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The Saturday World 1903-12-05

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 THE SATURDAY WO
Vol. I,   No. t4
ROSSLAND, B. C,  SATURDAY, DECEMBER   5. 1903
Price Five .Cents
ST. ANDREW
BANQUET
Scotsmen    Improve
Occasion.
the
IMPORTANT SPEECH DELIVERED
Silicious Ore Successfully Treated-
Ferruginous Ores Will Follow Suit,
St. Andrew's banquet on Monday night lust showed a return to
the vivacious dinners of the past.
Tbe Scotch are said to be clannish
but there is no doubt aB to their
hospitality and ae the way things
are made to hum when one haB
passed the drabs of the mutchkin
Btoup and peseed to the fuller
glories of the tappit hen. Indeed
the menu showed a taste of prophecy or perhapa merely a reminiscence of experience, when it ended with the old quotation:
"Your   airm,   Donal';   that's a
mau!
_,, I've shairly lamed mysel'."
Of course no Rossland banquet
would be worthy of the name if
some optimistic mining man were
not to come along and tell us all
kinds of nice things about Rossland
and ita future and equally of
oourse St. Andrew's banquet was
no exception to the rule. There
were several michty men there in
the mining world and some very
pregnant utterances were made.
The principel speech of the
evening was that made by William
Thompson, viewed from this standpoint. There were others that were
more inspired and that breathed
a greater air of jollity but when
Manager Thompson pointed out
that it was just a year ago that the
Elmore process for the reduotion of
the silicious ores of the oamp had
been announced as a success and
whioh waa oompleted, and that a
third plant was ordered he showed
that there was indeed occasion for
jollity. When he further announced that iron ores of the oamp were
now in the same relation to their
ultimate oommeroial reduotion aa
were the silicious ores at this time
last year he made a statement
which is fraught with momentuouB
consequences to Rossland. For, as
Mr. Thompson did not scruple to
state, the reduction of both the
silicious ores and the iron ores of
this camp on a large scale means
nothing less than the doubling and
the trebling of its population within a comparatively brief period of
time. But again aB he pointed
out this may be an occasion for
Rossland to rejoioe but it is also an
occasion for Rossland to get in and
work so as to verify those prophecies of good things and make them
into a verity the sooner.
H. Hyman Claudet of the Canadian Ore Concentration made a
modest speech. He did not refer
as be might well bave done lo the
"coffee mill" with whioh he was
twitted a year ago. That is to say
he did not refer to it in thoBe
terms though that selfsame coffee
mill has accomplished aome wonderfully smart thingB with regard
to the reduction of low grade ore
within the past few months and is
likely to prove even more marvellous in the months which lie before
ub. For, aB Mr. Claudet^ hinted,
the last thing has not as yet been
said with regard to concentration
of ore. Cheaper methods are yet
to be evolved, oheaper oil, oheaper
machinery. Mr. Claudet declared
that he waB confident that that
success which had been attendant
upon the concentration of gold copper ore by the Elmore ' process
would also be witnessed when it
grappled with the silver lead ores of
of adjacent camps.
Mr. Claudet finished his speeoh
by declaring that tbe government
Bhould help the budding industry
by the beBt means in itB power
whioh would be tbe making of a
rebate on concentrating machinery
not made in Canada and on oil
which oould not be prooured within the Dominion, at all events in
sufficient quantities. For the
lower the costs of concentration tho
larger tbe ore bodies which would
be Buooessfully attacked by it.
These were the features of the
evening—these two speeohes—inasmuch aa their subject matter was
intimately bound up with the
future of the oamp. But it must
not be supposed that these were
the only speeches worthy of record
on the occasion. By no means.
Ed. Kirby took a new role upon
him and oomplimenting the Sootch
declared tbat be foresaw the time
when tbe hill and glens of the
Kootenay would breed just suoh
another breed of men who would
be the finest type of humanity on
the continent. Governor Mackin
tosh also spoke eloquently aB to tbe
land we live in and there were
other and felicitous speakers.
A pleasing note of the evening's
entertainment was the entrance of
Harold Nelson, the Canadian
actor, who was received by a
demonstration by his many Rossland admirers on bis late coming
(after the play) into the banquet
hall. Mr. Nelson, with the Hon.
C H. Mackintosh, responded to
the toast. "The I"r^'" r ' „■&*
and right w —■ ne (It so A
master of elocution, a patriotic
Canadian and a fervid thinker
there is no wonder neither that Mr.
Nelson did bo well with his subject nor tbat he was bo enthusiastically applauded.
MINES OF
XOOTENAY
Rossland   and   Boundary
Shipments.
LATEST RETURNS OF OUTPUT
What the Mines Are Doing Over the
District—Rossland   Doing
Well-
NEW PYRITIC SMELTER
Will Be Built in the Spring
Upon the Velvet
Mine
The result of William Thompson's report on the Velvet of last
spring haB been the decision of the
London directorate to put in a
pyritio Bmelter of 100 ton capacity
to treat the ore upon the ground
Also to oarry out a new scheme of
development work. Also to amalgamate the Velvet and the Portland, adjoining properties already
connected by underground workings driven by Manager Grey, and
to effect this amalgamation on a
reduced capitalization so as to
seoure a larger profit per share to
the shareholders.
The peicentuge of iron was too
heavy for successful concentration,
the percentage of oopper too large
for the adoption of tbe Hendryx
process, the haul by wagon 100
long to admit of ordinary shipment
to outlying smelters, and tbe pyritio Bmeltiug is therefore considered to be the only process practicable under the circumstances.
Pyritio smelting will produce a
matte concentrating 20 tons or
thereabouts into one, and the
value of that matte will probably
ably be about $100 to tbe ton, it
the grade shipped thiB year be
kept. A lower grade, opening up
more bodies, will, of course, be
practicable under these circumstances.
The plant is to be set up in the
spring.
All olasaes of white Goods, at a
big reduotion in prices, come and
look them over, The Creecent-
The following shipments were
made during the week from the
Rossland mines.
WEEK TOTAL
Le Roi ,   5275 183.574
Centre Siar     i soo 70,042
War Eagle     1200 54,339
LeRoi No. 2      380 19.672
Kootenay        25 6,970
Velvet        50 4,920
Jumbo      130 3.321
Giant  714
White Bear  250
Spitzee  333
Silica concentrates .... 85
Homestake  80
I. X. L     60
O. K  20
Tho Kootenay Curlers
The annual meeting of the Kootenay Curling Association was held
here last evening and resulted in
Revelstoke being chosen as the
place of bonspiel this year, Nelson
running it close for honors. Tbe
election of officers resulted in
Judge Foriu of Nelson being selected as patron, J. S C. Fraser of
Rossliind, president, M. L. Grim-
mett of Sandon, H. A. Brown of
Revelstoke and P. E. Wilson of
Nelson as vice presidents, F. B.
Lewis of Revelstoke, secretory and
Rev. E. Procunior of the same
place as Chaplain, The first ice of
tbe season was played upon yesterday by several of the delegates was
declared excellent.
If yov want lo save money on
your purchases, this is the place to
come, our prices are right and
every thing marked in plain figures
as advertised, at Tbe Orocsent.
Totals 8,560     345,752
Boundary Shipments.
Phoenix, Deo. 5—Special.—
A new shipper is added to the
Boundary list this week being the
Senator in Sumit camp, wnich is
just starting to Bend ore to the
Qranby Bmelter. Now that the
seoond slag hauling locomotive
has been reoeived at the Granby
smelter,( ,next week'B. shipments
bhould "Re increased somewhat
frwtii i. is oamp, at, all six hlMaeea
oan now be operated at fullest capacity.
The following shipments were
made by the different mines:
WEEK       TOTAL
Granby  11,079     347.506
Mother Lode  2,240     121,124
Snowshoe  1,680       71,932
Emma  693        20,249
B.C  19,365
Sunset  60        15.581
Oro Denoro  859       13,625
Athelstan  360         4,516
Morrison  3>339
Winnipeg  2,435
Providence  910
Elkhorn  213
Senator  33                 33
Totals 17,004     6ig,72iS
Sloonn Shipment!*
The total amount of ore shipped
from the Slocan and  Slocan   City
mining   divisions    for   the year
1902 was, approximately, 30,000
tons. Since January 1 to Nov. 28,
1903, the shipments have been as
follows:
WEEK. TOTAL
American Boy  20 770
Antoine  210
Arlington  43
Mberta ,  7
Black Prtnce  10
Bondholder  2
Bosun  it>57
Bluebird  52
Capella 20 20
Cripple Stick  2
I'ayton  12
Dolly Varden  20
Empress  20
Enterprise  40 795
Fisher Maiden  280
Hartnev  42
Ham ton  4
Hampton  5
Highland Light  2
Idaho  420
Ivanhoe  50- 940
Jackson  37
Last Chance  20 40
Lucky Jim  103
Mercury  21 146
Monitor  20 760
Mountain Con  20
Meteor  52
Nansen  2
Ottawa  126
payne 44 1970
Queen Bess  204
Rambler  1448
Reco   153
Republic  70
Ruth  36 761
Rio  g
Red Fox  119
Rouse  20
Sapphire    5 5
Slocan Star 23 2132
S'ocan Boy  16
Silver Glance  55
Sunset  41
Surprise  5
Vancouver  20
Wakefield 140- 180
Wonderful.,  23
Totaltonf 276 13,521
POWDER SMOKE—Did, it eve
give you headache? Dr. Scotts
headaohe powders are a qnick and
sure cure. Sold at Morrows Drug
Store.
VICTORIA   LAWMAKERS
McBride Government Still
. on   Top  at the
Coast.
There has been a good deal of
talk at the coast during the week
among the legislators, but up to
pr;« 'very little haB been accomplished. The McBride government
has outlined its policy which is
being bitterly aflBailed by the Liberals headed by Macdonald, to
whom a general allegiance of a
flattering character is being given.
On the other hand tbe defection of
John Houston of Nelson has mastered little, even Bhould he vote
with the Liberals, which doeB not
seem probable at the present juncture of affairs. Harry Wright,
generally supposed to be the henchman of tbe man from Nelson, has
cut out a line for himself, and is a
staunch supporter of the premier.
The government is strengthened by
the adheBion of Davidson, the La
bor member tot the Slocan and
and alBO by the votes of the So
cialist members Hawtl ornthwaite
and Williams. This gives the Conservatives a majority of eight including John HouetOD, six without
him. Should the Fernie recount
be allowed and the seat go to the
Liberals, even thBD, still counting
on the defection Of Houston, the
premier will have a majority of
four votes.
The price be will have to pay is
a different matter. Iu such case
the Socialists, together with Davidson, control the situation and a
paot between them and the Liberals will overthrow the ministry.
The adhesion of Hawthornthwaite
is accounted for on ground of personal animosity to Mclnnes but on
tho other hand it is urged that the
Socialist contingent have more to
hope from a weak Conservative
than from an overwhelmingly
Liberal government unless the
latter would pledge themselveB in
oaucus.
Houston has introduced a measure calling for the taxaiion of
mines which probably will not
meet with the support of the Provincial Mining Association, or
whom, by the way, none seem to
be afraid. But whether Houston's
proposals will be endorsed by the
government is more than doubtful.
Concessions to the mining industry are far more likely to strengthen hia hands.
THE ASSOCIATED BOARDS
Important Work Transacted at
Annual Meeting Here-The
Duty on Oil.
The list of resolutions which was
disouesed this week by the meeting
of the Associated Boards of Trade
of the Kootenays is somewhat for
midable, embracing a variety of
most important subjects. But they
bave been dealt with in a manner
which leaves little to be desired
and reflects great credit upon the
delegates. The meetings were held
in the Court House which was
thrown open to the publio who
evinced from time to time great interest in the subject matter of the
debates, which were occasinally
lively enough.
Of oourse Rossland would not be
Rossland if it did   not dioe   and
wine its guests and  tbe Rossland
Board of Trade was by no means
behind in its endeavor to live up to
the reputation of   the   camp.   Ac
cordingly on the first day of their
stay tbe delegates were civilly en
treated, taken to the theatre and
regaled with Damon  and Pytbias,
enacted by Harold NelBon's   company, and their inner man after
wards fortified by a jolly little supper at the Allan where speechmak-
ing and the banjo (in  tbe hands of
C. B. Winter of the Bank of Mont
real; filled tbe cup (it was  Mumm
by the way) to overflowing.
Among those present were the
following delegates: Kaslo—G. O.
Buchanan, D. W. Cockle and J. L
Retallack. Nelson—J. M. Lay, T.
G. Proctor and W. W. Beer. Fer-
nie—Abraham Joyce. Trail—N.
Binns, James P. Byera and W. H.
Aldridge. Cascade—George C.
Rose. Greenwood—George R.
Naden and Duncan Ross. Fort
Steele—Dr. Augh Wait. Cranbrook
—J. D. McBride. Rosalaud—A
H. MacNeill, K. C, Mayor Dean
and Robert W. Grigor. The other
citizens present were Messrs. J.
Anderson, A. B. Barker, T. G.
Challoner, P. S. Couldrey, J. P.
C>sgro, A. W. Dyer, T. Embleton,
A. S. Goodeve, W. H. Goodeve, R
Hunter, R. Laird, J. P. McArthur,
J. D. MacDonald, A, B. Mackenzie,
H. G. Oliver, W. H. G. Phipps, fi.
W. Strickland, W. Thompson and
C. B. Winter.
There were several felicitous
speeches whose eloquence lack of
space oocludee, but amongst them
were a couple, the one by Paul S
Couldrey and the other by W.
Thompson to which attention muBt
be paid Mr. Couldrey, as mana-
ager of the first property in Rossland to the exploitation of who-e
ores the Elmore process has been
applied, pointed out tbat its success depended greatly commercially on the cheapness of the oil
which would be used. Just now
there was a heavy duty levied, although no oil could be had in
Canada which would suit the process and itB removal would tend
towards reducing the cost and thus
enlarging tbe bodieB ol ore which
could be treated at a profit.
