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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jul 30, 1910

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 .. t_____ ^6irsv____ir_i_____,x
Just a Little Better
Terry's
Fountain
ALWAYS IN THE LEAD
|i.*JUULlUUUUUUlilUUAMJU_JUl*J
The
_\ British Columbia Revi
Published at Victoria,  B.
Vol. VII.   No
£_
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 3
yynrBTinrrra a» itttti ir
£   HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone 83
*A_UUUJUU_J______UJUUtl_fc£
One Dollar Pee Annum
|\YING FOR VOTES
The disclosures made during the pre-
Int week in connection witli Mayor Mor-
ly's method of paying for votes with the
ltepayers' money furnished, perhaps, the
barest  illustration  of  that gentleman's
Jilitical methods which has yet come to
L'ht;   although the recent Police Coni-
lission Inquiry caine very near to un-
Irthing even more sensational methods,
spite of the fact that there is, and has
len, for a long time, widespread dissatis-
Iction with regard to the manner in which
Itblic works are carried on in Victoria,
|e Mayor recommended, and recommend-
in such terms that the recommendation
inounted to an instruction, that two men
lould bo employed as inspectors of side-
alks, who have absolutely no knowledge
cement or concrete work.    It is not a
Itle significant that the better known of
|ese two, Mr. J. C. Watters, is one of the
ost influential leaders and organizers of
le local Labour party.    He is a boiler-
laker by trade, and as far as The Week
lows, a man of estimable character, but
I no stretch of the imagination could he
1 regarded as competent to inspect cement
prk.   It is only too obvious that the sole
Irposes of his employment must have
len to secure the sympathy and support of
man who could control Labour votes.
l-obably, Mayor Morley would not deny
lis; he would simply claim that he was
[llowing a time-honoured custom—which
indeed, not without Scriptural warrant,
|r was it not the Great Teacher who said:
[ake   unto  yourselves  friends  of the
■Jammon of unrighteousness."    And did
not commend the Unjust Steward for
Lving feathered his nest when he had the
jiportunity.    But, the ratepayers might
jiject on the ground that the Mayor's
lethod is not only calculated to make
lem pay for votes, but for incompetent
Jtspection and defective sidewalks.    The
Imtractors, Messrs. Stedham & Co., have
lted one instance in whicii the inspection
las a farce, and could only result in the
oandonment of contract work, because no
Imtractors could afford to submit to it.
f'hen an inspector compels a contractor
|> discontinue work on an unfinished piece
cement laid, because the clock strikes
Ifive" and then compels him, next morn-
lig, to break it up and relay it because
I has "set" during the night, he lays him-
]_lf open to thc suspicion that he is more
Inxious to "knock" contract work than to
pcure good sidewalks.   This line of action
all the more easily understood when it
remembered   that   the   local   Labour
[fnions are opposed to contract work and
liat Mr. J. C. AVatters is tlieir representa-
jve.   The moral of the story is so plain
fiat it would be an insult to the intelli-
|ence of the readers of The Week to state
in precise terms,  but  the  disclosure
Ihould do much to aid the cause of civic
eform and to open tlie eyes of those who
1'cre blind to   "ways that are dark ancl
ricks that are vain."
riCTORIA MERCHANTS
The interview with Mr. Oscar Bass,
lublished in the Colonist of Friday, makes
literesting reading. Mr. Bass is an ob-
"prvant man and apart from "fishing
lories" fairly reliable. He has just re-
lirned from a visit to Stewart, and has
managed to bring back a report, at once
lore comprehensive and concise, than any
Ihich has previously been given out. Re-
jnced to the briefest possible terms it is
liat Stewart is a busy, business-like, en-
Irprising city; that it is excellently man-
ted ; that there is practically no drunken-
pss or disorder, and that there is every
lason to believe that it will be the head-
narters of a perriianent mining camp.   In
spite of the sensational "booming" in
which its injudicious friends have indulged, Mr. Bass believes that the Portland Canal camp contains many bona fide
mines in the making, and that after all
the wild-cats have been shot tliere will
be sufficient game left to furnish sport for
many a season. But, and Mr. Bass makes
it a very big "but," the merchant business
of Stewart is being conducted almost entirely by Vancouver houses. "The Victoria merchants," he says, ' are asleep.
They have no agents on the spot, whilst
their Vancouver competitors never leave
the ground." He might have added that
the Victoria merchants are apparently
more interested in formulating academic
and impracticable resolutions which never
get beyond the floor of the Board of Trade.
It is all very well to look into the future
but the Board of Trade is looking into the
very far future when it wastes its time
in agitating for a railway across Seymour
Narrows. Meanwhile, for lack of enterprise the merchants are losing the opportunity which lie at their door, and once
more the business of a Capital of the
North has fallen into the hands of their
more aggressive competitors. The history
of Dawson, of Prince Rupert and of
Stewart will be repeated in many a new
city of Northern British Columbia unless
the Victoria merchants "wake up."
of The Week, the whole episode was of a
disgraceful character and, at least, calls
for investigation by the Police Commissioners into the conduct of P. C. Dawley.
[Since writing the above The Week learns
that the Police Commissioners, greatly to
their credit, have suspended P. 0. Dawley
until the matter has been fully enquired
into. They also discharged a Constable
today for drunkenness.]
KICKED OUT
The Times' cartoonist cleverly depicted the somewhat humiliating operation recently performed by the Democrats
of Nebraska on William Jennings Bryan.
The Week never had much opinion of Mr.
Bryan, and from the moment when he
visited Victoria last year and delivered his
unctuous and oily address at the Empress
Hotel, it had a poorer opinion of him
than before. How he could ever have been
regarded seriously as a statesman passes
comprehension. He never was anything
but a "hot-air" artist of the first order,
and has found his level as a paid lecturer
for various, more or less philanthropic
organizations. Anyone possessing a copy
of Cruikshanks' drawing of Mr. Chad-
band, in the Dickens edition of Dickens,
will agree that the resemblance is so remarkable that the discarded Democrat
leader might have sat for the portrait.
native of Canada who has acquired citizenship by birth or naturalization, is also
a Canadian by nationality. But tliere is
no Canadian by racial or tribal origin,
unless the Indians are so counted. Every
person having an occupation or trade will
be entered for it, but. if employed in the
census year at some other occupation for
part or whole time he will be so recorded
also. If the person is working on own
account, the entry will be so made. An
entry is also required to be made showing
where the person is employed, as on farm,
in woolen mill, at foundry shop, in drug
store, etc. Wage-earners are entered to
show the number of weeks employed in
1910 at chief occupation or trade; at other
than chief occupation if any; the hours
of working time per week at chief occupation, or at other occupation if any; the
total earnings in 1910 at chief occupation; the total earnings at other than
chief occupation; and the rate per hour
when employed by the hour. Entries are
required to be made for each person showing the amount of insurance held at date
of the census upon life, as well as against
accident or sickness, together with the cost
of such insurance in the census year.
The last question on the extended schedule of Population relates to infirmities. It calls for a record of each person
having an infirmity. If blind, deaf and
dumb, crazy or lunatic, idiotic or silly,
a record thereof will be made in the
proper column, and tbe age at which the
infirmity appeared is required to be
specified.
AMENITIES   OF   TWENTIETH   CENTURY  CIVILIZATION
ENFORCING THE LAW
The cartoon on the front page of The
Week illustrates two incidents which have
occurred in Victoria and the vicinity recently. The ono has been satisfactorily
concluded in the police court, when Magistrate Jay fined the harum-scarum automobilist $25 and costs for "running
amuck" in Government Street and injuring a boy. The other, and more spectacular incident appears to have settled in the
shades of oblivion since it is nobody's
business to prosecute a drunken woman
who fires a revolver on the public highway, endangering human life. The fact
that the woman shot with the avowed intention of killing apparently does not
bring her action within the purview of the
Criminal Law. Tho aspect of the case
in which The Week is interested is not that
a worthless woman shot at the man who
had thrown her over, but that the public
safety seems to be disregarded by the authorities in consenting to hush the matter
up. It is quite conceivable that young
Gass was not anxious to prosecute and
Police Constable Dawley, his companion,
being a member of the City force, would
naturally wish to keep the matter out of
the papers. But such things cannot be
kept out of the papers, and, in the opinion
THE NEXT CENSUS
The next census of Canada will be
taken under date of June 1st, 1911, and
will embrace the subjects of population,
mortality, agriculture, manufactures, minerals, fisheries and dairy products. Population will be recorded under the heads
of residence and personal description;
citizenship, nationality and religion; profession, occupation and trade or means of
living; wage-earnings and insurance; education and language spoken, and infirmities. Every person living on lst Juno will
be entered on the schedule of population
by inline, as member of a family, institution or household, together with place of
habitation, sex, relationship to head of
the family or household, and whether
single, married, widowed, divorced or
legally separated. The month of birth,
year of birth and age at. last birthday will
also be recorded. Entries will be made for
each person to show thc country or place
of birth, year of immigration to Canada
if born elsewhere, year of naturalization
if formerly an alien, and also racial or
tribal origin, nationality and religion.
Every person of alien birth who has become a naturalized citizen is a Canadian
by nationality; and every British subject
with residence in Canada, as well as every
THE POOR PARSON
What's the matter with religion?  This
paraphrase of the historic question about
Kansas is suggested by an article in the
New York   Post   whicii   gives   statistics
about clergymen's salaries in the United
States.   The inevitable conclusion from a
study of the tables is that the average
churchgoer is not in earnest about his religion; if he were, he would not suffer his
clergyman to exist on the wages of unskilled labourer.   Even if he had no personal liking for his pastor, he would honour
his work, and would feel it a disgrace that
a minister of God should have to be also
a martyr.    The earthly reward of the
clergy in the United States is about $663.
The figure is taken from the census report
and is official.    Contrast this wage with
the handsome salary paid to Marcelline,
the clown at the New York hippodrome.
Marcelline gets $10,000 a year, and has a
long holiday.    Mpst of his salary, one
may take it for granted, is made up by
men and women who are supposed to be
churchgoers and who are at least Christians.    Another circus performer, named
''Desperado," receives $f>00  a week for
diving from the top of a tout to land on
his chest upon a runway far below.   Acrobats earn all the way from $«r>0 to $200 a
week, so that the poorest of them receives
what would keep four clergymen and their
families.   Consider the prize that was offered too by nominal Christians to tempt
two thugs like Jeffries and Johnson to
batter each other.   It would keep one hundred and fifty ministers and tlieir families
for a year.   Tho average professional baseball player earns twice as much as the average preacher.   The chorus girl earns more.
So does the bartender. The hangman earns
as much, a fair jockey cams twice as much.
Christians are willing to pay far more for
their amusements than for their religious
instruction.   The heathen who make their
witch doctors the most venerated nion in
the tribe show a truer understanding of
what   religion   should   be   than   do   we
Christians. THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 30,  1910
At The Street
Corner
By THE LOUNQER
I think that some sort of a movement ought to be put on foot to prevent the various vessels using the Inner Harbour from committing a nuisance which annoys the whole city. I
refer to their smoke. It is a matter
which is entirely in the hands of the
steamship companies. If they burn
good coal, there will not bc the nuisance. If they burn bad, it is up to
the municipal authorities to compel
them to burn good. On Thursday and
Friday last the "Prince George," in
addition to the damage which she
did to the wharf, also worried the
citizens with the dense volumes of
smoke which she poured out from her
funnels. On Friday last "The Iroquois" was a similar offender. We
have got accustomed to the noisome
fumes which make the Causeway objectionable and which are due to the
operations of The Chemical Co. Of
course, the latter is a Victoria manufacturing concern and helps out the
wealth of thc city; therefore it is
allowed to remain, because you can't
conduct chemical works without making a "smell." But a steamboat can
use coal which will not make the
smoke to which I refer. I have seen
the same obnoxious fumes coming
from C. P. R. "Princesses." This
company can well afford to pay high
prices for their fuel and I do not see
why a city of, approximately, 50,000
inhabitants should be constantly annoyed by the smoke evil, merely because steam companies want to economise in small ways. Incidentally I
might remark that both the Empress
Hotel and, more especially, the Diard
are offenders in the same way. [It
is more a matter of stoking than inferior fuel.—Ed.]
* *     *
I have seldom seen more excitement on the streets of Victoria than
was observable last Monday when a
scarlet motor-car collided with two
individuals. I don't want to make
any mistakes, so I will only say that
it was the opinion of the large crowd
which collected that the man who
was driving it was a "leetle bit on
the wrong side." He wasn't exactly
drunk, but he had had a few more
drinks than a man trying to steer a
machine should have had. Either
that, or he was a learner. Perhaps
the most charitable conclusion would
be the latter. Anyhow a boy was
hurt and I understand that a man
was knocked down without being
hurt, owing to the driver steering
the car onto the sidewalk opposite
Messrs. Charlston's store. All of
which goes to show that at least
one clause of the new Liquor Law
is good. No man who is in charge
of automobiles ought to be allowed
to drink whilst on duty. It may be
hard on him for the time being, but
it is very much harder on thc public
if he takes too much and endangers
their lives or limbs. I have talked
this new law over with many men;
men who frequent saloons and men
who occasionally go on a "toot."
But I haven't met one yet who did
not approve of this clause.
* *     *
The clause forbidding the sale of
liquor to minors or to women in a
public bar-room is one which appeals
to all, but there is one clause which
seems to a Lounger's eyes ridiculous.
That is the clause which, according
to the Colonist of thc 24th inst.,
says that "No liquors may at any
time be sold to 'joy-riders,' that is,
pleasure riders, motoring or driving,
and not bona fide travellers." Now,
that is somewhat drastic. Few people use an automobile except for
pleasure, but, according to the law,
if Father, Mother and Little Willie
go out for a motor drive and feel
thirsty, Father can't have his Scotch
and Soda, Mother can't have her
claret and lemonade, and poor little
Willie can't havc his plain lemonade,
because they won't stop thc car for
his sake. With respect to other features of the new law, it is not tin-
place of thc Lounger to speak.
* *     *
I think that thc daily press all over
the  world  gives  far  too  much  pro
minence to "murder cases." At present the London papers are advertising a certain Dr. Crippen and naturally provincial and colonial papers
are doing the same. What do we
care whether the man is a murderer
or not? If he is brought to justice
eventually and pays the penalty of
his crimes, that is enough for us.
Those of us who are old enough, do
not care to read revolting details,
and those who are young enough to
like them should not be allowed to
read them.    So, why print them?
And that brings me to an excellent
article in thc Colonist of the 26th inst.
"In Woman's Realm" usually contains
good common sense and in the issue
referred to the Lounger entirely
agrees with the views expressed with
regard to Moving Picture shows.
Films which deal with criminal acts
should bc excluded from any house
which caters to children. We all
know from experience the deleterious
effects which the "Penny Dreadful"
and the "Shilling Shocker" have had
on youth. It is not hard to believe
the yarn of the Tacoma boys, who
stated that they had committed burglary because they had seen how to
do it from the Moving Picture shows.
However, it is only fair to say that
Victoria has been peculiarly lucky in
this respect and that it is rare indeed
for anyone to be able to find fault
with any of the films shown in this
city.
