BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Saturday World 1903-09-19

Item Metadata

Download

Media
satworld-1.0312863.pdf
Metadata
JSON: satworld-1.0312863.json
JSON-LD: satworld-1.0312863-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): satworld-1.0312863-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: satworld-1.0312863-rdf.json
Turtle: satworld-1.0312863-turtle.txt
N-Triples: satworld-1.0312863-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: satworld-1.0312863-source.json
Full Text
satworld-1.0312863-fulltext.txt
Citation
satworld-1.0312863.ris

Full Text

 1' -'j*-
THE SATURDAY WORLD
Vol. I,     No. 3
3B
ROSSLAND, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1903
Price FIve.Cents
NEWS IN A
NUTSHELL
Items ot Interest   Round
the World.
LATEST TELEGRAPH BULLETINS
The Doings of Conspicuous Persons
Affecting Canadian Interests.
CANADIAN.
Sit Thomas Shaughnessy is expected out west.
Pay dirt haB been discovered on
the streets of Dawson.
The G. P. R. will build a million
dollar hotel and depot, at Winnipeg-
Ontario health officers are in
favor of military drill in public
schools.
The Anglioan bishops of Ontario
have endorbed the federation of the
universities.
Nearly a score of people have
been injured in a railway oollis-
sion near Chatham, Ont.
The competition of Canadian
railways has reduoed the freight
rate on grain 20 per oent.
The Petrel has been seizing some
fishing nets belonging to schooners
of the United States in Canadian
waters.
W. B. Pool deolares that the recent jumping of a portion of the
Lucky Jack does not amount to
anything.
The fortnightly service between
Antwerp and Canada to be under
taken by the C. P. R. will be begun
next month.
A British Columbia judge has
declared that Dunsmuir has the
right to employ Chinese in his
mines even if suoh employment
does tend to the injury and maiming of white miners.
IMPERIAL.
Joseph Chamberlain has resigned
the Secretaryship of  the Colonies.
The Cunard oompany may use
turbine engines on their new linen.
C. T. Ritchie and Lord George
Hamilton have both retired from
the Balfour oabinet.
Balfour is openly protectionist
and thinks that the preferential
duty must oome later.
Heavy enow fell last week in
Scotland and a terrifio storm raged
all over Great Britain.
It is proposed to arrange a floating exhibition of British manufactures to tour the Empire.
Dr. Parkin declares that the interest in the Rhodes' scholarships is
keener in New Zealand than elsewhere.
It is officially deolared that the
Prince of Wales has no intention,
or ever had, of visiting the St.
Louis Exhibition.
Lancashire cotton operatives out
of work declare that Eastern
Canadian wages are too low to in
vite immigration.
The leader of the Australian
opposition suggests that duties
on British goods be unconditionally reduoed fifty per oent.
It is reported that United States
war vessels have seized more British islands off the ooast of North
Borneo, just south of the Philippines.
The London Times holds the
question before the Alaska com
mission is one of law. When that
is settled a compromise may be arrived at.
A writer in the London press,
acquainted with Canada, deolares
that this oountry iB beginning to
loDk upon the old country with
contemptuous tolerance owing to
the continual misrepresentations of
the Associated Press.
The London Times deolares in
reply to Carnegie that if ever there
is difference between Great Britain
and the United States over the
preferential tariff the effect would
be to concentrate all British trade
with Canada to Canadian ports to
the great detriment of New  York.
FOREIGN
Bubonic plague is raging in
Manila.
German soldiers are forbidden to
be socialists.
The Seattle street car strike has
been called off.
Russia will go in for more extensive protection.
The Danish royal family is celebrating its jubilee.
Severe snow storms have been
raging throught Montana.
Bulgaria declares that it will
most certainly assist Maoedon.
The coal miners of Novinger,
Mo., have called off their strike.
A hurricane off the coast of
Florida has driven many vessels a
shore.
Relations between Venezuela and
Columbia are strained and war is
probable.
Insurgents have inflicted a severe
defeat upon the troops of the Sultan
of Morocco.
The steel trust haB reduced the
price of Bessemer steel from $19 to
$17 per ton.
San Miguel, Yucatan, where
Cortez landed, has been destroyed
by a hurricane.
The untimely snow has greatly
damaged the harvest in Dakota
and Minnesota.
Political feeling in Hungary deolares that oountry has a right to
choose its own king.
Japan will not agree to a conditional evacuation of Manchuria by
Russia on Ootober 8.
The military and the civil
authorities at Cripple creek are
quarreling as to jurisdiction,
General Baldwin of the United
States army is strongly lurging tbe
reestabliahment of the oanteen,
Two anarchists have been imprisoned in Porto Rico for insulting the flag of the United States.
The Turks are said to have wiped out the whole; population of
Kastoria in Maoedon—10,000 people.
Turkey has massed 300,000
troops in Macedonia whioh Bulgaria declares is a menace to its
own integrity.
A new Socialist party oalled the
Sooialist Revolutionary party has
been formed in Russia. Its tactics
are violence as opposed to the two
older socialist parties,
Labor Wanted
Every day inquiries are made
from the outside oamps for men,
testifying to the faot that the supply of labor is scarce. Men are
wanted at the Enterprise, Wakefield, Ivanhoe and various other
properties, and the local supply is
exhausted.
Fresh Eastern andOlympia Oysters at Thomas Embleton's.
MINING OUTLOOK BRIGHT
Kootenay Camps Are Now Shipping Well.
THE RIO TINTO OF THE BOUNDARY
Well Known Mining Han Exploits the Oro Denoro-
Boundary Beats the Record-Concentrates
of the Camp.
Preparations have already started on the War Eagle concentrator
and the machinery has been turned
over in the Elmore mill. Parts of
the machinery has yet to ariive,
the Wilfley tables are yet to be set
up and a dozen ether details in the
final completion to be attended
to. The mill ought to be in
going order inside of a few weeks
and a return made upon it showing
profit before tbe end of the year.
In this connection there is an unauthorized statement to the effect
that the Le. Roi No. 2 will declare
a dividend. It is well known that
both the Le Roi and the Le Roi
No. 2 have made substantial
profits during the past yet-
but as far as the latter is concerned it may be well to
point out that the end of the financial year occurs this month. The
profit is sufficient to declare a dividend but as a large expense is contemplated for next year in the putting up of large mill for concentration purposes, it would be well to
keep some money in the treasury.
The annual meeting will decide
this point.
The Kootenay has resumed work
with as large a force as before,
and will ship just as soon as
definite arrangements oan be
made with some smelter. The Le
Roi No 2 is shipping tbGreenwooJ.
The smaller mines are all doing
well and more than one unopened
mine has been examined lately with
a view to shipping.
WEEK      TOTAL
LeRoi  4434     142,263
Centre Star  1470      57,412
War Eagle  1350      43,359
LeRoi No. 2  301       18,500
Kootenay.".  6,298
Velvet  50        4,420
Jumbo  184        1,809
Giant  714
White Bear  250
Spitzee  30           150
Silica concentrates .... 85
Homestake  So
I.X.L  60
0. K  20
Totals 7,919     275,006
Boundary Shipments.
Phoenix, Sept, 19.—(Special.) —
Ore shipments from the combined
mines of the Boundary district are
greater this week than ever before,
as all the large mines are now
working at full capacity. The
output haB averaged considerably
over 2000 tons per day for the seven
days, end the total is several hundred tons more than the greatest
previous week.
P. A. O'Farrell, the well known
mining correspondent who has
been intimately connected with F.
A. Heiaze and the Montana oopper
mineB for some time past, has the
following to say about the Boundary oountry in a letter recently
contributed to the presB.
"It is astonishing how little the
outside world knows of this section
of the far northwest, not one man
in a hundred thousand could tell
you whether Greenwood were in
the States or in Canada, or in
Alaska, and yet here are two great
transcontinental railroads battling
for right^of way all over this section. I can travel from here to
Montreal in a palace car on the
Canadian Pacific railway and 20
miles from here I can take a palace
car on President J. J. Hill's railroad and run right through to New
York. President Hill has not yet
been able to get any of his lines into Greenwood. He is exceedingly
anxious to, but Sir Thomas Shaugh-
nessy has for the present outwitted and outgeneralled President
Hill, and, on this war of the American and Canadian railroad kings
hangs a great story. Neither
President Hill nor President
Shaughnessy would be battling for
rights^of way up here in the mountains and glens of British Columbia, but that vast tribute were to be
had from operations, in progress
here.
"The Kettle River drains a region not only of surpassing loveliness but of boundless mineral
wealth. The north fork of the Kettle river meets the parent flood at
Grand Forks, and there a smelter
is treating 2000 tons of gold and
oopper ore daily.
"Twenty-five miles further west
Boundary creek branches off and
on that river are two smelters, the
Boundary Falls smelter and the
Greenwood smelter, eaoh treating
700 tons a day of gold and oopper
ore.
"There are at present 4000 tons
of gold and copper ore being treated
daily by the smelters of the country. Within a year this can be increased to twenty or thirty thousand tons a day.
"A ton of coke is needed for
every eight or nine tons of ore; that
is the only flux needed with this
ore of the Kettle river country, and
that means that in a little while
the railroads will be handling
25,000 tonB, of ore daily and will
be hauling into this country 3000
tons of ooke. It also means hauling to New York 300 tons of oopper
every day for 365 days in the year.
'• They do not mine for oopper here,
they simple quarry it out from the
mountain side. The superintendent of the Granby is tearing out
the rook with steam shovels and
putting it on the oars at a cost of
25 cents a ton. He told me he
was ready to get out 6000 tons
daily but his smelter oan only
treat 2000 tons.
"The Mother Lode, the great
mine of the B. C. Copper oompany
oould be made to produce 5000
tons daily, but its smelter oan only
treat 700 tons daily.
"The Oro Denoro can be equipped
within lOOdaysto produce 6000 tons
but there are no smelters to treat
the ore; and its output is only 100
tonB a day.
"The Oro Denoro was opened up
by a railroad out. A vein probably
400 feet wide, running north and
south and dipping to the east was
encountered. A mountain rises to
the south of the railroad out and
the miners are quarrying the ore
from the side of this mountain.
This quarry, probably 400 feet wide
is a lime dyke between granite
walls. This dyke is impregnated
with iron and gold and coppei' and
sulphur. There is no zino nnr arsenic. There is very little silioa
and the iron runs to 40 per cent.
The ore will run about 35 pounds
of copper to the ton and from one
dollar to two dollars in gold. It
can be mined and put into matte
for $2 per ton. Every ton of ore
in that lime dyke, with oopper at
12 cents could be made to net $2,50
a ton, but that would require an
investment of $1,000,000, in a reduction works to treat say 2000
tons a day, but that would give a
profit of $5000 a day. The Oro
Denoro needs a great smelting plant
that will treat thousands, of tons
and when it gets that it will be
another Rio Tinto. The Granby
company own about a mile and a
half on this lime dyke, on whioh
the Oro Denoro is situated. The
dyke is 400 feet wide and the values
are the same wherever tested.
There are other olaims along this
lime dyke, notably claims owned
by the Mann & Mackenzie people,
but MessiS. Mann & Mackenzie are too busy gridiron-
ing the wheat fields of Manitoba and tbe Northwest territory
with railroads to busy themselves
with lime dykes in British Columbia even though they do contain
fabulous wealth in gold and copper.
It is four miles from the Oro Denoro to the Ironsides and the
chances are that this dyke,of iron,
oopper and gold ore extends that
entire length. The intervening
ground is unprospeoted, it is rough
and mountainous and clothed with
virgin forests, owned by the Canadian Pacific and F. A. Heinze.
"The Mother Lode is another
lime dyke parallel to this one
and about six miles further west,
but the values are similar. This
ore is self fluxing. Nine Or ten
tons of this ore are put into a blast
furnace with one ton of coke and a
50 per oent matte is the result. It
ought to be matter for $1.25 working, of course, on an immense soale.
"From these figures it will be
seen what the oopper industry in
this oountry oan become. The extraordinary thing is that both oapi
Continued on eighth page.
)
DECLARE FOR
PREFERENCE
Canadian    Manufacturers
Speak Out.
IMPERIAL TARIFF IMPERATIVE
Chamberlain's Fiscal Policy Endors*
ed by Leading Members
of the Dominion.
Toronto, Sept. 19.—At ihe open-
ing meeting of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association this morning,
president O. A. Birge, Hamilton,
delivered the annual address, in
whioh, after discussing Canada's
property and fisoal issue from the
Chamberlain point of view, dwelt
at some length on the efi'eot of
Canadian preference to British
products, deolaring that it would
not be just to Canadian manufacturers to withhold the faot that the
had suffered in many branches of
industry from the preference already existing. He said the manufacturers believed their position to
be a fair and reasonable one when
they said they would not agree to
accept any increase in the present
preferenoe.
George Drummond.Montreal, deolared that a low tariff would mean
ruin to Canadian industries, and a
higher duty on steel rails was imperative. Canada would welcome
capital, but oould not oonsent to
the Americanization of her markets
by American goods. There must
be an adequate tariff>gainst all the
world except the British Empire
and must inolude a mutual preference.        	
ROSSLANDER HONORED
A. S. Goodeve Appointed
Member of McBrlde
Cabinet.
The Hon. A. S. Goodeve has
been sworn in as Provincial Secretary and Minister of Education, a
telegram to that effect arriving in
camp yesterday afternoon. The
appointment is one that is calculated to help him in the provincial
election now on. The Conservatives are elated, but the Liberals
declare that honors are even, as
they say that if their candidate
comes out top on the polls, he is
sure of a cabinet position, possibly
the promiership.if their party wins
out over the province, as to whioh
event they profess every confidence.
If Mr. Goodeve does as well as
did Smith Curtis during his short
term of office of Minister of Mines
Rosslanders will have no kiok coming.
Another Marriage
John Phinney an old time miner
of this oamp was married last
evening at the Methodist parsonage
by tbe Rev. Stillman to Alioe Ransom of San Francisco. The wedding was very quiet, only the immediate friends of bridegroom and
bride being present. The happy
oouple will reside on Fifth avenue. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, SEPT. 19 1903.
t]
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the  Magazines are
Saying
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
—Topics Interesting* General Readers.
Tbe Idler for tho current month
is a good number, and contains an
interesting aooount of the game in
Northern Ontario, whioh artiole is
particularly well illustrated.
The Badminton contains several
sporting articles, including one on
tuna fishing in Southern California,
and another on turkey and part
ridge shooting in Virginia.
The Atlantic monthly oontains
an excellent artiole by Henry
James on that noted Frenoh author
Emile Zola, and has, in addition
an interesting sketch on the banking interests.
Scribner's Magazine for September has several very readable articles, a longst whioh may be reck
oned "A Night Out," by J. Hop
kinson Smith, and a literary, yet
chatty, article by Senator Hoar on
some famous judges.
Pearson for tho month is not
quite up to its usual form, but its
patrons will he plaased with the
continuation of the adventures of
'•Don Q," and a good article upon
the pastel painter, Mrs. Adrian
Hope.
The Windsor oontains another of
Rudyard Kipling's cbilds' stories,
upon which public opinion is eo
much divided. There is also an
article upon a Japan financier,
which is worthy of attention. An
excellent artiole upon the fiscal
polioy of the Empire will also be
widely read, coming at tbe present
time. Fred M. White contributes
a short story above the average—
"The Heart o! an Anarchist,"
The Designer for Ootober contains some good patterns which
can be made up expensively or
cheaply, as beet fits the taste of the
wearer.
Among the newer books "The
One Wott'aD," hy Tuumas Dixon
Jr., has come in for severe handling at the hand of the press in
general. It is a tale of a divorce and
is rather an impossible story. The
abuse is rather superlative. One,
for instance, oan hardly say thai
its "morals are utterly bad," without condemning a number of far
better authors.
"Heralds of Empire," by A.
Laut is a breezy story of the pio
neers of tbe Northwest, which forme
excellent reading for those who
are interested in the interesting story of the genesis oi
thi north and withal in the addition of a stirring story of adventure.
"The Sacrifice of the Shannon,"
by W. A. Hickurm.n, is a tale by a
Canadian aulhc ol life in Eastern
Canada, and goes far to explain
why the outside public in general,
having caught on so readily to Kipling's famous misnomer, "Our Lady
of thi Snows."
"Plower-O'-the-Corn," by S. R.
Crockett, is up to the author's usual
good form -\nd is a story of the
Scotch in France.
"Marie Corelli.the Writer and the
Woman," an appreciation by T.
CoateB and R. S. Warren Bell, is a
welcome biographioal sketch of a
very well-known author.
Cavendish in his twenty-third
edition of "Whist," has retained
his recent innovations' on whist,
especially in regard to the king
leads and the "show five" game.
He has, however.- recanted to some
extent on the wisdom of the long
suit lead in every particular case,
and also as far as to the advisability
of letting the hand be counted by a
strong adversary. This is shown
in a pregnant.little sentence—"The
modern system of leading should
be abandoned when an opponent
has shown such strength in trumps,
that it is not advisable for you to
let his count your hand precisely."
CONSERVATIVE PLATFORM
[Adopted at Rcvolntoko, September 13th, 1902,]
1. That this convention reaffirms the policy
of Mio party in matters of provincial roads and
trails; the ownership and control of railways
and the development of the agricultural re*
sourcoH of tho provinco as laid down In tho
platfoi in adopted in Octohor, 1890, which in us
folio wh;
"To activoly aid in the construction of trails
throughout the undeveloped portions of the
province and tho building of provincial trunk
roads of public necessity.
"To adopt the principles of government ownership of railways iu so far as the circumstances of the provinco will admit, and the
adoption of the principle that no bonus should
be granted to any railway company which
doss not give tho government of tho province
control of rates over linos bonused, tegether
with tho option of purchase.
"To actively assist by state aid in tho do vol'
opmont of tho agricultural resources of the
province."
2. That in (he meantime and until tho railway policy above sot forth can be accomplished, a general railway act bo passed giving
freedom to construct railways under certain
approved regulations, analogous to the system
that has resulted in such extensive railway
construction in the United States, with so
much advantage to trade and commerce.
3. That to encourage tho mining industrv.
tho taxation of metalliferous mines should be
on tho basis of aperceutogo on tho not profits.
4. That tho government ownership of telo
phone systems should be brought about as n
first step in tho acquisition of public utilities-
6. That a portion of every coal area here
after to be disposed of should bo reserved from
sale or lease, so that state owned mines may be
easily accessible, if their operation become*
necessary or advisable.
(i. That In tho pulp land leases provision
should bo made for reforesting and that stops
should be takon for the general preservation of
forests br guarding against tho wasteful destruction or timber.