Mr. Thompson followed along
the same line, pointing out as an
instance of the drawbacks which
were attendant upon the successful
prosecution of tbe mining industry
of British Columbia the action
taken hy the London companion
with which he was conuected
These companies had within the
past two yearB introduced much
capital into Mexico, New Mexioo,
Arizona, Colorado and California
At the present time the speak- r
was drawing up specifications for
tbe erection of a plant in Mexico
for the reduction of ore and wuh
also doing bo for the Velvet within
10 miles of a railway in this pro
vince. Now the Mexican mill had
to be carried on tbe back of burros
for 180 miles across the mountains
and yet its coBt was cheaper than
the ert'tion of a similar mill on
the Velve*. This the speaker put
down to the heavy freight rates
and the manner in which miuing
machinery waB taxed on its introduction into Canada. To successfully exploit the mines of the
Kootenay it was neceBsary that
these duties, these freights, should
be lowered. Already one mill had
gone up in Rossland, another was
building, another had been ordered
and more were to come. The sum
of money which would have to be
spent in Roesland over the erection
of mining machinery for the reduction of ore would be enormous.
Six dollar ore could be profitably
treated. Tbe mines of Mexico
were nothing in comparison, to
those of Rossland and what applied 10 Rossland applied to the
surrounding camps. It was urgently necessary that the disabilities to mining should be removed
to remove the present bar to the
influx of capital, the flow of which
waa setting in other directions. In
the past year the Elmore process
had successfully solved the treatment of the low grade silicious ores
of the camp. He waa now in position to state that tbe reduction oi
the ferruginous oreB had also been
successfully solved and proper
plans and specifications were now
in course of preparation for and
submission to the London directorate. All ibis would not take place
in a day but it was coming gradually. As each new plant went
up now plantB would be ordered
till many a mine now considered
as a wild cat 01 little better would
he ou the list of dividend payers.
Only recently tbe speaker had met
a well known RosBlander, W. L.
McDonald in Spokane He had
been awai from the camp for some
time. "Hullo, Billy" deolared the
speu ker he addressed him, "where
are you bound for"? "Bound back
to RosBlaud" quoth Billy "if I can
get back and if I do by GoBbl
I don't leave it again" "There is
uo camp like Rossland concluded
Mr. Thompson "and the more I
know of it the more am I inolined
to sny so."
Cheerful prophet,  Little  Willie!
But all thiB is just  by the way,
but an important  halt it was. The
real  business   of    tbe   Associated
Boards of Trado began on Wednesday   with  the presentation of an
able address by the president, G.
O.  Buchanan, which  referring to
the good work done in the past by
the Associated Boards, congratulated its members on their energy and
urged  them  to keep  up  the good
work.    The first resolution ooming
up was   that   of the   preferential
tariff, which passed after some discussion and some attempted amendments with a speech lhat endeavored to sidetrack  the importance of
tho question by referring to the possibility of Canada having to submit to the annexation of the French
islande off the coast of Newfoundland  by  the  United States with
their  inevitable consequences    in
the claim to ihe French Bbore, their
consequent    tendency    to   abBorb
Newfoundland,    next    Newfoundland's strip on Labrador, next Quebec and  the  North  Polo  together
wiih Greenland and Hudson's Bay,
B picture that Blirred some Liberal
auditors  to  tears,  but  moved not
the  sterner susceptibilities of the
Associated Hoards.
This  resolution  read as follows:
The Associated Board of Trade of
Enstern Biiiish Columbia approves
ol a oommeroial policy between the
Mother Country and her colonies
as outlined by the Hon. Joseph
Chamberlain, and are of tho opinion that such a policy would materially benefit the colonies and
would tend to strengthen and consolidate tbe British Empire.
Tho Associated Boards then pro-
oeeded to deal with tbe C. P. R.
and pointed out by resolution that
1 heir methods iu Poplar were lacking in popularity (no pun intended) and that ihe railway had better attend to business in a more
efficient manner.
The meeting next went ou to
deal with thu depart ment of the
provincial mineralogist whioh
(or perhapB whom) a resolution
condemned as inellicient and unsatisfactory   urging    that   depart-
t (1.tii tn 11 i,n fifth page. THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B C, .DEC 5,   1903.
AUTHORS
AND BOOKS
What the Magazines
Saying
OUTSIDE
MINING NEWS
are!What Is Being Done Outside the Province
SOCIALIST
COLUMN
Interesting Items of Social
Reform.
ARTICLES OFCURRENTCOMMENT
Some Recent Books and Periodicals
-Topics Interesting- General Readers,
The present week sees a large
batch of ChristmaB numbers in the
looal stationers, the Metropolitan,
McClure'e, Century, Soribner's
Ainslee'e, Ladies Home Journal,
Woman's Home Companion, Success, and the Bnglish London, all
contributing their quota to the
literature af Yule tide. And, the
reader rejoiceth in the faot there
is a decided tendency to give preference to the literature of a genera
tion or so sinoe, whioh dealt almoBt
exclusively with the legends of the
Nativity, together with accretions
of other stories not so purely Chris
tian, showing the remnants of the
superstitions ol a bygone but still
hard-dying Paganism. And apropos of this, there is quite a little
controversy in the would-be good,
"goody" literature intended for
abbath sohool circulation and
Bowdlerized humanity in general,
namely, with regard te the existence of Santa Claus and the morality of teaching his actual existence
to the youngsters.
It is curious but true that the
oldest books extant ate the dealing
with myth and fable. Fairy
stories are as old as the hills, not
to speak too "scientifically." And
it is doubtful whetherthey ever did
any harm. Viewed objectively
they are all lies, crudely and
puritanically put; viewed subjectively they invariably contain-
great truths which preserve their
essence thicvgh Ihe ages fnm ce
nation and literature, to another.
And the question is again asked,
"What is truth." No answer can
be given today any more than in
the thousands years ago when the
question was asked, but there is
one thing certain whioh is that
one form of truth is certainly those
beautiful ideas Buoh as are surrounding the season of Christmas and
which indeed can hardly be confound
ed with falsehood and immorality
except by a grossly material mind
As Ella Wilcox says 'suspect
suspicion and doubt doubt.'
It is certain that a glanoe oyer
the Christmas lilerature of today
with its beautiful illustrations
and its oharming stories can but
teach the child to'love his Master
whose Nativity is honored and the
adult to reoognize once again the
claims of the home cirole whioh
are far too muoh neglected in these
latter and strenuous days. Neither
honor and riches can well repay a
man unless he has a charmed domestic circle in which he may recuperate ior the fray and keep his
bouI olean through its love.
MINING ALL OVER THE WORLD
Progress of Various Countries
the Mining of Precious
Metal's
The Crescent are offering Borne
exceptionally good bargains thiB
week.
ii Linton Bros..::
!
Books, Stationery,
Newsdealers, Toys, Fishing
Taokle, Kodaks and
Supplies.
ROSSLAND,  B. C.
According to the report of the
Austrian consul in St. Petersburg
in the Mon tan Zeitung of November 1, the output of pig iron in
Russia in 1902 was 44,173,710
poods.
At the Indianapolis mine-work
era headquarters, it is asserted that
35,000 miners are involved in the
strike in Colorado, Wyoming, New
Mexico and Utah.
The cabled operations for October
for the De Lamar: Crushed during
tbe month, 3350 tons, yielding
$24,650; surplus, $2925; miscellaneous, $40; total amount, $27,605.
Expenses, revenue aocount, $21,-
910; established profit, $5,695,
(£1,162 )
The Ootober returns of the Alaska Mexioan: One hundred and
twenty stamp mill ran 191 days;
oruehed 19,952 tons ore; estimated
realisable value of the bullion, $26,-
780, saved 395 tons sulphurets; estimated realisable value of the
same, $28,459; working expenses
for month, $32,967.
The Viotoria gold yield during
the past ten months amounted to
670,000 ounoes, being an increase
of 53,020 ounces as compared witb
the corresponding period of last
year.
The New South Wales gold yield
in Ootober amounted to 32,319 ozs.,
valued at £110,246. The yield
during the past ten months was
269,373 ounceB, valued at £985,-
707.
The Ootober returns of the Alaska Treadwell, "240 stamp mill ran
294 days; 300 stamp mill ran 29.1
days; crushed 81,359 tons ore; estimated realisable value of the bullion, $80,141; saved 1630 tons sulphurets; estimated realisable value
of same, $86,203; working expenses for month, $86,077."
The manager of the Mesquital
cables: "September and October—
34 stamps, running 55 days crushes
3000 tons for 746 oz. of gold. Cyanide for September, 86 oz. of gold
and 446 oz. of silver. Total expenses tor the two months, $22,000
(equal to £2000.)" Estimated
value of output.
The Japanese mineral statistics
for 1900 are given it the "Montan
Zeitung." The output inoluded,in
tons, copper ore, 25,309; iron ore..
24,841; lead ore, 1878; antimony
ore, 429; manganese ore, 15,830;
ooal, 742,945;sulphur, 14,438. Three
were also produced 2124 kilogrammes of gold ore, 58,809 kilogrammes of Bilver ore, and 138,O76;660
heotolitres of petroleum.
The exports of minerals from
New South Wales during the nine
months ending September 30 were
as follows: Silver, 814,861 ozs.,
valued at £82,032; silver lead,246,<
201 tons, valued at £901,363; copper, 7715 tons, valued a £365,544;
tin, £1431 tons, valued   at   £177,-
PROGRESS MADE BY NEW PARTY
What is Being Done by Socialists
In Canada and the World
Over.
400; ooal,;2,866,146 tons, valued at
£1.336,561. Total value of minerals exported £2.863,900, as compared with £2,656,261 during the
corresponding period ot last year
Work on tbe Indianapolis, Ind.,
labor temple is expected to begin
January 1
One hundred and thirty-three
thousand women work in Massachusetts faotories.
A United Labor League, to comprise every union in Alabama, is in
the course of formation.
Garment workers are considering
the question of the abolition cf
Sunday work in the clothing trade
in Montreal, Can.
Only 11 per cent of the families
of London, England, employ a
servant, but there are 205,858 persons in the servant class.
The harvester trust iB to reduoe
its forces 25 per cent. About 7000
men will be dismissed. ThiB means a
saving of $4,^)00,000.
The Typographical union of
Copenhagen, Denmark, has set a
worthy example by building a
home for the aged members of their
trade,
Since the formation of the or
phan fund by Amalgamated Society of British Railway Servants
1643- famileB and 4410 children
have received benefits to the extent
of £80.857.
The British collieries employing
500,364 workpeople the pits worked an average during September of
5.22 days a week, as compared with
4.89 in August and 5.35 in Septem
ber, 1902.
A general strike in the granite
industry of Montpelier and Barre,
Vt., is threatened by the adoption
of a sharpening tool by the manu
faoturers' association. The tool Is
said to do the work of three or
four men.
Forty-five hundred girls employed in telephone factories in Chicago, 111., are to be organized at once
into the women's auxiliary to the
International Brotherhood of Eleo-
trical Workers. The girls' wages
run from $9 to $16 a week.
The arbitration oourtjtt Sydney,
N. S. W., has fined the captain ol
the Amerioan barquentine Andromeda $250 and costs for refusing to
employ union workmen and throwing overboard an order prohibiting
the crew from unloading the vessel.
The Chicago, 111., Federation of
Labor has decided in favor of the
sympathetic strike as a basio principle of trade unionism, and the
local delegate to the oonvention of
the American Federation of Labor
in Boston wae^instruoted to exert
every effort to induce the national
body to adopt the resolution.
Within the last few years tbe
Russian government has been en
aoting laws favoring man.   It has
provided that all faotories and mill
owners shall contribute to hospitals
and  give   medical   assiBtanoe for
their workmen.   There are labor
insurances   both   tor death  and
accidents.   There are also mntual
labor insurance companies for per
manent   and  temporary   disable
menta and one or two old age insurance companies.
Diamond ^
Mali
"Diamond Hall"—Ryrie
Bros.—Toronto, is one of
tha largest retail jewelry
stores in tht world.
From its magnificent itock of Dia-
Sanda, Jtwctry, Silverware, Leather
ooAa, etc., you may select with
guaranteed fatiifaction at your
nam*.
A request will bring1 to your
door—free of cost—our
handsomely illustrated new
catalogue. Ready for delivery Nov. 15th.
The great magnitude of our
business permits of our selling at money-saving prices.
We return your money in full with.
out queatioa if on receipt of article!
ordered you are not perfectly ■attt-
fied.
RYRIE BROS.
JEWELERS
IIS, 120, 122 and 124
Yonge St., Toronto
Nn^
Harry Mcintosh
DIRECT IMPORTER OF
'PERFECTION'
SCOTCH
Vintage of 1S78
Guaranteed Absolutely Pure
Burton Ale on Tap
Bass'
-AT-
Es Hoffman House
i R.L.Wright I
A. R. S. M.
(Assayer for I.e.Koi No. 2,)
WILL TAKE
rGustom Assays:;
READY   fr)R   BUSINESS.
 THE	
Rossland Home Bakery
Is now located in the McKenzie
Block, cor. First ave and Washington St.
Fetch & Schwartzenhauer Props
TICKETS
TO ALL POINTS
EAST and WEST
*sm
^^^^^C^ItCS******
*
TH
.PALACE,
RALPH HARRON, PROP.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*##$##
Rossland's
Leadinq
Hotel..
##»#*#
4
Sample Room   %
For Commercial Men.
*
Finest Grill in Kootenays
IN CONNECTION.
*
*
*
FIRST  CLASS
Bowling Allev
AND
4
I BILLIARD ROOM ]
ALL  KINDS   OF   DRY
WOOD
W. P. LINGLE
Cffce ojpesite Ore
Northern   ticket tffi
next to Bed Ptr r
1\
jjj The Brackman-Ker MillingCompany ]
—DEALER IN-
VIA
SHORT LINE
TO
St. Paul,Duluth,Mirmeapolis,Chicago
and appoints east
Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria,!Portlar.d
and^all Pacific Coast^points
9\
$
m
viz ■    	
£   Agent for Pratt's Celebrated Poultry  Food
All kinds of Cereals, Breakfast Foods, Hay and Grain.