* *     *
A complaint has recently been turned into me by a hotel-keeper, which
might well be ventilated. I don't take
it upon myself to give an opinion one
way or another, but open discussion
on the subject might be productive
of good. It appears that a great deal
of fruit grown in California, and—
mark this—which can't be grown in
British Columbia, is turned down for
trivial reasons. A spot here, or a
spot there turns down a whole case.
Mind you, I am not encouraging the
wholesale importation of rotten fruit,
but I do think that considering that
many of us eat an apple whicii is a
little bit gone on one side, it is a
little hard on shippers and consignees
that fruit should be refused in this
wholesale manner. Most people who
know anything at all, dont' care about
game unless it is "High"; and, personally, I won't eat a banana unless
it is three parts rotten.
* *     *
Since first beginning this column I
have had another idea suggested to
me by a visitor. How will the new
law deal with clubs and houses of
ill-fame with regard to the sale of
liquor? This I cannot answer, but it
seems to me that Jack is as good as
his master, at least that is the slogan
of the North American Continent,
and if Jack can't get a drink I don't
see why his master should, and I certainly hope that a severe watch will
be kept on the houses referred to.
* *     *
It seems to mc a reasonable argument that those people who improve
their property, and thereby increase
the value of neighbouring holdings,
should have some consideration in
the matter of taxation; and that those
people who do not improve their property should pay more than those
that do. But these things arc not so.
And, why not?
* *     *
I read an amusing article, or rather
a letter, in a late issue of the Colonist, in which the writer describes
the Mayor's scheme for the beautifi-
cation of Victoria. A Venus de Milo
on one side of thc Causeway and a
Dying Gladiator on the other. Of
course, thc whole thing must have
been a joke, but, seriously speaking,
it would add to the City's beauty if
the old lamps, which are now no
longer in use on the western side of
thc Causeway were either taken away
altogether, or provided with globes
for the edification of our noon-day
visitors.
* *     *
Almost 23 for Lounger
Lounger had the misfortune of being capsized while crossing in a boat
on Prospect Lake this week. Beyond
receiving a severe shock by the external indulgence of lake water,
Lounger is none the dirtier from thc
application.
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THE PIANO THAT ALWAYS RETAINS THE CHARM OF YOUTH
KRANICH & BACH, "NEW ART" BELL, BROADWOOD, CHI CKERING, HAINES BROS.
MONTELIUS PIANO HOUSE, LIMITED
SOLE B. C. REPRESENTATIVES
1104 GOVERNMENT STREET
-COR. FORT STREETl
I have often referred in disparaging terms to the boys of Victoria. I
havc attributed to them every vice under the sun, but, at the same time it
must be conceded that they are, essentially, a smart bunch of youngsters. The other night I went to a
show because I wanted some information; the manager was out, but a
kid of about fourteen told me all I
wanted, and told it to me in a business-like manner. Then, another thing
which I can't help admiring, is the
way in which these same boys ride
their bicycles. The "nerve" which
they display appeals to me. I tliink
on the whole that we have as healthy,
nervy and useful a set of boys in British Columbia as in any other place;
at least that is the opinion of
ofa
<rtc*-£Jl^,
The Canadian Magazine
The Canadian Magazine stands for
all that is best in the Canadian Magazine world and the issue to hand for
August is one of the best numbers
which we have yet had the pleasure
of perusing. There is an excellent
article on the late Professor Goldwin
Smith, having reference to his life
at Oxford. This is contributed by
Prof. W, L. Grant, an Oxford lecturer, and one, therefore, well entitled to undertake the task. Goldwin
Smith in Canada is dealt with by
Dr. A. H, U. Colquhoun, who tells
of the place and the work which
the eminent thinker held and did in
the Dominion. In this the writer refers to the attack made ou Smith
by Disraeli in "Lothair." Both these
articles arc well illustrated. Halifax
in days of yore, at the time when
the Duke of Kent was Commander
of the Forces, is the subject of an
interesting article by Professor Archibald MacMechan. Mr. Arthur O.
Wheeler, President of thc Canadian
Alpine Club, has a beautifully illustrated article on "Canada's Wonderland." Some good poetry and several
fine short stories go to make up a
magazine on which the publishers
may well congratulate themselves.
King Edward Mines
LIMITED
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
PORTLAND CANAL, B.C.
We are offering the balance
of the first issue of shares
in this Company at ioc per
share For Prospectus and
full particulars apply to	
KING EDWARD MINES, Limited
Room 8, Mahon Building      P. O. Box 772
Victoria, B.C.
The name on the Label should be SCHMIDT'S, if you
want the best in genuine imported Clarets and Burgundies. They have been on this market for the past
fifteen years and stand for the Popular Choice.
For sale by all liquor dealers.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents",
S. L. Wilson
J. Kennedy
VICTORIA GARAGE
S. L. WILSON, Manager
REPAIRING OF ALL MAKES  OF CARS A SPECIALTY
AUTOMOBILES STORED, CLEANED AND FOR
HIRE DAY AND NIGHT
943 FORT STREET (Opp. Skating Rink)
Telephone 2326 VICTORIA, B.C.
They were a very young and obviously bride and brldegroomlsh couple. On
entering the tea shop the maid tactfully
led them to a little side room which
chanced to be unoccupied. Tea was
ordered   and   served.     As   the   waitress
was leaving the room the young ml
discovered an important fault in tl
service. "Oh, waitress," he said, "ml
we have a spoon?" "Oh, yes," said tl
girl, "I won't come back for ten minutf
and I quite think you will be able
have the room all to yourselves." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
The Victoria Theatre
I On Saturday night last the Georgia
tinstrels   held   the   boards   at   Vienna's   principal   play-house.     These
jinstrels  are  real  niggers  and  they
live  a most excellent  performance,
lhe  songs and choruses were good
lid there were many good jokes, the
lie about thc electric pie being es-
pcially well received.   It went some-
ling after this style: "D'you know,
fistah  Johnsing,  that  I  horrified  a
|nncr party de ober day by sayin'
at I liked an electric pic?"   "Why,
Ihat kind of a pie is that, Sambo?"
I-Vell, it's a pie with  a lot of cur-
[nts  in  it."    Tableau.
lit is gratifying to know that the
ictoria  Musical Society,  Geo.  Phil-
ps, Director, has some distinguished
Itists coming to the Capital for the
|:xt   theatrical   season.     Mde.   Liza
ehmann,  a  vocalist  with  a  world-
Bide  reputation,  will  appear  in  the
■ictoria Theatre in November; Miss
lien Terry, who needs no introduc-
Ln to anyone who has followed the
|ama, may bc seen in December; M.
|>sef Hoffman, the celebrated pianist,
give one of his unexcelled reci-
lls  in  March  and the  eminent  M.
|ischa Elman, whose fame as a vio-
liist,  is  well known,  will  visit  the
Ity in April.    It is sincerely to be
Ipcd  that  those  people   who  have
lid  so  much  about  having  a  ne..'
Icatre, but who havc been so back-
ard in greeting really first-class at t-
fs,  will  rally and  assure  the V'c-
Iria Musical Society of their hearty
Id financial support.   The prices are
lasonable and may be  read in  the
pvcrtisement which appears in this
■sue.    Let  Victoria  redeem  her re-
Ltation as a music-loving commun-
ly and, by buying seats in advance,
luarantee the Society that it has not
|iade its efforts in vain.
The New Grand
Mr. Henry Lee is a great impersonator and he is the star this week,
lie  appears  in  quick   change  turns,
Ihich arc made in front of the audi-
Ince,  first  as  Mark Twain,  next as
|Unclc Joe" Cannon; then he re-ap-
■Jears  as   Gen.   Grant,  whilst  within
moment he comes back as Gen. Lee.
lie ends a really excellent pcrform-
|nce by showing the audience what
■Teddy," otherwise known as Theo-
lore  Roosevelt,    looks    and  speaks
■ike.    In short his "stunt" is a good
line and well worth going to sec and
Icar.    Leeds  & Lamar are  distinctly amusing in the boxing scene which
loncludes  their performance.    Musi-
Ial Irving docs some clever tricks on
|iis one-stringed, sort of, violin.
Pantages Theatre
During   the   past   week   Lewis   &
Lake havc been amusing full houses
Ivith   a   couple  of  farcical   comedies
Entitled  "Uncle  Hcinie"  and  "Foci
lng thc Farmer."   They are both ao-
Jurd,   but   they   arc   none   the   L-ss
laughable.    Scenery, costumes,  iaiic-
lng and singing arc quite up to tltc
Itandard   which   this   company   l::.s
liaintained  since  its  arrival  in   Vic-
loria.    Next week, I understand, we
Ire going   to havc    a "Wild    West
fhow" presented by thc same company, and I, for one, am not going to
piiss it.
The Empress Theatre
A good series of pictures have been
Ihown here up to the time of writ-
Jig, but, as I have said before, it is
lile to criticise pictures whicii will be
lone by the time this paper appears.
|)ne thing which struck me was thc
ppcarancc  outside    the    theatre  of
Dine new sign-boards, constructed in
|lission   style,  and  which,   I   undcr-
tand, arc the work of the management.    They are neat and attractive.
Romano's Theatre
On Wednesday and Thursday the
above theatre had a fine head-liner in
the shape of "The Missing Bridegroom." This is melodrama, but I,
personally, have always been fond of
melodrama and enjoy it. Another
feature of Romano's has been "The
Washington Quartette," which has
been furnishing good music and delighting  large  audiences.
The Majestic Theatre
Last week a special compliment
was paid to the manager of the Majestic Theatre. He was asked to continue his films of "Dotheboys Hall"
over and above the usual two days.
Hc did so and was well rewarded.
If there were more pictures of this
class shown, there would be less
"kick" about Moving Pictures, and
far more benefit to be derived from
the point of view of those who wish
to let their children know what
school days in the past were like. It
has been said that Dickens was
coarse; so hc was at times, but at
only such times when coarseness was
demanded, and he never wrote a word
which a child might not read. At
least that is the opinion of
MO MUS.
******
Mrs. Fiske
Mrs. Fiske, America's foremost actress, will be seen in the greatest role
of her career "Becky Sharp," at the
Victoria Theatre on the evening of
Monday,   August   1.
"Becky Sharp," in which Mrs.
Fiskc's realization of "the immortal
Becky" stands as one of the most
signal contributions that the American stage has known, is a dramatization of Thackeray's famous novel,
"Vanity Fair," made by Langdon
Mitchell.
With its various groups of strongly differentiated characters and its
multiplicity of incidents, "Vanity
Fair" has always been held to be
filled with dramatic material. It has
been said there are a dozen plays
in the novel. Many have been made,
but none other than this, by Langdon
Mitchell ever scored any particular
success. No skillfull dramatist should
ever attempt to make a play of the
book without making Becky the central figure, since the interest centres
and radiates with her as the principal object of the story. Mr. Mitchell,
in making his play, put every important incident in which Becky predominates into his work. Hc displayed
remarkable appreciation of the dramatic values of the novel, and an equally pronounced ability in assembling
them in dramatic sequence. In the
play as it stands, the reader of "Vanity Fair" will find that peculiar satisfaction that flows from the picturing
of a favourite novel on the stage—
thc living embodiment of its characters, and the actuality of its scenes
—-while one unacquainted with Thackeray's stories, if there be such a one,
which there are in British Coluumbia,
sad to say, will enjoy the play as a
perfect narrative in itself. In view of
the many failures which have been
witnessed in attempts to turn some
of our greatest novels into plays,
Langdon Mitchell's accomplishment
is not only unique but richly deserves
the high place it has taken in dramatic literature.
"Becky Sharp" is the most popular
play in Mrs. Fiske's comprehensive
repertoire, and her characterization
of Langdon Mitchell's heroine as
drawn from Thackeray's brilliant
figure, stands as one of the creations
which will bc remembered as long as
the history of dramatic art in America endures. Every nuance of
Becky's volatile character is brought
out by Mrs. Fiskc's delicately moulded art, and there is a buoyancy about
her portrayal of the role that is deli-
ciously infectious.
The Manhatton Company, Mrs.
Fiske's supporting organization, includes Holbrook Blinn, whose wonderful characterization of Jim Piatt,
the regenerated Bowery Loafer, in
"Salvation Nell," is doubtless so vividly remembered, Henry Stephenson, Edward Mackay, Wilfred Buck-
land, Harold Russell, Frank McCormack, Robert V. Ferguson, Sheldon
Lewis, R. Owen Meech, Gregory
Kelly, Alice John, Florine Arnold,
Merle Maddem, Veda McEvcrts, Helena Van Brugh, and numerous
others.
DIAMONDS
Of Rare
Quality
A few moments in our Gem
Room will convince you that
we carry a splendid stock, remarkable for perfection in color,
shape, brilliancy and freedom
from flaws.
We have just received another
large consignment and can offer
you
Unparalleled
Values
Tourists : —Kindly note that
Diamonds enter Canada duty
free. Better buy from us and
save money.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
V>>---r-r-A U5StE8,MANACr
MONDAY, AUGUST i
Harrison Grey Fiske
Presents
Mrs.
Fiske
And the Manhattan Company in
Becky Sharp
Prices—soc to $2.00.
Performance starts at 8.15 p.m. sharp.
JUST
RECEIVED
New carload of office desks,
chairs and stools, in plain and
fancy designs. Upholstered
chairs or chairs with a plain
polished oak finish. This shipment is the finest ever imported
into the city.
Baxter & Johnson
COMPANY, LIMITED
721 Yates St. Phone 730
BY THE SEA
The
poul Bay Tea Roonjs and
Bath Houses
NOW OPEN
This is the prettiest sandy bay
in Victoria
TAKE  COOK   STREET  CAR
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
G. Bjornfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856     -     821 Fort St.
ndJEJTK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
If you are dull and get the blues,
And do not know the place to choose
Come to the Majestic on Yates Street
Bring the friends you are apt to meet
And if on pleasure you are bent,
You won't regret the Dime you spent.
WE CATER TO  LADIES AND  CHILDREN
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
THE
New Grand
Week of Aug. 1
From the Follies Bergerie,  Paris
Europe's Most Artistic
Importation
Harry Elite
THE UAYVILLES
Lilliputian   Wonders   ancl   Living
Marionettes in a Wonderful
Performance
The Aerial Wonder
LOZELLE
In Incomparable Gymnastic
Accomplishments
Vaudeville's Irrepressable
Comedian
AL. LAWRENCE
With Primitive Laughter Provoking Qualntosltles
MARY ANN BBOWN
Vaudeville's Most Enchanting
Character Comedienne
A Duo of Superb Artistry
James Eleanor
McCormack and ibvinq
In  "PHrtology"
THOS. 3. PBICE
NEW MOVING  PICTURES
OUB OWN ORCHESTRA
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of Aug. I
THE LEWIS & LAKE CO.
Present
THE  GREAT WILD  WEST
MUSICAL
SHOW
Buffalo Bill
With its Cow Girls, Cow Boys,
Dancing Ponies and Western
Atmosphere
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME THREE TIMES A WEEK
COOLEST AND MOST POPULAR THEATRE IN THE CITY
ADMISSION-TEN CENTS
Open afternoons 2 to 5.30, evenings 7 to 11
EMPRESS
THEATRE
GOVERNMENT ST., NORTH OF JOHNSON
GEO. A. LEVELLE, Mgr.
