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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 22, 1906

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Array ; OTrrtirnrnTsroinsTeTripro^T^
Bank of Hamilton
Capital $2,5.0,ooo
Reserve $2,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits ol Jj
Ii and upwards in Savings Department. 3
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of Jj
Iheworld.  Vancouver Branches, cor. "K
(-   of Hasting aud Hamilton Sts. .Powell St. 3
1 r*   Cedar Grove. "i
4 CtiJL*UUL5UUUUlAAJULJLS^^
[S
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver 8. ©.
rsi5Tiro*T*tnnr'ti 1i ■«* mm •nmrtq
lo   Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
^*JVLjLSAt.aAajA<tXSLXlXiJLA£S
Vol. III.   No. 47.
DECEMBER 23, 1906
One Dollar Per Annum
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
Just the old greeting in word and
Christmas in sentiment, "A Merry Christ-
Greeting,     mas."   First to our kin, whether
in the land of our adoption or in
the dear old home-land. Then to those who
call us friend. Once more to all who share
with us the burdens and the joys of our common humanity. Every hand-grip heartens,
let every word cheer. It is the time to remember the One who spake peace and without
whose spirit charity would die out of the
world. Let us forget all else, lest we forget
ourselves, "A Merry Christmas."
It is with the history of cities as
Future of with that of nations,, that one
Victoria,     does not realise the full import of
events as they are occurring.   It
is only afterward when lhey are viewed in the
light of cause and effect that it is possible to
appreciate rightly the importance of what has
occurred.   This is particularly true as applied
to the present happenings at the Capital City.
If any part of the British Empire is justified
in looking forward to a prosperous future, it
is the City of Victoria and tlie Island of Vancouver.    Few people have realised the vast
natural resources of this favoured territory,
but within the last few months English and
American investors, to say nothing of wealthy
Eastern Canadians, have begun to see possibilities in the  development of our mineral,
lumbering, and agricultural industries.    The
average reader would  at once concede  this
proposition as applied to the whole Province,
but he is probably not well enough posted to
know how thoroughly applicable it is to our
home' district.   The aptest illustration of the
present condition of affairs is  to say  that
Victoria is awakening from a long sleep.   The
first evidence of this is found in the very general demand for real estate at enhanced prices.
Property owners who have been looking in
vain for a chance to sell at any time during
the last twenty years, and who, even a year
ago, were anxious to dispose of their lots at
the slightest advance upon previous prices, are
now realising from 50 to 100 per cent higher
rates.   This is not a real estate boom in the
sense of a purely speculative movement. Most
of the purchases are being effected for permanent investment, the bona fides of which is
demonstrated by the fact that the largest purchasers are Eastern corporations and  institutions,  and    well-to-do    farmers from  the
Northwest.    These  people    are  looking for
revenue and a steady dividend on their investment, not for a more or less problematical
clean-up in a short time.   The enlightened and
extensive policy of the C. P. R. for the clearing and settling of E. & N. lands has greatly
increased the spirit of confidence and optimism
which prevails. 'The certain construction of
a railway into (lie Alberni district in the near
future means much for the development of
that fertile section.    The extensive sale of
timber-land on the Island is already working
out its natural  corollary in the erection o"£
lumber mills on the west coast.   Mining development  is  in  its  infancy, but has  been
taken hold of by men of capital and energy,
and this branch of industry is capable of and
will produce surprising results within a few
years.   Perhaps, however, the most important
single industry about to be located on Vancouver Island is that of iron and steel manufacture.   In connection with a comprehensive
scheme for the amalgamation of the largest
construction works at the coast, the iron deposits which have received so much attention
of late years have been acquired by a London
syndicate", and now that the question of bounties has been dealt wilh more or less satisfactorily  in  Mr.  Fielding's  Tariff Bill,  the
establishment of this industry is assured. The
Week hoped to have been in a position to
furnish the details of this scheme in the present number, but, at the request of the principals, they are withheld for the moment.   It
is, however, a fact that the deal has been
consummated, the provisional board of directors appointed and arrangements  concluded
for incorporating the company under the Provincial statutes early in the new year.   Just
what this policy should mean, not only for
Victoria but for the Province of British Columbia, it is impossible for the most sanguine
among us to anticipate.   It requires no wide
stretch of the imagination to see a second
Pittsburg on the Pacific Coast, drawing its
supplies of fuel and ore from the boundless
resources of Vancouver Island.   Only a few
years ago the question of market presented
an insuperable difficulty.   The pioneers of the
movement were gravely  told  that the only
market was British Columbia and the total
consumption less than 30,000 tons of pig iron
a year.   Things have moved so rapidly that
by common consent the Orient is now open
to us, with a demand for iron and steel which
would require a second Pittsburg indeed to
supply; but, even the Orient does not exhaust
tlie possibilities, for at no point south of the
International boundary line upon the coast,
does ore or fuel exisit suitable for steel making, and it is as certain that tbe product of
Vancouver Island would dominate the market
for iron and steel as that the coal from Nanaimo has done so for thirty years.   With the
advent of cheap steel will assuredly come, as
it has in every part of the world, the development of secondary industries, and this Province, which requires and will continue to require enormous quantities of articles manufactured from iron and steel, such as mining machinery, agricultural implements and tools of
every kind, will produce them where the raw
material can be obtained.   All tbis means that
the  Capital  City of Victoria has a future
almost  beyond  conception.    However  many
cities may be established at the coast, Victoria will always be the capital and the centre
of commercial, political and legislative activ-
ty.   It therefore behooves those who are responsible for the conduct of public affairs, to
lay the foundations of their policy broad and
deep.    The day for pessimism has gone by.
In view of what has already occurred every
man should be an optimist.    Narrow gauge
ideas should be relegated to the limbo of tbe
past.   Large ideas must rule in future. Among
tbe immediate requirements to place Victoria
on anything like a parity with other progressive cities is an improved street railway service, with extensions into the newer districts
where property is being so rapidly acquired,
and the construction of a belt-line to do away
with double tracking and costly power distribution.   The City Hall wants to wake up and
see to it that new streets which have been
authorised nre laid out, so that subdivisions
can be properly served.   The hundreds of old
shacks which are still permitted to cumber the
ground in our principal thoroughfares should
be removed—if necessary by fire.   The excellent system of cement sidewalks should be
extended at a greater rate than heretofore to
keep pace with the growth of the city.   And
last, but by no means least, it is surely not
too much to ask that the citizens of one of
tlie most beautiful and attractive residential
spots in the world should bc supplied with
drinking water.    In this respect they have
been very long-suffering, but the limit has been
readied.    They  have been  talked  to death.
They will expect something to be done during
the coming year to settle this question forever.
Whether this will be doue or not depends
upon the citizens themselves.   In 1907, as in
all the years which have preceded it, candidates for public favour vill continue to make
the same promises and as soon as they are
elected will continue to break them. At least
it requires more faith in human nature than
even the Christmas season suggests to lead
one to discard this time-honoured belief. At
any rate it will be wise for the people not to
count upon it but to show by their own interest and energy that they are determined
to force these issues and to make their elected
Mayor and Aldermen what they should be—
the servants of the people. If this policy is
pursued, Victoria will not lag behind in the
march of progress which has commenced, but
will fill the place for which her natural advantages have destined her in the vanguard of
the movement.
The development of Victoria City
Songhee is hampered by the continued occu-
Reserve.    patiou   of   the   Songhee   Reserve
by the Indians, emphatically the
Red man blocks the way. His attitude is
not unlike that of "My Lord the Elephant,"
in Kipling's well-known story. In that case
the elephant settled down on his haunches
and, as he was big enough to fill the pass, the
whole procession came to a standstill. It is
not quite but almost as bad with the Indians
on the Songhee Reserve. There is no difference of opinion among those responsible for
the development of Victoria that these lands
should be acquired for the purpose of affording increased railway facilities. As a matter
of fact, there is no other land suitable for
the purpose. The C. P. R. have officially
stated that they are prepared to erect the necessary buildings and construct extensive sidings and yards, such as are even now required
and will become absolutely indispensable in
the near future. In spite of the difficulty
which has hitherto been experienced in negotiating with the Indians, the matter is a
very simple one and could be adjusted without
delay but for the unwillingness of the white
man to treat the Red man exactly as he would
insist upon being treated himself under similar circumstances. . In this connection it is
astounding to find as conservative a paper as
the Colonist pursuing a line of argument which
will only render negotiation more difficult, nnd
which, if persisted in, will effectually prevent
a settlement of the vexed question. In a
word, the Colonist says that since the Indian
does not own the land in fee simple, but only
in sufferance and during the pleasure of the
Federal and Provincial Governments, if he
will not come to terms, which means the terms
of the white man, he must be evicted by legislative enactment. The Week holds that this
contention is both illegal and immoral. It
may be technically correct to say that the
Indian is not the owner of the land, but he
has been in possession from time immemorable
and in actual possession as a "reserve" Indian since Confederation. It is certain that
his title is us good as if lie held the land in
fee simple, and not even for the advancement
of the Capital of British Columbia will the
people of Canada consent to nn act of confiscation or to any treatment of the Songhee
Indians which is not based upon full recognition of their moral and legal rights. In saying this The Week is not less anxious than
any other journal to advocate the acquisition
of these lands for public improvements, but it
realises that the surest and quickest way to
effect the consummation of this policy is to
recognise existing facts and not try a game
of bluff which would fail with the youngest
tenderfoot. There is another factor in the
case which has been lost sight of. Has the
Imperial Government nothing to say in this
matter, that is, in the lust resource? As long
as Federal and Provincial Governments can
effect a settlement which is agreeable to tbe
Indians, well and good. Bui at the first sign
of coercion, and nt the first suggestion from
a responsible quarter that the legislative
force shall be substituted for friendly negotiation, Downing Street will be heard from.
There is only one solution to the difficulty.
Chief Cooper and his tribe have expressed
their willingness to vacate the Songhee Reserve if they are allowed to acquire certain
specified lands at Cadboro Bay. These lands
belong to the Hudson's Bay Company, whose
president, Lord Strathcona, is the largest
shareholder, and one of the most influential
personalities in the C. P. R. He also possesses the confidence of the Indians, as was
evinced in a remarkable manner when the
school question hail, to be settled in Manitoba.
He and Sir Thomas Shaughnessy will ultimately have to settle this trouble between
them. They may as well do so at once. The
Indians have a right to name their price. They
cannot be forced to accept less. Their Chief
has suggested a way out of the difficulty, and
if the impasse continues it will 'not be the
fault of the Red man but of some white
brother who, in endeavouring to over-reach
him, finds that he has struck a snag.
The Provinee of British Columbia
Provincial approaches the New Year with the
Prospects,   brightest   prospects   which   have
ever dawned upon its career. The
bad dream which so disturbed it four years
ago has passed. From every district iu the
Province, and from many new districts which
were not known then, glowing reports are being brought to the cities almost daily. Thousands of square miles of territory have been
practically discovered, their resources explored, locations made and settlements established. Every boat which sails northward
carries pioneers of civilisation who go to establish homes in tne new land, lu spile of
delay, there is reason to hope that the coming
year will see a serious commencement of construction work by the G. T. P. Surveyors are
busy in every direction laying out lines, establishing townsitcs and blazing the trail for
roads and railways. Tliere is no longer a
dearth of capital. On the other hand, the
largest financial institutions on the continent
have commenced to pour a golden stream into
the valleys and mountains of British Columbia, to prepare the way for industrial development and the taking out of greater treasures
as the result of their enterprise. The Kootenay is rejoicing in n legitimate mining boom,
cheap smelting rates, higher prices for lead and
copper and the distribution of dividends. Fruit
growing in the Kootenay, in the Okanagan,
in the Fraser Valley, and on Vancouver
Island, lias received a 'tremendous impetus as
the result of judicious advertising and the
success which has attended the exhibition of
Britisli Columbia fruit in the Mother Country. Of the lumbering industry it is hardly
necessary to speak, so well is it generally
known that it is rejoicing in higher prices
and a demand far in excess of supply. The
Finance Minister has lost his headache and
instead of puzzling from morning to night how
he mny wring n fow additional dollars from
reluctant banks, is able to contemplate a respectable surplus. The wheels of government
nre running smoothly, nnd men, as they meet
in the street, show upon their fnces the cheer
which they feel in their hearts, and nre able
to greet ench other with n "Merry Christmas"
without nny suggestion that they nre merely
whistling to keep their courage up. The long
nnd the short of it is that tho tide hns turned
nnd is now flowing towards permanent prosperity. This is not thc time, in fnct of all
times it is the lenst appropriate, for attempting to make political capital out of this happy
concurrence of events. On the other hand it
would be just ns unreasonable to deny to the
men who have worked successfully to achieve
Ihis result the measure of praise to which
they nre entitled. This is not so much a
political ns n business question. The nverage
mnn is tired of party sqnnbbles, nnd would
willingly forget them, not only during the
Chi'istmns holidays but for n long time nfter-
wnrds.
I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906.
EDITORIAL  COflMENT.
Trustees
Beware.
congratulated on the ability of her pu-
  pils, as the JilTeitnt parts in the play
The article which appeared «iven were Pearly well sustained,
in the  last issue of  The     MrS- Nash entertained at the tea hour
Week,  on the  subject of on Thursday last in  honour  of Miss
Dr. Ernest   Hall's   purity Nora Smith.   During the afternoon mu-
, ..      .   ,     ., 1  sical selections were rendered by Miss
campaign, has attracted widespread Smithj Miss winnifred Lugrin) M'iss Vi-
attention and has brought us many olejt Powell and Mrs. Harry Young,
communications, verbal and written. The guests were Mrs. Arundel, Mrs.
T •■•*.•'■. •   j      McBride, Mrs. McPhillips, Miss Davie,
In no instance have we received a Miss   wimlifred  Lugri*   Miss   viole(
letter at variance with the tenour of Powell, Mrs. Harry Young, Mrs. Rowe,
the article.    On the other band the Mrs* Rebbeck and Mrs. Maclure.
*   *   *
expressions  of    opinion    are  much     ,, ,  ,,      _. .    .
,, ,      , .    .        Mr.   and Mrs.   Pigott entertained   a
stronger than any we ventured to in- mlmber o{ their friends at .*soo„ on Fri.
dulge in, and the request has been day evening last, at their home on Bel-
made in influential quarters that the 1110nt Avenue.   The prizes were won by
..       1    11 u j     r, a e     Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Tuck, Mr. Brett and
matter should be pursued.   But for Mrs    Stuan' Robertson;    The   guests
the danger of delay it would have were:   Mr. and Mrs. W. S...Gore, Mr.
been left over for another week, but and Mrs. Cross, Mrs. Tuck, Mrs,. Berk-
with an indifference to public opinion t^ilSo^^^iT^
rare in men who pose for public ser- neVi   Mr. and Mrs. Raymur, Mr.   and
vice, Dr. Ernest Hall has seen fit to Mrs. Gibb, Mr. and Mrs. Arundel, Mr.
take up the gauntlet and to push his and Mrs. Brett, Mr. and Mrs.  Shall-
. '        ° , ,    .     ,,.,..; cross, Mr. Lindley Crease, Mr. and M*s.
prurient and objectionable ideas to the a Pigott and Mrs. J. A. Hall,
forefront. The Week would be the last —	
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Limited
•7ICT0RIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View  Sts.
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
Sea & Gowen's
Presents
for Men
For those fortunate
enough to have men to
provide for at Christmas, there is a long list
of things desirable which
we stock in the best of
materials from the most
reliable makers, such as
DRESSING GOWNS,
from $7.50 to $12.50;
SMOKING JACKETS,
from $3.50 to $12.00;
FANCY VESTS, from
$3.00 to $6.50; Initial
Handkerchiefs in finest
Irish linen; MUFFLERS, in SILK, latest
designs and colours;'
ENGLISH and AMERICAN TIES in the correct fashions.
Sea & Gowen's
The Gentlemen's Store
64 Government St.
Victoria, B. C.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land on Forcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eugene Wacker, northwest corner: thence
east 80 chains; thence south 20 chains
to McKay's northeast corner; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locator.
P. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge <
Bay, commencing at a post marked Arthur McKay, southwest corner; thence
running north 20 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 20 chains; ihence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres.
ARTHUR MoKAT, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
to suggest that in doing this he is
simply seeking notoriety and prefers
to believe that he is one of those
strong-headed but weak-minded fanatics who, when he once gets a bee into
his bonnet, cannot be dissuaded from
pursuing a fatal course. The Week
is informed that since the meeting of
the Women's Council, Dr. Hall has
taken advantage of his position as a
School Trustee, to prepare a lecture
upon the objectionable sugject, which
he proposes to deliver in the various
schools of the eity. Report says that
he has already carried out his intention in one instance. The Week can
conceive of no course more discreditable to a man occupying a public position by the popular vote. Such conduct distinctly disqualifies him for
- any position where good judgment, to
say nothing of good taste, plays any
part. It labels him as a distinctly
dangerous man where the protection
of the innocence and purity of children by discreet silence upon certain
subjects is    concerned.    Unless Dr.
Hall at once desists and abandons the
programme which he has apparently
mapped out he will have to face smth
an uproar as he little contemplated
when in an unguarded moment he
took up this crank idea.   The parents
of Victoria will not submit to the
dictation of any man in ths matter,
even though he be a school trustee AGASSIZ—
and a doctor.   The only surprise is
that a person of mature years should       ^JST^S^J^S S
possess  so  little  intelligence  as  to       ranch, land easily cleared; $i,6oo,
think that fathers and mothers would "
allow their most sacred r
invaded.   It would be interesting to
know what the other Trustees think
about this matter.
By Appointment to His
Majesty the King.
Manufactured with scrupulous cleanliness and care,
from the choicest materials
only.
HUNTLY & PALMERS
BISCUITS
Are always superlatively
dainty and good. Insist on
HUNTLEY & PALMER'S.
Refuse all proffered substitutes.
H. P. 1968.
THE NAME
CROSSE &
BLACKWEIX
On a jar or tin of Marmalade or Jams is a certain
guarantee of the absolute
purity and delicious flavor
of the content's.
C. & B.'s Jams and Marmalades are sold by all up-
to-date grocery stores.
C.B.2066.
What Ho!
easy terms, low interest.
rights to be KixsiLANO-
US feet on Victoria street, facing
sea, splendid view of Gulf; $2,750;
terms can be arranged.
Social News.
visiting Mrs. E.  E.
Mrs. Corsan  is
Blackwood.
* *   *
Miss Ida Cambie of Vancouver is visiting Miss Tatlow Pemberton Road.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Hulbert of Chilliwack
arc guests at the Balmoral.
* *   *
Mrs. Ernest Evans of Vancouver
spent the week in Victoria, returning to
her home yesterday.
* *   *
Mrs. Laing entertained a number of
friends at the ever popular bridge Wednesday afternoon at the "Laurels."
* *   *
Mrs. Gillespie is entertaining at the
tea hour today at 'Highwood." A large
number of invitations have been issued.
* *   *
Mr. Jnck Cambie leaves very shortly
for Greenwood, haying been placed there
in the interests of the Canadian Bank of
Commerce.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Maline spent
Sunday in the city, returning to their
home in Westminster on Monday.
While here they were the guests of Dr.
and Mrs. C. J. Fapan.
* *   *
The many friends of Mrs. P. dc Noe
Walker will be pleased to learn that she
is o'i the road to recovery, after a severe illness.
* *   *
Mrs. Blaiklock held her usual closing
exercises on Wednesday evening last,
followed by a most enjoyable and informal dance.    Mrs. Blaiklock is to be
WESTMINSTER AVENUE AND
DUFFERIN STREET, 88 by 132
feet; brick block on corner; store
and 17 rooms; 8-room house to
south and 9-room house in rear of
brick block; $31,000; half cash; will
arrange for balance.
A. 0. P. Francis & Co.
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WEEK DECEMBER 7
     The New
Grand
SULLIVAN • CONSIDINE,    Proprl.tor..
Manag.ment ef HOST. JAMIESON.
THE THREE WALSEYS
Wonderful Acrobats and Posturing Feats.
KURTIS AND BUSSE
With Their Trained Toy Terriers.
THE GREAT EARL
Banjo Virtuoso.
AMY STANLEY
Comedienne.
JULES HARRON
"The Little German."
GEORGE F. KEANE
Our New Song Illustrator.
NEW MOVING PICTURES.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Under New Management.
Thursday, Dec. 20th,
CON, The Shaughraun
Monday, Dec. 24th, and throughout
Xmas Week,
"THE GATES OF HEAVEN"
A powerful Biblical drama of Rome
in the time of the Caesars. Usual
prices.
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S Plum Puddings 40c and 75c
HOME-MADE PLUM PUDDINGS 60c and $1.00
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S Mincemeat,  1  lb. tin 30c
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S Mincemeat, glass jars 40c and 75c
HOME-MADE  MINCEMEAT,  per lb 15c
CONDENSED MINCEMEAT, per packet   10c
MINCE PIES, each 20c
FRUIT CAKES, each 25c, 50c, $1.00 and $1.50
"FILL   THE   BUMPER  FAIR.     EVERY   DROP  WE   SPRINOLE   O'ER
THE BROW OF OARS SMOOTHS AWAY A WRINKLE."
RARE OLD DRY SHERRY, per bottle $1.50
PALE SHERRY, per bottle $1.00
VERY OLD DRY PORT, per bottle $1.50
TAWNEY PORT, per bottle $1.00
CALIFORNIA PORT, per bottle 50c
FRENCH CLARET, per bottle 50c
FINE FRENCH BRANDY, per bottle $1.00
MUMM'S  CHAMPAGNE,  per pint  bottle    $1.50
ANY WHISKEY YOU LIKE TO NAME, from, per bottle... .85c to $2.00
ORDER   BY   MAIL   OR   PERSONALLY  FROM   TBE   LARGEST   AND
FINEST QUALITY STOCK IB WESTERN OABADA.
DIXI H. ROSS & e©
Wine and Spirit Merchants 111 Government Street, Victoria
Fresh and Dried Fruit Importer*. R.2123.
R, 3064
/npTirrrrrrrr.^
E 31
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21.
Claud Amsden (Roseian Opera Company), Comedian
Miss    Hazel    Davenport     (Roseian
Opera Company), Soprano
And a Big Chorus in
"The Governor's Wife"
A Musical Cocktail by Claud Amsden.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I irtend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thenee north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 11)06. Dec.22
Reservoir Pens.
One of the most appropriate gifts for
your lady or gentleman friends
will be a
Waterman Ideal
Fountain Pen.
We can supply you with a variety, ranging
in price from $1.75 to $7.50 each.
T.N. Hibben&Qo
©
©
©
©
o
©
Government St.,, Victoria, B. C.     I	 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1906.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Go, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list of specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUT
Victoria Property is the safest and best
Investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 Macflregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
Money
Properly invested
leads on to
Fortune.
We are the medium
through which this
happy result can be
ACHIEVED, therefore invest in
Vancouver Realty.
BURNETT, SON & CO.
Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
1
VICTOEIA
******************** **•* ** *
1     REAL
ESTATE
F RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
! Viotoria Real Estate today is the
! J best investment in the Province. , ■
i i Prices advancing rapidly.   I ad- *
vise immediate investment.
Consult me,
11 l•
J S. Murray
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
p. 0. box 77 phone 1279
,-n   * >
■ j
J*************************
The Home
Seekers
Goal.
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6# acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, #600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
♦	
t
We WiH
Sell
5,000 Cariboo McKinney  90.05
1,000 Bambler Cariboo     -31
1,000 International Coal 67
1,000 La Plata     .aa
100 Dominion Copper  5.75
100 Consolidated Smelters   .    145.00
2,000 Sullivan 10H
5,000 American Boy     .03
£0 Western Oil Con 1.90
500 B. C. Amalgamated Coal.. .Offer
If you will SELL DIAMOND VALE
at market prices please offer to us by
wire, stating NUMBER OF SHARES
and PRICE.
B.B. MIGHTON& CO.
Mining and Inveitment Broken,
Drawer 1083. Nelson, B. 0.
FOR SALE
In a good Kootenay town, splendid newspaper outfit and job
plant.
An opportunity for a live man
with small capital.
Address "The Week," Victoria.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, also of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining inen and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B.C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur!
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.  The miners' home.
"DANNY" DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hote
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
W.B.Smith
rta&t
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $i.oo per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SrUTH. Prop's.
WE
HAVE
Fruit Lands
Timber Limits
Range Land
and
Mineral Claims
Throughout the
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT
UNRIVALLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FRUIT CULTURE
IN THE KETTLE
RIVER VALLEY.
Before Locating Send   Ut  Particulars of What You
Require
A.
Erskine
Smith &
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor.
35 YATES 5.
PHONE.     892
Navy
Sale
Subscribe for The Week.
Having bought np all the
large $% lb. brass shells
curio collectors and others
will find them highly desirable for umbrella stands,
flower pots, jardinieres,
etc. They are 4J in. in diameter and cannot tumble
over. Nioe for Christmas presents.   To be had at
H. STADTHAGEN
THE INDIAN TRADER
79 Johnson St. VICTORIA
HAIL ORDERS SOLICITED
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Worker!
ofthe Kootenays.
W. E. ricCandiish,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
Tbe Best Family Hotel In the City.
II a da>.
Mm. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R.
depot.
Ho garth & Rollins, Proprietors.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay lake and West Arm.
Lake and Biver frontage. We
have large and small tracts of
good land anl prices to suit all.
Also several partly improved
ranches. Fall particulars willingly given.
H. E. CROASDAILE & CO.
Nelson, B.C.
o
I i
i Y
II'
I
I
I
o
<>
o
o
II
o
o
o
o
::
Co.
REALTY and MINING
I VESTMENTS
Reference: Eastern Townships Bank.
Grand Forks* B.C.
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots.
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E- ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
r!w.Hinton   Nelson, B. C.
Collectors!
I oarry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE ooc PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations hy the hundred are
the lowest in Canada. Photo post
card* made from any subject yon
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Gold      ?i.co
Silver       i.oo
Copper       1.25
Lead       1.85
Iron      I.SO
Zinc       2.00
Gold and Silver      1.50
Gold and Copper      2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper     2.50
Gold, Silver and Lead     2.50
Other metals on application.
.A discount allowed to regular customers.
 , ,_
YMIR Is a thriving mlnlne:
town, situated 18 miles
south ol Nelson tn the rich
mineral district ot West Koo-
tenay. It ls essentially a
free-milling camp, and there
are six stamp-mills operating
In the vicinity-one of them
(the Ymir) being the largest
in Canada, with Its 80 stamps
constantly dropping. There
are numerous mines ln active
operation In the camp, and
reliable Information Is always available In Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S. CeLBMRN.
Proprietor.
YMIR enioys every facility
for mining operations.
Timber and Water are abundant, the roads and trails sr*
In good condition In the
main, and new ones are being opened up. There Is direct railway communication
with three smelters, all within fifty miles ol lhe town.
The climate is congenial and
every necessary and luxury
of life can be secured In the
camp and at prices that com*
pare favourably with those
of any other district. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER aa, 1906.
•*%,
CAHPBELL'S
m
CHRISTflAS
GOODS
LATEST FASHIONS AT LEAST MONEY
Our Gloves
WE OHXY KEEP TBE BEBT AND GUARANTEE EVERY PAIR. DENT'S SPECIAI, *U; GENUINE
FRENCH KID, $1; HAOtUONI, 81.50; ENGLISH CAPE GLOVES, $1; ROUILLON, BEBT SUEDE, 81.50;
MISSES' GLOVES, LONG EVENING GLOVES, SUEDE AND GLACE, BEST PARIS HAKES, AT 81.75, 88.35
AND 83.50.
OUR BELTS
,%maa
OUR LADIES' BELTS WILL DELIGHT YOU, NOT ONLY WITH REGARD TO PRICE BUT PARTICULARLY IN THE EXCELLENT QUALITIES AND NEW FASHIONABLE SHAPES AND STYLES. WE
MENTION ONE OB TWO OUT OP A NUMBER.
New Belts
Elsie Janis
In White, Black, Navy, Green and Tan Sk-*-     w Wo carry this most fashionable belt ln
Kid; with the large fashionable brass \j ]fc *""*' ^.T*   u?' ?*** WMt? ?"?
.      ' ->4>V^ Brown Kid,  with    the    very latest
or   gun   metal  buckles    and   patent /rT^. shaped   front   and   patent   fastener,
fasteners, at  81.50 W \ at   81.60
THE NEW LACED BACK KID BELT, in tan, black and navy, each 75c
SILK GIRDLE BELTS, in black and white, shirred and daintily trimmed, each   60c
BLACK SILK BELTS, shirred, extra  quality  silk   35o
THE NEW ELASTIC SILK BELT, in black and white, with cut steel trimmings, each 81.50
BLACK SILK ELASTIC BELT, with riveted steel trimmings and fashionable cut steel buckles, each 83.35
FANCY SILK BELTS, in the latest French designs, fitted with art nouveau   jewelled   buckles,  at prices
ranging from 76c to 83.35
Our
Neckwear
NOTHING TO EQUAL our splendid
assortment of new and fashionable
NECKWEAB has ever been seen in
Vietoria before.