7. That tho legislature and government of
the provinco should persevere in tho effort to
secure tho exclusion of Asiatic labor.
8. That tho matter of better terras in the
way of subsidy and appropriations for the
province should be vigorously pressed upon the
Dominion government.
9. 7'hat the silver-lead industries of t ho prov
inco bo fostered and encouraged by tho imposition of increased customs duties on lead and
.'ead products imported into Canada, and that
t'io Conservative members of the Dominion
House bo urged to support any motion introduced for such a purpose,
10. That as industrial disputes almost invariably result in great loss and injury both to the
parties directly concerned and to tho public,
'(^Islation snould be passed to provide means
,or an amicable adjustment of such disputes
between employers and employes.
11. That it is advisable to foster the mnnu-
'..'.aro of the raw products of tho province
Within thoprovince as far as practicable by
meuns of taxation on thosaid raw products.sub-
icct to rebate of the same in whole or part
when manufactured in British Columbia.
Conservative Conventions
At a meeting of the executive of the Provincial Conservative Association, hold at Vancouver, tho province was dividod into five divisions for organization purposes. Tho Kooto-
nay.-Boundary division is made up of tho foi-
'owing provincial election districts: Itovel-
toko, Columbia, Fornio, Cranbrook, Ymir,
ICaslo,Slocan, Grand Forks, Greonwood, the
Oity of Rossland and tho City of Nelson. At
tie same mooting the following resolutions
were adopted:
1. That conventions for nominating candidates for members of the legislative assembly
OUTSIDE'
MINE NEWS
What Is Being Done Outside the,Province.
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various Countries
the Mining of Precious
Metals.
be made up of delegates chosen as follows:
__ Aty electoral districts, one dele     .
or every fifty and fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial election held in 1900. and if
the citv is divided into wards, tho proportion
of delegates for each ward shall be based on
Iho voto polled In each ward at the last municipal elect ion.
(b) In other doctoral districts, one delegate
Ccr overy fifty or fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial olection held in 1900, the dole-
gates to be apportioned to polling places, or as
near thereto as will be fair to the voters of the
different neighborhoods.
2. The election of delegates shall be nt public meetings, held at a designated central place
in each polling division, or in each ward in city
electoral district*, if the city is divided into
wards. At such public meetings only thoso
who pledge themselves to voto for tho candidate or candidates selected at the nominating
convention shall bo entitled to a vote for dole-
gates.
3. Two weeks notico shall bo given of the
publie meetings at which delegates aro to be
elected, and nominating conventions shall be
hold in city olectorat districts two days after
(ho day on which delegates aro olectea, and in
othor electoral districts seven days after. All
nominations throughout the province to bo
made at a designated central place in each
electoral district, and on tho same day.
i. All notices of the date of public meetings
for the election of delegates to nominating
conventions, the apportionment of delegates,
and tho place and date of nominating conventions in the several electoral districts shall bo
pi jpared by tho member oi tho executive of
I Im: division in which the electoral districts are
A\ jato, and issued over the names of the president and secretary of the Provincial Conservative Association
A meeting of the provincial executive will
be held at Vancouver within a month, and tho
date for holding district nominating conventions will then be fixed.
JOHN HOUSrON.
President of the Provincial
Conservative Association.
Nelson. Juno 8th. 1903. tf
Linton Bros.,
Books, Stationery,
Newsdealers, Toys, Fishing'
Tackle, Kodaks and
Supplies.
ROSSLAND,   B. C.
In washing woollen* and oannela, Lever".
Dry Soap (a powder) will be found vary
Extensive work is going on in the
Mysore gold fields.
Gold prospeotiag is actively being carried on in British Guiana.
The total gold production of
Rhodesia for June last was $400,-
000.
The June output of Kalgoorlie
oamp, Westralia, was 95,000 ozs,
fine gold.
The Camp Bird mine has sent
$50,000 to England on profit aooount.
Charter Towers Camp, Queensland, yielded $25,000 in gold during August.
TheWaiti.New Zealand, yielded
during the period ended August 15,
$250,000 in gold.
William Sundheim, a promoter
of the present Bio Tinto mine,
Spain is dead.
The Endopie mine, Rhodesia, is
yielding nearly an ounce of gold to
the ton.
The Mineowners' AsBooiation ol
Westralia wish to pay all overtime
at ordinary rates.
The Swedish output of iron in
1902 was the highest on record,
2,896,208 long tons.
The Great Boulder Perseverance
and Golden Horseshoe of Westralia
each yielded 17,000 ounces oi fine
gold during June last.
One of the Geological Survey
parties sent out by the Ontario
government reports the discovery
of platinum near Wabigoon in that
province.
The Broken Hill Proprietary of
New South Wales yielded 400 tons
lead and 18,000 ounoes of silver
during the first half of August.
The output of Mount Morgan
during the year ending June 1 last,
was 143,585 ounces gold averaging
half an ounce to the ton.
The gold yield for the past year
in Oregon has been $1,500,000 from
plaoer mining, and over double that
amount from quartz mining.
The production of coal in Belgium during the first half of 1903
was 9 per cent greater than during
the corresponding period of 1902.
The two large mills of the Smuggler Union mines, at Pandora, Col.,
are treating an average of 350 tons
per day under the new management.
A solid breast of silver, running
480 ounces to the ton, has been
discovered on the Alvarado mine,
Mexico. The daily output is now
$200,000.
The St. John del Rey, Brazil,
yielded $34,000 gold for ten days in
August, the ore running slightly
over half an ounce to the ton.
A good strike has been
made upon the Lincoln mine,
Thunder Mountain. The body of
ore ia six feet wide and goes $150
to the ton.
A steel lined shaft through water and clay has been successfully
Bunk on the Free State Colliery
company's property near Viljoen's
drift, Orange River.
A rioh strike has been made near
Atlanta, Idaho, on the Black Warrior oreek of sugar quartz two feet
wide, going $348.47' in gold to the
ton.
What are known as the South
Range copper mines of the Lake
district, Michigan, are producing,
at the rate of 35.000,000 pounds
annually whereas they were unknown seven years ago.
Our New York, contemporary,
the "American Mining News,"
points out that eleven-twelfths of
tbe plaoer gold obtained in Alaska
in 1902, amounting to $5,500,000,
was mined in the peninsula extending into the Behring Sea, north of
St. Miohaels, which has been named
the Seward Peninsula. The New
York "Sun" prints a map whioh
show that there ia activity in many
parts of the distriot. Not long ago
the beach at Nome, in the south
west corner of the peninsula, alone
represented mining industry in
this distriot; but today mining is
in progress on many of tbe BtreaniB
and gulohes in the interior, and
though Nome is still the greatest
produot, the other districts contribute a large amouut of gold dust
to the total output.
Woman's Franchise
One feature which emerges in the
new Australian Federal rolls, the
Colonial Review, notes, is the
great scale of the women's vote. In
Victoria, for example, there are
289,280 males entitled to the
franohise, and 296,824 women voters—an excess of 7600 women
about 21 years of age over men of
the same age.
FUN AND FANCY.
Knowing Ones
"It seems to me," said the auburn-haired damsel, "that it is
only the men who never marry
who know all about women."
"Or, in other words," replied the
cynical bachelor, '-it is only the
men who know all about women
who never marry."
Wants Realty
"I don't care for your facts and
figures," says a Rossland wife disputing   with her husband on  the
price of
truth."
cigars, "give me the real
PROGRESSIVE PLATFORM
1. No candidatewill be accepted or
endors»d by the pai ty unless endorsing tbe platform and placing his undated resignation in the hands of the
endorsing body,
2. Government ownership of transportation.
3. Compulsory arbitration of labor
disputes.
i. Absolute reservation of portions
of coal lands by the government. Coal
leases must have a aclauas inserted
governing coal prices. , TJlt
5. Conservation of forests so as to
produce a revenue and to promote the
pulp industry.
6. Insertion of a clause in all charters forbidding the employment, of
orien tls.
7. Compulsory scaling of all logs by
government scalers.
8. Free transportation to members
of the legislatures and the judiciary.
9. Gradual abolition of all taxes
upon producers and' Their products,
shifting the burden on land values.
10. Restriction of Oriental immigration on the lines of the Natal Act
with a provision for reenactment in
case of disallowance.
11. The abolition of property qualifications for public officers.
12. The establishment and operation of government smelters^ and refineries.
13. All franchises and subsidies to
be referred to the electorate.
14. Declaration of election day as a
public holiday, with four hours reserved in any case, so as to allow all
employes an opportunity of voting.
15. Farm lands and implements to
be exempt from taxation and wild
lands to be assessed at the price asked
by holders.
16. No land subsidies to be granted,
17. Ten per cent of public lands to
be set aside for a revenue for education and that children up to 10 years
be given tree books and meals and
clothing when necessary.
18. Municipalization arid public
control of the liquor traffic.
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
PROGRESS MADE BY NEW PARTY
What is Being Done by .Socialists
In Canada and the World
Over.
Call at the Strand for a  fancy drink
Green & Comerford, Props.
Railroad porters are organizing
against tips.
Socialist local has been formed >t Van Anda, and a obaiter
applied for.
Blast furnacemen, in Sootland
have suffered a reduction of 5 per
oent in wages.
Bricklayers at Minneapolis,
Minn., have refused to work with
nonunion laborers.
The Unions of Boston have denounced Governor Bates because
he vetoed the eight hour bill.
The labor traitors have been
pretty well weeded out. Now for
progress and viotory I—Clarion.
A plan is contemplated for the
federation of all the commercial
travelers' associations of the British Empire.
The Greenwood riding is a cinoh
for the Socialist candidate, Com.
Mills, of the Boundary Falls smelter.—Clarion.
There are 1,700,000 domestic servants of various kinds in England
of whom 300,000 are charwomen and
washerwomen.
In New Zealand munioipal ownership of publio utilities is no longer
a mere theory; it is an established
fact.
The International Typographical
Union will make a determined
effort for a general eight hour day,
commencing January 1,1905.
A demand has been made by the
Associated Coal Owners of Wales
to the conciliation board for a reduction cf miners' wages of 8f per
cent.
Without a dissenting vote, the
introduction of Asiatic labor to the
Rand minea has been denounced
by the Cape parliament as a thing
not to be tolerated at any cost.
The oo-operative union laundry,
whioh wbb established by union
laundry workers during the big
strike in Chicago's wash-house last
June, haB been declared a   failure.
A plan has been suggested in
England for the erection ot a sanatorium for the reception of tuberculosis patients on terms that
would be within the means of the
working classes.
The organization of women wage
workers throughout the country
has become popular and is increasing rapidly. In Chicago there are
twenty five crafts organized, with
31,000 members.
It has been voted to remove the
national headquarters of the International Brotherhood of Stationary
Engineers from New York city to
Omaha to facilitate a crusade to
organize the firemen of the West.
It is probable that before the
transcontinental railway bill, now
before the house at Ottawa,Canada,
ie finally disposed of, some provisions will be introduced with a
view to tbe protection of labor.
The miners' strike of last summer seems to have promoted thrifty
habits among the workers. It is
reported that not less than 6000
new saving aooounts have been
opened in Wilkesbarre, Pa., banks
since January 1.
The newly formed International
Brotherhood of Team Drivers and
Helpers' UnionB of Amerioa has
trade jurisdiction over automobile
drivers, and a systematized effort
will be made to organize them all
over tbe oountry. j
S. Shannon, B. A. the Sooia
oandidate in Kaslo riding,
make Bob Green hug the m
nhile Retallick (Liberal) will
his deposit. The miners there
tp over $350 in two hours towa
his campaign fund. Shane
should prove a winner.—Clarion
John Riordan, secretary of
W. P. of M at Phoenix will be t
Socialist representative at Vioto
for the Grand Forks riding. Hi
a fighter, every inoh of the w
kaows what the workers need
understands how to attain it
them. Com. Riordan will be hi
from.—Clarion.
South Afrioan labor unions
making a bid for labor represen
tion in the Cape colonial pari
ment. Aa a preliminary step, tl
have approached Sir Gordon Spri
with a petition to rise the paymc
of members sufficiently for a wot
ingman legislator to live on
salary.
The...
Clothes
And the
Man..
/■S«H-
-H-
To be properly clean and prope
ly dressed is important to a man
character and progress. It is
duty to himself, a courtesy ■
others. And more and more tl
neglect of it is a handicap. Dre:
will carry a fool far, it will enab
merit to gain speedier recogniiioi
It will beguile rrosperity an
plausibly give the l'e to adversit
Your Will Hear
Our Work
highly commended by those wh
know gO"d clothing when they se
it We have the suitings that ai
approved by fashion in textur
and coloring, and we guarante
the fit and workmanship.
Thomas & Co.,:
Wholesale dealers in
Wines,
. Liquors
and Cigars I
Cor. First Ave. & Washington St
'♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦»»•♦♦»♦»♦•»»»»
MORTGAGE SALE
Under and by virtue of Power of Pale
contained in a certain mortgage, which
will be produced at time of sale, there
will be offered for sale by Public Auction
at the premises Le Roi avenue, in thi
Citv nf Rowland, at 12 o'clock noon, on
the 6tb day of October, 1903, by Waller
J Robinson, Auction'er, the followin
property, viz: Lot 6, Block 43, according to Map 579 in the town of Rossland.
Terms of Sale.
Ten per rent of the purcrase money at
time of sale, the balance within thirty
days thereafter, For further particulars
apply to
Macdnell, McMaster & Geahy.,
51 Ydnge street. Toro mo.
Fresh Bread
PIES AND COOKIES
Home Bakery
Columbia avenue, next door to Empey's.
Washington St. and Second Ave. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 19, 1903
*e
Mining  News  of the
Outside
Gamps I
Week Over the Province and the Upper
Country.
^%^fv*y«v%,-%^
I A new tram is beinf bt ilt by B.
C. Rible for th e Silvei Jup mines,
connecting the newly acqui jd mine
adjoining the Silver Cup with the
main tram.
BODNDARV.
The force at the Oro Denoro,
Summit oamp, has been increased
to 25 men.
In Summit Chtnp, between the
Oro Denoro and Emma mines,
there are 40 men employed.
More men are being added to the
Mother Lode mine force now, there
being some 80 men employed there.
Manager Plewman, of the Winnipeg, expects to start shipments of
ore on a small scale shortly. The
mine is now pumped out  down to
the 100 foot level.
t
The Elkhorn mine is shipping
the Boundary smelter. The ore ia
being shipped just as it comes from
the mine, the management having
deoided that nothing was to be
gained by sorting.
The parlies interested in the
Providence are feeling good over
the ore recently enoountered in the
lower level of the mine. The values
in gold are surpassingly high and
discounts anything yet produced in
the distriot.
CAKIBOO.
The wash-up at the Point mine,
for four days work only, last week,
iB said to have been in the neighborhood of 200 ounces, or about
$3,600.
The Eight Mile Lake claim, Jas.
Ruro, manager has had a good season. Reports bo far that $15,000
have been washed up.
Quite a mining revival has taken
plaoe at Stanley. At present over
50 men are employed in the immediate vicinity of Lake La Fon-
taine.attbe Point and Montgomery's
claims.
The mining season in Cariboo
may now be considered to have
closed, and, aocording to an official
estimate, the value of the gold recovered this year, which is put at
approximately $300,000, falls considerably below that of the 1902
yield. The season, in faot, has
been an unsatisfactory one, due to
unfavorable spring weather conditions, and not, as alleged, to scanty
falls of snow last winter.
COAST.
A mortgage for $35,000 is to be
placed on the Britannia mine,
Howe Sound, for the purpose of
building a tramway to tidewater,
ISLAND
The Tyee mine smelted 4,787 tons
of ore last month of a value—less
refinery charges—of $68,885. The
property thus made an excellent
showing.
Mr. James Dunsmuir and a party
of friends were at Cumberland recently looking at the new work al
Hamilton Lake, where two slopes
are being driven into the anthracite
bed and coal is expected to be
Btruok immediately. Workmen
have be;uu to sink a shaft at the
same point.
There has been found at Qual-
sino Sound an apparently rich de
posit of bog or hematite iron. The
bog iron deposit is looated on the
west arm of Quatsino Sound, eight
miles from Coal Harbor, and only
about half a mile from salt water
LARDEAU.
The Oyster-Criterion tramline w
now in operation.
A wagon road is being built into
the Beatrice mine on which considerable work has been done this
Bummer.
The Black Warrior, Mountain
and Treadwell have considerable
ore bodies blocked out, and ore in'
transit to tbe smelter.
The Old Gold-Primrose has al
ready shipped ore giving returns of
over $100 per ton, and a large tonnage is stored at tbe mine awaiting
shipment. .
JuBt as tbe contract for driving
No. 7 tunnel on the Eva was finished the last shots broke into a vein
ol very rioh quartz on the continuation of No. 2 vein. The Btrike is
very important as it proves the
Eva mine to a depth of 700 feet.
The Kootenay Consolidated includes the.following well known
properties about FerguBon: Mountain Lion, Old Gold, Primrose,
Treadwell, Black Warrior.Lardeau-
Duncan, Guinea Gold extension,
Spring Group, Silvery Moon, Com-
stock, Rio Grande, Baltimore and
Amazon.
NELSON
Three thousand dollars, one
tenth of the purchase money, has
been paid to vendors, on the Star
group on the west side of Morning
mountain-, near Nelson.
POPLAR,
The owners of the Gold Park refused $1000 for a nugget found on
their claim.
The Lucky Jack tunnel haB been
run about 50 feet at a vertical
depth of 100 feet, and the values
found on the surface still continue.
J. J. Young of Calgary and
Cochrane Brothers of McLeod are
reported to have paid $35,000 cash
to Eric Larsen for a olaim lying between the Swede group and the
Lucky Jaok.
SLOCAN.
The Ottawa has slightly increased its force.
The lessees of the Black Prince
have started work.
More men are being added to
the force at the Enterprise.
The Ivanhoe is increasing its
force at the mine and mill, employing 65 men.
On the American Boy an 18
inoh vein of solid galena has been
encountered in an uprise between
No. 4 and No. 5 tunnels.
The main lead has been traced
to tbe end of the Montreal olaim,
and in stripping was uncovered a
paystreak of 10 inches of rich ore.
Assays have given 200 to 410 ounces
in silver.
N. F. McNaught continues his
development of the Hampton group
and has taken some very rioh one
A body of it struck during the
week gave returns of 1100 ounces
in silver to the ton.
Bob Sutherland and partners
have a good thing on the Lorna
Doon, Four Mile. They have two
carloads of rioh silver ore ready to
ship, and believe that ihey
will be able to continue regular
shipments.
SIMILKAMEEN.