P. BURNS & CO.
WHOLESALE   MARKETS
Rossland, Nelson, Tral!,Sandon,Revelstoke,Green-
wood, Grand Forks and Vancouver.
RETAIL  MARKETS-Rossland, Trail, Nelson,'Ymir, Kailo
Sandon, New Denver, Silverton, Cascade City, Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Phoenix, Midway, Camp   McKinney,
Revelstoke, Ferguson and Vancouver.
Fish,  Came and   Poultry in Season, Sausages oi AU Kinds.
WM. DONALD, Manager Rowland Branch
Through Palace and Tourist Sleepers
Dining & Buffet Smoking Library Oars
2-Fast.Trains Through Daily-2, §j
i
i
i
i
^WWWW«fWini«W1tfWWWWWWWWW1!f1!fW!fli
For rates, folders and full information
regarding trips, call on or address any
agent 8. F. & N. Railway.
H. BRANDT, C P * T A,
701 W Riverside, Spokane
ABC DENNISTON, G W P A,
Seattle,'Wash.
H. P. BROWN, Rossland Agent
Don't miss the bargain sale at
tha Crescent this week. j
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
A lull line of Fancy New Raisins, Currants, Canned Gools,
Mince Meat, Sweet Oider, Pure Spices, Almonds, Nuts and
everything required for Christmas Cakes and Pastry.
O. M. FOX & CO., GSi
COLUMBIA AVENUE
TELEPHONE 65
iMUMlllliilsilJMltMM. THE SATURDAY WORL ROSSLAND. B. C, DEC   5- 1903
SPEGiALBARGAIN SALE
Some of the bargains which are offered this week at the CRESCENT are
quoted below and are well worth your consideration. Compare the following
prices and see if they are not money savers for you.
Ladies' Underwear
Ladies' Combination. Suits, sold regu- tft |  t(|
larly for $2.50suit. Barg'nsale price 0 I. JU
Ladies' $ 1.75 Combination Suits I
Bargain Sale Price   |
Ladies'Ribbed Drawers and Vests, good QC0
weight. Bargain Sale Price OJb
Flannelette Night Gowns, actually worth PC.
$1 each. Bargain Sale Price only 0 J U
$1.50 Flannelette Night Gowns, colors j   I C
white pink and blue.    Bargain Price I, I J
Extra Special Ladies'
Coats and Jackets
Forty Coats and Jackets which we had left
over from last season. They are not the latest
styles but are all right to knock around in; they
sold at $6, 7.50, 10.00,12 50, 15 00, 16 50,18.00
and 20.00. That is when they were in style.
Bargain Sale Price.
$2.50
Bargains in the Dress
Goods and Silk Dep't.
We offer a choice seleotion of Silks in plaids and fig- P fl
ured effects; sold regularly for 7.ric, 85o, $1 and 1 25 ft IIP
Bargain Sale Price per yard V U U
Black Taffeta Silk, good value at 75c      Kfif,
Bargain Sale Price *JV/^
$1.25 Black Imported Peau de Soie Silk QX0
Bargain Sale Price •J*JKj
20-inch China Silk, all Shades, per yard OQc
27-inch China Silks, all shades, per yd. 4:5C
Lace Curtains
Dress Goods
Imported Blaok Venetian, 60 in. wide ft I C ft
worth $2.50 yd.  Bargain Sale Price 0 1,3U
$1 quality Serge Dress goods, colors navy   7C/
black and red.   Bargain Sale Price I 'v
50-inch Fanoy Weave Dress Goods, actu- CA|»
ally worth 85c yd.   Bargain Sale Price  «!"«
Only 5 fanoy weave Dress Patterns, sold L CA
for $10.50 suit.   Bargain Sale Price   , O.JU
Only 4 fancy weave Dress Patterns, sold C Cft
for $7.50 suit.   Bargain Sale Price        *• Jv
40-inch Melton Oloth in navy, red, black OCi*
and grey, regular 35c   Bargain Price &«y
Fancy plaid Dress Goods, suitable for OC|*
children s wear, worth 5oc yd,   Price **«Jv
:
all new patterns and designs   j  Specials f or the Little I
75o Laoe Curtains for	
90c Lace Curaains for	
$1 00 Laoe Curtains for	
1.25 Lace Curtains for ...
1 50 Lace Curtains for
1 75 Laoe Curtains for	
2 00 Laoe Curtains for....
2 50 Lace Curtains for....
3.00 Lace Curtains for.....
3.50 Laoe Curtains for...
4.00 Lice Curtains for,..
5.00 Lice Curtains for...
..55c
...65o
..75o
..95c
.$1.15
. 1.35
. 1.50
. 1.85
. 2.25
. 2 60
. 3.00
. 3.75
Children
Ten only Fancy Eider Down Coats, suitable for children from 3 to 6 years of age. SoW
for $2.00, 2.50 and 3.00 each. Bargain Sale
Price, while they last
$1.00 EACH
•1
HOSIERY
50c AU wool Ribbed Cash
mere Hose, Bizoa 8J. 9 and
9J, Bargain Sale Price
25c
THE CRESCENT DRY GOODS CO.
Ladies' Glove*
Imported Kid Gloves in colors, grey
tans, browns and blaoks; these gloves
are reallv worth $1.25 a pair
but the Bargain Sale Price
-75c
r
Outside
Gampsi
BOUNDARY.
The syndicate working the Ruby
olaim, near Greenwood, is making
a most satisfactory showing.
Manager Plewman reports times
aa being quiet at the Winnipeg
mine for the present, and no ore is
being sent out.
Four men are developing the
Minnie olaim in the Summit camp,
owned by Dr. Averill and A. Traun-
wiser of Grand Forks.
Pete Boucher has just finished
his assessment work on the Four
Paw claim, adjoining the Cracker
J*ok, ou the north side of the
oity.
ThiB week the C. P. R. completed
the work of putting in a seven-oar
switch for the accommodation of the
Atbalstan mine, from the Winnipeg Bpur.
The oontraot for diamond drill
ing to loHt the ore bodies on the
Volcanic, on the North Fork of the
Kettle river, for whioh a deal was
recently made with Miohigan capitalists was signed last Monday with
Boyles Bros.
Tbe balance of the bond on the
Elkhorn to Phil McDonald and
James Sutherland.is in the bankfor
tbe payment due next month—
from the net proceeds of ore shipments.
It is expeoted by Morrison and
Edwards, who have a bond on the
Blue Jay, that development will
shortly be resumed at that property, funds having been raised for
that purpose.
After many delays in getting the
crown grant straightened out, it is
now stated that the Nellie Cotton
Mining News of
Week Over theHProv-
ince and the   Upper
Country.
adjoining the Granby mines on the
south,have been sold to a syndioate of Chicago capitalists—the
terms of the transfer not having
been given out. It is understood
that development work will be
started in the spring.
COAST.
News of a valuable mineral discovery on the east coast of Queen
Charlotte Islands has been brought
by D. Yule. The find consists of
of three large ledges running parallel with each other. They are
respectively forty, five and two
feet wide, and an analysis shows it
to contain about 35 per cent of
zinc as well as a large percentage
of oopper, silver and gold. The
mineral runs about $70 to the ton
ISLAND.
The Southern Cross, a mining
propesty situated, on UchuckleBsett
Harbor, is showing up satisfactory.
Development operations have been
in progress for some months and a
flhaU has been sunk thirty-five
feet.
Despatches from Mount Sioker
are to tbe effeot that work on the
Richard III mine is progressing
satisfactorily. After striking rich
mineral the company [again, sank
twenty five feet in the shaft bo as
better work their body of ore. They
are now down to a depth of 490
feet.
New cables are being put in on
the tramline at the Tyee, and when
these are completed there may
then be put on more buckets, bo
that the carrying capacity of the
mine will be very much increased.
These lines will all be in place
within about a   month,  and   the
■Vfl carry at least 200 tons a   day to
th       \WheE. &N. linelto be shipped on
-   to  Ladysmith.    The company is
md MjHic chine, lecated almcelTyee Company   then   expects  to
well satisfied with the outlook, and
are continually opening out new
work at the mine, with a view to
increased shipments.
KAMLOOPS.
Extensive machinery to the extent of $100,000 has been ordered
for the Iron Mask and the mine
will make a start on a large scale
during the coming year.
LARDEAU
Work on the McMinville group
has been discontinued for the winter.
A deal has been oompleted by G.
Goldsmith for a one.eighth of his
interests in the Big Showing on
Goat mountain. The price paid
was $5,000 in payments of $2,500
down and $2,500 in June of next
year. The purchase iB being made
by eastern parties.
The Oyster-Criterion Btamp mill
will go into commission on Wednesday, nothing remaining to be done
tbah the joining of the few last
links of pipe wbich carries the
water for power. The compressor
plant is all completed and about 40
men will be put on at the mine at
the mine at once. Four machine
drills will be operated.
POPLAR.
The tunnel on tbe Lucky Jack
is now in about 165 feet, and the
values are still equal to that found
at the surface, and perhaps a little
better.
SLOCAN.
The Sovereign mine has been
opened up with a small foroe.
The returns from the recent shipment from the Sapphire were fairly satisfactory.
Another installment of the liabil-
ibities of the Howard Fraotion was
paid off during the week.
Word was brought down on
Saturday that the lessees on the
American Bell, one of the  Repub
lic group, had   made a  rich  and
substantial strike.
SOUTH EAST KOOTENAY.
Several Chinese outfitB who
have been working in the bed of
Wild Horse creek this summer
have done well. It is said that
the average pay has been about
$5 per man.
The Ban Quan oompany, who
have been operating on Wild Horse
creek, only made a partial clean up
this fall owing to tbe sudden cold
wave, which filled the boxes with
ice.
Considerable interest has been
aroused at Perry oreek, by the
Theis Company, who are now engaged in sinking a shaft to reach
bedrock. Tbe placer ground in the
vioinity of "Old Town" 1b known to
be very rich in yellow gold.
It is planned by the Kootenay
Perry Gold Minniug company to
continue exploratory operations on
their property all winter. A wire
cable is now being extended from
the wagon road to camp, and will
be used in the transportation of
supplies and machinery.
YMIR.
A strike of the greatest importance to the Ymir district has been
made on the long crosscut tunnel
on the Foghorn mine whioh at last
has reaohed its goal and tapped a
vein of high grade ore some 900
feet below the surface.
Closely following the announoe-
of the important strike on the
Foghorn mine, comes another similar announcement from the Atlin
mine. The vein here has been encountered in the crosscut tunnel at
a distance of 275 feet from the portal and about 200 feet below the
surface. As in the case of the
Foghorn the dead work turned out
to be longer than was expeoted, as
according to the survey the dis-
tsnee to the vein was only 215 feet.
The vein has evidently straightened up at depth, however.
FALL SHOES AND RUBBERS
Good Footwear-Lowest Prices.
This is the season of the year when the whole
family require to be shod! We have the largest
stock in.town and can suit all' from the baby right
up to the largest size required.
Special Trade Discount
to Large Purchasers	
w.f. mcneill
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR.
Near the Postofiice.
ISpecialsatPaulson's
I P. B. Blend
Goffee
Moosejaw
Flour'
! Chilliwack
Butter
1        	
< > ■ >
Paulson
Bros.
::THE GROCERS :
' i*m«mminMiii>mii
1   1        11 ssasm
Atlantic S.S. Sailings
C.P.K. ATLANTIC B.S. LINE
From Hi. John.
L.Chjmplain.  Nov. 28 L. Erie. Dec. 10
Like Erie is Christmai Steamer
ALLAN LINE
From St   lohn.
Pretorian.. ..Nov. 30 Bavarian.. .D*c.A
DOMINION LINE
From Halilax,
Dominion Dec. •
From Portland
Cambroinan .. Dec $ Canada... Ian, a
AMERICAN LINE
Philadelphia ..Dec 5 St. Louil..Deo. 11
RED STAR LINE
Fi nland Dec 5 Vaderland.. .Dec u
CUNAKD LINE
l-'.lruria 1 »i c 5 Campania...Dee it
Campania is Christmas Rteamer
WHITE STAR LINE
Cedric  Dec. 2 Majestic....Dec.e
FRENCH LINE
La Champaigr.e Dec 3 LaTouraine Dee 10
ALLAN STATE UNE
Numidian. .Dec. 10 Mongolian...Dec 17
Continental sailings of North German
Lloyd, H. A, P. and Italian lines on application.   Lowest rates on all lines.
W. P.F.CUMM1.NGS,
G. S. S, Agt., Winnipeg
O. W. DEY, Agent,
C. P.R. Depot, Rossland. THE SATURDAY JWtfkLD. ROSSLAND B. C, DEC.
5.  1903.
The Saturday World
By th* World Publishing Company.
Bntered at tho Rossland, B. C, postofiice for
transmission through the malls.May 1, 1901 as
second class reading matter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATBE-Ji.oo per year In
Tirlably in adTane*. Ad»e-tl»ing rate* mar>-
known on application.
LONDON   RATES-9 a. por   annum
JAMES H. FLETCHER.
GENERAL  MANAOER
P. O. Box 302 Itossland, B.
PYRITIC SMELTING.
Another cheerful note in to be
Bounded this week in tbe general
poean of rejoicing that is going up
from the oamp. ThiB time it is the
advent of a pyritio smelter at
Velvet mine. The plant will be
the first of its kind in the vicinity
of the camp and from the recommendations of William Thompson
who reported on this mine last
summer there seems to be no doubt
that this method will be efficacious
in the treatment of ores from the
Portland and Velvet. Concentration by itself would hardly bave
proved a success inasmuch as tbe
presence of native metal is not too
advantageous to the process of concentration. Also the iron in this
ore is abundant. But the iron id a
factor in favor of pyritic smelting
as is also the oopper whioh in this
mine runs over two per cent and,
indeed, occasionally is better than
five. The copper would have prevented the use of the Hendryx process and ordinary smelting involving the transposition of ores over
10 miles of a waggon road is a costly affair. Thus pyritic smelting
carried on in a reduotion plant upon tne ground seems to be the best
prooess to be adopted. Undoubtedly the presenoe of such a plant
upon Sophie mountain will have a
great effect upon the development
of that region and many a property up- till recently hopeless of shipping will now find it profitable to
extraot their ore.