Exquisite creations in LACE, SILK and
CHIFFON at.. .360, 60s, 76o, 81, 81.60
Also a very choice assortment of from
26c to $1.26 values are placed on one
counter and sold at one price; ea.13%0
Our
Handkerchiefs
SHEER LINEN, with the fashionable
small hemstitched border, extra good
quality; each  15c
HEMSTITCHED   EMBROIDERED,   the
new forget-me-not and other new designs;  each    30c
EMBROIDERED AND SCALLOPED
EDGE, a very large range of new designs, very superior quality; each.SSo
INITIAL HANDKERCHIEFS, very superior quality; each 35c
REAL SMALL LACE BORDER LINEN;
these are the most fashionable; prices,
each 60c, 75c and 90c
DELICATELY TINTED, with self border and small star design; each...10c
N. B.—We nave a very choice selection
Of REAL MALTESE and KANITON
LACE HANDKERCHIEFS.
NOVELTIES   IN   SHOPPING BAGS, FANS,  CHILDREN'S PARTY  FROCKS,   BABIES'   BIBS,   GARTERS,  HOODS  ARD  BONNETS, SILK BLOUSES, SILK PETTICOATS,   OPERA    COATS,   BATH    ROBES,
ETC., ETC., AT
Angus Campbell & Co.
;the ladies* store
Promis Block, Government Street, Victoria v
J
RETIRING FROM BUSINESS *
XMAS EVE SPECIALS r
8 dor. Motor Caps, were fi.oo to $1.50     75c
3 Tea Gowns, were $12.50 ,$6 75
3 Children's Evening Cloaks, were $5.00  ...3 00
Mrs. W. Bickford, 61-63 Fort Street.
tymt**^*H*tm1*1^^k****^*^lmt*v^*hiki>^t^l^imj\*%tA^A '
Th Sanitarium Hotol, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the Bow Ulver and its lovely and
romantic valley, is a large o-story building elegantly
fitted with ovary appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and comfort to tho tourist or invalid.
"f.A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to tlio Sanitarium, is presided over by
sKiimily trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
of its kind.
,.,A v<"% commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel,
whore Turkish, llussian, plunge, shower and douche
oatlisiiro given under medical supervision, with
water.direct from the celebrated hot sulphur springs.
«;A first class) very in connection so that rides and
drives through the maghifloant scenery may be en-
loyed.   Excellent euisino.
Forms: *!2.0t> a day upwards.   Spocial rates by weok
or month.  Opon all tho year.
A. C, THOMPSON, Manager.
Medical Staff:
B. G. Brett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
ii i, fli.u ;    \j, m
. H. BUETT, B.A
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
| give her time for other things j
S        besides^, cooking.
"llCook Your RoastrDo^dt'Roast Your(.Cbok, tf"™m',i
^VlCT01lIA~*GAS"CdMPANY, LIMITED^
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
tzs*     r_- .- .BREWERS OP
ENGLISH, ALE AND^ STOUT
[The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
[PHONE 893. VICTORIA
Like the babbling brook and the College Widow, "The Yankee Consul"
seems likely to go on forever. It is one
of those musical' pieces which, like "Rob_
in hood," "Erminie" and "The Belle
of New York" have an indescribable
charm about them that seems to endure
for all time.
When "The Yankee Consul" was first
produced at the Broadway Theatre,
New York, the magnificence of the
gowns worn by the members of the chor ?
us aroused widespread comment. Those
original costumes have outlived their
usefulness,  but  Manager John  P.  Slo-
cum has provided exact duplicates of
them, which will give the young ladies
of Victoria .some novel ideas in the
methods of Parisian modistes.
'The Yankee Consul" will appear at
the Victoria Theatre Monday, December
24th.
Mrs. John Irving and the Misses Irving were hostesses at a large and most
enjoyable dance given on Friday evening
last, at their home on Mendes Street.
Mrs. Irving and her daughters entertained in their usual hospitable manner,
and all the guests voted the dance delightful. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER aa, 1906
CHRISTMAS
STILL   MORE
OFFERINGS AT WEILER BROTHERS.
Beautiful
Gifts
BICH FBENCB BBOCADES
ABBAS CLOTHS
EXQUISITE ABT LIBERS
LIBEBTY GOODS
DBAWB LIBEB TABLE  CLOTBB
SEBYIETTES TO MATCB
BEAUTIFUL BED SPREADS
SILK ART CUSHIONS
MoLIBTOOK QUALITY QUILTS
CHALLIS CLOTBS
HAND-WORKED TAPESTRIES
LACE DOYLIES
C3NNEMABA LACE CURTAINS
ARE   ON   YIEW   IN   OUR   DRAPERY
SECTION.
AN EFFICIENT STAFF OF TRAINED
INTERIOR DECORATORS
ALWAYS AVAILABLE TO VISIT
TOWN    OR    COUNTRY    HOMES    TO
CONFER, ADVISE AND SUBMIT
BOHEMES    AND    ESTIMATES    FREE
OF COST.
A FREE GIFT
Every lad; leaving* her name and address in onr ofllce from now on to New
Year will receive FREE a handsome needle calendar containing; forty assorted
SHARPE'S needles.
SOLID STERLING SILVER
Child's Sets, knife, fork .and spoon, per
set, SOc to 82,00
Toast Racks, each, $1.00 to. 84.00
Butter Dishes, each, $1.50 to $10.00
Cruets, salt, peppei and mustard, each,
81.75 to    85.00
Manicure Sets,  sterling    silver,    each,
$3.35 to  810.00
Writing Sets, each, $3.00 to $7.50
Marmalade Jars, each, $3.50 to $5.00
Creams and Sugars, per nr., $5 to $10.00
Cake Dishes, $6.00 to $9.00
Tea Sets, 4 and 5 pieces, $15.00 to $35.00
Shoe Horns, sterling silver, each 75c
Cuticles, sterling silver, each 75c
Salve Boxes, sterling silver, each..$1.00
Gravy Ladles, 1847 Rogers Al, each...
 ;.    $1.50
Berry   Spoons,   gilt  bowl,   Rogers  Al,
each    $2.50
Hat Blushes, sterling silver, each. .$2.75
Coffee Spoons, assorted designs, Rogers
1S47 Al, per doz $4.00
Oyster Forks, Rogers 1847 Al, per doz.
 i   $6.00
Silver  Frait   Knives,   with   pearl   handles, per doz $12.00
Oriental
Gifts
MORODABAD FINGER BOWLS
CANDLESTICKS AND GOBLETS
BENABtS BBASS TRAYS
KAZARA CUBTAINS
TABLE   COVEBS AND SMALL MATS
INDIAN GUBBES
GOLD  EMBBOIDEBED  TABLE
COVEBS
EMBROIDERED DRAPES
RICH BUNDERABUS RUGS
AHMEDNEGAR RUGS
ANTIQUE MOUSOUL RUGS
PER3IAN   CARPETS
ARE   ON  VIEW  IN  OUR  ORIENTAL
SECTION.
A  SPLENDID  LINE  OF  BEAUTIFUL
AND USEFUL NOVELTIES IN
WEATHEBED OAK
Ink Stands, 2 bottles  .$1.00 .
Folding Book Backs  1.00
Cigar and Match Stands 2.60 -
Book Shelves         2,50
Magazine Stands  3.50
Pipe Racks, with drawers.. • 3.50
Umbrella Stands 3.50
Foot Stools, with Spanish leather top..
 13.75
Tambourette-f, 12 and 14 in. tops	
 $3.00 and $4.00
Folding Card Tables... *.  8.60
Dinner Bells for haU 6.00
Shirt Waist Boxes, 3 sites, $6.00, $7.00
and $8.00
Draught Screens, $8.50, $10.00 and.$12.00
av
•-?>:<:•
TWi
,.;,-'•«
ALL OUR PRICES ARE
SUBJECT TO A DISCOUNT
OF 5 PER CENT.
FOR CASH.
IW Mail Orders Filled Promptly and Carefully
Weiler Bros.
eomplete Home, Hotel, Club and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Gmrtnneat Streets, Victoro, B. C
factory
humboldt street,
victoria, b.c.
warehouse
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.
VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 22, 1906.
■ifif*ifififififififififif
if if
if A Lady's Letter if
•j- * if
W »y  BABETTE. y
:♦ *
;*i|r->|f^9^*rjf-^^^^^^^-if
Dear Madge:
I A Merry Christmas! and may Santa
Claus bring you beautiful gifts galore.
Of course you have not finished your
shopping; no one has just yet, so 1 am
going to give you a few hints. In these
modern days, the big stores of our cities
play tlie part of Santa Clause at Xmas
time, and with all the wealth and profusion of goods which they offer it is
still no easy question to decide exactly
what to buy for each relative or friend
to whom one wishes to give a present.
In the pressure of the moment a great
many obvious things which ought to occur to the purchaser are forgotten and
only remembered afterwards, when it
is too late to profit by tbe thought.
If, when you have wandered through
the galleries of any of the great museums, has it not often been a sad thought
that the objects so temptingly displayed
cannot be bought for love, or money?
Indeed, to me, the instinct of acquisition
is so strong that if the cases were unlocked I sometimes have thought that I
could hardly resist breaking tbe Seventh
Commandment. When one visits Mrs.
McLeod's on Douglas Street, it is as
though one walked through a miniature
museum, and like Aladdin in the magician's care, bewildered with the wonderful mirrors, tables, chairs, brass and
copper kettles, vases and candlesticks,
old English trays, beads from the sacred
mountain of Tibet, and jet that is almost
priceless. If you have a "penchant"
for old china, here is a place to rummage in for it contains bargains in old
plates, cups, bowls, figures, etc. Any
one of these would make a most acceptable Xmas gift. A new fashion has
set in among the cultured of eschewing
anything that' can lie bought by everybody, and this Christmastide fashionable
presents are largely being sought in
unique specimens of art. It is astonishing how far a little money will go
in a curiosity shop of this kind, and
there is always the additional pleasure
in knowing that what you have bought
will not be thought of by anybody else.
A most welcome form of Christmas
present is one of the many varieties of
gramophones and talking machines supplied by Fletcher Bros. The perfection
which these instruments have now attained will surprise many persons who
perhaps have only heard the original
type of sound-producing machines. The
latest types reproduce the human voice
and all kinds of instrumental music with
almost faultless perfection.
In a vaporous climate like ours,
where the heavens are telling a tale of
rain in season and out, the inevitableness
of the mackintosh coat is extremely apparent, and if one wanted to send a really appropriate present to a friend, say,
living in thc country, wnat gift would
be more responsively, not to say reverently, received than such a complete covering from the humidity of their environment? Angus Campbell on Government Street has a splendid assortment of these necessary articles of wearing apparel.
I have just been watching a girl packing for a Xmas week visit, and it was
borne in upon mc why the fathers of
daughters look such depressed men, also
what slaves to the conventions of clothes
wretched woman is. This particular girl
is an ardent devotee to golf, hockey,
hunting and bridge. As there is quite
a strong likelihood that she will do all
of this during the week, a sepcrate outfit for everything was packed. Nothing
. was quite suitable for any two occupations, so in they all had to go. Besides
these, of course, there were the necessary evening frocks, a fancy dress, a
small pile of frocks to meet the exigencies of a few wet days, and of course,
the few doren other things that one
really has to have. All these for one
week! !-
I know I am supposed to constantly
expiate on thc absolute necessity of having all these things, but I cannot help
feeling a profound admiration for thc
people, who simply will not be tyran
nized over by their clothes. They may
look odd to our convention-ridden minds,
but what pluck to just wear whatever
one's moods dictate! I have just seen
two of these brave women; one of these
has a large place in the country, takes
an active interest in her farm, and
spends long hours every day among her
chickens and pigs and directing the management generally, yet she is never seen
in anything else than a black tea gown.
Now she says she finds a black tea
gown (chiffon in summer and cashmere
in winter) very comfortable, and she
looks very pretty in them, far better
than in a short and hateful tweed skirt.
Why should she not farm in black tea
gowns if she likes?   Do tell.
The other brave thing that I could not
help admiring in the early autumn when
it was yet quite summery, was a girl
travelling in a lace bridge coat. It was
really quite hot, and thc other women at
the railway station were dropping in the
correctest of tweed travelling clothes,
yet they all glared at the lace coat almost as if it were indelicate. It must
be this oppressive anxiety about clothes
that makes women age and have to fly
these serene creatures who can farm in
thes serene creatures who can farm in
tea gowns and travel in lace jackets,
have faces as smooth as their minds.
Every one can see, of course, that
nowadays no woman with any sense and
a few pennies need look more than thirty-five, and grandmothers who play golf
and have finer heads of hair than their
grandchildren are among the commonplaces of life, but what is going to happen about the grandfathers? I could
not help noticing one night, looking
round at a crowded house at the theatre, that the audience was apparently
composed entirely of young women and
obviously elderly and middle-aged men.
It seems now that women stop permanently at thirty. Surely something can
be done to keep husbands at thirtv-five.
They say, "Eat, drink, be merry,
For tomorrow you may die."
Then sup tonight at the Poodle Dog
And drink Mumm's Extra Dry.
BABETTE.
REVIEW.
There is no more acceptable present
for boys than a copy of "Chums." This
maeazinc has, during the past few
years, usurped the position which was
once occupied by the B. O. P., and the
latest number is one which well bears
comparison with its fore-runners. Such
well-known writers for boys as Fred
Wishaw, Robert Leighton and S. Walk-
ley are among the contributors of serial
stories. The volume abounds in excellent short stories and articles on all the
topics which interest boys. Messrs.
Hibben of Victoria have the English
edition of this, the most wholesome lit-
erture which can be placed in the hands
of young people.
Drifted Apart.
There was a time when you and I
Adown life's stream went side by
side,
And then    we    thought, tho' years
rolled by,
That  nought our lives could e'er
divide.
But came a day when love's sweet
chain
By captious fate was snapt in twain,
And side by side we were no more,
Our ways apart the current bore.
Drifted apart, heart from heart,
On life's o'erflowing river,
Is it to be, for you and me,
A parting, love, forever?
As leaves that float upon the stream
Will part awhile to meet again,
So let our parting prove a dream,
That strove to part, but strove in
vain.
Once more together, side by side,
Adown life's river let us glide,
Thc future be from doubting free,
Forever, love, for you and me.
Drifted apart, heart from heart,
On life's o'erflowing river.
Ne'er could it be, for you and me.
A parting, love, forever.
"If you call your yacht Daisy you will
find it hard to steer her."
"Why so!"
"Because a daisy's course is always
naturally lea-ward."
The Fur business is done better in Victoria than almost anywhere else on the
continent. We set the pace with handsome displays of
Persian Lamb Jackets
Canadian Hink Coats
Handsome
Sealskin Coats
Labrador Mink Stoles
in qualities that are absolutely dependable, and at the lowest prices that really
high-grade Furs ever sell for. We know
the market and we know your needs.
Out-of-town customers should write for our catalogue.
THE B. C. FUR MANFQ COMPNY
VICTORIA, B.C.
for the Christmas trade are being received daily
also presents for the most fastidious devotee of
_^^^^_^^^_^^J| Lady   Nicotine.
Your Favorite Brand Can Now Be Had in Perfect Condition.
If you smoke Havanas we shall be pleased to show and quote low prices for fine cigars.
The Old Post Office Cigar Store
J.   A.   WORTHINGTON, PROP. VICTORIA. B. C.
A IEW OF THE
New
Books
seasonable as Christmas Gifts are:
The Doctor (Ralph Connor) $1.25
Jane Cable (Geo. Barr McCutcheon)  $1.25
Daniel   Sweetland    (Eden    Phill-
potts)  $1.25
House of Defence (C. F. Benson).$1.23
The Man Between (Amelia Barr). .$1.25
Puck of Pook's Hill (Rudyard Kipling)   $I.$Oj
Billy Topsail (Norman Duncan).. .$1.50'
Sir Xigel (Conan Doyle) $1.25
The  Treasure of Heaven  (Marie
Corelli)  '.  $1.25
The Silver Maple (Marian Keith).$1.25
Call of thc Blood (Robt. Hickens).$i.25(
Bcnita (Rider Haggard) $1.251
In the Van (Price Brown) $1.25
The Heart Tliat Knows  (Charles
Roberts)  $1.25
The Fighting Chance  (Robert W.
Chambers)  $1.25
The      Undertow      (Robert      C.
Knowlcs)  $1.25
For the up-to-date in literature go to
the
THOMSON
STATIONERY CO.
825 Hastings St.
VANCOUVEB, B. C.
To Give a
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Our glove stocks were never
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show:
Dent's Gloves, a pair	
 $1.00, $1.50, $1.75 to $3.00
Fowne's Gloves, a pair	
 $1.25 and $1.75
Perrin's Gloves, a pair	
 $1.50, $1.75 and $2.00
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS CHAHBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
M. J. HENRY'S
NURSERIES and SEED HOUSES '
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Headquarters for Pacific Coast grown
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A large stock of home grown Fruit
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Let me price your list before placing your order. Greenhouse plants,
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etc.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,  B.  C. THE WH
KJRDAY, DECEMBER aa, 1906.
OLLA PODRIDA
\
A Question of Faith.
President Patton of Princeton Univer
sity once delivered a sermon, his subject being "Faith." He spoke of the
blind faith of the client who puts himself at the mercy of a lawyer in preparing an action for trial, and of the confidence of the sick in entrusting themselves to the physician. "A case of blind
faith," said the clergyman. "The doctor writes out a prescription. Oftener
than not you cannot read it; yet don't
know what it is. He tells you to take
it. 'Yours not to reason why, but to do
and die.'" Whether or not Dr. Patton meant it, there was a distinct ripple
throughout the congregation.
Was Hamlet Mad?
Richard Mansfield, at a dinner
in New York, contributed an anec<
the old question of the sanity of
let.
"One morning in the West," hi
"I met a young friend of mini
asked him where he had been th<
before.
'"I went,' my young friend 1
'to see So-and-So's "Hamlet*'
"'Ah, ha, did you?' said I.
tell  me—do  you    think   Hamlc
mad?'
'"I certainly do,' said    he.
wasn't a hundred dollars in the hi
The Latest in Mottoes.
A lady travelling with her husband
through the West in a certain small
town recently had occasion to do some
shopping at what is called the general
store in a certain small town. She was
much entertained by the variety and
antiquity of the stock of goods, and as
she passed out her eyes were attracted
by a pile of mottoes, elaborately lettered
and ornately framed, the upper one being
the Scriptural passage: "Walk in love."
As she paused, the clerk, a dapper young
man of more affability than advantages,
stepped forward with the remark, "Them
are the latest things in mottoes. This
top one is swell to put over a young
lady's door—'Walk in love.'"
Who Is the Worst?
An English journal recently wondered
whether the pronunciation of some of
the ignorant classes or of some of the
cultivated classes is the worst.
For instance, the groom says: " 'Arry,
'old me 'oss."
But the curate says: "He that hath
yaws to yaw, let him yaw."
And the doctor's wife says: "Jawge,
please go to Awthah and awdah the
' hawse, and don't forget to look at the
fiah."
And the vicar says: "If owah gracious sovereign wur-ah to die!"
Latest English Epigrams.
Here are some epigrams culled
speeches delivered during the past
"Queen Victoria transformed
Britain into a crowned republic, a
which the will of the people is 1
preme law."—Andrew Carnegie.
"Great poetry is the surest a
to the prevailing virus of materi
—Alfred Austin, the Poet Laurea
'The educational system of this
try is chaotic and utterly behii
age."—Prime Minister Balfour.
"In dealing with education th
thing is to consider the childret
churches come afterward." — J
Chamberlain.
"We want sometimes in this ci
a little more of the spirit of toler;
—Earl Spencer.
"This is above all a reading ag
how many people read the Bible ?"
Bishop of Manchester.
"Plenty of porridge and milk \
more for the physique of a natio:
the most up-to-date physical d
Prof. Laurie, of Edinburgh Univ<
"We must dispel the blight of i
torial oppression which stunts, <
and withers every branch of the n
life of Ireland."—The Right Hoi
Wyndham, Chief Secretary for Ii
"The bicycle nowadays is part
necessary equipment of a lad."—County
Court Judge Sir A. Marten.
Not According to Shakespeare.
A negro amateur dramatic society was
attempting to give a performance of
"Othello." In the scene where Othello
demands a handkerchief from Desde-
mona there was a startling interruption
from one of the audience. When the
time came for the scene, the negro who
was playing the part of Othello bawled
out, "Desdemonie, gib me dat han'ker-
chif!"
No reply.
"Desdemonie, I say gib me dat han'-
kerchif!"
Still silence.
"Desdemonie, foh de third time, gib
me dat han'kerchif-1"
But she wouldn't do it.
Thereupon an old negro in the audience, tired of the apparent slowness,
spoke up and said: "Ah, wipe yo' nose
on yo' cote sleeve, niggah, an' let de
show go on!"—New York Tribune.
Ingenious.
"Pop, is it true that the word Adam
means earth?"
"So they say, my son."
"Then the first man's name was mud."
J'As things turned out, it was."
Political Dangers.
Howell—It is hard for woman to understand politics.
Powell—I should say so! My wife
asked me to-day if a candidate who was
scratched at an election ever had blood
poisoning.
Splitting Hairs.
A Buffalo dry goods firm recently advertised in the papers of that city:
"Shirt-waists one-third off." Is Buffalo
outside of Anthony Comstock's jurisdiction?
Skeptical.
Those glowing predictions of the flying machinists should be taken with a
few grains of ballast.
O. K.
In a Massachusetts cemetery there is
a monument erected to a large family of
O'Kelleys. Now the O'Kelleys were
too many for the monument and towards
the last there was not room enough for
the surnames. So this is the way the
later names were cut in: William 0. K.;
John 0. K.; Mary 0. K.
Distinction; No Difference.
"Didn't you steal my scales?" cried
the excited grocer.
"By no means," answered the suspected ; "I merely made a weigh with them."
A Question of Colour.
Barbara and Jessie were walking along
the street last week behind a very gorgeous young "lady," who was scarcely
remarkable for her daintiness or cleanliness. She wore a hat that had once
been white, but which then bore traces
of time, and it was "elegantly" trimmed
In pale blue velvet.
Jessie said to Barbara: "Don't you
wish you had a white leghorn?"
"BJarbara replied: "You don't call
that a white leghorn; it's a black mirt-
orca!"
Nerve.
"Yes." said the warden, "he was the
coolest and most thoughtful convict who
ever broke jail."
"You don't say?" exclaimed the visitor,
"Yes; he left behind him a note to
the governor of the state beginning: 'I
hope you will parden me for the liberty
I am taking.'"
The Source of Misunderstanding.
"We should be careful what we say,''
remarked the wise person,
"Of course," answered Miss Cayenne,
"although it isn't so much what we say
that gets us into difficulty as what somebody says wc said."
It is easier for a camel to get into Pastor (revisiting his flock)—"I can-
heaven than for a shabby man to catch not help noticing many absent faces with
the eye of the beadle. wbicb I used to shake hands."
=?f
CAflPBELL'S
1
;hristmas
offerings
GLOVES
lent's Special, per pair $1.00
nglish Kid Gloves, per pair. 1.00
rench Kid Gloves, per pair.. 1.00
laggioni Kid Gloves   1.50
errin's Best, per pair  1.50
VERY PAIR GUARANTEED,
ull stock of ladies' evening gloves
1 lace, suede and silk.
NECKWEAR
N ENDLESS variety, all the lat-
>t London and Paris fashions,
ice, chiffon and accordion pleated,
acked in special boxes for mail-
ig*
HANDKERCHIEFS
HOUSANDS of handkerchiefs,
pecially imported for the Xmas
eason, direct from Old England
nd Belfast, and the real Irishlin-
n handkerchiefs with small real
ace edges, from ioc up. See our
windows.
LADIES' BELTS
N SILK and Leather, smart new
LADIES' BAGS
SUCH pretty bags in new and
beautiful shapes and shades; the
interiors are as well finished as
the exteriors.
SILK BLOUSES
SPECIAL importations for our
Xmas showing; splendid goods at
specially low prices.
COATS AND COSTUMES
NEW Hand-Tailored Costumes
from London and Paris; recent arrivals for our early spring orders.
FANS
SEE the goods, then examine the
prices, and you will buy one because they are perfectly beautiful
productions.
CHILDREN'S DRESSES
IN Embroidered Muslin, such
etty party frocks, costing very
tie money. Also Bibs, Bonnets
id. Bearskin Coats.
EIDER ROBES
WILL keep you warm and comfortable; why not have one this
Christmas?   Suggest it.
SKIRTS
FINEST effects in Tweeds and
Ladies' Cloths—a great wealth of
selection, including the new chiffon-Panama and black silk.
OPERA CLOAKS.
BEAUTIFUL productions from
Paris. Husbands should take this
hint and this chance. Bridge
Jackets and Berthas in White
Cream and Black Lace.
UMBRELLAS
HERE we give you decided advantages in durability, pretty handles and low prices; they make
most desirable Christmas gifts.
EVENING DRESSES
EXCLUSIVE GARMENTS, bearing the hall mark of the finest
London, Vienna and Parisian Cos-
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Angu.     ampbell & Co.
Promii
I LADIES' STORE
, Government Street, Victoria
C. 2083
IUTH
How happy
was young an
was a swan ai
What would v\
morning at br
petite of unadi
how; live simi
lie porridge days when all the world
/ere young with it, when every goose
ry gander a dragon to be overcome,
to renew that youth, to sit down each
t with the fire of youth and the ap-
jd joy ? lt is quite easy when you know
d eat
R( Jed Oats
II K  1910 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER . 22, 1906.
The Week
▲ Fretinelal Review and JUufaiine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LM11ED.
Offleea:
Nit GoTommeat Street .... Victoria B. C.
Umpire Bleck   Vancouver, B. C.
'The Road to Mandalay;" or can
sing more sweetly, as in ''The True Romance"; or more majestically, as in
"Lord, God of Battles," or "Recession."
The popularity of Kipling has developed with his imperialism—of that there
can be no doubt. It is his generous and
persistent advocacy of "Tommy Atkins,"
and his sensitive and subtle appreciation
  of everything touching the true great-
BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor ness of empire that has caught the pub-
lie ear. But laudable as this may be, it
would be but an insecure foundation on
which to build even a literary reputation. Admirable as it is in its way,
'Pharaoh and the Sergeant" can never
become a classic; who will say as much
of "Recessional"? Smart strophes may
catch the ear; only true passion can
touch the heart; and it was when the
^^_ greatest pageant of all the age in jubilee
• For more than thirty years it has been year  was faujng away that the  dying
customary  to associate    tlie    name of footsteps of the- nations were arrested,
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN JJJj
Charles  Dickens with  Christmas  time
This is because no author in the range
and their jubileaii paean hushed, while
his voice whispered tp their hearts "Lest
4 I11S      13     IAW.M4V      .."        - ".-      '-  -4..
qf English literature has so thoroughly we forget, lest we forget."
Then and there Kipling came close to
the heart of. the people, and then and
there they recognised that he and he
alone could speak to them.
Is Kipling a poet? Some deny him
the "laurel wreath."   But apart from his
imbibed, or so admirably portrayed the
Christmas spirit. His Christmas Carol
is the English classic, and his Cheeryble
Brothers are the finest types of bright,
optimistic, generous-hearted old gentlemen to be found in the portrait gallery _„ ,     _ .
of literary celebrities. I always think of great hymn, the litany of an' empire, he
them as twin Santa Claus's, without i,as written at least two poems which
whiskers. would   establish the reputation  of any
-I want, however, to sing the praises laureate, "To the True Romance" and
of a more modem English writer, who "L'Envoi." What poet of this age would
in an entirely different style, but none „0t giadly bum his books to be hailed
the less   truly, exemplifies the  noblest as tne author of the following stanzas?
phase of Christmas feeling and Christmas thought.   I refer to Rudyard Kip- Thy face, is tar trom this, our war,
ling.    I wonder what he is doing this     Our call and counter cry;
Christmas time in his quiet Sussex re- i shall not find thee quick and kind,
treat 1   Whatever his occupation may be     Nor know thee till I die;
I am sure he is thinking of the children; Enough for me in dreams to see
their  pleasures  and  enjoyments;  their     And t0Uch thy garments' hem.
light-heartedness and laughter and how Thy feet have trod so near to God
he can contribute to their happiness. I m*-y not follow them.