ONLY FIRST CLASS
Motion Pictures and Illustrated Songs
Matinee every day from a to 5 p.m.   Evenings from 7 to 11 p.m.
Admission
10 Cents THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
:
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
'THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
"FORM"
BY BOHEMIAM
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash  discount on all orders
above $io.oo.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
I suppose that there is no word in
the English language which is so hard
to define as the word "form." Practically it is not capable of definition,
because what is good form in one
man's case is bad form in another's.
For instance, a man sitting down to
table in fustian or corduroys may eat
his peas with a knife, without losing
caste, where another, or the same
man, sitting down at the same table
with a high collar and a "boiled''
shirt would be considered ill-bred for
doing the same thing.
My own interpretation of the word
"Form" is that it consists of the cultivation of those manners and habits
which arc in accord with that particular class of mankind with whom
you are thrown most constantly into
contact.
But the reason for which I am
touching on this subject is because
I think that there is too little attention paid in this country to "good
form." The expression is, I believe,
a 'Varsity one entirely, and there are
too few young fellows out here who
are brought up in its observance.
Time and again I have noticed some
man of any age from twenty upwards accost a lady without raising
his hat, without taking his cigarette
out of his mouth, and leave her with
a wave of the hand. I don't suppose
any of the men meant to be rude;
they were just ignorant. But I do
know that a great many ladies notice
these things, and, when all is said
and done, we really govern our lives
so as to afford them satisfaction.
The worst feature of the whole
thing is that it is so easy to grow
"slack" on questions of this nature.
"Evil communications corrupt good
manners." This we know, not only
because the Bible says so, but because we can see it every day for
ourselves. There are thousands of
men in British Columbia, and probably millions in the Colonies generally, who have entirely lost their
sense of "form," thereby neglecting
those things they should do and practising those things which they should
not do. I am not writing from a
moral standpoint. Morals, qua morals,
don't come into my department at all.
I am writing from the standpoint of
a man of the world who hates to see
gentlemen, by which I mean men of
public school or university education,
who havc at one time learnt what
"good form" means, come out here
and because the stress of circumstances has forced them to associate
with men who havc not thc same advantages of education and training, let
themselves drop down, instead of trying to raise thc other fellows up.
There is absolutely no excuse for
a man being dirty as regards his personal appearance; a nail-brush doesn't
cost much, but it helps out a lot.
Just at present laundry work seems
to be the only thing in Victoria
which has not gone up in price—but
there are dirty shirts. Thc Dago.\s
have not raised their price for shining and a bright pair of shoes is a
good  recommendation  for  a   man,—
but .   As to language, I wrote last
week.   Any man who will persistent-
FURNITURE PACKING BY EXPERTS
For shipment to any part of the world.
Good Clean Material!.       Satisfaction Guaranteed.       Estimates Given.
Special Care taken with Glass and China.
A Special feature of our business   is   re-upholsterlng   and   restoring
Furniture of all descriptions
STYLES & SHARP
PHONE 2149
80S FOBT STREET
ly indulge in the use of coarse and
filthy language has lost all sense of
what constitutes "good form."
I think that as a matter of fact one
can learn a lot from some of the old
heroes  of either the  Elizabethan  or
the middle Plantagenet period.    Consider the Elizabethan sailor as represented either by Charles Kingsley in
"Westward Ho!", or by Froude in his
"Short   Studies."    These   men   were
fighters and their main article of belief  was  that  the  Spaniard  and  the!
Devil were one.    They were punctilious in tlieir observances of the polite
side of life.    Read Fronde's account |
of thc execution of Doughty on Sir,
Francis' ship.   It is beautifully pathe-!
tic.    Amyas Leigh, a creation of the
brain, but none the less a characteristic type of this same generation, is j
a wonderfully lovcable person and he
is only a pen picture of those men i
who served their Queen and Country j
in the sixteenth century, and through*** |
out   preserved   that  love   of   "form" j
which has made the Briton respected
wherever he goes.   Take Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle's books, "Sir Nigel" and'
"The   White   Company."    They   are
representative   works,    though   they |
may not be actual history.   The men
of   those   days   were,   for   the   most
part, perfect in their attitude to women and children.    No man who is
guilty of insulting a woman,  or ill-
treating a child or dumb animal can
claim   kinship   with   those   who   arc
within the pale of "good form."  And
these men of old who went out and
were prepared to fight to prove that
their  lady-love was superior  to any
other man's, were essentially "gentlemen," even   though   most   of   them
couldn't write, and few could read.
"But the age of chivalry has pass-j
ed"; so said Burke in his famous'
speech in connection with the French
Revolution. He goes on to say that
"the age of sophisters" has come in.
In reference to the subject on which
I am writing, I will endeavour, very
humbly, to imitate the orator and
say: "But the age of chivalry has
passed. That of finance, commercialism and thc era which preaches 'do
what you can, but at any rate get a
dollar' has come in." And I believe
that this is thc real reason why every
day we sec more evidences that mankind is losing its conception of what
constitutes "good form."
FERN
POTS
One of the daintiest of home
ornaments is a pretty green
Fern Set in an attractive Pot.
It gives the room an air of
freshness which nothing else
can. We have the Fern Pots
—vvith or without ferns—in silver, brushed brass and copper—
From $3 to $io
Redfern & Sons
Diamond Merchants and
Jewellers
ioog Government Street
VICTORIA, B.C.
New Grand Theatre
The most gorgeously artistic novelty importation offered to Grand
patrons this season will be presented by the Mayvillcs next week. Their
lilliputian wonders and living marionettes standing only twenty-two inches
high, offer one of the grandest spectacular performances in the history of
vaudeville. These wonderful little
imps sing and dance and present
scenic novelties surprisingly beautiful.
They will not only furnish an abundance of amusement for the little folks,
but will be appreciated by thc grown
ups as well, for their offering is a
real miniature show on a real miniature stage. This novelty comes direct from the Follies Bcrgcrs, Paris,
where   it  was  a   special   feature  for
two seasons.
In the gymnastic line, Lozelle
stands supreme in this or any other
country. He bears the title of "The
Aerial Wonder" and is well deserving of it. Graceful as well as mar-
velously skilled, it is a plcasureable
sight to witness his astonishing performances. His gymnastic feats are
sensational and thrillful. Lozelle
comes to Victoria direct from European laurels and his success in this
country is well evidenced by his foreign reputation.
Al Lawrence, the gifted mimetic of
"Dolly Dimples" fame has made a
compete tour of the world since his
last appearance. His vaudeville offering consists of delightful impersonations of well known types. He also
gives impersonations of stage celebrities with characterizations which
are extremely entertaining.
Vaudeville's most bewitching character comedienne, is Mary Anne
Brown, who will be a delightful number of the Grand bill next week. Miss
Brown was erstwhile prima-donna of
Mr. Hamlet of Broadway and other
metropolitan productions. She has a
winning personality and a voice remarkably well trained and exceedingly
sweet. Her repertoire of songs, including classical and comedy numbers, are presented with an individuality and charm. Miss Brown is a superlative genius and wins her audience right from the start.
One of the features of an interesting bill next week is the Natty Duo,
McCormack & Irving, in "Flirtology,"
a dainty singing and dancing oddity.
Mr. McCormack is a clever singing
comedian. Miss Irving is a bright
and snappy comedienne, full of ginger
and her songs and dances are a
rarity.
DANGER!
DO YOU KNOW that there are more fatal diseases contracted
from the dust you sweep off your floors and carpets, than
from any other source?
AND YET at the cost of a few cents a week, by using our sweeping compound, Dustless Waxine, you need run no such risk.
WAXINE collects all dirt and dust as you sweep it across your
rooms and saves you the necessity of dusting.
WAXINE contains a disinfectant that is sure destruction to germs
and microbes.
WAXINE also contains an expensive essence that will drive away
fleas and other pests.
WAXINE will keep an oiled floor, or oilcloth, always bright and
glossy, and carpets sweet and clean.
WAXINE leaves a refreshing odor in your rooms.
WAXINE is cheaper than anything else of its kind on the market.
WAXINE is used by many of the principal stores, offices, banks,
theatres and private houses of Victoria and Vancouver.
WAXINE is manufactured in Victoria by Victoria people, who
spend their money in Victoria.
Prices:
25-lb box, $1.00; 50-lb box, $2.00; 100-lb box, $3.75; 250-lb box, $7.50
AMBERINE FLOOR OIL—Our Floor Oil will stand the test as
against any other make, in fact it is the best floor oil made.
Use it.   Per gallon  $1.00
ACME METAL POLISH—Our Metal Polish, which is unequalled,
should be used by everybody.
IMPERIAL WAXINE CO.
PHONE 1968
1602 DOUGLAS STREET
Amateurs' printing and developing done at shortest
notice.
A. H. MAYNARD, 715 Pandora St.
Victoria Musical Society
Patron—His Excellency Earl Grey, Governor-General
Hon. President—The Hon. T. W. Patterson, Lieut.-Governor
Season 1910-11
Artists
LIZA LEHMANN JOSEF HOFMANN
With Vocal Quartette, will ren- Pianist
der    her    own    compositions, March
'Daisy Chain,' 'Persian Garden'
November MISCHA ELMAN
ELLEN TERRY _;__u„;_,_
England's Greatest Actress violinist
December April
The Committee have much pleasure in announcing the engagement of the above Artists. Tickets for any one Entertainment
may be subscribed for in advance at $4.00 each.
500 Season Tickets, entitling Holders to one
seat for each of the four Entertainments, will
be issued at $8.00 for the Course.
Applications for same should be addressed to Mr. C. Denham,
Hon. Secretary, Box Office, Victoria Theatre.
The Box Office will be open to Subscribers one day in advance
of the general public.
Prices of Boxes for the Season
No. 1—Ground Floor, 8 seats $100.00
No. 2—Ground Floor, 4 seats  50.00
No. 3—Ground Floor, 3 seats   37.50
No. 4—Balcony, 6 seats    50.00
No. 5—Balcony, 6 seats   50.00
No. 6—Gallery, 6 seats   30.00
No. 7—Gallery, 6 seats   30.00
Note—The Balcony and Gallery Boxes will be sold to bona-fide
Musical Students at Half-Price. Applications for same must come
through Teachers.
GEO. PHILLIPS, Director.
The Cue Rate
The curate had just arrived. Hc
was young, handsome, and single,
and, consequently, very popular with
the ladies of the parish, whose appreciation took thc usual form of worked slippers.
A fair caller at his boarding-house
thus interviewed the housekeeper:
"You see, I wanted to make our dear
curate a pair of slippers, and I
thought you might lend me one of
his old shoes to get thc size."
I "Law, miss," was the reply, "til
shoes is all a-given out four daj
ago. And it was only yesterdd
I morning a lady came here a-implol
I ing me to let her measure the wl
footmarks on the reverend gentll
man's bathroom immediately he hq
I gone out."
I 	
I In Both Senses
Fuddy—Did you ever notice th|
successful men are generally bald?
Duddy—Certainly! They come o|
on top. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
THE MOTHERLAND
Endowment of Motherhood
The New Zealand Parliament was
ipened lately. Thc legislation pro-
nised includes a measure for State
id in maternity cases.
First Step to Annex Korea
What is considered the first step
owards the annexation of Korea has
.ist taken place. In accordance with
he convention between Japan and
hat country, the Korean Emperor
as issued an edict delegating to the
apanese Government thc police ;.d-
linistration.
New Hurdle Record
G. R. L. Anderson, the present
urdle champion of Great Britain,
itablished a world's record for 440
ards over three foot hurdles at the
rystal Palace meeting on Saturday
'temoon. Anderson's time was 56
•Sths seconds.
Bishop's Carriage Stoned
Feeling between sections of Pre-
istants and Roman Catholics at
ivcrpool continues very bitter.    On
recent Sunday the Roman Catholic
ishop laid the foundation stone of
J. Alphonso's Chapel, and as he
■ove away his carriage was stoned,
mob of several hundreds followed
, hooting and shouting. The pol'c-.
■evented a serious disturbance.
Costly Fireworks
During a Guy Fawkes festival at
inehead, Somerset, Mr. William R.
rcbb discharged fireworks from a
indow of an hotel into a public
uare crowded with people. Mrs.
iiomas Besley was struck in the
e by a Roman candle, and was
warded £600 damages at the Bris-
1 Assizes against Mr. Webb.
New G. P. O. Building
The preliminary preparations for
e transfer of 4,000 of the Post Office
nployes at St. Martin's-le-Grand to
ie new King Edward's buildings, on
e site of thc old Bluecoat School,
trly in August arc almost completed,
he 3,000 sorters, representing thc
oreign and East Central postal ser-
ces who are to be transferred have
_cn assigned their places, and short-
they will bc taken in batches on a
>ur of inspection over the building.
Historian's Death
By the death of Major Martin
umc, the country loses one of its
lost celebrated historical writers. He
'as perhaps the foremost modern
uthority on the English diplomatic
istory of the -Elizabethan era and
ie Spain of that period; and his
opular lectures dealing with the ad*
cnturous life of thc Elizabethan
lariners, the romance of their calling,
nd the history of the pride and fall
f their Spanish rivals gained him
lany  admirers.
General Injured
Lieut.-General J. M. Grierson, the
ommander of the First Division at
ildershot, was injured while super-
sing the operations of the troops
nder his command on Monday night,
uly 4th.
Night manoeuvres were being car-
ied out on a fairly large scale, and
cncral Grierson, who was in charge
thc operations, was knocked down
t the dark by an officer who was rid-
ig downhill on a bicycle.
He was at once removed to his rc-
dence, and medical assistance was
immoiied. Thc operations were sus-
ended and the troops sent back to
imp. The general is progressing
vourably.
Postal Orders in Canada
An arrangement has been made
th the Canadian Post Office under
hich British postal orders will in
ture be paid in Canada at the fol-
wing chief post offices, but not clse-
iiere:—Charlottetown, P.E.I., Hali-
x, St. John, N.B., Frcdericton, N.B.,
lerbrooke, Que, Quebec, Que.,
ontreal, Que., Ottawa, Ont., King-
n, Ont., Toronto, Out., Hamilton,
it., Brantford, Ont., London, Ont.,
indsor,     Ont.,    Winnipeg,     Man
| Regina, Sask., Calgary, Alta., Edmonton, Alta., Vancouver, B.C., Victoria,
B. C.
Postage stamps, whether British or
Colonial, affixed to postal orders presented for payment in Canada will not
be paid.
British postal orders will not be is-
i sued in Canada.
Lese Majestic
A young American girl who was
walking in the Zoological Gardens,
Berlin, a few days ago received an
unpleasant surprise. She happened
to pass the following uncompliment- ]
ary remark about the personal appearance of a young lady and her
companion who passed by:
"I suppose they are frumps of German  aristocrats."