A LAND TAX.
Saul among the prophets wasn't
a circumstance to Edmund B. Kirby advooating  a  graduated  land
tax all the samee New  Zealand.
Politics indeed  has  strange  bedfellows.   The   Vancouver   World
thinks suoh a   measure  altogether too radical and sweeping.   But
the Vanoouver   World is  a   coast
newspaper   and   has   fishing and
logging on the brain and has never
heard of the wants of the Kootenay
along the lines of mining.     Had
MoBride seen fit to abolish the two
per cent tax on the output of mines,
it is probable that nothing  would
ever have been heard about a graduated land tax.   By the   way,  as
things have turned   out, it would
seem that the head and front of the
two per cent tax repeal   agitation
has proven somewhat of an  advo-
catus diabolus in this   regard.   Be
that as it may   there ia   no doubt
that there are  all  kinds   of land
holdings in this province, prinoely
in their extent, whioh   should be
taxed after the style of New Zealand.   There is one thing undoubt
ed which is that the land tax there
has promoted small  holdings   and
h.w settled people on the land.   In
British Columbia  all we seem   to
want to settle on the land is Chinamen.
Dominion, their resolution is apt to
carry weight. There was one voice
raised against the resolution which
was that of the worthy chairman,]
Q. 0. Buohanan, a man of parts,
whom we confess we see with surprise against the movement, the
more especially as he himself was
strongly in its favour when it was
thought it meant the imposition of
a duty on pig lead. Coming to the
conclusion by some unkuown process that pig lead would be regarded as raw material, Mr. Buohanan
is now of the opinion that the preferential tariff would not be benefiting this province, therefore, would
not benefit the Dominion, ergo, the
the Empire. Slender foundation
for sojoverwhelming a theory | Perhaps some of the objection comes
from the idea that Chamberlain is
a Conservative. Now the man is
a Radical and in his Toryism is so
advanoed a Socialist that his theories would probably paralyze any
Kootenay politioal organization.
Exception need not be taken on
that score. Mr. Buohanan has
read Lord RoBebery's speeches very
carefully as was evident from his
disoourse, but he should not have
reckoned him as a thorough opponent of Chamberlain as a reper-
usal of those very speeches will dis-
olose the faot that Roseberry is extremely careful as to his ohoice of
words. Similarly Lord Goschen
and Sir Michael Hicks-Beach have
have already recanted and are supporters of Balfour between whom
and Chamberlain there exists a perfect pact as is well understood in
Great Britain. But all these men,
inoluding Chamberlain's relations,
were assumed by Mr. Buchanan to
be against Chamberlain's polioy.
"We owe" said Mr. Buohanan," a
certain amount of loyalty to Great
Britain,and aoertain amount to Mr.
Chamber lain,but we also owe a certain amount to those other men who
are all opposed to him". Now the
point iB that this oountry owes no
loyalty to Great Britain nor to its
leaders, but Canada and its leaders,
inoluding men in such prominent
positions as Mr. Buohanan as
President of the Associated Boards
Trades of the Kootenays, together
with the Home Country and its insular statesmen,owe a common loyalty to that ideal of all Britons
whether of Great or Greater Britain, the Empire. United we stand,
divided we fall.
EXCURSION TO SPOKANE
The Spokane Falls and Northern
Railway will sell round trip tickets
to Spokane at one fare and third.
To witness the production of "Ben
Hur". Selling dates, Dec, 14th.
Limit Dec. 16th-
H. A. Jackson, Gen. Pass. Agt.
H. P. Brown,Agt. Rossland,
A special   line   of  ladies   flan
nelette    night  gowns in   oolnrs,
worth 11.00, now selli ng for 65 ots,
at The Crescent.
A Masquerade Ball
PREFERENTIAL TARIFF.
The Associated Boards of Trade
are to be congratulated upon the
stand they have taken with regard
to the Imperial polioy as outlined
by Joseph Chamberlain. The resolution oarried will be found in another column. The Associated
Boards of Trade meeting this week
in Rossland represent fourteen ont
of Borne forty odd similar bodies
in the Dominion of Canada, and
representing as they do some of the
most important industries in the
A grand masquerade ball will be
given by the Rossland Hive of the
Ladies of the Maooabees at tbe
Miners Union hall on Wednesday
evening, December 16th 1903.
Prizes will be presented for the
following characters; Best sustained Lady charaoter, set of
Sterling coffee spoons; Best sustained Gentlemen charaoter, carving set; Best dress Lady, pair of
slippers; Best dressed Gentlemen,
pair of sleeve buttons; A prize will
be given for the best comic character. Ladies masked will be admitted free, ladies and children spectators. 25 cents.
Masks will be raised at the door.
J. A. K. McKinnon floor manager,
Graham's orchestra in attendecce.
Admission $1,00.
tVhat shrunk your woolens ?
Why di J holes wear so soon ?
You   i?ed    common   soap.
Sunlight
Soap
REDUCES
Our
Invitation
to
You
We want you when
in tbe oity to visit
our etore, get acquainted with our
methods,
our stock and
our prices.
It will not take many
minutes for us to
Bhow you a
Jewelry
Stock
that is incomparably
great.
Aline that is
strictly in it from
start to finish.
You will never
regret the time spent
with us.
It will mean dollars
and cenls to you.
Of course you will
be made welcome
whether you buy
or not.
Cwert Bn.
Jewelers
and
Engravers
ROSSLAND
NELSON
TRAIL
GO TO
ftGNEWS
FOR
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers,
Men's Underwear, Overalls
and Sox,   Gloves,   Groceries,
AT AG-NEW'S
Third Avenue and Washington
Le Roi Feed
and Sale Stables
John F. Linburg, Prop.
Best Turnouts in the City.
Saddle horses for fishing and hunting parties a specialty.
Telephone 39.
Rossland, B C
Gtf,-
Alhambra Hotel
§&tf&R8 $6.50 per week
The only hotel in the city having a dry
room for miners,    Free Bath Room.
You Can't
Afford
To pay your money for
Clothes unless you are
sure of getting your money' worth of Style, Quality, Fit and Workmanship
You Can
Afford
To oome in and look at
Our display of FALL
FABRICS. You make a
selection, and we warrant
the garments to be correct
in every way.
The High-Class Tailors,
Taylor &
McQuarrie
18 and 20 Col. Ave.
The Best is always
the Cheapest....
Siwirg Machines for Sale or Ren
For Women, Misses and Children. We havo as usual the
largest and the best assortment in the city. WARM
SUPPERS in Felt, Satin, Plush, Velvet, etc., for Women,
Misses an 1 Children in great variety. Rubber Ov.rshoes,
(jloveB, Mitss, Mocassins and Bnowshoes for everybody,
and for leather footwear we always lead in qunlity md ;t
correct prices.  ■
2 See our Window and come inside for Prices &j
3 We are always pleased to show our goods £3
! C. O. LALONDE 1
j THE   SHOEMAN. 1
&ftf^^9&m&^G®m&3em^m^^d
,f«K««l*«^l« XXMXX&XX&w
Madame Russell's
Cream
Cleanses and clears the skin, and improves
the complexion. Unequaled for redneBs,
ehfipped or rough Bkin.
PRICE ONLY 50C. AT
Morrow's Drug Store
mxxxxxxxxxx, xxxxxxxxxii
Place Your Advt.
In The WORLD, It
Will Pay You.
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I
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
Pompeian Massage Cream
Removes, Blackheads, Freckles
and Pimpples and brings color the Cheeks.    For Sale at
Royal BarberShod
SUPPLY HOUSE.
W. J. PREST, PROP
Ladies satine under skirts, only
a few more of them left, they are
trimmed with four rows of narrow
ruffles on a wide acoordion pleates.
Worth $2.00. Sale price, 95o, at
XhatttMMBt.
I
• •
::
••
::
i
••
••
•*
HOLIDAY DAINTIES
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
Fancy Cluster Raisins
• •
• •
• •
• •
London Layer Raisins
• •
• •
California Raisins
• •
• •
Table Pears and Apples
• •
• •
New Walnuts, Almonds
::
and Filberts
:
Robertson's Toronto
:
Chocolates, Bon Bons
and Mixed Cancies
:
Fresh Lettuce and Celery
:
Norway Stock Fish
1!
FresJi EesterD aufl Olymiim Oysters
■ •
• •
• •
• •
• •
1                      RECEIVED   D.AILY                      1
• •
• •
• •
• •
I
Thos. Embleton
The Grocer
••
••
••
em
• •
a •
{•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••2
#*»•••••••»••••■••••»•••••■•••••••••••••••••••••••••» THE SATURDAY WORL ROSSLAND. B. C..DEC   5, too^
mm
a
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Holiday Attractions
*****
The Big Store has surpassed all previous seasons in Christmas preparations. Every Department folly Stocked with all the TJp-to-Date
Novelties suitable for Christmas Presents. The Toy Department is especially well represented; the assortment is now complete and on display.   SPECIAL CHRISTMAS STORE DECORATIONS.
DRY GOODS.
LADIES COATS AND
SKIRTS,
The correot New York styles.
NEW
Ladies' Collars,
Ladies' Neck Ribbons,
Ladies' Handkerohiefs,
Children's Handkerchiefs,
Ladies'e Hosiery,
LadieB' Underwear.
UMBRELLAS
Ladies Silk Umbrellas, Gold, Silver and Pearl Handles
CUSHION TOPS.
Swell New Cushion Tops.
TOYS! TOYS.
The largest assortment of Mechanical and Novelty Toys ever shown
in the City.
Mens' Furnishing
and Clothing
CLOTHING-
New Styles Mens' Overcoats,
New Styles Mens' Suits,
Childrens' Clothing.
Russian, Norfolk and D. B. Suits.
HATS.
Two new Blocks just reoeived.
SHIRTS.
New patterns in Salem Shirts,
SMOKING JACKETS.
New goods.   New Bwell patterns
UMBRELLAS.
Men's Silk Umbrellas; Gold Silver
and Natural bandies.
NECKWEAR.
Wilson BroB. American Neckwear.
Up-to-Date.
SUSPENDERS
Best   assortment   of   Fancy   and
President Suspenders.
GROCERIES
FANCY GROCERIES
Complete assortment of High-Grade
Delicacies.
CONFECTIONERY.
Harry Webb's Chooolates; the best
goods manufactured in Canada.
McCormick's Confectionery.
CHRISTIE'S
Fancy BiBouit's, Frnit Cake, Plum
Pudding, etc
Crosse & Blaokwell's
Jams, Jellies,Olives, Pickles, Chow
Chow, etc.
CRANBERRIES.
Cape Cod Cranberries.
LONG'S PRESERVES.
The finest Preserves put up in Amerioa.
ONTARIO
Cheese, Eggs, Vegetables, Canned
Fruit, etc.
We keep everything usually found in
a firsic'ass grocery houaa.
HARDWARE
SLEIGHS
Children's Sleds
Baby Sleighs
SKATES
Hookey and Club Skates lor ladies, men and boys.
Nickel or Silver Plate.
SILVERWARE
Rogers' 1847 Silver Knives, Forks
and Spoons.   Carving Sets, etc
BIRD CAGES
Large assortment.
Popular prioes.
STOVES
Cole's Hot Blast Stoves.
McClary Stoves and Ranges.
Bissell's Carpet Sweepers
Fine assortment.
CHINAWARE
ROYAL
CROWN DERBY CHINA
ENGLISH ROCKWOOD
Very swell goods; see them;
ROGERS' OAK
BISCUIT JARS, TRAYS
Silver mounted
DINNER SETS
Big assortment.
TEA SETS
Big range; popular prices.
Fanoy Cups and Saucers
Fancy Mugs, Berry Sets
Souvenir Dishes
CUT GLASS
All kinds, popular prioes.
WEDGEWOOD
:$:
•+.:
•t*
•■f •
It •
• t •
th
•+•
*T*
*T*
• r •
• t*
• + •
• r
:*:
m
It:
Big
Assortment
HUNTER BROS
Courteous
Treatment
^iiwiia^^w+www+tmftfwttw*^ '-'-'-' '"'"'"'I'"'"''"""!!!'!! rrftt
ASSOCIATED
BOARDS
Continued from page 1.
ment generally to wake up, investigate the varied mineral resources
of the province and the condition
of the mining industries reporting
ou the eame, to pay eBpecial attention to the production of zinc, and
to let the publio know officially by
the publication of up to date bulletins of the success of new processes as for instance that of Elmore.
Alter this the Boards determined to adjourn until Thursday and
adjourned.
The second day's proceedings
began with an inspection of the
Elmore mill upon the Le Roi No. 2
and after this was oonoluded the
delegations got down to a discussion of the remaining resolutions
which ocoupied the whole of the
remainder of the day.
The most important resolutions
presented, were those dealing with
the importation ol mining machinery, oonoentrating maohinery
and the duty on oil. As far aa the
import ol mining machinery was
concerned the Associated Boards
were obdurate. It was pointed out
that where mining maohinery was
not manufactured in Canada that a
clause in the tariff prevented a
charge being made and where it
was manufactured in Canada, it
ought to be purchased in Canada.
On the other Bide it was urged that
although this was true, there waB a
limit somewhere. It could hardly
poiut to a right oondition of affairB
when it took as muoh to ereot a
mill in the vicinity ol a railroad in
Canada as it did to ereot one in
Mexico that was a oouple of hundred miles from steam locomotion.
This was either a question of
freight or it was a question of duty.