There may be, even yet, a few who
are at a loss to understand the popu- oh Charity, all patiently
larity of Kipling.   For these there is no     Abiding wrack and scaith.
message.    Nothing I could say would oh   Faith,   that   meets   ten   thousand
pierce the  iron-clad prejudice of those cheats
who can find no beauty in him, because     Yet drops no jot of faith.
he  once told  lhe  truth  (unpardonable Devil and brute thou dost transmute
sin for a poet)  in "Our Lady of the     To higher, lordlier show,
Snows."    But to say the least, all such who art in truth that lovelier Truth
cavillers  must    own    themselves  in a     That careless angels know.
WM...-C minority, since queen and emperor, princes and princesses hummer-     jn   statelier measure  and  with pro-
able, and not only the English-speaking phetic  insight he    portrays    in a  few
peoples, but all the civilised world, have vjvid   ijnes ana  with  a  few  graphic
done homage at his sick-bed and paid strokes the gospel of the optimist, and
tribute to his genius. who, as he reads it, does not realise that
This    universal    acknowledgment   is "L'Envoi" is the work of a master?
unique, and rarely, indeed, has it fallen
to the lot of an author, in his lifetime y*/nen  Earth's last picture  is painted,
.to  realise  such an apothesis of fame.        anQ the tubes are twisted and dried,
And yet the reasons are not hard to when the oldest colours have faded, and
__. ..      . •   .  „.«  ..11 .        .. j
thirty years asleep. In the mirister's
pew were three tall, light-haired, graceful girls. Alas! not at all attentive to
their father's ministrations—the eldest
now Kipling's mother. At the reading
desk a pale, dark-haired, thoughtful-
looking young man with a prominent
forehead, neat dress and silvery voice—
Frederick Macdonald, Kipling's uncle
and closest friend, In the same church
at the same time, in the back pew under the gallery, sat Henry Hartley Fowler, now Sir Henry Fowler, privy-councillor and ex-Secretary for India, arid
his little chubby daughter, Eleanor
Thorneycr'oft Fowler, the brilliant authoress of "Isabel Camaby."
Then on the paternal side is a father
noted for his artistic acquirements, and
an uncle, E. J. Poynter, a Royal Academician. In estimating Kipling's charac-
t and work, these facts play an important part and explain the source whence
some of his strongest and most unlocked
for characteristics are derived. That
his spared life is a gain to all "kindreds
and peoples" has been joyfully declared
hy the tongues of many; and when "The
Times" seven years ago proclaimed
"that his loss to the world, and especially to the Empire, would be greater
than that 'of any living man," it recognised not only the sterling worth of a
true man and a great poet, but unveiled
the truth present to every thoughtful
mind—that he had been face to face
witli the mystery of ■ death and would
come back to enrich the mystery of life.
And although we still await his magnum
opus he is «**■*"" the most virile and impressive of English writers. He will
receive Christmas greetings from all
parts of the Empire, and no more heartfelt one than that sent by
BOHEMIAN.
UR   CHRISTMAS   GIFTS  are
very appropriate because they
are practical and beautiful, they
B      denote the discriminating taste
?'.?;.,;?.??? ? of the giver and imply a similar comp
-""-■■■"• liment to the receiver; the charm of
merit and originality is found in all, from the least expensive to the most
costly.   Permit us to draw your attention to
W A T C M E S
find.    Kipling is strong just where
all
the youngest critic has died,
the writers of this decadent period are \ye shall rest, and faith we shall need
■weak.   Although   keenly   alive to the it—lie down for an aeon or two,
faults and foibles, to the sins and wick- Till the Master of all good workmen
edness of a degenerate age, he is no slia.ll set us to work anew,
pessimist.   The cloud which overhung
thc sunset of a century had a rift, and And only the Master shall praise us,
a blue streak, and a silver lining for him. anj on-y the Master shall blame,
He shares not the despondency of the And no one shall work for money, and
many because he is a stranger to their n0 one shall work for fame,
doubt.                                                  ; But each for the joy of the working,
He is an optimist because be knows
and each in his separate star,
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it for
the God of the Things as they are.
Some have marvelled at this serious
vein  in a man who can write so flip-
that "God is above, and all's well." He
is not tinged with the gloomy foreboding
of Hardy, the fantastic uncertainty of
Meredith, thc sophistry of Arnold, the
cynicism of Carlyle, or the blank unbelief of Tolstoi. So it is that above the pantly, but they have not looked bewail which was the funeral dirge of the lleat|, the surface. His flippancy covers
greatest of all centuries one voice at a big heart, big and bursting with hu-
least was heard ringing true and clear manness. His virility, his genuineness,
for "the faith of our fathers." his true ring, his emphasis, his sympa-
It seemed for some years as if the thy, all stamp him • a man. Neither
fame of this stripling author must rest ab0Ve nor below the weaknesses of our
on his unrivalled creation of Mulvaney race, but endeared to us by community
in "Soldiers Three," or on his unsur- 0f interest and capacity to say and suf-
passed dramatic comedy, "The Gads- fcr. His "Poor Little Jo," on hearing
bys"; then his deep insight into Anglo- 0f the death of his little daughter, went
Indian affairs was manifested in "Plain t0 every heart, and now by thc ties of
Talcs from the Hills." By tbis time he common humanity, no less than by the
had established an unassailable position glamour of genius, he is ours,
as the one exponent of this phase of Kipling is essentially a "man of the
life. But those who could read between people," despite his imperialistic tenden-
the lines had already discovered the cies, but he is a democrat of the highest
promise of greater things. He could iype, it is the destiny of the people
not write the history of tbe profane which fixes his horizon. And can we
Mulvaney, or tell tlle story of the shal- wonder when we look at his origin? It
lowest society in the world, without giv- seems but yesterday that the writer sat
ing a glimpse of the real truth whicli in Trinity Church of the Metropolis of
lay hidden, the religious streak which in ihe Black Country listening to tiie elo-
reality dominates his character. None quent and godly George Brown Macdon-
can    lilt    more    pleasantly,    as    in aid—Kipling's   grand father—more   than
Anchored.
I stood and watched my ships go out,
Each, one by one, unmooring free,
What time the quiet harbor filled
With flood-tide from the sea.
Thc first that sailed, her name was
Joy;
She spread a smooth white shining
sail,
And eastward drove    with bending
spars
Before the sighing gale.
Another sailed: her name was Hope;
No cargo in her hold she bore,
Thinking to find in western lands
Of merchandise a store.
The next that sailed, her name was
love;
;     She showed a red flag at her mast,
I A flag as red as blood she showed,
And she sped south right fast.
1 The last that sailed, her name was
Faith;
Slowly she took her passage forth,
Tacked and lay to; at last she steered
A straight course for the north.
My gallant ships, they sailed away
Over the shimmeirng summer sea;
I stood at watch for many a day—
But one came back to me.
For Joy was caught by Pirate Pain;
Hope ran upon a hidden reef;
And  Love took fire and foundered
fast
In whelming seas of grief.
Faith  came  at  last,  storm-beat and
torn;
She recompensed me all my loss,
For as a cargo safe she brought
A crown linked to a cross.
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Outwitting the Canvasser.
■ The recent Suffragettes' demonstration in Trafalgar-square was enlivened
'by a good story, told by Mrs. Barras,
. of the Women's Co-operative Guild. She
knew, she said, of a lady who called
on a laborer's wife and asked if her
husband would vote for Lord Blank.
"No, he won't," was the reply. "He's
been promised a new pair of trousers
if he votes for Mr. Dash."   Suspecting
\ that this was a case of bribery that
must be outdone, the lady offered a sovereign if the woman would tell her who
had promised the trousers. The money
paid over, the woman smiled. "I
promised them," she said, "and I'll buy
them out of your sovereign."
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Is that bearing the names of the most
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The large purchases for our various branches
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the cutlery manufactured by the above celebrated
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OAT-TING SETS.
Game and Meat Carvers, on cards, in cases and
handsome wood chests, 2, 3 and 5-piece sets,
at all prices, from $1.00 to $12.50
TABLE CUTLERY.
Silver Plated Forks and Spoons, from, per
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Best Sheffield Steel Table Knives for, per
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133 Government Street, Vlcteria, B. e.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
 p. R. 1911 The Week
Literary SuppLEriENT
CHRISTMAS, 1906.
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(Lbrietmas <3reetinc$8
36? Cltvc pbillipps^Molle?.
Back! we are back from the frontier lands
Where the greatest game of the world Is played,
Where men take their lives in their reckless hands,
Play hazard with Death and are undismayed.
We are back from the mine and the railway grade
To our island home mid the orchard trees,
Each to his merry Canadian maid-
Peace and good will to you over the seas.
We have heard the surf on the Arctic strands,
Have tickled the Earth's ribs with a miner's spade,
Washed gold at Nome from the frozen sands
Where mammoth and aurochs lie undecayed,
Back in our overalls tattered and frayed
To kneel with our girls on bended knees,
Praying the prayer that the angels prayed—
Peace and good will to you over the seas.
We have done the work which the Race demands
Have worked for a wage that cannot be paid,
Contented if only She understands
That 'twas not for a dole of fame, nor trade
Alone, that we cleared, that the rails were laid
But just for her folk, whom such labour frees,
Giving room to breathe in the homes we made-
Peace and good will to you over the seas.
L' ENVOI.
Sire! if political critics upbraid
As if we forsooth had not paid our fees
To share in the Empire Your Fathers swayed,
Point to the world you rule over the seas.
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I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DEC. aa, 1906
The Letter.
By Felix D'Arblay.
(Written for The Week.)
A powerful love story, with strong human
interest, and a dramatic and altogether unexpected conclusion. The scene is laid in
London and the development of the plot introduces the reader to a phase of life and
thought which is one of the most striking
features of modern society. The solution of
a difficult problem is found without resort to
that morbidity which is the refuge of degenerates. This story introduces a new writer
to the readers of "The Week," whose optimistic note will find an echo in many a heart.
It was Christmas Eve. A day of bright
sunshine with a frosty nip in the air and
just a tang upon the cheek; a day which is
the most grateful to Londoners in the month
of December had mellowed into a still, starry
night.. The morrow bid fair to be a typical
Christmas Day, and even in the last hours of
eve the seething multitudes flowing through
the streets of the mysterious city were making their final preparations for celebrating
the greatest event of the year.
An angel of love and an angel of pity
looked down on the six million people who
inhabited tlie world's emporium. The mission
of the one to fill with joy and happiness the
hearts of those who tomorrow would rejoice
in devotion or festivities as. inclination or
opportunity might dispose. The mission of
the other to administer the healing touch to
hearts bowed with sorrow, crushed beneath
the burden of that complex life, which was
never so great a mystery as now, when the
crying of the children, the wailing of the
parent and the sighing of the homeless wanderer accentuate the luxury and material
prosperity of the twentieth century.
Big Ben had just struck eleven and aroused
from his reverie a man who is sitting in a
deep cushioned chnir, before a fire, in one of
the most luxurious and well-appointed dens
to be found in all Kensington. The man is
approaching middle age, and as he rises and
begins to pace the room, with head slightly
bowed, and hands folded behind his back, one
sees that he is not an ordinary man. He
bears the stamp of birth and breeding, liis
face is refined and strong, his blue-gray eyes
reveal depths of feeling which are not reflected by his features, his lightish brown hair
is fast turning gray, he is a man of strong
build, with masterfulness and determination
written in every movement and gesture, and
yet with a suggestion which tells of fierce
struggle if not of complete victory.
The den is furnished as might be expected
for a man of such marked individuality;
books, especially of romance and poetry, by
the best writers of the Old World; a few pictures, all carefully selected, and most of them
the pick of the Academy; Japanese vases,
Chinese carved ivory ornaments; half a dozen
heads of big game; thick Persian rugs; heavy
Damascus hangings; a big high backed settee, three or four easy chairs and provisions
for smokes and refreshment constituted the
equipment of a room which had a touch of
the Bohemian and a suspicion of the Sybarite.
After pacing the room for fully ten minutes the man walked to the fire-place and
gazed steadily at an overhanging portrait,
lt was the picture of a woman in the prime
of life, anywhere between thirty and thirty-
live. The artist had realized the importance
of his subject and the product was a real
work of art. The woman was surpassingly
beautiful; upon her small, well-shaped head
were coiled masses of dark brown hair; her
hazel eyes palpitated with feeling; she had
the colouring and contour of a Southerner
combined wilh the intellectual nobility and
dignity of a Northerner. The expression was
one of extreme gentleness and kindliness,
whilst thc superb neck and shoulders and
the whole pose denoted physical perfection
and vigorous health. She bore herself like a
queen, and it was hard to tell whether one
was more impressed by her look of sympathy
or her perfection of form and figure. She
was a woman whom any man might bc proud
to know, but of so rare a ty|>e that few could
expect to know well.
It was interesting to notice thc play of the
man's features as he looked at the picture.
Their first expression was one of profound
attention with features relaxed slightly, and
a look half of admiration and half of pride
mounted on his face, as who should say,
"there is none like you and I know it."
And then the half smile vanished, eclipsed by
a note of ineffable sadness, strange to see
upon so Strang a face. For a moment he
rested his hands on the mantel, lowered his
face and looked down into the fire; then lifting his eyes to the picture again, it could be
seen that they were moist, and in them it was
easy to read the story of a lost love.
Pulling himself together he walked to a
desk, and unlocking one of the drawers lifted
out an envelope; it was faded and ragged, as
was the letter it contained. Seating himself
once more in front of the fire he opened the
letter and read it carefully.
As he read the expression of his face underwent many a change, and a skilled physiognomist might almost have deduced the contents of the letter from its mobile play. At
first it was sad and hard, though never harsh;
then the lips parted slightly, the delicate nostrils expanded, the breathing was quicker and
more laboured. That passed, the muscles of
the face relaxed, the eyes became humid,-the
mouth almost tremulous, and finally the letter fell from his fingers and he clasped his
hands whilst gazing abstractedly into the fire.
Thus he sat for many minutes, and during
these minutes he recalled an incident which
had occurred in that room just fifteen years
ago, an incident which had shaken the very
foundation of his being, broken up the waters
of the mighty deep in his soul, and precipitated once of the fiercest struggles in which
a masterful and determined man could engage. The battle had been with himself, and
he had won. His presence here tonight, and
the delicate limning of the picture of his life
in his very expression, as he studied first the
portrait and then the letter was the best evidence that he had won.
Fifteen years ago—then he was thirty-five,
one of the most brilliant pleaders in the Oxford circuit, a darling of society, a member
of the best London clubs, au acknowledged
authority on literature and art, a thorough
sportsmen, a clean-living honourable man,—a
bachelor. The latter occasioned the greatest
surprise of all to his friends, for no mau was
more popular. His genial manner, high spirits and optimistic outlook on human life made
him a general favourite.
He was one of those men who believed that
life was worth living. Its problems might
perplex, but they never depressed him. He
could pluck roses at the top of the highest
and most difficult mountains, and see stars
shining from the depths of the deepest valley. His outlook on life and the world was
eminently sane and philosophical. For the
imperfections and failings of society he had
a charitable tolerance. Upon its gross derelictions he passed no judgment. He hewed
his own path and followed it, not holding
himself accountable to his fellolws but to his
own conscience.
He had mounted many rungs in the ladder
of fame. Parliamentary honours had been
thrust upon him, and at this time nothing
which was possible to brilliancy of intellect
and strength of character was denied to his
career. But though the gods had knocked at
his door, one little god had passed him by.
Cupid's dart had never pierced thc citadel of
his heart; that saving grace which would
have rounded out his life had been withheld.
Match-making dowagers and designing duchesses had given him up as a bad job; his very
good nature and nonchalance had disarmed
them, and they felt that his indeed was a
hopeless case, for they had exhausted all
their artifices without making the slightest
impression. He was wedded to his art and
to his hobbies; he declared that this satisfied
his every requirement and that the last thing
he should do would be to marry. Then it was
that the strong man armed was overcome,
for what skilful design failed to effect, one
glance into the depths of hazel eyes had
wrought in nn instant.
It was at Lady Delamere's reception that
Gerald Paget met Lady Scott. The picture
hanging over his fire-place tells the story of
her matchless beauty and attractiveness. It
was a case of love at first sight. They were
perfect strangers when they entered the room.
Of course she had heard of him, as who had
not, but no woman ever yet loved a man for
his brilliant achievements, hardly for his no
bility of character; and that was all that she
could have known; and if any philosopher
has been born who can tell why two people
meeting for the first time should experience
a magnetic thrill, and a consciousness that
there is an invisible but unbreakable link
welded by that first look, I have yet to meet
him. It is one of the facts which cannot be
explained and yet which cannot be controverted. It is denied by the many because
naturally only the few have experienced it,
but they are sufficient to maintain faith in
what is sometimes declared to be a polite
fiction.
Whatever they may have experienced or
thought in the first moment of introduction
they knew when they parted that night that
for them there could be no peace in the
world, apart, for their hands had touched and
fire had leaped through their veins, lt was
a sentient touch that carried conviction, and
i.rom that moment there was never any question of their love. They knew it, they toon
it for granted and thence-forward, as long
as their intimacy lasted, they adjusted every
movement with reference to its controlling
power.
Lady Scott in addition to her exquisite
personal, charms was a woman of high intellectual ability who had made her mark in
her own circle and who wielded an influence
that was wholly ennobling. ' Her husband was
a man considerably older than nerself, of
aristocratic birth, of simple habits and with
the tastes and occupations of a country gentleman. Stock-breeding and hunting occupied
all his time except when he sat as a magistrate and dispensed justices' justice through
the country side. He was kind-hearted but
narrow-minded, and his mental attainments
were rather below than above the average.
His knowledge of literaftire, at any rate since
his school days, was confined to what he
gleaned from the Field, the Pink'Un and the
daily papers, and upon his wife's intellectual
pursuits he looked with a tolerant but slightly
bored air.
She had married him the first year after
she came out, when she was barely twenty,
when she had seen little of the world and
was possessed of the idea, impressed on the
mlinds of young ladies by the principals of
high-class finishing schools, that the whole
object of life should be to marry as soon as
possible.
At twenty it looked an attractive prospect
to marry Lord Scott, a member for his
county, a magistrate and a M. F. H. With
her, as with many girls of that age, the attentions of a man ten or fifteen years older than
herself possessed a weight which became almost an authority, and was the determining
factor in her acceptance.
In a very short time came the usual awakening and disillusionment, followed by a
period of reckless, though harmless, gaiety,
into which she plunged with feverish abandon, eagerly accepting every pleasure that
society offered without fully realising that
this was the safety valve for her disappointment.
During the years that followed she was
courted on every side. Her beauty, her youth,
her personal charm and temperament all conspired to arouse the passions of men; and
although there were times when the tongue of
gossip wagged rather freely, it soon began
to be realised' that she had herself well in
hand, and that if Hire were any madness in
her procedure, there was also method in it.
She played the game of give and take with
admirable skill, but always taking more than
she gave. She used to say that the only really
exciting game was the game of hearts, with
all the cards on the table; and that the man
who could not take care of himself deserved
to lose, even if it did hurt, for what was
woman's wit given her for if not to pit itself
against the wit of man. If the poor creature
would deceive himself, why should he be
pitied? Surely the sex which was never tired
of declaiming against the inferiority of woman
had surrendered the right to cry out when
hurt.
There was a time when she had several of
these games going on at once, and yet they
were none of her choosing, nor was she heartless, but if the butterfly would break itself
upon thc wheel, what was she to do? She
never consciously lured a man on, but she
could hardly warn him of his danger before
he showed his hand.
Then a great change came over her, and
when people referred to it in latter years
they would say that ever since her boy was
born she had been a different woman; and
when asked in what respect they said she
tabooed society, stopped flirting, drew into
her shell and devoted herself to her baby.
Then it was understood that it was the maternal instinct that had imparted that tender,
brooding expression to the lovely face and
the limpid eyes; and when a second and then
a third child came it looked as if she was
anchored down for life. No mother could
have been more devoted; she sacrificed everything for her children, their well-being was
her only care; if she had been a butterfly of j
fashion she was now a model matron with all
the responsibilities of motherhood resting :
sweetly and lightly upon her.
This continued for ten years, by which time
her children were at school and she had en-,
gaged once more in the activities of social
life, but her energy found a different outlet
this time: It was not social court which
claimed her, but social interest. With voice
and pen she strove to express her ideals, to
live her life.
And there was yet one thing lacking; she
felt it although she never dared to admit it 1
even to herself. Around her were other brilliant women who felt the same need aud hesi- '1
tated not to admit it or to seek solace. It
had become fashionable at this time to think
very charitably of ill-mated couples who decorously sought elsewhere the sympathy denied them at home, that is as long as it was
decorous; it must not leak out beyond the
confines of a select circle. Each coterie had
its round of country-houses which could reveal
many a secret, but which in the common interest revealed none.
But Lady Scott was not a woman of that
type. She was saved fromj folly by her own
nature; it was neither her training nor her
church, it was her own innate purity and
rectitude. It was not even the inevitable conclusion in her own mind that a false step
might spell ruin. It was not the restraint
imposed by the fear of desecrating her own
ideals or violating her own standards. On
all these points her judgment raug sound and
true, but it carried not ihe weight of her own .
personality, of a nature which knew no evil
and refused to know, because it revolted from
impurity.
And so she closed eyes and ears to every
appeal; some of them suppressed, some of
them pitiful and some of them ending in
perpetual banishment, until at Lady Delamere's she met Gerald Paget.
I have promised myself that some day I
will write the history of the next month, and
it was only a month. And yet when two
people live under the dynamic pressure of
that month to tell its story would demand the
chronicle of years. They lived months in a
day, meetitig at the houses of friends, at the
rendezvous of litterateurs and artists, sometimes at the theatre and sometimes in the
park, but always meeting.
There was no reckless riot in their intimacy,
it was just the irresistible drawing together
of two human hearts that needed each other ,
and had found their counterpart. Nor was
their converse that of passionate lovers, but
rather of kindred spirits who did not for a
moment attempt to disguise the fact that they
loved; but the language was of the eyes and
rarely of the lips. Yet as the month wore,
on the ache of absence, even for a few hours,
became intolerable, the desire of a strong and
masterful man in the full maturity of In*-,
physical nnd intellectual powers, for the mate
who suited his every mood and satisfied his
every requirement became insatiable if not
uncontrollable, and there was about her
yielding a sweet pitifulness as if she now ,
began to realise the inevitable end.
The third week of the month was spent in
a silent but Titanic struggle, not a word was
spoken on the subject, but both knew that a
crisis was approaching. Too often had one
piercingly looked into the depths of the
other's troubled eyes for either to remain
ignorant of the truth. Heart was now crying
for heart; the cry would' not be hushed; the
pain of stilling it was unbearable, and on the
last day of the month, which seemed to cover
years of living and experience, the barrier
had been broken down, and without the slightest hesitation, and as naturally as she would ,
have acquiesced in the request for a rendezvous in the park, she had assented to his suggestion that they should meet that night in
his rooms.   The Rubicon was crossed and they THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DEC. 22, 1906
parted with lighter hearts than they had
known for many days.
And it was this self-same room of which
I have already told. He had made every
preparation; had dismissed nis man; had
drawn the curtains; built up a ruddy fire,
and turned down the lamp. Now he waited
with door ajar and with palpitating heart to
hear her footsteps in the corridor. The clock
ticked monotonously on the mantelpiece. One
after another he had flung half-smoked cigars
into the fire; time and again he had moved
about the room; his eyes danced with excitement, his hands were cold and his breathing
irregular. Now the thought of her nearness
produced a sense which almost choked him,
his eyes dimmed and there was just the faintest suspicion of giddiness, and still the clock
ticked on. Suspense became intolerable, and
then he heard the footstep and rushing to Ihe
door came face to face with a messenger who
handed him a letter.
It did not at first occur to him that it could
be from her. He had never entertained the
slightest doubt that she would come. There
could be no question of her love and her surrender. So perfect had been their accord that
to doubt her, or to doubt that she would fulfil
her promise was sacrilege. So when the possibility first dawned upon him that it might
be from her a chill struck his heart, and for
a moment it stopped beating. She was ill, or
had perhaps met with an accident.
Then he opened it and after the first few
words sank into a chair and buried his face
in his hands. He had seen enough to realise
that it meant rennuciation. When he had
the strength he swallowed a feeling of choke
in his throat, and read the letter by the glimmer of the fire-light, and thus it ran:
Dear:—I know just how you will feel when
you receive this, and I would willingly die
rather than send it you. I think you know
this or I would not send it, but, Gerald, I
can't do it, and you know that also if you
would only think. It Isn't that I am a.
coward. I love you, and never so dearly as
now: I could almost say that we have a right
to our love and to each other, and if that
right be measured by our needs I am sure we
have. But it is forced upon me that in our
plans we have thought only of ourselves and
our own needs and our own pleasure. We
have forgotten that there are others, and if
some of them have no claims upon us but
those imposed by human laws, there are those
with claims neither you nor I can overlook.
We have very nearly sacrificed these to our
love; we have come very near to being selfish.
We forgot for the moment, but have remembered before it is too late. I have always
been so proud of you; I have always admired
your strength. How often have you quoted
to me those lines of Henley, "I am the master
of my soul. I am the captain of my fate."
Gerald, dear, you must not fall below that
standard, and I must not help you to destroy
your ideals. Dear, you know that this moans
good-bye. For us there Is only one way of
safety. Henceforth our lives must lie apart.
It is so sad even to think It, and yet it must
be so. But it Is so sad to write it that my
tears are trying to blot it out now that it is
written, but as you love me, I will not say if
you love me, let this be our good-bve—goodbye. LILIAN.
As he finished reading the letter the first
boom of the midnight bell fell upon his ear,
and then from all the steeples clashed the
merry peals of Christmas bells, and ere long
the strains of music floated through the
streets, borne to the window of the den, and
as he sat looking and looking and looking into
the embers his mind ran over the years of
his life and the short month of his love, and
he began to grapple with the problem that
seemed too big for him or for any man.
But the Christmas spirit was in the air, and
its benediction reached his troubled heart, and
in the gray ashes of the fire he buried the
emblem of his love. Yes, she was right. He
knew it, there was never a time when he
could have thought otherwise, yet the bitterness of it all and the cruelty of fate, and the
inexorableness of destiny! If he had only
met her before. If, Oh, if a thousand things
had happened, but they had not, and here the
masterful, the determined, the strong-hearted
bowed to the destiny he could not avert without making a greater sacrifice than he had any
right to make or to demand.
All this was fifteen years ago, and every
Christmas Eve since then has been spent in
the den, and his celebration hns been the reading of the letter, now faded, but ever fresh
and inspiriting to him, and although fate has
robbed him of the companionship of his dear
love, nothing can rob him of the memory of
her tenderness and charm, and nothing can
weaken her influence over his life and conduct. His whole career is devotion to an
ideal, an ideal whicli was never shattered, and
which as the years pass loses none of its
fragrance and none of its potency.
Lest We Forget.
"Far and  far our  graves are set  round  the
Seven Seas."
Where sailors sleep in far Esquimalt.
By Agnes Deans Cameron,
Vice-President Canadian Women's Press Club.
(Written for The Week.)
Miss Cameron's sketch is a beautiful prose
idyll, breathing the true sentiment of poetry
and paying a tender tribute to the God's Acre
at Esquimalt, where many British sailors
sleep. It is fitting that at Christmas time
these brave sons of the Empire should be
remembered, and Miss Cameron has laid a
fragrant bouquet upon their graves.
Lichen-grown and darkened by clumps of
blue-green pines, behind the curved line of
Esquimalt Harbor rises a ridge of massive
rocks. You must follow the old Admiral's
Road to reach this sea-swept "Acre of God"
where sleep the true and brave. To the landward side of a long hill it lies, a hill blue
when I last saw it with wild forget-me-nots
and starred with Vancouver Island lilies, our
English cousins call them the dog's tooth
violets. Few wanderers find out this little
grave-yard looking out on the seaward side
to where "the dawn comes up like thunder
out 0' China crost the Bay," and guarded by
its tiny chapel.   It is England's last Vedette.
Over it all broods the bright stillness of
a summer-time Sunday. Off to the hither side
children are calling out to one another as they
gather big bunches of lilies and May-leaves,
the tinkle of a cow-bell comes up from the
meadow-land, and the humming of the bees in
the clover-blooms are not noises but rather
running commentary to the June-day silence.
The sharp staccato barking of a squirrel, the
pheasant's call in the long grass, the rustling
of the dead pine-needles, these are no intrusion. The organ chant of the pine-boughs
is a drowsy note, and the sea sing's requiem.
The grave-yard is literally "God's Acre."
One surveyed acre in colonist days was duly
measured and set apart for the sailors' resting-place. An iron railing hedges it in and
a neat garden-bed lines the outer boundary.