To her astonishment shortly afterwards a policeman came up and asked for her address. Next day she
received a polite invitation to leave
Germany. One of the ladies she had
called frumps was the Kaiser's
daughter, Princess Victoria Louisa,
who, of course, understands and
speaks   English  fluently.
by special train of crowds of golfers
on that day, Mr. Kerr-Smiley, who,
as member for North Antrim, is the
representative in Parliament of Port-
rush, moved an amendment to the
effect that Sunday golf should not
be permitted without the consent of
the Portrush Urban Council. This
was seconded by Mr. H. T. Barrie,
M.P. for North Derry, and, although
strongly opposed on behalf of the
Midland Railway Company, carried
by 94 to .59 The division was on
non-party lines, and the amendment
received considerable support from
the Labour party.
Licensing Test Case j
A.test case of great importance to'*
the Licensed Victualling Trade, that I
of the Crown and Shuttle, a Shore-1
ditch public-house, has been deckled, j
Technically, it was an application on
behalf of the  licensee of the  house .
"for a rule nisi for a mandamus di- j
rectctl to the Assessment Committee
of the  Borough of Shoreditch"; the
point at issue being whether the increased   licence  duty  payable  under
the  Budget  of  1909-10—in  this  case
the duty will be £130 instead of £35
—is  to be  taken  as  decreasing pro
tanto the rateable value of the premises on which the duty is levied.
The application was allowed and
the rule made absolute. The Lord
Chief Justice said he was of opinion
Merle Maddern with Mrs. Fiske
Station Besieged by Bees
Six hives of bees, despatched from
Guildford to Maiden, naer Kingston-
on-Thames, wcre productive of an exciting incident at Surbiton Station.
The train did not stop at Maiden, and
an attempt was made to take the bees
out of the van at Surbiton. But one
of thc hives fell to pieces, and the
porters had to beat a rtreat. Thc
train could not wait, and thc van was
taken on to Waterloo, but subsequently was returned to Surbiton.
Once again the porters entered the
van and succeeded in dragging the
hives on to the platform. The bees
from the broken hive, however, immediately besieged the station, causing waiting passengers to scatter in
all directions. Several members of
thc station staff were stung, and finally lighted pieces of oily waste were
ipplied to thc hive, which was quickly consumed.
The Question of Sunday Golf at
Portrush
General satisfaction is felt in the
North of Ireland at the success of
Mr. Kerr Smiley's amendment to thc
Midland Railway Bill in thc House
of Commons last week. One of the
objects of the Bill was to sanction
the acquisition by the Company of
the golf links at Portrush. It being
feared that this would lead to thc
throwing open of the links on Sunday, and the bringing into Portrush
that each should be dealt with upon
the particular facts. In this case
there was strong evidence that the
increased licence duty fell upon the
tenant, and they could not close their
eyes to the fact that the tenant, having to pay the increased licence duty,
would call for a reduction in thc
rental value. Therefore the rule
should bc made absolute, and the Assessment Committee ordered to prepare a provisional list.
Britain's Magic Wand
Plymouth fishing feast, as the annual fish inspection by thc corporation of its waterworks is quaintly
termed, was graced by thc presence
of Commodore Clark and the officers
of the American fleet now at Plymouth. In twenty-four pair-horse
carriages the party drove to Burra-
tor reservoir, an artificial lake a mile
and a half long and half a mile wide,
embosomed in the hills of Dartmoor,
in whicii Plymouth stores its water
supply.
At thc intake a time-honoured ceremony was observed. Lining up, thc
company, from a goblet of water
taken from the weir, drank to the
pious memory of Sir Francis Drake,
and in a bumper of wine afterwards
subscribed to thc sentiment, "May thc
We Spell Picnic With a
Capital "P"
This store is headquarters for picnic supplies. Everything is to
be found here from a Picnic Basket or Picnic Plate to a Picnic
Chicken or a Picnic Flask. We make a specialty of Picnic
Goods. Enjoyable outings are only possible when you have good
foods, the kind we offer at right prices. Our Delicatessen Department is famous for nice Cold Meats and Poultry, cooked in the
good, old English way, Meat Pies, Salads, Fruit Pies and Cakes,
etc., "good as Granny made." We justly pride ourselves on carrying the best and largest line of Groceries in B. C.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
To tell a man who has used wine and beer properly the
whole of his life that they are harmful, and to try to mystify him into belie -zing you by using long and technical
words, is rank charlatanism and should be punished by
the hearty and expressed contempt of every honest man.
People who talk in this fashion should be made fools of.
It is thc best cure, and if they are not yet treated in
this fashion it is because our society still suffers from a
moral evil far worse than drunkenness—that is, lack of
courage. Beer that is made out of malt and hops is
healthy; if substitutes of one kind or another are used,
the concoction becomes more and more dangerous in proportion to the type of adulterant supplied. Beer has been
an ordinary and healthy food of our ancestors from the
earliest   recorded  times.
The above is not our own wording. It is a quotation
from the speech of a well known English M.P. We would,
however, add: Drink the best—Drink Lemp's Beer. Call
for a bottle at your club, cafe or hotel. Your licensed
grocer can supply you with a case for home use. Pither
and Leiser, wholesale agents, Victoria, Vancouver and
Nelson, B.C.
Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Sale of Linen
Goods
Comprising—
Table Covers—Regular price   1.50.    Sale Price    $1.00
Sideboard Covers—Regular price $1.25.    Sale Price 85c
Tray Cloths—Regular price 50c.    Sale Price 30c
These are all  made up of   excellent   linen,   with   handsome
drawnwork.
Oriental Importing Co.
510 CORMORANT STREET   ■
-   OPP. E. & N. DEPOT
descendants of him who brought us
water  never  want  of  wine."
Commodore Clark, responding to a
toast of welcome to thc American
officers at thc subsequent banquet,
said it had been his pleasure to meet
Englishmen  in  thc  seven  seas,  and
in the remote corners of the earth,
where he had seen with astonishment
and amazement their wonderful mastery of men. Thc Englishman witli
his magic wand seemed to sway thein
as an orchestra leader did thc men
of his band. '
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
.
Hitting It Tip
A guest In a Cincinnati hotel was
shot and killed. The negro porter who
heard the shooting was a witness at the
trial.
"How many shots did you hear?"
asked the lawyer.
"Two shots, sah," he replied.
"How far apart were they?"
'"Bout like dis way," explained the
negro, clapping his hands with an Interval of about a second between them.
"Where were you when the first shot
was fired?"
"Shinin' a gemman's shoe in de basement of de hotel."
"Where were you when the second
shot was fired?"
"Ah was a passin' de Big Fo' depot."
It is said that matrimony ends a
woman's existence; but the man who
acts as the motor for a baby carriage
is still in the push.
IMPORTANT
SALE
OF
Building Lots
In the Townsite of
COLEMAN, ALBERTA
SITUATED IN THE CROWS
NEST COAL FIELDS
TIMBER   AND   PORESTRY   COMMISSION
Pinal Sitting
Notice is hereby given that final sittings of the Timber and Forestry Commission will be held in the Court-house,
Victoria, commencing August 15th next,
at the hour of 10.30 a.m.
FRED. J. FULTON,
Chairman.
Victoria, B.C., 23rd July, 1810.
jy30
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY
Companies' Act
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 3a, 1910.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
Walker, Parker Company, Limited," is
authorised and licensed to carry on
business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company
to which the legislative authority of
the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at No. 150 Wellington Street
West,  in  the City of Toronto,  Ontario.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at 545 Bastion
Street, Victoria, and Albert Edward Me-
Phlllips, Barrister-at-law, of Victoria,
whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is
the attorney for the Company.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one hundred and fifty
thousand dollars, divided Into fifteen
hundred shares.
Given   under   my  hand   and   seal   of
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province   of  British
Columbia, this fourth day of July, one
thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting  Registrar  of Joint  Stock
Companies.
The objects for whicii this Company
has been established and licensed are:-—
To manufacture,  buy,  sell  and  deal In
boots and shoes.
jy30
McLaughlin Buick
Runabout Cars
A more serviceable and artistically designed Runabout Car has
never before been produced. The McLaughlin Buick 20 h.p. Runabout is the height of perfection, and the last word in motor car
construction, made from the highest possible grade of materials.
They give satisfactory service where others fail. Better let
us show you one priced at
81,400
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY CO.
New Premises, 1410 Broad Street
Telephone 695 - R. P. CLARK, Manager
Headquarters   of   the   Famous   Collieries of the International Coal
and Coke Co., Ltd.
Messrs. Stewart Williams & Co., of
Victoria, having been duly instructed
by the International Coal and Coke
Co., Ltd., will sell by PUBLIC
AUCTION at
VICTORIA, B.C.
ON
Monday and Tnesdaj,
the 19th and 20th September, 1910,
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date Alexander Cook, Surveyor's
assistant, of Victoria, B.C., intends to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for permission to purchase the
following described land in Renfrew District, V.I.:—Commencing at a post planted near high water mark on the Straits
of Fuca, near the south-west corner of
Timber Licence No. 40753, thence north
erly and along the west boundary of
said licence a distance of 40 chains
more or less to the south-east corner
of Timber Licence No. 35167, thence
westerly a distance of 60 chains more
or less to the shore, thence easterly
along the shore line to point of commencement, the whole containing 200
acres more or less.
July 9th, 1910.
A.   COOK.
jy30
NOTICE is hereby given that Isabel
Armstrong, of Victoria, B.C., dressmaker, intends within 60 days to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
for permission to purchase the following described land in Renfrew District,
V.I.,:—Commencing at a post planted
near high water mark on the Straits
of Fuca, near the south-west eorner of
Timber Licence No. 40753, thence easterly following the shore line a distance
of 80 chains; thenee north to the south
boundary of Timber License No. 40753;
thence westerly along said boundary to
the south-west corner of the licence,
thence southerly to point of commencement, the whole containing about 300
acres.
July 9th, 1910.
I. ARMSTRONG,
Jy30 A.  Cook,  Agent.
the remainder of the company's Real
Estate Holdings in the City of Coleman, Alberta, comprising some Three
Hundred eligible Business and Residential Sites, located in this thriving
industrial centre.
For further and full particulars,
plans, maps, photographs, etc., apply
to The Auctioneer,
Stewart Williams
637 Fort Street,
Victoria, B.C.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Buslck E. Pemberton, of London, England, occupation
Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near Salmon Rlver about two miles
S.W. of the S.W. corner of Lot 385;
thence north 80 ehains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 50 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located June 25th,  1910.
BUSICK E. PEMBERTON,
jy 30 J.  R.  Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Helena Frank, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near
Salmon River, about two miles S.W. of
the S.W. corner of Lot 385; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains:
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located June 25th, 1910.
HELENA FRANK,
jy 30 J. R.  Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Richard
Robbins, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gardiner, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains north of Uhlqako
River and about 30 miles west of Clus-
cus Lake on the Cluscus and Alcacho
trail and marked the N W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 cliains to point of commencement.
Located  June  23rd,   1910.
FRANCIS RICHARD ROBBINS,
jy 30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Dennis
Ohrly, of London, England, occupation
Spinster, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles north of Lot 387, Salmon River Country, and at South end
of Small Lake and marked the N.W.
corner; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located June 24th,  1910.
MARY DENNIS OHRLY,
jy 30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. E. Hamfleld,
of Duluth, Minnesota, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 20 chains north of Uhlqako River and about 30 miles west of
Cluscus Lake on the Cluscus and Alcacho trall and marked N.E. corner;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Located  June  23rd,  1910.
MRS. E. HAMFIELD,
jy 30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Hamfleld, of Duluth, Minnesota, occupation
Engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north bank of Salmon River
near the crossing of the Bella Coola
Ootsa Lake Summer trail; thence north
40 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains, more or less ,to river;
thence west 80 chains, more or less!
along river to point of commencement.
Located  June  22nd.  1910.
ALEXANDER HAMFIELD,
jy 30 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
No.  3080
"Companies Act, 1897"
CERTIFICATE    OF    RE-INCORPORATION
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Victoria-Phoenix Brewing Company, Limited Liability," has this day been reincorporated and registered as "The
Victoria-Phoenix Brewing Company,
Limited," under Section 5 of the "Companies Act, 1897," as a Limited Company, with a capital of three hundred
thousand dollars, divided into three
thousand shares of one hundred dollars
each.
Given   under   my  hand   and  heal   of
office  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia, this seventeenth day of June,
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of Joint Stock
Companies.
The following are the objects for
which the Company has been incorporated:—
The manufacturing and brewing of
lager beer, steam beer, ale and porter,
and to engage In and carry on the general business of brewers, distillers and
bottlers.
To manufacture, buy and sell malt,
and to engage in and carry on the general business of maltsters, and also to
manufacture, buy and sell ice, and to
carry on the general business of ice
dealers.
To erect, build, purchase, lease, or
otherwise acquire breweries, distilleries,
malthouses and other buildings, plant,
machinery and other personal property
for the purpose of carrying into effect
the aforesaid objects, and the business
of the  Company.
To carry on any other business whieh
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on In connection with the above or calculated
directly or indirectly to enhance the
value of or render profitable any of
the Company's property or rights.
To purchase, lease, or otherwise acquire and own such real estate ana
personal property as the Company may
deem necessary or expedient for the
nurposes and business of the Company,
and to sell, rent or dispose of the same
when deemed expedient.
To establish, buy and sell, in any part
of British Columbia, the Dominion of
Canada, or elsewhere, agencies for the
sale by wholesale and retail of the
manufactures and products of the Company's business.
To sell, Improve, manage, develop,
lease, mortgage, pledge, dispose of, turn
to account, or otherwise deal with all or
any of the property and rights of the
Company.
To use steam, water, electricity or
any other power as a motive power, or
otherwise, in connection with the Company's business.
To enter into partnership or into any
arrangement for sharing profits, union
of interest, reciprocal concession or cooperation with any person or Company
carrying on or about to carry on any
business which the Company is authorised to carry on, or any business or
transaction capable of being conducted
so as directly or indirectly to benefit
this Company, and to take or otherwise
acquire and hold shares or stock in o_
securities of and to subsidise or otherwise assist any such Company or person, and to sell, hold, re-Issue with or
without guarantee, or otherwise deal
with such shares and securities.
To acquire and undertake all or any
part of the business, property and liabilities of any person or company carrying on any business which this Company is authorized to carry on, or possessed of property suitable for the purposes of this Company; and to pay for
same in paid-up and non-assessable or
other shares of this company,
other shares of this Company.
To sell the undertaking of the Company or any part hereof, for such consideration as the Company may think
fit, and in particular for shares, debentures or securities of any other company having objects altogether, or in
part, similar to those of this Company.
To promote any other Company for
the purpose of acquiring all, or any of
the property, rights, and liabilities of
the Company, or for any other purpose
which may seem directly or Indirectly  calculated  to  benefit  this  Company.
To remunerate any person or persons
for service rendered, or to be rendered
In placing any shares or securities of
the Company, or in relation to the establishment of the Company, either In
money or In shares partly or fully paid
up.
To borrow or raise, or secure the payment of money in such manner as the
Company shall think fit and in particular by the issue of debentures or debenture stock charged upon all or any
nf the Company's property (both present and future) including its uncalled
can!tal ancl to purchase, redeem or pay
off any such securities.
