonder as
to the elasticity of the consciences
of the narrators ol these extraordinary episodes. Nobody wants lo
say that these things do not bap
pen, for truth may beBtranger than
fiction, but whether it ',is just tbe
whole truth or an embellished
truth is often hard enough to
diagnose while examining Ihe
claims to credibility of this wonderful little magazine.
Pearson's is fully up to its usual
standard for the current month and
is indeed an improvement on many
of the past numbers. This magazine 1b coming slowly to the very
front rank.
Pall Mall has also a good number. The illustrations are especially good and there is nowhere on the
continent or across the Atlantic
which oan be seen here which in
any way equals the artistic pictures which the Pall Mall rs now put
ting before the public. Iu the current month tbe magazine excels
itself.
The Strand has another of the
Sherlock Holmes stories, but tbe
"Mystery of the Norwood Builder,"
which, by the way, is appearing
concurrently in Colliers', is certainly not up to the standard of Doyle's
wonderful detective stories. He
does not require to be a Sherlock
Holmes to divine the "mystery"
which foiled the popularly considered "stupid" police.
The North American Review contains an indictment of the British
monarchy by an anonymouB writer,
whom the editor assures his public
ii a well known English writer who
lately  paid  a visit to the United
Slates.   The writer begins by Baying that the  British are beginning
to doubt their Star; they are challenging their owu efficiency, but he
finds it remarkable that while all
other institutions are doubted the
throne is left untouched.    Yet the
writer thinks, while acknowledging
that were Monarchy assailed by the
new movement that that new movement would immediately commit a
sort of political hari-kari and wipe
itself   out  of  existence,  that the
Monarchy has tobemoreefficient itself if Great Britain ia to be regenerated. He accuses it of being too
social, of pervading all classes oi
sjciety, of being too popular, ol
now interfering in affairs politi
cal, of being futile because it is the
bead without being the initiative.
He proposes no remedy but the
general one being more efficient
He suggest no alternative. To au
Englishman the alternative is unthinkable. To a Briton the alternative, a republio, woultrmean political turmoil and the inevitable split
ting up of the Empire into a loose
incoherent faggot of sticks,to bescat
tered as soon as the lirst political
stress came. The writer has no
conclusions, and, furthermore, hie
facts are contradicted by the
thi ughtful observer who knows the
enormous initiative that is actually
exercised by the Sovereign. Qoeen
Victoria] Btood for the peace j£of
Europe through her own personality, and tho career of the King today showB promise of being even
more remarkable from the point ol
view of initiative. The late faint
clamor raised against the interference by the King in the formation
of tbe Balfour cabinet was inBtant
ly drowned in the insistent voice
of the nation declaring that Edward
was within his right.
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
The   Open   Door,
Courting is a natural blessing
It teaches young people to speak
softly, especially if the old folks arc
in the next room with the door
open.
LATEST NOVELS,
SHEET MUSIC,
FRESH BLUEPRINT
PAPER,
I TALLY CARDS FOR 500 ♦
♦ AT
I M.  W. Simpson's
Conservative: Platform
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
PROGRESS MADE BY NEW PARTY
What is Being Done by Socialists
In.Canadaland the World
Over.
[Adopted at Revolstoko, September J8th, 1002J
1. That this convention reaffirms the polioy
of tho party in mat tors of provinoldl roads and
trails; tho owner-hip and control of railways
and the development of the agricultural resources of.thc' province as laid down in the
platform adopted in October, 18!f!>. which is us
follows;
"To actively itid in tho construction of trails
throuKhoul the undeveloped portions of the
province and the building of provincial trunk
mails of public necessity.
"To adopt the principles of government ownership of railways in so far as the circumstances of the provinco will admit., and the
adoption Of the principle that no bonus should
be granted to any railway oompany which
docs not givo tho government of the province
controlof rates over lines bonused, together
with the option of purchase.
"To actively assist by state aid in Ihe development of the agricultural resources of tbo
provinoe."
2. That in the ineniitimc find until tho railway policy above set forth can be accomplished, il general railway act bo passed giving
freedom to construct railways under certain
approved regulations, analogous to the system
that has resulted in such extensive railway
construction in thu United Stales, with so
much advantage to Irn.ie and commerce
:t. That to encourage the lull.Ing industr'.
the taxation of metalliferous mines should lo
on    the basis of iipuccntnge on the net  profit-
t. That the government ownership of tele
phono systems should bo brought about as a
llrsl stop in IhO acquisition of   public utiHUd
ft. That a portion of every coal area hereafter to lie disposed of should be reserved fro.lt
sale or lease, so that state owned mines ma be
easily accessible, if I heir operation becoTos
necessary or advisable.
it.   Thai   iu tiie pulp land leases  provision
should be made for reforesting and that, stops
should be taken for the general presorvalIon
forests hy guarding against  tho wasteful ileal ruction of Limber.
7, That the legislature and government of
the province should persevere in Ihe effort to
secure tbe exclusion of Asiatic labor.
S. Thai, the mailer of better terms In the
way of subsidy and appropriations Tor the
provinoe should be vigorously pressed upon I he
Dominion government.
II. That, I he silver-lead ludtlslricsof the province bo fosterod and encouraged by the liuposi-
tion of increased customs duties on lead and
lead-products Imported' into Canada, and thai
the Conservative members of the Dominion
Hoi.so bo urged to support any motion lnt.ro-
d need for such a purposo,
1(1. That as industrial disputes almost invariably result, in great, loss and injury both to Iho
part ies directly concerned and to the public,
legislation should be parsed to provide means
for an amicable adjustment of such disputes
between employers and oinploycs.
II. That il. is advisable lo foslcr Ihe manufacture of tho raw product., of the province
within the province aa far aH practicable by
means of taxation oil the said raw prodint ,.,.ub;
toot, to rebate of the inunc in whole or p;n '
ivJi i-ji manufactured in ilritjsb l.'oliunliia.
Ogden, Utah, has passed an
eight hour ordinance.
Laboring men of Pittsburg are
founding a hospital.
There are 85,000 trade unionists
in Xew .South Wales.
Five thousand coal miners are
on Blrike in the Aberdale Valley
Wales.
Ottawa, Canada, Allied Trades
and Labor Association has condemned Chamberlain's preferential
policy.
LouiBville & Nashville railroad
has issued an edict against its clerical employes joining labor unions.
Railway construction in South
Africa bus been suspended, aa the
number of laborers is insuflicient
(or both the mining industry and
ihe railways.
Union mechanics of Portland
Or., have purchased a large tract of
timber land and a sawmill and will
engage in a co-operative enterprise.
The Rand, South Africa, mines
require at the present day between
140,000 and 150,000 laborers, and
their requirements in three yeafV
time should bo twice that figure.
Engineer apprentices on the
Groat Western Railway Company
in England aro allowed to attend
day cl_asseB for instruction, and
draw lull pay at the same time.
The operators and miners of the
Eastern Ohio coal district No. 0
have reached an arrangement by
which operators will h're none but
union firemen, pumpmen and
electricians,
The initiation fee of the Coal
MinerB' Unions of Missouri is $50,
and many workmen are debarred
from membership because of their
inability to secure this amount
of money,
There has been a large increase
of female employes in Iowa in recent years, the total between the
years 1890 and 1902 being 52.77
per oent. The average workday
for the female employe iB 91 hours.
According to official statistics
just published,tbere were in Russia
at the begiiiing of 1902, 17,780 industrial establishments employing
1,710,375 persons, of whom 73.2
per cent were males and 2G 8 per
cent females.
Iu the interest of making Australia "a white man's country," a
government bounty is paid for
sugar grown by white labor. Of
the last year's sugar crop of 100,-
000 tons seven-tenths were produced by Kanaka black labor.
Tho Ocean Wave coal mine,
operating at Williamsburg, Col.,
notified their men by posted notices that they will establish an
eight hour day throughout tbe
mine and on the outside and will
pay the same wages tbey have been
paying for ten hours.
At a recent mass meeting of employes of the Northeastern Railway,
of England, a resolution was nn- j
animously passed urging that a
Hchomci of old age pension, approved by the employes and direc-
ors of the road, be put  in ^operation aB Boon aa possible.
Any sober.reliable farm laborer in
Denmark, who has saved one-tenth
the value of the little farm he
covets—thiB value not to exceed
if 1100, oan buy the land by borrowing the other nine-tenths from a
government fund. He gives a
mortgage on which he pays 3 per
cent.
The Sennte of Labor is the pretentious title of a labor orgauiz
tion formed at Pittsburg. One of
the planks in the platform advocates unlimited aid in strikes;
absolute control of negotiations
with employers is aimed at. Its
founders hope to wipe out Buch
organizations as the Knights of
Labor and the American Federation of Labor.
OUTSIDE
MINING NEWS
What Is Being Done Outside the Provinc
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« •♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦1
Linton Bros.,
Bocks, Stationery,
Newsdealers, ToyB, Fishing
Tackle, Kodaks and
SupplieB.
ROSSLAND,   B. C.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«
MARKET
REPORTS
Retail Prices in Rossland
Stores.
GROCERIES AND MINE SUPPLIES
Corrected Up to Date by the Leading Merchants of the
Camp.
Axes, per doz $7.50-10.00
CandleB, per case $5.50-0.50
Caps, Bennett, per box 75c
Coal, blacksmith per ton $22.50
Dynamite, GO per ct, per lb 19$
Dynamite, 50 per ct, per lb 18c
Dynamite, 40 perct, perlbl6}c
Fuse, Bennett per 100 ft 75c
Hammers, per lb 15c
Iron, per lb 3i-5o
Nails, base, per keg 81
Shovels, per doz $7.60-10
Steel. Canton per lb 8 Jo
MEAT AND POUI.TKY.
Bacon, per lb 18-20c
Beef, per lb (side) 9 10c
Chickens, each 50-90c
Fish, per lb 12J-15o
Ham, per lb 18-20o
Mutton per lb (side) 13-15o
Turkey, per lb 23c
Veal, per lb (side) 18o
PROVISIONS
Almonds, per lb 25o
Apples, per COlb box $1.25 $1.50
Bananas, per doz 40c
Beans, per lb Go
Butter, per lb  25-35o
Cheese, per lb 20o
Chocolate, per lb 40-50o
Coooa, per lb 40c $1.00
Coffee, per lb 25 50o
Condensed Milk per can 15c
Dried Peas, per lb 80
Eggs, per doz 30-40
Flour, per 501b $1-60-1.65
Grapes, per lb 15o
Honey, per lb 25o
Jams and Jellies per lb 12-13c
Lard, per lb 17 Jo
Onions, per lb 5c
OrangeB, per doz 40-50c
Peaches, per 201b box $1.25
Pears, per 401b box $1.60
Pickles, per qt 20o-25o
Plums, per 201b box 50o
Potatoes, per 1001b sack $1.00
Rice, per lb 8c
Rolled Oats per lb 5o
Sugar, per lb G.Jo
Vinegar, per gal 50c-75o
Walnuts, per lb 25c
Watermelons, each 50-G0c
FEUD
Bran, per ton $27
Hay, per ton $27
OatB, per ton $32
Shorts, per ton $30
MISCELLANEOUS
Coal, per ton, Gait, $8.60
Kerosine, per gal 50o
Soap, per bar 5c j
Wood, per cord $4.50-15.50
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various  Countries in
the Mining of Precious
Metal's
It has been decided lo erect new
steel works that will employ 1000
workmen at Benrath, near Dussel-
dorf.
Tbe deepeBt workings at the Kal-
gurli mine, Westralia, continue.
Both drives at the 1000 and 1050
level are in good ore, value 1$ ozb.
to the ton.
An expert who has been examin
ing gold reefs in East Africa has
left for England to make his report. He Btates that the paying
capacity of the reefs is undetermined.
Messrs. N, M. Rotbsohild and
Soub announce that, according to
advice received from the Bank of
California, San Franoisco, a divi
(lend ol 37 J cents per share hai
been declared by the Alaska Treadwell Qold Mining Company.
Gold from the Gold CoaBt to the
value of £96,880 was exported
against /,'22,188 in 1902, Bhowing
an increase of /,74,G93. The large
increase in the export of gold is
mainly due to the renewal of active
mining operations following the pa
cilication of Ashanti.
MesBrB. N. M. Rothschild and
Sons announce that, according to
advice received from the Bank of
California, San Francisco, a divi
deud of 10 cents per share and a
bonus dividend of ten centa per
share have been declared by the
Alaska Mexican Gold Mining Company.
The official report of Mr. L.
Aguillon showB lhat, of the 181.-
034 persons employed in the French
mines in 1902 there were 25,927
proteoted by law. Of the total employed 11.02 per cent were boys of
twelve to eighteen, and 3.23 per
cent, girls and women.
According to the "Moniteur des-
lnterestH Materiels," there are in
Germany, included within the Coke
Syndicate, 1888 by-product ovens,
with a production of2,124,000tons,
and 5314 ovens without reooveiy of
by-products, with a production of
4,169,080 tons. The former represents 33.8 per cent of the total.
At Bale, in Bohemia, gold occurs in quartz veins traversing porphyries and greenstones. The
gold vein appears to have been
formed by hot springs rising from
the granitic magma. Rich speoi-
menB of gold are rare. The mineral associated with the gold are
quartz, oalcite, dolomite, chlorite,
iron pyrites, arsenical pyrites, and
occasionally orthoolase, copper
pyrites, and molybdenite.