Everything is trim and ship-shape. Round
the little chapel bloom English flowers, cowslips, love-lies-bleeding, wall-flowers and the
rare primrose. The walls are edged with
shells, as befits this last resting-place on the
seaside of an Empire's Outpost. The chapel
is like a pictured church lifted out of an
English village and deposited here in far
Vancouver Island with its old world walls of
red and its glittering white-washed spire.
Within this miniature House of God the only
furniture is the altar, a long bench on either
side of the length of the building, and before
the altar two wooden trestles on which to rest
a sailor's coffln.
Looking from the doorway into this quiet,
cool chamber while the twitter of field-fare
stops as we do at the portal, a sad thought
flashes upon us. This is not the little village
church we thought it, the prototype of a
thousand others that dot the leas of the pleasant land of England. No infants are held up
for baptism within these walls, no merry
groups gather to celebrate a village wedding.
This little room where the Douglas firs throw
their shadows over our shoulders on to the
whitened floor is sacred to one rite only, the
sad rite of burial. It has seen only groups
of silent bluejackets, bareheaded, listening to
the solemn Words that tell of Death and
Resurrection and Life Everlasting, while between them and the white-surpliced clergyman
lies the still body of a messmate called home.
To one of the mourners he was dearer than
all the warm-hearted, roughly-sympathetic
comrades that remain:
"There was no one like 'im, Marine or Line,
Nor any of the Guns I knew.
An' because it was so, why o' course
'E went and died,
Which Is just wot the best men do!"
Out into the open we pass, and subdued and
silent look at the long rows of grass-covered
graves. Is it fanciful to see in these the
crested billows of the sunny Pacific rolling
landward and losing themselves in soft lappings on the sand?
The first fact to impress us is that almost
all who sleep here among the buttercups are
young men. The second thought is that
friends rather than relatives laid them to rest
and carved on rude head-board memorial text
and halting verse.    The words repeat them
selves, "by his shipmates, "by the officers
and crew as a mark of respect," "as a token
of the esteem of his comrades," "by his sorrowing messmates." Some lie forgotten with
only a letter or number to mark their resting-
places, and even these distinguishing marks
wind and weather have in some cases obliterated. But Nature is a kindly Nurse—these
nameless graves are the most beautiful of all,
moss and soft-coloured lichens, and fronds of
fern tenderly leave their touch on these. Under the bracken and daisies of this far-off
English island sleep lads from dales of Derby
and Devon and the high white cliffs of Cornwall, boys who a few short months before
climbed Arthur's Seat, and cousins whose
lips dropped soft farewell words to Ireland
when they took ship and services with the
good Queen.
In this little church-yard are frail memorials to those who sleep otherwhere, some in
South America, some in New Zealand and
the far-off isles of the sea, and some the sea
holds.
One reiterated remark of this early Governor might well be taken to heart by his
later-day successors. On finding that public
opinion was against him he withdrew his opposition in a statesmanlike speech with the
peroration that "the Governor, as Governor,
should hold no political opinions." The inscription on the monument states that "Sir
Frederick Seymour, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of British Columbia, died at sea,
on board H. M. S. Sparrowhawk, while in the
discharge of an important official duty, July
10, 1869."
Off in a corner is an unusual name contrasting sharply with those of the able seamen
around it, "Here lies the Honourable Horace
Douglas Lascelles, seventh son of Henry,
third Earl of Harewood, aged 36 years.''
We wonder was he one of Kipling's Lost
Legion of Gentlemen Adventurers, the Broken
Brigade "whose pride it is to know no spur
of pride."
Was he an honoured commander, beloved
by his men and eulogised in a village memorial
service at home when the news eame of his
death, or was he of those who sing:
"And the curse of Reuben holds us,  till an
alien turf enfolds us,
We  die,  and  none can tell them where we
die"?
Here also, far from Yokohama and the
silver cone of Fusi Yama sleeps a little Japanese midshipmite, dying on board one of
those Oriental vessels so closely modelled after
British men-of-war, and here with true groth-
erly kindliness accorded a corner of rest by
the side of his less swarthy brothers of the
sea.
Next to this grave we read in terse simplicity, "Erected by a friend who knew him
long and valued him much," a tribute to one
George K. Macaulay, a young Scots engineer
of H. M. S. Brisk.
No old man lies in this God's Acre. This
fact impresses itself again and again. With
the exception of two or three infant children
and two women, all who sleep here are young
men, the sons of some stricken mother, the
flower of Britain's "wooden walls" of defence.
The verse is rude and halting, but it impresses one more than rounded periods would
do here. We think of the messmate with
infinite labour and tender thought weaving
the limping lines:
"Cut down like grass just in my bloom,
My morning sun went down at noon.
Weep not, dear friends, but joyful be,
I hope that Christ has set me free."
And again:
"Just as a bud cut from a tree,
So death has parted you and me.
Where 1 am gone you soon shall be,
Therefore prepare to follow ma."
who planned the allotments had the family
thought in view. Shipmates sleep in company with shipmates. Near the far fence in
a clump of Scottish broom lies a cluster of
graves—all "zealous" men these; the men
of the Warspite are nearer the gate.
An historic name stands out from the centre
of the little grave-yard. A monument is
erected here to Sir Frederick Seymour, a Governor of the Crown Colony time, and a noted
figure in his day. Sir Frederick was an ardent
objector to British Columbia's entry into the
Canadian Confederacy, opposing Amor de
Cosmos on this issue.
The thought that lingers is not a sad one,
everything here breathes perpetual benediction. Softly closing the little gate behind us,
wc feel better and truer and more kindly for
our half hour spent where sleep the dead.
We, too, must soon wrap the drapery of our
couch around us and lie down to pleasant
dreams. If there is a kind thing to do, a
generous thought to think, a brave smile to
face a friend with, let us pass these on now,
before we, too, must cross the Great Divide.
And as for our fellow-Britons who sleep in
the Sailors' Grave-yard, ye have fought the
good fight, you gave up life with an air
debonair, ready for the "next adventure
brave and new." God rest ye, merry gentlemen, let nothing you dismay.
EM VlXONltEHT.
By J. Forsyth Smith.
The icy blast that leaves the frozen pole
'Neath southern skies becomes a balmy breeze.
The sturdy plant that decks the craggy knoll
In shelt'ring vales and 'neath protecting trees
Becomes a puny weakling, fair and sweet.
'Tis thus the moulding touch of circumstance
And every subtle influence we meet
Doth form our lives by good or evil chance.
THB QTLLh ©F THE
BCJNeH'GRASS HILLS
By Freeman Harding.
(Written for The Week.)
"The Call of the Bunchgrass Hills" is a
fine romance of the dry-belt told by the editor
of the Kamloops Standard. It paints with
equal skill and poetic fancy the fascinating
beauty of the range country and the tender
romance of a true love story.
"Of the ealls that a. man must list to,
Whether or not he wills,
There is none that goes to the heart that
kin, ,vs
Like the call of the bunchgrass hills."
Hiyah! hi! hi! hiyah! A pinto cayuse
broke suddenly out of a rolling cloud of
alkali-laden dust on the heels of a white-
faeed four-year-old whieh shot from the
bunch at the bend of the ereek. A short,
sharp turn, a jingle of spur and a rattle of
bridle chain and the refractory was turned.
He buried himself in the heaving chaos from
whence he came, while the painted pony
jogged back to his place in the cloudy column.
Hiyah ! hi! hi! hiyah! The driven herd broke
into a clumsy run. The thunder of eight
hundred cloven hoofs, the quick tattoo of a
score of steel-shod shoes, au occasional protesting bellow from some protesting bullock,
the shrill, oft-recurring liiyahs and the vicious
popping of the stock whips told the story of
that mass of acrid dust.
Hiyah! hi! hiyah! The ponies spurred in
closer, the stock whips cracked a feu de joie,
and with a last wild rush the dusty, thirsty,
hungry herd swept jostling, rattling and bellowing into the big corral. A heavy gate
banged against the last pair of clumsy heels,
the penetrating alkali dust settled quickly in
the still evening air and four tired men flung
themselves from the saddle to stretch the
stiffness from leather-clad legs, while as many
reeking cayuses shook themselves till their
trappings rattled like castanets. Renton, the
owner of tiie outfit, sat with one leg over the
horn of his saddle watching the cattle settle
clown after their long hot drive, and not until
he had satisfied himself that none of the herd
was overly distressed did hc think of dropping from his horse, then his first thought
was of water for the dust-choked beasts. A
nearby irrigation ditch which ran along the
slope just above the corral was booming full,
and it was only a minute's work to turn the
stream into the dripping troughs. The nearest eattle soon drank nostrils deep, little caring that the cool clear stream was uhnost as
alkaline ns the dust that had tormented them
on the drive. It was cool and wet and satisfying, so they drank, fell bnek for others to
drink, and then drank again before they began on the sweet-smelling hay which had come
down from the ranch house above almost as
soon as thc herd had been corralled.
The cattle watered and fed, Renton refused
for himself the hospitality of the ranch house
which he accepted for his men, and with one
last look over the now quietly feeding animals and a last word of instruction to his
cowboys, swung himself into the saddle for
the last five miles of the ride which would
bring him into Kamloops. He expected
the drive to reach the shipping yards soon
after dawn, so he was anxious to see that
cars were ready and also to look up a couple
of men to take charge of the shipment during
the two hundred and fifty mile trip to Van- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DEC. aa, 1906
couver. The dusty, saddle-wearied cattleman
had, moreover, sensuous visions of tub and
razor and a change, a good dinner and an
evening with friends at the club, of—well, of
many things not usually obtainable on a cattle
ranch sixty miles from the railway.
With the thought of these things in his
mind and the knowledge of the goodly addition to his bank account which the two hundred head of range-fed beef would bring, Renton felt somewhat elated, too much so to suit
bis old cattle horse, which struck a leisurely
gait as he left the corral and laid back his
ears as the long rowelled spurs struck his
ribs with an unwonted jab. The amiable lope
lengthened into the long, easy gallop of the
hill-bred cayuse, and for a mile or two Renton
swung on, loose-reined and heedless. Between
tufts of stunted sage-brush, lying ghostly gray
in the gathering dusk, past clumps of red-
stemmed firs looming black against the darkening eastern sky, through quakenasp dingles
whispering weird evesong in the mellow light
of the west, he sped. A covey of prairie
chicken, disturbed at a belated repast, flew
with a whir and a cluck from a bunch of
wild rose scrub, while a gray coyote slunk on
noiseless pads to the crest of the nearest hill,
from whence he yelped complaining defiance
to the clattering rider who had spoiled his
careful stalk. Unchecked the old horse galloped on, down into a little canon where the
noise of his pounding hoofs echoed sharply
from wall to wall, out agaiu to the open
range, snorting as he stampeded a band of
horses grazing near the canon mouth and
sharply shying as a great horned owl swept
ou silent wings within an arm's length of his
head.
The last mile of open ground was quickly
covered. Renton pulled up his cayuse at the
very edge of the valley, where he sat motionless drinking in the beauty of the scene. Behind him, to the south, daylight had faded
into dusk. The setting sun was long since
hidden by the hills, but the valley Hlow and
all the slopes on the northern side were still
bathed in mellow light. Just across the river
Mount St. Paul stood, illumined in liquid
amethyst against a sapphire sky. Garde Lafferty's rolling plateau lay flooded in soft
light, a study in chromes, and browns, and
reds, which no mortal palette could ever hope
to hold. The fringe of fir-clad hills stretching on either side of the north branch of the
river faded imperceptibly into the dark blue
distance, while away beyond towered mountains whose everlasting snows reflected for
the moment the warm tints of the western
sky. To the east towered grim battlements
of rock over which the trailing robes of night
had already swept; to the west, over the
placid waters of Kamloops Lake, the daylight
lingered still.
It was a wonderful picture which lay
spread before the eyes of the motionless
horseman. There was distance without the
benumbing influence of a prairie view, grandeur without the overpowering majesty of
the great mountain ranges. It was a panorama of mountains and valleys, of wooded
hills and wind-swept bunchgrass range, of
streams and lakes and mighty rivers such as
could be seen in no other part of the world,
and over it all brooded a mystery which
gathered Renton's very soul into its weird
embrace. It had only been one of a thousand
such sunsets, only one of the many colour
schemes whicli Nature paints for mortals.
Yet Renton saw it all with new eyes. The
iron brand of the country that night burned
deep into his heart and the bunchgrass hills
would forever claim him as their own.
Early next morning the band of cattle came
in to the shipping yards and before the sun
was half way to the meridian the work of
loading them was ended. Before noon, well
groomed, cool and fresh once more, Renton
was at the bank transferring to his own
account a draft upon the coast buyer who had
purchased the cattle. There was great satisfaction in this for him, for the reason that
it was his first financial return from his five
years' ranching experience in British Columbia.
A younger son, unfitted by nature for the
riches which are left for younger sons at
homo to fill, he had drifted out to Western
Canada and on the plains of Alberta first felt
the fascination of a stockman's life. The
country had not appealed to him, however,
and he wandered farther west. Over the
divide of the Rockies, through the awesome
defiles of the Selkirks, Fate guided him into
the dry-belt of British Columbia, and there
he heard the first enticing whisper of the
bunchgrass hills. He went no farther, but
fell at once beneath the spell. His modest
patrimony procured him the ranch in the
southern part of the ranges, where his home
now stood, and with the ranch a tidy bunch
of breeding stock, some horses and other
equipment. Renton's experience in the Northwest stood him in good stead and the life
suited him so he settled easily into his new
career. To-day he was reaping the reward
of success in disposing of bis first available
round-up of beef at a good price.
As he stopped at the customers' desk he
was surprised to see the manager beckon him
into his office, but thought nothing of it until
told that a cable had been received for him,
addressed in care of the bank, and which
would have been sent out by messenger had
he not come in that day.
When he came out of the little room a
minute or two later a gray pallor overshadowed the bronzed face, and his erstwhile
buoyant footsteps uncertainly sought the
outer door. Out in the street the crisp morning air brought him suddenly to, and he
looked again at the crumpled sheet of yellow
paper which he held in his hand. Straightening it out he read again: "Brother and both
boys drowned. Come at once if possible.
Hastings." Hastings, the name was familial*.
Yes, he knew it. Hastings had been his
father's business man for years, and it must
be .   He only fully grasped the import of
the fateful message now—it must be Bert and
the kiddies. It benumbed him—that message
scribbled in a hasty telegrapher's handwriting. The elder brother had been almost a
father to Renton. Two others there had been,
soldiers both, and he had heard of their
deaths with nothing more than natural brotherly regret. This was different—this brother
who had been like a father and the two
nephews who had always looked upon him as
an older brother. It was hard. Why should
he go, even if possible? There was nobody
there now to wait for him—nobody in the
world. Why should he come at once? So
deep his grief, so stunned was he that the
thought had never entered his mind of the
change that the message meant for him. At
last the full significance of the cablegram
burst upon him like a thunderclap, and his
spirit rebelled against the future which accident had forced upon him.
A fortnight later Renton slept in the home
of his fathers. Although thoroughly wearied
after his unbroken journey he rested little,
and when the first gray feather of dawn
streaked the east, before even the servants
were astir, he wandered out into the cool
liquid air of the morning. Through the park
and down to the beach his footsteps led by
once familiar paths, and there seated on a
giant boulder overlooking the gray expanse
of the Irish Sea he awaited the sun rise. In
the distance dim headlands loomed through
the morning mists. The light grew clearer,
a soft white light which touched with diaph-
onous shadows the pearl-lined sea, while far
out a narrow line of foam marked the limits
of the sand.
Here on the Lancashire coast he had spent
his boyhood days, and the sea in all its moods
was dear to him, but this morning its loneliness and resistlessness tortured him to the
quick. The gloom of the lately stricken home
seemed to overshadow the beauties of the
dawn. Still he stayed on his boulder seat—
stayed until the cloud on the horizon broke
into many clouds and rifts of blue, spread as
the gold light spread till all the east was
bright.
Renton Hall stood well up on a wooded
promontory jutting into the Irish Sea. Its
gray walls had for years withstood the stress
of time and tempest and none but a Renton
had it owned as master since its first course
was laid. Every gable and every wall of the
Hall, every path and tree in the grand old
park, every grey rock and every wooded dell
spoke to the returned wanderer with voices
from the past, and now that on him had fallen
the mantle of the master they spoke, too, in
whispers of the future, and of responsibilities
which would shackle his wandering feat. It
was a splendid heritage, but he was loathe
to assume the burden of its administration.
All day, and for days until the days lengthened into weeks, he wandered about the old
home and each day the spirit of rebellion
grew stronger. He was almost alone, for the
few friends of his youth were wanderers like
himself and were scattered all over the Empire. Most of them were members of "the
legion which never was listed" up and doing,
while he, as he told himself, was tied down
to his place as master of Renton and landlord
to a long list of tenants.
The weeks grew into months and Renton
became more irritable and morose. He tried
to escape from himself but found it impossible, and after vainly combatting his longing for the West and its free, full-blooded
existence, he gave it up.
When Hastings was sent for and told that
everything was to be put in his charge and
he was requested to find a good tenant for
the hall the old lawyer was thunderstruck.
He brought all his arguments to bear to dissuade Renton from leaving the home of his
father in the careless hands of strangers, but
the younger man was determined. That very
day everything was arranged and his face
was turned toward the West. The bunchgrass hills had called him.
Back sped Renton to the West—back across
the fertile prairie and the rolling plains—
back across the snow-capped divide and
through the grim defile as fast as steam could
take him. Early one December morning he
stepped from his train into the cool, crisp
air of a winter dawn in the dry belt. He
was free now from the shackles of undesired
responsibilities, free to return to the ranch,
to the life which seemed to him the only life,
to his work on the ranges. A few hours more
would see him on his way, and although the
road was long he revelled in the thought of
the glorious gallop he would have over the
hardened, dustless ground as soon as business
would allow him to be gone.
What he had to do was done with a lighter
heart than he had laboured with since that
day some months before when he had gone
into the bank with the proceeds of his first
cattle sale, but he could not hurry as he
would finish up before the evening fell. He
decided to make an tearly start the next
morning and ride straight through to the
ranch.
Long before the darkness gave the slightest hint of dissipation he was astir. A grumbling hostler had fed and saddled his horse
for him and he swung off up the hill, away
from the twinkling street lights, up from the
sleeping town. On the crest of the hill he
stopped, and, from the very spot where he,
months before, had watched the setting of a
summer sun, he saw the black of a star-
pierced winter sky receive the purple warning of the dawn, saw the purple fade to gray
and the dark line of the eastern hills grow
radiant in the roseate light which heralded
the sun. There he and his horse stood motionless, silhouetted against the vaporous
mists of dawn, until upon the horizon, where
cloud mingled with peak, there broke a ring
of red gold light. Not till then did he turn
and ride toward the south.
His horse soon straightened out with the
long smooth lope which covers ground without effort. The sharp shod hoofs rang in
rythm on the frosted ground, while the rider
settled into the easy, peaceful seat of the
range rider who knows that he has a long
road before him. The clumps of anumic sage
brush swept by in gray array, and the combre
firs loomed dark against the mists of dawn.
The quaken-asps, stripped of their shivering
leaves, waved spectral arms in the crisp breeze
blowing from the snow'topped hills. Ren-
ton's nostrils quivered as he breathed deep
draughts of the cool, crisp, frosty air with
its elusive perfume of sage and balsam and
bunch-grass. The horse had caught the spirit
of the morning and galloped untiringly along
the frozen road which wound like a gray ribbon over the brown range, dipping ever and
again into a gloomy draw, then coiling around
the foot of a sun-kissed hill, or sweeping the
edge of a jewel-like lake. Ranch houses nestled in sheltered groves here and there along
its course, but he stopped at none of them.
He only counted the miles that he had put
behind him and those which lay between him
and his own home. On through the morning
he rode by lake, through canyons, past ranches, until the noonday called a halt. A short
rest, a hasty meal, and he took up again the
tale of miles. Sundown found him pulling
up at the village, which then as now nestled
at the foot of Nicola Lake. His stay here
was as short as his noonday rest, but when he
rode out into the darkness again he was not
alone. Another horse galloped in company ]
with the one whieh had carried him so well,
that day, and another man swung in unison'
with the hoof beats.
Only a few miles farther wound the roadd
and the two horsemen swept through the:
darkness without drawing rein. The road i
was familiar to both and neither seemed in-j
dined for conversation, so the quick tattool
of the steel-shod feet continued unchecked.]
In an hour they pulled up at a gateway, and]
Renton dismounted to open it. Another moment and he was on his own ground, only aJ
mile from his own house, only a few minutea
from  His heart beat fast as he swungl
to the saddle again, but he gave no sign as hej
drew up beside his companion. In ten minf
utes they were at the house, and while Renton again dismounted, his companion kept!
to the saddle. Bright lights shone from thtT
windows, and as the returned cattleman!
reached the door it was flung open. A slen-l
der, graceful girl appeared for an instant!
framled in the yellow light, then flung herselfJ
into Renton's outstretched arms, whispering!
with tremulous lips, "You heard me, heard me]
dearest, heard my call." "Yes," answeredJ
Renton, "yes, your call and the call of thej
bunch-grass hills."
Out in the still winter night, under the star-
sprinkled sky, with "the voice that breathed]
o'er Eden," whispering through the firs about 1
them, the companion who had ridden with j
Renton over the last few miles of his daylong journey, righted what he believed to be |
a wrong.   He had vowed that he would never
pass the door of the ranch house until the'
work was done, and he kept his vow.   Ren-1
ton and the graceful, loving woman who had,
come to him as the bird seeks a mate, were
wedded before an altar as high as the everlasting hills, as old as the story which made
the first one sought.   Then and not till then, ]
did the party pass together into the house
which had thus been blessed.   With the sweet
shynesr of her new dignity strong upon her
the  newly-made wife  watched her husband
sign the register which had been taken from
the clergyman's saddlebags and wondered that
the signature should only be a firm "Renton."   She wondered still more as the clock-I
struck twelve, and the parson who had by |
then prepared for his ride home, stood with
stirrup cap in hand and drank:   "A happy
Christmas to you, my lord, and to you, madam."
Renton has long since returned to the home
of his father, and the bunch-grass hills know
him no more. He still wanders at times
down to his favorite boulder on the sands
and gazes out across the Irish Sea. Oft-times
he sees not the pearl-hued water and the
stretch of gray beach, but in its stead the
brown expanse of range.
The boom of the surf comes to his ears like
the moan of the free mountain winds surging
among the fir tops, above two white crosses, in '
a sheltered grove in the bunch-grass country.
Although another countess has borne him sons
who are old enough to feel the wanderlust,
which is as much their heritage as are the
gray walls of Renton Hall, at times across
the tossing sea he hears the call of the bunchgrass hills.
Tommy's
Christmas Teapot.
By Mary Langton.
(Written for The Week.)
This is an unconventional Christmas story
which will charm all the children, the grownup ones as well as the little ones. It tells of I
the adventures of a messenger boy, his love
for his mother, and how his misfortunes led
to the fulfilment of a happy dream. It is a
tender, pathetic story, artistically told.
The snow had been falling heavily all day,
and it now lay thick everywhere. The wind
was piercingly cold; occasionally great gusts
swept up the streets, forming big drifts on
either side, and making the traffic difficult.
Such a blustering, cold Chirstmas Eve had not
been known in New York for years. It was
now three o'clock in the afternoon, and many
of the stores were already brilliantly lighted,
people hurried to and fro anxious to obtain
shelter from the biting wind, and the incessant jingle of sleigh-bells filled the air. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DEK. aa, 1906
The Messenger Service Office on Fifteenth
Street was perhaps the busiest in the great city
at that time. The counters were heaped with
interesting looking parcels of all shapes and
sizes; they seemed like a large consignment
of pleasure done up in separate paper packages, to be distributed at random throughout
the city. The boys were all very tired, especially little. Tommy Kerwin, who had been on
the run since early morning, with only a few
minutes' rest, for luncheon. As he sat waiting for his next "call" his hand stole under
the bench and he carefully brought forth a
large brown paper parcel. Tenderly he undid
the wrappings, and his eyes sparkled as he
gazed at a big nickel-plated teapot. "Isn't
she a beauty?" he said to himself, opening
.and shutting the lid for the tenth time. "I
wonder what mother will say when she finds
it is for her, and a Christmas present from
me; it's worth saving all my spare nickels for,
and I am so glad now I didn't take the car
home nights when I was tired, 'cause if I did
I wouldn't have had enough money to buy it."
Tommy's eyes became very large and bright,
and his heart beat fast with expectation and
happiness. He had it all planned how he
should hide his present in the woodshed until
he was perfectly sure that his mother was
asleep, then he would steal out in the dark,
bring in the teapot and put it on the shelf
where the old one stood, and she would find
. it next morning, when she went to make the
tea. It would be a wonderfully happy Christmas for them both, for he had never given his
. mother sueh a beautiful present before.
Tommy was twelve years old, the only child
of Mrs. Kerwin, who had married very young,
not the man she loved, but the man whom her
guardian had chosen for her. Five years later
her husband died, leaving nothing for the
support of his widow and child. The following years had been a hard struggle, but Mrs.
Kerwin managed to earn enough for both by
her needle and occasional employment at one
of the large department stores in the city.
Now that Tommy was earning five dollars a
week, she was putting a little by, and soon
she hoped to let him go to the public school.
Tommy was very proud of his mother, she
was not like the other boys' mothers in their
street. In the first place, she always spoke
softly, and she never wore her boots unbuttoned, and her clothes were neatly fastened,
especially about the waist. This Tommy considered the most important item in all ladies'
attire. Everyone said she was beautiful, but
Tommy thought she was just like the angels
he sometimes saw in the Christmas picture
papers. He remembered once when he was
very ill how he had called to her in the night,
and when she came to his bedside he thought
she really was an angel, in her long white robe
aud golden hair, and he got the thought in his
head somehow, that God had sent her to take
him away. And he cried out, "Mother must
come too, dear angel." Then she took him
in her arms and said she was mother, and he
went to sleep playing with her hair.
"Here, number five!" Tommy roused him-
sefl from his reverie, and hastily tucked his
parcel under the bench.
"Take this box to Miss Hemsworth, No. 590
Park Place. It's a long way, Tommy, and
when you have delivered it, you'd better go
home, as your shift is over at six o'clock."
Tommy picked up the long thin box.
"Flowers," he thought. "Roses, perhaps.
Like to get mother some too. Well, I will
some day when I'm a man." He must take
the teapot with him on his errand, as he was
not going back to the office again that night;
aud off he started in the cold winter's dusk.
When he arrived at 590 Park Place it was
quite dark. The cook gave him hot coffee,
and asked him in to the warm kitchen. He
was very grateful for her kindness, for he
felt almost frozen. Six o'clock struck in the
hallway, Tommy was a very long way from
home, so he bade the cook a cheery good-bye
and determined to take a short cut through
the park.
The wind was now terribly cold, and the
suow drifts in places were as high as Tommy
himself. Still he kept bravely on, his eyes
on a distant light that sparkled at the other
side of tbe park, and his hands tightly clasping the teapot. There were many other lights
around the park, but that particular one was
at Tenth Street, four blocks from his home.
Once the wind blew the snow in his face, so
that it blinded him for a minute, and when
lie opened his eyes he could not see the light.
But he was sure it was there, right in front
of him, he would see it again in a minute.
How tired he was I if he could only rest;
but he might fall asleep, and his mother would
be anxiously awaiting him at home. It was
now over half an hour since he left Park
Place. The snow drifts seemed endless, he
was no sooner out of one than into another.
But he kept up his spirits thinking of his
warm bed and his mother cooking his supper.
He was not so cold now, the wind seemed
almost to burn his face, and there was a
strange numb sensation in his hands that
caused his burden to slip many times from
his grasp. He could not see the light, either
—in fact there were no lights at all in sight
now, but he tramped wearily onward.
Strange fancies seemed to seize him; did he
not hear someone singing, and surely there
were lots of bright lights all about him? No,
it was but the cold night wind singing through
the trees, and the lights, he saw only when
he shut his eyes tight to keep out the blinding
snow.
On he trudged, almost exhausted, but never
giving up hope. Again he heard the singing,
and he seemed to see white forms rising up
out of the snow. They must be Christmas
angels, he thought. He could not move, the
numb sensation had got into his feet, and his
legs utterly gave way. How he loved to watch
those angels; but their hair was white, not
gold like his mother's. After all, it was nice
out there in the snow, with those beautiful
white things blown about from one drift to
another.
**###*•*#
"It's a small lad, sir, one of them messenger boys. 'Ere's 'is 'at. Number five on the
outside and his name is Tommy Kerwin, 72
South Forty-second Street. What'11 wo do
with him, sir?"