Nobody seemed willing, however,
to say a word as to the C. P. R.
freights, and no good Liberal oould
for one moment admit that the
present tariff waa anything but the
real thing.
However tbe matter being approached in another way there
was some benefit that accrued.
This was in touohing upon the import of oil. Oil iB paying five oents
per gallon duty, that iB to say that
it is wanted in concentration, al
though such oil is not procurable
within the Dominion. Nobody
oould be found to defend such a
proposition. Nobody's corns would
be trodden on if the duly were removed. Therefore the Associated
Beards were willing to paBB a resolution calling for tbe abolition of
the duty and they did.
But they went yet further and
after the conditions of this
camp bad been presented, showing
tbat the number of plants that
would be going up within this
camp for the concentration of ores
would be large indeed and that
their cost was already bo enormous
in the aggregate as to give pause to
thought without a back breaking
duty in addition, the Board come
to the conclusion that the interests
of the province and of Canada in
general would be best served by the
encouragement of concentration
and the consequent exploital of the
Kootenay mines and passed a resolution calling for the abrogation
of the duties on concentrating machinery.
Beyond this the Associated
Boards called upon Premier MoBride to make good the resolution
ol the Conservative Convention at
Revelstoke and rescind the two per
cent tax upon the gross output ol
the mines which impinges unfairly
upon the lower  grade   properties.
But when it came down to a
queBtion of calling the C. P. R. to
account for itB failure to provide
sufficient facilities as a common
carrier not a seconder could be
found to the resolution whioh was
proposed by Joyce of Fernie. On
the otb r hand a vote of thanks
waB passed to tbe steamship and
railway companies for reduced
fares to the delegates.
The other resolutions pasBed
called for Ihe assignment of unoccupied crown lands for schools
purposes; an import duty on rough
lumber from tbe United States;
the appointment of a judge of the
Supreme Court to be resident at
in the Kootenay; that the ooal and
oil lands in Southeast Kootenay
Bhould be opened under proper
conditions, and that Nelson Bhould
be the next place of meeting.
Other resolutions ou the
agenda were not disposed of but a
committee was appointed to look
into the proposed bounty on the
production of zino.
HAROLD NELSON COMPANY.
Richelieu and Daman and Pythias at
the Theatre
Certainly the finest impersonation of Harold Nelson's as yet seen
in Rossland is that of the grand
old minister of Franoe, he who
paved the way for Le Grand Roi,
Armand Duplesis, Cardinal Richelieu, The conception of the role
was vivid and its portrayal was
masterly. Some of the scenes,
where Nelson was well played up to,
were worthy of any stage. Mr.
Nelson is always good but on
Tuesday night he surpassed himself.
Fred Roland, known to Ross-
playgoers as the man who enacted
Nero so well in Quo Vadis, did
particularly well as Baradas and
oarried out the charaoter so that he
formed no mean colleague to his
better known brother actor. C. L.
Bruce as Adrien played the hero's
part with a swashbuckling air that
gave him great credit.
Among the women although
Julie de Mortimer (Florence Mo-
Leay) is muoh more prominently
before the public eye and although
she acquitted herself especially in
the heavier scenes, with spirit
Marion de Lome, partly from the
character of the impersonation
partly through the wit and ability
of the impersonator certainly bore
the palm. That "fair perdition"
as Bhe is entitled by her patron the
oardinal, waB oertainly seen to better advantage than in any other
role she has undertaken on these
boards.
On the succeeding night was presented "Damon and Pythias"
which proved popular enough and
was well received by a good house.
Mr. Nelson was a good Damon and
Bruce carried off the honors among
the other male actors by his rendition of Pythias whioh waB creditable indeed. Miss Jowett, who
played the part of Hermione, was
seen   to    advantage.    The   most
effective part perhaps is that of the
betrothed of Pythias which was
undertaken by Helen Scott. But
the quiet force ol Idalie Jowett certainly carried the sympathies of
audience with her especially on her
last appearance in the closing
scence with Damon.
If yov want to save money on
your purchases, this is the place to
come, our prices are right' and
every thing marked in plain figures
as advertised, at The Crecsent.
THE CITY FATHERS
Have a Bare Quorum--Tha   Right of
Appeal
The city oounoil on Tuesday
night was not well represented in
point of numbers. There were
only three of the aldermen present
who were Aldermen Daniel, Talbot
and McKiohan. This led to an
unexpected result, unexpected by
the mayor. It would seem the
mayor was not satisfied with the
decision of the police magistrate
with regard to the alleged infringement of the firelimit bylaw by the
occupiers ol Judge Newton's property on the corner ol Columbia
avenue and Spokane Street. Consequently he wanted to appeal.
Consequently he lodged $50 of the
city's money in the hands of the
Chief of Police in order to be allowed to make that appeal. This
without consulting the oounoil.
Consequently the counoil got angry. (At least Alderman Mo
Kichan wasn't disturbed.) Consequently Alderman Daniel moved
that tbe money should not be
passed over by the council. Aud
it wasn't, there being a majority of
two to one against the mayor.
In connection with this matter
a petition was read from the agents
of Judge Newton asking to be permitted to go on with the repairs to
the property, which Alderman
Daniel moved should be granted
but on being told he was out ol
order gave notice that he would so
f Christmas!    Christmas! i
Christmas will soon be here. What is
more suitable for your wife or daughter
than one of
7
"The tone of the Heintzman & Co. Art
Piano is delightful, the elasticity of action
marvelous, every note ringing out in clear,
pearly and and limpid quality. It excels
any Piano I ever used
-MADAM ALBANI."
S
FOR PRICES AND TERMS SEE
I J. B. Johnson b Co., j
Sole Agents.
move at the next regular   meeting
of the oounoil.
The mayor gave notice of a resolution praying the Bitting mem
ber for Rossland to so amend the
Water Act as to make its meaning
unmistakable.
Great bargains are to be had in
Ladies and Childrens woolen and
Cashmere gloves. Also a new line
of the famous Perrin'a Kid Gloves,
for the Xmas trade, at The Crescent.
LOST—A small valise on the
road between Rossland and Sheep
cieek, finder will please leave at
this Oflice.
All classes of white Goods, at a
big reduotion in prices, come and
look them over, The Crescent-
THE SCHUBERT COMPANY
Favorable  Crltlelam   an Appearanoe
In Spokane
Concerning tbe Schubert company whioh appears at the M, B.
ohuroh on December 14th, the
Spokesman-Review says: "Tha
Schubert Symphony Clnb do*
lighted a large audienoe at the
First Methodist ohuroh last night.
There wsb a well filled house, tad
the audience was one of the molt
demonstrative in the history of the
Ladies Matinee Musioalee. Every
number was applauded to
the echo, but the feature of the
evening was the splendid singing
of the Ladies Quartette. Their
rendering ol Waldtenfels 'Waltz
Melodies,' brought a storm ol applause, and tbe response to the en*
oore 'Old Kentucky Home,' waa
one of the gems of the evening." THE SATURDAY ..WORLD, ROSSLAND B. C, DEC.  5, 1903-
SALE OF LANDS
For Delinquent Unpaid Taxes in the Rossland Assessment District, Province of British Columbia.
I hereby give notice that on Tuesday, the eighth day of December, A.
D., 1903, at the hour of 12 o'clock noon, at the Court House, in the City of
Rossland, I shall sell at public auction the lands hereinafter set out of the
persons in said list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes unpaid by
said persons on the 31st day of December, 1902, and for interest, costs and
expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale.
LIST ABOVE MENTIONED
Name of Peraon Assessed
Short Description of Property
Delinquent Taics
£ a
Rice, L. M Lot 20, Block 17        6.25
Kaiser, A Lot 7, Block 24       4.80
Rice, L. M Lot 17, Block 26       6.25
MIDWAY
McNicol, James  Lot 13, Block 11
Name of Peraon Asaessed
Short Description of Property
Delinquent Taxes
Kane, Thomas —
Thall, Nick 	
Thall, Nick 	
Thall, Nick 	
Maynard, George .
Bennett, Elizabeth
Kerr, James 	
.Lot 7,
.Lot A
.Lot 1,
.Lot 2, Block 14
.Lot 13
Unknown 	
White, Henry ....
Unknown  	
Unknown  .'.	
White, Henry
McCrea, Colin  ...
Unknown  	
MoNichol, James
Earl, John 	
Earl, John 	
Earl, John 	
Childs, G. W	
Childs, G. W	
Childs, G. W	
Childs, G. W	
Casey, H. M	
Casey, H. M	
Miller, J. M	
Black, Ira J	
Pierce, W. E	
Stout, Thomas	
Earl, John 	
Archer, W. C	
Archer, W. C	
Schmidt, Leo 	
Schalck, D	
Smith,  George   ...
Clute, Jennie  	
Clute, Jennie 	
McRae ft McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren  .
Mayer,  John   	
Hayden, William ...
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren  .
Wilkie, Alex	
McLeod, J. P	
McDonell, Thomas ..
McDonell, Thomas ..
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae ft McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
Adams, Catherine J.
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
Gully & Company ...
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren  .
Harlan, John 	
Rendell & Co	
Rendell & Co	
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren  .
Harlan, John  	
Harlan, John 	
McRae & McLaren .
Belgrove, Matilda ...
Belgrove, Matilda ..
Cameron, D. A	
Cameron, D. A	
McRae & McLaren .
Greig, Alex	
Drummond, A. J. ..
McRae & McLaren .
McRae & McLaren .
McRae ft McLaren .
McLaren, D. 0	
McRae & McLaren
McRae ft McLaren
.60
5.85
.20
5.25
5.65
6.05
.20
.20
ANACONDA.
Block 3   $   .80
Block 14       .40
Block 14      4.00
 40
»■. *., Block 18       2.40
Lot 9, Block 26     1.20
Lot 9, Block 29      1.20
CARSON
.. Lots 4, 5 and 6, Block 1	
.. Lou i and 4, Block 2 	
..Lot 10, Block 3 	
..Lot 1, Block 4  	
..Lot 14, Block 4  	
..Lot 1, Block 5  	
..IiOt 3, Block 6  	
..Lot 11, Block 14  	
I CASCADE.
..Lot 7, Block 3  	
..Lot 8, Block 3  	
..Lot 9, Block 3 	
..Lot 1, Block 4  	
..Lot 2, Block 4  	
..Lot 3, Block 4  	
..Lot 4, Block 4  	
..Lot 5, Block 4  	
..Lot 6, Block 4   	
...Lot 8, Block 5  	
... Lot 12, Block 6 	
..Lot 1, Block 7   	
...Lot 3, Block 8   	
...U>ls 5 and 6, S. 28 feet, Block 10
...lxit 11, Block 11  	
...Lot 12, Block 11  	
... Lot 4, Block 12 	
... Ixit 6, Block 12 	
...Lot 4, Block 24 	
...Ixit 11, Block 33   	
...Lot 12, Block 33  	
) DEADWOOD.
2.00
4.00
.80
1.00
.60
.60
.60
3.95
5.15
.80
25.85
1.20
.80
,      .80
,      .80
,    1.20
,    7.85
,    4.40
,      .80
,      .80
,    1.00
.. Lots 1 to 15, Block 1 	
.. Lots 1 to 32,' Block 2 	
.. Lots 1 to 17, Block 3 	
.. Lot 18, Block 3 	
..Lot 19, Block 3 	
..Lots 20 to 25, Block 3	
..Lots 1 to 20, Block 4 	
.. Lots 1 to 7, Block 6	
..Lots 1 to 10, Block 6 	
..Lots 1 to 5, and Lot 7, Block 7	
..Lot 6, Block 7  	
..Lot 8, Block 7  	
...Lot 9, Block 7  	
... Lot 10, Block 7 	
.. Lots 1 to 17, Block 8 	
.. Lots 19 and 20, Block 8 	
.. Lots 1 to 14, Block 9 	
.. Lots 16 to 20, Block 9 	
.. Lots 1 to 10, Block 10 	
... Lots 1 to 10, Block 11 	
... Lots 1 to 12, Block 12 	
..Lot 13, Block 12  	
... Lots 14 to 20, Block 12 	
... Lots 1 to 10, Block 13	
..Lot 13, Block 13  	
...Lots 14 to 20, Block 13 	
... Lots 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 11 to 16, Block 14
...Lot 3, Block 14 	
...Lot 17, Block 14  	
...Lot 18, Block 14  	
...Lots 1 and 2, Block 15 	
...Lots 4 to 8, Block 15 	
...Lot 9, Block 16   	
...Lot 10, Block 15  	
... Lots 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, Block 16 	
...Lot 9, Block 16  	
...Lot 10, Block 16  	
... Lot 1, Block 17 	
...Lot 2, Block 17 	
... Lot 3, Block 17 	
...Lot 4, Block 17 	
... Lot 6, Block 17 	
... Ixits 7 to 20, Block 17	
... Lots 1 to 12, Block 18 	
... Lots 1 to 10, Block 19 	
...Lot 11, Block 19  	
.... Lota 12, 15, 16 and 17, Block 19 	
.... Lots 1 to 10, Block 20	
EHOLT
McArthur, Ella 	
Bellman & Johnson  	
Stewart, Alex	
Caulfleld, J. J	
Ohessar, William 	
Hlattery,  John   	
Chessar, W., ft Hummel, H. A.
Tebo,  M	
Tebo, M	
Collins, G. H	
Tebo,  M	
Rice, L. M	
John, B. H	
John, B. H	
Shaw, William  	
Kaiser, Fred	
Kaiser, Fred	
Kaiser, Fred	
Kaiser, Fred	
Kaiser, Fred.	
Atkins, J. A. M	
Atkins, J. A. M	
Atkins, J. A. M	
Atkins, J. A. M	
McDonald, W. O	
McDonald. W. a	
Joha, », at ..
#aaa\ »» K. »<
.Lot 10, Block 3 ..
. Lot 9, Block 4 ..
. Lot 19, Block 4 ..
.Ixit 20, Block 4 ..
. Lot 22, Block 4 ..
. Lot 21, Block 5 ..