A telegram from the mine manager of the El Oro Mining and
Railway company for the month
ending 30th September. Mill ran 30
days, crushed 9080 tons, producing
from new mill $120,512, producing
from old cyanide plant $5500;
total production, $126,012; working
expenses an 1 development, $63,410;
leaving profit from the mine ol
$62,602. The profit from the railway for the month was $11,000;
total, $73,602.
A oable from the mine manager
of the Camp Bird, reporting for the
month of September: The mill ran
30 days and crushed 5608 tons of
dry ore. Bullion sales, $167,666;
concentrates Bales, 381 tons, $24,-
346; estimated deposit in cyanide
mill, 35G0 tons which haa yielded
bullion of an estimated value of
$12,098; total receipts, $194,110.
Working expenses and development, including transportation and
treatment of product, $56,905;
balance, $137,205.
According to advices from Kabul,
a ooal deposit has been discovered
at Koorokh, in the Jugdalak Mountains, by employes of the Ameer,
who have sent to Kabul many
camel loads of ooal, whioh, after
being subjected to various tests,
was found to be particularly useful
for fuel in the workshops and machine sheds. A number of expert
miners and four companies of
Bappers and miners, under the
command of the colonel, with 400
oamels, have been sent to the scene
of the discovery, and if there is a
sufficient output from the mine en
enormous saving will be effeoted in
maohinery expenses. Coal of an
inferior quality has already been
found in the Paglman and Jalalabad Mountains.
Lova In a Cottaga-
Love in a cottage is all right,
the thing is to get the cottage.
TI6KETS
TO ALL  POINTS
EAST and WEST
VIA
SHORT LINE
TO
St. Paul,Duluth,Minneapo|is,Chicigo
and all points east
Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria,'Portland
and'all Pacific Coast;pointi
Through Palace and Tourist Sleepers
Dining & Buffet Smoking Library Oars
2-FastlTrains Through Daily-2
For rates, folders and full information'
regarding trips, call on or address any
agent S.F. & N. Railway.
H. BRANDT, C P 4 T A,
701 W Riverside, Spokane j
ABC DENN1STON, GWFA,
Seattle, Wash.
H. P. BROWN, Rossland Agent
THE
London Directory,
CONTAINING over 2000 pages of con-j
densed commercial matter, enables j
enterprising traders throughout the Em- j
pire to keep in close touch with the trade
of the Motherland. Besides being a complete  commercial guide to London and J
its Suburbs, tbe London Directory contains lists of:—
EXPORT MERCHANTS
with the goods they ship, and the Colon-]
ial and Foreign markets they supply.
8TEAM8H1P LINE8
arranged under the Porte to which the*!
sail,  and  indicaiing  the  approximate]
sailings,
PROVINCIAL APPENDIX
of Trade Notices of leading ManulniJ
turers, Merchants, etc., in the principp
towns  and  industrial  centres of   th|
United Kingdom.
A copy  of the 1904 edition will be for]
warded freight paid en receipt of Pot
Office Order for £1.
The London Directory Co.,Ltdl
25 Abcburch Lane, London, K. C. j THE SATURDAY WORLD   ROSSLAND.    B C     NOV 14 1903
r
Mining News of the
Week Over the Province and the Uppar
Country.
l Outside
Samps
ATLIN.
The Canadian-American Company has 640 acres of dredging
leases ou Oold Run Creek, in tbe
Atlin country, from which they
hope to make a big profit. This
summer thev built the largest
dredge ever used in gold mining in
C.iuadit. It is a monster concern,
capable of handling 3000 yards of
gravel a day.
In Atlin the Pine Creek Pow*r
Co. contemplate replacing the long
flame on the north side of Pine
oreek, opposite Gold Run, by »
1,600 foot tunnel, Gx8 iu the clear,
to be driven through the bench
upon whiob the present flume fronts.
The project is proposed in view of
the trouble experienced from the
oaving of the earth supporting the
flume when the frosts leave the
ground, usually at tbe beginning of
the season's work, entailing much
oostly delay.
BOUNDARY.
Tho Emma mine, Summit camp,
is shipping to four different smelters, the ore being most desirable for
fluxing purposes, having a high
percentage of iron. It is said that
shipments from this property whioh
are now about 150 tons daily, will
soon be increased,
OAIIIBOO.
At Eight-Mile Lake the Thistle
Gold mine is said to have for itB
fiscal clean up a total of $50,000.
The Cunningham Creek property
of I/veell and Wendell is said on
good authority to have yielded gold
this season far beyond the expectations of these gentlemen.
StiDveys are about oompleted at
the Consolidated Hydraulio Mine,
Bullion, for the extension of the
company's water system. Estimates of tho cost of tapping these
water reserves will be made by
Mtnager J. B. Hobson, when a
decision will be arrived at by the
directors as to proceeding with the
new ditohes.
The Thibert Creek Mining Company should be congratulated on
having bad a tolerably satisfactory
season although a shortage of
water somewhat restricted operations, and in return it will be
necessary to make further provision
against difficulty on that account.
As it is, however, the company
has, relatively speaking, and very
nearly in point of actual faot, made
the best showing this year of any
hydraulio mining undertaking iu
British Columbia, the three cleanups representing probably between
twenty-five and thirty thousand
dollars.
ISLAM).
The Tyee mine at Mount Sicker
is steadily increasing its output,
and it has been found necessary to
double tbe capacity of the aerial
tramway system. Last month's
production was 4,417 tons and the
gross value $58,222.
LARDEAU
When the concentrator iB oompleted the Silver Cup and Nettie L
will  start   shipping   on   a  large
The Ethel and Lucky Boy mines
have grown to larger proportions
than the owners anticipated in so
short a time aud daily shipments
bave been made all summer.
The Black Prince group, situated about six miles above Ten Mile
and owned by A. J. Becker and
associates, has been developed during the summer to a point where
shipments have commenced, not
steadily, but one lot is being shipped and others will follow at intervals.
A remarkable rich strike of free-
gold ore has been made on the Silver Dollar group on Mohawk oreek.
An assay gives values of $350 to
the ton. The ledge averages nine
feet in width and has been traced
for 3000, feet the full length "of two
claims.
Three gold brinks, the united
weight of which was 395 ounces troy,
have been placed ou exhibition in
Nelson. They represent the result of the first twenty days run of
tho Eva mill at Camborne, and
were a most welcome and satisfactory sight to the many local shareholders in the property.
NELSON
Two more Nelson properties commenced shipping last week and
will oontinue[through the winter.
These are the Star and the Juno.
The report of the Hall Mining
and Smelting oompany for the year
euded June 30th last, refers to the
difficulties which the smeller experienced in obtaining supplies of
fuel and ore, notwithstanding
which one furnace was kept in constant operation, and owing to the
new bounty on lead the outlook is
now more favorable both for mines i
aud smelters. The Silver King
mine, which is at present leased
ou tribute, Bhowed a total profit to
the company of about £1000 for
the year, and there seems some
probability that new bodies of ore
may be discovered before tbe lease
expires in August next. The company has secured an interest in a
group of mines in tho Boundary
district, from which upwards of
18,000 tons of ore were shipped
during the year. The value of
this ore at present is chit My as a
flux, owing to the excess of iron,
but it is hoped that good copper
may be found with depth. The
width of vein is about GO feet. The
net loss for the year, according lo
the balance sheet, is £857, and the
sum of ,£8903 bas been written oft'
for depreciation.
POPLAR
The Spyglass group of mines, on
Poplar oreek, has been bonded to
R. G. McLeod for $35,000.
A rich discovery has been made
on the Spyglass group, on Poplar
oreek, the quartz carrying free gold
and na'ive silver.
Slocan.
The Payne's zinc separating
plant haB commenced operation.
Tbe force on tho lteco is being
gradually increased, and is now
about 15 strong.
Frank Griffith reports ore again
showing in the drift of bis' West-
mont, on Ten Mile.
The office furniture of the Slocan Kilo Mining company was distrained last week for rent.
The Bosun mine, al New Denver,
has closed down tight, quite a
number of men being let out.
Tbe McAllister oa the north
fork of Carpenter will soon bave
another carload ready for shipment.
A beginning was made this week
looking to tbe development of the
Cripple Stick group this winter.
^ ]    Two men  went  up to the   Kilo
! group this week to   sort  out  and
I sack   for shipment a  carload   of
gold ore.
Work has commenced on the
Redress No. 2. This claim adjoins
the Meroury and ia owned by Ransom, Garde and Jones.
Messrs. Mulvey and Johnson
were down from the Black Prince
during the week. They stated they
would have five oars of ore ready
to go out when shipping commenced.
Three feet of galena has been encountered in the No. 6 tunnel on
the Last Chance. It assays 170
oz. in silver and 60 per oent lead.
It sprung from the floor of the
drift, indicating a big shoot below.
SOUTH EAST KOOTENAY
The Thompson Placer Mining
company, operating on Wild Horse
creek, have closed down for the
season.
It is reported that a strike of
rich ore has been m ide at a depth
of 00 feet, in a shaft now being
sunk al the Sullivan mine.
The development of ledges in
a number of promising properties on Wild Horse oreek, and
east of Fort Steele continues to give
promising results.
It is reported that J. L. Parker
manager of the North Star mine,
and J. T. Laidlaw, C. E., were
making an examination of the
Katella group of mines, in tbe
interest of a Montreal syndioate,
during the past week.
YMIR,
Messrs. Hughes and Dimmock,
leasees of the Ore Hill mine, near
Ymir, owned by Godfrey Birtschof
Nelson, have shipped a gold brick
weighing over 15 ounces.
The output of the Wilcox mine
for the mouth of Ootober is again
in excess of any previous month.
Tbo amount saved on the plates is
represented by a gold brick weighing 325 ounces and of an approximate value of $4000.
The mine manager of the Ymir
reports the return for the month of
September, 1903, by cable as follow?: Sixty stamps ran 27 days,
and crushed 4,600 tons of ore, producing 910 oz. bullion. The estimated realisable value (gross) of
the product is $10,000; 260 tous of
concentrates shipped, gross estimated value, $6000; oyanide plant
treated 3050 tons of tailings, producing bullion having estimated
gross value ef $2000; Bundry revenue, $11-10; total $19,140. Work-
ing expenses $20,000; loss $860.
There bas been expended during
month on development $5,000.
A Taste for Astronomy.
A taste for astronomy is springing up among young people of both
sexes. It always does as soon as
the season permits sitting in the
garden by moonlight.
LATEST NOVELS.
SHEET MUSIC,
FRESH BLUEPRINT
PAPER.
TALLY CARDS FOR SOO
AT
M.   W. Simpson's
k
LUMBER
Mine Timber a Specialty
I  GOOD   WOOD  in   large or <
small quantities.
R.L.Wright
A. R.S.M.
(Assayer for Le Roi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
'Custom Assays!
F0R SALE
On hundred new and
second and stoves. Now
is the time to get a bargain in a good stove.
...Trie...
Rossland Bazaar
Alhambra Hotel
Haters $6.50 per week
The only hotel In the city having a dry
room tor miners.    Free Bath Room
MORTGAGE SALE
The best Bowing Alley in the  city,
tho Alhambra.
CURED BY
COLONIAL   REIVIED*
No Taste.   No Odor.   Can be 4given  in glass n
water, tea or eoffee%witliout patient's  knowledge.
Colonial Remedy will cure or destroy the clls-
whethe
tippler,1
: ior *nj
coholic liquor.
eased Appetite lor alcoholic stimulants, whether
the patient is a confirmed inebriate. '".
social drinker or drunkard*   impossible ior any,
one to have an  appetite tor  alt '
Of Valuable Freehold Property
Under and by virtue of Powers of Bale
contained in certain mortgages, which
will be produced at time of sale, there
will be offered for sale by Public Auction
by Walter J. Robinson, at the office of
Orde & Co., Real Estate Agents in the
City of Rossland, B. C . on Monday, the
30th day of November, A. D., 1901, at
12 o'clock noon, the following pioperty,
in the City of Rossland:
Parcel i-l/t 5, block cj, subdivision
of district lot 535, on-wht'h there is erected a i.'-J story triune building, containing
seven rooms and cellar and healo 1 wiii
hot air.
Parcel 2 Lot It, block 2, in the Railway addition to the City of Rosslaiid-
uport which there arc erecttci twj (our,
roomed houses at Ihe rorner of Cook
Avenue and Cliff Streets.
Parcel 3—Lot g, in block 9, subdivision
of disttict lot 535.
Parcel 4 Lot 10, in l/.ock (1, subdivision of district lot 535.
For farther particulars and conditions
of sale apply to
Harris & Bum.
Banktf If N. A. Building,
Vancouver, B.C.,
Vendors' Solicitor".
Or to Oude & Co ,
Real Estate Agents
Rossland, B. C.
October 23rd, 1903.
* *
I THE  I
* r
*
*
*
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*
*
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#
*
-1*
.PALACE, I
EALPH HAREON, PROP.
Rossland's
Leadinq
Hotel..
*
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*
Sample Room   *
For Commercial Men. <+
        *
Finest Grill in Kootenays I
*
Bowling Allev     ♦
AND &.
BILLIARD ROOM I
*
«£r 4.4.44 4.4*K2ICS2ii* 4* 4* 4.4* JC
IN CONNECTION.
FIRST  CLASS
EXPLOSIVES.