"Bring him here, James, and I'll have a
look at him." James lifted the small form
of Tommy and placed him on the velvet cushions and fur robes of the coupe. "Poor little
chap," said Jack Dyke, "he must have lost
his way in the drifts. Luckily we took the
short cut through the park."
"Will you take him on to Miss Hems-
worth's, sir?"
"No, James, first to the nearest doctor, then
find out South Forty-second Street and take
him home.''
"But you'll be late for dinner, sir; it's
seven o'clock now."
"I'll send word that I am detained in
town," remarked the young man. "We must
look after the lad first."
Helen Hemsworth paced restlessly up and
down the library floor; 7:15, and no Jack.
She wondered why he did not come. His
note said he would be here at seven sharp.
Could the snow storm have detained him?
She had something particular to say to him
this evening. For she had made up her mind
to end their engagement. Helen did not love
Jack. In fact she was rather surprised that
she ever imagined she did. And sometimes,
too, she doubted whether he really cared for
her.
He must know, too, that she was very much
infatuated with the dashing Captain Barnes,
and he—well—he certainly seemed to have a
preference for her. Jack was much too sedate and retired, she thought. His wealth
was nothing, compared with the brilliant
social standing of Captain Barnes.
The telephone bell rang. Jack could not
possibly keep his angagement to-night. He
would explain to-morrow. Helen gave a sigh
of relief, and sat down to write a note to
Captain Barnes.
In a humble, cosy little kitchen in a three-
room house at the end of South Forty-second
Street Mrs. Kerwin was busily preparing
Tommy's supper. Her eyes often sought the
doorway, and her ears were ever listening for
his manly little footsteps. Everything must
be nice and hot, for Tommy would be cold,
hungry and tired. She smiled, as she sang
to herself, thinking of his bright little face,
and all that he would have to tell her about
his busy day. Seven o'clock struck, but she
did not worry; of course he would be late
to-night, so she busied herself with some sewing. A half hour went by, she stirred the
fire and listened eagerly, but only the night
wind wailing about the hourse greeted her
ears. Eight o'clock, then there was tlie sound
of sleigh bells gradually drawing nearer and
nearer. What was a sleigh doing in their
humble street? The bells ceased and the
sleigh stopped at the door. Her heart stood
still. What did it mean? Her instinct told
her that something must have happened to
Tomm)'. She heard a heavy tread outside,
mechanically she opened the door, and then
stood rigid with fright.
" 'E's all right, mum, 'e came to at the
doctor's. No, 'e ain't hurt, but he was well
nigh frozen when we found him in the snow.
The doctor fixed him up all right, and he'll
come round as soon as the effects of the 'ot
drink wears off."
Then James laid Tommy on his bed, and
proceeded to tell Mrs. Kerwin how he and
his master had found him on the side of the
Park road, almost buried in the drift.
Outside in his warm coupe Jack Dyke sat
waiting for James. He was thinking of Helen
Hemsworth, his fiancee. He was certain now
that she did not care for him, since Captain
Barnes had appeared on the scene, and he
was also sure that he could never be happy
with her. She was not his sort. He resolved,
therefore, to give her every opportunity of
ending the engagement, and he supposed that
he would now settle down to be a confirmed
old bachelor.
He wished James would come; it was getting cold and he had had no dinner. He
tucked the fur robe closer around him, and
in so doing his foot touched something. Jack
groped for the something in the dark and
found it to be Tommy's nickel-plated teapot,
with most of the wrapping paper off. They
had taken it from Tommy's almost frozen
arms at the doctor's office, thinking it was
a parcel to be delivered somewhere. But on
opening the lid a slip of paper fell out ou
which was written: "For dear mother, from
her son Tommy, Christmas 1906."
Jack sighed. He supposed he ought to take
the teapot in to Tommy's mother. He cautiously opened the door, and there in the
little room beyond the kitchen he saw a beautiful fair head bending over little Tommy.
Then as the head turned, the teapot slipped
from his fingers to the floor.
"Clarice!" he cried. Mrs. Kerwin rose
from her knees. "Jack!" she whispered in
amazement.   Tommy stirred.
"Mother," he called, and he put his arms
around her and whispered something in her
ear. Then the tears came and he cried and
sobbed as if his little heart would break.
"It's all right, Tommy dear. It was not
lost in the snow. Mother has your beautiful
teapot.   See how it shines in the light."
Christmas and
The Beachcomber
By G. S.
PEACE   ON EARTH.
By W. Blakemore.
It was tlie Orient sky,
Aflame with diadem,
Curtained in azure blue,
And bright with many a grin
That ushered in the dawn
Of that first Christmas day,
When peace and joy to men
Attuned th' angelic lay.
It was the Orient sky,
Curtained with sable pall,
That darkened o'er the earth
When lassed the Lord of all:
And hung its fiery torch
Above the lonely hill,
Where, "faithful unto death,"
The women waited still.
It was the Orient sky,
Transfused with golden ray,
That saw the glorious sight
Of that triumphant day,
When heaven's gates Hung wide
Their portals for the King,
And wondering mortals heard
The loud Hosannas ring.
And as the glittering band
That heralded His birth,
With songs of holy joy
Received  Him  back  from  earth;
A loving benediction
Fell from His lips again.
To cheer the stricken watchers
"My peace I leave with men."
It came with magic thrill
To many a weary breast,
It hushed the rising murmur,
It quieted  the unrest;
It cooled the burning fever,
That  rose  with  passion's  power:
It stilled the demon doubt
That racked the midnight hour.
And o'er the scattered ashes
Of many a wasted life;
It breathed a fairer promise,
It stirred a nobler strife;
It planted ln the valley
A kindly light for all
That like a beacon shineth,
Till shades of evening fall.
And as the Christmas greeting
That echoes through the world,
Resounds In every empire,
Where banner Is unfurled,
May this sweet note of music
Vibrate from shore to shore,
"The peace which tills with gladness
Be yours for evermore."
Stay, busy world, He passoth
Who spake the word of peace,
Hush every cry of anguish,
Bid every sorrow cease:
For still the Herald angels
Aro singing In the sky,
And every heart that slghoth
May hear their melody.
(Writteii for The Week.)
This story will attract attention. It is
bright, interesting and singularly appropriate
to the festive season. Its denouement is a
beautiful little conception which will delight
every reader. The story tells of the doings,
the arrest and the strange conversion of a
professional cracksman, and in interest and
dramatic movement is well up to the level of
Louis Becke's best Pacific stories.
The metallic click of handcuffs as they
snapped on his wrists changed Deshler's
hilarious laughter instanter to a gasp of surprise. Two Chinese aiding him to pillage the
pawnshop near the south gate of old Tientsin
dropped bolts of flowered silk and sprang
toward the door. Sounding like a young cannon, a .44 Colt sputtered fire and one man
pitched writhing into the narrow street; then
he lay huddled and still with blood trickling
on the frozen roadway from under his padded
blouse. The other sprang into the outstretched arms of a native policeman and the
two rolled heavily out from the threshold
while other Chinese police battered the struggling robber into unconsciousness.
"Merry Christmas, Desh! Better to be a
foreigner, ain't it?" said the deputy marshal,
as he pocketed the heavy calibre Smith &
Wesson dropped from the beachcomber's hand
when the handcuffs snapped.
"Was told to arrest you, not kill you—
they didn't matter." The marshal swung his
arm to indicate the prostrate Chinese. "The
Taotai'll have the carrion carted away, and
the other: well, guess it's a touch of opium
to make him feel good and off goes his block
with one sweep of the sword."
The beachcomber gritted liis teeth and
stared at tlie loot spread on the matted floor.
"Few minutes more and you'd have been
all to the good, wouldn't you?" said the
marshal.
Hart Deshler sat silently on the corner of
a profusely carved ebony table where he had
perched himself to watch the frightened
pawnbroker crouched behind a chair rubbing
his tapering fingers together nervously as he
"chin-chinned joss" with fright, and the
fear-palsied assistants who cowered in corners with chattering teeth while old Vah-da-
loo and his nephew Chau-tsun had dragged
their plunder to the centre of the matted
floor and made ready to bundle up the pawnbroker's goods: jade, jewels, shoes and sycee
of native silver, bolts of richly-embroidered
silk, mandarin coats embroidered so that they
seemed fields of cloth of gold, coins with
dragons stamped on their face, with single
eagles nnd double eagles—all heaped in heterogeneous bundles. The smoke of revolvers
clouded the place and pungent joss-sticks the
pawnbroker stacked in clay-filled pots before
a half-hidden joss in a niche at one side of
the room stirred him to a fit of coughing.
A few minutes before. Deshler had been
drumming on the inky-lacquered table with
a samshu bottle and singing an old sailor's
chantey. It called to his mind other adventures on thc fringe of Asia witli his partner
in crime, Montana Brown, one-time of the
Ninth Infantry—Montana had gone for a
bullock-cart to carry off thc loot. He remembered how they had deserted together, how
the rains hnd sogged their pith helmets into
misshapen leaden tilings ns they bumped over
rutted roads on a lurching bullock-cart to
Soochow; how they had been camp-followers
of that wondcfrul army of nations on the
march to Peking. Those weird, wild days
when they looted the porcelain-tiled temples
and the yamens of the fugitive rich, when
silver bars were carted away with wheelbarrows because carls were scarce, and those
feverish days when lie and Montana journeyed into Mongolia on camel-back to sell a
flawed diamond to a Tartar prince—of these
and many things, he thought; but most of
all, as the memory-pictures faded, he dreamed
of a fireside witli little dangling stockings
and a glistening Christ inns tree with dolls and
Noah's arks, and candles and glass baubles.
Sure, he would quit it all. This would be the
home-stake hc had longed for. he would go
home and  why shouldn't he and she dress THE WEEK, SATURDAY DEC. 28, 1906.
Christmas trees again, and	
The handcuffs snapped with a sharp click
and he looked over his shoulder with a start
to see the deputy marshal grinning at him.
His revolver slid from his hand to the floor.
What happened in the next few minutes he
was too much stunned to understand, and a
filmy mist hid things from his eyes.
"Where's Montana?" asked the marshal,
when the smoke cleared.
"Running a game at Harbin; we've had a
row," said Deshler, promptly. "Look here,
marshal; can't we fix this? Say I escaped;
guess Uncle Sam don't pay you too much,
anyhow. And there's a big cache at Peit-
sang since Boxer times. I'll let you in if
you say the word."
The marshal looked at the beachcomber
from the corner of his eye. "Say," he said.
I'll—no, it's the Consular court for yours,
and after the Merry Christmas business is
over, you'll get yours; five years, maybe, and
deportation afterward."
"Merry Christmas," said the beachcomber,
laughingly. "Well, it might have been if
you—oh, well.   Come on, let's get a 'ricksha.
" 'Ricksha nothing; government's good for
a Victoria for us—we'll ride like missionaries
over the Pei-ho."
Deshler tried hard to remember where he
had seen the marshal before. Was it Cape
Nome? His thoughts harked back to the garish lights of the daylight nights when he dealt
faro at the Savoy adjoining the noisy dance-
hall and men bet fortunes torn from ruby-
sanded beaches on the turn of a card. Peking? There were many he had known in the
days of the big loot; when the sack of the
ancient capita lwas on and every Chinese was
considered lawful prey. Was it;—? Memory flashed back and pictured turmoil. He
remembered all—this was Slim Calthrop, of
course.
"Now, look here, Slim—" ventured the
beachcomber.
"Slim—hell; who in thunder told you
about Slim. He's dead; died after that gunplay on the Pasig. Come on, you. We'll
leave the Chink for the native police; you're
the only one I've got a warrant for; you've
been raising too much hell in the native city
—and look here, if you mention Slim again
I'll let daylight through you and say you
tried to escape. By the jumping snakes, I've
a good mind to kill you now."
Deshler swung his long legs free and slid
from the table. He lopkcd, Hie marshal full
in the eye and said without fear: "Forget
it."
The pawnbroker hurried up behind them as
the marshal moved off with his prisoner. He
plucked at the marshal's sleeve, and as he
turned in response handed him a piece of jade
taken from the heap on the floor and a few
gold coins.
"Do to buy dollies for the kids," said the
marshal, half apologetically.
"Married?" asked Deshler, laconically.
"Yes," answered the marshal; "wife and
three kids near German concession, back of
Victoria road—she's dressing a Christmas
tree for the kids and praying you won't puncture me; they've got their stockings hanging.
Come on, I'm eager to get you in thc consulate jug and get home to fill 'em."
"There's enough hidden up to Peitsang to
fill your socks, too. Suppose you square this;
who knows? You say I ducked with the darbies on, tear your tunic and scratch your face
a little; and in a month or two I blows back
with a bunch of the ready—more than you
could earn in ten years. Well, you don't lose,
do you? Ain't these Chinks fair game, anyhow?"
Then, with nn inspiration, Deshler continued: "And who's going to fill my kids'
socks, eh ? Fine Christmas for the old woman
and them, ain't it?"
With sudden remembrance Deshler's memory told him this was "Sentimental Slim."
Of course; strange he hadn't recalled it before. This was Slim, whose sentimentality
induced him to pay back the bank's winnings
at the Savoy; who had been dismissed from
the Constabulary for letting Furniss go after
he stole a banca and looted a river station
because the young fellow told him of a mother ill at home.
"I didn't know you'd—" The marshal
spoke almost tenderly.
"No, of course, you didn't," interrupted
Deshler; " '(wasn't in the society papers."
Craftily, the beachcomber stirred the only
emotion the marshal was capable of. His
sentimentality was his stronger feeling. An
appeal to his cupidity often availed; an appeal to his emotions seldom failed. He wept
wth women when the Amateur Dramatic society put on "East Lynne," and the thought
of Christmas and all its appeal to sentiment
was as infectious to him as strong drink; he
was, in fact, drunk with the spirit of the
time.
"Well, what's to prevent you from going
home and filling the socks, eh?" asked the
marshal, after a pause.
"You mean it, Slim—I mean, marshal,"
asked the beachcomber, eagerly.
"Sure, 'tain't me to see the kids robbed
of Christmas."
"Hell, no—guess it's better to cut it out,
unless—say, will you hide the darbies while
we're in the house, and cut out all talk about
ths thing?" asked the beachcomber pleading-
ly*
"Sure, Ave'11 be a couple of Kris Kringles
for the minute; then we'll move on to the
consulate.''
"I'll go yon, Slim—I mean, marshal."
The Victoria was driven rapidly under the
vault of the old city gate, now crumbling
with senile decay. Clothes-dealers shouted
from the chilly store-fronts of the narrow
street, lifting garments they sought to sell
from pile to pile, one by one, as they extolled them with sing-song chant. A chilling
wind blew from the frozen Pei-ho and teeming street people hurried by swathed with fur-
lined clothing padded profusely; wheelbarrows ereked as muffled coolies trundled their
freights, and none of the wayfarers of the
busy city, other than the beggars that were
vermin-fested bundles of rags and dirt, paid
attention to the victoria with its noisy driver
continually shouting to warn those who
thronged the way. Hawkers with sibilant
shouting called priases of their wares and
beat gongs and drums; bullock-carts blocked
under fret-worked arches, camel caravans
swung aside, until the close-built porcelain-
tiled compound walls fronting moss-grown
yamens suggesting the mildew of centuries,
gave place to a wide driveway beside the
frozen river, where big Sikh police stood sentinel to keep the crossings clear. Beyond
loomed many-storied buildings of vast commercial houses of the foreign city with its
many peoples clustered side by side in their
various concessions.
"Did you ever long for anything, and have
that longing get a grip on you?" asked the
beachcomber, after a long pause, while he
sat contemplating the passing scene from the
open carriage.
"Yep, I've wanted money—and never got
it," answered the marshal, with a grin.
"No, not that," retorted Deshler, acridly.
"Did you ever feel the Christmas spirit grasp
you, and long to fondle some kiddies of your
own, to steal in with stocking feet like a
thief in the night to load the stockings with
dolls and the like, to wait batedly while they
toddled to you, hugging their armloads of
toys and beaming with satisfaction as they
told you in baby lisps that Santa Claus had
brought them 'thum nice fings;' and you felt
a gladness fill you that no human calipers
may measure. And—say, you're going too
far."
"But—" gasped the marshal.
The beachcomber interrupted him quickly.
"Oh, it'll be all right, Slim, if you're making
good for tonight."
The victoria stoped at a narrow tilted gate
in the ruck of outer Tientsin and Deshler led
the way across a rutted compound, hard-
frozen. Adown some close-walled lanes they
found an open door where a big-framed German woman stood in the doorway.
"Why, Deshler," she said, with surprise,
"what brings—?"
"Oh, that's all right; me and him's come
to play Santy for the kids. Ain't we, Slim?"
interpolated the beachcomber quickly.
A moment later saw each squatted beside
the k'ang of the native house with its chilling
rieepaper windows and dangling short-froeked
children on their knees. The marshal was
singing:
"Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
A merry old soul was he;
Hc called for his pipe and he called for his
bowl—
It was better stuff than tea."
The big woman busied herself at the table,
scrubibng the top with energy.   Deshler had
dragged a little brass joss from an inner
pocket and was holding it before the little
one's eyes. "Pap's got a Christmas present
for Gretchen and    .    .    .
The woman swung her head and flashed a
quick glance of inquiry. Deshler winked, almost perceptibly.
There was a tear glistening on the marshal's cheek. "I'm sorry about this thing,"
he said, as he fondled the child on his knee.
"Oh, slush; get busy and fill the stockings,
and we'l get along. And say, there's to be
no monkey business." Half in a whisper,
he added: "I'll get you with my gun if
there it."
"Oh, cut it out; get in the Christmas spirit," muttered the beachcomber. "How about
that peace on earth, good will toward men
pidgin?"
Deshler was busy at the end of the k'ang
when he called the child seated on the marshal's knee, who slid down and ran to him.
The marshal watched her tenderly; and, before he realized what had happened, he was
on. his back with his hands caught tight behind him. His revolver was hurriedly snatched from the holster, and his own handcuffs
snapped on his wrists eaught behind him.
Cursing energetically, he turned to see
Montana Brown. At the doorway Deshler
was tsanding, hat in hand, bowed deeply.
"Au re voir, Slim. Merry Christmas," he
said, and was gone.
"Merry Christmas, Calthrop," said Montana. . . . "Come to see the kiddies
Christmas. Why, you're as welcome as the
flowers in May."
"Merry hell. ... so these are your
kids, eh?"
"Who's did you think they were—Deshler's? he asked, and there was a gleam of
satisfaction in his eyes.
"Well, there's no hard feeling, is there,
marshal? Have a drink . . . stop a
minute . . . I'll loose your hands . . .
do, it's Christmas Eve."
With his eyes at a tiny hole in the rice
paper and his ears strained, the beachcomber
saw and heard things, and he felt satisfied
with himself. It was lucky he had thought
of Montana's wife and kids; where else in
all the fringe of Asia would he have found
a wife and kids ready to hand. Yes; possibly
at Nagasaki.
"This is a lady day for me, Montana,"
the marshal was saying. "If I don't take
him back I'm fired. Consul told me I was
too all gred sentimental to be a marshal, anyhow. Remember that young fellow embezzled
money at Pootung; well, I let him make a
get-away because of his sick mother. Somehow the Consul found out. I've forgotten
the old days, Montana, and I'm no good for
anything else. It'll be tough for me and the
kids, at that. It'll not be much of a merry
Christmas for them."
A minute or two later the door opened
again, letting in a chilly blast. Deshler stepped in. He had thought hard for the minute
or two and had decided.
The Light in
The Window
By Agnes Cumberland.
"You blamed
-" started Montana.
The beachcomber paid no attention. He
went over to the marshal and laid his hands
on his shoulders. "Say, Slim, I'm going
back ... on condition. You let me in
on the kid's Christmas. Let me spend Christmas as a white man. Let me sit before your
fire, at your table . . . and say let me
help you and the missus fill the kiddies' socks.
Won't you, Slim. Say you will—and I don't
care if I go up for life."
Montana Brown looked at the beachcomber
with a sneer and spat with disgust. "You're
daffy," he said, scornfully.
"Come on, Slim," said Deshler. "Merry
Christmas and a happy"—the other words
were lost as Montana loosed the marshal, and
he walked away with his prisoner. That night
Hart Deshler was another man and was in
elysium for a night and a day. Then he went
into the outhouse which is the gaol for American citizens at Tientsin—and whistled as
the door was locked.
A few days later a little girl toddled across
the yard with a massive key and with difficulty opened the gaol door at dusk. As he
pushed open the door Deshler picked her up
and kissed her on both cheeks—then he clambered over the compound wall and was lost
among the teeming millions of North China.
(Written for The Week.) j
Agnes Cumberland is a new writer whose
first work appears in this issue of The Week.
"The Light in the Window" is a story reminiscent of the spirit which Dickens did so
much to diffuse. The nervous, restrained style,
the pure sentiment, the novel incident, the .
sound teaching and the dramatic ending will -
strongly appeal to all who can appreciate a
tender, simple Christmas idyll, the most diffi-'
cult piece of literary work to conceive and ;
to produce.
It was midnight, Christmas Eve. The small
hours of Christmas Day would soon be breaking. The snow lay deep on garden, lawns, and
fields. Inside the great house all bespoke
comfort and Christmas cheer. In the large
drawing room there was a huge Christmas
tree sheltering a profuse array of toys, and
alone stood an uninvited guest. He was
poorly clad, unshaven, and his hair seemed a
stranger to the comb. In one hand he held
a dark-lantern and over his shoulder was a
common jute bag, the window was still open,
showing that he had made his entrance that
way. He stealthily crossed the room, and
lighting a match in the flame of his lantern,
turned on the gas and lit it, so he might the
better get the character of his surroundings.
"This is luck," said he. "Gold sleeve buttons, books, engines, and purses with banknotes in them. It's a great help to our profession nowadays, parents giving their children such expensive gifts as these."
His eyes wandered further over the scene,
before him lay a gold watch.
"Quite a fine lay-out."
There was a rustling sound behind him.
By force of habit he slid the cover of the
dark-lantern, but it was unavailing: the room
was still lighted by the gas.
"Hello!" said a child's gentle voice behind
him.
He turned, and there stood a little girl in
her night gown.
"Is that you, Mr. Santa Claus?" she added,
peering curiously at the visitor.
The man laughed. "Well, not exactly, little
one, I'm only his clerk."
"His what?" said the child.
"Don't talk so loud—you'll waken everybody, and if you do I'll vanish like the snow
flakes, my child. You see, Santa Claus had
so many places to go to on this street, that
he thought he would not get here until next
year, so he asked me to help him. I had
just laid these things here for you when you
surprised me."
The little maid came nearer. "Oh, what
beautiful presents you have brought, a horse,
and dolls, an engine, a ball, and a gold watch,
too—just what I wanted."
The man drew back with a strange look in
his eyes, and sat down on a chair.
"Are you very tired?" asked the child.
"Yes," said the man.
"I'm so sorry," said the little one affectionately, as she took the stranger's hand in
hers and kissed it.
"Don't, child, don't do that. It's unclean,
it's dirty."
"Well, how could it be clean," laughed the
child, "you have cilmbed down so many sooty
chimneys, though there is no soot on the
toys.''
"Oh, I take care to come through the window sometimes to prevent that, it is easier
and cleaner, too."
"You have finished now, your bag is
empty," said the little one. "Isn't there
anyone else you could take a toy to?"
"There are two," said the man, hastily
wiping a tear from his face with his grimy
hand, and it's my fault I've nothing for
them."
"Here, take some of mine, take this, and
this," said the child.
"No, no," said the man.
"Please do take only this," and the little
girl reached out her tiny hands with treasures from the pile.
The visitor slowly reached out his hand and
took one toy.
"Now, little one, I must be off, before anyone wakes."
i THE WEEK, SATURDAY DEC. 22, 1906.
-
He moved towards the open window, the
child ran after him.
"Please, won't you take a kiss for Santa
for me?"
"That I will," said the man. He bent over
the child, kissed her forehead, fled through the
window, and disappeared in the storm and
darkness outside.
It was Christmas Eve, and the old couple
were sitting in front of the cheerful open fireplace in the kitchen of the farmhouse. The
snow was falling in large, soft flakes, and the
wind was bitterly cold.
"To-morrow will be Christmas," said the
old man slowly. "You have uot forgotten it,
have you mother?"
"No, father," she said. "How could I?
Have I not said all along that if he ever came
home again it would be on Christmas Eve?"
"So you have. Let us hope—let us hope.
It is six long years now since our only boy
left us. Yes, he will come home on Christmas
Eve."
"I know it, father," said the woman. "I
have read so often of such things happening
before. We will wait for him here in front
of the fire, and the door must not be locked,
" and we must place the lamp in the window.
J;. Our boy must see the lamp burning in the
window when he returns." Her hands trembled, but she filled the lamp and placed it in
the window. She sank again into her chair,
and rested the tips of her fingers on the arm
of the empty chair beside her, while her husband's hand lay heavily on the other arm.
For a long time neither spoke, but gazed
into the fire and listened to the storm without,
the tears glistening in their eyes.
"He must come, he must come to-night,"
murmured the mother, and they kept their
lonely vigil by the fireside waiting for the
long absent son who might never return.
Down the road to the farmhouse where a
bright light seemed to beckon came a man
tired, hungry and almost overcome with fatigue. The snow was deep, the path was hidden, it was many years since he had trod the
old road which led to his boyhood's home.
But to-night of all nights he would be tliere
with the dear old folks who must be waiting
for him. He longed to hear his mother's
voice once more, to hear her say that she had
forgiven him, and he resolved that the New
Year would see him earning his daily bread
as an honest man, the fine son of the father
and mother who years before had lavished so
much love and care upon him.
At last he reached the old familiar garden
gate, it was but a few steps to the door. He
rapped, opened the door slowly and stood
upon the threshold; the mother and father
were still by the fire which was burning
brightly.
"Mother," "Father," he faltered, "I've
come home."
There was no reply.
"Mother! Won't you speak to me; your
wayward son has returned, won't you take a
kiss—a Santa Claus kiss from me, 'tis the
only thing that was ever given to me."
Still neither spoke. The light had dawned
for them in another window when the bells
had chimed the glad tidings at midnight,
"Unto us a son is born."
The man turned and went out into the
storm once mora.
On Christmas morning the sun rose bright
and warm on the deep snow. The church
bells were cheerily ringing out their message of
"peace and good will to man," the villagers
on their way to church stumbled against a
hard white mound; beneath it lay a man
rough and unkempt, in his hands tightly
clutched was a child's toy, over his shoulder
an empty bag and a dark-lantern.
The Vacant Chair.
By L. McLeod Gould.
THE EMPTY LIFE.
By Theodosla Garrison.
I have closed all my life and shut the door
As men may close that house wherein one
died
Who one day loved them  there,  that nevermore
May lesser lover ln its hold abide.
Why should my door stand open to the sun,
Seeing  the  guest  supreme  hath  gone  his
way?
What welcome have I for another one—
What lamp to mock the glory of the day?
Naught would that other tenant find but this—
Rust on the hearth and dust upon the floor,
And  that  poor ghost  that  once was  living
bliss—
I have closed all my life and shut the door.
(Written for The Week.)
Mr. Gould is well known to the readers of
The Week as one of our most regular contributors in another department, but that he
can write a good story will be conceded by
all who read "The Vacant Chair." It is
thoroughly seasonable, has an attractive plot
and a touch of that mystery which is inseparable from the traditional atmosphere of
Yuletide.
It was an ideal Chirstmas Eve; a hard
black frost, crisp snow and bright stars, all
combined to make the heart of such a man
as George Allardyce happy as he swung into
The Strand on his way to the Savoy for the
Club's annual dinner. And yet his usually
cheery countenance looked worried,' and he
glanced to right and left as though seeking to
find among the many faces which passed and
re-passed him some one which he wished to
see. And this was the truth, for it was his
turn once more to fill the Vacant Chair, and
so far he had not come across the man for
his purpose. The Club was a strange one,
and had been of Allardyce's own formation.
Many years ago when away in Western Canada he had been seeking the fortune with
which he had later returned home, he had
arrived in Victoria one Christmas Eve, after
a particularly successful trip up-country, and
seeing the happy throngh hurrying to and fro,
had felt a curiously lonely feeling, and a
deep regret that he amongst so many had no
one to rejoice over his safe return from the
dangers which he had encountered. The
thought of Christmas cheer had warmed his
heart, and he had been on his way to order
a regular Christmas dinner at the Poodle
Dog, when his attention had been attracted
to the gaunt form of a man, who was coughing and shivering in a too thin overcoat, with
the pinch of hunger on his face, and the look
of desperation in his eyes which only comes
to a man when he has reached the limit of
his endurance. Something had tempted the
prosperous man to accost his less fortunate
neighbour, and the story of ill-luck which he
heard had prompted the invitation to join
in the Christmas fare, an invitation which
had resulted in a friendship still unbroken
after twelve years. Tony Burke was one of
many who, with all the advantages of good
education, had through no fault of his own
fallen on evil times. An illness had robbed
him of his small capital, and he had lacked
the opportunity to make a fresh start, and
the energy to make his own opportunity. This
Allardyce discovered during the meal, and
liking the man he had offered to take him with
him on his next expedition, veiling his charity
under the pretence that he needed company.