To lend or advance money to such
persons on such terms as may seem expedient, and in particular to customers
of nnd persons having dealings with
the Company and to guarantee the performance of contracts by such customers or persons, and to take securities for the repayment of such loss or
advances or the performance of any
contracts so guaranteed.
To divide any of the property In specie among the members.
Generally to make, do and execute all
such acts, deeds, covenants and things
ns the Company may deem necessary,
expedient, incidental or otherwise, to the
attainment of all or any of the foregoing objects, or to the conversion or
disposal of any security held or acquired
hy the Company.
July 23
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroug
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Burroughs Webster, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west bank of the
Chilco River, about 80 chains north of
the northeast corner of 4347; thence
west 40 chains: thenee south to the
north boundary of Lot 347 (being 80
chains more or less); thence east along
the north boundary of L. 347 to the
river bank, being 35 chains more or
less; thence following the said river
bank northerly 80 chains more or less
to point of eommeneement and containing 300 acres more or less.
Dated  June  4th,  1910.
ROBERT BURROUGHS WEBSTER
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. W. W. Wilson, of Russell, Manitoba, occupation
Student-at-Law, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of the north-west corner of Section 12, Township 21, thence
north 40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 320 acres more or less.
D-vted June 15, 1910.
William Wilbur Wilfred Wilson
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent,
P. Leonard James, A, R. A, I, Gj
Architect
1006 GOVERNMENT STREET
Phone No. 269
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PllOVINl
CIAL COMPANY
"Companies Act,  1897"
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No. 593
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Boulteil
Waugh & Co., Limited," is authorise!
and licensed to carry on business withil
the Province of British Columbia, anl
to carry out or effect all or any of thi
objects of the Company to which till
Legislative authority of the Legislatur|
of British  Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company il
situate at the City of Montreal, In th|
Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of thi
Company Is live hundred thousand doll
lars, divided into five thousand share|
of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company
this Province is situate at 614 Foil
Street, Victoria, and Harold Bruci
Robertson, Solicitor, whose address il
Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for th|
Company.
Given   under  by  Hand   and   Seal   cl
Offlce  at  Victoria,  Province  of  Brltisl
Columbia,   this   eleventh   day   of   Junf
one thousand nine hundred and ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companiel
The objects for which this Companl
has  been  established  and  licensed ar*§
To carry on throughout the Dominio
of  Canada   the   business   of   importer!
exporters,   manufacturers,   and   deale*
In Hats,    Caps,    Garments,    Furs    anl
Wearing Apparel, and as General Fu|
rlers, Clothiers    and    Outfitters, and
dressers and dyers of furs, with powc|
to do  all business of a like nature
incidental thereto.
jyl6
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVHl
CIAL   COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1S97."
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that R. H. Keay, of
Shellmouth, Manitoba, occupation Farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains north of the south-east
corner of Timber License 35038, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 aeres more or less.
Dated June 16,  1910.
RICHARD HENRY KEAY,
jy23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. S. Bartley, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Jeweller,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains north of the North-west eorner
of Section 12, township 21, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated June 15, 1900.
WILFRED STANLEY BARTLEY,
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distriot of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that D. C. McDonald,
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Agent,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one mile
west of the north-east corner of Section 12, township 21, thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains; thenee
east 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated June 16,  1910.
DONALD CROMWELL McDONALD
jy 23 F, M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that W. L. Ney, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Bank
Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of section 12, township 21, thence west 80 chains; thence
south 40 chatns; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement ancl containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated June 15,  1910.
WILLIAM  LOCKYER NEY.
jy 23
F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that R. A. Jones, of
Russell, Manitoba, occupation Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted near
small lake about 120 chains west of
the north-west corner of Section 13,
township 21, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thvnce south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
REGINALD  AMBROSE  JONES,
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that Angus Sutherland of Russell, Manitoba, occupation
Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near small lake about 120 chains
west of the north-west corner of Section 13, Township 21, thence east 40
chains, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres more or less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
ANGUS SUTHERLAND.
,1v23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No.   603
THIS   IS   TO   CERTIFY   that   "Tl|
Campbell Manufacturing Company," (I
mited),   is   authorized   and   licensed
earry  on  business within  the  Provinl
of  British Columbia,  and  to  carry of
or  effect  all  or any of  the  objeots
the  Company  to  which   the  legislatH
authority of the Legislature of BrltiiJ
Columbia  extends.
The   head   offlce  of  the   Company
situate at the City of Montreal in tl|
Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of til
Company is seventy-five thousand do
lars, divided Into seven hundred an
fifty shares of one hundred dolla|
each.
The head offlce of the Company ln thi
Province is situate at 514 Fort StrecT
Victoria, and Harold Bruce Robertsol
Barrlster-at-law, whose address is 5i
Fort Street, Victoria, is the attornq
for  the   Company.
Given  under  my  Hand   and   Seal  cl
Ofllce  at  Victoria,  Province  of  BritlsT
Columbia,   this   twenty-fourth   day
June,   one  thousand  nine  hundred  an|
ten.
(L.S.) J. P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companiel
The objects for which this companl
has been established and licensed arer
Tlie manufacture and sale of elothln]
and clothing supplies.
jy ie
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that A. G. O'Farrell
of London, England, occupation Stool
Broker, intends to apply for pcrmlssioi
to purchase the following describe!
lands:—Commencing at a post plante!
about 9 miles south of the Salmon Rlvel
ford on the Bella Coola Ootsa Lakf
Summer trail and marked the N.
corner; thence east 40 chains; thenci
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chainsf
thence north 40 chains to point of con
mencement.
Located June 21st,  1910.
A. G. O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agent|
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. Dorothl
O'Farrell, of Dublin, Ireland, oceupatio!
Married Woman, intends to apply foi
permission to purchase the followin!
described lands:—Commencing at a posl
planted at the south end of Takla Lakl
on the Bella Coola and Ootsa Lakl
trail and marked the N. E. corner!
thence west 40 chains; thence south 4f
chains; thence east 40 chains more 01
less to Lake; thence northerly alonir
lake to point of commencement ani|
containing 160 acres more or less.
Located  June  21st,   1910.
MRS. DOROTHY O'FARRELL,
jyl6 J. R. Morrison, Agent)
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. Rose O'Farl
rell, of London, England, oceupatio!
Married Woman, intends to apply fo]
permission to purchase the followlnl
described lands:—Commencing at a poa
planted about 8 miles south of thi
Salmon River ford on the Bella Coolf
and Ootsa Lake summer trnil and markl
ed the N. W. corner; thence east 8]
chains; thence south 40 chains; thenol
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chain!
to point of commencement.
Located June 21st,  1910.
MRS.  ROSE O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Agen|
CANCELLATION OP  BESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the rl
serve existing upon the lands embrace!
in special Timber Licences No. 20281
situated near Sechelt Inlet, New Wesl
minster District, ls cancelled, and thf
the said lands will be open for locatlcl
under the provisions of the Land Aq
at midnight on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lunj
Lands Department,
Victoria, July  14,  1910.
jy 16 THE WEEK, SATUKDAY, JULY 30, 1910
Licence   to   an  extra-provincial COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897"
Canada:
I'rovinee of British Columbia,
No. 590
, THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "Prince
J'.upert Coal Fields, Limited," is auth-
Irized and licensed to carry on business
I'ithin the Province of British Colum-
lia, and to carry out or effect all or
Iny of the objects of the Company to
l'hich the legislative authority of the
legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
Ittuate at the City of Montreal in the
|rovince of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of the
Jompany is flve million dollars, divided
lito fifty thousand shares of one hun-
|red  dollars   each.
The head offlce of the Company ln
Ills Province is situate at the City of
[ictoria, and Henry G. Lawson, Soli-
Itor, whose address is 908 Government
■treet, Victoria aforesaid, is the attor-
|ey for the Company.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
Ifflce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
lolumbia,  this  sixth day  of June,  one
Iiousand nine hundred and ten.
|l.S.) J.  P. McLEOD,
Acting Registrar of
Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
ive been established and licenced are:
J To carry on the businesses of colliery
Iroprietors, mine owners, coke manu-
Iictuvevs, coal dealers, smelters, iron
lastevs, steel converters, tin plate mak-
ls, iron founders, miners, prospectors,
letallurgists, refiners and manufactures of oil and other substances from
[•es, minerals and other natural pro-
licts, powder manufacturers, electri-
lans, engineers, shipbuilders, ship-
Ivlghts, brick makers, pulp and paper
lanufactuvers, loggers, lumber merch-
lits, manufacturers of timber, timber
lowers, saw mill owners, cannerymen,
lihevymen, ship owners, carriers, ware-
fcusemen, merchants, builders, contrac-
Ivs, farmers, hotel and restaurant
lepers and store keepers, or any one
I' more of the said businesses from
Ime to time, and to buy, sell, ex-
Trt, manipulate, prepare for the market
Id deal in merchandise of all kinds;
[To search for, prospect, explore, mine,
In, open, develop and work collieries,
lines, minerals, quarries, coal, coal oil,
Tells, ores, minerals and other deposits;
jTo acquire by purchase, lease, hire.
Iscovery, license, location or other-
lse, and hold lands, estates, coal lands,
Lses and licenses, deposits of oil and
Itvoleum, quartz and placer mines, and
pneral claims, leases or prospects, mln-
lands and mineral rights, collieries,
iarries, clay, timber lands or leases,
Inbev claims or licenses to cut timber,
lip leases, surface rights and rights
I way, water rights and privileges,
Ireshore rights, mills, factories, eleva-
Ivs, coke ovens, furnaces for smelting,
patlng ores and refining metals, ships,
J_amboats and other vessels, tramways
Id railway sidings on property owned
1 controlled by the Company, ov ad-
pent thereto, roads, wharves, docks,
l-minal facilities, buildings, machinery,
iint, stock-in-trade or other real or
Irsonal property, as may be deemed
Ivlsable, and to equip, operate and
Im the same to account, and to sell,
|ise, or otherwise dispose of the same,
any of them, or any interest there-
Jto construct, carry out, repair, maln-
llu, Improve, manage, work, control
Id superintend any roads, ways, adits,
Ivels, shafts, tunnels, tramways and
lilway sidings on property owned or
Intvolled by the Company, or adjacent
leveto, brides, coaling stations, reser-
liivs, water courses, aqueducts, docks,
■harves, terminal facilities, furnaces,
Ike ovens, plant, engines, machinery,
■ills, factories, elevators, warehouses,
mips, steam vessels and boats, dwell-
|g houses, buildings, and other works
lid conveniences which may seem di-
Ictly or indirectly conducive to any of
lie objects of the Company, and to con-
flbute to or otherwise aid or take part
1 any such operations, and to purchase,
Ire or build, and repair, navigate and
lade with ships, steam vessels and
tats for the purposes of the company,
Jid also railway waggons or trucks or
liy other rolling stock, and also steam
f other locomotive or motive power;
I To treat, make merchantable, trans-
fcvt and trade in coal, coke, ores,
totals, metallic substances and min-
I-als of every description, and the pvo-
lucts thereof, and to trade ln sub-
lances used In getting, reducing, treat-
Ig or making merchantable, coal, coke,
les, metals, metallic substances, mln-
J-als, and precious stones or In manu-
licturing products therefrom;
| To clear, manage, farm, cultivate, ir-
Igate, plant, build on or otherwise
[ork, use or improve any land which,
J* any interest in which, may belong
li the company, and to deal with any
Trm   or   other   products   thereof,   and
■ so  to  lay   out   Into  town   sites,   said
lnds or any parts thereof;
I To establish, operate and maintain,
lores, trading posts and supply sta-
Ions for the purposes of the company,
lid the supplying goods to any of Its
Inployees or the occupiers of any of
Is lands, or any other persons, and
fir bartering and dealing in the products of mine and forest, and the earning on of the general business of
ladevs and merchants;
I To construct dams, and Improve
Ivers, streams and lakes, and to divert
lie whole or part of the water of such
Ireams and rivers as the purposes of
lie company may require, subject, howler, to the provisions of any Statute
living reference thereto;
■ To   construct,   equip,   maintain,   compete   and    operate,    tram-ways,     upon
Inds owned or controlled by the com-
liny;   to use any motive power in the
Iteration of the same; to take,  trans-
Jirt and  carry  passengers and  freight
li such tramways, and for the purposes
lereof, to use, construct and equip all
lioessavy works, telephones, telegraphs,
lilldlngs,  appliances  and conveniences;
1.  erect, construct, operate, and maln-
lln compressed air and electric works,
Iwer   houses,    generating   plant,    and
Ich other appliances and conveniences
I   are  necessary   and   proper   for   the
■Inerating of compressed  air and elec-
llcity,  and  for  transmitting  the  same
1 be used as a motive power for tram-
livs  or  other  works  of the  company,
lii  to be supplied by the company as
■motive power for hauling, propelling,
Imping, lighting, heating, smelting, voicing, milling or drilling or nny other
■evntions of any nature ov kind what-
levev   fov   which   compvessed   air   or
■ctrlcity  may  he  used,   supplied,  up-
led, or required, and to produce, use,
ll, lease and dispose of, In any miltl-
Ir  the  company  may  see  fit,   electric
Iht,   heat   or  power.    Provided,   how-
fcr,   that  any   supply,   distribution   or
Insmlsslon of electric, hydraulic, pneu-
Itlc or other power or force for the
1-poses   of  heat,   light   or  power   be-
lid   the   limits   of   the   lands   of   the
company, shall be subject to local and
municipal control in that behalf;
To contract with any person, body
corporate or politic fov supplying compvessed air and electricity or water
powev, to any such pevson, body cov-
povate or politic, ov to any stveets,
ways, lanes, passages, tvamways, mines,
smeltevs, mills, manufactovies, ships,
wavehouses, public ov pvivate houses,
buildings and places, and fvom time to
time lay down, cavvy, fit up, connect
and finish, any cumulative stovage bat-
tevy, cable, wiring, pipes, flume
switches, connections, branch, buvnev,
lamp, meter, transformer or other apparatus, for ov in connection with any
compvessed aiv, watev ov electvic main,
pipe, lead ov cable, which fov such
puvposes may be vequived, and to let
any such appavatus fov hive fov such
sum as may be agveed upon;
To acquive, opevate and cavvy on the
business of a powev company, subject
to local and municipal vegulations in
that behalf;
To undevtake any ov cavvy Into effect
all such financial, tvading ov othev opev-
ations ov businesses In connection with
the objects of the company, as the
company may think fit;
To acquive and cavvy on all ov any
pavt of the business ov pvopevty, and
to undertake any liabilities of any person, firm or association or company,
possessed of property suitable for the
purposes of this company, or carrying
on any business which this company is
authorized to carry on, or which can
be conveniently carried on in connection with the same, or may seem to
the company calculated directly or in-
divectly to benefit the company, and,
as the considevation fov the same, to
pay cash, ov to Issue any shaves, stocks
ov obligations of this company;
To entev into pavtnership or into any
arrangement for shaving pvofits, union
of intevest, co-opevation, joint adven-
uive, veclpvocal concessions ov othev-
wlse, with any pevson ov company, cav-
vying on ov engaged in, ov about to
cavvy on ov engage in, any business ov
transaction which this company ls authorized to carvy on ov engage in, ov any
business ov tvansaction capable of being conducted so as divectly ov indivect-
ly benefit this company, and to lend
money to, guavantee the contvacts of,
ov otherwise assist any such person or
company, and to take or otherwise acquive shaves and secuvltles of any such
company, and to sell, hold, ve-lssue,
with ov wtihout guavantee, ov othev-
wise deal with the same, notwithstanding the pvovlsions of Section 44 of the
said Act;
To sell ov dispose of the pvopevty of
the company, ov any pavt theveof, fov
such considevation as may be deemed
advisable, and in pavtlculav fov shaves,
debentuves ov secuvltles of any othev
company having objects altogethev ov
in pavt similav to those of this company;
To pvomote any company or companies fov the puvpose of acquiving all
ov any of the pvopevty and liabilities
of this company, ov fov any othev puvpose which may seem divectly or in-
dlvectly calculoted to benefit this company;
To puvchase, take on lease ov in exchange, hive ov othevwise acquive, any
veal ov pevsonal pvopevty, and any
vights and privileges which may be
necessary or convenient for the puvposes of the business of the company;
To entev into any arrangements with
any government or any authority, municipal, local or othevwise, that may seem
conducive to the company's objects, ov
any of them, and to obtain fvom any
such govevnment ov authority, any
rights, privileges and concessions, whicii
the company may think it desirable to
obtain, and to carry out, exercise and
comply with, or, if deemed advisable,
dispose of any such arrangements,
rights, privileges and concessions;
To obtain any Act of Parliament or
Legislature for enabling the company
to carry any of its objects into effect,
or for any other purpose that may seem
expedient, or to oppose any pvoceed-
ings ov applications which may seem
calculated divectly ov indivectly to prejudice the company's  lntevests;
Notwithstanding the pvovlsions of
Section 44 of the said Act, to take ov
othevwise acquive, hold, vote by its
duly appointed pvoxy, sell, pledge ov
othevwise dispose of, and deal with the
shaves, debentures and other secuvltles
in any other company, having objects
altogether or In part similar to those
of this company, or carrying on any
business capable of being conducted so
as divectly ov indivectly to benefit this
company, and move pavticulavly, but not
so as to limit the fovegolng, the debentuves and othev secuvltles of any railway company, owning or authorized to
construct and operate a railway line or
lines, connecting with any of the company's properties whereby and over
which the company may ship its coal
and  othev pvoducts;
To endovse, guavantee and secuve the
payment ov satisfaction of the bonds,
coupons, movtgages, deeds of tvust, debentuves, secuvltles, obligations, evidences of Indebtedness and shaves of
the capital stock of othev covpovations,
and also to guavantee and secuve the
payment and satisfaction of dividends
on shaves of the capital stock of such
othev covpovations, provided such othev
covpovations, fall within the descvlptlon
of covpovations mentioned in tlie last
pvecedlng section;
To apply fov, puvchase ov otherwise
acquire any patents of invention, licenses, concessions and the like, con-
fevvlng any exclusive ov non-exclusive
ov limited vlght to use, ov nny sccvet
nr othev lnfovmatlon as to any invention, which may seem capable of being
used fov any of the puvposes of the
company, ov the acquisition of which
may seem calculated divectly ov Indirectly to benefit the company, and tn
use, exevcise, develop, ov grant licenses
In respect to, or otherwise turn to account the property, rights or Information so acquired;
To purchase, acquire, apply for, register, secure, hold, own or sell or otherwise dispose of, any and all copyrights,
trade marks, trade names and distinctive  marks;
To distribute any of the property of
the company among Its members in
specie;
To pay out of the funds of the company all expenses of, or incidental to
the formation, registvation and advev-
tlslng of the company, and to vemun-
evate any pevson or company for services rendered or to be rendered in
placing or assisting to place, or the
guaranteeing the placing of any shaves
In the Company's capital, ov any debentuves ov othev securities of the company, or In or about the formation ov
promotion of the company or the conduct of Its business;
To sell. Improve, manage, develop, exchange, lease, dispose of, turn to account, or otherwise deal with the undertaking or nil or any part of the property and rights of the company, with
power tn accept as the consideration,
nnv shnves. stocks or obligations of any
nther company.