The Colfon Pcwrier Comoanv. Ltd
32 Queen Victoria St., LONDON; E. 0.>
- MANUFACTURE-
Faversham Powder
Or. tb f-IICl/1  DM <i Icni'ir ;I>}lo:m   Cmm, ifiCO
the best explosivejfor underground^work ei
clutively rjped in Severn and MerBey tunnel
Cordite, Gelignite, Gelatine Dy amite, Blasting Gelatine, De-
tonatorB for all  claws  of Explosives, Electric Appliances,
ine Charges for the  removal of   Wrecks,  Etc.,   Etc.
TONITE
after using Colonial Retnedv.
Endorsed by Members of W. C. T..U.
Mrs. Moore, Superintendent of the Woman's
Christain Temperance Union, Ventura, Cal.,
writes: "I have tested Colonial Remedy on very
obstinate drunkards, and, the cures have 'been
many. In mauy cases tne Remedy was given
secretly. I cheerfully recommend and endorse
Colonial Remedy. Members of our Union aie
del'Rhted to find a practical nnd economical
treatment to aid us in our temperance work."
Sold by druggists everywhere and by mail,
Price $1. Trial package free by writing or calling on Mrs. M. A. Cowan, (for years member of
the Woman's Christain Temperance Union) 2304
St. Catharine St., Montreal.
SSfcSS; T.R.M0RR0W °tt
Harry Mcintosh
DIRECT IMPORTER OF
'PERFECTION'
SCOTCH
Vintage of 1878
Guaranteed Absolutely Pure
Bass' Burton Ale on Tap
—at—
21 Hoffman House
Works: Faversham, Kent and Melling, near Liverpool
K DR. BRUHN'S   K
^ointment!
HaB established ilfelf ns a houeehold necessity and
has a record of Cures uuparelleled in the history of
MediciDO, It cures old and new Sores, Ulcere,
Eoezema, Salt Rheum, Itching Files, dialings,
Pimples, Blackheads and all Skin Diseases. ThiB
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Testimonials from thousands who have been
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Directions for use—Apply freely night and morning, or often as required.
 PRICE	
50 Cents a 8ox
MANUFACTURED BY jnt
W Or. Bruhn Medical 6o. U
M NEW YORK M
J4   Sole agent for Rossland, T.   R. MORROW, The  DrUggJSt   H
JU CALL FOR A TRIAL BOX. DO
&SXSJES38«BgXSXS3S3BI THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B.C.NOV  14, 1903
The Saturday World
Br the World Publishing Company.
York, nor elsewhere in the Republic. And the remarks apply to
the Djminion.
Kutered at 'he Rossland, B. C, postofiice for
transmission through the mails,May :, 1901 as
second class reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION   RATKE-$i,oo per  year In
variably In advance.    Ad re-Using rates mar-.
known on application.
PANAMA.
LONDON   RATES-9 a. par   annum
JAMES H. FLETCHER.
GENERAL   MANAGE*
P. O. Box 301 Itossland, B.
TIIE BY ELECTION
The appointment of Charles
WilBon to the Attorney General-
Bhip will commend itself to Vancouver, especially to Conservatives
Vanoouver may have a quarrel with
Premier McBride but it will have
none with Charles Wilson. How
far, however, the shortcomings of
the one will be visited on the other
yet remains to be seen. If the Liberals contest the Beat, they will
have to put up an equally good
man. There is no doubt that Van
oouver is Liberal despite itB return
of five Conservative members. The
Conservatives did not poll^a ma
jority of the vote. If all classes
were ur.ited against the present
Attorney General there is no
doubt that he would fail to secure
reelection although he iB personally
popular a'ul the strongest Conservative in Vancouver, possibly in
the province. But will they so
uuite?
The Nelson News proposes an
excellent move, which 1b to ask the
Attorney General to return
the Fernie ballot boxes and
have an official recount. He will
be hard put to it to make a satisfactory reply.
SIR MICHAEL  HICKS BEACH
Sir Michael Hicks Beach, after
seceding from tbe Balfour cabinet
has now assured the British public
that he will support Balfour's policy. But between Balfour's polioy,
which is that of retaliation, and
that of Chamberlain, there is no
difference, although there is a distinct ion. For if Balfour retaliates
he will inevitably give a preference to other countries. He can
not retaliate against the Outer
Empire inasmuch as there ie nothing there to call for retaliation.
Balfour's policy therefore simmers
down to preference and I'mperial
preference at that. But Hicks
Beach bas been exporting himself
•gainst Chamberlain. He finds
the drift of opinion against him
and he takes refuge in a subterfuge,
a mere playing with words. And
the subterfuge is a fair sign that
Chamberlain will win in the estimation of the repentant minister.
TAMMANY.
One of the best signs that has
been observed in the United States
of the assured prosperity of the
future of that republic is the manner in which it has exposed oor-
r uption in its cities. This has been
much alluded to, paraded, by its
apologists. But the victory of Tarn-
may shows that the Uothamites are
quickly tired of well-doing, which
is not a good sign. After all, the
only real remedy is to cut Tammany's ground from under it by
putting the municipal servants under a real   civil   service.     When
Liko a bolt out of the blue came
tho annouucement of the secession
of tho province of Panama from
Colombia and equally sudden was
the recognition of the seceding province by the United States and itB
consequent almost inevitable recognition by thu European powers,
all of which seem likely lo follow
the lead of the United StateB and
of Italy. Colombia is protesting
but what can Colombia do? The
Monroe doctrine seems to have no
application, and if it had it would
not be of any practical avail lo
the Colombians.     Colombia won't
fight, for Colombia will not try to
enter   into   a   conflict   with   her
gigantic northern neighbor.
The facts of the matter would
aeeni to be that Colombia wanted
all kinds of money in order to permit of the cutting of the Panama
canal. Refusing to listen to reason
the United States, under guarantee
to Great Britain to carry out the
Isthmian project, vitally interested
itself, characteristically cut the
Gordian knot. Colombia may be
mad, but Colombia must get sane
again. It has no redress. It may
appeal to the Hague tribunal, but
tbe Hague tribunal would talk to
empty air. Colombia may vainly
ask the United Slates how that
country would have liked the
European powers to have recognized
the Southern States, but Colombia
will have to take its medicine just
the same. The United States is
not the only power that iB inconsistent when the boot is on the
toher foot. That oanal haB been
long enough delayed and the can-
tankeromness of any little South
American pseudo republic cannot
be allowed to stand in the way.
The only revengo lhat Colombia
will ever have is on the possible
day when some other power takes
exactly tbe same step aud the
strenuouBness of the United States
will be pleaded as an excuse. It
is only the precedent that is dangerous, not Colombia.
FKOM   THE   RECORDS
Work Accomplished Dur
ing  the Month of
October.
Location*
Oct. 13—White Bear Fractional
next White Bear, by the White
Bear Mining company.
Oot. 17.—Empire Fraotion on
Emerald Mountain by B. F. GriB
wold.
Oot. 16.—Gold Run on Norway
Mountain by S. F. Griswold for J
F. Hanson.
Certificate* of Work
Oct. 2.—On the Snowdrop for
work done on the same to A. Gar-
vey, for A. Garvey et al.
Oct. 5.—On the Berlin for work
d one on the earne to S. F. Griswold
for the Bame.
Oot. 6.—On the Inland Empire,
for work done on the same to S. F.
Griswold tor the Maine.
Oct. (>.—On the Pride of Cascade
for work done on tbe same lo H.
F. Libby, for the Bame.
Oot. 9.—On the Hafe Hon for
work done on the same to C. Ling-
gren for the Bame.
Oot. 9.—On the Brnnswiok, for
work done on the Amazon to G.
M. Miller for the Bame.
Odt.  13—On   the   C«pe Colony
to  C.  Connell  for  the Nest Egg
Mining company.
Oot. 20,—On the Blue Bonnet for
work done on the same to A Jean-
ette, for A. Jeanette et al.|-      a*.
Dot. 22.—On the Glasgow for
work done on the fame to W. C.
Heed for the 8amo.
Oct. 23- On the Triumph Fraotion, for work done on tbe Bame, to
B. W. Finnell for the Bame.
Oot.  30.—On   the   Dawson
work^done an the' same to K.
Burnett for F. R. Bloakberger.
Certificates of Improvamanta
Oct. 31.—On   the One  Eye See
situated on  Murphy Creek lo A'
wilda Simpson, for the same.
for
L
there are   no spoils to distribute
there will be no Tammany in New I Fraction for work clone in the same
The Sunlight way of washing requires little or no
rubbing. You should try
Sunlight Soap.
Will not injure
dainty fabrics.
Love's Dividends.
KisBos are the dividends payable
on the bonds of love.
j h. r. mm
Groceries
Provisions
Agent for the celebrated
iiGiei liel Haiit:
•lb, Brlcka.
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦**♦♦»♦»♦♦»»»♦♦♦•
eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Rossland Mails.
Mails close
ilv except Su nday
at 6:30 .a m
for Trail,
Mail-, delivered
daily except
Monday at
7:00 a.in.
Pho»nix,
Le Roi Feed
and Sale Stables
John F. Linburg, Prop.
Best Turnouts in the City.
Saddle horses for fishing and hunting parties a specialty.
Cascade, Columbia
Grand Forks, Fife,
Greenwood, Fliolf, Midway and all Boundary
District points.
Daily except Dally except
Sunday Monday
6:30 a.m. 7:00 a. 111,
Kobson, Castlegar
Mon., Wed., Frl Wed.. Eri„ Sun
6:30 a. m. 7:00 a m.
Gladstone
Dally Daily
0:40 a. m. (1 no a. 111,
Northport, SpoVane
and al) United States
points. Paterson, 11. C.
Daily except Dailv except
Sunday Sunday
1/40 a. in. 6: 00 p in,
Kaslo, and also Wanef,
Ymir, Neleon and Sulino,
B.C.
Daily *:oo p. m.
and 7.00 a. m.
Ordinary letter mail
only for all Eastern
Canada, and the United Kingdom and a I
Euro e:-n and other
foreign countries,
Daily
7:00 a. m
All points served by
the Canadian Pacific
Railway, the North-
weet Territories, Manitoba, all Eastern Can-
rda, the United Kingdom, and aU Europe an
•n't other foiejgn countries.
Daily 5:15 p ra„ Dai y 7:00 a. m.
Crew's Xrst Pass and
connections, Ne.'son.
Daily
9:40 a.
Daily
5:15 P
Tues., 1 hur., r?a
7:00 a. m,
Daily except
Monday
7:00 a. m.
DJily 700 a. m
Sun., Tues., Thur
5:15 p m.
0       eerPark.
Daily excp'
Saturday
5:15 p.m.
Sandon.
Daily 5:15 p.m
Trail, Arrowhead, Nakusp, Revelstoke Station, Halcyon and Columbia River, Slocan
and 1ardeau District
point and connections.
Daily 5:15 p m. Daily ;,oo a. m.
All points nerved by
the Canadian Pacific
Railway west of K-v
elstoke Station including China and Japan
aud Klondike.
Spokaoe Falls & Norifieru R'7
Nelson & Fort Sheppard Railway
Red Mountain Railway
Washington & Great Northern R'y
Vancouver.Victoria & Eastern R'y St
Nav. Co.
The only all rail between" points east
west and south to Rossland, Nelson,
Grand Forks and Republic. Connects
at Spokane with the Great Northern,
Northern Pacific and O. B. & N. Co.
for points east, west and south; connects
at Rossland and Nelson with the Canadian Pacific R'y.
Connects at Nelson with K. R. A N.
Co. for Kaslo and K' & S. points.
Connects at Curlsw with stage for
Greenwood and Midway, B, C.
Buffet cars run between Spokane and
Northport.
Effective June 14, 1903
Leave..
Arrive..
Arrive .
Arrive. ,
Arrive..
NORTHBOUND.
.... Spokane ,
....Rossland	
... .."Nelson	
,. Grand Forks....
....Republic	
.8:45 &.m.
.4=35 PJ».
.7.20 p.m.
4:00 pjn.
6:15 pjn
Telephone 39.
RoBBland, B C
Leave	
Leave	
Leave	
Leave	
Arrive	
SOUTHBOUND
. Republic 8:30 a.m.
..Grand Forks 10:35 a-m
. Nelson 7:20 a. m
. Rossland io:4oa.m
..Spokane 6:15 p.m
For further information regarding
reservation of berths or price of tickets,
apply to any agent of the above companies, or to
H, A. JACKSON,
etntral Faaernf*r Agi
■pokaaa, waafc
n, 1.11 iv is
lOWIERSMOKE-Did it eve
give yon headaohe? Dr. Sootls
headaohe powders are u qnick and
sure cure. Sold at Morrowi Drug
Store.
<9<
For Women. Misses and Children. We have aa usual the
lareest and the best assortment ia the city. WARM
SUPPERS in Kelt, Satin, Plush, Velvet, etc., for Women,
Misses and Children in great variety. Rubber Overshoes,
Cloves, Mitss, Mocassins and Snowshoes for everybody,
and for leather footwear we always lead in quality «nd :t
correct prices, —
£g See our Window and come inside for Prices
gj3 We are always pleased to show our goods
J C. O. LALONDE
I THE   SHOEMAN.