This was the beginning of their fortunes.
There is no need to tell of their doings; it is
sufficient to say that Burke had developed
marvellous qualities and that in the following
year they both had returned to Victoria in
time for Christmas. On their way to dine at
the same restaurant George, reminding his
companion of their last Christmas Eve meal,
had suggested that they two should take another with them, he to be chosen by Tony, the
only condition being that he should be in
want, and should show evidence of hard luck,
and not of vice and extravagance. That was
how Hillary had become a member. And so
on. Every year, so long as the members of
the Club were in the same part of the world
they had met on Chirstmas Eve for dinner,
the last member being responsible for filling
what was called "the vacant chair." Luck
had attended them. It seemed as though the
charitable instinct which was at the root of
the Club had been repaid in material kind.
All had prospered, and this year all were in
London, and George Allardyce, the president
and founder, had undertaken to arrange the
dinner and to fill the vacant chair. It was
now half-past eight, and the dinner was fixed
for nine o'clock, and as yet he had not seen
one face which had appealed to him as bearing the marks of hunger without thc accompanying signs of indulgence. Many wretches
he had seen whose drink-besotted faces proclaimed the cause of their destitution; many
there had been who had supplicated alms with
vice written plain in every feature, but the
Club was not for such as these. With a grunt
of disgust Allardyce buttoned his fur-lined
overcoat more closely round him, as he realised that within a few minutes he must appear
before his friends without the promised guest.
The table was set for thirteen, and were only
twelve to partake of its luxuries? In his
impatience he roughly elbowed an individual
out of his path, but his conscience smote him,
when he heard a groan, and saw the victim
of his action fall heavily into the gutter.
Stopping in his career, he turned and raised
the man to his feet, with a muttered apology,
and then fell back with a start. Could it be
that even at the eleventh hour he had stumbled across the very one for whom he had
been looking? By the electric light he could
see looking into his, a face from which every
vestige of colour had fled, eyes deep-sunken
which glowed with the glare of want, but yet
had in them nothing of the rapacity whieh
had characterised so many into whieh he had
gazed that day. It was a man of about thirty
at whom the prosperous miner was looking,
and even as he looked a ghastly spasm of
coughing shook the feeble frame, which
seemed almost ethereal in its slightness. "Are
you hungry?" queried Allardyce. The other
nodded eagerly, he was too exhausted to
speak. Without another word Allardyce took
his arm in his and hurried him away towards
the Savoy. There was no need of questioning; he was sure from his brief scrutiny that
here was a worthy member for the Club.
Silently they walked along; as silently they
entered the hospitable portals of the famous
restaurant and mounted the stairs to the
room engaged for the Club dinner. Not a
word was spoken till the waiter had divested
the pair of their coats and hats. Then Allardyce, turning to the other members who had
all arrived and were waiting in front of the
roaring fire, with the customary introduction,
"Gentlemen, the Vacant Chair," motioned
them to the table. The stranger sat, as was
the custom, on the president's right, on his
left was last year's member, Hugh Jackson,
who had been brought in from the streets
of New York in. a similar plight. Facing
Allardyce was Tony Burke, while on either
side of the table were men who during the
twelve years had been picked up in the direst
ditsress and were now, owing to the magic
touch of the influence of the Club, rejoicing
in affluence and reputation. The stranger
spoke but little, nor was he pressed. It was
one of the hospitable rules of the Club never
to thrust impertinent questions on their waifs
and strays. "Fill the belly first, for it is ill
talking on an empty stomach," was their
motto. So the talk went on; each had some
experience to recount, some story to tell, and
all the time the stranger's eyes were here,
there and everywhere, drinking in as it were
the varied characteristics of the men with
whom he had thus fortuitously been thrown
in contact. His manners were those of a
perfect gentleman, whieh sat somewhat oddly
on one whose clothes, if clothes they could
be called, seemed to hang together by a miracle. But this excited no comment, it was the
rule, and not the exception that The Vacant
Chair should be a gentleman. When the dessert was on the table, and the wines had been
placed in front of the president he charged
his glass, and circulated the decanters before
rising to propose the toast of the evening,
which always took the form of the same
words: "Gentlemen, success to the Club, and
may it long be spared to help one soul every
year to make a new start." This was drunk
in silence. Then eame the next feature of
the meeting, the signing of the register. This
was kept in a massive book, bound with a
silver padlock, thc key of which was kept by
the president, and in it the members, beginning with him, and down to the last corner
signed their names, below which they were
in the habit of making any comment they
desired, either on their past year of life, or
on the constitution of the Club. As each
man signed he passed through heavy curtains
into a smoking room beyond, where the rest
of the evening would be passed in reminiscences and other conversation. This afforded
also a delicate attention to Thc Vacant Chair,
whose name was not thus disclosed, if such
were his will, until the following year, though
never yet had this been the case. After Allardyce had explained the custom to his right
hand neighbour he rose to ent rhis name, following him came Tony Burke, and so on in
order till the stranger was left alone. With
a curious light in his eyes he, too, rose, and
walking to the book he wrote.
"The new chum seems to have a precious
long name," said Bobby Jellicot when ten
minutes had elapsed, and there was no sign
of the stranger's appearance. "Give him
time," answered Allardyce, "perhaps he is
writing of what he has been, as has been the
case before." This was an allusion to Hepburn, who on his first appearance, four years
before, had filled a page with his story. When
half an hour had passed, however, Allardyce
thought it well to see what had happened to
keep their guest so long. He drew back the
curtains, and gave an exclamation of disgust.
"Bah. I was deceived, after all," he said;
"the beggar*s gone." "Better count the
spoons," joined in Burke. It was true the
room was empty. Investigation down stairs
proved fruitless, as no one had been seen to
pass the hall porter during the time named.
Disconsolate they returned to the banqueting
room, to And that nothing had disappeared
except the man himself, and thinking that he
was merely unwilling to give his story to
the rest, they were proceeding to the smoking
room again, somewhat mortified at the treatment that had been meted out to them, when
Hugh glanced at the register. "Come here,
boys." he said, and his voice had an odd
shake in it, very unlike his usual hale and
hearty bellow. "Come and look at this."
They came, Allardyce first, and as he read,
he turned away white and shaking. They
all followed, and each as he read turned pale,
for there in blazing characters were the words:
"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least
of these, ye have done it unto Me."
And even us they gazed in awe-struck silence
the words melted from their sight. Without
a word Allardyce closed the book, locked it,
and threw the key into the fire. That was
the last meeting of the Club under the old
conditions, lt was not fitting that the Vacant
Chair should be used by another, but every
Christmas Eve the Club meet, aye, and will
meet as usual, but the Vacant Chair will not
be filled by mortal man. "What puzzles me,"
said Allardyce. "is why we should have been
chosen, because we are none of us what you
would call religious, io entertain the angel
unawares.''
THAT NIOHT.
By Madison Caweln.
That night I sat listening, as in a swoon,
With half-closed eyes,
To far-off bells, low-lulling as a tun*
That drifts and dies
Beneath  the ilowery lingers of the June
Harping to Summer skies.
And then 1 dreamed the world 1 knew was
gone,
And someone brought—
Leading me far o'er sainted hill and lawn,
In heavenly thought—
My soul where well the sources of the dawn
With dew and lire fraught.
Above me tho majestic dome of night,
With star on star,
Sparkled;   in   which  one  star  shone  blinding
bright;
Radiant as spar
That walls the hulls of morning, pearly white
Around her golden ear,
About me temples, vast in desert seas,
Columned a land
Of ruins—bones of old monstrosities
God's awful hand
Had smitten; homes of dead idolatries,
O'erwhelmed with dust and sand.
Their bestial gods, caked thick with gems and
gold—
Their blasphemies
Of beauty, rent; 'mid shattered altars rolled;
Their agonies
And rites abolished; and their priests of old
Dust on tiie desert breeze.
Then Syrian valleys, purple with veiling mist,
.Museum ed  1  t lulled,
Where   the   frail   floweret,   by   tlio   dewdrop
kissed,
Soft-blusing, quailed;
And drowned In dlngled deeps of amethyst
The moon-mad bulbul walled.
On glimmering wolds  1  seemed  to  hear  the
bleat
Of folded Hocks;
Then shepherds passed mc, bare of heud and
feet;
And  then an ox
Lowed; und above me swept the solemn beat
Of angel wings and locks.
A manger then 1 seemed to see where bent
In adoration,
Above a Bubo, men of the Orient,
Where, low of station,
His mother lay, wnllo round them swam sweet
scent
And sounds of jubilation.
And then I woke.   The rose-white moon above
Bloomed on my sight—
And In her train the sturs of Winter drove,
Light upon light;
While Yuletide bells  rocked,  pealing,  "Peace
and love;"
Down all the aisles of night. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DEC. 22, 1906.
The Tenderfoot.
By J. G. Potter and H. W. Power.
(Written for The Week.)
The Tenderfoot is an amusing and characteristic story of pioneer times in the Slocan
mining district, wherein is shown the manner
in which a tenderfoot belied his popular designation, and badly euchred three old-timers.
The promotion of the Kootenay Prospecting
and Developing Syndicate is an incident which
even at this distance of time will be found
distinctly humorous. The joint authors are
well known Kootenay journalists.
When the high water of boom prosperity
receded from the Slocan in 1897, it left not
a few in the undisputed possession of divers
wildcat mines and no funds, while on the other hand, parties who had entered the country
in a state of suspended financial animation,
found themselves in command of bank accounts and a correspondingly increased
amount of their fellowmen's respect. To the
latter class belonged one Black Jack Pete,
alias Peter McPherson Henry. He was popularly known by the former cognomen on account of a weakness which he had for playing
a certain well known game of chance. Onee
in a while he received a letter at the post-
office, but these were always addressed to
Peter McPherson Henry.
The gentleman in question was among the
various castes of society that had drifted into
Kaslo at the time when a silver-lead mine
with $10,000 worth of ore in sight could be
sold for about $100,000. He came from the
Couer d'Alenes, having been driven out by
hard times there. His enemies maintained
that he was a flsheater, although he strenuously denied the allegation, and upon one
occasion punched the nasal appendage of an
"alligator" from County Bruce, who had
been rash enough to make such an assertion
openly.
About this time Peter McPherson Henry,
or, as we shall hereafter call him, Black Jack
Pete, sold a half interest in a claim with a
much faulted vein on it for $2,000 cash, which
amount he decided to "blow in" by taking
a trip East. As if to lend color to the frequently repeated theory of his fish-eating nationality, he went straight to Nova Scotia,
returning therefrom at the end of about six
months with a nineteen-year-old nephew in
tow, a sadly depleted wallet, and an unquenchable thirst for a further taste of the
joys of wealth.
The young man whom he had brought out
from Nova Scotia bore the illustrious name
of Henry also—John Henry, to be exact—
but his uncle had already given him a West-
tern appellation in the shape of "tender-
footed calfie." The boys soon shortened this
down to "calfie," and the poor fellow soon
became the butt of many rude jests. Not being acquainted with the ways of the West,
he naturally resented such treatment, which
action on his part only served to make him
a more shining mark for the coarse wit of
his uncle's associates. "It'll make a man
uv 'im," said Black Jack, "an' that's wot
I've brought 'im out here for. When he
gets to be a man he can always help his
uncle, wot 'as always been good to 'im."
The speeches generally wound up with a few
love pats in the shape of cuffs.
Having upon an evil occasion made the acquaintance of two men who could play blackjack and poker slightly beter than he, and
alos having been fined $100 by the police
magistrate for amusing himself by playing
a tune with his boots upon the skull of a
drunken miner, Black Jack Pete reached the
decision that he must do something real quick
or go without a meal ticket, and the consequent satisfaction resulting from possession
of the same. Being of a speculative nature,
the idea of working by the day for certain
jaltry considerations did not appeal to him
at all.
Since returning, Pete had formed a defensive and offensive alliance with a eouple
of bad men named Tom Yates and Jim Gunnison. When the three had found themselves
at the last rung of the financial ladder, they
met one night by appointment in Spokane
Mike's saloon, and formed an organization
which they caleld the Kootenay Prospecting
and Development Syndicate. Pete was made
president, Yates vice-president, while Gunnison was unanimously elected secretary.   Calfie
became part of the syndicate to a certain
extent, holding the office of cook and dishwasher. The syndicate was formed for the
purpose, as the president said, "of stakin'
claims, prospectin' and developin' the same,
or disposin' of said claims or mines, to such
party or parties, at such time and in such
manner as the syndicate shall see fit."
Upon counting up the assets of the newly
organized company, it was found that about
$130 cash, two rolls of blankets, a prospector's pick and half a coil of fuse were the sum
total of capital with whieh to carry out sueh
ambitious designs. A large part of the money went for the purchase of supplies and a
boat. It was also necessary to have a Free
Miner's License in order to stake claims, and
as the purchase of a license for each of the
three members would entail cossiderable expense, it was decided to have only one for
the crowd. It would have to be in some
one's name, however, and owing to the fact
that none of the gang would trust the other,
it was decided to take it out in the name of
John Henry, otherwise Calfie. "It'll give
him dignity an' make a man uv him," they
said. "An' when 'e gets to be a man, 'e
can always 'elp 'is uncle as a dootiful nephoo
should," added Pete.
The scene of operations chosen was in the
wild mountainous section to the north of
Howser Lake. The syndicate, after much exertion, arrived on the ground and settled down
for a month's prospecting. Calfie was obliged
to do all the cooking and chores around the
camp. The rest scurried off all day in search
of mineral.
One day Gunnison marched triumphantly
into camp with a huge chunk of copper ore in
his hand. "There," he exclaimed; "now
we've got it! As pretty a lead as you'd
wish to see, ore shoot about five feet wide
on the surface, and I'll eat my hat if it don't
carry one hundred plunks to the ton in values. ''
The next day the whole crowd adjourned
to the scene of the find, and the way lead-
stripipng was carried on was a caution. As
the indications were good, three claims were
staked, and each member of the syndicate was
supposed to have a share in them, although
Calfie was not considered as being entitled to
any. The fact that he would enjoy the honor
of having them recorded in his name, was,
in their opinion, sufficient to reward him.
Several pounds of fine samples were gathered together, and the expedition returned to
Kaslo, where the new claims were duly recorded in the name of John Henry at the
mining recorder's office.
"Now, kid," said the affectionate uncle,
"you must remember that them there claims
are ourn an' not yourn, an' act accordingly.
But when we 'ave a deal on for them, you
must be cute an' act as though they wuz
yourn."
"Well, I don't see nohow."
"Stoopid! We'l sell th' claims fer a pile
of money."
"An' will I get any uv it?"
"Ha, ha, p'raps."
Shortly after this a party arrived who had
some money to invest in any promising mining property offering. Pete soon managed to
get him on the string and told him about the
fine properties his nephew owned. The samples and asay certificate interested the stranger, and he made arrangements with Pete and
his newphew to visit the claims before purchasing. Of course Yates and Gunnison had
to go along, in order to keep an eye on their
blackjack friend.
"Now, kid," warned Calfie's uncle when
the outfit had returned, "we want to get
about $60,000 dollars for them claims."
At the mention of such tremendous figures,
the young man's eyes became large and
round.
"Now, if he asks how you want for th'
layout, just say $100,000. He'll start jewin'
yon down, but don't let him put you below
sixty. That'll be $20,000 each for th' three
uv us."
"Yes?   An' any fer me?"
"We'll see. But you'd better not count
on it. Wot 'ave you done to deserve any,
I'd like to know? Huh, only wash dishes,
cook an' carry water. You didn't find no
mineral."
"Well, I own them claims."
"Mebby so. But your Uncle Peter owns
you, an' owners uv one piece uv property are
owners uv its property. Quod erat Demonstrandum,  by  gum.    You  don't  want  ever
to go back on your pore old uncle, wot's always been so good to yon."
Definite arangements were soon made for
the conclusion of the deal. Pete and the other members of the Kootenay Prospecting and
Development Syndicate made an effort to take
a hand in the business, but the purchaser,
whose name was Perkins, objected to their
presence and debarred them from taking part
in the final negotiations. "I'm dealing with
principals only," said he. "You fellows have
no interest in those claims." The syndicate
grumblingly withdrew, but hung around the
office where Calfie, Perkins and a lawyer were
closeted together.
"Now, young man," said Perkins, "how
much do you want for those wild cats of
yours ?'' The words came calmly and without hesitation. "One hundred thousand dollars."
"What?"
"One hundred thousand dollars," said
Calfie, who was beginning to realize that he
was the doctor. His judicial mind began to
perceive the legal status of the case.
"Now, look here; can't you be reasonable?
Why, those dinkly little surface showings of
yours are only worth about $5,000. But I'll
give you twenty."
"Well, I dunno.   I'l sell them to you for
eighty."
"Too much."
This performance was kept up for over
an hour, and finally $40,000 was the price
agreed upon. A cheque for the amount was
forthwith made out in Calfie's name, the necessary papers signed and the deal closed.
The syndicate was ready, though almost
doubled with anxiety when they emerged.
"How much did you get, kid?" was the
chorus.
The kid eyed them airily and went on in
the direction of the bank, his uncle and colleagues following closely at his heels. He
marched in, opened an account and had the
cheque placed to his credit, the others looking
on in wide-mouthed amazement. Then Calfie
marched out with a swagger on him that no
one had ever seen before. " 'E must be
crazy," said his uncle. Outside he was
promptly pulled into a corner. "How much
did you get?" they all hissed.
"Forty thousand."
"Wot?"
"Just what I said."
"You  chump.    You  could ha'  got sixty
easy."   Wrath and indignation was pictured
on the faces of the Kootenay Prospecting and
Development Syndicate.
"Well, I reckoned forty was enough."
"You reckoned!   You pack mule, wot right
'ad you to reckon anything?   You orter be
well scragged."
"I guess they wuz my claims."
"G'wan!   Fork over the money."
"Can't.  It's in the bank."
"Come, dig up now.    We can't wait all
day."
"Dig up what?"
"Our money," bellowed Pete.
"Yes, better dig up quick," seconded the
others, visions of a royal "toot" flooding
their imaginations.
"W'y, you don't mean to say that it is
your money?"
"Certainly," came the unanimous chorus.
"Well I declare. I go and sell my claims
and you fellers want the money. I guess I'll
keep it in the bank until I want it. It'll be
safe there.
"Wot?" came in a horrified shout.
"Wot?" mocked the newly-born magnate.
"W'y, you low down, lyin', deceitful rogue.
'Ere you've gone an' robbed your pore old
uncle, wot 'as always been good to you. Oh,
I'll fix you for this. You're a thief, that's
wot you are. I'll 'ave the law on you," bellowed Uncle Peter. He spent several fruitless hours chasing around in a wild endeavour
to get anybody, the chief of police, a lawyer,
the gold commissioner to take up his case.
They could hold forth no help for him. His
rage knew no bounds. Finally it broke forth
in one concentrated and awful eruption of
wrath. He rounded up his nephew and
punched him most shamefully, and in a manner awful to behold. The upshot of the encounter was that the nephew went to the hospital and his uncle to jail. When the former
was able to get around, he appeared to give
evidence against his uncle at the police court.
The cadi, upon sentencing the prisoner, said
in brief:
"Now, McPherson, you're getting to be a
nuisance around this town. You're forever
making a row of some kind. You can go to.
jail for six months. You are a cowardly
brute, and have most shamefully damaged the
person of this young man, whom I may say
is ten times more of a man than you are."
And knowing the circumstances of the case,
the P. M. could only be excused for smiling
to himself as he ordered an adjournment.
"OH, BAIBNIES, CUDDLE DOON."
The bairnies cuddle doon at nloht,
Wi' muckle faueht an' din;
Oh, try an' sleep ye waukrife rogues,
Your father's comin' in;
They never heed a word I speak,
I try to gi'e a frown;
But aye I hap them up an' say,
"Oh, bairnies, cuddle doon."
Wee Jamie wi' the curly held,
He aye sleeps next the wa\
Bangs up and cries "I want a piece!"
The rascal starts them a'.
I run and fetch them pieces, drinks,
They stop a wee the soun',
Then draw the blankets up an' cry,
"Noo weanles, cuddle doon."
But ere flve minutes gang, wee Rab
Cries out fra' neath the claes,
"Mither, mak' Tain gi'e owre at ance,
He's kittlin' wi' his taes."
The mischief's in that Tarn for tricks,
He'd bother half the toon;
But aye I hap them up and say,
"Oh, bairnies, cuddle doon."
At length they hear their father's step,
An' as he steeks the door,
They turn their faces to the wa'
While Tam pretends to snore.    •
"Ha'e a' the weans been gude?" he asks,
As he pits off his shoon.
"The bairnies, John, are in their beds,
An' lang since cuddled doon."
An' just before we bed oursel's
We look at our wee Iambs;
Tam has his airm roun' wee Rab's neek
An' Rab his airm roun' Tarn's.
I lift wee Jamie up the bed,
An' as I straik each croon,
I whisper till my heart Alls up,
"Oh, bairnies, cuddle doon."
The bairnies cuddle doon at nicht,
Wi' mirth that's dear to me;
But soon the big warl's eark an' care
Will quaten doon their glee..
Yet eome what may to ilka ane,
May He who rules aboon,
Aye whisper, though their pows be bauld,
"Oh, barnies, cuddle doon."
—Anon.
THE INNERMOST ROOM.
By Robertson Nicoll.
The innermost room may be a torture chamber, or a shrine of peace. According as it is
one or the other, so is life happy or unhappy.
For the blessedness of life does not so much
depend on what is passing in the outer chambers, as on what is passing in the secret place
of the soul. It is because we forget this that
we blunder so much, strive so hard, are so
bitterly disappointed with our so-called successes. In the innermost room remorse may
be present, infinite repining, infinite sorrow.
The very thought of entering it may be an
agony, but enter it you must. An unseen force
drags you into the place of pain. Or it may
be a shrine of rest, a refuge from the storms
of life, a veritable chamber of peace. To
visit it, to linger in it may be the chief joy
and solace of existence. One may come from
it with radiant face and strong heart, able
to cope with his difficulties, and perform his
allotted task in another spirit. Is this the
last word? No, the riddle of life is never
understood until we know that the torture
chamber may become, not all at once, but by
slow and sure degrees, a shrine of peace. Most
of us know how this comes to pass in sorrow,
how a sober joy at last replaces the bitter
anguish. It may even come to be so when
there has been shame, and treachery and base
surrender of the will. The test of the true
religion may be found here. The religion that
we need is the religion that will lay all the
ghosts, that will cast the instruments of torture from the innermost room, that will divide the great glooms, and make it a place of
repair. And this is why we must always say
to the sufferer, in his most cruel hour of endurance: "Hope on, hope ever. It will not
be always as it is now. The places to which
you are now dragged, as by furies, may come
some day to be your chosen home. You will
one day want nothing better than the peace
of the innermost room." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1906
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
The Christmas Spirit. Things Doing in Grand Forks.
There is something doing in Fernie Judging from the press reports, Eddie
this Christmas, which all will hope may Miller is as P°Pular as ever with the
lead to the dawn of a better day. Dur- rank and file of his Party* A Grand
ing the recent visit of Commissioner Forks disPatch states that at a l^e
and Mrs. Coombs many of the public and enthusiastic gathering of Conserv-
men of the coal'capital met them and atlves- held m the °Pera House* he was
were inducted into the mysteries of Sal- unanimously elected president of the
vation Army methods. Notable among Conservative Association for the ensu-
those who took part in the proceedings lnS year- wlth the following official col-
at a public meeting was Mr; G. G. S. ^ues: Flrst vice-president, Win.
Lindsay, Mayor Bleasdell, Alderman Dl»s'nore; second vice-president, E.
Tuttle and Messrs. W. H. Whimster, D. sPraggett; secretary, Donald McCallum;
Davis and Dr. Bonnell, to say nothing Usurer, H. C. Hannington.
of the ever popular and radiant M. P.
P. W. R. Ross.
Naturally at this season of the year ,.,.-,.
the subject of relief for the poor, a„dth,S   Chnslmas  t'me'  but  »othl,nS wl11
•charitable contributions to widows and glve more.Se»fra' satisfaction than the
Good News.
There will be plenty of good news
orphans was under discussion, and Coin-
reports being brought home by return-
■   .   .         ~      ,    . ,,          ',  ..     . ing wanderers from every section of the
missioner Coombs told a pathetic story .   -                       '
of a "Jack," who carried a little street Pr°Vm"'   ^-M   °f ^^
...          '.     ....             .,        . prosperity.   The following cutting from
waif on his shoulders to warmth and ,    ..   '■■         .           a         s   .
safety.    Manager Lindsay and his as
sociates have not always  been distin-
the New Westminster Daily News is a
sample of what might be culled from
.,,,,. ,     ,       •,        almost every exchange which comes to
guished by their sympathy for widows ,     , ;
and orphans.   The same might be said
"Alderman Henley returned yesterday
of at least one alderman who was con- fnfa a ^ ^ ..    Re fa
spicuous on the platform, but hereafter enthusiastic terms  of ^ devel t
there is little doubt that they will bene-    ,. , .     , ...       .       ,  -.*■
•   ,      ,   . .;,_'-.■.. which he observed throughout the coun-
fit by their contact with Commissioner tfy    w,)ere & ^ ^ ^
Coombs and the Salvation Army, and birds and the den«a» of the forest held
they may even be blessed with a ripple ^ possession> ^ rjng q{ ^ ^ .g
of the Christmasj-pint heard) and homes are ^^ .^ ex
istence."
Discerning. ^^^
Editor Grace, of the Cranbrook Pros- Patronize Home Merchants.
pector, is a man of experience and good Whatever else may be said of the
judgment. He is a Kootenay pioneer Revelstoke Mail-Herald, it is always
and probably no one in Kootenay knows loyal to its own city, and never
the state of public feeling better than he.  misses  an  opportunity  to  speak  a
With reference to prospective candi- word for local industries and local
dates at the forthcoming Provincial elec- interests. This is the spirit which
tion, he has the .following to say: builds up a strong and prosperous
'.'The voters of Cranbrook riding want community, and is to be commended.
J. A. Harvey to represent them in the The suggestion of our esteemed con-
next legislative assembly, and there is temporary contained in the following
no doubt but that Mr. Harvey will re- ParagraPh is thoroughly seasonable,
ceive    the    Conservative    nomination. *nd can be repeated with advantage
There is also uo doubt but that many by„Tevery n™spaper in the Province:
political combinations  may be  formed,       Let your purse str.ngs Be loos-
T   ,. ,„ . .-l . ened, give your home merchants vour
by- the opposition, between the present  „„. .,,,,.,      „    ,   '
.* • .u    t,  j*        c      „..-■■-■ .patronage and that libera y for the
time and  the holding of  a  Provincial  _„   .    ...   .      .. . , .        „     .
...     ... . ■    ...   ..      good of your city, and let us all unte
election which will have as an objective  •    -_„-,;„„ icf. n,   ■ .        .    ,
, „„ .       ,       ln making this Christmas trrly a sea-
the   defeat of Mr.   Harvey, but   these son of Teace and Goodwin,„
combinations had better be brought in 	
-for they might get frosted.   The Con- The Enemy Testifieg<
servative voters of Cranbrook riding The Cumberland News, which gave
have clearly expressed their preference an excellent report of the Premier's
for Harvey, and being human they will visit to that enterprising city, has the
naturally stay with their friend." following to say with reference to tbe
  effect produced by Mr. McBride upon
some members of the opposition.   It
may be regarded as a very season-
Seasonable Weather in the Slocan.
Residents   at  the   coast  have   many
things to be thankful for, and probably  ab>e bouquet for the Premier.
they will be reconciled to the few inches
Premier McBride has caught the
dea of Canada's greatness and with
of  rain  which have  fallen   during the a,•    „                 ,,
44.   rr,       1       1     .1          a aa. a thls  ar°uses  enthusiasm.    Some  of
month of December when they read that ,*,. r„mi...i    a t ••_     ,             .
'-.  '. ■ -a ,                cue a Cumberland Liberals were broad
the third heavy snowfall of the season Pnr.„~i, .„ „„„fa„    ax. . •_              .
.             '                          . enough to confess that he was the
has visited Sandon and other points in .greatest orator that had visited
the Slocan, and that in twelve hours district and they now cou]d ^ ^
more than twelve inches fell. There is which side they belonged to, but firm-
plenty of variety in the climate of Brit- ly believed that the Premier's was
ish Columbia.   You can pay your money the right one.'"
and take your choice.    It is mild and 	
damp at the coast; cold and dry at A Poetical Appeal.