The new strike on Sixteen Mile
oreek hag been bonded for $75,000.
Tbe ore is bornite and ohaloopyrite.
A small stamp mill is to be installed at tbe Cherry Creek quarlz
mines iu the Okanogan district.
A reoent discovery ou tbe Helen
H. Gardner mine in the Similkameen, iB attracting more than uaual
attention.
D. R. Youug has resigned the
presidency of the Similkameen Valley Coal company; W. C. McLean
is filling the position.
SOUTH E(\ST KOOTENAY.
TheC. P. R. ha? paid $110,000
for four coal claims in the Crow's
Neat.
A large amount of development
work is being done in the vicinity
of St. Mary's lake.
Fifty coke ovens are now completed.   About half of this number
■ire already in use and are turning
j out a splendid sample of coke.
Tbe total coke production for the
month amounted to 19,000 tons
even. This is an increase of nearly
3000 tons over previous record.
The Gold River Mining company
has begun work with a gang of
men outting out the right of way
from the upper canyon on the falls
on Bull river.
The total coal output for August
amounted to 73,600 tons whioh is
an increase of over 2000 tons over
the previous month. This increase
is made up in the Coal Creek collieries, the Michel and Morrissey
collieries remaining about the
aame. -
YMIR.
Lack of water has caused the
closing of the Relief mine and mill
at Erie till next spring.
A strike of high grade galena
and zinc blende has been made in
th* 400 foot level of the Ymir. It i3
reported to be worth over $100 to
the ton. At thiB mine the tram is
to be extended to the No. 2 tunnel.
Shipments were resumed from
the Arlington mine (Erie) on 1st
Jane, and have been maintained
regularly since that date. During
June and July eight oar-loads of
ore were shipped, giving net smelter
returns of $6,653 07. The expenses
during the same period, including
management and Nelson office,
were $5,576, leaving a profit over
working expenses of $1,377 07.
The manager of the Ymir mine
reports the return for July, as follows: 70 stamps ran 28 days,
and crushed 5200 tons, (2000
pounds) of ore, producing 1080,
ounces bullion. Theestimatedrealis- J
able value, gross, of the product is
$12,000, 246 tons of concentrates,
shipped grosB estimated value,
$5500. Cyanide plant treated
3250 tons, 2000 pounds, of tailings,
produoing bullion having estimated gross value of $1300. Sundry
revenue, $770. Total, $19,570.
Working expenses, $21,000. Loss,
$1430. There has been expended
during month on development,
$7250.
TissuePapers
Crepe and Plain
All Colors
Best Quality
OVER 50 SHADES
to select from
Note Papers
All the newest things in shape,
quality and colors.
"Gibson Girl" & "Coon"
Folly and Dinner Cards.
The very latest New York fad.
Goodeve Bros.
Druggists and Stationers.
When vou get it at Goodeve's it's good
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R ATLANTIC S. 3. LINE
from Montreal
M't Temple Sept n L.Crnmplain.Sept 17
ALLAN LINE
From Montreal
Paristan Sept 12 Pretorian.. .Sept 10
DOMINION LINE
From Montreal
Southwark Sept 19 Canada Sept 26
From Boston
Mayflower. Sept 10 Commonw'lth Sept24
AMERICAN LINE
New York... Sept 16 Philadelphia Sept 23
RED STAR LINE
Finland Sept 12 Vederland. .Sept 10.
CUNARD LINE
Ivernia Sept 8 Ultonia Sept 15
ALLAN STATE LINE
Lanrentian . .Sept 17'NuMidian Oct 1
WHITE STAR LINE
Cedric Sept 11 Mai estic Sept 16
FRENCH LINE
LaTourainc.Sept 10 La Savoic. Sept 17
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A. P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F.CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt., Winnipeg
O. W. DEY, Agent,
C. P.R Depot, Rossland.
NOTICE
THOMAS STOUT, the First Avenue
Druggist, has resumed charee of his
business and will be pleased to meet all
his old customers as well as many new
ones.
I
LUMBER
I      Mine Timber a Specialty     $
f  GOOD   WOOD   in  large  or g
small quantities.
R.L Wright!
A.R.S M.
X       (Assayer for Le Roi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
iiCustom Assays ii
»♦♦♦♦♦*«••»'
F0R SALE
On hundred new and
second and stoves. Now
is the time to get a bargain in a good stove.
...THE...
Rossland Bazaar
AJhambra Hotel
Ioarddyer8 $6.50 per week
The only hotel in the city having a dry
room tor miners,    Free Bath Room.
Curse
-OF—
DRINK
CURED BV
COLONIAL   REMEDH
No Taste.   No Odor.   Can be given in glass or
water, tea or coffee*, without fatten?s  knowledge.
Colonial Remedy will cure or destroy the diseased appetite ior alcoholic stimulants, whether
the patieul is a confirmed Inebriate, "tippler,*'
social drinker or drunkard Impossible lor anyone to have an appetite lor alcoholic liquors
after usIur Colonial Remedy.
Endorsed by Members of W. C. T..U.
Mrs. Moore, Superintendent of the Woman's
Christain Temperance Union, Ventura, CalM
writes: "I have tested Colonial Remedy on very
obstinate drunkards, and the cures have been
many. In many cases the Remedy was given
secretly. I cheerfully recommend and endorse
Colonial Remedy, Members of our Union are
delighted to find a practical and economical
treatment to aid us in our temperance work."
Sold by druggists everywhere and by mail,
Price $1. Trial package Iree by writing or calling on Mrs. M. A. Cowan, (for years member of
the Woman's Christain Temperance Union) 2204
St. Catharine St., Montreal.
S8S££ T.R.M0RR0W °SSS
Il Fresh Fruits!!
Received Daily.
Apples, Crab Apples,
Plums, "Watermelons,
Muskmelons. Peaches,
Greapes, Etc.ig^A^ |
#
#
#|
w
#
I*
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
l#
#
*
#
*
#
It
#
Special offering for next
week in Furniture, Carpets, Linoleums, Oil
Cloths, Etc. Below are
a few of the lines : : : :
BED LOUNGES, from $10 00 to $20 00
DINING CHAIRS, 1 00 to     3 00
CENTRE TABLES, 1 50 to     7 50
MORRIS CHAIRS, 10 00 to   20 00
TAPESTRY CARPETS,
BRUSSELS CARPETS,
LINOLEUMS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
50 to
1 00 to
50 to
30 to
20 to
75
1 25
1 00
40
30
If you don't like paying cash I will
sell you all you want on the little
at-a-time-payment plan.
J. M. Jordan
y ^f :w; *w* _jj* ~y ™? "^rf ~w ^* ,y ~y ^ ~y ^ w ~y y* ~y w~ ~y m y w *y ^fb
#
#
#
*
#
#
t,
#
#
*
8
I*,
#1
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trall,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL MARKETS-Rossland, Trail, Nelson. Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish,  Came and  Poultry In Season, Sausages of All Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Retaland Branch
a. ^»»»»»»»»»^»»**»»^»mmmmMt^mmm■»»■»»»»»»»» k■»»■■»»»»"»■»»»»»■»■■>ai«ajiiaaiaaiaiai A
E
E
m
E
For Lunches and Picnics 2 - 1
Libby, McNeill & Libby's and Armour's
CANNED MEATS   I
Try MELROSE PATE,
O. M. FOX & CO., (mm 1
COLUMBIA AVENUE TELEPHONE 65 3
w ■JPww*^PVw»w*^PVvWww^wajaj^ar^para/^rajaTaW"l*^*Jar»w?^rwT WVaranjBj^raj Wvarajw^nja^BvBja^B^ava^ova^B^a) ^a*
EXPLOSIVES.
The Cotton Powder Gomoanv. Ltd
32 Queen Victoria St., LONDON; E. CV
-MANOTACTTJBB
Faversham Powder
On the SPECIAL LIS1 of Permitted ; Explosives.. Ootober, 1901
the best explosive'for underground,work ex
clusively need in Severn and Mersey tunnel
Cordite, Gelignite, Gelatine Dyramite, Blasting Gelatine,  Detonators for all  classes of Explosives.  Electric Appliances,
ine Charges for the removal of   Wrecks,  Etc.,   Etc.
TONJTE
Works: Faversham, Kent and Melling, near Liverpool
ESTABLISHED 1840.
GEORGE GREEN.
THE FOUNDRY.
ABERYSTWYlfl,        -:-        ENGLAND.
: All Preserving Fruits |
Paulson
Bros.
I THE GROCERS
1 SOLE AGENTS—Chilliwaok
f reamery'',Butter1 4,1
»» IIMMMMMlj
Manufacturer of Concentrating Machinery.
MEDALS—Royal Cornwall Polytechnic; Gold medal International Mining Exll
bition, Crystal Palace, 1890.    Unly award for Concentrators.
SPECIALTIES:
Stamps with 1?test improvements, of up-to-date desigr, and with wearing partso-
Hadheld's steel, from 2 cwts. to 10 cwts. per head, Stonebreakers, Crushers, J'jrs
Trommels, Vanners, etc., all constructed in sections for facility of transport if dc
sired. Patent Portable Crushing and Amalgamating Pans ior Prospecting, A
small concentrating plant to treal up to five tons erected At the works by whica
commercial results can be seen by intending purchasers for a merely nominal col
Estimates for complete plants on application.   Special "ttention given to
engineer's specifications,  Telegrams—"JIGGER. AberystwyU. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, SEPT. i9 1903.
I'
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the Magazines are
Saying
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
—Topics Interesting- General Readers.
The Idler for the'current month
is a good number, and contains an
interesting account of the game in
Northern Ontario, whioh article iB
particularly well illustrated.
The Badminton contains several
sporting articles, including one on
tuna fishing in Southern California,
and another on turkey and partridge shooting in Virginia.
The Atlantic monthly oontains
an excellent artiole by Henry
James on that noted French author
Emile Zola, and has, in addition,
an interesting sketch on the banking interests.
Scribner's Magazine for September has several very readable articles, amongst which may be reckoned "A Night Out," by J. Hop-
kinson Smith, and a literary, yet
chatty, article by Senator Hoar on
some famous judges.
Pearson's for tho month is not
quite up to its usual form, but its
patrons will be plaased with the
continuation of the adventures of
'Don Q," and a good article upon
the pastel painter, Mrs. Adrian
Hope.
The Windsor contains another oi
Rudyard Kipling's childs' stories,
upon v hich public opinion is so
much divided. There is also an
article upon a Japan financier,
which is worthy of attention. An
excellent artiole upon the fiscal
polioy of the Empire will also be
widely read, coming at the present
time. Fred M. White contributes
a short story above the average—
"The Heart of an AnarchiBt,"
The Designer for Ootober contains Bome good patterns whioh
can be made up expensively or
cheaply, as best fits the taste of the
wearer.
Among the newer books "The
One Woman," by Thomas Dixon
Jr., has come in for severe handling at the hand of the press in
general. It is a tale of a divorce and
is rather an impossible story. The
abuse is rather superlative. One,
for instance, oan hardly say that
its "morals are utterly bad," without condemning a number of far
better authors.
"Heralds of Empire," by A.
Laut is a breezy story of the pio
neers of the Northwest, which forms
excellent reading for those who
are interested in the interesting story of the genesis oi
the north and withal in the addition of a stirring story of adventure.
"The Sacrifice of the Shannon,"
by \V. A. Hickman, is a tale by a
Canadian author of life in Eastern
Canada, and goes far to explain
why the outside public in general,
having caught on so readily to Kipling's famous misnomer, "Our Lady
of the SnowB."
"Flower-O'-the-Corn," by S. R.,
Crockett, is up to the author's usual
good form and is a  story  of the
/Scotch in France.
"Marie Corelli.the Writer and the
Woman," an appreciation by T.
Coates and R. S. Warren Bell, is a
welcome biographical sketch of a
very well-known author.
Cavendish in his twenty-third
edition of "Whist," has retained
his recent innovations' on whist,
especially in regard to the king
leads and the "show five" game.
He has, however., recanted to some
extent on the wisdom of the long
suit lead iu every particular case,
and also as far as to the advisability
of letting the hand be counted by a
strong adversary. This iB shown
in a pregnant.little sentence—"The
modern system of leading should
be abandoned when an opponent
has shown such strength in trumps,
that it is not advisable for you to
let his count your hand precisely."
CONSERVATIVE PLATFORM
OUTSIDE'
MINE NEWS
What Is Being Done Outside the.Province.
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various Countries in
the Mining of Precious
Metals.
[Adopted at Rovclntoko, Soptombor 13th, 1902,]
1. That this convention reaffirms the policy
of the party in matters of provincial roads and
trails; the ownership and control of railways
and the development of tho agricultural re-
sources of tho provinco as laid down in tho
platfoi in adoptod in October, 18SK), which in as
follows;
"To actively aid in tho construction of trails
throughout the undeveloped portions of tho
provinco and tho building of provincial trunk
roads of public necessity.
"To adopt tho principles of government ownership of railways in ho far as the cireum-
sUinces of the provinco will admit, and tho
adoption of tho principle that no bonus should
be granted to any railway company which
does not give the government of tho province
control 01 rates over linos bemused, together
with the option of purchase.
"To actively assist by state aid in tho devoi
opmontof tho agricultural resources of the
provinco."
2. That in iho meantime and until the railway policy above set forth can bo accomplished, a general railway act bo passed giving
freedom to construct railways under cortaiu
approved regulations, analogous to the system
that has resulted in such extensive railway
construction in the United States, with so
much advantage to trade and commerce.
3. That to encourage tho mining industry,
tho taxation of metalliferous mines should be
on the basis of aperoentage on the net profits.
4. That tho government ownership of telo
phone systems should be brought about as a
first step in tho acquisition of public utilities.
5. That a portion of every coal area here
after to bo disposed of should bo reserved from
salo or lease, so that state owned mines may be
cosily accessible, if their operation becomes
necessary or advisable.
G. That in tho pulp land leases provision
should be made for reforesting and that steps
should be taken for tho general preservation of
forests by guarding against tho wasteful do
struction of timber,
7, That tho legislature and government of
the provinco should persevere in tho effort to
secure the exclusion of Asiatic labor.
8. That tho matter of better terms in tho
way of subsidy and appropriations for the
province should bo vigorously pressed upon the
Dominion government.
... That the silver-load industries of tho prov
incc be fostered and encouraged by tho impost'
tion of increased customs duties on lead and
.'cad products imported into Canada, and that
1'ie Conservative members of the Dominion
House be urged to support any motion introduced for such a purpose,
10. That as industrial disputes almost invariably rosult in great loss and injury both to the
p irties directly concerned and to tho public,
•t jislation should bo passed to provide means
/or an amicable adjustment of such disputes
between employers and employes.
11, That it is advisable to foster the manu
Y. !i ,iro of the raw products of the province
Within theprovinco as far as practicable by
means of taxation on tho said rawproducts,sub-
icst to robato of the same in whole or part
when manufactured in British Columbia.
Conservative Conventions
At a meeting of the executive of tho Provincial Conservative Association, held at Vancouver, the province was divided into five divisions for organization purposes. Tho Kooto-
n;-.y-Boundary division is made up of tho fol-
■owing provincial election districts: Rovol-
toke, Columbia, Fernie, Cran brook, Ymir,
Kaslo,Slocon, Grand Forks, Greenwood, the
City of Rossland and tho City of Nelson. At
the same meeting tho following resolutions
were adopted:
1. That conventions for nominating candidates for members of the legislative assembly
be made up of delegates chosen as follows:
(al In city electoral districts, one delegate
for every fifty and fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial election held iu 1900. and if
the citv is divided into wards, tho proportion
of delegates for each ward shall be based on
the vote polled in each ward at the last municipal election,
(b) In other electoral districts, one delegato
_v every fifty or fraction of fifty votes polled
at the provincial election held in 1900, the delegates to be apportioned to polling places, or as
near thereto as will be air to the voters of the
different neighborhoods.
2. The olection of delegates shall be at public meetings, held at a designated central place
in each Dolling division, or in each ward in city
electoral districts, if the city is divided into
wards. At such public meetings only those
who pledgo themselves to voto for tho candidate or candidates selected at the nominating
convention shall bo entitled to a voto for delegates.
3. Two weeks notico shall bo given of the
publio meetings at which delegates are to be
elected, and nominating conventions shall be
held in city elect oral districts two days after
ho day on which delegates are elected., and in
other electoral districts seven days after. All
nominations throughout the province to bo
made at a designated central place in each
electoral district, and on tho same day.
i. All notices of tho date of public meetings
for the election of dclegatos to nominating
conventions, the apportionment of delegates,
and the place and date of nominating conven-
t'oufl in the several electoral districts shall be
pi jpared by tho member of tho executive of
the division in which the electoral districts are
...I date, and issued over tho names of tho president and secretary of tho Provincial Conservative Association
A mcoting of the provincial executive will
be hold at Vancouver within a month, and the
date for holding district nominating conventions will thon be fixed.
JOHN HOUSrON.
President of the Provincial
Conservative Association.
Nelson, Juno 8th, 1903. tf
Linton Bros.,:
Books, Stationery,
Newsdealers, Toys, Fishing
Taokle, Kodaks and
Supplies.
ROSSLAND,   B. C.
»♦»♦»»♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
In wishing woollens and iiannels, Lever's
Dry Soap (a powder) will bo found Tar/
satisfactory. al
Extensive work is going on in tbe
Mysore gold fields.
Gold prospecting is actively being carried on in British Guiana.
The total gold production of
Rhodesia for June last was $400,-
000.
The June output of Kalgoorlie
oamp, Westralia, was 95,000 ozs.
fine gold.
The Camp Bird mine has sent
$50,000 to England on profit account.
Charter Towers Camp, Queensland, yielded $25,000 in gold during August.
TheWaiti.New Zealand, yielded
during the period ended August 15,
$250,000 in gold.
William Sundheim, a promoter
of the present Bio Tinto mine,
Spain is dead.
The Endopie mine, Rhodesia, is
yielding nearly an ounce of gold to
tbe ton.
The Mineowners' Association o(
Westralia wish to pay all overtime
at ordinary rates.
The Swedish output of iron in
1902 was the highest on record,
2,896,208 long tons.
The Great Boulder Perseverance
and Golden Horseshoe of Westralia
each yielded 17,000 ounces ol fine
gold during June last.
One of the Geological Survey
parties sent out by the Ontario
government reports the discovery
of platinum near Wabigoon in that
province.
The Broken Hill Proprietary of
New South Wales yielded 400 tons
lead and 18,000 ounceB of silver
during the first half of August.
The output of Mount Morgan
during the year ending June 1 last,
was 143,585 ounces gold averaging
half an ounce to the ton.