SsaAstflerlsfttMAABaBaTaafJaBNaftf sa^aa^A I «a1sla>sisiaiala»iaaasia>sialSlaiaia>a»*alaia>assisai--"■'-- — —~  •*-
"r: Rossland Souvenirs j
•Showing the New Postofiice and Lcr 3
Roi Mine. A large variety of arti- 3k
cles to select from.^cccccccGGcxxoco        3
i o. m. fox & coTiiri 1
*"" COLUMBIA AVENUE TELEPHONE 65 2
MimuiuuuiiimmuiiiniMriuiumiinmiiiumaiuiiiiK
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKET8
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL  MARKETS-Rossland, Trail,  Nelson, Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish,  Same and  Poultry In Season, Sausage* of All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Roaaland Branch
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Thos. Embleton
The G rocer
s
A LARGE
Consignment
-OF-
FINE
CONCORD
CRAPES
The Brackman-Ker MillingCompany
-DEALER 1N-
All kinds of Cereals, Breakfast Foods, Hay and Grain.
1   Agent for Pratt's Celebrated Poultry  Pood
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Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
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eemmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa* • THE SATURDAY WORL ROSSLAND. B.C., NOV.14,
1903
ROSSLAND'S
IRON ORES.
Prooess
That Hay
Elmore.
FURTHER BOOM FOR THE CAMP
Mcdification  of the Hendryx Mill
May Solve Iron Ore
Problem.
ing the Kootenay as an example
the position of  the mine entails
heavy transport charges as to the
ore must be brought in by wagons.
Further all ores of thiB description,
although subject   to a rebate foi
Rival ItDeir   excess  units  of   iron  over
silica, are only paid by tbe smelter
for some 95 per cent of their gold
values.   The silver and the copper
go for nothing.    Hence as far ae
the mine is  oonoerned tbe silver
aud copper have no existence.    01
oourse, it must be understood that
the silver values are small and the
copper values not better, probably
less, than II 00 per ton.   If the excess units of iron drop in ^quantity
tbe smelting  charges   become so
high as to make this method of re-
oovoring'.the ores ofjittle „value to
the mine and would only tend towards the gophering of the property
0inoerned.
There is then the Pohle Croas-
dale process which is being perfected in Denver. Is being perfected! I? not peifected! That
tells the story. Great strides have
been made during the year, and
the ^possibilities before this sublimation prooess are great, but even
if the men of this camp are not
from Missouri they still have to
be shewn. Moreover, the adoption
of the Pohle Croasdale process
means tbe buying of an expensive
plant. Therefore, there is a serious doubt in tbe adoption of .such a
prooess as this.
Then there is pyritic  smelting.
This is not  an expensive process
but as far as Rossland is concerned
it is a prooess which entails much
outlay for the bringing of water to
tbe smelter.   And if the smelter iB
situated   at a distance   from the
mine it means the introduction oi
freight charges as another unknown
factor in the equation.    The prob
lem oould be solved this way there
iB no   doubt.     It   is successfully
solved today in Mexico under conditions which,  aB  this paper has
pointed out, are far, far more serious than those   surrounding Rossland.    But apparently there is a
another process which oan be made
use of.   This ie a   modification of
that process, which   is   known in
this  district   as   the Hendryx, a
mill of which type is now experimenting in Spokane. The specialties
differentiating  thiB  process   from
the old   McArthur   Forest  process
of cj aniding is the method in which
the cyanide solution procures its
oxygen, necessary for the taking up
of the gold,and the method in which
the cyanide is renewed.   The latter
prooees, which is that of regeneration by electrolysis, 1b by no means
new and iB merely such iu its new
conjunction.    For, aB  already explained, the cyanide has an affinity
(or the metals and will take them
up, but when it haB taken them up
it ie saturated and the metals have
to  be   precipitated   if   the  same
oyanide is to be used again.   But if
the expense of precipitation is greater than the value of that precipitation then it will not be incurred
and the cyanide itself will be renewed. Cyanide itself iB expensive
Henoe where copper or iron is present in large quantities the ore up
to the present has been considered
unsuited tooyaniding.
But in Rossland, owing to the
enterprise and business methods of
the West Kootenay Power company, power is cheap. That ia to
say it would be cheaper to regenerate rather than to renew, for regeneration ie performed by means
of electric power.
Again there is another point to
It is well known that there are
two classes ol ore in thiB oamp, both
low   grade but abundant; the ore
being that of a silicious nature and
the other having a heavy percentage ol iron and other minerals. As
the ordinary concentration prooess,
even    that   of   Elmore, will save
all the metal parts ot the ore and
reject all the eaitby matters, such
aB silica, it will readily be seen il
ib not adapted for the treatment of
low giade iron ores.   For if an ore
oontains^only 15 to 25 per oent of
silica, such as is the case in some
of our mines, it will follow that
concentration will be only that of
five tons into four, or four tonB into
three. At this stage of the develop*
ment of the oamp it is hard to say
which of the two elapses of the ore
ii the moat abundant, the silicious
or the iron.    Both   exist in vast
quantities.   The concentration process invented by Elmore has solved
the problem as far as regards the
treatment of silicious ores and it
will not be long before .the treatment of the iron oreB is also solved.
At the present moment there is
erected in Spokane a -aill whioh is
treating Rossland ores, those from
the Kootenay, and on the result of
these experiments will depend tbe
adoption of the process involved.
All that can be said at present ie
that from laboratory experiments
oarried out by William Thompson,
of the Rossland Kootenay the process are successful. Whether it will
prove bo on a commercial scale has
yet   to be demonstrated.    In the
meantime thirty tons of RoBsland
ores bave passed through the Spokane mill during tbe current week
Yet if this experiment is successful it will mean that a complete
revolution haa been mad« in oyanid-
ingores. Up to the present it has been
held that ores containing copper are
uneuited to cyaniding, inasmuch aB
the metal attacked Ihe oyanide and
destroyed it and in consequence so
muoh cyanide has to be used that
the process becomes bo expensive as
to be commercially impossible,
To understand how this has
come about it is necessary to look
baok into tbe various processes
which have been examined and
which have been experimented upon in the past by the minrs in this
oamp, especially by the Rossland
Kootenay, as the leading property
of this type in Rossland.
There are several ways in which
it is possible to treat the iron ores
There is the present method ol
smelting. There is only a timid
demand lor this class of ores by the
smelters, and as the high grade
concentrates from the Elmore process come upon the market this demand will be lessened. Naturally
the producers of this class ol ore,
while satisfied with .the conditions
prevailing during the past eighteen
months.antioipate a strong competition in concentrates and a corresponding inorease in smelter charges.
Hence a search for an alternative! be considered in the new process
jprooess has to be undertaken. Talc-1 which is that instead of a strong a I
weak solution ol cyanide is used'
The same quantity oi cyanide is
present but there is a larger quantity of water. Now both copper
and iron have a strong affinity for
sulphur. Such is not the case with
gold nor silver. But that affinity
for sulphur is overcome by a strong j
but not by a weak solution of oyanide. Hence the use of a weak solution. Again there is not tbe same
same amount of the breaking down
ol tbe cyanide by tbe baser metals
whioh would occur il a strong solution were used. Henoe again the
electric power to be used is less
and that means less^expense.
Turning to the other point in the
Hendryx process, that ol  oxidization, it must be premised that   before the cyanide will act upon   tbe
precious metals   oxygen  must be
taken up.   This is supplied by the
atmosphere.    Usually this  is  introduced by means  of compressed
air.   This takes some considerable
time to  thoroughly permeate  the
pulp and besides the  thermal  action set up tends  to  separate  the
nitrogen and oxygen, mechanically
mixed in air, and thus leads to the
formation   of   nitrous compounds
which    give    trouble.     Hendryx
makes the atmosphere do the work.
HiB agitator, has a cylinder. Inside
the cylinder are a series of paddles
which elevate the pulp in the path
of a spiral to the surface, where the
pulp falls in a  thin stream, exposed to tbe atmosphere,  over a   Hat
surface back over the tides   of  tbe
cylinder to the bottom of the   tank
or agit ator whence it is again uplifted    The cyanide during itB exposure, greedy for oxgyen, absorbs
it from   the   atmosphere.   Hence
the process merely takes a few hours
instead of days, which again   is  a
cheapening, a small mill doing the
work of a much larger one on   the
other principle.
In detail the   Hendryx  mill so
modified for the treatment of Rossland ore  commences much as doeB
the   Elmore   plant  upon   the Le
Roi No, 2.   There are the ordinary
crushers through which the crushed ore iB fed to tbe Chilian  mills.
Here instead of water a   weak  solution   of cyanide  is  introduced,
ooming    liom   the   storage tank
above.   Tbe pulp flows into storage
tanks where the  surplus oyanide
solution is drawn   off and returned
to the oyanide storage tank above.
Thence the pulp is drawn off  into
the agitator described.   After a due
lapse of time the solution is decanted into another tank  below.   The
pulp is then subjected to hydraulio
pressure, squeezing   out  tbe   last
drops of oyanide solution.   It contains nearly the whole of the  iron
and the email quantity  ol  copper
present in the Rossland iron ores,
averaging less than the ball ol one
per cent.   These are   the  tailings.
The cyanide solution is then  subjected to electrolysis and  a  dore
metal iB precipitated upon a silvered plate.   The cyanide tolution   is
regenerated by tbe  eleotrio  power
thus applied, only about  lour  per
cent being a loss, which is  added
It is then returned to the  oyanide
storage tank at tbe   head  of  the
mill and the process is finished.
The process takes from four to
eight hours. It reoovers 98 per
cent of gold (the smelters do not
give this) it recovers over 80 per
cent ol the silver (the smelters
give nothing) it loses the copper
(and so do the smelters.) Moreover the cost is stated to be well
under a dollar the ton.
Its advantages are apparent.
If the experiment oan be carried
out successfully aa a mill requires
but little water, and  that mostly
lor the washing away ol the tailings, a plant can be erected on tbe
ground of the mine concerned, a refinery built, if tbe mine be a large
one, and the produot of the work of
several bundled miners for a
month be oarried out over a mountain trail oa the baok of a burro.
Nor is the machinery expensive.
A thousand tons a week could
probably be treated by a mill tbe
cost of whioh would be somewhere
in the neighborhood of $30,000.
If successful the new process will
certainly seem to be as likely to
help in the exploitation of the
Roasland mines aa does the Elmore. And it is in nowise competitive as it deals with an utterly different class ol ore, both classes
however, apparently being equally
abundant in this oamp.
FALL SHOES AND RUBBERS
Good Footwear-Lowest Prices.
Application for Transfer of Liquor
License.
Notice ia hereby given that I will apply to the Board of Licensing Commissioners ot the city of Rossland at its next
meeting for a transfer of the liquor licence held bv me for the ' Strand" Saloon on Lot 8, Hlock 28, in the City of
Rossland, to Thomas Comerford and
rant HcAlpine.
George H. Green.
Dated this '6th day of October i 9O3.
This is the season of the year when the whole
family require to be shod! We have the largest
stook iif town and can suit all] from the baby right
up to the largest size required.
Special Trade Discount
to Large Purchasers	
W.F.McNEILL
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR.
Near the Postoffloe.
Vegetable Hair
Renewer.
You Can't
Afford
To pay your money lor
Clothes unlesB you are
sure of getting your money' worth ol Style, Quality, Fit and Workmanship
Just whayou need if your hair is faded or turning grey, f oit always restores tbe color.   It keeps
the   scalp    lean  and   healthy and makes the hair
smooth andsoft.   The hair grows  long and heavy
and doeB not split at tbe ends.
PRICE 75C. AT
Morrow's Drug Store
•X*e^X*eWeW%MMi %AeW%9VXXWXw
WBtf
r*M
WE HAVEJNOW ON
HAND A GOOD ASSORTMENT OK
^H-H/"<-H-
You Can
Afford
To come in and look at
Our display of FALL
FABRICS. You make a
selection, and we warrant
the garments to be correct
in every way.
The High-Class Tailors,
Taylor &
McQuarrie
18 and 20 Col, Ave.
Tbe Best is si ways
tbe Cheapest ....
Sewiag Machines for Sale or Rm
Gents Furnishings
Clothing and Shoes
Bought cheap, at less than half price for you. From
the last firo we have left a number of articles just
slightly damaged by water which we will dispose of
at a much lower price than you will pay elsewhere
as long as they last.
People's 'Store
B. BANNETT
Clifton Block
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R ATLANTIC S.S. LINE
from Montreal
L.Champlain. Oct 22 L.Michigan Oct. 30
ALLAN LINE
From Montreal
Pretorian Oct. 24 Bavarian.. .Oct. 31
DOMINION LINE
From Montreal
Canada... Oct 31 Southwark Nov 7
From Boston
Commonwealth Oct 22 New Eng, Oct 2o
AMERICAN LINE
New York...Oct 28 Philadelphia Nov. 4
RED STAR LINE
Kroonland Oct 24 Zeeland.. .Oct 31
CUNARD LINE
Umbria Oct 24Lucania Oct 31
WHITE STAR LINE
Teutonic ... Oct 28 Cedric Nov 4
FRENCH LINE
La Lorraine.Oct 29 LaTouraine. .Nov. 5
Continental sailings of No'th German
Lloyd, H. A. P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt„ Winnipeg
ALL  KINDS
DRY
WOOD
W. F. LINGLE
Office opposite Great
Northern   ticket ofDo«
nnrt to Red Stir
O. W. DEY, Agent,
C. P.R. Depot, Kossland.
British Columbia
Provincial
Exhibition M
New Westminster-Victoria, B.C.
For the above occasion Ihe Spokane!
Falls .1 Northern railway will sell round 1
trip tickets to New Westminster as fol> I
luws:    (Children half fare.)