Kamloops and along the Fraser and The following poetical appeal won
Thompson; cold and snowy through the f°r 'ts author, the editor of the
Kootenays, and, in the far North, ac- Rocky Mountain Celt, the prize of
cording to the Colonist, it is 50 degrees $I*°°o for the best appeal poem to
below zero, with a high wind. newspaper men to pay up their sub-
After all, Victoria is not a bad place scr('Pf*on:
to live in. "Lives of poor men all remind us,
  honest men don't stand no chance.
„ .ir          ■    o     1    a The more we work' there grow be-
Not Known in Rossland. h;n.i „„ •,;_„„ _„. ,            °
ninci us bigger patches on our pants.
The old saying  that one has  to go On our pants once new and glossy,
away from home to learn news is ap- now are strips  of different hue   all
parently as true as ever, for, in a recent because subscribers linger and don't
issue, the Rossland Miner has the foi- pay us what is due.
lowing paragraph: "Then let us be up and doing, send
"Mayor  McDonald  leaves today   for '» your mite, however small, or when
the coast for the purpose of endeavor- the   snow  of  winter  strikes   us  we
ing to induce the government to give slla-1 have n° pants at all."
the   city  one-half   of   the  proceeds of
the two per cent tax levied on the product of the mines of the camp.   He expects to be absent for a week."
Presumably   the  "Miner"   had  never
heard   that   the   Conservatives   of  the r™ .3S   1S,,mafe   by    the   Cowichan
Copper  City were anxious that Mayor ,-.!''   A" the :same.'.to reproduc.
A Pathetic Appeal.
It is hardly likely that any other
newspaper in the Province needs to
make such an appeal to its subscrib-
it will at least give an idea of what
it is to conduct a small weekly paper.
It is brief and to the point:
'We would like to remind our sub-
McDonald should be their standard-
bearer at the forthcoming election. Victoria Conservatives know this, and gave
the Mayor a hearty greeting during his scr'bers that Christmas is close *,t
visit. They expvt to congratulate him hand, and the children will want some
inside of six weeks as a Kootenay rep- little presents. Could you help us
resentative in the local legislature. out?"
SPIRITUOUS ADVICE.
Try Us For Your Christmas
Wines and Liquors.
Twenty-year-old Scotch Whisky, a bottle.. .$2.00
Imperial Quart 12-year-old Scotch....  1.25
Caledonian Scotch, a bottle  1.00
Watson Scotch, a bottle  1.00
Dewar's Scotch, a bottle  1.00
Three-Swallow Irish, a bottle  1.25
Burke's Irish, a bottle  1.00
Mitchell's Irish, a bottle  1.00
XXX Brandy, a bottle.  1.25
X Brandy, a bottle  l.Od
Old. Nick Rum, a bottle  1.25
Burke's Rum, a bottle  1.25
THE WEST END
GROCERY.
Phone 88.
42 Government Street, Victoria
Shipping orders promptly attended to.
S»-i-tti>*i-*^»**i--it*4-t*ti|<-*^^
+***ityi+
!■
C. H. Smith ASo.
Fine Art Dealers
32 Fort St., Victoria.
i
Demarara Rum, a bottle 1.00
Cockburn's Port, a bottle. .$1.50, $1.25 and 1.00
Amontillado Sherry, a bottle 1.50
Finest Table Sherry, a bottle.  1.00
California Sherry, a bottle    .50
Native Port, a bottle 35
California Port, a bottle 50
Zinfandel Claret, a bottle 35
St. Julien Claret, a bottle    .75
La Rose Claret, a bottle  1.00
Sparkling Hock    2.00
In fact, we arry all the well known brands.
>
;
:
:
1
Q^'V-#4'»-V**»*---/*-»*4,*'^»4>*->-*|»
Ckinese- made ohirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE
BUTTING AHEAD. 10
THE WEEK  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, 190b.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner oi Section 34,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 17th, 1906.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner ot Section 10,
Township 12, Range 5, Pouorier Survey; thence south 40 cnains; thence
cut 80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of
Section 8 .Township 12, Range 5, of
laid survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September aoth, 1906.
No. 10.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
tide of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining E. J. Palmer's northeast
corner: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," thenee
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chain*,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 5th day
of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
Na 11.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 10: Commencing at a
post marked "A Young, Southeast
Corner," thence north 160 chain*,
thence west 40 chains, thence south 160
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 160 ch,ains, thence east 40 chains
to place of cemmencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 5th day
of November, 1006.
ALEX. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south side of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked C
T., N. E corner purchase claim, thence
running south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
C.TAKADA
November and, 1906.    __
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
CWe Commissioner of Land* and
Works for permission 0 purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
C. W. PECK,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
_N0TICE"is"hweb3rgiven"tharsixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south bank of the Skeena River adjoining H .A Draper's preemption claim,
south boundary line, at a poat marked
M. V. Wadham's N. W. corner post,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west to bank of river,
following the river bank north to poat
of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS,
Locator.
H. DRAPER,
Agent.
N'ov. 24.
Na ix
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
tide of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's timber limit
No. 11, on the east boundary: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southeast Corner," thence north 160
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 13.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining J. Young's east boundary of limit No. 12: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of N'ovember, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
following described land rituated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L .L. Watson, thence running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A Wadham's
purchase claim, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L L WATSON,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
daysafter date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
E. A WADHAMS,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent
No. 14.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I inttnd to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 13: Commencing at a
post marked "J. Young, Southwest Corner," thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17. Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains:
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, and
being said Section 17 of said survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M .Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 16b acres more or less. Located
October 26th, 1906.
D. M. MOORE,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.    •
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim marked J.
Curther's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J. CURTHERS,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent.
Nov. 24.	
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, cintaining 160 acres more or
less.
Located 26th October, 1006.
W. BRUCE.
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent
Nov. 24. _
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
the Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains.thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 cnains, thence south 40 chains to
place of commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
Located Oct. ist, 1006.
L. S. HUTCHESON.
Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, and adjoining C. Takuda's purchase claim, commencing at a post marked G. B. W., N.
E. corner purchase claim, thence running west 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chainsh t opost of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
November 2nd, 1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS,
Locator.
W. A. WADHAMS,
Agent
Nov. 24.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60
days from date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the Ne*
chaco Valley, Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
nortn 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDW»^ " HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, commencing at
a post planted on the bank of the
Skeena River two and a half miles
below Kitwangat, at the N.W. corner
of A. E. Price's purchase claim;
thence S. 22 chains, more or less, to
the S.W. corner of A. E. Price's purchase claim; thence W. 40 chains to
the S.E. corner of Elizabeth Price's
purchase claim; thence N. 31 chains,
more or less, to the Skeena River,
containing 100 acres, more or less.
F. PRICE.
A. ./. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chalna;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township to, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post planted nt
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
thc south-east corner of Section ft
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement, and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent    i\
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted it
the south-west corner of  Section   10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-i
vey; thence north 80   chains;   thence\
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 10'
of said survey. 1
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A T. Clark, Agent
nugut 6th, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
August 5th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner." placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October,
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
-ifter date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," tnence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence, east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10,   Range 5, Poudrier Survey;,
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 J
chains; thence south 80 chains: tnence
east 80 chains to point of commence- <
ment; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thenee
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and being said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 16,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thenee
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16,
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEiR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at <
the south-west corner of   Section   15,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur- .
vey; thence north 80 chains;  thence 1
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chain*; j
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey*
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date T intend to applv to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
NOTICE is hereby given that ixty
sdays after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2]/2 miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "R. S.
C," placed at the northeast corner of
lot 331; thence atsronomicall" north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 80
chains; thence astronomically south 80
chains; thence astronomically west 80
chains, and thence astronomically north
40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
ROBERT SENIOR
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1006.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days (60) after date, I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands nnd Works, Victoria, B. C,
for permission to purchase the southwest quarter of Section Twenty-three
(23) Township Eight (8), Range
Five (5); Coast District. Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and
sixty (160) acres, more or less.
.11 E. WILD MAN.
1st December, 1006. Dec.15
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1006.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east comer of Section 35.
Townshin 1.' Ranee a, Poudrier Survey:
thence south 80 chillis: thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
past 80 rhni*--* t" tinl-it of commencement', and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner   of   Section   6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-i
vey; thence south 80 chains, thence east 1
80   chains;   thence   north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of j
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at 1
the north-east corner of Section 1,1
township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur- .
vey; thence south 80 chains; thence '
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chain*; |
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section I
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted ab
the south-west corner of Section 7,1
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-]
vey; thence north 80 chains; thence eaat j
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;(
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 7 of j
said survey.
THOMA.c. SHOPLAND,
A T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted at L
the south-east corner of Section 12, f
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-1
vey; thence north 80 chains; thence1]
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains; j
tnence east 80 chains to point of com-1
mencement, and being said Section I*]
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
23. Commencing at a post planted at I
the north-west corner of Section 11,1
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-j
vey; thence south 80chains; thence east!
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;]
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section n*j
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A T. Clark, Agent.
August ioth, 1906. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 22,  1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to- the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about four miles above
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' northwest corner, and marked "N. M. J.s' N.
W. Corner," thence running south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
if Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lands, Range V.,
Skeena River District, about 1 mile
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on the
—> South-west comer, marked A. O.'Cun-
K'ningham's S. W. Corner, thence North
■• 40 (forty) chains( thence East 40
m\ (forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty)
1/ chains to Little's Southwest corner,
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to point
of commencement,' and containing 160
(one hundred and sixty) acres more or
less.
Located October ist, 1906.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
S. C. WEEKS, Agent
(vest SO chains to place of commencement,
containing  WO acres.
Duted at Port Iteuftew on the 30th day
ol October, laou.
ALEXR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1806.
Mo. 8—
NOTICE! Is hereby given that thirty
days after dute 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a speciul license to cut and carry away
tinnier from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of Ban Juan
River, Henfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
southeast corner: Commencing at a post
marked "A. Young, Southwest Corner,'
thence north 40 chains; thence east 140
chains; theuce south 40 chains; thenee
west 100 chains to place ot commencement,
containing (HO acres.
Dated at fort Keiifrew on the 30Uh day
of October, 1906.
ALEXR.  YOUNG.
November IT, 1906.
NOTICE) Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following desoribed lands situate ln the Kit-ram Kalum
Valley, Range V, Coast District: Commencing at a stake planted at the N. El.
oorner of Jas. Adams' purchase claim,
marked N. T. C. No. 1 Initial Post; thence
40 chalna west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement and containing 160 acres more or less.
N. T. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
V. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October 1st, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about $t/9 miles above
the Lakelse River, and joining John
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marked
"L. W. S.'s Northwest Corner," and
running south 8o chains; thence east 8o
chains; therce north 8o chains, more or
less, to lefl bank of Skeena River;
, thence westwardly along Skeena River
i. to point of commencement, containing
11 640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 Intend to apply tu the lion.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated in the Coast District, Range 5: Uegiuuing at a post
planted on the north bank of the Skeena
river, al the mouth of Zynigetltx river and
marked li. B.'s Southwest Corner; thence
running north 100 chains; thence east 80
chains; theuce south to bank of Skeena
river about 40 chains more or less; thence
following meandering of Skeena river ln
a southwesterly direction to post of commencement, containing 640 acres of laud
■more or less,
BEATRICE! BATBMAiN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Located September 20th,  1906.
6a Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of ). A Harvey's
land, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of com-
menctment
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 4.
Commencing at a post situate on or near
the northwest corner of Lot 79, Muck-
toosh; thence 40 chains east; thence 40
north; thence 100 west; thence 80 south •
thence 60 east; thence 40 north, to point
of commencement
C. F. PARK, 111
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
Oct. 22d, 1906.
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey thence south 80 chains; thence east
3o chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
ihence 00 chains west; thence 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 sout.i; thence
east to the waterfront thence following
the shore line to point of commencement.
C. LUTK1N,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
LiCt.   27tll,   I9O6. ^-mt B-.S>»BBBBiai^	
61. Commencing at a .ist planted at
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty! ^e north-west corner of J. A Aarvey'.
days after date I intend to apply to the la°? L^"« ."?[* fVJ h *,' -S
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Linos and «* & «"»■»• *«*• *ouU» *'*""*
Works for a special license to cut and thtnce we" *> chaws t0 P°mt o£ **■
carry away timber from the following mencement t-iat-mitc
described lands:   1. Starting at a post CA*P-J}N.f. HAINfcb,
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy J* B. Wtason, Agent.
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni     September ioth, 1906.
Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
40 chains west; thence south to tbe
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chain*
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Land*
and Works for a special license to cot
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner poat of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
6c. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*;
thence north 80 chain* to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
No. 3—
•NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of 'Lands and Works
for a speclnl license to cut and carry awny
timber from the following described tonus,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining Mrs.
J. S. Young's south boundary: Commenc-
ing at a post marked "A. Young, Nortbwest Corner," thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to place of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
1 Dated nt Port Renfrew, October »th,
1906.
ALEXR.  YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
3a Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'li,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
fc'
No. 4-
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining A.
Young's southwest corner: Commenclu
- ._.„ ...  Yoxiag, Northwest
....... . ..... Commencing at
a post marked "J. Young, Northwest Cor
nor" thence south 80 chains; thence east
ner,      lut-uut;   ovum   ov   uuniiia,   iucuic   can.
80 chains: tiience north 80 chains; thence
west 80 cbalns to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 29th day
of October, 1906.
JOHN YOUNO.
November IT, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east, thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
No. 6—
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
tor a special license to cut and carry away
(timber from the following described lands,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining John
1 Young's southeast corner: Commencing at
a post marked "A Young, Northeast Cor-
«.ner," thence north 40 chains: thence west
160 chains; thence soutb 40 chains; tbence
east 160 chains to place of commencement,
containing 6(0 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 29th day
of October, 1906.
ALBXR.   \OUNG.
November IT, 1906.
No. 6_
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat thirty
days nfter date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from tbe following described lands,
situated on the south side of Ban Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
southeast corner: .ommenclng at a post
(marked   "J.   Young,   Northeast   Corner."
thence  south  80 chains;  thence  west 80
j chains: thence north 80 chnins; thence east
) 80 chains to place of commencement, con-
1 taining 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 80th day
1  44.4.t...    .una
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 17,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of aid
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So tl.i.ins; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent
. September nth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E L Blake'*
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank of
said river to point of commencement;
640 acres, more or less.
MARY BLAKE,
A T. CLARK, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake'*
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the hank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acre*,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A T. Clark, .Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thenee
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chain*;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or lets.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watsoq, Agent
September 13th, 1906,
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Land*
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
NOTICE Is hereby giveu that 60 days
after date 1 Intend to apply to tbe Hoa.
Chief Comnilssloner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land: Coiuuieucliig at a post at
the northeast corner of Lot 182, Range
Ave (5), Coast District, marked E. Dairies'
Southeast Coiner; thence ruuniug 40 chains
west; tiience 40 chains north; theuce 40
chains east, more or less, to Ky-yex river;
theuce following meandering of Ky-yex
river to polut of commencement, coatalaiaf
oue hundred and sixty acres, more or lets.
  B.  DAVIES.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight**
land ,* thence north 80 cbhii s; thence j survey,
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
Located July 12th. 1U06.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence nortli 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi f Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: a.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chain*
west and 90 south ofsoutheast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west:
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to point of commencement
J. T. BUCKLEY.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com'
mencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
 ■ J. C. PORTER.
A T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
of October, 1906.
November IT, 1906
JOHN YOUNO.
,No. T—
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of 'Lands and Works
for a apeclal license to cnt and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
situated on the sooth side of San Jnan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining T. Lee's
■southeast  corner:  Commencing at a  post
marked   "A.  Young,   Northwest   Comer."
1 thence south 80 chains;  thence east 80
chains;    thence north 80 cbalns;   tbence
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
69: thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
following the shore line to point of commencement
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct 20th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshio 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chain*
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section n, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 19th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook'*
lease; thence north 80 chain*; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
the Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 0,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, contain-
ine* 80 pcres more or less.
December I, 1006.
e f. g. McGregor
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9. Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 9, thence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains more or les-sto
the Wn-iwilghet River, thence following
the river in a westerly direction to the
noint of commencement, containing Po
acres more or less.
December t   iqofi.
G. P.  ROPF"'r<".
73. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
ithe Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite tlie south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River; thence followinf
bank of said river to point of et
mencement; 640 aeres. more or le**.
EDGAR L BLAKE,
A T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at the N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1006. Dec.15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lands, situated on
the left bank of thc Skeena River,
about one mile below thc Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Mi-
chaud's N.E. corner post on the bank
of the Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousie's S.
boundary; thence W. 38 chains, more
or less, to the Skeena River; thence
N. 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22. 1906.
* Short Story *
9$? if
ififififififififififififif
THE GHOST OF PAYNE MOUNTAIN.
By Harold Sands.
(Written for The Week.)
The Which Is Not   a  Temperance
Lecture but a Warning Against
"The Curse of Canada."
And Also the Story of the Famous
Payne Mine, With a Christmas
Flavour of Fiction.
"Where the mountains wed with heaven
There, where men dream of Gold,
Came the vision of the vanished—
Came Love.   And there Death rode.
—From   the   unpublished and unauthorized Ballad of Hell-Roaring Pete.
"I'll shake you for a drink, Pete," I
said to the old prospector as we pushed
the overworked swing doors of Jack
Merry's saloon at Kaslo.
"To hell with yer drink," he growled.
"Hell, man, didn't I tell yer I was goin'
ter Sandon. It's a bottle I'm needin'.
An' that's a hell of a little."
After that nobody need inquire why
he was called "Hell-Roaring Pete."
From now on he is Pete; the prefix can
be taken as read, and polite society need
shudder no more while perusing the
story for fear a too literal chronicler
will offend the pink ears of modesty by
indulging in bad language. Moreover,
Pete's speech shall be converted into
public schol correctness, as nearly as
possible.
"All right, Pete, let it be a bottle then.
Pass the bones, Jack," I said. "Shall it
be first flop, Pete?"
"Of course," he answered. "Four
deuces. You can't beat my little ones."
A newspaper man after stories knows
better than to beat four of a kind, and
I paid for Hiram Walker, while Pete
pocketed him. We then walked down
to the Kaslo and Slocan depot, where we
boarded the narrow-gauge car. Pete
divided the first few minutes of the
journey between the whiskey and expectorating into the small hole in the
big stove. His aim was true. He was
proud of the fact that the sign "Don't
Spit on the Floor" did not apply to him.
He had another accomplishment which
endeared himself to himself—he could
chew and smoke at the same time. He
was only sorry he could not expectorate,
chew and smoke simultaneously. But,
as he used to say, "Even 'Old Tomorrow' could not do that." Sir John Macdonald, when alive, was the one hero
in the world to Pete, and, being dead,
was remembered by that faithful follower long after many he befriended had
forgotten him.
It may be as well to mention here as
anywhere else that Pete was a French-
Canadian. He loved Honore Mercier
second only to Sir John A. Their spirits lived with Pete long after death
claimed their bodies. I never knew
Pete's real name, it had been lost somewhere on the other side of the Rockies.
His fondness for bringing Old Nick into
his conversation was responsible for his
Western cognomen. Pete certainly was
an artist at swearing, but I must deny
myself the pleasure of repeating his performance; for the sake of Mrs. Grundy
I must forbear.
After he had diligently performed
those acts for which thc W. C. T. U.
and the Anti-Tuberculosis Society would
severely, jointly and justly condemn
him, Pete started to tell me the story
of the ghost of Payne Mountain. He
was always an uncertain wanderer, and
departed often from the track. I must
beg the reader to be patient and follow
him into the byways as well as upon
the beaten path. He was ready to swear
by Sir John A. that it was all true, from
which fact I know it to be a marvellous
invention. But it is too good to be
lost with Pete, who, poor old chap, is
somewhere at the bottom of Payne bluff,
consorting for all I know, with the
wraith. If -jo, he is in good company,
for, according to his own description,
the ghost was a marvelously pretty girl.
"We shall be coming to the Payne
bluff in a few minutes," he remarked,
as he shifted his plug and took a draw
at his five-cent domestic, one of the
kind that Montreal is infamous for, "and
if you are short of stories for that rotten paper you get out at Kaslo once a
week—thank heaven (you know where he
meant) it is only once a week—. I'll
tel you one that is gospel truth, whut is
a strange thing to find in newspapers.
'You know the old legend about Eli
Carpenter and the other chaps coming
over the hills from Kootenay Lake,
staking out virgin ground on Payne
Mountain and making the name of the
Slocan, which some of you flowery fellows call silvery to this day. That's all
tommyrot Virgin ground be hanged."
He expectorated again and was so excited he almost missed the hole in the
stove.
"I was there before those chaps," he
went on. "Yes, I, blank, blank Pete, as
you fellows blasphemously call me. And
there was a ghost before me, too, which
knew I was coming. Yes, sir, that
beautiful spirit, the ghost of my dead
love, was aware that Pete's unsteady
footsteps would mark the earth of Payne
Mountain."
"If you have never seen the Payne
bluff you have missed one of the sights
of British Columbia. It is a scenic wonder of Canada's scenic wonderland.
"I never look down into that blank
of a hole," Pete continued, "but I feel
I want to jump into it. Now, don't get
scared, I'm not going to do it just now.
I'm not entered in long distance jumps
today."
"How about the ghost, Pete?" I asked.
"For goodness sake, let it walk and
don't talk like a hired humorist."
"You bet your sweet life (public
school language, mind) she could walk,"
he replied. "There never was so graceful a girl as she and a more beautiful
woman never revisited the earth. The
only time I ever saw a girl who could
approach her was in the old Coeur
d'Alene Theatre in Spokane in the wide
open days. They some stunning girls
there then, but this world is getting
too good for old sinners like me."
"Oh, forget it, Pete," I said, "forget
it and come back to the ghost."
"Right you are, my boy," Pete proceeded, "but let's have a nip in 'the
curse of Canada' first. Well, as I
was saying before you drew my attention to other things, I was here
before old Eli and his pals stampeded in from Ainsworth. Silver was
no account in those days. I wanted
gold; everybody wanted gold. Sixteen to one hadn't been born; everyone was willing to be crucified on the
cross of gold Bryan got so mad
about afterwards. The first time I
struck the hills here I came across
silver right at the grass roots, Bin
I wanted gold, I tell you, and didn'f
give a continental about the other,;
which is why old Eli subsequently
went one better than me."
"I don't believe there ever was a
ghost on Payne Mountain, Pete," I
interposed.
Thc old prospector got huffy and
consigned me to his favourite place,
and by that time thc train had pulled
up at Sandon.   I felt irritated.   Pete
still had the story and he had finished
the whiskey.    Billy Allanson, editor
of thc Paystreak, was at the station.
"Billy," said I, "you've got to help
me  rope  in old  Pete.    He's got  a
ghost story concealed about him."
Billy laughed at mc.
"I  know that story," he declared.
"Rut you're just a bottle of rye short.
Pete requires one more before he'll
hc in condition to finish the yarn."
"Then I shall be two bottles shy.
Well, come along and help Pete drink
Xo. 2."
Hc came. There's nothing slow
about Billy; but Irish is his poison
so Pete was all alone with the curse.
"Ah!" sighed Pete, as he started on
the bottle," Sandon always reminds
me of thc first day I looked down the
gulch. I had just descended Payne
Mountain, where I had seen the very
image of Mary—Mary who I knew
and loved in old Quebec. I was
young, and she was young; all the
world was young, boy. I can almost
see her now as she appeared that
last Christmas before I struck out
West. She went to mass. I watched
her from a back pew. Virtue spoke
in every line of her. I knew she
loved me and waited but for the word.
Would that I had spoken it that
Christmas morning, would that I had
married her and stayed' East. But no,
I can't truly say that. I would not
have missed the grand, glorious West
Five Good Toasts.
While there's life on the lip, while there's
Warmth in the wine,
One deep health I'll pledge, and that health
Shall be thine.
—Owen Meredith.
Let schoolmasters puzzle their brain
With grammar and nonsense and learning;
Good liquor, I stoutly maintain,
Gives genius a better discerning.
—Oliver Goldsmith.
Then fill the bowl, away with gloom I
Our joy shall always last!
For hope will brighten days to come,
And memory gild the past.
—Thomas Moore.
Drink, for you know not
When you came, nor why;
Drink, for you know not why    ,    ,
You go, nor whence.
—Omar Khayyam.
MUMM'S  CHAMPAGNE.
P.L. 2067
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Government St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
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Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria,
Established 1856
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The True Test of Merit
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Due entirely to their purity, old age and fine flavor.
Ask your wine merchant for Red Seal, at $1 per bottle; Black & White,
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JAMES BUCHANAN A CO., by Royal Warradt Purvayors to RoyAl family
MA6EY DESK PILE
Your memory sometimes falls  you-
the Macey Desk File never
For following up Inquiries Received, Orders in Prospect, Remittances
Promised, Shipments Delayed, Advertisements to be Placed,
Engagements, Appointments, Reports, Collections.
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Government Street,  VICTORIA.
MODERN OFFICE APPLIANCES
Phone 730 Opp. Post Ofllce.
for all the girls in the world. Still,
one lias womanly longings sometimes.
I told her that I heard the West calling me, but that before many a
Christmas was past I would be back
in old Quebec to claim her."
"And you never returned?" I put
in.
"Never, but L have seen her, out
there on Payne Mountain; when I
was well nigh starving, almost too
weak to go on prospecting, she ap-
f peared to me and showed me the now
celebrated Payne mine."
"But Pete," I said, despite a warning from Billy, "Eli Carpenter and
Jack Seaton discovered the Payne."
"Yes, I know that is what people
say nowadays," he replied, "but if
old Eli could revisit the earth, as my
lost love did, he would be the first
to tell you that little Mary of Quebec
found that mine and showed it to the
(Continued on Page 13.)
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
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JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
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For Christmas or New Years, how
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Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
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No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22 1906.
13
The Ghost of Payne Mountain
(Continued from Page 12.)
man who swore to come back and
marry her but who failed to keep his
promise. Thus it was that I was the
first man to know that the Slocan
hills were treasure-lined. My little
girl came across the lakes and the
prairies and the mountains to me, and
as I slept she pointed out the mine.
But I have always had an enemy;
you see it here (and he pointed to the
whiskey), the curse of Canada. I
might have been a rich man but for
it. I can distinctly remember, even to
this way, that when I lay down t'o
sleep that night on Payne Mountain
I was all in—couldn't go another
step. And yet, when I awoke in the
morning, I was b-ilf a mile away
from my camp; and what is more, I
'know that my good angel came to
me and pointed out the riches that
would take me back to the old home
and to her. When I awoke there was
my fortune right at my very feet. I
staked out my claim and started down
to Ainsworth to record it.
"Of course the first place I struck
in Ainsworth was a bar and there I
met Eli. I told him of my wonderful
visitor and of the great find, and the
more I told it the greater my thirst
grew and I sold him my claim for a
hundred dollars. I drank and drank
till I had nothing left, and when I
got back to Payne Mountain the
whole hill was staked. I never saw
my little girl again. She's dead, yes,
I know she's dead—she died of a
broken heart. My heart tells me
that; it, too, is broken; the body that
encloses it is but a useless old hulk.
One more drink, boys. Good night."
"Poor old Pete," said Billy as we
left him there in the little back room
behind the bar of that mean hotel at
Sandon. "He's a battered old ruin
but he is a pioneer of pioneers and
entitled to praise rather than to
blame. Poor old Pete," he repeated,
"he thoroughly believes in that yam
of the ghost of Payne Mountain. But
he did not see the hill until the spring
\after Carpenter and Seaton wandered
to its summit. He was one of the
(earliest in the famous Slocan stampede, but luck was not with him and
he sold his claim for a hundred dollars. There's a lack of grey matter
in his upper stope now and he has
run across a fault in his mental make-
jup. He's innocent enough with it all
and never sees anything worse than
that ghost.
"There's one thing about old Pete
always admire, and that is his great
aith in the Slocan. Old Eli Carpen-
er possessed none. He sold the
Payne for a mere song and went to
^Spokane, where he blew in the money.
He used to like to tell his friends how
the had roped in one of the smartest
^mining men in the country, but the
man he sold to made as many thousands out of the Payne as Eli did
hundreds. I don't know where Carpenter is now. The last I heard of
jhim he was seeking a new fortune in
he Klondike. Poor Jack Seaton was
[another man who did not think much
|of the Slocan. However, he's dead
ow—killed in a dance hall in Idaho."