The gold yield for the past year
in Oregon has been $1,500,000 from
plaoer mining, and over double that
amount from quartz mining.
The production of coal in Belgium during the first half of 1903
was 9 per cent greater than during
the corresponding period of 1902.
The two large mills of the Smuggler Union mines, at Pandora, Col.,
are treating an average of 350 tons
per day under the new management.
A solid breast of silver, running
480 ounces to the ton, has been
discovered on the Alvarado mine,
Mexico. The daily output is now
$200,000.
The St. John del Rey, Brazil,
yielded $34,000 gold for ten days in
August, the ore running slightly
over half an ounce to the ton.
A good strike haB been
made upon the Lincoln mine,
Thunder Mountain. The body ol
ore is six feet wide and goes $150
to the ton.
A steel lined shaft through water and clay has been successfully
sunk on the Free State Colliery
company's property near Viljoen's
drift, Orange River.
A rioh strike has been made near
Atlanta, Idaho, on the Black Warrior oreek of sugar quartz two feet'
wide, going $348.47 in gold to the
ton.
What are known as the South
Range copper mines of the Lake
district, Michigan, are produoiog,
at the rate of 35.000,000 pounds
annually whereas they were unknown seven years ago.
Our New York, contemporary,
the "American Mining News,"
points out that eleven-twelfths of
the placer gold obtained in Alaska
in 1902, amounting to $5,500,000,
was mined in the peninsula extending into the Behring Sea, north of
St. Michaels, which has been named
the Seward Peninsula. The New
York "Sun" prints a map whioh
show that there is aotivity in many
parts of the distriot. Not long ago
the beach at Nome, in the south
west corner of the peninsula, alone
represented mining industry in
this district; but today mining is
in progress on many of the streams
and gulohes in the interior, and
though Nome is still the greatest
product, the other districts contribute a large amount of gold dust
to the total output.
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
Woman's Franchise
One feature which emerges in the
new Australian Federal rolls, the
Colonial Review, notes," is the
great scale of the women's vote. In
Victoria, for example, there are
289,280 males entitled to the
franchise, and 296,824 women voters—an excess of 7600 women
about 21 years of age over men of
the same age.
FUN AND FANCr.
Knowing Ones
"If seems to me," said the au
bum-haired damsel, "that it is
only the men who never marry
who know all about women."
"Or, in other words," replied the
cynical bachelor, 'it is only the
men who know all about women
who never marry."
Wants Realty
"I don't care for your facts and
figures," says a Rossland wife die
puting with her husband on the
price of cigars, "give me the real
truth."
PROGRESSIVE PLATFORM
1. No candidate will be accepted or
endorsed by the pai ty unless endorsing the platform and placing his undated resignation in the hands of the
endorsing body.
2. Government ownership of transportation.
3. Compulsory arbitration of labor
disputes.
4. Absolute reservation of portions
of coal lands by the government. Coal
leases must have a aclaues inserted
governing coal prices. , .'„!£
5. Conservation of forests so as to
produce a revenue and to promote the
pulp industry.
6. Insertion of a clause in all charters forbidding the employment, of
orien tls.
7. Compulsory soaling of all logs by
government scalers.
8. Free transportation to members
of the legislatures and the judiciary.
0. Gradual abolition of all taxes
upon producers and' Their products,
shifting the burden on land values.
10. Restriction of Oriental immigration on the lines of the Natal Act
with a provision for teenactment in
case of disallowance.
11. The abolition of property qualifications for public officers.
12. The establishment and operation of government smelters." and refineries.
13. All franchises and subsidies to
be referred to the electorate.
14. Declaration of election day as a
public holiday, with four hours reserved in any case, so as to allow all
employes an opportunity of voting.
15. Farm lands and implements to
be exempt from taxation and wild
lands to be assessed at the price asked
by holders.
16. No land subsidies to be granted.
17. Ten per cent of public lands to
be set aside for a revenue for education and that children up lo 18 years
be given tree books and meals and
clothing when necessary.
18. Municipalijiation and public
control of the liquor traffic.
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
PROGRESS MADE Br NEW PARTY
Call at the Strand for a fancy drink
Green & Comerford, Props.
What is Being Done by .Socialists
In Canada and the World
Over.
Railroad porters are organizing
against tips.
Socialist local has been formed [at Van Anda, and a oharter
applied for.
Blast furnacemen, in Scotland
have suffered a reduction of 5 per
oent in wages,
Bricklayers at Minneapolis,
Minn., have refused to work with
nonunion laborers.
The Unions of Boston have denounced Governor Bates beoauae
he vetoed the eight hour bill.
The labor traitors have been
pretty well weeded out. Now for
progress and viotoryl—Clarion.
A plan is contemplated for the
federation of all the commercial
travelers' associations of the British Empire.
The Greenwood riding is a cinch
for the Socialist candidate, Com.
Mills, of the Boundary Palls smelter.—Clarion.
There are 1,700,000 domestio ser
vants of various kinds in England
of whom 300,000 are oharwomen and
washerwomen.
In New Zealand municipal ownership of public utilities is no longer
a mere theory; it is an established
fact.
The International Typographical
Union will make a determined
effort for a general eight hour day,
commencing January 1,1905.
A demand has been made by the
Associated Coal Owners of Wales
to the conciliation board for a reduction cf miners' wages of 8j per
cent.
Without a dissenting vote, the
introduction of Asiatio labor to the
Rand mines has been denounced
by the Cape parliament as a thing
not to be tolerated at any cost.
The co-operative union laundry,
which was established by union
laundry workers during the big
strike in Chicago's washhouse last
June, haB been declared a   failure.
A plan has been suggested in
England for the ereolion ot a sanatorium for the reception of tuberculosis patients on terms that
would be within the means of the
working classes.
The organization of women wage
workers throughout the country
has become popular and is increasing rapidly. In Chioago there are
twenty five crafts organized, with
31,000 members.
It has been voted to remove the
national headquarters of the International Brotherhood of Stationary
Engineers from New York city to
Omaha to facilitate a crusade to
organize the firemen of the West.
It is probable that before the
transcontinental railway bill, now
before the house at Ottawa,Canada,
is finally disposed of, some provisions will be introduced with a
view to tbe protection of labor.
The miners' strike of last summer seems to have promoted thrifty
habits among the workers. It is
reported that not less than 6000
new saving aooounts have been
opened in Wilkesbarre, Pa., banks
since January 1.
The newly formed International
Brotherhood of Team Drivers and
Helpers' Unions of Amerioa has
trade jurisdiction over automobile
drivers, and a systematized effort
will be made to organize them all
over the country.
Si Shannon, B. A. the Socia
candidate in Kaslo riding, <
make Bob Green hug the m
while Retallick (Liberal) will 1'
his deposit. The miners there d
up over $350 in two hours towai
bis campaign fund. Shann
should prove a winner.—Clarion
John Riordan, secretary of I
W. P. of M at Phoenix will be t
Socialist representative at Victo
for the Grand Forks riding. H>
a fighter, every inoh of the w
knows what the workers need a
understands how to attain it
them. Com. Riordan will be het
from.—Clarion.
South Afrioan labor unions
making a bid for labor represen
tion in the Cape colonial pari
ment. Aa a preliminary step, tl
have approached Sir Gordon Spri
with a petition to rise the paymc
of members sufficiently for a wot
ingman legislator to live on
salary.
The...
Clothes
And the
Man..
>1++*rt'W
To be properly clean and propei
ly dressed is important to a man1
character and progress. It is
duty to himself, a courtesy t
others. And more and more th
neglect of it is a handicap. Dres'
will carry a fool far, it will enabl
merit to gain speedier recognitor
It will beguile rrosperity sn>
plausibly give the l;c to adversit)
Your Will Hear
Our Work
highly commended by those win
know gO"d cloi hing when they se
it We have the suitings lhat ar
approved by fashion in textur
and coloring, and we guarantc
the fit and workmanship.
Taylor &
McQuarrie
18 and 20 Col. Are.
Thomas & Co.,
Wholesale dealers in
Wines,
Liquors
and Cigars
i 1    Cor. First Ave. & Washington St   \
MORTGAGE SALE
Under and by virtue of Power of Pale
contained in a certain mortgage, which
will be produced ot time of sale, there
will be effered for sale by Public Auction
at the premises. Le Roi avenue, in the
City ct Rowland, at 12 o'clock noon, on
the 6th day of October, 1901, by Walter
J Robinson, Auction-er, the following
property, viz: Lot 6, Block 43, according to Map 579 in the town of Rossland.
Terms of Sale.
Ten pet rent of the purchase money at
time of sale, the balance within thirty
days the. afier. For further paniculars
apply to
Macdnell, McMaster & Geaby.,
51 Yongestreet. Toro 1 to.
Fresh Bread
PIES AND COOKIES
Home Bakery
Columbia avenue, next door to Empey's,
Washington St. and Second Ave.
ftttfc ISdiwa rtZHiiaijer.Pnijii THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 19, 1903
Outside
(Samps
Mining News of the
Week Over the Province and the Upper
Country.
*
k,%%^«iv«V«V%^«
BOUNDARY.
The force at the Oro Denoro,
Summit camp, has been increased
to 25 men.
In Summit curap, between the
Oro Denoro and Emma mines,
there are 40 men employed.
More men are being added to the
Mother Lode mine force now, there
being some 80 men employed there.
Manager Plewman.of the Winnipeg, expects to start shipments of
ore on a small Boale shortly. The
mine is now pumped out down to
the 100 foot level.
■
The Elkhorn mine is shipping
the Boundary smelter. Tbe ore iB
being shipped just as it comes from
the mine, the management having
deoided that nothing was to be
gained by sorting.
The parties interested in the
Providence are feeling good over
the ore reoently encountered in the
lower level of the mine. The values
in gold are surpassingly high and
discounts anything yet produced in
the distriot.
CARIBOO.
The wash-up at the Point mine,
for four days work only, last week,
is said to have been in the neighborhood of 200 ounces, or about
$3,600.
The Eight Mile Lake claim, Jas.
Ruro, manager has had a good season. Reports bo far that $15,000
have been washed up.
Quite a mining revival has taken
plaoe at Stanley. At present over
50 men are employed in the immediate vicinity of Lake La Fon-
taine,atthe Point and Montgomery's
claims.
The mining season in Cariboo
may now be considered to have
closed, and, according to an official
estimate, the value of the gold recovered this year, which ia put at
approximately $300,000, falls considerably below that of the 1902
yield. The season, in faot, has
been an unsatisfactory one, due to
unfavorable spring weather conditions, and not, as alleged, to scanty
falls of snow last winter.
COAST.
A mortgage for $35,000 is to be
placed on the Britannia mine,
Howe Sound, for the purpose of
building a tramway to tidewater,
ISLAND
The Tyee mine smelted 4,787 tons
of ore last month of a value—less
refinery charges—of $68,885. The
property thus made an excellent
showing.
Mr. James Dunsmuir and a party
of friends were at Cumberland recently looking at the new work at
Hamilton Lake, where two slopes
are being driven into the anthracite
bed and coal is expected to be
struok immediately. Workmen
have be;un to sink a shaft at the
same point.
There has been found at Qual-
sino Sound an apparently rich de
posit of bog or hematite iron. The
bog iron deposit is looated on the
west arm of Quatsino Sound, eight
miles from Coal Harbor, and only
about half a mile from salt water
LARDEAU.
The Oyster-Criterion tramline in
now in operation.
A wagon road is beiug built into
the Beatrice mine on whioh considerable work has been done this
summer.
The Black Warrior, Mountain
and Treadwell have considerable
ore bodies blocked out, and ore in'
transit to tbe smelter.
The Old Gold-Primrose has   al
ready shipped ore giving returns of
over $100 per ton, and a large tonnage is stored at the mine awaiting
shipment. .
if
i/%^9y%t%r%r%, mV*y%^r%i%m%r*i%r%f%^^%f%l%r%r%l'%^
• A new tram is being built by B.
C. Rible for th e Silver Cup mines,
oonneoting the newly acquired mine
adjoining the Silver Cup with the
main tram.
Just as the contract for driving
No. 7 tunnel on the Eva was finished the last shots broke into a vein
of very rioh quartz on the continuation of No. 2 vein. The strike is
very important as it proves the
Eva mine to a depth of 700 feet.
The Kootenay Consolidated includes the.following well known
properties about Ferguson: Mountain Lion, Old Gold, Primrose,
Treadwell, Black Warrior.Lardeau-
Dunoan, Guinea Gold extension,
Spring Group, Silvery Moon, Com-
stook, Rio Grande, Baltimore and
Amazon.
NELSON
Three thouaand dollars, one
tenth of the purchase money, has
been paid to vendors, on the Star
group on the west side of Morning
mountain-, near Nelson.
POPLAR.
The owners of the Gold Park refused $1000 for a nugget found on
their claim.
The Luoky Jack tunnel has been
run about 50 feet at a vertical
depth of 100 feet, and the values*
found on the surface still continue.
J. J. Young of Calgary and
Cochrane Brothers of McLeod are
reported to have paid $35,000 cash
to Eric Larson for a olaim lying between the Swede group and the
Lucky Jack.
SLOCAN.
The Ottawa has slightly increased its force.
The lessees of the Black Prince
have started work.
More men are being added to
the force at the Enterprise.
The Ivanhoe is increasing its
force at the mine and mill, employing 65 men.
On the American Boy an 18
inch vein of solid galena haa been
encountered in an uprise between
No. 4 and No. 5 tunnels.
The main lead has been traced
to the end of the Montreal claim,
and in stripping was uncovered a
paystreak of 10 inohes of rich ore.
Assays have given 200 to 410 ounces
in silver.
N. F. McNaught continues his
development of the Hampton group
and has taken some very rich ore
A body of it struck during the
week gave returns of 1100 ounces
in silver to the ton.
Eob Sutherland and partners
have a good thing on the Lorna
Doon, Four Mile. They have two
carloads of rich silver ore ready to
ship, and believe that they
will be able to continue regular
shipments.
The total coke production for the
month amounted to 19,000 tons
even. This is an inorease of nearly
3000 tons over previous re lord.
The Gold River Mining company
has begun work with 0. gang of
men outting out tbj right of way
from the upper canyon on the falh
on Bull river.
The total ooal output for August
amounted to 73,600 tons which is
an inorease of over 2000 tons over
the previous month. This inorease
is made up in the Coal Creek collieries, the Michel and Morrissey
collieries remaining about the
same. .
YMIR.
Lack ol water has caused the
closing of the Relief mine and mill
at Erie till next spring.
A strike of high grade galena
and zinc blende has been made in
thu 400 foot level of the Ymir. It is
reported to be worth over $100 to
the ton. At this mine the tram ie
to be extended to the No. 2 tunnel.
Shipments were resnmed from
the Arlington mine (Erie) on let
June, and have been maintained
regularly since that date. During
June and July eight oar-loads of
ore were shipped, giving net smelter
returns of $6,653 07. The expenses
during the same period, inoluding
management and Nelson office,
were $5,576, leaving a profit over
working expensea of $1,377 07.
The manager of the Ymir mine
reports the return for July, as follows: 70 stamps ran 28 days,
and crushed 5200 tons, (2000
pounds) of ore, producing 1080
ounces bullion. The estimated realisable value, gross, ol the product is
$12,000, 246 tons of concentrates,
shipped groBB estimated value,
$5500. Cyanide plant treated
3250 tone, 2000 pounds, of tailings,
produoing bullion having estimated gross value of $1300. Sundry
revenue, $770. Total, $19,570.
Working expenses, $21,000. Loss,
$1430. There has been expended
during month on development,
$7250.
SIMILKAMEEN.
The new strike on Sixteen Mile
oreek has been bonded for $75,000.
The ore is bornite and chaloopyrite.
A small stamp mill iB to be installed at the Cherry Creek quartz
mines in the Okanogan district.
A reoent discovery on the Helen
H. Gardner mine in the Similkameen, is attracting more than usual
attention.
D. R. Young has resigned the
presidency of the Similkameen Valley Coal company; W. C. McLean
is filling the position,
SOUTH  EAST KOOTENAY.
TheC. P. R. ha? paid $110,000
for four ooal claims in the Crow's
Nest.
A large amount of development
work is being done in the vicinity
of St, Mary's lake.
Fifty coke ovens are now completed. About half of this number
are already in use and are turning
out a splendid sample of coke.
TissuePapers
Crepe and Plain
All Colors
Best Quality
OVER 50 SHADES
to select from
Note Papers
All the newest things in shape,
quality and colors.
"Gibson Girl" & "Coon"
Folly and Dinner Cards.
The very latest New York fad.
Goodeve Bros.
Druggists and Stationers.
When vou get it at Goodeve's it's good
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.R ATLANTIC S.S. LINE
from Montreal
M't Temple Sept n L.Chimplain.Sept 17
ALLAN LINE
From Montreal
Paristan 8ept 12 Pretorian.. .Sept 10
DOMINION LINE
From Montreal
Southwark Sept 19 Canada Sept 26
From Boston
Mayflower. Sept 10 Commonw'lth Sept24
AMERICAN LINE
New York.. .Bept 16 Philadelphia Sept 23
RED STAR LINE
Finland Sept 12 Vederland. .Sept 19
CUNABD LINE
Ivernia Sept 8 Ultonia Sept 15
ALLAN STATE LINE
Laurentian . .Sept 17'NuMidian Oct 1
WHITE STAR LINE
Cedric Sept 11 Majestic Sept 16
FRENCH LINE
LaTouraine.Sept 10 La Savoie. Sept 17
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A. P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P F.CUMMINGS,
G. S. S, Agt., Winnipeg
O. W. DEY, Agent,
C. P.R. Depot, Rossland.
NOTICE
THOMAS STOUT, the First Avenue
Druggist, has resumed charee of his
business and will be pleased to meet all
his old customers as well as many new
on?s.
&  JJIMMlllfl
LUMBER
M ine Timber a Specialty
J  GOOD   WOOD   |n  large  or i
small quantities.
iR.L Wright
.     A.R.S.M.
(Assayer for Le Roi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
Custom Assays ii
FORSflLE
On hundred new and
second and stoves. Now
is the time to get a bargain in a good stove.
...Tnbi.i
Rossland Bazaar
AJhambra Hotel
IoarDyer8 $6.50 per week
The only hotel in the city having a dry
room tor miners.    Free Bath Room.
Curse
-OP-
DRINK
CURED BY
COLONIAL   REMEDH
No Taste.   No Odor.   Can be given in glass or
water, tea or coffce\ without PattenCs  knowledge.
Colonial Remedy will cure or destroy the diseased appetite ior alcoholic stimulants, whether
the patieul is a confirme-l inebriate, "tippler,''
social drinker or drunkard Impossible tor anyone to have an appetite for alcoholic liquors
afier uslns Colonial Remedy.