.Lot 24, Block 5 ..
. Lot 1, Block 6 ...
.Lot 2, Block 6 ...
.Lot 17, Block 6 ..
.Lot 3, Block 7  ..
.Lot 5, Block 7  ..
.Lot 14, Block 7 ..
, Lot 21, Block 7 ..
.Lot 16, Block 13
.Lot 11, Block 14
.Lot 12, Block 14
.Lot 1, Block 16 ..
.Lot 2, Block 16 ..
. Lot 3, Block 15 ..
. Lot 9, Block 16 ..
.Lot 10, Block 16
.Lot 11, Block 16
.Lot 12, Block 16
.Lot 7, Block 17 ..
.Lot S. Block If ..
lot t. Block II
*V
5 a
■
s
8
o
i
>*>
1
o
X
3
W
3
•n
+3
a
02
3
McNicol, James ...
McNicol, James ...
Gansz, Mrs. S	
McNicol, James ...
McNicol, James ...
McNicol, James ..
Banbury, Mrs. C.
Barton,  F. W.   ..
Bryant & Archer
Bryant ft Archer
Nelson, J. W.  ...
Nelson, J. W.  ...
Nelson, J. W.  ...
Munro, D. G	
Bhrlich ft Wake
Ehrllch & Wake
Finch, E. C	
Finch,  E.  C.
     80
.Lot 14, Block 11  80
.Lot 15, Block 11         .80
. Lot 8, Block 14      1.60
.Lot 13, Block 16          .80
• Lot 14, Block 16          .80
.Lot 15, Block 16          80
.Lot 10, Block 17       8.25
* .10
.05
.45
.06
.26
.15
.15
.10
.65
.05
.60
.65
.70
.05
.05
.20
.45
.10
.10
.05
.05
.05
.45
.60
.10
2.90
.15
.10
.10
.10
.15
.85
.30
.10
.10
.10
1.20
2.56
1.36
.80
.08
.48
1.60
.56
.80
.48
.80
.80
.80
1.20
1.36
.16
1.12
.40
.80
.80
.96
.80
.56
.80
.80
.56
.88
.80
.80
.80
.16
.40
.80
1.20
.40
.80
1.20
1.20
.80
.08
.80
.80
1.12
.96
.80
.80
.32
.80
1.60
7.06
4.40
4.00
4.40
2.40
2.80
1.20
.80
.80
3.20
.80
.80
.80
1.20
1.60
1.80
24.60
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.40
4.35
4.SS
4.76
.15
.30
.15
.10
.02
.05
.20
.05
.10
.05
.10
.10
.10
.15
.15
.02
.15
.05
.10
.10
.10
-.10
.05
.10
.10
.05
.10
.10
.10
.10
.02
.05
.10
.16
.05
.10
.15
.16
.10
.02
.10
.10
.15
.10
.10
.10*
.05
.10
.20
.80
.60
.45
.60
.25
.30
.15
.10
.10
.36
.10
.10
.10
.16
.20
.20
2.76
.15
.15
.16
.16
.16
.16
.60
.60
.SB
. 2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.90
2.46
6.46
2.45
4.65
3.35
JsSgSSP
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2i00
2.09
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
loo
Mi
Ml
2.70
8.50
2.25
7.85
8.30
8.75
2.25
2.25
4.20
6.45
2.90
3.10
2.65
2.65
2.65
6.40
7.76
2.90
30.75
8.35
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.35
10.70
6.70
2.90
2.90
3.10
3.35
4.16
3.51
2.90
2.10
2.63
3.80
2.61
2.90
2.53
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.36
3.51
2.1S
3.27
2.45
2.90
2.90
3.06
2.90
2.61
2.90
2.90
2.81
2.98
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.18
2.45
2.90
3.85
2.46
2.90
3.36
3.35
2.90
2.10
2.90
2.90
3.27
3.06
2.90
2.90
2.37
2.90
3.90
9.85
6.90
6.46
6.90
4.85
6.10
3.36
2.90
2.90
5.55
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.15
3.80
4.00
29.85
1.86
3.36
3.36
3.35
3.81
3,65
6.86
6.85
f.M
Ml
Kerr  Brothers   	
Kerr   Brothers   	
Gaunce, W. G	
Gaunce, W. G	
Harper, Mrs. F. C	
Denzler, Robert  	
Powell, John 	
Powell, John  	
Nash, E., and Asqukh. W. H.
McNicol, .linnet	
McNicol, James	
Owen, Mary E	
Owen, Mary E	
Nelson, J. W	
NelBon, J. W	
McGuire, G. C	
Cross, L. J ,	
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
Gaunce, W. G	
Empey, F. B	
Cummi-iga,  C	
' Cuuimiiu.il,   C	
Bush, J. H	
Stephens,  J.  M	
Peel, Henry   	
Hassard, F. H	
Hassard, F.  11	
Powell, John  	
Powell, John  	
Finch. E. C	
Finch, B. C	
Mcfioyle, W. E	
Hodgson, R. T	
Bush,  James   	
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
Lind, J. W	
McNicol, Jeanette 	
McNicol, James 	
Foster, G. M	
McNicol, James 	
Wright ft Hackett  	
Wright ft Hackett  	
Nelson, H	
Cross, L. J	
Powell, John  	
Powell, John  	
McNicol, James 	
McNicol, James 	
McNicol, James 	
Cameron, Dougal E	
Glaie, W. D	
Glaze, W. D	
Powell, John  	
Powell, John  	
McNicol, James 	
Reynolds, A. H	
. Lot 3, Block 18 	
• Lot 5, Block 18 	
.Lot 6, Block 18 	
..Lot 20, Block 19  	
■ •Lot 21, Block 19  	
..Lot 22, Block 19   	
• • Lot 3, Block 21  	
• •Lot U, Block 21  	
• •Lot 12, Block 21  	
• •Lot 11, Block 24  	
• •Lot 12, Block 24  	
• •Lot 23, Block 24  	
• ■Lot 24, Block 24  	
• •Lot 13, Block 25  	
• •Lot 14, Block 26  	
• •Lot 2, Block 29 	
• •Lot 10, Block 29  	
• •Lot 23, Block 31  	
• ••Lot 24, Block 31  	
• •■Lot 14, Block 32  	
...Lot 19, Block 32  	
...Lot 20, Block 32  	
...Lot 11, Block 33  	
...Lot 12, Block 33   	
...Lot 15, Block 33   	
...Lot 16, Block 33   	
...Lot 17, Block 33  	
...Lot 18, Block 33  	
...Lot 19, Block 33   	
...Lot 20, Block  33   	
...Lot 11, Block 34   	
...Lot 12, Block 34  	
... Lot  1,   Block   35   	
...Lot 2, Block 35 	
...Lot 12, Block 35   	
, ...Lot 14, Block 35   	
....Lot 19, Block 35   	
....Lot 18, Block 37   	
....Lot 19, Block 37   	
....Lot 20, Block 37   	
....Lot 21,  Block 37   	
....Lot 23, Block 39   	
....Lot 24, Block 39   ..i...
 Lots 3 and 4, Block 40
 Lot 7, Block 44 	
....Lot 1, Block 45 	
.... Lot 5, Block 45 	
 Lot 6, Block 45 	
.... Lot 7, Block 45 	
....Lot 8, Block 45 	
 Lot 13, Block 46   	
....Lot 14, Block 45  	
....Lot 8, Block 46 	
.... Lot 4, Block 47 	
....Lot 11, Block 47   	
....Lot 12, Block 47   ....
 Lot 18, Block 48   ....
 Lot 19, Block 48   ....
 Ixit 19, Block 51  ....
 Lot 20, Block 61   ....
 Lot 22, Block 51   ....
 Ixit 23, Block 51  ....
 Lot 24, Block 51  	
 Lot 22,  Block 57   ....
 Lot 1, Block 68 	
 Lot 2, Block 58 .
.80
1.20
1.20
.80
.80
.80
1.60
1.00
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
2.40
4.95
4.35
7.05
4.00
.80
1.20
1.00
1.20
1.20
1.20
8.00
1.20
1.20
8.25
1.20
1.20
1.20
7.25
9.45
• 1.20
• 1.20
• 4.80
• 1.20
■ 1.20
■ 1.00
■ 1.00
• 1.00
• 1.00
• 1.00
• 1.20
• 4.80
• 6.46
• 3.60
■ 1.20
• 1.20
• 1.20
• 1.20
• 8.00
• 1.20
• 1.20
■ 1.80
• 1.00
• • 1.20
. • 7.85
.. 8.25
.. .80
..       .80
• •      .80
.80
• • 1.00
.. 6.65
.. 6.15
..    6.95
Moran, Michael 	
MoQulre, Mrs.  Anna  	
Hodgson, R. T	
Hodgson, R. T	
McNIchol, James  	
SSH£&a%i ..        ,-   ..,•..,*,
Jackson, August   	
Henderson, Mrs. J. E	
Breckenrldge, Elizabeth Ann
Talenio, C, and Bonier, C. ..
Snell, Benjamin
Struthers, Alex. .
. Lot 15, Block 59    80
.Lot 16, Block 59    80
.Lot 18, Block 59    80
.Lot 6, Block 76      7.45
MIDWAY, SOUTH.
.Lot 1, Block 2  	
.Lot 1, Block 4  	
.Lot 5, Block 4  	
.Lot 6, Block 4  	
. Lot 6, Block 4, Lot 377, 5 acres	
PHOENIX,  NEW YORK ADDITION.
. Lots 1 and 2, Block 1 	
.Lot 9, Block 7  	
. Lota 19 and 20, Block 7 	
.Lot 2, Block 8  	
PHOENIX CITY.
.Lot 5, Block 5      7.06
. Lot 12, Block 9      6.66
2.80
1.60
1.20
1.20
4.00
3.20
3.20
3.20
1.20
ROCK CREEK.
Ingram, Mrs. Bart
Ingram, B	
Gordon, —. 	
Ingram, B	
.Lot 7, Block 4
.Lot 1, Block 5
.Lot 2, Block 5
.Lot 21, Block 5
RUCKLE'S ADDITION.
Tenant, W. N	
Parr, William 	
Ruckle, F. ft B	
Ruckle, F. ft E	
Nunn, George \	
Nunn, George	
Manly, L. A. 	
Manly, L. A. 	
Mack, William  	
Mack, William  	
Stedham, Fred. Janice
Hodgson, John  	
Hodgson, John  	
Kane, Bd. D	
Manly, J. L	
Logan, Mrs. Carrie ...
Manly, W. K. C	
Lambert, Margaret H.
Lambert, Margaret H.
Hall, Robert S	
Hall, Robert S. 	
Dahl, Ethel G	
Dahl. Bthel G	
Dahl. Bthel O	
Dahl. Ethel O	
Ferriter, D. J	
Ferriter, D. J	
Eaaton, W. 0	
Morrison, Wm. James
Burton, Mrs. Annie ...
Skeratt, B. T	
McKle, John, Jr	
Arthur, Robert 	
Topping, B. 3	
Topping, B. 8	
Topping, B. S	
Topping, B. 3	
Topping, B. 8	
Canadian Pacific Railway
Conlln, J. C	
Hanna, John 	
Hutchinson Bros	
Topping. B. 8. 	
MulhoUand, Lewie  	
...................
..Lot 6, Block 5	
..Lot 10, Block 7 	
.. Lot 11, Block 7 	
..Lot 8, Block 9	
.. Lot 6, Block 10 	
..Lot 7, Block 10 	
..Lot 17, Block 10  	
..Lot 18, Block 10  	
..Lot 19, Block 10 	
..Lot 20, Block 10  	
..Lot 21, Block 10  	
.. Lot 2, Block 16 	
.. Lot 3, Block 16 	
..Lot 4, Block 16 	
.. Lot 5, Block 16 	
.. Lots 7 and 8, Block 16 	
..Lot 12, Block 16  	
.. Lot 15, Block 16  	
..Lot 16, Block 16 	
..Lot 25, Block 16  	
..Lot 26, Block 16  	
.. Lot 3, Block 17 	
.. Lot 4, Block 17 	
.. Lot 5, Block 17 	
.. Ixit 6, Block 17 	
...Lot 2, Block 21 	
.. Lot 3, Block 21 	
..Lot 10, Block 23   	
.. Lots 1 and 2, Block 24	
,.. Lota 3, 4, 6, 6, Block 24 	
...Lot 7, Block 29 	
...Lota 1 and 2, Block 30 	
,.. Lots 3, 4, and 5, Block 30 	
CITY OF TRAIL.
,.. Lota 1 and 2 and S. 20 ft of L. 3, B.
... Lota 11 to 16, Block 1 	
,.. Lot 19, Block 1 	
,.. Lot 16, Block 4 	
,.. Lot 19, Block 4 	
,.. Lot 1, Block 10 	
,.. Lot 4, Block 10 	
... Lota 1 and 2, Block 13 	
... Lots 3 and 4, Block 13  '..
...Lots 19 and 20, Block 14 	
...Lot 1, Block 16 	
...tM t. Monk IS	
.70
.55
.70
.10
.10
.10
.20
.10
.10
.10
.95
.10
.15
.16
.10
.10
.10
.20
.10
.15
.15
.15
.15
.25
.55
.60
.80
.45
.10
.15
.10
.15
.15
.15
.90
.15
.15
.95
.16
.15
.15
.80
1.05
.15
.15
.55
.15
.15
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.15
.55
.76
.40
.15
.15
.16
.15
.90
.15
.15
.20
.10
.15
.90
.95
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.70
.70
.65
.10
.10
.10
.85
.20
.20
.15
.15
.45
.60
2.40
.40
.40
.40
.80
.80
.80
1.60
1.60
1.20
1.20
1.20
3.20
2.00
2.40
.80
3.20
.80
.80
.80
1.00
.80
.80
1.00
.80
.80
.80
.80
.40
.40
.80
1.60
3.20
.80
.80
1.20
1 16.13
. 47.85
. 7.85
. 6.25
. 6.25
. 21.60
. 14.26
. 13.85
. 11.05
. 11.06
. 1L60
SMI
£■§.