******
It is five years now since I was in
Sandon. Last summer I wrote to a
'Wend there asking him to look up
pete. He replied that nobody had
the old prospector around his
Lid haunts this year. He suddenly
Propped out of sight last Christmas,
let the matter rest. In my inmost
:art I believe that if a search were
nade at the foot of Payne Bluff his
Ivhitening bones would be found. I
Tike to think it is so. Earth had no
lucre use for him and he had no more
tor the world. On Payne Mountain
lie saw the most beautiful vision of
liis life and at the foot of the big hill
lie would be at rest. There, perchance,
the ghost of Payne Mountain rejoined
Jiiin and the past was forgotten.
Yes, I like to think it is so.
Lake, about half way between Pinchi
and Tac'ier Rivers and about 3l/i miles
inland in the Coast Distritc o,f the
Province of British Columbia, viz.;
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary
of Walter J. Friedlander's purchase,
about 40 chains from the northeast corner; thence astronomically north 80
chains j thence astronomically east So
chainsj thence astronomically south 80
chains, and thence astronomically west
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, beginning at a post sjtuate
at the mouth of Kitsonschultz River, on
the north bank of the Skeena River,
inarked "S., VV. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
Timber Claim;" thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 160 chains to point
of beginning.
Dated Nover 17th, 1906.
WILFRED LOISELLE, Locator.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
nine miles from Fort St. Jmes, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. N. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore, thence astronomically west
3o chains; thence astronomically south
40 chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains, thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically west 40
chains; thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomiclly north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomically north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30, 1906. December 8
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
ten miles from Fort St. James, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. S. E," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains, more or less, to said southwest shore at a point near the head of
what is known as the Big Bay; thence
following said shore in southeasterly direction for about 60 chains; and thence
astronomically south for about 20 chains
to point of commencement, and containing about 400 acres, more or less.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30, 1906.
December 8.
A man who fails to raise his hat when
**! funeral is passing in Chester, England,
Is liable to fine and imprisonment.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
lays after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
ILands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
Mtuate on the north shore of Stuart
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from thc following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post ou the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet into Effingham Inlet, Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
80 W., along boundary No. 2; thence
60  S.;  thence  40  E.;  thence 40  S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of the
S. E. corner of No. 3; thence 100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. boundary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, iqo6.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by thc
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1006.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
tnence 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. t6o; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 2*A miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
F. S. E.," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomically
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J. FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief. Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
i.    .ibid lands, in Alberni District;
No. 1.—Commencing at a post on the
cast side of Silver Lake, about 40 chains
from the outlet; thence 40 chains E.;
80 chains N.; thence west to Silver
Lake; thence following the shore line
to point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing S. W. corner of
No. 1, on east shore of Silver Lake;
thence 40 chains E.. 40 chains N.; 60
chains E.; 80 chains S.; thence west to
outlet of lake; thence following the
shore line to point of commencement.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post at the
outlet of Silver Lake; thence 40 chains
S.; thence 40 chains W.; thence 40
chains N.; thence 100 chains W.; thence
M. 'o Silver Lake; thence following
shore line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
31st October, 1906. no29
to shore; thence westerly along. shore
to point of commencement.
W. E.  GREEN,
W. B.  Garrard, Ague;.
Clayoquot District.
NOTICE Is nereby given that 60 days
from date I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase die following described
land, adjoining Lot (140, Skeena District:
Commencing at a post marked "A C.'s N.
\V. Comer"; thence east 40 chains along
south boundary of T. Flewln's claim; thence
south 40 chuius; tiience west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, along east boundary
of Lot 646 to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
ANNIE COPEJLAND.
No.  9—
NOTICE is hereby given that Hurt/
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described lands,
11029 j situated on the north side of San Juan
Kiver, Keufrevr District, adjoining iB. J.
Palmer's southwest corner No. 2: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southwest Corner," thenco north, SO
chains; thence east SO chains; thence south
So chnins; thence west 80 chains to place
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 1st dajr
of November, 11)08.
JOHN   YOUNO.
November 17, 1000.
THIRTY DAYS AFTER DATE I In-
tend to make application to the Chief
Commissioner of Lauds and Works for permission to cut and carry away timber from
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt 00 days the following described lands, situated
after date 1 Intend to npply to the Chief ; No. 1. Starting at a post In Bay on west
Commissioner of Lunds and Works for per- side of extreme end of the lake and run-
lli'lssion to purchnse the following described I aiug SO chains west; SO chains north; 80
land situated ln the Kitsumkalum Valley,: dtiaius more or less, east back to shore
Unnge 5, Coast District: Commencing at | <"ld following shore back to point of com-
11 stake planted at the N. E. corner of N.. mi'!'ce,';e"■    . „„,„,„„,,. „„.„„.
T. Cunningham purchase claim, marked *»• 2* '"?/'"? 3L**R-^f?,7!fL^HRS
W. A. Wadhams' No. 1 Initial Post; thenee £itt mSS ™ ui^ etf 108 chain-f
runaiiv 40 ohains west; thence 40 chains Jft^ ^'^ "^f £%Vu?of cim-
north;  thence 40 chains  east;   thenoe -*01 tmoneement. *
chalus   south   to  post  of   eonmieucoinent,
containing 160 acres more or less.
W. A. WADHAMS,  Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Locuted  October 1st,  1000.
mencement.
No. 3, Beginning 10 chains south oi the
northwest coiner of No. 2 nnd running 00
chains south; 108 chains west; (10 chains
north and 106 ehalus east buck to point of
commencement.
No.  4. iBegiuning    at a  post  10 chains
-NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days ! .,-■..£ ^^ comer"of No. 8 runnin"
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief soutn m (.huins; we8t ioq chains; north 60
Commissioner of Lands and Works for pei-  cunjns ail(1 cngt i06 cha*ns back to point
mission to purchase the following described 0( commencement,
land situated lu the. Kltsumkajlum  Valley, j ALBERT  FRASEK.
Range 5,  Coast  District:   Commencing at'    Victoria, B. C, November 11, 1006.
a stake' planted at the N. E. corner of
W. A. Wadhams' purchuse claim, marked L.
Guue No. 1 Initiul i-ost; theuce running
40 chains west; theuce 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains  east;  thence  40 chuins
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE is   hereby given that 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
H....L.-  .„  vU.....o  Commissioner  of  Lands  and   Works  for
south to post of comimencement, containing  permission to purchase the following land,
10O acres more or less. adlolnlmr    Lot   4«7   on    PorH.nrt   r.n.l,
L.  GUNE,  Locator.
F. W. BOHLEK, Agent.
Located  October  1st,  1000.
adjoining   Lot   467   on   Portland "Canal:
Starting from a post marked "W. P. F's.
N.  W.  Corner"; thence 20 chains south;
thence 40 chuins eust;   thence   40 chains
  _   north; thence 40 chuins, more or less, west
NOTICE ls hereby given that two months ■ \° "bore Une; thence southerly along shore
afte? dute 1 SI to apply to the Hon., "ne &£*>** «TgJJce,Be,,t- contttto,n,t
Chief Commissioner of Lauds aud Works: 1J0 aa<*- more 01 ie^ „   .,.„.„
tor a special licence to cut and carry away I    vove,nl)„r ,7   jojut
timber from the following described lands, J    "Ovemner 17,  lauu.	
commencing at a post planted about three:    N(mCB  ,    ^     D      ,        u t ^ d
fourths of a mile west of the Elk river,? aftor date  , intend'to apply to the Chief
thence   north   SO ehalus,   theuce   west  40; Commissioner    of  Lands and  Works    for
chains, thence soutb 40 chains, thence west. pi,rmlssIon to purchase the following land,
40 chains, thence south 40 chains, thence, a|tuate   ou  Observatory Inlet,    adjoining
east 40 chains, thence south 40 ohains,
thence east along the beach of Kennedy
lake, thence uorth to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
.id il.M
Sept. 40C,  1008.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi mer of Lands and
Lot 479: Starting from a post marked
"W. G. P's. S. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chnins; thence east 20 chains; thence
south 20 cbalns, more or less, to shore
line; thence along the shore line westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
acres, more or less.
W. G. PINDER.
November, 17, 1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty (60)
ly to the
Works for a special license to cut and days after date we Intend to appl
rarrv awav timber  from the  following  Chief Comnilssloner of Lands and Works
S.L,;i,.?yi2i«Thirnl niitrif.!*for permission to purchase the  followine
described    lands,   in Alberni District:, (,escfllbed  ,„„,,  ^atca  Bmr 0rtveTard
Commencing at a post on the Alberni Point, commencing at a post on the North
Canal, about 30 chains S. of Hayes hank of the Skeena' rivet, thence in a
r-inHintr* theno W An chains • thence westerly direction 40 chains; thence north-
Landing, tnence W. 40 cnams, tnence cr]   40 chlll„s. tll(.nco ensterly 40 chains:
S. 160 chains; thence E. to water front;  thence southerly 40 chains nlong bank of
thence following the water    front   to river to point of commencement, contain-
point of commencement. ,n« m *?***• I!,oreo-r !??»-•
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
October 29, 1906.                        no29
Located October 16, 1908.
B.  EBY AND  S.  McKENZIE,
Locators.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (80)
64. Commencing at a post planted I V,ays *&!' .dlle ' . , "d to apply to the
,, v... „«.4V,...».(. „^.„„ «« 11.4-L.rf 1 H°n* chlef Commissioner of Lands and
at the northwest corner of Hubert works for permission to purchase the
Haines land, thence west 80 chains,! following described land situated near
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80 Graveyard Point: Commencing st a post on
«-,„.*„„ »i._«.. »„..■.►, tv. ,i,.:a„ .„ ««:„»' tlle North bnnk of the Skeena river; thence
chains, thence south 80 chains to point |n „ westerly direction 40 chains; thence
of commencement. '
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept. ioth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the Indian Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the N. E.
boundary post of the Indian Reserve
and at the S. E. corner of No. 1;
thenq- So chains N.; thence F? tn W.
boundary of Lot 79; thence S. to shore
line; thence following the shore to E.
boundary of I. R.; tnence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1906.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. no2g
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, marked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
southerly 40   ehnlns;   th-nee   easterly  40
chains; tbence northerly 40 cbalns slong
bnnk of river to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Loented   October  16,  1906.
H.  McKENZIE,  Loeator.
S.   McKENZIE,    Agent.
November  17, 1908.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty (80)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Land* and
Works for permission to purchase the following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
the North bnnk of the Skeena river; thence
ln a westerly direction 40 chains; thence
northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
cbnlns; thence southerly 40 cbalns following bank of river to point of commencement, containing lflu acres, more or less.
Located October 16,  1908.
G.  B. BAILLIB,  Locator.
B. EBY,   Agent.
November  17, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situated at Kum-ea-lon Inlet, Skeena District: Commencing at
a stake marked "W. R. F.'s Initial
Post," planted near shore of Inlet,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 6b
chains, thence south 100 chains, thence
west 40 chains to shore line, thence
westerly alon gshore line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R. FLEWIN.
December 8.
NOTTCE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry_ away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a post
on the N. shore of Uchticklesit Harbour, on the W. boundary of Loe 690,
* r ,r-nrie" Mineral Claim; t'*ence N.
nnd E. along boundary of "Cascade"
M. C. to the W. boundary of Lot 70;
thence N. and E. alnnp 70 to Fern M.
C. thence N. and E. atom* boundaries
nf "Fern " "Wasp" and "Sun-shine" No.
2 Mineral Claims, to the N. E. corner
"' "Sunshine" M. C.; thence N. to
chains; thence W. 100 chains; thence S.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands:
Commencing at a stake marked "G A.
B. No. 1," planted on the east bank of
Mammon River, thence north t6o
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, Ihence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
No. 1—
NOTICE le hereby given that thirty
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described; lands,
situated on the south side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, Joining Parkinson's southenst comer: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young. Northeast Corner," dhenec south 160 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 ohains, thencs
east 40 cbalns to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Dated nt Port Renfrew on the 18th day
of October, 1900.
ALEXR.  YOU.NG.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after dale I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away iimber from the following described lands, situated on the east bank
of Marmon River, Graham Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G A.
R.'s No. 2 Claim;" thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
No.  2-
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after dnte I intend to njiply to the
Chief Comnilssloner of Lnnds nnd Works
for a speclnl license to cut nnd carry away
timber from the following described lands,
sltunted on tbe south side of San Juan
River. Renfrew District: Commencing st
n post marked "J. Young, N. E. Corner,"
ndjoinlng Mrs. J. S. Young's south boundnry, thence south 120 chains: tiience west
80 chnins; thence nortli 40 chains; thence
enst 40 chnins; thence north 80 ehnlns;
thence enst 40 chains to place of commencement, eontnlulng 040 acres.
Dnted nt Port Renfrew, this 2»Ui dny of
October,   1000.
JOHN  YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the Hoi.
Chief Comnilssloner of Lnnds and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described lnnd, situated In the Coast District. Rnnge 5: Beginning at n port plant-
ill on the north bnnk of the Skeena river
nbout one mlie southwest of Zymqetlts
river nt the southeast corner of J. B. Bate-
man's pre-emption claim and marked B. B.'s
Northenst Corner; thence running west 120
chains! tbence south about 50 chains, more
or less, to bnnk at Skeena river; thence In
a northeasterly direction following meandering of the Skeena rivet to post of coin-
mencciiK-nt, containing nbout 320 sores of
lnnd more or less.
EMMA BAT '.MAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Asent.
Located September 20th, 1908. 15
THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 22, 1906.
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EDITORIAL COMflENT.
The platform of Vancou-
Spread ver's new daily newspa-
Eagleism. per, the Guardian, is distinctly amusing, both by
reason of its extravagance and its
comprehensiveness. We have had papers before which advocated government or municipal ownership of railways and all public utilities. It is
not a new thing for a journal to advocate a revenue tariff, and the complete control of educational matters
by each Province. Such ideas have
always been considered radical, but
there have been men who have looked
forward to the time when they would
come within the range of practical
politics. From this point on, however,
the Guardian becomes something more
than radical. In fact, the remaining
arguments of its programme are socialistic, if not anarchistic. They include the abolition of the Senate,
secession from Confederation, if satisfactory or better terms are not granted and the entire prohibition of Chi-
■ r—
nese- Japanese, Hindis and al. other
tindesittlule aliens from entering Canada. If there was any doubt beldi'6
as to who inspired the policy of the
Guardian, there can be no doubt after
reading this propaganda, and to know
the man is to realise that he is nothing if not extravagant, at any rate
in his ideas. But while Joseph Martin has rendered some service to the
Dominion, his latest manifesto would
not indicate that his views are any
less extreme and impracticable than
they were five or ten years ago. He
is still the stormy petrel, whether in
politics or journalism. He still fails
to appreciate that the one thing above
all others which British Columbia
needed when he flung away his chances
was stable government. Thi" is of all
times the least opportune in which to
launch a revolutionary programme.
He may hope to convince Canadians
that it would be wise to abolish the
Senate at about the same time as the
House of Lords is put out of business,
and that seems to be the darling idea
of the English party of which Mr.
Martin is the Canadian prototype.
The abolition of protective duty is
hardly likely to meet with favor in
British Columbia at a time when we
are just starting the most important
manufacturing industries, the very
existence of which will depend for
many years upon the same principle
of protection under whicli our East-
ern'industries have tall created and
developed. On the immigration question little need be said. There is no
real divergence of opinion among men
who wish to advance the interests of
the Province and at the same time to
observe the golden rule. The Guardian's wind-up is very much like the
last bout in a twenty-round fight, It
breathes vengeance upon Bob Kelly
and all his works, and upon all other
grafts and grafters. The Guardian
may safely be left to settle this question with the astute politician who
controls the Federal Government patronage in the Terminal City. It is
no business of ours.
A Coal
Famine.
It is not likely that Victoria will have any anxious
moments  with  respect  to
fuel supply. That, however,
is due to   two   circumstances upon
which the Coast City ought to be
congratulated—the mild climate and
unlimited resources of coal. Even if
the latter should be cut off no serious
consequences would ensue. The worst
would be merely temporary inconvenience. Out on the prairies, however,
it is a different matter. At any time
between October and April, and at
any point between the Great Lakes
and the Rockies, a temperature of
from 30 to 50 degrees below zero may
be experienced. During the present
week it has been 30 degrees below in
Winnipeg, and the same in Brandon,
where the utmost distress prevails.
One shudders to read that the hospital was entirely without coal and
wood. Unless speedy relief comes the
situation will be desperate at many
points in the Northwest. There are
those who think that the only remedy
for this is public ownership of coal
lands, but such forget that the public
does own coal lands, both in the
Northwest and in British Columbia,
and the various Governments interested are supposed to control them.
The present state of affairs only
shows that such a term is a misnomer. It is a long stride from owning to operating and is by no means
certain that it is either necessary or
would be wise for the Government to
undertake this. It is, however, quite
certain that that will be the next step
unless control is made more effective.
The Federal Government, for instance,
has had 50,000 acres of coal land
specially set apart for the public use,
but during the five years which have
elapsed since their selection, no attempt whatever has been made to secure their operation. This property
might have been producing 5,000 tons
a day and would have ensured a supply as far east as Winnipeg.   There
is no matter of more vital importance
than this. It affects even the lives of
Canadian citizens and should be grappled with promptly and courageously.
No one wants to see the Government
competing with private industry, but
it is the first duty of every Government to protect the public interest,
and the fact that this may trench
upon private investments cannot be
allowed for a moment to weigh when
human lives are in the balance.
Some day the Canadian
The House press will understand
of Lords.      and publish correct views
on those questions which
agitate English political life. At present nearly every paper misrepresents
English opinion. Not purposely, but
because all Canadian view? are tinc-
toed by a spirit alien to Canadian
interests, and apparently our writers
do not stop to think for themselves
but accept without enquiry whatever
is offered. These thoughts are suggested by the grotesque criticisms
which hava appeared during the last
few weeks on the attitude of the
SouSe of Lords toward the Government Education Bill. We were told
again and again that the Lords were
antagonizing the people of England.
That if they mutilated this precious
measure they would certainly ride to
their doom, that their tale of iniquity was about complete, and that
a long-suffering people who had put
up with them almost beyond endurance would no longer tolerate them.
We have heard all this before and
the House of Lords still lives. The
fact of the case is that Englishmen
do not readily become iconoclasts.
And further, the very important fact
has been overlooked that on the education question public opinion is with
the Lords and against the Government. Secular education in England
is doomed. Beyond the confines of
little Bethel passive resistance is a
played-out farce. Englishmen have
resolved that religious instruction
shall be given in their schools. The
policy of 1870 is a back number, and
not for the first time the House of
Lords stands in the breach and reflects the sober determination of the
people. Sir Henry Campbell-Banner-
man does not know this, or at any
rate he did not know it a little while
ago, but it is doughnuts to dollars
that he is beginning to have a shrewd
suspicion of the truth and that he
will not dare' to take the only step
consistent with the loud protestations
of his Government, and appeal to the
people, against the Lords. No ministry has ever done that. It is twenty-
five years since Lord Roseberry talked
of "ending or mending," and the
Lords are stronger and more popular
than evt*.
THE QUEST THAT TAILED.
O the night was dark and the night was
late,
And the robbers came to rob him;
And they picked the locks of his palace-
gate,
The robbers that came to rob him—
They  picked  the  locks  of  his  palace-
gate.
Seized his jewels and gems of state,
His  coffers  of gold  and  his  priceless
plate,—
The robbers that came to rob him.
But  loud laughed  he  ln  the morning
red!
For of what had the robbers robbed
him?
Hoi hidden safe as he slept ln bed,
When the robbers came to rob him,
They robbed him not of a golden shred
Of the childish dreams In his wise old
head—
"And   they're   welcome   to   all   things
else!" he said,
When the robbers came to rob him.
f
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I   The Drama. |
There is unquestionable authority for
the statement that men have entertained
angels unawares. After attending the
Victoria Theatre on Monday night and
witnessing the performance of John
Griffith in "King Richard III.," a good
modern paraphrase would be "Victorians
have entertained comedians unawares."
For of all the roaring, ranting barnstormers who ever had the brazen effrontery to call himself a Shakespearian
actor he is absolutely the worst. A man
cannot be held responsible for his personal appearance, unless by a course of
self-neglect and abuse he mars the image in which he was created: I am far
from saying that this is the case with
John Griffith, but nature in her most
freakish mood never produced anything
so unsuitable in appearance for a serious actor as John Griffith. There is a
certain class of character which he
might portray acceptably; he would
make an ideal executioner; he might
even aspire to the position of sheriff in
some half-civilized community, but anything more humane or heroic, and above
all any speaking part is entirely beyond
the range of his capabilities. And yet
for the space of three hours this self-
styled "actor" undertook to mouth and
rant some of the finest sentences which
Shakespeare penned. When he was not
roaring he was ranting. When he was
not raving he was squirming on the
floor, apparently in an epileptic fit. But
the depth of the ridiculous was plumbed
in the celebrated tent scene, where five
members of the company stood around
his couch, each robed in a sheet, and
with the limelight turned on. The monster lay supposedly dreaming, but the
grotesque action which followed the
most un-ghost-like upbraiding which
came from the lips of his victims, was
altogether too much for the house, and
the gallery fairly roared, as did the
house, when a few moments later he
rolled upon the floor under the influence of the epileptic seizure referred to.
I   have seen many   representations   of
Richard ill. as far back as the days of
good old Sam Phelps, but it has remained for John Griffith to reveal to me
the possibilities of Shakespeare's classic
as a farcical comedy. Having seen what
he can make of it, I should have no
hesitation, were I an entrepeneur, looking for a star in starting John Griffith
out with the roaring farce "King Richard III." The., only addition that it
would be necessary  to make to  what
Victorians so thoroughly enjoyed on
Monday night would be a new headdress for John Griffith—the cap and
bells.
It would be unkind to say anything
of the other members of the company,
although several of them, notably Benedict Brown as Catesby, William Lloyd
as Richmond, and Charles Sutton as
King Henry VI. were incomparably superior to the star. The mounting was
ridiculous, the stage accessories being
practically nil, and the armies of Richard and Richmond fought under great
disadvantages, having to produce the
semblance of a decisive battle with eight
suoes and the same number of tin-foil
spears. The conclusion of the whole
matter is that if Shakespeare can survive this kind of thing he must indeed
be immortal.
This is what the Colonist dramatic
critic says, in its issue of December 18th.
My readers can take their choice:
'The Tragedy of King Richard the
Third is supposed to contain the account of that king's treacherous plots
against his brother Clarence; the pitiful
murder of his innocent nephews; his
tyrannical usurpation, together with the
whole course of his detested life and
most deserved death." So says the old
chronicle, and the villains of history
must remain villains to the end 1 Though
there remains some sad apology in the
fact that Richard's natural equipment
seemed suitable only for that melancholy part—
"I, deformed, unfinished,
Sent before my time,
Go to this breathing world, scarce half
made up;
And that so lamely, and unfashionable
That dogs bark at me, as  I halt by
them."
The play,  as given at the Victoria
Theatre last evening, was well set, well
costumed, and well sutsained throughout. In the opening act, the gentle-
monkish king, Hemy VI., was portrayed
by Charles Sutton with great dignity
and feeling, and the scene of his murder
in the Tower by Gloucester, fairly justified that personage's unflattering accoun'
of himself. As the tragedy developed
the extraordinarily able acting of John
Griffith held his audience spell-bound—
and made them shudder! He, indeed,
once again proved with no little success,
that "plain devil—except in the final issue—is a very certain ally, especially,
and alas! where frail woman is concerned! Miss Mabel Standish, as the
Lady Anne, posed and moved with grace
and charm, and had a rich, soft-speaking
voice, which was charming to listen to.
William Lloyd, as Buckingham and
Richmond- did full justice to his double
parts. The little Princes in the Tower-
that tragedy familiar since childhood—
again made instant appeal to heart and
motherhood, and the boys themselves
were so simple and natural af to be almost a complete realization of the "humanities" of s-ich a scene. Indeed, the
personifications were all ■ xrellent, and
it was a real treat to hear this page of
English history repeated—in the immortal English of Shakespeare—by a cast
qualified to render it with English tone
and color, and no little of mediaeval
English barbarism. Those who were
present will remember John Griffith for
a long time, and condole sincerely with
tnose among the playgoers who missed
the opportunity of remembering him,
too.
"The Governor's Wife," a merry musical comedy, will be presented by the
Amsden Opera Company at the Victoria
Theatre on Friday evening, December
21st. Tlie piece is reputed to be an exceptionally attractive one, and is said to
possess a plot of a most interesting
charactre, which in itself is sufficient to
make it attractive. Mr. Claude Amsden and the clever soprano, Miss Hazel
Davenport, will sustain the leading roles
of the governor and his spouse, and a
well-balanced and harmonious chorus
will support them. With an excellent
scenic investiture, a chorus of talented
vocalists and two such clever people in
the lead the success of "The Governor's
Wife" should be assured.
The Old Home
Down rfthe Farm
Will be brighter, more attractive to the young folks
and dearer to the old folks too, if cheered by
a first-class
.Talking Machine..
We"arc sole agents on Vancouver Island for
Columbia Graphophones,
Victor and|Berliner Gramophones,
and Edison Phonographs
Catalogues of Machines and Records sent to any address
on application.
FLETCHER BROS.
SUPERIOR QUALITY   MUSIC  HOUSE
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
To my mind the best feature about the
performance at the New Grand Theatre
is the work of the orchestra in selections from "Faust." The piece which
struck me particularly was the rendering
of the "Intermezzo," which precedes the
"Pilgrim's Chorus." Signor Claudio's
work in on the first violin was excellent,
and the way in which the orchestra attacked the full chorus later was a most
creditable performance. Prof. Nagel is
to be congratulated very heartily on the
successful production of a difficult piece
of music. Mr. George F. Keane has appeared before a Victoria audience as a
song; illustrator. Mr. Keane is the possessor of a nice tenor voice, but I was
sorry that he had not been provided
with a more catchy song than "Kate
Kearney' for his first appearance. I
think that Messrs. Considine & Sullivan
would be well advised if they made a
radical change in the style of the songs
which they present to their audiences.
I have heard many opinions, and I have
had my own, and I have not the slightest hesitation in saying that the major-
ty of these "illustrated songs" are rotten. It is not fair to the man who is
vo sing them, that he should be given a
poor song, with a bad tune, accompanied
with diotic pictures. I know for a fact
that this feature in the bill of the New
Grand has ben very severely criticized.
Good voices have been wasted on spurious music, and I think that this is a
Rood time to make a well-deserved kick.
I would far rather hear either Mr. Roberts or Mr. Keane sing a song in the
full glare of the footlights htan hear
them prostitute their talent to the accompaniment of the cheap music which usually goes to the "illustrated song." I
have overstepped my space in talking of
this music, and have no room to say
what I would like to about the company at present playing. I must compromise by expressing my opinion that
there is as good a show at the New
Grand this week as there ever has been.
I may alos say that Manager Jamieson
A Cosy Corner at the Foodie Dog.
;;
The \\
Poodle Dog I \
Grill,
Yates SI.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
•XCTUALLV
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the delicacies of lhe
season.
W. S. D. SMITH
Proprietor
Your Object
and Ours
YOU have three things which you expect to attain by being in  business.
• And you must attain all three if you
expect to stay there. The first is to make
money—the second, to make friends, and the
third, to sell the kind of Clothing that will
enable you to make both.      J
You can temporarily accomplish the
first two without the aid of the latter. Nevertheless, you can figure out as well as we can
about how long you can keep things going
on that plan.fjl,,
HI The right kind of Clothing" is essential
to permanent success—and ourj[object is to
see that you get it.
"Picadilly Brand" Clothes fit, wear and
hold their perfect shape in a manner which
tells any man plainly enough that he will go
far and look long before he will find anything
of a like quality at a lower price.
We would like your trade, and we know
you will like the trade that the selling of
"Picadilly Brand" will bring you.
Our salesmen are out now with the new
line. Don't place your orders for Spring
until you have seen our samples.
ti. E. BOND & CO.
LIMITED
Manufacturers - - - TORONTO
told me privately that he has a "cracker-
jack" coming for Christmas week.
Victoria Theatre
MONDAY, DEC. 24
John R.  Slocum Company  (Inc.), Offer
the Comic Opera Success,
THE
Yankee
Consul
With
HARRY SKOBT
And Seventy-five Others.
The   most   successful   Comic   Opera  of
the Decade.
Twenty tuneful,  catchy song hits  cc
30—Tuneful, Catchy Son? HUB—20
Box office opens- 10 a.m. Friday, December  21st.    Mail orders accompanied
by cheque will receive their usual attention.
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE PEELING" {DROP
IK* AT THE
GARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET;
Nuff Sed !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
nnd Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group:
Commenging at a post planted in the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. B„
N. E. corner"; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence cast 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated November  7th,  1906.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.

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