Endorsed by Members off W. C.T..U.
Mrs. Moore, Superintendent of the Woman's
Christain Temperance Union, Ventura, Cal.,
writes: "I have tested Colonial Remedy on very
obstinate drunkards, and the cures have been
many. In many canes the Remedy was jriven
secretly. I cheerfully recommend and endorse
Colonial Remedy. Members of our Union are
delighted to find a practical and economical
treatment to aid us in our temperance work."
Sold by druggists everywhere and by mail,
Price %x. Trial package free by writing or calling on Mrs. M. A. Cowan, (for years member of
the Woman's Christain Temperance Union) 3204
St. Catharine St., Montreal.
SSfti^l; T.R.M0RR0W °«
I! Fresh Fruits I
Received Daily.
Apples, Crab Apples, i
'' Plums, "Watermelons, ♦
;; Muskmelons. Peaches, i
; I Qreapes, Etc.jffgjff**^ |
All Preserving Fruits j
Paulson
Bros.
THE GROCERS
SOLE  AGENTS—Chilliwaok
reamery'^-Butter
^ y ^*/t y ~y ~y ^ '%£ "%> % '$,<■■ w. v w ~y y ~y y ?*jf tw y y ^ ~y y ^
Rui
Special offering for next
week in Furniture, Carpets, Linoleums, Oil
Cloths, Etc. Below are
a few of the lines : : : :
BED LOUNGES, from $10 00 to $20 00
DINING CHAIRS, 1 00 to     3 00
CENTRE TABLES, 1 50 to    7 50
MORRIS CHAIRS, 10 00 to 20 00
TAPESTRY CARPETS, 50 to 75
BRUSSELS CARPETS, 1 00 to 1 25
LINOLEUMS, 50 to    1 OO
OIL CLOTHS, 30 to        40
MATTINGS, 20 to       30
If you don't like paying cash I will
sell you all you want on the
at-a-time-payment plan.
little-
J. M. Jordan
JL -afc. xl. -<4l Jtt :*-om-.*•**-om-^tr^k-^k-^k-oik-^k>Xk-oik-xk-oik.xt* jk- ^k-otk-^k-oik jrifc
•**■?• •***y •*sy nm "SJF Iff ^T ^K W ?r*   ?|r t|t ?|v ^Tj   7JK tIT ^rV ^F ttt  W m" ^fv ^|v ^fv  ?F ^F|
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Trail,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL MARKETS-Rossiand, Trail, Nelson. Ymir, Kaslo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKlnney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish,  Came and Poultry In Season, Sausages of AU Kindt.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rctaland Branch
i For Lunches and Picnics
a^a^aar^aia^a^a*^aiaiaia*MBa*tal a
1WWl\WW£
We  carry a
full  line  of   ^
Libby, McNeill & Libbv's and Armour's
I   CANNED MEATS   1
Try MELROSE PATE.
I O. M. FOX & CO., GrSi 1
fc COLUMBIA AVENUE TELEPHONE 65 3
^iUiiiiUiiiiUiUiiiiiiiiiUiUiiiiiii^lUUiiUiUiUUiUiiUiUiUlU^
EXPLOSIVES.
The Cotton Powder Gomoanv. Ltd
32 Queen Victoria St., LONDON; E. OV
 MANDFACTUBB	
Faversham Powder
On the SPECIAL LIST of Permitted "Exploravefl. Ootober, 1901
,T"^,N KM "T" r~    the beat explosiveffor underground, work ex
I  \J I ^-|   I   C'   clusively used in Severn and Mersey tunnel
Cordite, Gelignite, Gelatine Dyramite, Blasting Gelatine, Detonators for all classes of Explosives, Electric Appliances,
ine Charges for the removal of   Wrecks,  Etc.,   Eta.
Works: Faversham, Kent and Melling, near Liverpool
ESTABLISHED 1849.
GEORGE GREEN.
THE FOUNDRY.
ABERYSTWY1£,        -:■        ENGLAND.
Manufacturer of Concentrating Machinery.
MEDALS—Royal Cornwall Polytechnic; Gold medal  International  MininfExll
bition, Crystal Palace, 1800.    Only award for Concentrators.
SPECIALTIES:
Stamps with iMest improvements, of up-to-date desigr, and with wearing partso-
Hadheld's steel, from 2 cwts. to 10 cwts. per head, Stonebrcakers, Crushers, Jigs
Trommels, Vanners, etc., all constructed in sections for facility of transport if tic
sired. Patent Portable Crushing and Amalgamating Pans lor Prospecting, A
small concentrating plant to treat up to five tons erected at the works by whica
commercial results can be seen by intending purchasers for a merely nominal cos
Estimates for complete plants on application.   Specud »"c.?li'>°K*T*»'(°
engineer's specifications.  Telegrams—"JIGGER, Aberystwru. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, SEPT. 10 1903.
The Saturday World
By the World Pnbllihliut Company.
Kntercd at Ihe Rossland, B. C, postofflce for
transmission through the mails,May I, iooi as
second class reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATKE—$!,oo per year ln-
Tariably in adrance. Ad reining rate. mate
known on application.
LONDON   RATES-9 s. per   annum
JAMES H. FLETCHER.
GENERAL   MANAGER
P. 0. Box 902 Rosaland, B. C.
THE PREFERENTIAL TARIFF
Published   broadcast   over  the
whole of Canada during the past
week, through the agenoy of ihe
Associated Press, is a lengthy article, partly fact, partly notion, but
moBtly gratuitous and unjustifiable
comment, relating to the issue of a
pamphlet   by Premier Balfour on
the  fiscal   issues now before  the
Empire. The pamphlet is distinctly protectionist.   Mr. Balfour professes himself a free trader, but declares that free trade as ruling in
Great   Britain   today is merely a
condition of  affairs that  delivers
the country bound into the hands
of her commercial -enemies.   He
believes that the greatest aid free
trade has ever had was not from
Great Britain in its free trade poll
oy of the last fifty years, but by the
United States in tho latter's con
sistent protectionist polioy over the
same period of time.   The reason
of this belief is the free trade that
prevails between every state of that
great union.   Arguing purely from
an insular point of view, the premier has little to   say about the
colonies, and less about preferential
duties.   The Associated Press im
proves thiB bo called opportunity,
solely in what it thinks to be the
interest of the United   States, by
declaring that this attitude means
the abandonment of Chamberlain's
fiscal polioy.   Now that polioy is
also one of protection but superadds a  preferential tariff in favor
of tbe outlying portions of the Empire.    The   premier  admits  that
the   exports of  Great Britain are
showing no increase, and from this
argues, on selfish   grounds alone,
that a change of policy is imperative if Great Britain is to maintain
ita plaoe in the race for commercial
supremacy, in which for so long a
time it has been easily first,  but
which now is being gradually closed
in upon by other nations.   Chamberlain    advances   exactly    the
same    facta      and    sets     forth
figures     in     corroboration     He
then    advocates    a ] preferential
tariff.   But before there oan be any
preferential tariff there must firs!
be a protectionist tariff on which to
grant   tbe   preferential    rebates
Balfour  urges  that  protectionist
tariff. Chamberlain wants to grant
that   preference  to   the  colonies.
Balfour says that the greatest instance of its advantage is shown in
the zollverein between the States of
the American Union.   This ia tantamount to the same thing.    The
Associated Press says tbat this is
not so.   ThiB is the sort of thing
the morning RoaBland paper allows
to appear in its columns without
editorially referring to ita gross inconsistency and the deliberate attempt to  pervert   public opinion
It is likely enough that the elections will go against Chamberlain.
It is almost certain, if such be the
case,   that  within   a   very  short
period the decision will be reversed
by a more matured public.
This is evidently enough the
opinion of the premier in his letter
of acceptance of Chamberlain's resignation of thesecretaryshipof the
colonies, Mr. Balfour points out
that the question of protection is
now   being favorably   received in
government scalers.
6. That s-ich legislation should be
enacted as will reiult in making the
lands included in the various dyking
aieas avai able for cultivation as quickly
as possible and secure prompt payments
of assessments when due.
7, That the government should keep
in touch with the conditions in connection with mining, protecting said indus
Great Britain, but that while that try againBt combines and  trusts  and if
necessary  for  the purpose  build  and
operate smelters  and  refineries.    No
a preferential tariff for the colonies
is an inevitable corollary on Imperial lines of policy that preferential tariff cannot as yet take the
form of a rebate on a duty on food
stuffs. Yet after all the foodstuffs
are-exaotly that which the outlying portions, the granaries, of the
Empire would care to see taxed.
Again the agricultural interests in
Great Britain, always powerful,
would also like exactly the same
polioy. Under such an issue the
elections must be forced. The Liberals will probably win out for the
time being, and in faot express
themselves confidently that such
will be the case.
NOTE AND COMMENT.
A British Columbia judge has
been found to declare that Duns-
muir has the right to employ Chinese in his mines even should the
employment work to tbe injury of
white miners. If this is the law it
should be altered mighty quick. In
the meantime if it is not we have
some mighty nice judges in this
province.
There is one consideration with
regard to the transportation of ore
whioh is overlooked by railway companies generally which
is that if ore is sent out of ,'a
mine, it means tho employment of
many men, the bringing in of their
provisions, the freight on machinery
and tools on all of which particularly good rateB obtain. Hence
even if ore is sent away at a cost
which will just pay expenses, the
railway is a gainer by suoh a policy. On the other band an expensive freight rate on ore means curtailed production, and consequently
fewer miners, less supplies and less
machinery and tools.
THE STRAND is a good place to
)end yonr spare time. Good music
reen & Comerford, Proprietors.
Two prizes will be given at the Alham-
bra Bowling alley every two weeks for
t he largest score made,
THE LIBERAL MANIFESTO.
radical change should be made in the
mining laws without full notice to all
parties interested, giving full opportunity
for d'scussion and criticism.
8. As the province cat only advance
hy the settlement within its borders of
thrifty and prosperous citizens, and as
Orientals never become cit'zens in any
proper sense of the word, wo declare it
to be the dutv of the government to discourage Oriental immigration and employment by every means within its
power, and we appeal to our fellow Liberals throughout the Dominion to aid us
in our efforts to protect ourselves against
the ruinous competition of men having a
standard of decency and comfort immensely below that of civilizei peoples,
and who shirk every duty and obligation
of citizenship which the law will allow
them to escape.
9. The government ought to prevent
the waste and suffering caused by strikes
and lockouts, and an earnest effort ought
to be made to provide some means of
preventing such! strikes and lockouts,
and we approve the adoption of compulsory arbitration.
10. The fiscal system of the province
stands in need of revision. Taxation
should bear upon privilege rather than
upon industry, and no addition should be
made to the debt of the province except
for public works properly ehargeable to
capital.
11. The retaining of the resources of
the province as an asset for the benefit
of the people and taking effective measures to prevent the alienation of the public domain except for actual bo a fide
business or industrial purposes, putting
an end to the practice of speculating in
connection with the same.
12. The construction and maintenance of roads throughout the province
to aid in the development of the mining
and agricultural districts.
Is sued  to the  Electorate of British
Columbia
The following manifesto has been
issued to the electors by the executive of the British Columbia
Liberal Association:
At a Liberal convention held at the
city of Vancouver on the 6th and 7th
of February, K02, the following platform was adopted:
1. The immediate redistribution of
the constituencies of the province on the
basis of population, but allowing a smaller unit of population per seat for the outlying districts.
2. Government ownership, Dominion,
provincial and municipal, of public services of utilities is sound and should be
carried out in British Columbia.
3. Should it be advisable at any time
to grant aid to a railway company such
shall be in cash and not in land and no
bonus of any kind shall be given without definite and effective means being
taken to safeguard the interests of the
province in the management of the road,
control of the freight and passenger
rates, and provision made against such
railway having any liability against it
except for actual cost.
4. Immediate construction of the
Ooast-Kootenay railway; the Cariboo
railway, the extension of the Island railway; a railway from Alberni to a point
on the east coast of the Island; a road in
the northern part of the province from
the coast to the eastern boundary with
an extension to the ; northern boundary;
the railway fiom Vernon to Midway by
north fork of Kettle river; with necessary
branch lines, femes and connections.
5. The enforcement of the act now in
force compelling the scaling of logs by
The first plank of the above platform
refers to a subject which, though not a
live issue now, was so when the platform
was adopted. In this matter the rights
of the people have been substantially
secured by the efforts of a handful of
Liberal membc rs who, holding the balance of power during the session of 1902,
compelled an unwilling administration
to pass the present Redistribution Act.
The executive of the British Columbia
Liberal Association desire to call your
attention to the following;
The province is on the eve of a general
election, and for the first time in its history the contest is to be conducted upon
party lines.
Hitherto contests in the province have
been carried on  between  aggregations
bound together rather by interest  than
by   principle,  by private arrangement
rather than by public considerations. In
the past the dominant influences  in  the
several  governments of  the  province
have been Conservative.     The  Prior,
Dunsmuir, Turner and previous governments have been  almost  entirely composed of Conservatives, supported in the
house by Conservatives.    The  present
government,  of which  the  Honorable
Richard  McBride  is premier,   is  the
natural successor in tradition and policy
of that mischievous series of personal
governments which has made this prov-
ince.allhough the richest of any in natural resources, the least  prosperous in the
Dominion.    With our vast mineral and
other resources the progiess of our  development has been  slow and  entirely
unsatisfactory.   Unwise legislation, principally in the interest of speculation,  not
of industry, is responsible to a very large
extent for this condition of affairs.   The
public assels,  public   franchises   rnd
monopolies, have Leen given  away  to
favorite persons and corporations,  instead of being utilized for the benefit of
the people at large, and this has been
going on for so long a  time  that  the
province now finds itself compelled  to
exact from industry that revenue which,
h ad our affairs been wisely  conducted,
could easily have been obtained   from
our squandered heritage.
The last Conservative government,
owing to its maladministration" of the
public affairs of the province, was,
through the efforts principally of a small
band of Liberals, dismissed from office,
and accident and the introduction of
party lines has placed another Conservative government in power, and has
placed tit the head of that government a
man who was not only an ardent supporter of past Conservative administrations, liut was himself a member of one
of them, and shared fully in the responsibility of an attempt on the part of
that government to (rive away to a railway corporation, in dirtct defiance of the
instrnelionH of the legislature as expressed by statute, two large blocks of
enormously valuable coal and oil lands
in Kootenay.
It is the aim of the Liberal party to
place in the field at the coming election
men pledged to remedy the evils from
which we have so long suffered, ,
Among the matters requiring immediate attention are the following:
CIVIL SERVICE   REFORM.
(a) By taking care that the staff of
officials shall not be maintained beyond
the actual requirements of the service;
(b) by making good conduct and efficiency the conditions of tenure of office; (c)
fitness, not favoritism, to govern appointments.
FISCAL  REFORM.
(a) By keeping expenditure within
revenue, borrowing money if at all only
for works properly chargeable to capital;
(b) wise and provident administration of
tbe natural riches of the province, so as
to bring into the treasury that revenue
which should be derived from our great
nnd varied reeonrcee; we declare ou
conviction that the proper taxes, rents
and royalties can and ought to be.levied
and collected in such a way as to encourage industry, and at the same time
provide sufficient revenue and enable
the government to repeal in whole or in
part certain taxes which now hamper
industry, arrest development and create
dissatisfaction among the people, (c;
In thiB connection the taxation of mines
will receive that consideration which the
importance of the mining industry to the
province demands. It is not claimed by
those engaged in mining that their property should be exempt from taxation,
but they do claim that Ihe present system of levying taxes is unfair, and tends
to discourage the investment of capital
and the employment of labor in mining
enterprise, thus not only retarding the
development of our mineral resources,
but also impeding the prosperity of the
mining community, and preventing the
enlargement of sources of revenue to the
province itself. The present system im
poses a tax on wages as well as on profits, and shouli be readjusted so as to
bear upon profit only,
REFORM IN LAND ADMINISTRATION,
(a) We denounce absolutely the Conservative policy of Ian 1 grants by way
of bonus to railways, and alio the reservation of large tracts of land which has
has obtained in tbe past,
(b) We declare it to be our policy to
hold the public lands in trust for the
promotion of settlement and encouragement of industry. In the case of agricultural lands we favor free homesteads
under conditions which shall effectually
secure the land to actual Bettlers.
(c) Full and exact information as to
all public lands fit for se.Moment should
be obtained by the government, and
made available at eve; y government office for the information of the public.
THE FARMING INDUSTRY
(a) Recognizing 'he importance of
agriculture in the province, we are in favor of placirg the agricultural department of the government on a thoroughly
practical and efficient basis.
(b) The bud management and inefficiency of the government have imposed
upon the owners of the dyked lands a
much heavier burden than they should
have been called upon to bear. We
would enact legislation making the lands
included in the various dyking areas
available for cultivation as quickly as
possible. This whole question calls for
prompt attention and settlement upon a
basis which shall be at once just to the
owners of these lands and fair to the taxpayers of the province as a whole.
(c) In the interest of agriculture in
what is commonly known as the dry
belt, the question of the proper utilization of the water supply for irrigation
purposes demands and must receive
prompt attention from  the government
ROADS.
The present lack of system of constructing and maintaining roads and
trails is productive of a serious waste of
public money, and in this connection
more can be done to open up new districts where roads are needed, and at
less cost than what has been done in the
past, under the wasteful and corrupt system which has been so long in vogue.
PUBLIC HEALTH,
The Health Act should be amended so
as to meet the growing requirements of
unincorporated districts in respect of
sanitation and isolation, as to which no
adequate provision is now found upon
tbe statutes.
PROVINCIAL RIGHTS.
Regardless of all question of party
affiliation, the rights of the province under the constitution should be jealously
guarded. While, from the point of view
of Dominion politics, we heartily eup
port the government now in power at
Ottawa, we shall at the same time insist
moBt firmly upon the protection of o- r
people by the exclusion of Oriental la
bor. and we shall also insist upon the
right of the province to make such provisions as it may see fit in all contracts,
grants and leases under provincial control. We shall also strenuously presH
upon the Dominion government a readjustment of our financial relations, and
we claim the full enjoyment of all ri£hts
given us by the letter and spirit of the
constitution.
In conclusion, we appeal to all patriotic voters in British Columbia to seize
the opportunity now presented to them
to rid the province of that Incubus which
has been so disastrous to iln progress,
and to' secure sane, progressive and
stable goyernment by placing the Liberals in power at Victoria.
STUART HENDERSON, Pres.
T. S. BAXTER, Sec.
Vancouver, September 4,1003.