3 i
x a
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
.36
.36
.36
.15
.80
.75
.05
.25
.06
.06
.05
.10
.10
.10
.20
.20
.15
.15
.15
.35
.20
.25
.10
.35
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.10
.05
.05
.10
.20
.35
.10
.10
.15
1.80
5.40
.90
.70
.70
2.40
1.60
1.60
1.25
1.25
1.30
S.66
8.95
7.35
8.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.80
2.90
2.90
2.90
11.20
2.90
8.35
3.S6
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.80
8.10
3.35
8.35
8.35
8.85
4.66
7.60
6.85
9.85
6.45
2.90
3.35
3.10
3.35
3.35
8.36
10.90
3.35
3.35
11.20
3.35
3.35
3.36
10.05
12.50
3.35
3.35
7.35
3.35
3.35
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.35
7.35
9.20
6.00
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.35
10.90
3.35
3.35
4.00
3.10
3.35
10.75
11.20
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.10
9.35
8.85
8.60-
2.90
2.90
3.90
10.30
5.10
3.80
3.35
3.35
6.45
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
5.55
6.55
6.65
3.35
9.85
9.40
2.65
4.65
2.45
2.45
2.45
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.80
3.80
3.35
3.35
3.35
5.55
4.20
4.65
2.90
6.55
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.10
2.90
2.90
3.10
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.45
2.45
2.90
3.80
5.55
2.90
2.90
3.35
17.93
65.25
10.75
8.95
8.95
26.00
17.85
17.45
14.30
14.30
14.90
38.16 THE SATURDAY WORLD, ROSSLAND, B. C. DEC 5,   1903
Namb of Person AssesioJ
Short Descriptiog of Property
Deliuquent Taxea
a i
H    J
Bm a
00 m
o o
O *
. c
c1 &
3 w
CO a
Krummer, F Lot 4, Block 17 .,
Topping, B. S Lot G, Block 17 ..
Topping, B. S L°t n- Block 17
Topping, E. S Lot 12, Block 17
Topping, B. S Lot 13, Block 17
  10.25
  7.05
  7.85
  7.05
 ^^^^^^^^^^      7.45
Bostwick, May  Lot 2, Block 31   0.25
Topping,  B.  S Lot 4, Block 31   3.95
Topping,  E.  S Lot 9, Block 31   0.25
Topping, E.  S Lot 10, Block 31    0.25
Topping,  E.  S Lot 1, Block 33   0.25
Topping, E.  S Lota 3 and 4, Block 33   7.85
Topping, E.  S Lot 5, Block 33   7.05
G.  1, OSOYOOS.
Boundary Creek M. & M. Co Lot 038, Township 79.	
Boundary Ck M.&M. Co & T. McDonellLot 039, Township 79  	
Boundary Ck M.&M. Co & T. McDonellLot 040, Township 79 .'
Baillie, Edward   Lot 747, Township 74	
Baillie, Edward  Lot 748, Township 75 	
Brown, 11. A Lot 093, Township 77 	
Garden, Ellen  B Part Lot 312, Township 73
Garter,  Williar:    Lot 1012, Township 71  ...
Clilsholm, John  Lot 2733, Township 73  ...
Ghristianson,   M Lot 2083, Towntliip 70  ...
Coryell & Murray  Lot 453, Township 71 	
Donaldson, John, & QrlrieU, Thomas..Pi rt Lot 530, TownBhip 72 	
Dronuen, J. B Lot 040, Township 09 	
Olaze, W. D Part Lot 781, Township 09 	
Haddington, Hon. • H.  H     Part Lot 053, Township 72  	
Henderson,  David    Lots 1721 and 1721 a, Township 70	
Hole, J. C Lot 1271, Township 71  	
Johnson, Sydney M Lot 929, Township 09 	
Johnson, Sydney M Lot 2394, Township 70  	
Kuntz, Max Lot 2053, Township 77  	
Lamb, F. Mortimer  Lot 004, Township 09 	
Lambly,  Hester E Part Lot 429, Township 70  	
Manery, R. J., and Hall, R. S Lot 1054, Township 79   	
Manly,  J.  L Part Lot 700, Township 71 	
McCarthy, J. R Lot 2732, Township 73  	
NewUy,   Leonard    Lot 1357, Township 72  	
Rose,   Marion    Part Lot 053, Township 72  	
Smith, James A Part Lot 530, Township 72  	
Traunweiser, A Part Lot 530, Township 72	
Warmuth,  C.   C Lot 090, Township 09 	
Ward,  Mrs. Jennie   Lot 1494, Township 72  	
Davis,   Ed Part Lot 382  	
McNee, William    tart Lol 382	
Robinson, A. P. ...' Lot 4 in Sub-division Lot 519 	
Lane,  James  Wellington    Part Lot. 9, in Sub-division Lot 519 ..
Macdonell, A.  C Part Lot 10, in Sub-division Lot 519..
Cowan,  George  H Lot 11 in Sub-division Lot 519 	
Macdonell, A. C Part Lot 12 in Sub-division Lot 619 ..
Macdonell, A. C Part Lot 13 in Sub-division Lot BlU ..
Macdonell, A. C N. Part Lot 14 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C N. Part Lot 15 in Sub-division Lot 519
Macdonell, A. C Lot 10 in Sub-division Lot 511  	
A. C Lot 17 in Sub-division Lot 519 	
A. C Lot 18 in Sub-division Lot 519  	
A. C Lot 19 in Sub-division Lot 519  	
A. C Lot 20 in Sub-division Lot 519  	
D. J Lot 13 In Sub-division Lot 534  	
D. J Lot 14 In Sub-division Lot 534 	
Macdonell,
Macdonell,
Macdonell,
Macdonell,
Ferriter
Ferriter
534
Johnson, Julia  Lot 10 in Sub-division Lot
Mullady,   Tim Part Sub-division 534 	
Wa Gin Sing  Lot 13 in Sub-division Lot 535  	
Graham,   Maggie    Lot 1, Blor-k 7, Sub-div. Lot 700	
McCarren, R Lot 3, 3!ock 10, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
Massle, A. W Lots 1 to 4, Block 12, Sub-div. Lot 700
McCarren, R Lot 2, Block 14, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
McCarren, R Lot 2, Block 10, Sub-div. Lot 700 	
Massey, George E Lots 1  ,ud 2, Block 1"., Sub-div. Lot 700
Hargrave, John M Lot 1, Block 21, Sub-div. Lot 700 ....
N. ii F. S. LAND GRANT.
Ferrler, J. W Part Section 22, Tp. 9a., Block 12 ....
Ferrler, J. W Part section 21, Tp. 9a., Block 12 ....
O'Brien, Barney   Lot i004, U. 1, West Kootenay 	
51.20
12.10
12.80
8.00
0.40
12.00
3.20
5.00
0.40
0.40
144.00
3.08
9.00
4.00
.80
0.40
3.20
12.80
12.80
0.40
11.20
2.40
12.80
18.40
3.20
10.40
4.80
7.08
39.04
12.00
24.24
14.80
21.00
4.00
10.80
12.00
8.00
2.40
2.80
2.80
2.80
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
1.20
1.20
2.40
1.60
4.80
.80
.00
3.20
.80
.00
.80
.80
2.40
2.25
25.00
1.15
.80
.85
.85
.86
.70
.45
.70
.70
.70
.90
.80
6.75
1.35
1.45
.90
.70
1.25
.35
.65
.70
.70
10.20
.40
1.10
.45
.10
.70
.35
1.45
1.45
.70
1.25
.25
1.45
2.10
.35
1.20
.55
.90
4.45
1.35
2.70
1.05
2.45
.45
1.90
1.35
.90
.25
.30
.30
.30
.45
.45
.45
.45
.45
.15
.15
.25
.20
.55
.10
.05
.35
.10
.05
.10
.10
.25
.25
2.90
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
13.40
9.85
10.70
10.50
10.30
8.95
S.40
8.95
8.95
8.95
10.75
9.85
58.95
15.51
10.25
10.90
9.10
15.35
6.55
7.55
9.10
».10
102.20
6.08
12.70
6.45
2.90
9.10
5.55
16.25
16.25
9.10
14.45
4.05
16.25
22.50
5.55
13.00
7.35
10.58
40.09
15.35
28.94
18.45
20.05
6.45
20.70
15.35
10.90
4.65
6.10
5.10
5.10
6.45
6.45
6.45
6.45
6.45
3.35
3.35
4.65
3.80
7.35
2.90
2.05
5.55
2.90
2.65
2.90
2.90
4.65
4.50
30.50
JOHN KIRKUP,
.assessor and Collector Rossland Assessment District
Rossland, B. O., October 27th, 1902.
PHRA
!! The Phoenician.
BY
EDWIN
LESTER
ARNOLD
• •'
^^••^•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■•z
,£•••••••••••••••••»••••••••••'»•«•••••••••••••••••,
SYNOPSIS
Phra, who dies and lives again in
Britain, begins to recount his e?.r'v adventures— He buys a British slave girl
and sails on a trading voyage to Cornwall and marries a British princess. Is
attacked and captured by the Romans
Escupes and is murdered by the Druids.
Is born again in later Roman Hritai.i.
Fnds a tattooed record bv his wife on.
his body. Rescues a Roman lady from
a bull and is taken into favor. Live
and dies in her service. Wakes up in
Saxon England just before the Hattie ->f
Hestines.
CHAPTER V (Contiiuodj.
When I woke I was both hungry
and well. Indeed, it was tbe »jent
of the breakfast that roused me.
But, alas! the meal was nore of
mine. The little table had been
oleared, and at it, on olean white
napkins, were places for three or
four people. There were wooden
platters with steel knives upon
them, oaten loaves, great node'
tankards of wine and mead, with
fish and fowl ilesh in abundance.
Surely my entertainer was going to
turn out a jolly fellow, now the
night's vigils were over! But aB I
speculated in my retired couoli
there fell the beat of marching
men, a clatter of arms outaine and
a shouting of many voioes in clamorous welcome, the ringing of stirrup irons and the champing c I bits,
and then, to my infinite astonishment, in stalked as comely a man
I had ever seen, and leading by
the hand a fair, pale, black haired
girl, who looked jaded and red i'
ber eyes.
'There, my Adeliza,' he said;
'nov>' dry those lashes of yours and
oheer up. Whatl A Norman girl
like you, and weeping because two
hosts Brand faced for battle I What
will our Saxon maids Bay to those
shining drops?'
'Oh, Harold I' the girl ezolaimed,
'it is not conflict I fear, or I would
not have come hiliior to you, braving your anger, bu t think o' the
luckless chance that !>rings my
father from Normandy in arms
against my Stxori lovel Think 0/
my fears, think how I dread that
either eido should win—sure!',
grief bo oooaplicaujd should cla ..
pardon for these simple tears.'
'Well, well,' Baid he—whom I,
mebserved iu the shadows, now
recognized aa the English monarch himself—'if we ..re bound to
die, we oan do so but once, and at
least we still breakfast first,' and
down he sat, signing the |girl to get
herself another stool in rough Saxon, manner.
And a very good meal he made
of it, putting away the toasted ortolans and cheese, and waging war
with his fingers and dagger upon all
the viands,washing them down with
constant mighty draughts from the
wooden flagons, and this all in a
jolly, light hearted way that waB
very captivating. Ever and anon
he called to the 'churls' outside, or
gave a hasty order to his captains
with his mouth full of meat and
bread, or put some dainty morsel
into the idle fingers of his damsel,
as though kingdoms were not tottering to the martial tread of an in-
v ader.
But even gallant Harold, the last
King of the Saxons, had finished
presently, and then donned bis
pointed oaeque and his flawing
silken filigreed cloak, thrusting hiB
whinger into his jewelled girdle, he
threw hiB round steel target on his
back—then held out both his arms.
Whether or not his Norman love
the reluctant seal of a broken
promise, had always loved him, it
is not for me to say, but, woman
like, ahe loved him at the losing,
and flew to him and was enfolded
.ight into his ample chest, and
mixed her raven tresses with his
yellow Eoglish hair, and sobbed
and clung to him, and took and
gave a hundred kisses, and was bo
sweet and tearful tbat my inmost
heart was moved.
When Harold had gone out, and
when presently the olatter of arms
and shouting proved he was moving off to the field of eventful battle, Adeliza the proud bowed her
head upon the table, and abandoned herself to so wild a grief that I
was greatly impelled to rise and
comfort her.   Bat she would not
be consoled, even by the ministrations of two of her waiting maidens,
who soon entered the place; and
seeing this I took an opportunity
when all three were blending their
tears to slip out into the open   air.
There I found my friendly Soxon j
monk in great tribulation, with  a
fragment of vellum in hie hand.
'Ah, my. son,' he said—'the very
man. Look here, the air is heavy
with event. Yonder, under the
sheen of the sun, William of Normandy is encampered with sixty
thousand of his cruel adventures,
and there, down there among the
trees, you see the gallant Harold
nnd his straggling array, sorry and
muddy with long marohing, on the
way to oppo?e them. But the
King has not half his force with
bim, nor a fourth as many aB he
needs! Takn this vellum, and, if
you ever put a buskin in speed to
the grass, run now for the credit of
England and for the sake of history
—run for lhat ridge away there behind us, where you will find the
good Earl of Mercia and several
thousand msn encampered—and, if
not asleep, most probably stuffing
themselves with food and drink,
he added bitterly under his breath.
'Give him this, and say Harold
will not be persuaded, say that
unless the reserves march at once
tbe fight will be fought without
them—and then I think Dane and
Saxon will be chaff befo-e the
wind of retribution. Runl my son
—mn for the good cause, and for
Saxon England!'
Without a word I took the vellum
and crammed it into my bosom and
span round on my heels and fled
down the hillside and breasted the
dewy tangles of fern and brambles,
and glided through the thickets,
and flying from ridge to ridge, and
leaping and running as though the
silvery wings of Mercury were on
my heels, in an hour I dashed up
the far hillside, and, panting and
exhausted, threw down the miBBive
under the tawny beard of tbe great
Earl himself.