Rossland $17 20 |
Nelson   10 55
Ymir   16 551
Grand Forks  18 2t, '
SELLING DATES
Sept. 26, 27, 28, 20. Limit Oct. 6
Passengers desiring to attend Ihe exhibition at Victoria from October 6 to 10
and who purchase round trip ticket*
from New Westminster to Victoria, will
be granted an extension of eight days on
th ir tickets by the agent at New West
minster.
H.A. JACK80N, G. P.A.,
Spokane, Was
H.P.BROWN, Agent,   Rossland,  15.
LABOR UNION DIRECTORY
Officers and Meetings.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. go, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
130 o'clock. Thos.'Roynon,
Yes., Prank Philips, Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
r,
GO TO
AGNBW'S
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Un
ion hall. Robert Elliott,
Pres., W. B. Mclsaac, Sec.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. F. M., meets every
Saturday evening in Union hall.
H. R. Parsons, Pres., Geo. F.
Dougherty, Sec.-Treae,
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers,
Men'H Underwear, Overalls
and Sox,   Gloves,   Groceries,
AT AG-NEWS
*   Third Avenue  and Washington
Fresh Bread
PIES AND COOKIES
Rossland Home Bakery
Columbia avenue, next door to EmDey's,
Washington St.and Second Ave.
'It - Petch & Schwartzenhauer PrOps THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND   B. C, NOV. 14,  1903
SALE OF LANDS
For Delinquent Unpaid Taxes in the Rossland Assessment District, Province of British Columbia.
I hereby give notice that on Tuesday, the eighth day of December, A
D., 1903, at the hour of 12 o'clock noon, at the Court House, in the City of
Rossland, I shall sell at public auction the lands hereinafter set out of the
persons in said list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes unpaid by
said persons on the 31st day of December, 1902, and for interest, costs and
expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale.
LIST ABOVE MENTIONED
Kama of Por»on A»se«sed
Short Description of Property
Delinquent Tuxes
ANACONDA.
Kane, Thomas I.ot 7,
Thall, Nick  Lot A.,
Thall, Nick  Lot 1,
Thall, Nick   Lot. 2,
Maynard,  George   Ixit 13
Bennett, Elizabeth
Kerr, James
.... Lot 9,
.... Lot 9,
Block 3  ..
Block 14 .
Block 14 ..
Block 14 .
, Block 18
Block 2ti ..
Block 29 ..
CARSON
Unknown    Lots 4, 5 and C, Block 1
White, Henry  Lots 3 and 4, Block 2 ..
..so
.in
4.00
.40
2.411
1.20
1.20
.60
Unknown    Lot 10,
Unknown    Lot 1,
White, Henry  Lot 14
Medea, Colin    I.ot 1,
Unknown    Ixit 3,
McNlchol, James   Lot 11,
Block
Block 4   ..
Block 4 .
Block 5 ..
Block 6  ..
Block 14
i.Bt
CASCADE.
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Earl, John  Lot 7,
Earl, John  Lot 8,
Earl, John  Lot 9,
Childs, G. W Lot 1,
Childs, G. W Lot 2,
Childs, G. W Lit 3,
Childs, G. W Lot 4,
CaBey, H. M Lot 5,
Casey, H. M Lot 6,-
Miller,  J.   M Lot 8,  Block  5   	
Black, Ira J Lot 12, Block I) 	
Pierce, W. E Lot  I,  Block 7  	
Stout, Thomas  Lot   3,  Block 8   	
Earl, John  Lots 5 and 0, S. 2S feet, Block 10
Archer, W. C Lot  11,   Block  11   	
Archer, W. C Lot 12,  Block 11   	
Schmidt, Leo   Lot 4, Block 12 	
Schaick, D Lot 6, Block 12 	
Smith,   George    Lot 4, Block 24  	
Clute, Jennie Lot 11,  Block 33   	
Clute, Jennie   Lot 12, Block 33   	
0,06
.20
.20
2.00
4.110
.80
1.00
.110
.till
,U0
i.15
.8(1
1.20
■ Ml
.80
.80
I.-JO
7.85
I,hi
.so
.80
1.00
DEADWOOD.
to 15, Block 1
to 32, Block 2
to 17, Block 3
Block 3 	
Block 3 	
Block 3
Block 4
7
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1
McRae & McLaren    Lots 1
Mayer,  John    Lot 18
Haydcn, William   Lot 19,
McRae & McLaren   Lots 20 to
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1 to 20,
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1 to 7, Block 5 	
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1 to 10, Block ti  	
McRae & McLaren    Lots 1 to 5, and Lot 7, Block 7
Wilkie, Alex Lot 6,  Block 7  	
McLeod, J. P Lot 8, Block 7  	
McDonell, Thomas   Lot 9,  Block 7  	
McDonell,
McRae &
McRae &
McRae &
McRae &
McRae &
McRae &
McRae &
Thomas   Lot 10, Block 7 	
McLaren   IxjU 1 to 17, Block 8 	
McLaren   Lots 19 and 20, Block 8 	
McLaren   Lots 1 to 14, Block 9 	
McLaren   Lots 16 to 20, Block 9 	
McLaren   Lots 1 to 10, Block 10 	
McLaren   Lots 1 to 10, Block 11 	
McLaren   Lots 1 to 12, Block 12 	
Adams,  Catherine J Lot 13,  Block  12   	
McRae & McLaren   Lots 14 to 20, Block 12 	
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1 to 10, Block 13	
Gully & Company  Lot 13,  Block 13  	
McRae & McLaren   .' Lots 14 to 20, Block 13 	
McRae & McLaren    Lots 1, 2, 4, 5, 0, and 11 to 16, Block 14
Harlan, John   Lot 3, Block 14   :	
Rendell & Co Lot 17, Block 14   	
Rendell & Co Lot 18,  Block  14   	
McRae & McLaren    Ixits 1 and 2, Block 15 	
McRae &  McLaren    Lots 4 to 8. Block 15 	
Harlan, John   Lot 9, Block  15  	
Harlan, John    Lot 10,  Block 15   	
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1,3, 4, 5, 8, Block Hi 	
Belgrove, Matilda  Lot 9, Block  16  	
Belgrove, Matilda  Lot 10,  Block  10   	
Cameron, D. A Lot I, Block 17  	
Cameron, D. A Lot 2, Block  17  	
McRae & McLaren   Lot 3, Block
Grelg,   Alex Lot 4, Block
Drummond, A. J Lot 5. Block
McRae & McLaren  Lots 7 lo 20,
McRae & McLaren  Ixita 1 to 12,
McRae & Mcl.aren  Lots 1 to 10,
McLaren, D. C Lot 11, Block
McRae & McLaren    Lots 12, 15, 16
McRae & McLaren   Lots 1 to 10,
17  	
17  	
17  	
Block 17 	
Block IS 	
Block 19 	
19  	
and 17, Block 19
Block 20
EHOLT
1.20
2.50
1.36
.80
.08
.18
1.00
.56
.80
.48
.80
.80
.80
1.20
1.30
,16
1.12
.10
.SO
.80
.80
.56
.80
.80
.56
.88
.80
.80
.80
.Hi
.40
.80
1.20
.10
.80
1.20
1.20
.SO
.08
.80
.80
1.12
.96
.80
.80
.SO
McArthur, Ella   I/)t 10, Block 3
Bellman & Johnson   Lot 9, Block 4  .
Stewart, Alex Lot 19, Block 4
Caulfleld, J. J Lot 20, Block 4
 Lot 22, Block 4
H. A.
      1.60
     7.05
      4.40
      4.00
      4.40
     2.40
     2.80
     1.20
 SO
 SO
     3.20
       .80
 SO
 SI)
      1.211
      1.110
^^^^    ,-,  ~.w»o   .-.         1.80
Kaiser, Fred Lit 1, Block 15    24.60
Kaiser,  Fred Lot 2, Block 15      1.20
Kaiser, Fred Lot 3, Block 15       1 20
""  '  Lot 9, Block 1G     1.20
 Lot 10, Block  15         1.20
 Lot 11, Block  15       1.20
• •••Lot  12, Block  15       1.10
.... Lot 7, Block 17      4.35
.... Lot 8, Block 17      4.35
....Lot 9, Block 17      4.75
.„-Lot M, Block 17      4.7!,
Chessar, William
Slattery,  John   	
Chessar, W., & Hummel
Tebo, M	
Tebo,  M	
Collins, G. H	
Tebo,  M	
Rice, L. M	
John, B.  H	
John, B.  H	
Shaw, William	
Kaiser, Fred Lot 11,
Kaiser, Fred Lot 12,
Lot 21, Block 5 .
Lot 24, Block 6 ..
Lot 1, Block 6  ...
Lot 2, Block 6 ...
Lot 17, Block 6 ..
Lot 3, Block  7  ..
Lot 5,  Block  7   ..
Lot 14, Block 7  ..
Lot 21, Block 7 ..
Ixit 16, Block 13
Block 14
Block  14
Atkins, ,T. A. M
Atkins, J. A. M.
Atkins. J. A. M.
Atkins, J. A. M.
McDonald, W. C.
McDonald, W. C.
John, B. H	
John, B. a. ....
a,   z
5 2
.10
.05
.45
.05
.25
.15
.15
.10
.06
.05
.(it)
.05
.70
.05
.05
.20
.45
.io
.10
.05
.05
.05
.15
.60
.10
2.00
.15
.10
.10
.10
.15
.85
.30
.10
.10
.10
.05
.10
.05
.10
.10
.10
.15
.15
.02
.15
.05
.10
.10
.10
.10
.05
.10
.10
.05
.10
.10
.10
.10
.02
.05
.10
.15
.05
.10
.15
.15
.10
.02
.10
.10
.15
.10
.10
JO
.05
.10
.20
.80
.50
.45
.50
.30
.15
.10
.10
.35
JO
.10
.10
.15
.20
.20
2.75
.15
.15
.15
.15
.15
.15
.50
.50
.66
M
■J.
c
_>
U
a
>»
V
z
y.
H
«
-J
a
J.
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.oil
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.oo
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00-
2.00
2.00
$ 2.90
2.45
6.45
2.45
4.65
3.35
3.35
2.70
8.50
2.25
7.85
8.30
8.75
2.25
2.00
4.20
2.00
6.45
2.00
2.90
2.00
3.10
2.00
2.66
2.00
2.65
2.00
2.05
2.00
0.40
2.00
7.75
2.00
2.90
2.00
30.75
2.00
3.35
2.00
2.90
2.00
2.90
2.00
2.90
2.0(1
3.35
2.00
10.70
2.00
0.70
2.00
2.90
2.00
2.90
2.00
3.10
3.35
4.86
3.51
2.90
2.10
2.53
3.80
2.61
2.90
2.53
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.35
3.51
2.18
3.27
2.45
2.90
2.90
3.00
2.90
2.61
2.90
2.90
2.61
2.98
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.1S
2.45
2.90
3.35
2.46
2.90
2.90
2.10
2.90
2.90
3.27
3.06
2.90
2.90
2.37
2.90
3.S0
9.S5
6.90
6.45
6.90
4.65
5.10
3.35
2.90
2.90
5.5G
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.35
3.80
4.00
29.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
3,55
6.85
6.85
7.30
7.30
'Name of Pet son Assessed
Short Description of Property
Delinquent Taxes
Rice, L. M.
Kaiser, A.
Rice, L. M.
s
h
.Lot 20, Block 17       6.25
.Lot 7, Block 24     4.80
.Lot  17,  Block 26        6.25
MIDWAY
McNicol, James  	
McNicol, James  	
McNicol, James  	
Gansss, Mrs. S	
McNicol, James 	
McNicol, James  	
McNicol, James  	
Banbury, Mrs. 0	
Barton,   K.   W	
Bryant. & Archer 	
Bryant. & Archer  	
Nelson, J.   W	
Nelson, J.  W	
Nelson, .1.  AV Jxit
Munro, l). Q	
Ehrllch  &  Wake   	
Ehrllch  &  Wake   	
Finch,  E.  C	
Finch,  E.  C	
Kerr  Brothers   	
C.
Kerr Brothers
Gaunce, W. G.
Gaunce, W. G.
Harper, Mrs. F.
Denzler,  Robert   	
Powell,  John   	
Powell,  John   	
Nash, E., and Asqutili. W.
McNicol, James
 Lot
MoNiool, .Ju'nes Lot
Owen, Mary E Lot
Owen, Mary E Lot 12, Block
Nelson, J. W .".... Lot 15, Block 33
Nelson, .1. W Lot 16,
McGuire, G.  C Lot  17.
Cross, L. .1 Lot  IS,
Lind. .1. W Lot 19,
Lind, J. W Lot 20,
Gaunce,  W.  ('. Lot 11,
Empey, F.  E Lot  12,
Cummings,   C Lot  1,
Cummlngs,   0 Lot
Bush, J. H Lol
Stephens.  J.   M Lot
Peel,   Henry    Lot
Hassard,  F.   II Lot.
Hassard,  F.   II Lol.