_yi«
GOVERNMENT
AUCTION
SALE
OF
QUESNEL
TOWN LOTS
Notice is hereby given that all vacant
lots in the
Townsite of Quesnel
will be offered for sale at Quesnel by
PUBLIC AUCTION
ON
Monday, Aug. 1
Over one hundred lots will be offered at this sale, the terms of sale
being 25 per cent, cash and the balance in three equal annual instalments with interest at the rate of 6
per cent, per annum.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 27, 1910.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Cadboro Bay School
Sealed Tenders, superscvlbed "Tendev
fov School-house," will be veceived by
the Honouvable the Ministev of Public
Wovks up to noon of Monday, the 18th
July, 1910, fov the erection and completion of a two-room frame school-
house at Cadboro Bay, Saanich Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
fovms of tendev may be seen on and
aftev the Gth day of July, 1910, at the
Public Works Department, Victoria,
B. C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, in
a sum of $300, which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline to enter
Into contract when called upon to do so,
or if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques ov cevtiflcates
of deposit of unsuccessful tendevers
will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, slgne*-
with the actual signature of the jii-
devev, and enclosed in the envelop s
fuvnlshed.
The lowest or any tender not noces-
savlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Wovks Englneev
Public Wovks Depavtment,
Victovia, B.C., Bth July, 1910.
Jy9
"LAND   REGISTRY  ACT"
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Subdivisions Nos. 3, 53 and 54 of
Section XXV (Richmond Estate)
Victovia District.
NOTICE is hereby given that it ls
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof, to issue a Duplicate
Cevtificate of Title to above land Issued
to Robevt Patevson Rithet on the 23rd
day of August, 1882, and numbeved
4016A.
Land   Reglstvy  Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the 9th day of June, 1910.
J.  P.  McLEOD,
je 11 Deputy Registvav-General
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Duncan
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Merchant,
Intends to apply fov pevmlsston to purchase the following descvlbed Iands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. covnev of Lot 336, thence 40
chains novth; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains south to the novth
boundavy of Lot 336; thence west along
the said novth boundavy of Lot 336
40 chains to point of commencement and
containing 160 acves move ov less.
Dated May 30th,  1910.
je25 CHARLES   DUNCAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gonzales,
of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Fishev-
man, intends to apply fov pevmlssion
to puvchase the following descvlbed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast covnev of Lot 331; thence 80 chains
novth to the south-east covnev of Lot
331; thence west 80 chains a!on_. the
south boundavy of Lot 331; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acves, move or less.
Dated  June  lst,  1910.
je25 JOSEPH GONZALES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Gustav Bram-
well Ehrenborg, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Architect, Intends to apply for
permission to puvchase the following
descvlbed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west covnev
of Lot 333; thence novth 80 chains;
thence east SO chains, move or less, to
the north-east corner of Lot 333; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
along the north .boundary of Lot 334
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, and being Lot 333.
Dated  June  1st,  1910.
GUSTAV BRAMWELL EHRENBORG.
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Frank McGinn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
novth-east covnev of Lot 342; thence
80 chains, more or less to the northwest corner of Lot 342; thence south
65.76 chains more or less to the shove
of Eagle Lake; thence following the
said shore to the south-east corner of
Lot 342; thence north 37.92 chains to
the point of commencement containing
412 acres, more ov less, and being Lot
342.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 FRANK McGINN.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
waters of Shoo-wah-tlans and Wood-
worth Lakes, ln Range 6, Coast District,
and the waters of all streams flowing
Into said lakes, and all streams flowing
therefrom, are reserved, subject to the
rights of existing records only, for the
use of the Crown.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., April 29th, 1910.
apr 30
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that A. R. Tingley,
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ut a post planted
at the south-east corner of Section 13,
township 21, thence west 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chaina to point
of commencement and containing 1140
acres  more ov less.
Dated June 16, 1910.
ARCHIBALD REUBEN TINGLEY.
jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline B.
Bavnes, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Stenographer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 136 chains north of the
novtheast covnev of Lot 347 on the west
bnnk of the Chilco Rlvev (being about
50 chains novth of the N. E. covnev of
R. B. Webstev's application to puvchase); thence west 50 chains; thence
south to the novth boundavy of R. B.
Webstev's application to puvchase, being
50 chains move ov less; thence east 36
chains move or less to the river; thence
following the river bank northerly to
point of commencement and containing
200 acres more or less.
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je25 CAROLINE B. BARNES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Annie O'Farrell,
of Bournemouth, England, occupation
Splnstev, Intends to apply fov pevmlsston to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 5 miles south of the Salmon
Rivcv ford on the Bella Coola and Ootsa Lake summer troll and marked the
N.W. corner; thence cast SO chains;
thence south 40 chains: thence west SO
chains; thence north -10 chains to point
of commencement.
Located  June  21st.  1910.
ANNIE O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morvlson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE thnt O. W, Goodliun,
of Shellmoutli, Manitoba, occupation
Farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 20 chains north of the southeast corner of Timber License 86088,
thence south 40 chains: thenee cast so
chains: thence north 40 chains; thenco
west SO cliains to pnlnt of commencement and containing 1120 acres, move ov
less.
Dated   June   1(1,  1910.
OSCAR   WILLIAM   GOODBUN,
jy 28 P, M.  Kelly,  Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT
District  nf  Rupert
TAKE NOTICE thnt \V. A. S. Wilson
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Clerk,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase tiie following described lnnds:—
Commencing nt a post planted at thc
south-west corner of Section IS, township S, thence east 40 chains; thence
north SO chains; thonce west 10 chains;
thence south SO chnins to point of commencement nnd containing 320 acres
more or less.
Dated June  15,  1910.
William Alexander Sanderson Wilson
Jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that G. E. Swallow,
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Physician, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commenolng nt a post planted
nt the north-west cornev of Section 7.
township S, thence east 10 chnins;
thence south SO chnins: thence west 40
chains; thence north SO chains tn point
of commencement, and containing 320
acres move ov less.
Dated  June  16,  1910.
GEORGE ERNEST SWALLOW,
jy'.'.l F. M.  Kelly,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Katie Gibson, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to puvchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River,
about 65 chains north of where the said
river flows out of Chilco Lake, and being at the north-east corner of R. H.
W. Edmond's application to purchase;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains more or
less to vivev bank; thence following
the west shove of the vivev southevly to
point of commencement and containing
640 acves move ov less.
Dated June 3rd, 1910.
je25 KATIE GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Eva Gunn, wife
of John William Gunn, of Suthwyn,
occupation farmer Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing     at     a     post     planted
about 5 chains from the north bank of
Salmon River and beside the south-east
covnev   post   of   lot   392   as   suvveyed,
thenee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains;  thence novth  80 chains;  thence
east  80 chains to this post, containing
640 acres and being lot 393 as surveyed,
which  land  was located by me on  the
14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
EVA GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John McBeth,
of Parkdalu, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land:—Commencing
at a post planted about 60 chains from
the north bank of the Salmon River
and beside the north-west corner post of
lot 396, as surveyed, thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres and being lot 396,
as surveyed, which land was located by
me on the 14th day of June, 1910.
Dated June 25th,  1910.
JOHN  McBETH.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Gunn, of Suthwyn, occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 5
chains fvom the north bank of the Salmon River and beside the south-east
corner post of lot 392 as surveyed;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 cliains, containing 640 acres, and
being lot 392, as surveyed, which land
was located by me on the 14th day of
June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
JOHN WILLIAM GUNN.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David M. Robinson, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
School Superintendent, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following descvlbed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the novth-west covner
of Lot 340; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 66.76 chains, more or less, to the
shore of Eagle Lake; thence following
the said shore to the south-west corner
of Lot 340; thence north 84.60 chains,
more or less, to the point of commencement, and containing 607 acres, more
or less, and being Lot 340.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
Je 25 DAVID M. ROBINSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of_Coast, Range 2
TAKE NO-HOE that George Henry
Lawrence Hobson, of Vancouver, B.C.,
occupation Insurance Agent, intends to
apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the
following descvlbed lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south-east covnev of Lot 343; thence novth 40.04
chnins; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 40.04 chains to the novth-west
covnev of Lot 344; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less, and being
Lot 343.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25     George Henry Lawrence Hobson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Const, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Anquetel
Norman, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of Chilco River about
15 chains north of where the Chilco
River flows out of Chilco Lake; thence
west 20 chains; thence south to the low
water mark on the shore of Chilco Lake
being 40 chains (more or less); thence
following the sinuosities of the shore
northerly to point of commencement and
containing 40 ncres more or less.
Dated June Srd. 1910.
je 25 JOHN ANQUETEL NORMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alfred Gonzales,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Fisherman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchnse the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about SO chnins soutli of the southeast corner of Lot 831; thence 80 chains
west; thence SO chains south; thence SO
chains oast; thence SO chains north to
point of eommeneement and containing
640 acres move or less.
Dated   June   1st.   1910.
je25 ALFRED  GONZALES.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate certificate of Title to Lot
41,  Victoria  West.
NOTICE Is hereby given that lt Is
my Intention at tiie expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said land Issued to
Charles Pollock on the Sth dny of May,
1S69, and numbered 4311.
Land Registry Ofllce. Victoria, B.C.,
the 30th day of Juno,  1910.
J. P. McLEOD,
Jy 9 Deputy Registrar General
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that Alex McDonngh
of Russell, Manitoba, occupation Agent.
Intends to npply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing nt a post planted about one
mile north of the north-west corner of
soction 12, township 21, thonce north
80 chains, thence wost SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thonco oust SO chains
to point nf commencement and containing 640 noves move or less.
ALEXANDER McDONAGIt.
Jy 23 F. M. Kelly, Agent, THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
*:
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is heveby given that the Re-
sevve existing on Crown Lands in the
vicinity of Babine Lake, situate in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
was published in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated December 17th, 1908, Is
cancelled in so far as said Reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1618, 1517,
1616, 1516, 1510, 1507, 1506 1506A, 1503,
1501, 1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1614, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528, 1529,
1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1537, 1539,
1536, 1538, 1540, 1541, 1544, 1543, 1545,
1646, 1542, 1547, 1548, 1549, 1550, 1520,
1521, 1522, 1523, 1524, 1526, 1526 and
1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissionev of Lands
Lands Depavtment,
Victovia, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
je 25
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is heveby given that the Re-
sevve existing on Crown Lands ln the
vicinity of Babine Lake, and situate in
Cassiar District, notice of which beaving
date June 30th, 1908, was published in
the Bvitish Columbia Gazette, dated July
2nd, 1908, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissionev of Lands
Lands Depavtment,
Victovia, B.C., June 16th, 1910.
Je'26
MINEBAL ACT
Fovm F
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Jacob"  Mineral   Claim,   situate  in  the
Victoria Mining Division of Renfrew
District.     Where   located—Bugaboo
TAKE NOTICE that I, C. R. Carter,
acting agent for John Bentley, 'Free
Minev's Cevtiflcate No. 46076B, L. N. An-
devson, Fvee Minev's Cevtiflcate No.