****■•*•••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••
***•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
HAS taken the premises lately occupied by Vaughan
& Cook, corner Columbia avenue and Spokane street, -where
he is better than ever prepared to attend to the wants of
his numerous customers. Fresh
Fruits for table and preserving arriving daily. All kinds
df Vegetables in season. Cantaloupes and Sweet Potatoes.
Vinegars and Pickling Spiceo
kept in stock. Ranch Eggs
and Best Creamery Butter.
Fruit Jars, pints, quarts and
one-half gallon sizes.
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
^i*1*1^tt**KS^CS**?t^^&
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
#
*
TH
.PALACE)
RALPH HARROW, PROP.
Rossland's
Leadinq
Hotel..
tt#4H&4M&
t   Sample Room
*
For Commercial Men.
Finest Grill in Kootenays
IN CONNECTION.
FIRST  CLASS
Bowling Alley
AND
! BILLIARD ROOM
*
m
*
*
*
*l
*
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
*4'4'4»4'4»4»iK![£g3|f|4»4"f'4'tf IHE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND B. C, SEPT io, 1903.
MINOR MENTION
in
J. L. Whitney is back from Poplar.
The school attendance is steadily
growing.
Arthur   Hickling   is back  from
England.
Jim Young is off to the coast on
a vacation.    •
Hon.   R.   McBride   iB expected
here next week.
Sam Tonkin has retnrned from a
visit to England.
Smith Curtis is baok from a trip
to the Boundary.
Frank Fortin is baok from a
visit to Spokane.
Big Bill Galliher is expected
back from Ottawa.
The I. X. L. ore is being steadily
run at the O. K. Mill.
A son was born yesterday to Mr.
and Mrs. M, T. Moran.
Fred Moffatt of Nelson was
the town during the week.
The High Sohool Debate Society
is about to make its debut.
Local masons . have been having
a high old time at Northport.
The Eastern Star had a pleasant
sooial on Wednesday evening.
Boaooe B. Leslie left for Spokane
this morning on a ten day trip.
Hotel men do not like the Bank
saloon's cutting the price of beer.
The oity taxes are coming in
well now that times are pioking
up.
A. G. Creelman and family have
returned from an outing at Kitchener.
W. H. Aldridge of the Trail
smelter is expected back from
Montreal.
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs.
J. Davidson died yesterday and
buried today.
An examination  of the Velvet
mine is being  conducted by An
drew Larsen.
The infant daughter, Dorothy, of
Mr. and Mrs. S. Sidell was buried
this morning.
Mrs. Baillie and family, together
with Mrs. and Miss Kepke have
removed to Poplar.
Charles Bernhardt is foreman of
construction on the new War Eagle concentrator.
The C, P. R. Telegraph office has
introduced a typewriter that telegraphs directly.
Harry Robinson on probation
for a month at the firehall has resigned his billet.
Tbe Miner has again been guilty
of poetry. The subject was beer.
Truly a drouthy choice.
A social was given last evening
to the Sunday sohool children of
the Churoh of St. George.
The danoe of the Rathbone Sisters at Miners' Union Hall during
the. week scored a success.
A. S. Goodeve has gone to the
ooast whence he may carry away
the provincial secretaryship.
Including office salaries the payroll in camp was well over 1100,-
000 for last month.
Superintendent Eye of Silioa is
take oharge of the War Eagle concentrator on Stoney oreek.
The Knights of Pythias have
been welooming distinguished visiting brethren during tbe week.
A surprise party was given to
David Johnson during the week on
the occasion of his forty-fifth birthday.
Barney Mullin and George Mo-
Laughlin are to have a glove fight
at the International on Tuesday
next.
Frank Armstrong has been
brought  baok   from the  Lardeau
suffering   from a severe attack of
fever.
The request of Rossland Liberals
that the oity be granted a special
postal bag for Fire Valley has been
granted.
Monday   being   the  autumnal
equinox disturbed weather condi
lions must be expected for the coming wetk.
A. Stewart   of   the   police force
was married on  Wednesday at the
Presbyterian  churoh,  to  Miss H
Stanaway.
Grouse are fairly plentiful this
year: 71 birds are reported to have
been shot over one dog. Must be a
good one.
Mr. and Mrs. Weaver had a
pleasant sooial at their residence
on North Washington street on
Thursday night.
The Miner thinks that Hon. A,
S. Goodeve has no ohance of election. The wrong oandidate was put
up, don'tcher know!
R. T. Lowery has paid this
office a visit during the week.
That's why these columns are
brighter than ufiual.
A traveller tried to bilk the Ho
tel Allan during the week, out of
his bill. The unlucky man was
arrested, at the depot.
Tbe Miner haB now gone in for
astrology, and will cast horoscopes
for the benefit of the political
parties.   They are both thankful.
Three false alarms were turned
in on Saturday night last. The
police have no clue. Tbisis strange
Police most always do have a clue.
The Tennis tournament has yet
ts be completed, the Mixed Open
Doubles and the Men's Handicap
Singles having their finals yet to
play.
D. McDonald, a lineman belonging to the West Kootenay Power &
Light company has been thrown
from his horse, sustaining a broken
shoulder.
H. G. Danger, a London lawyer,
is here investigating charges
against Whitaker Wright. The
evidence of the Hon. Charles Mackintosh is to be taken.
The only thing that the mayor
oan possibly regret at tbe present
time is that he is not a sohool trustee. Let's lump the whole thing
and make him Rossland's Pooh
Bah.
The Miner does not understand
why the Liberal candidate should
draw a distinction between bona
fide prospeotors and alien speculators. Perfectly natural that on the
part of the Miner.
Somebody or bodies before this
ought "to have gone along with a
rope and jerked down those carnival arches, as about the best means
of stopping the protracted argument between Dean and Nelson.
R. W. Grigor has been trying to
persuade some of the delegates of
the Chambers of Commerce of tbe
Empire to visit Rossland. They
being unable to appreciate Ramsa-
ian wut the Clerk of Works failed.
A Chinese 000k was found in a
starving oondition yesterday on the
hills on the far side of the Columbia, by J. Chambers. The unfortunate man has been missing for
12 days, out on a hunting expedite in.
council, and the proceedings of
which are carried on in a back
room instead of the hall built for
the purpoee, there were not sufficient alderman present when tl e
mayor at last adjourned to enter
the publio purview. The regular
hour for meeting of the council is
8:30 o'clook in the evening. Protests have been vainly made for
some time past as to the habit of
the councillors to indefinitely postpone this. On Tuesday night the
the hour went beyond 9 o'clock
and consequently a couple of the
aldermen, Messrs. Armstrong and
Talbot made a more effective protest by, going home, leaving tbe
council thus without a quorum.
The mayor wants the committee
meetings on some other night and
thus occupy yet more of the time
of the councillors but the protestors merely wish him to abjourn
the committee meeting when tbe
hour comes for the open discussion
of public business.
MARKET
REPORTS
Retail Prices in Rossland
Stores.
GROCERIES AND MINE SUPPLIES
Corrected Up to Date by the Leading Merchants of the
Camp.
Spokane Industrial   Fair Oct. 3 to 13
For (he above occasion the Spokane Falls & Northern   Railway
will sell round trip tickets to Spokane  at  one  and   one fifth, viz:
$6:16. Selling dates October 4th to
12th inclusive.   Final limit Goto
ber 14th.   Children half fare.
H, P. Buown, Agent,
Rossland, B. C.
H. A. Jackson, G. P. A.,
Spokane, Wash.
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
Churches desiring special mention of
their services must present the notices
for publication on or before Friday
morning.
Come and see us at   the  Strand, you
will be treated right. Green & Comerford
If your want to bowl try the Alhambra
Best ally in the city,
AT THE CITY COUNCIL
Illegal Delay Causes Council to Be Minus
Quorum.
There was an unexpected denouement to the usual Tuesday
evening proceedings of tbe oity
oounoil by there being no quorum
present when the public's business
had to be transacted.
All the oounoilmen were present
with the exoeption of Alderman
Daniel but as the time was consumed in some mysterious transactions in committee, the minutes
of whioh are never  read  in open
Salvation Army.—7 a.m., Knee
Drill; 11 a.m., junior meeting; 3
p.m., Free and Easy; 8 p.m., Salvation meeting.
Church of the Sacred Heart.—
Rev. M. W. McKinnon^in charge.
First masB 8:30 a.m.; Second mass
10:30a.m.; Sunday School,2:30p.m.
followed by Benediction of the
Blessed  Saorament.
St. George's Church—Rev. J. A.
Cleland, rector Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity. 11 a. m.,
Matins and .Holy Communion;
2:30 p.m., Sunday School;
3:30 p.m., Holy Baptism; 7:30
p.m., Evensong.
Baptist Church—Rev. M. Van
Sickle, pastor. Services at 11 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Sunday scLool and
bible class, 12:15 p. m.
Methodist Church.—Rev. R. F.
Stillman, B.A., pastor. Services 11
a.m., and 7:30 p.m. Class meeting
at 10:15 a. in. Sunday school
and   Bible   class    at   2:30   p.m.
St. Andrew's Church,(Presbyterian.)—Corner First avenue and
Queen street. Public worship at
11 a.m., and 7:30 p.m. Sunday
school and Pastor's Bible class,
2:30 p. m.
LATEST NOVELS, J'
SHEET MUSIC,
PAPER,
♦ TALLY CARDS FOR SOO ♦
| M.   W. Simpson's <>
<WMMMMM«»M»»M«»
Harry Mcintosh
DIRECT IMPORTER OF
'PERFECTION'
SCOTCH
Vintage of 1878
Guaranteed Absolutely Pure
Bass' Burton Ale on Tap
—AT—
HMman House
MINING   SUPPLIES.
Axes, per doz $7.50-10.00
Candles, per case $5.50-6 50
Caps, Bennett, per box 75c
Coal, blacksmith per ton $22 50
Dynamite, 60 per ot, per lb 19^0
Dynamite, 50 per ct, per lb 18o
Dynamite, 40 per ct, per lb 16^0
Fuse, Bennett per 100 ft 75o
Hammers, per lb 15c
Iron, per lb 3£-5o
Nails, base, per keg $4
Shovels, per doz $7.50-10
Steel, Canton per lb 8$o
MEAT AND POULTRY.
Bacon, per lb 18-20c
Beef, per lb (side) 9 lOo
Chickens, each 50-90o
Fish, per lb 12f 15o
Ham, per lb 18-20o
Mutton per lb (side) 13-15o
Turkey, per lb 23c
Veal, per lb (side) 18o
PROVISIONS
Almonds, per lb 25o
AppleB, per 501b box $1.25$1 50
Bananas, per doz 40c
Beans, per lb 6c
Blackberries, per box 15c
Butter, per lb 25-35o
Cheese, per lb 20c
Chocolate, per lb 40-50o
Cocoa, per lb 40c $1.00
Coffee, per lb 25 50o
Condensed Milk per can 15c
Dried Peas, per lb 8o
Eggs, per doz 30-40
Flour, per 501b $1 60-1.65
Grapes, per lb 15c
Honey, per lb 25o
Jams and Jellies per lb 12-13o
Lard, per lb 17^0
Onions, per lb 5c
Oranges, per doz 40-50o
Peaohes, per 201b box $1.25
Pears, per 401b box $1.60
Pickles, per qt 20o-25o
Plums, per 201b box 50o
Potatoes, per 1001b sack $1.00
Rioe, per lb 8c
Rolled Oats per lb 5o
Sugar, per lb 6-Jc
Vinegar, per gal 50c-75o
Walnuts, per lb 25c
Watermelons, each 50-60c
FEED
Bran, per ton $27
Hay, per ton $27
Oats, per ton $32
Shorts, psr ton $30
MISCELLANEOUS
Coal, per ton, Gait, $8.50
Kerosine, per gal 50o
Soap,- per bar 5c
Wood, per oord $4.50-65.50
For th3 balance of the season we offer our large stook of Women's
Oxford Ties at greatly reduced prioes.   NOTE THE FALL:
Pine Pat. Colt Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Pat. Kid Oxford Ties, -welt,
Pine Pat. Calf Oxford Ties, welt,
Pine Dongola Oxford Ties, -welt,
Pine Vici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
Pine Yici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
Pine Vici Kid Oxford Ties, turn,
$4.00 now $3.20
4.50 now 3.50
4.00 now 2.00
3.00 now 2.00
3.00 now 2.40
2.50 now 1.75
2.00 now 1.60
Do not misB this ohance to get nice Summer Footwear at low prioes
w.f. mcneill
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR.
Vegetable Hair Renewer
Just what you need if your hair is faded or turning grey, for it always restores the color. It keeps
tbe scalp clean and healthy and makes the hair
smooth and soft. The hair grows long and heavy
and does not split at the ends.
PRICE 75C. AT
Morrow's Drug Store
TENNIS    TOURNAMENT
State of the Games in the Principal Series Now Being
Played Off.
Men's Open Singles.
Rose	
Lewer  Rose.
Phipps	
Anderson Fnipps.
Phipps.
Site::::::0uime"e---
Hamilton Davis
Davis	
Phipps.
Davis.
Dewdney.
LABOR UNION.DIREGTORY
Officers and Meetings.
NELSON MINERS UNION
No. ob, W. F. M. Meets
every Saturday evening at
7:30 o'clock. Thos. Roynon,
Pres., Frank Philips, Sec.
Visiting brothers cordially
invited.
YMIR MINERS UNION
No. 85, W. F. M., meets
every Wednesday evening
at 8 o'clock in Miners' Un
ion hall. Robert Elliott,
Pres., W. B. Mclsaac, Sec.
GREENWOOD MINERS UNION
No. 22, W. F. M., meets every
Saturday evening in Union hall,
H. R. Parsons, Pres., Geo. F.
Dougherty, Seo.-Treas,
Potppeian Massage Cream
Removes, Blackheads, Freokles
and PlmppleB and brings color the Cheeks.    For Sale at
Royal BarberShop
SUPPLY HOUSE,
W. J. PR EST, PROP
Macdonald.
Dewdney
Buckingham     _    , .    ,
Eden... Buckingham.
McNeill ,, „ .„
Morkill McNeill	
Claudet.... Bye
Buckingham M
Buckingham...
Buckingham.^
McNeill
Men's'.Open Doubles.
Eden & Ouimette..
Davis &Rose.
Bye
Bye
Falding & Dempster.
Bye
Richardson & Fraser.
Grant & Morkill
D.AR.
D.& R..„
R.&F.
R. * F..
Dewdney & Phipps ..
Macdonald & Claudet D. & P.
Viels & Kamm.
D.AP.
Lewer & McNeill
Bye
Bye
Buckingh'm-Carmc'l.
Bye
D, k P.
D.AP.
B. AC.
Mixed Open Doubles*
Miss Fraser A Richardson .
Miss Falding & Dewdney .. *. A D.._
Mrs. Richds'n & Bucking'm •
Mi=s Boultbee & Fraser R. S B.,
F.AD.
Miss Homer & Ouimette,
Miss Shrapnel & Phipps ,
•S.&P.
Mrs. Scott & Coulthard ....
Bye
S. Ac P.,
Ladles' Handicap Singles
Mrs. Hunter 1-6
Bye
>'«
Miss Fraser 1-2 30...
Bye
Mrs. Richardson -15..
Bye
Miss Homer 15 uill B1,.„ „,
Miss Shrapnel 1-6 is MlM8hr»PneI
Mrs. Mackenzie 30 ..
Dye
Miss Boultbee 1-6 is.
Bye
Mrs. Scott -30.
Mrs Hunter.
Miss S...
Miss Shrapnel
Mn. Scott.
Miss Boultbee .
Mrs. Scott.
Miss Falding-is
1
Bye
Bye
Mrs. Scott. THE SATURDAY EWORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT, 19  (Q03
OUTSIDE POINTS OF VIEW
What the Outside Newspapers are Saying.
r-YRITIC   SMELTINC1
Since the publication of an article on thiB subject in this paper,
says the London Mining Journal,
some useful records of recent practice have become available, and
muoh of the misunderstanding previously existing is being removed.
The term "pyritic flmelting" is undoubtedly vague, for it may mean,
in the words of Dr. Percy, the
smelting of gold and silver ores
whioh are either free from lead or
do not contain it in sufficient quan
tity to collect the silver in conjunction with pyrites in order to produce regulus, in which the silver,
may be concentrated. On the other
hand, it may mean a process in
which part of the heat is supplied
by tbe burning of pyrites and part
by coke, as in Mr. Walter E. Kooh's
process.
Striotly speaking, the meaning
Bhould be the smelting and concentration of pyrites and regulus
with the formation of a siliciouB
slag by the aid of the heat derived
from pyrites alone. Mr. Franklin !
R. Carpenter shows that when pyrites is used as a oarrier of precious
metals the process is a success, but
when added as a fuel or a flux,
difficulties arise that render the
use of hot blast essential.
The modification of Percy's original definition dates from the granting  of a   patent  in the  Ignited
States to Mr. Lawrence Austin in
1889.   The theoretioal value ol the
method   patented   by Mr. Austin
under the name of pyritic smelting
is open to discussion, and Professor
Lodin, of the Paris School of Mines,
has not hesitated to assert that its
realization is impossible in practice.
The smelting  of pyritic ore with
addition of solid fuel is, he points
out, an old metallurgical method
for   which a new name was  not
needed.   Iu most  oases the heat
liberated by the combustion of the
sulphides represents only a small
fraction of the total quantity nee
essary to ensure the regular work
i ng of  the  smelter process.   The
economy in fuel resulting from the
utilization of this heat should therefore be considered merely as of secondary importance in the selection
of the method of treatment to h,
adopted for a given ore.
1   Professor Scbiffner, in Mb papei
read at the recent Congrees of Applied Chemistry in Berlin, took 1
much more opt'miBtio view of th<
merits of pyritic smelting.   He re
ferred to the fact that at Tilt Cove,
Newfoundland,    it     had     beei
found   possible  to smelt without
carbonaceous  fuel.   In   all  othei
cases an  addition of 1.5 to 5 per
cent of coke has been found necessary.  Any increase in the addition
of fuel lessens the oxidizing aotion
and thus causes the   formation  of
an inoreased amount of poor regu
lus.   The wildest proposal is to replace the solid fuel by  blowing in
producer gas or oil with the  blast.
These burn at the expense  of thi
oxygen in the  air and lessen the
'.he oxidising action.   Undoubted-
y, the best method of replacing a
part of the fuel is   to   employ ho.
blast.    This increases the intensity
of the chemical reaotions and promotes the  oxidation   of the  sulphides.   It follows therefore that
hot blast is   most  suitable  when
from 25 per cent upwards of pyrites
is present.   From  ore  containing
35 per cent of pyriteB, with lesB
than 5 per cent of coke, and hot
blast, a concentration of 8 to 1 haB
been effected. With a lower proportion of pyrites in the charge,
hot blast causes so powerful an
oxidation that there is not enough
sulphur left to form regulus. In
this case it would be cheaper to inorease the temperature by an increased addition of fuel.