That soion of Saxon royalty was,
aa the monk had foreseen, absorbed
iu the first meal of the day, but he
waB too much of a soldier, though,
like ail his race, a desperate good
trencherman, to let such a matter
as my errand grow cold, and no
sooner had he read the scroll and
put me a shrewd question or two
than tbe order went forth for his
detachments to arm and march at
at once. Bnt only a oaptain of many
fights knows how slow reluctant
troops can be in such oase. Surely,
I thought, aB I stood by with crossed arms watching the preparations
it was none of my business to help
—surely a nation, though gallant
enough, which quits its breakfast
1)3 rd so tardily, and takes suoh a
nerilous time to oross-garter its
legs, and buckle on its blades, and
peak its beard, and tag out its baldric so nicely, when the invader is
oa foot—surely such a nation is
ripe to the fall I And these comely
English troopB were doubly weary
this morning, for they were fresh,
as one of them told me, from a hard
fight in the far north of the kingdom, where Harold had juBt overthrown and slain Hardrada, King
of Norway,and the unduteous Totti,
Harold's own brother. LeBB wonder, then, I found them travel-
stained and weary, no marvel for
the once they were so Blow to my
fatal invitation.
It was noon before the  English
Earl led off the van of his men
and an hour later before I had seen
the- last of them out of the oamp
1 and followed reflective in the rear
a place that never yet sor led with
my mood—wondering, with the
happy impartiality of my circumstances, whether it were best this
morning to be invader or invaded.
a struggling ghastly life into the
heaps of mangled oorpses. Every*
where, aB we treaded the mazes of
destruction or stepped unwitting in
the darkness into pools of blood
When we had gone a mile or two and mire, were dead warriors in
through the leafy tangles, a hush every shape and contortion, lying
fell upon the troop with whioh I all asprawl, or piled up one on top
rode, and then with a shout we
burst into a run, for up from the
valley beyond came the unmistakable sound of conflict and turmoil.
We breasted the last ridge, I and
two hundred men, and there, suddenly emerging into the open, was
tbe bloody valley of Senlao beneath
us, and the sunny autumn sua beyond, and at our feet right and left
the wail and glitter and dust of
nearly finished battle—Harold had
fought without us, and we saw the
quick-coming forfeit he had to pay.
The unhappy Saxons down there
on the pleasant grassy undulations
and among the yellow gorse and
ling stood to it like warriors of
good mettle, but already the day
was lost. The Earl and his tardy
troops had been merged into the
general catastrophe, and my handful would have been of naught
avail. The English array was
broken and formless, galled by the
swarming Norman bowmen, the
twang of whose strings we could
mark even up here, and fiercely
assailed by foot and horsemen. In
the oentre alone the English stood
stubbornly shoulder to shoulder
around the peaked flag, at whose
foot Harold himself was grimly repelling tbe ceaseless onset of the
foeman.
But alas for Harold, alas for the
curly-headed son of Ethelwalf, and
all the princes and peers with him!
We saw a mighty mass of foreign
cavalry oreeping around the shoul-
ber of the hill, like the shadow of a
raincloud upon a sunny landscape:
we saw the the thousand gonfalons
of the spoilers fluttering in the
wind: we saw the glitter on the
great throng of northern chivalry
that crowded after the black charger of William of Normany and the
sacred flag—aocurBed ensign— that
Toustain held aloft: we Baw their
sweeping charge, and then when it
was passed, the battle was gone and
done, the Saxon power was a hundred little groups dying bravely in
different corners of the field.
The men with me that luckless
afternoon melted away into the
woods, and I turned my steps once
more to the little hill above Sen-
lac and my hermit's cell.
There the ill news had been
brought by a wounded soldier, and
the women were filling the air with
cries and weeping. All that night
they wept and wailed, Harold's
wife leading them, and when dawning oame nothing would serve but
that she must go and find her husband's body. Muoh the good monk
tried to dissuade her, but to no purpose, and swathing herself in a
man's long cloak, with one fair
maiden likewise disguised, and me
for a guide, the brave Norman girl
Bet out.
And sorry waa our errand and
grim our success.    The field of battle waB deserted, Bave of
dying men.
the night went up to heaven from
it a great fitful moan, as all the
wounded groaned in unionism to
their unseen miseries. Alas! thoBe
tender charges of mine had never
seen till now the harvest field of
war laid out with swathes of dead
and dying! Often tbey hesitated
on that gloomy walk and hid their
faces as tho fitful clouds drifted
over the scene, and the changing
lights and shadows seemed to put •
of another, or sleeping pleasantly
in dreamless dissolution against
the red sides of stricken horses.
nnd many were the pale, blood-besmeared faoes of princes and chiefs
itny white-faced ladies turned up to
the starlight, and many were tbe
sodden yellow curls they lifted from
the dead faces of thanes and frank-
ins, until in an hour the Norman
girl, who had gone a little apart
from ua, suddenly stood still, and
then up to the dear, black vault of
heaven there went suoh a olear,
piercing shriek as hushed even the
very midnight sorrows of the battlefield itself.
The king was found!
And Editha the handmaiden, too,i
made her find presently, for there
over the dead prince's feet) their
left hands still clasping eaoh a*
when they had died, were her father and her two stalwart brothers.
Never did silenter courtiers than
we six sit at a monarch's feet until
the day should break; and then we
who lived covered the comely faces
with the heme of their Saxon tunics
and were away as fast as we oould
go to the Norman camp, that the
poor princess-girl might beg a
tiopby of her victorious father.
[To be continued.]
MYSTERI0UT PROCEEDINGS-
Eqtraordlnary   Occurrence.*   en War
Eagle Avanua.
It is Btated that most mysterious
occurrences have lately taken place
on War Eagle avenue. A new
building has been ereoted on War
Eagle avenue next to the assay
office and therein are confined
a number of oarpenters, ma-
cluneals, mining experts, draughtsmen, yellow leggings, who are
allowed no communication with
the outside world (muoh lees tbe
Saturday.) Experiments are in
process of evolution and the oamp
may now brace itself for a shook.
Christmas Books
Christmas Notions
w
Christmas Presents!
AT X
M.  W. Simpson's f
1H. R. J0NE&
Groceries
Provisions
...Salted Crackers....!
A DELICIOUS WAFER
dead and i a
On the dark wind of | •
f
Look Here!:
TURKEYS,
CHICKENS,
FRESH FISH,
OYSTERS,
VENISON
 AT THE	
I B.C. market!
Send Us in Your Order. THE SATURDAY »WORLD ROSSLAND.    B  C     DEC 5   1903
M!Iil@Iiil!i!IiljaiilPli!^
WZ* have lots of room
© and we would like
you to come in and look
around even if you don't
want to buy.
Fancy and Useful
There's a world of variety in our
FANCY GOODS lines for Christmas.
Novelty -without limit, and every piece
picked with some one in view as a prospective buyer. All sorts of useful things
in
LEATHER GOODS, WRITING DESKS,
BLOTTERS,   INK STANDS,
CIGAR HOLDERS, CIGARETTE CASES
PAPER CUTTERS,
CURLING SETS, SCRAP BOOKS,
FANCY PHOTO FRAMES
LETTER BOOKS, POCKET BOOKS
COIN PURSES
and a thousand and one things more to
delight the eye, please the taste, fit the
purse and he a daily reminder of the
donor.
Gentlemen's Goods.
Smokers' Sets,
Pipe Racks,
Ash Trays,1
Fountain Pens,
Pen Knives,
Military Brush Sets
Tobacco Jars,
Shaving Sets
Collar and Cuff Boxes
Necktie Boxes
Liquor Sets
Traveling Companions
And many other useful and ornamental
things.
Christmas Cards and Calendars
In endless variety.   Don't buy until
you see our goods.
Ladies' Goods
DAINTY,   TASTY.   UNIQUE
Fancy Fans      Card Cases      Hand Bags
Music Rolls, Writing Folios
Bon Bon Boxes
Ladies Companion and Toilet Sets
In Ebony, French Stag, Pearl and Olive Wood and Porcelain and Gold and Silver
Manicures     Puff Boxes      Jewel Cases
Every piece a work of art.
"See Yourself as Others See You,"
Mirrors! Mirrors! Mirrors!
The largest stock ever shewn in the
Kootenay. In every conceiveable size,
shape and quality. From the dainty
pocket Mirror to the large pier glass.
Every Glass a Bargain.
And varying in price from 25 cents
to $25,00.
GOODEVE BEOTHERS
"It Pays to Deal with Goodeve Bros"        0RU6PSTS AND STATIONERS
U=i     t,
Gililrlfj^jilPliliiiigii^^
THE LOCAL
EXCHANGE
Centre  Star in Fair Demand.
MARKET NOT QUITE SO ACTIVE
The Latest Quotations and Sales
Locally   Upon   the
Market.
The market haa not been so
active this week but a fair number
ot transactions bave been recorded
nevertheless Centre Star is weaker
but is etill in good demand.
Today'f Looal Quotation:
American Boy....,	
Ben Hur	
Black Tall	
Canadian Oold Vltldi	
Cariboo (Camp alcKlnntjr) ei-dlr
Centre Star	
Crowe Neat Pan Coal f
Pairrlew	
Planer Maiden	
Olant	
Granby Consolidated   (4.30
Horning Glory  3
Mountain Mon       ac
North Star (Bart Kootenay)..
Payne	
Onllp	
Rambler-Cariboo	
Ian Poll	
BnUlran	
Tom Thumb ,
War Ragle Consolidated ,
Waterloo (Aaaew. paid)	
While Bear Maeeai, paid) ...
is
17
Si
2%
sM
3
14
t'H
Bid
4
■X
18
8
II
29
1*
Today's Sales.
Mountain Lion, 1000, 18Jo; Centre Star, 500, 1000, 22c; Payne,
1000, Hi   Total, 3500.
The Week's Sales.
Sullivan, 5000, 5|; Centre Star,
1000, 1000, 23o, 1000, 214o, 1000,
500, 22c; Giant, 4000, ljo; Amerioan Boy, 3000, 4io; Fisher Maiden, 3000, 2Jc; Waterloo, 1000,1000,
GJc; Mountain Lion, 1000, 18je;
War Eagle, 1000,13c; Payne, 1000,
114o; North Star, 1000, 8c; San
Poil, 600, 2|c; Tom Thumb, 500,
2jo.   Total, 26,500.
Week's Quotations.
Lowest
4
Highest
American Boy      5
Ben Hur      4
Black Tail      3
Canadian Gold F. S      3 %
Cariboo, Camp McK ....     6
Centre Star  24
r'airview      4
Fisher Maiden,      3X
Giant      2%
Granby Consolidated $4.50
Morning Glory      2
Mountain Lion  20
North Star      9
Payne  12
Quilp  17
Rambler-Cariboo  31
San Poil      2%
Sullivan      5X
Tom Thumb  3
War Eagle  14
Waterloo      6%
WhiteBear      4%
Showing highest asked and lowest bid
puring the past week.
3
2%
1%
S375
1%
18
8
11
29
2%
4
2
12
4'A
3'A
MINOR MENTION
Henry Roy is in tbe city.
Registration tor municipal voters
is now open.
The I, X. L. mill has resumed
operations.
The Hookey Club held a meeting on Friday evening.
R. Plewman has returned from
a visit to the Boundary.
The Board of Trade have not as
yet held their monthly meeting.
Why is the Mayor like a fire oall
from the Hotel Allan corner?.
There will be no services in the
Baptist eburcb tomorrow.
The EVENING Would will begin
its reissue on the 15th instant.
The Madrigals met this week at
the home of Mrs. Hobbs.
The Current Events Club held a
meeting on Thursday evening.
The Masons held and eleotion of
offioers on Thursday last.
The auditing of the city accounts
will necessitate some trouble in
order to make a fair showing.
The collection of taxes seem to
be tbe chief thing just now in the
eyes of the oity officials.
It is possible, if the weather continues, that the rink will be open
to skating on Monday.
Supreme Court sittings will be
held here on December 18. Mr.
Justice Irving will probably preside.
Wanted to know who are the
candidates for election in this riding in the forthcoming Dominion
eleotion.
The Great Northern is Belling
excursion tickets to Spokane a fare
and a third in order to let Rosslanders see the production of Ben
Hur.
E. Kirby had a heading in hiB
organ for Tuesday last "The Coming Race." Now we wonder who
that can be?.
An intermediate Hockey Club
hs been formed in tbe city open to
all teams not having a place on the
first team.
No notice has yet been given
with regard to tha expiry of the
lighting franchise by any member
of the oity council.
Great Northern officials deolare
that the nuisance from the swamp
in the north of the camp arises
from the brewery drainage.
The bazaar and dance by the la
dies of tbe Guilds of   St. George
will   be held on Friday  at   the
Miners' Union Hall.
There is little snow in Nelson,
a returning Rosslander reports, inasmuch as the air is still warm
with the indignation meetings.
J. Y. Cole, not satisfied with the
verdict of the civil aotoin brought
by him against George Novak,
tried assault and baltory. He was
battered to the tune of a dollar
fine, costs and an apology.
A. C. Gait is indignant with the
Colonist for its oritioism of the
Centre Star mine and is wroth with
the government over its failure to
abolish the two per oent tax. Is
there any connection?
A WORD
TO CUSTOMERS and STRANGERS
OUR STOCK OF
Christmas Goods
Is now complete. We are Leaders at the Holiday Season as at all other times of the year.
SEE what we are showing before buying
your Holiday Goods. Come in and select what
you want and we will keep anything for you
until Christmas time.
Toys for the Chi! (ten
We don't forget the Children at Christmas
time. We have a good line of TOYS if you get
here on time.
SILVERWARE
We have a special line of Silverware guaranteed for ten years.    The price is very lew and
we have only a small quantity so you had better call early before the best, lines are picked
over
McArthur
Columbia Avenue.

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