Lot 13, Block 11    80
Lot 14, Block 11    '80
Lit 15, Block 11    -80
Lot 8, Block 14   1 60
Lot  13,  Block 16     80
Lot 14, Block 16    80
Lot 15,  Block  10     '80
Lot 10, Block 17    g'25
Lol 3, Block 18   80
Lot 5, Block 18   120
Lot 6, Block 18    !20
Lot 20, Block 19     go
Lot 21,  Block  19     ]g0
22,  Block  19     80
Lot 3, Block 21   l'co
Ixit 11, Block 21    100
Lot 12, Block 21    l'j)0
Lot 11, Block 24    120
Lot 12, Block 24    120
Lol  23,  Block 24     1*20
Lot 24, Block 24     2.40
Lot 13, Block 25     4'%
Lot  11, Block 25     435
Lot 2, Block 29    7 05
Lot 10, Block 29    4,00
Lot 23, Block 31     80
Lot 24, Block. 31     1.20
Lot  14, Block 32     1 00
19, Block 32    120
20, Block  32     1*20
11, Block 33    120
Block
Block 33
Block 33
Block 33
Block 33
Block 34
8.00
1.20
1.20
8.25
1.20
1.20
1.20
7.25
Block 34        9.45
Block  35
Block 35
Powell,  John    Lot 20,
  1.20
  1.20
12, Block 35    4 80
14, Block 35     120
19, Block 35     I'jjo
15, Block 37     100
19,  Block 37    LOO
Powell, John
Finch, E. C. ..
Finch, E. C. ..
McBoylo, W. E.
Hodgson, R. T.
Bush,  James   ..
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
Lot 21,
. Lot 23,
. U)t 24,
Block
Block
Block
Block
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.20
4.80
6.45
3.60
 Lots 3 and  I, Block 40
 Lot 7, Block 44  	
 Lot 1, Block 45  	
 Lot 5, Block 45       1.20
 Lol  6, Block 45       1.20
 I .ot 7, Block 45       1.20
Lind, J. W Lot 8, Block 45       1,20
McNicol, Jeanette  Lot 13, Block 45    8.00
McNicol, James   Lot  14,  Block 45       1.20
Poster,. G.   M Lol S, Block 46      1^20
McNicol, James   Lot 4, Block 47       1.80
Wright   &   Hackett    Lot  11,  Block  47        1.00
Wright  &   Hackett    Lot  12,  Block 47        1.20
Nelson,   H Lot
Cross, L. .1 Lot
Powell,  John    Lol
Powell,  John Lot
McNicol, James   Lot
McNicol, James    Lol
McNicol, James    Lol
Cameron, Dougal E Lot
Gluze, W.  D Lol 1, Block
Glaze, w! D Lot 2, lllock
Powell,  John    Lot
Powell, John    Lot
McNicol, James   Lot
Reynolds, A.  II Lot
12,
18,
19,
19,
20,
•>•.
23,
24,
15
16
18
0,
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block
Block 51
lllock  51
Block  57
58 ..
58 ..
Block 59
Block 59
Block 59
7.85
8.25
.80
.80
.80
.80
1.00
6.65
6.1G
5.95
.80
.80
.80
Block 76      7.45
MIDWAY, SOUTH.
Moran, Michael   ....Lot 1, Block 2
McQutl'e,   Mrs.   Anna    Lol 1, Block  4
Hodgson, R. T Lot 5, Block  4
Hodgson, R. T Lot 6, Block 4
McNichol,  James   	
  2.80
  1.60
  1.20
  1.20
acres  4.00
Jackson,   August
Henderson, Mrs. J.
Lot 6, Block 4, Lot 377, 5
PHOENIX,  NEW YORK ADDITION.
1 and 2, Block 1 	
 Lois I and 2, Block 1   3.20
E Lot  9,  Block 7  3.20
Breckenridge, Elizabeth Ann   Lots 19 and 20, Block 7   8.20
Talenio, C, and Bohler, C Lot 2, Block 8    1.20
Snell,  Benjamin    Lot 5
Stnllliers, Alex I.ot
PHOENIX CITY.
Block 5   	
12, Block 9 	
ROCK  CREEK.
Ingram,  Mrs.   Bart    Lot
Ingram,   11 Lot
Gordon, — Lot
Ingram, li Lot 21, Block 5 	
RUCKLE'S  ADDITION.
Block
Block
Block
Tenant, W. N.
Parr, William .
Ruckle, F. & B,
Ruckle, F. & E.
Nunn, George .
Nunn, George .
Manly, L A. ..
Manly, L. A. ..
Mack, William
Mack, William
Stedham, Fred.
Hodgson, John
Hodgson,  John
.Lot  6,  Block G  ..
. Lot 10, Block 7 ..
.Lot 11, Block 7 ..
.Lot 8,  Block 9   ..
.Lot 6, Block 10 ..
.Lot 7, Block 10 ..
.Ixit 17, Block 10
Block 10
Block 10
Block 10
Block 10
 Lot  18,
 Lol 19,
 Lot  20,
James   Lot 21,
 Lot 2, Block 16 	
 Lot 3, Block 16  	
Kane, Ed. D Lot 4, Block 16 	
Manly, J. L Lot 5, Block 16 	
Ixigan, Mrs.  Carrie   Lots 7 and 8, Block 16
Manly, W. K. C Lot 12,  Block 16   	
Lambert,  Margaret  H Lot  15, Block 16  	
Lambert,  Margaret  H Lot 16, Block 16  	
Hall, Robert S Lot 25,  Block 16  	
Hall, Robert S Lot 26.  Block 16  	
Dahl, Ethel  G Lot 3, Block 17 	
Dahl, Ethel  G Lot 4, Block 17 	
Dahl, Ethel  G Lot 5, Block 17 	
Dahl, Ethel  O ....Lot 6, Block 17  	
Ferrlter, D. J Ixit 2, Block 21 	
Ferriter. D. J Lot 3, Block 21  	
Easlon, W. 0 Lot 10,  Block 23  	
Morrison, Wm. James   Lots 1 and 2, Block 24      1.60
Burton, Mrs. Annie  Lois 3, 4, 5, 6, Block 24      3.20
Skcratt,   E.   T Lot 7, Block 29  80
McKie, John, Jr Lois 1 and 2, Block 30 80
Arthur,  Robert   Lots 3, 4, and 5, Block 30      1.20
z CITY OF TRAIL.
Topping,  E.  S Lots 1 and 2 and S. 20 ft of L. 3, B. 1 16.13
Topping,  E.  S Lots 11 to 16, Block 1    47.86
Topping, E.  S Lot 19, Block 1      7.86
Topping, E.  S Lot 16, Block 4      6.25
Topping, E.   S Lot 19, Block 4      6.25
Canadian Pacific Railway  Lot 1, Block 10    21.60
Conlin, J.  C Lot 4, Block 10   14.26
Hanna,  John    Lots 1 and 2, Block 13    13.86
Hutchinson Bros Lots 3 and 4, Block 13    11.05
Topping, E. S Lots ]9 and 20, Block 14      11.06
Mulholland,   Lewis    Lot 7, Block 15     11,60
Hanna, John   Lot S» Block 16 „ »,.... SUM
7.05
6.6S
.60
2.40
.40
.40
.40
.80
.80
.80
1.60
1.60
1.20
1.20
1.20
3.20
2.00
2.40
.80
3.20
.80
.80
.80
1.00
.80
.80
1.00
.80
.80
.80
.80
.40
.40
.80
£
£ a
.70
.65
.70
.10
.10
.10
.20
-10
.10
.10
.95
.10
.15
.15
.10
.10
.10
.20
.10
.15
.15
.15
.15
.25
.55
.60
.80
.45
.10
.15
.10
.15
,15
.15
.90
.15
.15
.95
.15
J5
.15
.80
1.05
.15
.15
.55
.15
.16
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.15
.55
.75
.40
.16
.16
.16
.15
.90
.16
.15
.20
.10
.16
.90
.95
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.70
.70
.66
.10
.10
.10
.86
.30
.20
.15
.16
.46
.35
.35
.36
.16
.80
.76
.06
.26
.06
.05
.05
.10
.10
.10
.20
.20
.16
.15
.15
.35
.20
.25
.10
.35
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.05
.05
.10
.20
.10
.10
.15
1.80
6.40
.90
.70
.70
2.40
1.60
1.60
1.25
1.25
1.30
3.(6
3
is
j?i
2 *
0«
+3
a tj
05   g
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.90
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
.2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
8.96
7.35
8.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.80
2.90
2.90
2.90
11.20
2.90
3.36
3.35
2.90
2.90
2.90
t.80
3.10
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
4.65
7.60
6.85
9.85
6.45
2.90
3.35
3.10
3.35
3.35
3.35
10.90
3.35
3.35
11.20
3.35
3.85
3.35
10.05
12.50
3.35
3.35
7.35
3.35
3.35
8.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.85
7.35
9.20
6.00
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
10.90
3.35
8.85
4.00
3.10
3.35
10.75
11.20
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
8.10
9.35
8.85
8.60
2.90
2.90
2.90
10.80
6.10
8.80
3.36
3.36
6.45
5.66
6.56
6.55
3.36
9.86
9.40
2.66
4.66
2.46
2.45
2.45
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.80
3.S0
3.35
3.35
3.35
5.55
4.20
4.65
2.90
5.55
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.10
2.90
2.90
3.10
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.45
2.45
2.90
3.80
5.65
2.90
2.90
3.35
17.93
65.25
10.76
8.95
8.95
26.00
17.85
17.45
14.30
14.30
14.90
3*.«
_____ THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, NOV. 14, <903-
Name of Person Assessed
Short DescJIptiog of Property
Delinquent Taxes
' CO
5
o
Krummer, F Lot 4
Topping, B. S Lot 6.
Topping, E. S Lot 11, Block 17
Topping, E. S Lot 12, Block 17  	
Topping, E. S Lot 13, Block 17   	
Bostwlck, May  Lot 2, Block 31 	
Topping,  E.  S Lot 4, Block 31 	
Topping,  E.  S Lot 9, Block 31 	
-   -  Lot 10, Block 31  	
 Lot 1, Block 33 	
 Lots 3 and 4, Block 33
 Lot 6, Block 33  	
Block 17    10.25
Block 17         ™5
S.
E. S.
Topping, B. S.
Topping, E. S.
Topping, E. S.
Topping,  E.  S.
Boundary Creek M. & M.
Co Lot 638,
G. 1,  OSOYOOS.
Township 79  	
Township 79
7.85
7.65
7.45
6.25
3.95
6.25
6.25
6.25
7.85
7.05
51.20
12.16
Boundary Ck M.&M. Co & T. McDonellLot 639, iu,.„„...r  	
Boundary Ck M.&M. Co & T. McDonell Lot 640, Township 79    12.80
■■■■«■■-.   ,.: i  Lot 747, Township 74 onn
Baillie, Edward
Baillie, Edward
Brown, R. A
8.00
6.40
12.00
  .. Lot 748, Township 75
 Lot 693, Township 77	
Garden,  Ellen B.   ...,„. Part Lot 312, Township 73       3.20
Carter,  William    Lot 1612, Township 71        5.00
Chisholm, John  Lot 2733, Township 73
Chrlstianson,   M Lot 2083, Township 70   _
Coryell & Murray  Lot 453, Township 71  144.00
•Donaldson, John, & Grinell, Thomas..Part Lot 536, Township 72      3.68
      '    •■•  Lot ""   ~ """
6.40
6.40
Drennen, J. E
Glaze, W. D	
Haddington, Hon.
Henderson,  David
Hole, J. C.
Johnson, Sydney
646,
C   DdU,     hj»iiouiF     ._.    	
Township G9      9.60
H.  H.
4.00
80
6.40
.Part Lot 781, Township 69  	
.Part Lot 653, Township 72  	
. Lots 1721 and 1721 a, Township 70 .
 Lot 1271, Township 71        3.20
M Lot 929, Township 69 1"°"
. R. S.
.Lot 2394, Township 70   ....
...Lot 2653, Township 77   	
.Lot 604, Township 69 	
...Part Lot 420. Township 70
i'i'.Lot 1054, Township 79
...Part Lot 700,
...Lot 2732,
1357,
12.80
12.80
6.40
11.20
2.40
Johnson, Sydney M. ..
Kuntz, Max	
Lamb, F. Mortimer ...
Lambly, Hester E. ...
Manery, R. J., and Hall
Manly, J. L	
McCarthy, J. R _____________
Newby,   Leonard    Lot    _
^^^ ... Part Lot 653, Township 72  	
...Part Lot 536, Township 72       7.68
-.Part Lot 530, Township 72 "" "'
„..„...„     12.80
.„v, Township 71    18.40
Township 73  3.20
                                        Township 72     10.40
Rose,   Marlon   ..                                     "   fisa   Township 72    4.80
Smith, James A.
Traunweiser, A 	
Warmuth,  C.  C Lot 690, Township 69
Ward, Mrs. Jennie Lot 1494, Township '
Davis,  Ed Part Lot 382    «
McNee, William    Part Lot 382    21.60
Robinson, A. P Lot 4 in Sub-division Lot 519   4.00
Lane, James Wellington    Part Lot 9, in Sub-division Lot 519 . 1R8"
39.64
12.00
24.24
14.80
in Sub-division Lot 519.
Macdonell, A. C.   .." Part Lot 10. ...
. Lot 11 in Sub-division Lot 519
! Part Lot 12 in Sub-division Lot 519
Part ! ot 13 in Sub-division Ixrt 519^
Cowan, George  H.
Macdonell, A. C.
Macdonell, A. C ran. . ■» io ,., „„„ 	
Macdonell, A. C N. Part Lot 14 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C N. Part Lot 15 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C Lot 16 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C Lot 17 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C Lot 18 in Sub-division Lot 519       4.00
Macdonell, A. C.        Lot 19 in Sub-division Lot 519       4.00
Macdonell, A. C.