The use of hot blast is also advisable if a Blag fusible with difficulty
has to be formed. It is unsatis-
tory with ores rich in lead sulphide and in zino sulphide, inasmuch as those substances are
volatilised to an increased degree,
and at the same time more silver
is lost.
At Silverton, Colorado, with hot
blast 150 tons were smelted in
twenty-four hours with 7.3 per cent
of coke, whilst with cold blast only
104 tons could be treated with 143
per cent of coke, the yield of regulus being the same. This represents an economy of 4s. per ton of
charge, or of 6s 9d per ton of ore,
Compared with the ordinary
German method the American
method is thought by Professor
Schiffner to present the following
advantages: 1. Absence of roasting, with labor, cost, and loss of
metal entailed; 2. economy in coke
and flux; 3. production of a richer
regulus; and 4. production of a
purer regulus.
From the last mentioned point
of view, the results obtained by Mr.
Herbert Lang at the Blue Dick
mine, Arizona, are particularly instructive. The charge consisted 0!
quartz, in which arsenical pyriteB,
iron pyrites, and small quantities
of other sulphides were disseminated. It couiained[45 per cent of
silioa, and 17 per cent each of iron,
sulphur, and arsenic. o On smelting
with limestone 90 per oent of the
iron, 94 per cent of the sulphur,
and almost all the^ arsenic were
oxidised and removed, so that the
regulus was nearly free from arsenic.
The ideal conditions fur installing
works on the Amerioan plan would
be: 1. High price for ooke and
low price for coal; 2. high wage
and cost of transport; 3. ores in
which a high proportion of zinc,
lime, or magnesia renders roasting
difficult; 4. ores too poor to be
transported, and oontaining copper,
gold, and silver in such condition
that these metals cannot be concentrated either by dressing or by
leaching or amalgamation;   5. ab
sence^)! lead ores for concentration
in lead; and 6. absence of a market for sulphuric aoid.
Pyritic smelting was at first met
with great mistrust, and has been
discarded in many places. The
reasons are not far to seek: Unsuitable charges, lack of proper flux,
employment of furnaces built for
other purposes, insufficiency of
blast, deficient metallurgical knowledge, and anxiety for immediate
profit. At first the advantages to
be expected were exaggerated.
Now that more aocurate information is available more uniformly
satisfactory results may be expected.
The most recent development of
pyritic smelting is the application
of the Bessemer converter to the
process at Sulityelma in Norway.
SIMILKAMEEN CITY, B. C.
Now Is the Time to Buy Lots
in Similkameen Sity, B. 6.
a
CAMP HEDLEY ia the most talked of camp in the province, and situated in rtie centre is Similkameen City, surrounded by
rich mines which will shortly have large payrolls. Over 200 lots have been sold to business people who realize tha't Similkameen will become the metropolis of this distriot. The Nickel Plate mines have expended 1300,000 in development and are at
present building tramways and a 40-stamp mill. Arrangements are being made for the erection of a hwge Bmelter at Similkameen City which will cost about a million dollarB. Besides the Nickel Plate group of claims being developed by one of the richest
mining companies in North America, there are several other groups and properties whioh will shortly be developed, among them
being the Kingston Mines, Rollo, Wellington, Winnipeg, Red Chief and Pollock. Situated as it is in the beautiful 'similkameen
valley, midway between Princet.n and Keremeos, and proteoted from all oppoBil'on in the valley by adjoining a large Indian
reservation, this townsite will become one of the prinoipal mining camps of the Paoifio Northwest. It was only a short time ago
that lots in Rossland, Nelson, Greenwood and other mining centres were selling for the same prioe that they are today being sold
for in Similkameen.   Come in before the boom and double your money.
Similkameen City to Have Two Railways.
The Viotoria, Vancouver & Eastern and the Canadian Paoific railways are starting immediate construction for the Similkameen
which will make this town a railroad centre and divisional point, and when these competing lineB are completed through to the
Pacific coast they will become the main through lines, being the shortest route from the interior to the coast. A large sawmill is
running steadily on the west addition, the only available timbor for miles around. The main street is 90 feet wide, being all
cleared and ready for building purposes. All railways, roads, telegraph and telephone lines will have to oome through this
townsite, which is looated in the centre of the whole Similkameen valley and will become the largest distributing point and
mining oentre in British Columbia.
Similkameen City Lots Will Make You Rich.
_ A large agricultural area to draw from.   Pure water, fine climate, rich mineB, big payrolls.
Lots for Sale $2 to $ 10 Per Front Foot.    ABents in A"•tqwmtih.b. c.
For further particulars apply to
FRANK BAILEY & CO,, Greenwood and Similkameen
J.JH. YATES, Empire State; Building, Spokane.
JAMES H. FLETCHER, 120 Columbia Ave., ROSSLAND
*4K31
Smelting for copper regulus with
45 to 50 per cent of copper is carried out in a converter, and the
regulus is smelted for black copper
in a second converter. The prooess
is effeoted without fuel. The converter has ^ capaeity 01 7 tons
of reguluB, and the charge is treated in four and a half hours. The
lining of the converter consists of
magnesite. The blast is not heated
and enters through 18 tuyeres made
of iron pipe. It requires 85 horse
power. The Blag contains one per
cent of copper, and is further treated in a reverberatory furnace. At
the beginning of the blow a
few lumps of coke have to be laid
before the tuyeres in order to form
a filter for the fluid slag and regulus. The method is also adopted
for nickel smelting, and appears to
have a useful field in districts
where fuel is dear, power cheap,
and injury to vegetation from
fumes not of serious moment.
Pyritic smelting in the converter
is also oarried out with conspicuc
ous success at Mount Lyell. There
the BeBsemerising of the ores is
carried on in three stages. First
he enrichment of the ore to a 12
per cent regulus; second, an enrichment from 12 per cent to 45
per cent; and, third, the conversion
of 45 per. cent regulus to blister
copper.
The reactions taking place have
been described at length in a recent
article by Mr, Donald Clark. Four-
tteen years' experience of pyriti
smelting in the United States and
Australia proves conclusively that
the process presents notable advantages. Nevertheless, it is difficult
to state in general terms what Ihe
experience of the process haB been,
because looal conditions have great
weight, the mode of procedure
varies considerably, and few systematic investigations have been
made or published.
Further numerical details are
required, and it is greatly to be de-
aired that metallurgists engaged in
work of this kind Bhould place their
experience on record.
-— ' fill 0
SATURDAY WORLD
$2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
CHIEFLY DEVOTED TO
Mining and Social Matters
Special Columns
Will be  Literature, Current Topicp, Canadian,
Imperial and Foreign Affairs.
•
A Serial Story Will Run
A
ALL THE LATEST INEWS
OF THE DAY.
Eight Pages!    Eight Pages!
•
GOOD SUNDAY READING.
 IHE —	
SATURDAY IVORl
.D1 /
1 HE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND B. C, SEPT io, 1903.
Le Roi Feed
and Sale Stables
John F. Linburg, Prop.
Best Turnouts in the City.
Saddle homes for fishing'and hunting parties a specialty.
Telephone 39.
Rossland, B C
TISKETS
Nelson 61 Fort Sheppard Railway.
Red Mountain Railway
Washington & Great Northern R'y
Vancouver,Victoria & Eastern R'y Si
Nav. Co.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••a••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••a •'••••••!
• • ••
• •        BY ••
• • ••
• • ••••••••••••• C
« •
■ •
< •
PHRft
The Phoenician.
TO ALL  POINTS
EAST and WEST
VIA
SHORT LINE
TO
St. Paul,Duluth,Minneapo!is,Chic3go
and all points east
Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria, Portland
and all Pacific Coast, points
Through Palace and Tourist Sleepers
Dining & BuSet Smoking Library Oars
2-Fast Trains Through Daily-2
For rates, folders and full information
regarding trips, call on or address any
agent 8. F. & N. Railway.
H. BRANDT, C P A T A,
701 W Riverside, Spokane
ABC DENNISTON, G W P A,
Seattle, Wash.
H. P. BROWN. Rossland Agent
The only all rail between points east
west and south to Rossland, Nelson,
Grand Forks and Republic. Connects
at Spokane with the Great Northern,
Northern Pacific and 0. B. & N. Co.
for points east, west and south; connects
at RosBland and Nelson with the Canadian Pacific R'y.
Connects at Nelson with K. R. A N.
Co. for Kaslo and K' & S. points.
Connects at Curlsw with stage for
Greenwood and Midway, B. C.
BuSet cars run between Spokane and
Northport.
Effective June 14, 1903
NORTHBOUND.
Leave Spokane 8:4s a.m.
Arrive Rossland 4:3s p.m.
Arrive Nelson 7:20 p.m.
Arrive Grand Forks....   4:00 p.m.
Arrive Republic 6:15 p.m
SOUTHBOUND.
Leave ...Republic 8:30 a.m.
Leave Grand Forks 10:3s ajn
Leave Nelson 7:20 a. m
Leave   Rossland io:4o a.m
Arrive Spokane 6:15 p.m
•• •• ••
EDWIN
LESTER
ARNOLD
For further information regarding
reservation of berths or price of tickets,
apply to any agent of the above com
panies, or to
H. A. JACKSON,
Or if ni FunngrT All
Sprtkan*. wa.li
. . c
SOCIETY   CARDS.
Ff\ TJI FRATBRNAI, ORDKR OP
• VJ. Pj. KAGLK8, Rowland Aerie.
No, 10, Regalai.meetings every Monday even*
Inn, 8 p. m, Kaglei Hall, Carpentera' Union
Bld'g.
J. tevy. W   f.
H, Daniel W. See -tttrv.
I.O.O.F.
Meets In Odd Fellows Hail
en Quet.i Street, between
Firtttand Second fTennes. Regular meeting*
each MondaT night. Visiting brothers are cordially iuTitea to attend and register within jc
days.
W. S.Murphy, Sec.     Jos. Goldsworthy, N.G.
?otve.youLICE
 If bo use-
1*
..on your   a\
POULTR Y ?    oik
SYNOPSIS.
Phra, who dies and lives again, in
Britain, begins to recount his early adventures—He buys a British slave girl
and sails on a trading voyage to Cornwall.
CHAPTER I (continued)
So I called out Blodwen tbe slave
and told her to snuff the wind and
find what it had to say. She knew
only too well, and was vastly delighted, wistfully scanning the long
grey horizon ahead, and being
beside herself with eagerness.
We steered westwardly towards
the outer islands, called Cassiterides
where most of our people collected
and bought their tin, but we were
fated not to reach them. On ihe
morrow so fierce a gale sprang out
of the deep we oould by no means
stand against it, but turned and
fled through the storm and over
Buch a terrible expanse of mighty
billows as I never saw the like of.
To my surprise my girl thought
naught of the wind and sea, but
came constantly to the groaning
bulwarks, where the angry green
water swirled and gleamed like a
cauldron, and, holding on by a
shroud, looked with longing but
familiar eyes at tbe rugged shore
we were running down. At one
time I saw her smile to recognize,
close in shore, and plunging heavily towards some unknown haven,
half a dozen of her own native fisher boats. Later on, Blodwen brightened up even more as the savage
cliffs of the west gave way to rolling downs of grass,and when these,
as we fled with the sea spume,
grew lower, and were here and
there clothed with woods, and little
specks among them of oorn fields,
she shouted with joy, and, leaning
down from the tall prow, where
she had stood indifferent to the
angry thunder of the bursting
surges upon our counter, and the
sting and rattle of the white spray
that flew up to the swinging yard
every time we dropped into the
bosom of the angry sea, she said
ezultingly,' with her faoe red and
gleaming in a salt wet glaze, she
oould guide us to a harbor if we
would.
I was by this time a little siok at
heart for the safety of all my precious things in bales and boxes below, and something like the long
invoice of them I knew so well rose
in my throat every time we sank
with a horrible sinking into one of
those shadowy valleys between the
hissing creBts—so I nodded. Blodwen at onoe made the helmsman
draw us nearer the cost. By the
time we had approached the shore
within a mile or so the white squalls
were following each other fast, while
heavy columns of western rain
were careering a'ong the green sea
in many tall spectral forms. But
nothing cared that purchase of
mine. She had gone to tbe tiller,
and, like some wild goddess of the
foam, stood there, her long hair
flying on tbe wet sea wind and her
fierce bright eyes|aglow with pleasure and excitement as she scanned
the white ramparts of the coast
down which we were hurtling. She
was oblivious of the swarthy seamen, who eyed her with wonder
and awe; oblivious of the white
Jibed of froth] whioh boiled and
¥ I NEW YORK JT1 j flashed all down the rim of  our
fe^^»%I• IU»0R»OW, The tat* Mfej^^
KCS3CS2C^t3iI^CS3CS3CS3£S3KlBmoked up°n onr deckB'and made
Rex Lice Killer $
 For sale by  W
The Brackman-Ker MillingCompany |
14V
ft
ALL KINDS   OF   DRY
W©©D
W. F. LINGLE
Office opposite Great
Northern  ticket offln
next to Bed Star
HLSXSXgXSfflg&gCSXSaBl
:■:
_ __     8
|8 Dr. Bruhn Medical 6o. jjj
DR. BRUHN'S
OINTMENT
Is pharmaceutically, medioinally,soientifioally the
most valuable composition of the century and
marks a new era in the preparation of curatives
for the external treatment of humors of the skin,
scalp and blood, including loss of bair, as well as
for sores, outs, ulcers, wounds, scalds, burns, inflammations, itching piles, eczema, pimples,
chapped hands, chafings, irritations and pain,
soreness and stiffness of the musoleB and joints,
and for many other uses which readily suggest
themselves. This preparation ban been in use for
a quarter of a century. Testimonials from thousands testify as to its curative qualities.
Directions for use—Apply freely night and morning, or often as required.
 PRICE—
50 Cents a
MANUFACTURED BY
our straining sails as hard as stiff
wood.
Just as the great shore began to
loom over us, and I sorely doubted
my wisdom in sailing these un
known waters with such a pilot,
she gave a scream of pleasure—an
exulting, triumphant note that
roused a sympathetic ohorus in the
piping wildfowl overhead—and,
following the point of her finger,
we saw the solid rampart of cliffs
had divided, and a little estuary
was opening before us,
Round went our felucca to the
imperious gesture of that girl, and,
gripping the throbbing tiller over
the hands of the strong steersman'
aglow with exoitement yet noting
everything, while the swart brown
Bailors shouted at the humming
oordage, she took us down through
an angry oauldron of sea and over
a foaming bar (where I cursed in my
haste every ounce I had spent upon
her) into the quieter water beyond,
and when, a few minutes later—
reeking with salt spray, but safe
and Bound—we slowly rolled in
with the making tide to a aeoure,
land locked haven, that brave girl
left the rudder, and, going forward,
gave one look at the opening val
ley, whioh I afterward knew was
her strangely recovered home, and
then her fair head fell upon her
arme, and, leaning against the
mast, under the tent of her red hair
she burst into a passionate storm
of tears.
She soon recovered, and stealing
a glanoe at me, as she wiped her
lids with the baok of her hands, to
note if I were angry, her feminine
perception found my eyes gave tbe
lie to the frown upon my forehead,
so she put on some extra importance (aa though the air of the
place suited,her dignity), and resumed command of the ship.
Weill There is much to tell, so
it must be told briefly. We sailed
into a fair green estuary, with
woods on'either hand dipping into
the water and nodding to their own
glistening reflections, until we turned a bend and oame upon a British
village down by the edge. There
were, perhaps, two hundred huts
scattered round the slope of a
grassy mound, upon top of whioh
was a stockade of logs and mud
walls encompassing a few better-
built houses. Canoes and bigger
boats were drawn upon the beach,
and naked children and dogs were
were at play along the margin;
while women and some few men
were grinding corn and fashioning
boat-gear.
Aa our sails came round the
headland, with one single aooord
the population took to flight, flung
down their meal bags and tools,
tumbling over each other in their
haste, and yelling and scrambling
they stormed away up the hill.
This amused Blodwen greatly,
and she let them run until the fat
old women had snorted themselves
out into a panting rearguard halfway up, and the longlegged youngsters were already scrambling over
the barrier: then, with her hand
over her mouth, Bhe exerted her
powerful voice in a long, wailing
signal cry. The effect was instantaneous. The orowd stopped, hesitated, and finally came scrambling
down again to the beach; and after
a little parley,  being assured  of
their goodwill and greatly urged
by Blodwen, we landed, and were
aoon overwhelmed in a throng of
wandering, jostling, excited Brit'
ish.
But it was not me to whom they
thronged, but rather her; and suoh
wonder and surprise, broadening
slowly in joy as she, with her nimble woman's tongue, answered their
countless questions, I never witnessed. At last they set up yelling
and shouting, and, seizing her
dragged and carried her in a tumultuous procession up the zigzag
into the fortalioe.
Blodwen had come home—that
was all; and from a slave girl had
blossomed into a Prinoesa.
Never before was there auoh a
yelling and chattering and blowing
of horna and beating of shields.
While messengers rushed off down
the woodland paths to arouse the
oountry, the villagers crowded
around me and. my men and,
having by the advice of one of
their elders, relinquished their first
intention of outting all our throats
in the exoeas of their pleasure,
treated us very handsomely, feeding and feasting the orew to the
utmost of their capacity.
I, aa you will suppose was ill at
ease for my fair barbarian who had
thus turned the tables upon me,
and in whose power it was impossible not to reoognize that we now
lay. How would the slave Pri n-
cess treat her captive . master? I
was not long in doubt. Her messenger presently touohed me on the
on the shoulder aa I aat, a little
rueful, on a atone apart from my
rollicking men, and led me through
that prehistoric village street up
the gentle slope and between the
oak log barrier into the long, low
dwelling that was at once the pal-
aoe and the oitadel of the place.
Entering, I found myself in a
spacious hall, effeotive in its gloomy
dignity. All round the three
straight sides the maaaive walls
were hidden in the drapery of the
skins and furs of bear,wolf,and deer,
over these were hung in rude profusion light round shields embossed
with shining metal kuobs, javelins,
and bear speara, with a hundred
other implements of war or wood
craft. Below them stood along the
walls rough settles, and benohes
with rougher tables, enough to seat,
perhaps, a hundred men. At the
crescent shaped end of the hall,
facing the entranoe door, was a
dais—a raised platform of solid loga
closely placed together and oovered
with skins—upon which a massive
and ample ohair atood, also of oak,
and wonderfully fashioned and
oarved by the patient labor of many
bands.