44913B; Cavl Stvomgven, Executov, and
H. M. Shove, Executvix of the estate of
Sidney Shove, deceased, Fvee Minev's
Cevtiflcate No. 40864B, Wm. Havrison,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 41007B,
John H. Smith, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40823B, E. J. Smith, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 45083B, Elizabeth Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No. 45066B
and Oliver Snaith, Free Minev's Certificate No. 44938B., intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recordev for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Graut of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this Sixteenth day of June, A.D.
1910.
je 25 C. R. CARTER.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Sarah
Catherine Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for pevmlssion to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of Lot 345 on the shore of Eagle Lake;
thence north 44.23 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 99.57 chains,
more or less, to the north shove of Eagle
Lake; thence following the said shove in
an eastevly direction to point it commencement, and containing 568 acves,
move ov less, and being Lot 345.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
(MRS.) SARAH CATHERINE COLES
je 25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William R. Blind,
of Vancouvev, B.C., Real Estate Agent,
intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco Rivev about 135
chains novth fvom wheve the said river
flows out of Chilco Lake (being at or
neav the N. E. covnev of Katie Gibson'3
application to puvchase; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains novth; thence 80
chains east move ov less to vivev bank;
thence following the west shove of vivev
southevly to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acves move ov less.
Dated June 3vd, 1910.
je  26 WILLIAM  R. BLIND.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Gibson, of
Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Clevk, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
novth-west corner of Lot 337 and the
south-east corner of Lot 334; thence
80 chains west along the south boundary of Lot 334; thence south 60 chains
thenee east to the shore of Eagle Lake,
thence following the shore of Eagle
Lake In a northerly and easterly direction to the south-west cornev of Lot
337; thence north 45.49 chains, more or
less, to point of commencement, and
containing 400 acres, more or less.
Dated June 2nd,  1910.
je25 JOSEPH  GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that James Ross, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation, Accountant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of the Chilco Rivev, about 2
miles novthevly fvom the confluence of
Lingfield Cveek with the Chilco Rivev
and about one mile novthevly fvom the
N.E. covnev of Chas. R. Bvown's application to puvchase; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains move ov
less to the novth boundavy of Chas. R.
Bvown's application to puvchase; thence
east 80 chains more ov less along the
novth boundavy of Bvown's application
to puvchase to the Chilco Rivev; thence
following the west bank of the Chilco
Rivev novthevly to point of commencement, and containing 640 acves move ov
Dated June 4th, 1910.
je 25 JAMES ROSS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Geovge William
Hobson, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation
Insuvance Agent, intends to apply fov
pevmlssion to puvchase the following
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east covnev of Lot 334,
thence novth 19.53 chains to the southeast covnev of Lot 343; thence east along
the south boundavy of Lot 343 eighty
chains to the east boundavy of Lot 341;
thence south along the eastevn bound-
avies of Lots 341 and 342 to the shove
of Eagle Lake; thence following the said
shove novthevly and eastevly to point
of commencement, and containing 396
acves, and being Lot 344.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM HOBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Henvy Joseph
Shavp, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation
Clevk, intends to apply fov pevmlssion
to puvchase the following descvlbed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the southeast
covnev of Lot 331 and adjoining Mavy
Gibson's, Joseph Gonzales' and Alfved
Gonzales' locations; thence 80 chains
novth to the southeast covnev of Lot
331; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence 80 chains west to
point of commencement, and containing
640  acves  move  ov  less.
Dated June lst,  1910.
je25 HENRY   JOSEPH   SHARP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that David Blaiv of
Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Avchitect,
intends to apply for permission to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
novtheast covner of Lot 328; thence west
40 chains to the north-west corner of
Lot 328; thence south 40 chains to tne
south-west covner of Lot 328; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 480 acves,
move ov less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 DAVID BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald Foulkes
Cottrell of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 336;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains, move
ov less, to the south-west covnev of Lot
336; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 606 acves
of land, move ov less, and being Lot 336.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je   REGINALD FOULKES COTTRELL
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that John Atkinson,
of St. Mavks, occupation Favmev, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 chains
novth of the Salmon Rivev and about
38 chains south fvom the novth-west
covnev post of lot 396 as suvveyed on
the west boundavy line of said lot 396;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence novth SO chains; thence
oast 80 chains; which land was located
by me on the 11th day of June, 1910,
containing 640 acves.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
JOHN  ATKINSON,
jy 2 William Fovvest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Richards
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Accountant, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 chains south of the confluence
of Lingfield Cveek and the Chilco Rivev
on the west bank of the Chilco Rivev,
being about one and one-half miles novth
of the N. E. covnev of W. R. Blind's
application to puvchase; thence west 80
chains; thence novth SO chains; thence
east 80 chains move ov less to the west
shove of the Chilco Rivev; thence follow the said shove southevly to point
of commencement and containing 640
acves move ov less.
Dated June Srd. 1910.
je 25      CHARLES RICHARDS BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Simons, of
Vnncouver, B.C., occupntion Accountant,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. eorner of Lot 343; thence N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
80 chains to the N. W. corner of Lot
343; thence E. along the north boundary of Lot 343 eighty chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated May 30th, 1910.
je 26 JOHN SIMONS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Const. Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Tena Blanchard,
wife of Charles Haliburton Blanchard,
of Lydiatt, occupation Farmer, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 70 chains north
of the Salmon River and beside the
north-west corner post of lot 391, as
surveyod; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains: thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains, and being lot
391 as surveyed, which land was loented
by me on the 14th day of June, 1910,
and contains 320 acres.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
TENA BLANCHARD.
jy2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Street,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east covnev of Lot 332; thence
novth 80 chains', thence west 80 chains
to the novth-west covnev of Lot 332,
(being the novth-east covnev of Lot
217); thence south along the east boundavy of Lot 217 eighty chains to the
south-west covnev of Lot 332; thence
east SO chains, move or less, to point
of commencement, (excepting any part
of Lot 332 that may not be at present
Crown lands), and containing 600 acres,
move ov less, and being Lot 332.
Dated June lst, 1910,
Je 25 STANLEY STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Edwavd Avthur
Movvio, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation
Tobacconist, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west covnev of Lot
335; thence east 80 chains; thence novth
80 chains move ov less along the west
boundavy of Lot 336 to the novth-east
boundavy of Lot 335; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 620
acves of land move or less and being
Lot 335.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 26      EDWARD ARTHUR MORRIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Gibson, ot
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Stenographer, intends to apply for permission to puvchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains south of the south-east
cornev of Lot 331; thenee 80 chains east;
thenee 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
south; thence 80 chains west; thence 80
chains novth to point of commencement,
nnd  containing 640 acves, move ov less.
Dated June 1st, 1910.
je 25 MARY GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fved Gibson, of
Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Clevk, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 332, thenc* 40
chnins west to the north-west corn* r of
Lot 217; thence 40 chains south; thence
10 chains west; thence SO chains north;
thence 80 chains east to point of commencement nnd containing 480 acres,
more or loss.
Dated Jue lst,  1910.
je FRED GIBSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Maurice Glntz-
buvgev, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Real Estate Agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner of Lot
331, thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chnins south; thence 80 chains west to
the south-east corner of Lot 331; thence
SO chains north along the east boundary
of said Lot 331 to point of r rimence-
ment, and containing 640 acr" we or
less.
Dated June 1st,  1910.
je  25 MAURICE  GINT..13Ui:Gl_Il.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John Charles
Thurston Crofts of Vancouver, occupation Cvlil Engineer, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following descvlbed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nt the south-west covnev of
Lot 339; thence east 80 chains; thence
novth SO ohnlns; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acves, being Lot 339.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
Je 25     John Charlei Tkuriton Crofti.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Jonathan Rogers,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 347; thence
east 61.40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 90.91 chains to the
bank of Chilco River; thence following
the river bank southerly to point of
commencement and containing 588 acres,
more or less, and being Lot 347.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25 JONATHAN   ROGERS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George William
Coles, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Lot 346;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 492 acres of land
and being Lot 346.
Dated June  2nd,  1910.
je25        GEORGE WILLIAM COLES.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Cecil Croker
Fox, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Architect, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east covnev of Lot 334;
thence novth 80 chains; thence west 80
chains: thence south 80 chains, move ov
less, to the south-west covnev of Lot
334; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 040 acves
and being Lot 334.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25 CECIL   CROKER   FOX.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Robevt Havlow
W. Edmond, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation, Gentleman, intends to apply for
pevmlssion to puvchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west bank of the Chilco
Rivev about 55 chains novth of wheve
the said river flows out of Chilco Lake;
thence west 20 chains; thence south 40
chains more or less to the north boundary of John A. Novman's application
to puvchase; thence following the said
novth boundavy in an eastevly direction
to low water of the river a distance of
10 chains more or less; thenee following the west shore of the river northerly to point of commencement and containing 40 acres more or less.
Dated June 3vd, 1910.
je5      ROBERT HARLOW W. EDMOND
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that William Ralph
of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Mevchant,
Intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvibed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
novth-east covnev of Lot 348; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 49.61
chains to the shove of Eagle Lake;
thence following the said shore northerly to the south boundary of Lot 346;
thence following the said boundary east
53.16 chains to point of commencement
and containing 468 acres and being Lot
348.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 WILLIAM RALPH.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that George Phillip
Carr, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Postman, Intends to apply for permission to puvchase the following descvlbed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the Intevsectlon of the N. W.
covner of L. 330 and the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
329); thence north 40 chains more or
less to the novth-east covnev of said
pve-emptlon; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains to the
north-east corner of L. 330; thence
west 80 chains more or less along the
north boundavy of said Lot 330 to point
of commencement and containing 480
acves move ov less.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 GGEORGE PHILIP CARR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that John David
Bveese, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation
Insurance Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot
330 on the shore of Cochin Lake; thence
east along the north boundary of Lot
331, 53.88 chains; thence north 80
chains to the north-east corner of Lot
330; thence west to the east boundary
of Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot
No. 329); thence south along the said
boundarv 27.01 chains to the shore of
Cochin Lake; thence following the said
shore southerly and eastevly to point of
commencement and containing 559 acves
and being Lot 330.
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je 25 JOHN DAVID BREESE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Alexandev Good,
of St. James, occupation Favmev, intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvibed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one chain west of the tvail which vuns
along the east bank of the Salmon
Rivev, known as the Ootsa Lake Tvail
fvom Anaham Lake, said post being
about 15 chains novth-west fvom an
oblong lake (pavtly meadow) on the
east side of the said tvail and said post
being neavly equidistant between lots
suvveyed vespectively as Lots 3S7 and
388 and said post being William Setter's
north-west eorner post and William
Brown's south-west corner post, which
land was located June 13th, 1910, and
contains 640 acres.
Dated   June   25th,   1910.
ALEXANDER GOOD,
jy 2 William Forvest. Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fvances Dunlo
of Vancouvev, occupation Stepogvaphei
intends to apply fov pevmlssion to pui
chase the following descvibed lands:-
Commencing at a post planted at th
southeast corner of Lot 330; thence 8
chains east; thence 80 chains nortl
thence 80 chains west to the novtheas
covnev of Lot 330; thence 80 chain
south along the east boundavy of sal
Lot 330 to point of commencement an
containing 640 acves move ov less.
Dated   June   lst,   1910.
je25 FRANCES  DUNLOP.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Fvedevick Hems-
ley Shanks, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Secvetavy, intends to apply fov
permission to purchase the following
described lands;—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of Lot
346; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains
to the novth-west covnev of Lot 345;
thence along the novth boundavy of Lot
345 eighty chains to point of commencement, and containing 320 acves, move
ov  less.
Dated  May   30th,   1910.
je 25 FREDERICK HEMSLEY SHANKS
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Avthuv W. Javvis
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Bank
Manager, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following descvlbed
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the novth-west covnev of Lot 337;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 78.38
chains along the novth boundavy of Lot
338 to the shove of Eagle Lake; thence
following the said shove in a westevly
direction to the south-west covnev of
Lot 337; thence novth 45.49 chains to
the point of commencement, and containing 462  acves and being Lot 337.
Dated  June  2nd,  1910.
je 25 ARTHUR   W.   JARVIS.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Annie McBeth,
wife of John McBeth, of Pavkdale, occupation Favmev, intends to npply fov
pevmlssion to puvchase the following
descvibed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 65 chains novth of the
Salmon Rivev, and beside the novth-
east corner of lot 396 as surveyed;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, containing 640 acres,
and being lot 396 as surveyed, which
land was located by me on the 14th
day of June, 1910.
Dated  June   25th,   1910.
ANNIE McBETH.
jy 2 William Forrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Hillman
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Florist,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at tho
north-west corner of Lot 331 on the
shore of Cochin Lake; thence east 53.8S
chains along the north boundary of
Lot 331 and the south boundary of Lot
330 to the north-east corner of Lot 331;
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north 53.91 chains, more
or less, to the shore of Cochin Lake;
thence following the shore of Cochin
Lake In a north-easterly direction to
point of commencement and containing
582.8 acres, and being Lot 331.
Dated May 31st,  1910.
je 25 CHARLES  HILLMAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Alexandev Mo-
gee, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation Gentleman, Intends to apply fov pevmlssion
to puvchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west bank of the Chilco River
about two and one-half miles novth of
the novth-east covnev of Lot 347; thence
west 50 chains; thence south 80 chains,
thence east to the vivev, being 35 chains
move ov less; thence following the said
river ln a northevly direction to point
of commencement and containing 300
acves move ov less.
Dated June 4th. 1910.
Je25 ALEXANDER  MOGEE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William Bvown,
of Headlngly, occupation Favmev, Intends to apply fov pevmlssion to puvchase the following descvlbed lands: Commencing at a post planted about one
chain west of the tvail which vuns along
the east bank of the Salmon Rivev,
known as the Ootsa Lake tvail, fvom
Anaham Lake, said post being about 15
chains north-west from an oblong lake
(partly meadow) on the east side of
the said trail and said post being nearly equidistant between lots surveyed
vespectively as lots 387 and 388, and
said post being William Settev's novth-
west covnev post and Alexandev Good's
south-east covnev post which land was
located June 13th, 1910, and contains
640 acves.
Dated   June   25th,   1910.
WILLIAM  BROWN.
jy 2 William Fovrest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range Three (3)
TAKE NOTICE that George Munro,
of Winnipeg, occupation Banker, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about flve
chains north of the Salmon River and
beside the south-east covnev post of Lot
392 as suvveyed, thence novth along
the east boundavy line of Lot 392 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to said post,
containing 320 acres, which land was
located by me June 14th, 1910.
Dated June 25th. 1910.
GEORGE MUNRO.
jy 2 William Forvest, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Colin C. McLei
nan, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupation H(
tel Clevk, intends to apply fov pevmis
sion to purchase the following d(
scribed lands:—Commencing at a pos
planted at the south-east covnev of Lt
341; thence novth 80 chains, move c
less, to the novth-east covnev of L(
341; thence west SO chains; thenc
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chain:
to point of commencement, and contalr
ing 640 acves, move ov less and bein
Lot 341.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 COLIN  C.  McLENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that William Sette
of St. Andvews, occupation Favmev, ir
tends to apply fov pevmlssion to pui
chase the following descvlbed lands: Con
mencing at a post planted about or
chain west of the Tvail which vur
along the east bank of the Salmon Riv<
known as the Ootsa Lake Trail, froi
Anaham Lake, said post being about 1
chains north-west from an oblong Ial
(partly meadow) on the east side of tl
said trail, and said post being near
equidistant between lots surveyed <
Nos. 3S7 and 388. which land was I
cated by me on the 13th day of Jun
1910, containing 640 acres.