16.80
12.00
8.00
2.40
2.80
2.80
2.80
4.00
4.00
 IjOL     IV     111     0UM-M.T....V	
  Lot 20 in Sub-division Lot 519       4.00
Ferrlter, D. J Lot 13 in Sub-division Lot 534       1.20
Ferrlter, D. J Lot 14 in Sub-division Lot 534       1.20
Johnson, Julia  Lot 16 in Sub-division Lot"534       2.40
Mullady,  Tim Part Sub-division 534 ...".	
"»-  Lot 13 in Sub-division Lot 535  	
 Lot t, Block 7, Sub-div. Lot 700 	
 Lot 3, Block 10, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
 Lots 1 to 4, Block 12, Sub-div. Lot 700
 Lot 2, Block 14, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
 Lot 2, Block 16, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
 Lots 1 and 2, Block IS, Sub-div. Lot 700
 Lot 1, Block 21, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
N. & F. S. LAND GRANT.
Farrier, J. W Part Section 22, Tp. 9a., Block 12 ....
Ferrier, J. W Part Section 21, Tp. 9a., Block 12
O'Brien, Barney    "
Wa Gin Sing
Graham,   Maggie   .
McCarren, R	
Massle, A. W	
McCarren, R	
McCarren, R	
Massey,  George  E.
Hargrave, John M.
1.60
4.80
.80
.60
3.20
.80
.60
.SO
.80
2.40
2.25
1.15
.80
.85
.86
.85
.70
.45
.70
.70
.70
.90
.80
5.75
1.35
1.45
.90
.70
1.35
.35
.55
.70
.70-
16.20
.40
1.10
.45
.10
.70
.35
1.45
1.45
.70
1.25
.25
1.45
2.10
.35
1.20
.55
.90
4.45
1.35
2.70
1.65
2.45
.45
1.90
1.35
.90
.25
.30
.30
.30
.45
.45
.45
.45
.45
.15
.15
.25
".20
.55
.10
.05
.35
.10
.05
.10
.10
.25
.26
2.90
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
-2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
• 2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
13.40
9.85
10.70
10.50
10.30
8.95
6.40
8.95
8.95
8.95
10.75
9.85
58.96
15.51
16.25
10.90
9.10
15.35
5.55
7.55
9.10
9.10
162.20
6.08
12.70
6.45
2.90
9.10
5.55
16.25
16.26
9.10
14.45
4.65
16.25
22.50
5.55
13.60
7.35
10.58
46.09
15.35
28.94
18.45
26.05
6.45
20.70
15.35
10.90
4.65
5.10
5.10
5.10
6.45
6.45
6.45
6.45
6.45
3.35
3.35
4.65
3.80
7.35
2.90
2.65
5.55
2.90
2.65
2.90
2.90
4.65
4.50
30.50
.Lot 4664, G. l,West Kootenay     25.60
JOHN KIRKUP,
Assessor and Collector Rossland Assessment District
Rossland, B. C, October 27th, 1903.
SYNOPSIS
Phra, wht> dies and lives again in
Britain, begins to recount his early adventures—He buys a British slave girl
and sails on a trading voyage to Cornwall and marries a British princess. Is
attacked and captured by the Romans.
Escapes and is murdered by the Druids.
Is born again in later Roman Britain.
Fnds a tattooed record by his wif<i on.
his bxly Rescues a Roman lady from
a bull and is taken into favor.
CHAPTER IV (Continued)
Thus, one day having discovered
Numidea weeping over a new made
wound, I sought out the offender,
and as she sauntered up and down
her teaselated   pavements I shook
my flat at her queenship, and said.
'By the  bright   flame of Vesta,
Lady Eleotra, and by every deity,
old or new, in the endless capacity
oi the   skies, if you get out your
abominable fl»il for that girl again
or draw  but  onoe upon her your
aooursed  bodkins,  I will—marry
her among the smoking ruins  of
this white sty of yours!'
When I spoke to her thus under
the lash of  my anger, she would
uprise to the topmost r,>aoh of her
height, and thenoe frowning down
upon me, her shapely head tossed
baok,  and  her  draperies  falling
from her crossed arms and ample
shoulders to the marble floor, she
would regard me with an imperious
stare that might have withered an
ordinary mortal.   So beautiful and
statuesque   was   her  ladyship on
these occasions, towering there iu
her own white hall like an image
of an   offended   Juno   in  the first
fluBh of her queenly   wrath,   that
even I   would   Btep   back a paoe.
But I did not   oower or drop my
eyes, and, when we had'glowered
at each other so for a  minute or
two, the royal instinct within her
was no  match   for   traitor Love.
Slowly   then   the   woman   would
come welling into her proud face;
and the glow   of   anger gave way
upon her cheeks; her arms dropped
by her Bides; she shrank to mortal
proportions and lastly sank ou the
ebony and ivory oouch in a wild
guat of weeping, wofully asking to
know, as I turned upon my heels,
why the slave's trivial soars were
more  to   me than   the mistress's
tears.
My vice prefect was avarioious
too. There was, stored in the spa-
oious hollows below h'vr villa, I
know not how muoh bronze and
gold squeezed from those reluctant
British hinds whose old-world hues
clustered together in the oak
dumps dotting the fertile vales aB
far as the eye could see from our
roof-ledges on every hand. Had
all the offloes of the Imperial government been kept as she kept her
duties of tax collecting, the great
Empire would have been further
by many a long year from its ruin.
And the closer Eleotra made her
accounts, the more deadly became
her exactions, the more angry and
rebellious grew the natives round
us.
Already they had heard whispers
of how hard barbarians were pressing upon Rome, day by day they
saw Britain depleted of the stalwart legionaries who bad occupied
the land tour hundred years, and
as phalanx after phalanx went
south through Gaul to protect the
mother oity on the Tiber their dem
agogues seoretly stirred the
people up to ambition and discontent.
Nor can it be denied the villains
had  something  to   grumble  for.
Society was dissolute and debased,
while the oountry was full of those
who made the  good Roman name
a  byword.   The   British   peasant
had to toil and sweat that a hundred tyrants, the rank production
of social   decay,  might  squander
and  parade  in  the  luxury  and
finery his labor purchased.   Added
to this, the pressing needs  of  the'
Emperor  himself demanded   the
services of those who had taken upon themselves for centuries the protection of the  country.    As   they
retired,   Northern   rovers  at first
fitfully, but afterwards  with  increasing rigour, oame  down upon
the unguarded coasts, and  sailing
up the estuaries harried   the  rioh
English values on either  side, and
a nd rioted amid the accumulated
splendour and plenty of the luckless land to their hearts' content.
' Saddled thus with the weight of
luxurious conquerors who had lost
nearly every art but that of extortion, miserable at home, and
devastated from abroad, who can
wonder that the British • longed to
throw off the Roman yoke and
breathe the fresher air of a wholesome life again? And as the
shadow of the Imperial wings was
withdrawn from them their hopes
ripened; they thought they were
strong and ruleworthy. Fatal mistake I I 8aw it bud, and I saw it bitterly fruitful I
If you turn back the pages of
history you will find these hinds
did indeed make a stand for a moment, and, when Honorius had
withdrawn his last legionaries and
given the islanders their liberty, for
a few brief years there was a shepherd government here—the British
ruled again in Britain. Then oame
the next strong tide of Northern
invasion, and another conquest.
I well remenber how, iu the
throes of the first great ohange that
heralded a new era in Britain, the
herdsmen and serfs were crushed
between waning Roman terrors,
such as Electra wielded, and the
growing horrors of the Northmen.
Of these latter I saw something.
On one occasion when the storm
was brewing I waB away down in
the coast provinces hunting wolves,
and thus by ohanoe fell in with a
'sea king's' foray and a British reprisal. On that occasion the spoilers were spoilt, and we taught the
Northern ravishers a lesson which,
had they been more united so that
suoh a blow might have been better felt by the whole, would have
damped their ardour for a long
time. As it was, to rout and destroy their scattered parties waB but
like mopping up the advancing
tide of those salt waves that
brought on us.
Those down there by the Kentish shore had been unmolested for
some years, they hid lived at their
leisure, had got their harvests in,
had rebuilt their villages out in the
open, and Bet up forges and hammered spearheads and bosses, rings
for the women, of silver and brass,
and chains and furniture for their
horses, of gold; shearing their
flocks, and living as though suoh
things aB Norsemen were not—
when one day tbe infliction came
upon them again.
Is was gusty morniug in early
summer—I remember it well—and
most of the men were from the
villages bunting, when away towards the coast went up to the
brightening sky a thin curl of
smoke followed by another and
another. The Bight was understood only loo well. Line after
line orept up in the silence of the
morning over the green tree tops
and against the grey of the sea,
while groups of black figures (flying villagers we knew them to be)
went now and then over the sky
line of the wolds into the valleys to
right and left. As the wail went
up from the huts where I rested, a
mounted ohief, his toes in tbe iron
rings of bis stirrups and hiB wolf
skins flying from his bare should
ers, came pounding through the
woods with tbe bad news the raiders were close behind.
Rapid packing wae a great feminine accomplishment in those
days, and, while the women swept
their children and more portable
valuables into their oloths and
disappeared into the forest, we sent
the quicker footed youths that were
and made our first stand there
round the huts and moundB of the
old village of Caen Edron.
And we kept its thatch and chattels inviolate, for, by this time, the
countryside waB all in arms, and as
the sea was far behind them, the
despoilers but showed themselves on
the fringe of the open, exchanged a
javelin or two and turned.
Hot on their track that morning
of vengeance we went after them;
over the scrubby open ground and
down through the tangles of oak
and hazel.    We pressed them back
past the charred and smoking remnants of   the   villages   they   had
burnt, baok by the   streams that
Btill   ran streaky   in quiet places
with blood, back down the red path
of ruin and savagery they .had trodden, back by the cruel finger posts
of dead women, back by the halting
places of the ravisherB— ever draw- t
ing new recruits and courage till
we outnumbered them by six to one
—and thus we trampled that day
on the heels of those laden pirates
from the valley head down to tbe
shore.
It waa a time of vengeance, and
our women and women crowded
singing and screaming after us to
kill and torture the wounded.
Every now and then those surly
spoilers turned, and we fled before
them as the dogs (ly from a big
boar who goes to bay; but each
time we oame on again, and their
standing places by the coverts and
under the lichened rocks were littered with dead, and all bestrewn
amid the ferns in the pink morning
light was the glittering spoil tbey
disgorged. Truly that was an hour
of victory, and the Britons were
drunk with success. They followed
like starving wolves after a herd of
deer, leaping from rock to rock,
crowding every point of vantage,
and running and yelling through
the underwood until surely the
Northmen must have thought the
place in possession of a legion of
devils.
But all of this noise was nothing
to the frightful yell of  savage joy
whioh went up from ub when we
saw the raiders draw together on
the shingle ridge of the beach and
knew  instinctively by their pale,
[tideward faces and hesitation that
they were trapped—the Bea was out
and their Bhips were high and dry!
Somehow, I scarcely know how
it was when those men turned grimly and prepared to make their last
stand under their ship,  a strange
silence fell upon  both binds, and
for a minute or two the long, wild
rank of our warriors halted at the
bottom of the slope, every man silent and dumb by a strange acoord,
while opposite, against the sky-line,
were the mighty Norsemen clustered together, and looking down with
fierce sullen brows, equally silent
and expeotant, while the Bun glinted on their rustling arms and tall
peaked caBquea.
We stood thus a minute or two,
and I hoard tbe thumpings of my
own heart, like an echo of the low
wash of the far away Bea—a plover
piping overhead, and a raven
oroaking on the distant hills, but
not another sound until—suddenly
some British women who had come
red-handed to a mound behind
broke out into a wild war song.
Then the spell was loosed, and we
were again at them, sweeping the
sea kings from tbe ridge into the
tangle of long grass and sand and
stunted bushes that led to the shore,
and there, separated, but dying
stubbornly,   powerleBs against our
their armour from them and stripping their cloths, till the pleasant
liohened alleys of the seashore
wood and the green footways of the
moss were stamped full of crimson
puddles and littered with the naked
bodies of those tawny giants.
The last man to fall was a ohief.
Twioe I had seen him hard pressed
and had lifted my javelin to slay
him, but a touch of Billy compunction had eaoh time held my hand,
and now he stood with his baok to
his ship like some fierce beautiful
thing of the sea. His plated brass
and steel cuirass was hacked and
dinted, his white linen hung in
shreds about him; his arms were
bare, and blood ran down them,
while his long fair hair lifted to the
tbe salt wind that was coming in
freshly with the tide, and the sun
shone on his cold blue eyes, and his
draw- I P°'isbed harness, and hie tall and
oomely proportions standing out
there against the dark side of bis
high-sterned vessel.