Nigh it were a group of women
and one one or two whiterobed
Druida, aa theae people call their
priests. But chief among them
was she who stepped forth to meet
me, clad (for her first idea had been
to change her dress) iu fine linen
and fair furs—how I scarcely
know, save that they suited her
marvellously. Fine chains of
hammered gold were about her
neck, a shining gorget belt aet with
a great boas of native pearls
upon her middle, and two
bare white arms gleamed like
ivory under their load of bracelets
of yellow metal and prismatic pearl
shell that clanked harmoniously to
her every movement. But' the air
she put on along with these fine
things was equally becoming, and
she took me by the hand with an
affeotionate condescension while
turning to her people, ihe briefly
91
over my virtues, and bestowing
praiBe upon the way in whioh I
had rescued and restored her to her
kindred, until, so gracefully did
Bhe pervert the truth, I felt a blush
of unwonted virtue under my oal-
lous skin; and when they acclaimed me friend and ally, I stood an
inoh taller among them to find myself of Buoh unexpected worth—one
tall Druid alone scowling on me
evilly.
For long that pleasant village by
the shallow waters remembered the
coming of Blodwen to her own.
Her kinsmen had all been slain in
the raid of the sea rovers whioh
brought about her captivity, and
thus—the succession to .headship
and rule being very Btriotly observed among the Britons—the
was elected, after an absence of six
months, to the oath throne and the
headship of the olan with an almost unbroken aooord. Bat that
priest, Dhuwallon, her ooruin,
and next below her in birth, soowl-
ed again to see her seated there,
and hated me, I saw, aa the unconscious thwarter of hie ambition.
Those were fine times, and the
Princeaa bought my cargo of wine
and oil and southern things, distributing it to all that oame to pay
her homage, so that for days we
were drank and jolly. Fires gleamed on twenty hilltops round about,
and the little becks ran red down
to the river with the blood of aheep
and bullocks slaughtered in aaori-
fioe; and the foot tracka in the
woods were stamped into highways,
and the fords ran muddy to ocean;
and the grass was worn away; and
birds and beasts fled to quieter
thickets; and fishes swam oat to
the blue sea; and everything was
eaten up, far and wide; that time
my fairy slave girl first put her foot
upon the dais and prayed to the
manes of her ancestors among the
oak trees.
CHAPTER II
Nothing whatever have I to say
against Blodwen, the beautiful
British Prinoess, and many months
we spent there happy in her town:
and she bore a son, for whom the
blaok priest, at the accursed inspiration of hia own jealous heart and
thwarted hopes, read oat an evil
destiny, to her great sorrow.
Going down one morning to the
ahore somewhat sad and sorry, for
the inevitable time of parting was
near, my ship lying ready loaded
by the beach, I rubbed my eyes
again and again to aee that the
felucca had gone from the little
inlet where she had lain eo long.
Nor was comfort at hand when,
rushing to a promontory commanding a better view, to my horror
there shone the golden speck of her
sail in the morning sunlight on
the blue rim of the most distant
sea.
I have often thought, since, the
orafty Princess had a hand in this
desertion. She waa so ready with
her oondolenoe, so persuasive that
I should 'bide the winter and leave
her in the spring' (the which waa
aaid with her most detaining smile)
that I could not think the oataa-
trophe took my gentle savage much
by surprise.
[To be continued.J
good
pend yonr spare lime.     Good
<reen & Comerford, Proprietors,
THE STRAND is a
Jl
C.reen
lace  to
music
Two prizes will be given at the Alham-
bra Bowling alley every two weeks for
the largest score made,
arangued   them,  running glibly
AU kinds of summer drinks at the
Strand.   Green & Comerford, Props. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C, SEPT. 19, 1903
THE LOCAL
EXCHANGE
Stocks Picked   Up
During Week.
Well
AMERICAN BOY IS IN DEMAND
The Latest Quotations and Sales
Locally    Upon   the
Market.
Stocks were much more lively
during the paBt week, showing a
great improvement over the earlier
portion of the month. American
Boy is in the lead; after sagging
Bomewhat it doses higher than it
has been lately. Other stocks also
are evincing greater firmness, and
altogether the outlook is brighter
for the fall business.
Today's Local Quotationt:
POLITICAL ITINERARY.
Hon.   W.
Galllher is
Country
Stumping the
Nelson, Soft. 18.—W. A. Galli-
her started on an electioneering
tour yesterday morning on behalf
of the Kootenay Liberal candidates,
going first to Greenwood, where he
spoke yesterday evening, and
thence to Midway for today, and
Grand Forka for tomorrow.
On Tuesday, September 22, Mr.
Galliher will address a meeting at
Kaslo, and the following meetings
have been arranged after the Kaslo
date:
Ferguson, Thursday, 24th.
Trout Lake, Friday, 25th.
Fernie, Monday, 28th.
MorriBsey, TueBday, 29 th.
Cranbrook, Wednesday, 30th.
On Thursday, October 1st, Mr.
Galliher will address a meeting in
this city, an.1 the day following he
will   speak at Rossland.
ELECTORAL
CANDIDATES
Full List of Those Now in
the Field.
FOUR PARTIES SEEK FOR VOTES
Progressives  and  Socialists
Put Up a Long List
Men-
Have
Alkcd
:   k
Bid
«
American Boy	
Ben Hur	
Black Tall	
Canadian Oold »i«Ida....   .
Carlboo (Camp McKlnnaj) ex-ilir 8X
Centre Star .'  33
Crowi Neil Fan Coal I I
Palrview  4         3
FUher Maiden  3V       «!
Slant  3     „    '
Granbj Consolidated   }<t-S°     $375
MornincQlory.....  '%       '
Mountain lion  M        "
North Star (gait Kootenay)  11X
Payne  IS
Qullo  a°
gambler-Cariboo  36
Ban Poll  s
BuUlran  sK
Tom Thumb •• A%
War Kagle Consolidated  13
Waterloo (Aaseaa. paid)  7
White Bear {Asaest. paid)   4V
MINING OUTLOOK BRIGHT
14
34
2
M
3«
II
White Bear, 3000, 3fo; American
Boy,  2000,   4|c;  Fisher   Maiden,
2000, 3c.   Total, 7000.
Week's Quotations.
Highest Lowest
American Boy      5 4
Ben Hur      5M 4'A
BlackTail      nU 3'A
Canadian Gold F. S      5 4 %
Cariboo, Camp McK  io j%
Centre Star  24 21
Fairview      5 3
Fisher Maiden.,      3% 2'A
Giant      3 2
Granby Consolida'ed $4.50 $3.75
Mo-ning Glory      1% 1
Mountain Lion  25 21
NorthStar  n# qlA
Payne  ri'A 14
Quilp  20
Rambler-Cariboo ..:  38 34
San Poil      S 2
Sullivan      5M 4#
Tom Thumb      4^ 3%
War Eagle  13 n
Waterloo      7 i%
White Bear      4# 3'A
Showing highest asked and lowest bid
during the past week.
The Week's Sales.
American Boy, 5000, 5000, 4$o,
5000,4go,  5000,  4}c,   2000,   4Jc;
White   Bear,   3000,    3000, . 3|o,
Mountain Lion,   4000, 23o,   1500,
234c; Rambler-Cariboo, 1500,374c,
500, 37c; Payne, 2000,154c; Fisher
Maiden, 2000, 3c;   Cariboo,   Camp
McKinney, 2000, 8^0; Centre Star,
500, 21o, 1000, 22ic;   North Star,
1000,10c; Giant, 1000, 2Jc;   War
Eagle, 500, life,   Total, 45,500.
(Continued from first page.)
tal and labor are badly needed,
capital to build smelters and labor
to mine the ore. Every smelter
and mine in British Columbia complains of the scarcity of men, and
labor iB paid the same in this country as in Montana. That is $3 for
surface minerB, $3.50 for underground miners and an eight hour
day."
The following shipments were
made by the different mines:
[The Oro Denoro is just now getting much of its ore treated, owing
to the excess units of iron, for noth
ing, while the rnmander is treated
for 50 and 60 oents a ton—ED.J
Granby mineB to Granby smelter,
8,012 tons; Mother Lode to Greenwood smelter, 3840 tons; Snowshoe
to Sunset ameUer,2010 tons; Athel-
stan to Sunset amelter,180 tons; Oro
Denoro to Sunset smelter, 792 tons;
Emma to Nelson smelter, 462 tons;
Sunset to Sunset smelter, 780 tons;
MorriBon to Greenwood smelter,
540 tons; Winnipeg to Sunset
smelter, 180 tons.
Spokane Falls and (Northern  Railway
Excursion, Stevens County Produce Association! Colville
For the above occasion the Spokane Falls & Northern Railway
will Bell excursion tickets to Colville for one fare and one-third for
the round trip. Children half fare.
Selling date, September 27, to Ootober 1st, inclusive. Limit Ootober 3rd.
H. P. Brown, Agent,
RoBBland, B. B.
H. A. Jackson, G. P. A.,
Spokane, Waeh.
LIBERAL    NOMINATION
British Columbia
Provincial
Exhibition
New Westminster-Victoria, B. C.
For the above occasion the Spokane
Falls & Northern railway will sell round
trip tickets to New Westminster as foi
lows:   (Children half fare.)
Rossland $17 20
Nelson .'  16 55
Ymir  16 55
Grand Forks  18 25
SELLING DATES
Sept. 26,27, 28,20. Limit Oct
Passengers desiring to attend the exhibition at Victoria from October 6 to 10
and who purchase round trip tickets
from >'ew Westminster to Victoria, will
be granted an extension of eight days on
th- ir tickets by the agent at New West
minster.
H. A. JACKSON, G. P. A.,
Spokane, Wash
H. P. BROWN, Agent, Rowland, B. C
Lost—A poeketbook oontaining
some money and papers. A suit*
able reward will be paid by returning the same to this oflico.
POWDER SMOKE—Did it ever
give you headache? Dr. Scotts
headache powders are a qniek and
sure eure. Sold at Morrows Drng
fitore.
WEEK
Granby  8,012
Mother Lode  3840
Snowshoe  2,010
B.C	
Sunset  73°
Emma  462
Oro Denoro  792
Morrison  540
Athelstap  180
Providence	
Winnipeg  180
Elkhorn	
TOTAL
242,208
85.791
48,562
'9.365
13.447
12,512
5.787
2,404
1.39°
705
l80
129
Totals 16,791      432.475
Slocan Shipments.
The total amount of ore shipped
from the Slocan and Slocan City
mining divisions for the year
1902 was, approximately, 30,000
tons. Since January 1 to Sept. 12,
1903, the shipments have been as
follows:
, WEEK.     TOTAL
American Boy  565
Antoine  212
Arlington  40
Black Prtnce  17
Bondholder ...:  1
Bosun  40 • 890
Bluebird  20
Dayton  4
Enterprise  53;
Fisher Maiden  280
Hartney  42
Hamilton  4
Highland Light  2
Idaho  21
Ivanhoe  41 652
Lucky Jim  105
Mercury  41
Monitor  476
Meteor.'  52
Ottawa  126
Payne  1714
Queen Bess  204
Rambler  1448
Reco  153
Republic  70
Ruth  417
Rio  9
Red Fox  94
Slocan Star  53 1871
Slocan Boy     ' 16
Silver Glance  55
Surprise.. ,  5
Vancouver  20
Wonderful  23
Total toaa ..iji 10,243
Alberni—one--W. W. B. Mc-
Innes, Liberal, Major Hickey, Conservative.
Atlin—one—J. Kirkland, Progressive.
Cariboo—two—S. A. Rogers, W.
AdamB, Conservative.
Chilliwack—one—C. W. Munro,
Liberal; J. L. Atkinson, Conservative.
Columbia—one—W. C. Wells
Liberal.
Comox—one—F. MoB. Young,
Liberal.
Cranbrook—one—J. H. King,
Liberal, T. Cavin, Coniervative.
Cowiohan—one—J. EvanB, Liberal, E. M. Skinner, Conservative.
Delta—one—J. Oliver, Liberal,
W. H. Ladner, Conservative.
Dewdney—one—W. W. Forrester, Liberal, Hon.R. MoBride, Conservative,
Esquimalt—on<—J. Jardine,Lib-
eral, C. E. Pooley, Conservative.
Fernie—one—E.C.Smith.Liberal,
W. R. Ros8,Con8ervative, J. R. Mo-
Pherson, Socialist.
Grand ForkB—one—W. H. P.
Clement, Liberal, G. A.Fraser, Conservative, J. Riordan, Socialist.
Greenwood—one—J. R. Brown,
Liberal, E. G. Spankie, Conservative.
Islands—one—T. W. Paterson,
Liberal, H. W. Bullook, Conservative.
Kamloops—one—F. J. Deane,
Liberal; F. J. Fulton, Conservative.
Kaslo—one—J. L. Retallack
Liberal, R. Green, Conservative, S.
Shannon, Sooialist.
Lillooet—one — A. McDonald,
Conservative.
Nanaimo—one — E. Quennell,
Conservative, H. Sheppard, Progressive, J. Hawthornthwaite,
Socialist.
Nelson— one—S. 8. Taylor, Liberal, J. Houston, Conservative.
Newcastle—one—D. W. Murray
Liberal, A. Bryden, Conservative,
P. Williams, Socialist.
New Westminster—one—W. H.
Keary, Liberal, T. Giffoid, Con
servative.
Okanagan—one—T. W. Sterling,
Liberal, P. Ellison, Conservative.
Revelstoke—one—J. M. Kellie,
Liberal, T. Taylor, Conservative,
John W.  Bennett,   Socialist.
Riohmond—one—J. C. Brown,
Liberal, F. Carter Cotton, Conservative.
RoBsland—one—A. S. Goodeve,
Conservative, J. A. Macdonald, Lib
eral.
Saanioh—one—H. Tanner, Liberal, D. M. Eberts, Conservative.
Similkameen—one—W. A. Mac-
Lean, Liberal, L. W. Shatford.Con
servative.
Skeena—one—C. W. D. Clifford,
Conservative; P. Herman, Liberal
Slocan—one—W. Hunter, Conservative^. Davidson, Progressive.
Vancouver—five—Erneat Burns,
A. it. Stebbings, Socialist, J. Edwards^. G. Perry and F. Williams,
Progres8ive,R.C.Tatlow, C. Wilson,
J. J. Garden, W. C. Bowser, A. H.
B. MacGowan,Conservative, J. Martin, T. Baxter, Dr. Brydone Jaok,
J. D. Turnbull.C. R. Monk, Liberal
Viotoria—four—tt. L. Drury, W.
G. Cameron, J. D. MoNiven, R.
Hall, Liberal, H. D. Helmoken, A.
E. McPhillipB, C. Hayward, J.
Hun tor, Conservative,.!. C. Watters,
L. O. Charlton, Socialist.
Yale—one—Stuart Henderson,
Libera), T. G. MoManamon, Conservative.
Ymir—one—A. Parr, Liberal, H.
WrightJjConBorvative.
J.
A. Macdonald Speaks
Out on the Issues of
the Day,
advanced his opinion as to how the
present state of things could be
bettered and the burden of taxation
equalized.
The Eist Kootenay question waB
dealt with and au explicit statement made by the candidate as to
his stand with regard to the granting of licences which was met with
approval by the audience.
The work of the Mining Association in settling the Fernie strike
waB commended and Mr. Macdonald
said that that which that body
could do without power to enforoe
ita recommendations nurely oould
be done by the government which
the means of enforcement.
Certlflca'A of Improvement
NOTICE.
The Gordon and Texas Fraction
Mineral Claims, situate in the Trail
Creek Mining Division of West Kootenay District.
Where located: North slope of Red
mountain.
Take notice that I, Kenneth L. Burnet, Prov. Land Surveyor of Rossland,
agent for F. R. Blnchbe'ger, free miner's certificate No. B57494, Andrew Suth-
erland.free miner's certificate N0.B73315
and Ner Smith, free miner's certificate
No. B75408, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
a Crown Grant of the above claim,
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate of
certainly had the power to provide   XeS^vo*A^A&m
ET
KENNETH L. BURN!
$u^s&%^^g%im&ms8Q&%Mmwm
The Big Sale tt Season
at the Big Shoe Store
The nomination of J. A. Macdonald as the Liberal condidate
for Rossland in the coming provincial oampaign waB a foregone con
elusion on Monday night. There
was a large attendance and the
proceedings were characterized by
their unanimity throughout.
Mr. Macdonald was proposed by
Dr. K»rr and seconded by Kenneth
Martin, C. O. Lalonde, A. McMillan and J. H, Maodonald while
several others who were present
spoke. In aeoepting the nomination Mr. Macdonald spoke for an
hour dealing as fully as time would
admit with some of the prinoipal
questions confronting the province.
It had been suggested by his
opponents in their street canvass
that be waa a Martinite. This, the
speaker declared, was not true.
The question of leadership was
one to be decided by the members
elect, as it should be, and every
member elect should abide by the
decision of the majority.
Mr. Maodonald then proceeded
to deal at some length with the
question of taxation and the injustice of the present   system and
On TUESDAY, September 8th, and
following days we will offer the balance
of this year's styles of Ladies Extension
Hole Low and High Bhoes in Patent
Leather. Patent Ivd, Vici Kid. Box Calf.
etc, AT COST AND BELOW
COST.     Come and see  for yourself
0.0. Lalonde
* THE SHOEMAN
!♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦?♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦£
Watches::    I
OF ALL SORTS and at all prices for man. woman or
child, all alike, however, in being good timekeepers—we insist jn that. We have low pricecf watches which are not
toys but good timekeepers. From these our assortment
runs up to the most Beautiful examples of the watchmakers  ait. —-—	
1EWERT BROS.
T ROSSLAND, NELSON AND Tf
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦!♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦£
JEWELERS
AND
ENGRAVERS.
ROSSLAND, NELSON AND TRAIL.
™E BIG STORE
Biq
Remnant
Sale!
We have a large quantity
of short ends and odd lines in
our Dry Goods Department
which we are oftering at ridiculously low prices to clear.
Biq
Reduction
Sale!
Thirty-five Eton Jackets
and Short Coats, regular prices
$10, $15, $18.50,
Yourehoice, $5
1
I
i
i
NEW FALL GOODS
New Pall Goods are arriving daily. We have something now
to show you every day. Call and examine our new goods. Everybody welcome.
New Dress Goods and Silks
New Jackets, Capes and Skirts
New Underwear and Hosiery
New Goods in all lines.
Hunter   Bros.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.satworld.1-0312863/manifest

Comment

Related Items