But what cared the Britons for
flaxen looks or the godliness of a
young Thor?   He had in his hands
a broken spear, his own sword being snapped in two; and with this
weapon he lay about fiercely every
now and then as the men edged in
upon him.   Luokless Viking, there
is no retreat  or   reacue!   He was
bleeding  heavily,   and even ae I
watched his ohin   Bank   upon his
cheat.    At onoe the Britons ran in
upon him; but the life flared up
again,  and   the    gallant    robber
orushed in a pair   of heads  with
his stave and sent the others flying
back, still glaring upon   tbe wide
circle of his  enemies   with death
and defiance struggling for mastery
in   his    eyes   in a    way   wonderful   to    behold.    Again    and
again   the   yellow   head   of  the
young Thor nodded and sank, and
sank,  and   again  and  again   he
started up and scowled upon them,
as each savage cry of  joy, to  see
him thus bleeding   to   death,   fell
upon   his   ears.     Presently    he
wavered for a moment and leaned
his shoulders against the blaok side
of his ship, and hia   lids  dropped
wearily; at onoe the Britons   rushed, and, when I   turned   my   face
there again they were hacking and
stripping    the    armour    from  a
mutilated    but     still     quivering
oorpse!
A few suoh episodes as this repulse of the Northmen, magnified
and circulated with all the lying
exaggeration .that a cowed race
ever wraps about his feats of arms
made the Britons bold, and their
boldness brings me to the end of
my ohapter.
[To bo oontinued.J
Tima and tha Ladlaa.
Hawley: "Men live faster than
women."
Jepeon: "That's right. My wife
and I were the same age when we
were married. I am forty now and
she lias only turned thirty."
What Troubled Har.
Mistress: "Let you go to the
evecing sohool, Mary? Why, I
thought you could read I"
Mary: "Well, ma'am, I does
know my letters fust-rate so long's
tbey keep all in a row, one after the
other. But just as Boon's they gets
mixed up into words I'm beatl"
Hia Reason.
The reason an urchin gave for
being late at school was that the
boy in the next house was going to
bave a dressing-down with a trunk
with ns to call baok the  hunters, j killed them one  by  one, lopping
numbers, we pulled them down and strap, and he waited to hear him
'howl. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C. NOV  14, igo*
%
THE
STORE
Announcement of Fall and Winter Goods
We are in receipt of our Fall and Winter Goods and are now showing the
finest line of reliable merchandise at reasonable prices that we hare ever carried.   Our aim has been to get together a seasonable stock at right values.
Satisfied buyers are OUr best advertisements.     We believe we have trflde winners here.
DRY GOODS
We have the following specials to offer this
pay day.
IS pieces Striped Flannelettes at 5c a yard
10 pieces Figured Wrapperette at... 10c a yard
20 pieces Crash Toweling at 10c a ya^d
8-4 Plain White Sheeting at 18c a yara
8-4 Hemmed Sheets at 75c
15 Ladies' Tailor-made Suits at.- $5.00
12 Ladies' Walking Skirts at    2.50
LADIES' SHOES
We are agents for J. & T. Bell and the celebrated Hanan makes.
CHILDREN'S  SCHOOL  SHOES
We  are headquarters  for them   and  our
prices are right.
FURNISHINGS
UNDERWEAR from $1.50 per suit to $7.00
Good Fleece, Natural Wool Cashmere. We also
handle Dr. Jaegar's and Stanfleld's lines.
Christy's Hats    Stetson's Hats
See the new Fall and Winter Styles.
MEN'S OVERCOATS
A Full line at reasonable prices,  The newest and nobbiest.
Overshoes and Rubbers
Standard grades at popular prices.
UMBRELLAS AND CRAVANBTTE COATS.
FOR BOYS
Boys' School Suits, Boys' Caps, Boys' Shoes
Boys' Overcoats.   We can fit them right.
GROCERIES
Direct importers of Fancy and Staple Groceries.   Ask to see our imported goods.
Breakfast foods of all kinds.
Libby McNeill and Libby celebrated canned
meats, fresh this week.
Car of Canadian Eggs.
Car of Swift's Meats.
Car of Fancy Apples.
HARDWARE
Complete stock of Household Hardware,
Granite Ware, Cutlery, Etc., Stoves, Cole's
Hot Blast, Box Stoves, Coal Stoves, Queen
Stoves, Bissell's Carpet Sweeper, Snow Shovels
Bird Cages, Coal Scuttles, Etc., Mining Hardware.   Tinshop in connection.
HUNTER
THERS
THE LOCAL
EXCHANGE
Market Drops in Cariboo
Camp Mckinney
RAMBLER CARIBOO IS STRONGER
The Latest Quotations and Sales
Locally    Upon    the
Market.
2fo; Lone Pine,   2500,   l.Je;   War
Eagle, 2000,   lldj   Cariboo   Camp
"McKinney, 2000, 6Jo; Centre Star,
500,1000, 20c.   Total, 20,500.
Week's Quotations.
Highest   Lowes
American Boy  j,
Ben Hur  4
BlackTail  3
Canadian Gold F.S  3)/
4%
7M
2
3
5
20
3
2%
'•A
S.175
1%
The week has again been quiet
the only noteworthy point, the
drop in Cariboo, Camp McKinney '
which iB now lower than at any
previous period in the history of
the mine. Rambler Cariboo has
also suffered somewhat but < closed
the week more Htrongly than it
opened.
Cariboo, Camp McK
Centre Star  22
p'airview  4
Fisher Maiden  3X
Giant  2'/z
Granby Consolida'ed... .$4.50
MorningGlory  2
Mountain Lion  20
North Star  g</2
Payne  13
Quilp  \~7
Rambler-Cariboo  38
San Foil  2%
Sullivan  5%
Tom Thumb  3
War Eagle  \\y2
Waterloo  6V£
White Bear  4%,
Showing highest asked and loweat bid
during the past week.
S
12
34
2%
4
2
10
4A
3'A
Today's Looal Quotation!:
liked Bid
American Boy          5 4tt
Ben  Hur  4
Black Till          3 2
Canadian Oold Fields          lit 3
Cariboo (Camp slcaUnnay) ex-dir       7 5
CentreHtar       22 20
Crowa Neat Pass Cod f      •
Falrvlew          4 3
Piaher Maiden         3M 'H
Slant         2% iJ4
Granby Consolidated    U-V f.i-7.i
aforntiw Olorj          2 1%
If onntatn Lion       20
North star (But Kootenay)         4 X
Pane	
Rambler-Cariboo	
Ban Poll	
Bulllvan	
Tom Thumb	
War Ragle Consolidated....
Waterlco(Assess, paid)......
White Bear Mssess, paid) .
■3
'7
37
2%
5Si
3
n'4
A'A
34
4
HOCKEY CLUB ORGANIZES.
Strong Executive Elected for the Coming Season-
Today's Sales.
American Boy, 2000, 'He; Centre
Star, 1000, 20c; Rambler   Cariboo,
500,35c; Fisber Maiden, 3000, 2|o.
Total 6.500.
The Week's Sales.
Amerioan Boy, 2500,  2000,  4 Jo,
4000, 4o; Tom   Thumb,   4000,   2c;
Rambler-Cariboo,  1500, 1000,37c,
500, 35o; Fisher    Maiden,   3000,
Thorn was an enthusiastic meet
ing of the Hockey Club held in the
Allan House during the weak and
and the exeoutivejappointed augurs
well for the future of tbe club during the winter. It was known that
NelBOit is stronger than ever this
year and that every effort should
be strained in order to put a good
team in the field against the Nelson
boys who have lately had the best
of the game in the contests with
the camp.
The officer elected were R. H.
Anderson, president, Dr. Campbell,
D. A. Campbell, W. Thompson, J.
P. Cosir.ro, F. J. Stephens, C. Barrett, vice presidents; A, D. Davis,
D. Thomas, C. F. Summers, H. P.
Dickinson, J. Donahue,   executive.
POWDER SMOKE—Did it eve
give you headache? Dr. Scotts
headache powders are a qnick and
sure cure. Sold at Morrows Drug
Store.
MINOR MENTION
[    II. T. Ileuwick lias gone to   the
Laidoau ou business.
W. Thompson is paying a visit
to Spokane on business.
Mrs. Embleton gave an afternoon tea on Monday last.
The next sitting of the oountry
court in Rossland will be on January 14.
The Merchant of Venice will bn
the play tonight at the Opera
House.
There was a well attended meeting of the Current Events Club on
Monday last.
"The White Bear is now building
a spur to connect its head works
with the main line.
Richard Plewman of the Winnipeg spent a day in the oity daring the woek on business.
W. Towneend is now working on
the water department of the oity as
an assistant accountant.
W. de V. le Maistre, formerly of
the (inn of Daly and Hamilton, is
now located in Edmonton.
J. A. Macdonald will be present
in Vancouver to assist in the defeat of Attorney General   Wilson.
Archdeacon Pentreath will take
the services both morning and
evening at St. Georges churoh on
Sunday week.
There was a Blight fire in the
Canadian Ore Concentration premises on Tuesday last but there
was little damage done.
The Curling Club will hold its
annual meeting on Monday next
in the Board of Trade rooms at
8 o'clock in the evening,
E. S. H. Winn has successfully
passed his law examination   whioh j
he attended reoently  at   Calgary.
He is now admitted to the bar.
St. Andrew's Society will this
year give a dinner instead of a
dance. Haggis and the barley
bree will be the chief things.
The rink in   now  making good
progress and should be ready by
the end of the month. The making of ice haB already begun.
Admirers of lie Chamberlain
are all shaving their faces. Imitation is the sincerest flattery. The
first imitator, however, has muoh
to answer for.
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
Churches desiring special mention o
their servicea must present the notices
for publication on or before Friday
morning.
St. George's Church—Rev. J. A.
Cleland,reotor. Twenty-third Sun.f
day after Trinity, 11 a. m. Mat.
ins and Holy Communion;
2:30 p.m., Sunday School;
3:30 p.m., Holy Baptism; 7:30
p.m., Evensong.
Church of the Sacred Heart.—
Rev. M. W. MoKinnon in charge.
First mass 8:30 a.m.; Second mass
10:30 a.m.; Sunday School,2:30 p.m.
followed by Benediction of the
Blessed Sacrament.
St. Andrew's Church,(Presbyterian.)—Corner First avenue and
Queen street. There will be no
service in the morning, but Sunday
sohool will be as usual. The Rev.
R. Stillman will preach in the
evening.
Methodist Church.—Rev. R. F.
Stillman, B.A., pastor. Services 11
a.m.,and 7:30 p.m.
Baptish Churoh—Rev. P. H.
MoEwen Supt. Baptist Missions in
B. C. will remain in Rossland until the end of the year and will
preaoh in the Baptist Church each
Sunday morning and Evening. A
cordial invitation is extended to
all.
Salvation Army.—7 a.m., Knee
Drill; 11 a.m., junior meeting; 3
p.m., Free and Easy; 8 p.m., Salvation meeting.
full attendance and a dance after
due trausaction of business completed the enjoyment of the ocoa-
SOCIETY   CARDS.
Ift Ar Meets in Odd Fellows Haii
• \/>V/.J* • on Queen Street, between
First and Second avenues. Regular meetings
each Monday night. VlslUng brother* are cordially Invited to attend and resist within fa
days.
W.  S.Vurphy, Sec.      Jos, Goldswotthy, N.O.
Ff\      T71    FRATERNAL   ORDKR   OF
•   \J.   Hi. kaoi.ks,    Roasland  Aerie,
No, in, Regular meetings every Monday even,
■--•,r ..   .     .i ..  ...       ... . -   -
'g.
ingi, 8 p, m,   Eagles  flail, CarpenUre' Union
Bid'
J. Levy   W
tl, Daniel w. Sea
Rossland Opera House
3 NIGHTS 3
Commencing Nov. 12
Mr. Harold Nelson
THE DISTINGUISHED    .
CANADIAN ACTOR
AND HIS COMPANY
Pompeian Massage Cream
Removes, Blackheads, Freckles
and Pimpples and brings color  the  Cheeks.     For Sale at
RoyalBarberShoo
SUPPLY HOUSE.
W. J. PREST, PROP
Tha Madrigals.
The Madrigals had a successful
evening  on  Wednesday   evening
last, assembling at the residence of
£. O. Paulson.   There waa a
Fresh Fruits
Received Daily.
Apples, Crab Apples, I
Plums, Watermelons, j
Muskmelons. Peaches,
Greapes, Etc.^ijf ^ !
MATINEE 2:30 P. M.
THIS AFTERNOON.
A SET OF TURQUOISE
 AND	
Taming of the Shrew
Evening, 8:30:
Merchant
of Venice
Prices $1.00 and 75 Cts.
All Preserving Fruits | i
Paulson
Bros.
THE GROCERS
SOLE  AGENTS—Chilliwack
Creamery Butter.
3
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R. ATLANTIC 8. S. LINE
From Bt. Jobn.
L.Champlain. .Nov. 28 L. Erie..Dec. 10
Lake Erie is Christmas Steamer.
ALLAN LINE
From St   John.
Pretorian... .Nov. 30 Bavarian.. .Dec, 6
DOMINION LINE
From Halifax,
Dominion Dec. 9
From Portland
Cambroinan .. .Dec. 5 Canada... Tan, 2
AMERICAN LINE
Philadelphia ..Dec 5 St. Louis..Dec. 12
RED STAR LINE
Finland Dee 5 Vaderland.. .Dec 12
CUNAkD LINE
Etruria Dec 5 Campania.. .Dec 12
Campania is Christmas Steamer
WHITE STAR LINE
Cedric Dec. 2 Majestic... .Dec. a
FRENCH LINE
LaChampaignc Dec 3 LaTouraine Deo 10
ALLAN Sl'ATE LINE
Numidian. .Dec. 10 Mongolian... Dec 17
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A, P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F.CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt. Winnipeg
O, W. DEY, Agent,
C. PR. Depot, RossUnA.

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