Dated June 25th, 1910.
WILLIAM SETTER,
jy 2 William Forvest, Agen
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distvict of Coast, Range Thvee (3)
TAKE NOTICE that Chavles Halybu
ton Blanchavd, of Lydiatt, occupatic
Favmev, intends to apply fov perml
sion to purchase the following descri
ed lands:—Commencing at a post plan
ed about 70 chains north of the Salmc
Rivev and beside the novth-west corn
post of lot 391 as surveyed, then
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chain
thence north 80 chains; thence east
chains, containing 640 acres, which lai
was located by me on the 14th day
June,   1910.
Dated  June  25th,   1910.
Charles Halyburton Blanchard.
jy2 William Forrest, Agei
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Elean
Mary Crofts, of Vancouver, B.C., occ
pation Married Woman, intends to a
ply for permission to purchase the ft
lowing described lands:—Commencing
a post planted at the north-east corn
of Lot 338; thence west 80 chain
thence south 78.38 chains to the sho
of Eagle Lake; thence following the sa
shore to the south-east corner of L
338; thence north 84.60 chains to poi
of commencement, containing 640 acr(
more or less, and being Lot 338.
Dated  June 2nd,  1910.
(MRS.) ELEANOR MART CROFT
je25
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that (Mrs.) Catherii
Blair, of Vancouvev, B.C., occupatic
Mavvied Woman, intends to apply f<
pevmlssion to puvchase the followln
descvibed lands:—Commencing at a po:
planted at the novth-west corner <
Charles Skinner's pre-emption (Lot 329
thence east 80 chains; thence north 4
chains; thence west 80 chains; thenc
south 40 chains to point of commenci
ment and containing 320 acres, more t
Dated May 31st, 1910.
je25        (MRS.) CATHERINE BLAIR.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Livin.
stone of Vancouver, B.C., occupatic
Spinster, intends to apply for perml;
sion to purchase the following describe
lands:—Commencing at a post plante
at the north-east corner of Lot 34!
thence west 61.40 chains; thence sout
SO chains; thence east to the banks <
Chilco River, being 85 chains, move c
less; thence novthevly to point of con
mencement and containing 640 acve
move ov less, and being Lot 349.
Dated June 2nd, 1910.
je 25 MINNIE MVINGSTONE.
9L__
^M
CANCELLATION   OF   BESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the r
sevve existing upon the lands embvacc
in special Timbev Licences Nos. 2896
28963 and 28964, situated in Goldstvea
Distvict, is cancelled, and that the sa
lands will be open for location und<
the provisions of the Land Act at mb
night on October 14th, 1910.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lam
Lands Department,
Victoria,  July  14,  1910.
jy i-s
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Rupevt
TAKE  NOTICE   that   Fvedevick   Ri
Janes,  of Victovia,  B.C.,  Clevk,  intent
to   apply   fov   pevmlssion   to   puvcha
the   following   descvibed   lands:—Cor
mencing at a post planted on the sou-
shove of Geovgle Lake, about 60 chaii
fvom    eastevn    end;    thence    south
chains;  thence  west  40  chains;   then
novth  40 chains;  thence east 40 chaii
following   shore   of   lake   to   point
commencement,     and     containing     1
acres,  more or less.
FREDERICK  ROY   JANES,
jy 16 F. M. Kelly, Ager
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
TAKE NOTICE that E. O'Farrell,
Dublin, Ireland, occupation Barrister, i
tends to apply for permission to pu
chase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
mlles ln a south-eastevly direction fvo
foot of Takia Lake on the Bella Coo
and Ootsa Lake tvail and mavked t
S. W. covner; thence north 40 chain
thence east 80 chains; thence south
chains; thence west SO ehains to poi
of commencement.
Dated June 21st. 1910.
E.  O'FARRELL,
jy 16 J. R. Morrison, Age THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 30,  1910
ICE CREAM
FREEZERS
All Sizes
Priced from
$2.75
HAMMOCKS
from
$1-75
SPECIAL
THREE-PIECE
TEA SET
Teapot
Sugar
Cream
for
35C
You'll Never Find Smarter Styles in Reed,
Willow and Fibre Chairs
You cannot find better styles in reed, willow or linen fibre chairs than we are at present showing on our fourth floor. The very utmost in design is offered and
there's an excellent choice—something to satisfy every desire in an ideal Summer chair.
This is the season when an invitingly comfortable chair is in great demand—when just such a chair as one of these is the most sought furniture piece in the home.
These are great for porch or lawn.
These chairs are superior in design, and they are also superior in workmanship and finish and materials. Made of selected reed or linen fibre. Workmanship the
best and the finish specially good. These are shellaced, and this preserves as well as adds to the beauty of the chair. Another feature of this display is the fairness of the
pricings.   Considering the superiority in  quality and design, the pricings are exceptionally interesting.
Right now is an opportune time to secure one of these chairs—opportune because the variety is best now and because this is the season when such a chair is
particularly desirable.   Come in and let us show you a big variety of styles in rockers or arm chairs, with prices ranging from $4.50.
 $4.50, 5, $6, $7.50, $8, $9, $12.50 REED ARM CHAIRS at  $4.50, $8.50, $7, $7.50 and up
SETTEES,   COUCHES,   ROUND  AND  SQUARE  TABLES—A  GREAT CHOICE OP STYLES
REED ROCKERS at.
GET YOUR REFRIGERATOR HERE.   WE HAVE THEM PRICED FROM $12.
FOLDING CAMP FURNITURE AND ALL CAMPERS' SUPPLIES HERE.
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Editorial Notes
JHALT
IThe Week wishes to congratulate all
cerned on the very excellent piece of
Ik which has been done in asphalting'
lien Avenue from Fort Street to Rock-
|l Avenue. It could not have been
er clone in England and the result is
furnish an object lesson to Victoria,
pady the property owners on Fort
bet are anxious to have asphalt instead
Vood-block pavement, on the ground of
liomy. The Week would respectfully
gest that the first cost is not every-
Ig, and that, excellent as asphalt is in
liy respects, it has its drawbacks. In
I or frosty weather it is as slippery as
the surface, or skin, which is only
Lit an inch thick, is not very durable,
jicially where traffic is heavy and un-
(btedly Fort Street would come in the
br category. The AVeek thinks that the
nee of the City Engineer to use asphalt
1 residential streets only, where the
lie is light, is sound, and the last word
lhe subject.
maintain the said enactments to the best
of his power. No single incident of late
years, has so clearly demonstrated the
growing influence of Non-conformists, and,
incidentally, the episode must be regarded
as a triumph for the principles advocated
for a quarter of a century by Mr. Lloyd-
George. Unquestionably, at the moment
Lloyd-George and the Non-conformist conscience are "on top."
JESSION OATH
(Truly times change.    No one would
thought, twenty years ago, that the
bssion Oath would have been altered
Lich an extent that all reference to the
Irch of England, as by law established,
Id have been eliminated.    This has
liened and yet the heavens have not
In.   To the masses of mankind it will
ear that the  Protestant situation  is
piently protected by a declaration of
King that he is a faithful Protestant,
Ithat he will, according to the true
Lt of enactments which secured Pro-
pit succession to the throne, hold and
THE COMPANIES ACT
The Times is trying to work up an
agitation against the Companies Act, ancl,
incidentally, to take a slap at the Attorney-
General. In the absence of Mr. Bowser,
who is well able to take care of himself,
his deputy has pointed out that there is
considerable mis-conception with regard to
the interpretation of the Act ancl that
local agents of Eastern Companies have
contributed to that mis-conception by placing an interpretation on the Act which it
does not bear. In this, as in many other
matters, time will tell, and there are lots
of subjects more worthy the attention of
British Columbia journals than the defence of Eastern manufacturers. Tlie latter have never been suspected of excessive
charity, or even consideration, in their
dealings with this Province. Their cupidity has helped to make Victoria one of
the dearest places to live in within the
boundaries of the Britisli Empire; ancl if
the operation of the Companies Act should
result in a transference of business to
other quarters, especially to England, there
would be no cause for regret in British
Columbia.
election was over the Liberal party would
continue to fight with the same determination and fierceness as during the campaign, and that tliere would be no backing-
down with respect to the Lords' veto. Now
all this is changed. Mr. Balfour and Mr.
Asquith have got together; compromise is
in the air, ancl it is generally conceded
that, whatever eventuates, it will be something very much less drastic than was contemplated. The truth of the matter is
that Mr. Asquith managed to ride to
power on an excellent party cry. But, face
to face with the responsibility of dismembering one of the most venerable of British institutions, he hesitates, and, in the
end, is almost certain to join with the
Conservative party in carrying a mild
measure of reform. Unless The Week is
greatly mistaken, there will, before long,
be a re-adjustment, of party affiliations, in
which the Socialists, Labourites, Home-
Rulers and extreme Radicals will join
forces and the more moderate Liberals
will unite with the Conservative party to
protect the Constitution.
THE CRISIS
Some Canadian journalists express
surprise at the manner in which the political crisis has been handled at home.
They evidently expected  that  when the
JOSEPH MARTIN
Mr. Joseph Martin, the "Stormy
Petrel'' of Canadian politics mid the
elected representative of St. Pancrns, is
back at thc Pacific Coast, where, however, he has no intention of remaining;
for, when he has put liis business affairs
in order he will hie him again to London town in time for the next session of
Parliament, which will probably be convened in November. .Mr. Martin is full
of racy anecdote of his sojourn in the
Old Country, but his soul is sore vexed
at the lack of men of light and lending
in both political parties. As lie walks
along the corridors of the House nnd views
the statues of England's worthies, lie is
reminded  that "there were giants in the
land in those clays," but, alas, they are all
dead.    And he only is left to tell the
story.    Mr. Martin thinks that neither Mr.
Asquith nor Mr. Balfour possesses any
of the elements of leadership.   He thinks
that Lloyd-George is brilliant but superficial, ancl that everything he does and
says is with a view to advance the interests
of Lloyd-George.    He is a little puzzled
about, Winston Churchill;   thinks he is
cleverer than  George and may possibly
have an element of greatness in him, but
he has not yet quite made up his mind
and is still considering the matter.    Sir
Edward Grey, once the hope of the Liberal
party, lacks grip and force, ancl in spite
of personal charm, displays none of the
characteristics of leadership,    lir. Martin  speaks   very  favourably  of  Austen
Chamberlain, who, without being brilliant,
is an under-rated man, who has been overshadowed by his father, but is exceedingly able, well posted and a thorough politician.   Mr. Martin thinks that there are
many more unlikely things than that he
will one day be Premier.    With reference to his own constituency, Mr. Martin
expressed the opinion that he suited the
people and  that  he could  hold the fort
against all comers.    It is no secret tliat
he is not a persona grata with the leaders
of the Liberal party, who actually opposed
him in St.  Pancras, though not openly,
lir. Martin, however, thinks that no combination can put him out.   He is "nursing"  the constituency and holds public
open-air meetings every Thursday.    During his absence his lieutenants are currying on the gootl work.   On the whole, Mr.
Martin seems to be having a good time,
and, backed its lie is bv an ultra Radical
constituency, lie is bound to make things
lively for somebody, and probably quite
as much for his political friends ns his
enemies. H
10
THE AVEEK, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
Gas Demonstration And Salesroom
Our new demonstrating room here is filling a long-felt want in Victoria. It is
right in the business part of the city where ladies are shopping every day. It is
right up-to-date with a full line of modern gas goods absolutely needed by up-to-date
people—
Gas Ranges, Gas Stoves, Gas
Radiators, Gas Water Heaters,
Etc., Etc.
TfiEr
]I£ST~
WAY-T9-
Everything required in good gas apparatus.   It is in charge of a man who knows this business from A to Z, one who is thoroughly competent in every way to
show the goods and demonstrate the safety, economy and simplicity of gas for heating and cooking purposes.
WE CORDIALLY INVITE VICTORIANS TO CALL HERE EVEN IF THEY  DO  NOT  DESIRE  TO  BUY.   THEY  ARE  WELCOME  EVEN
MERELY AS SIGHTSEERS.   IF THEY WISH TO PURCHASE THEY WILL BE SURPRISED AT OUR REASONABLENESS OF PRICE.
A fine "Gurney" Gas Stove, a splendid cooker, connected free for $20.00
An exceptionally good and handsome "Jewel" Stove, connected free for $28.00
An unrivalled "Jewel" Gas Range, with Two Ovens, one small oven for breakfast
and light cooking, the other a large and roomy oven for baking bread and
roasting meat; connected free for $40.00
Hotplate Gas Cookers, up from  $2.50
Gas Toasters, the newest device, right up-to-the-minute 50c
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
652 YATES STREET      TEL 2i79
Salesroom
tel. 2479       652 YATES STREET
Dominion and Provincial News
Society Girl Resumes
After a close down of several weeks'
duration, work has been resumed at
the Society Girl mine, two miles east
of Moyie and adjoining the St. Eugene property.
Big Output
During the month of June the
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company's
mines at Michel and Coal Creek produced 116,447 tons, the largest monthly output in the history of these
colliesies.
Hotel is Burgled
Burglars lately broke into the Ladysmith Hotel at Greenwood and stole
three hundred and ten dollars in cash
and coins and curios valued at a
thousand dollars. The police have no
clue.
A Big Donation
Sir Wilfrid Laurier has suggested
that his government will donate at
least $2,000,000 to the proposed Winnipeg exhibition in 1914. The exhibition will attract the whole world and
particularly will the West benefit
thereby.
Last Decoration
Captain A. O. Cooper, R.N.R., chief
officer of the R.M.S. Empress of
China, was the last man upon whom
his late Majesty King Edward conferred a decoration. This was the
medal for long service in the Royal
Naval Reserve, and the presentation
was made on behalf of the late king
by Rear Admiral Lyon on board H.
M. S. Tartar at Kongkong.
tourist route in the world. I saw
lots of places along the route where
ideal summer resorts could be located.
These will be developed and an immense traffic will be attracted to the
coast."
Great Tourist Route
Speaking   of   the   coast   trip   from
the   south   to   Prince   Rupert,  D.   D.
Mann, one of the heads of the Canadian   Northern    Railway   Company,'
says:   "It   will   become   the   greatest1
Le Roi is to Close
The management of the well-known
Le Roi mine of Rossland has decided
to discontinue operations indefinitely.
The mine was closed last year for a
few months, but additional capital
was obtained and development was
recommenced. Specimens of ore have
since been taken, but the results were
not up to expectations and the mine
will be closed again in the course of i
the next few days.
How About Goats
Not having received notification
from the authorities in Great Britain
of an outbreak of foot and mouth
disease among cattle in Yorkshire,
England, the department of agriculture on the 22nd inst cabled to the
British board of agriculture, asking
for an official statement on the subject.
Immediately upon the receipt of the
official confirmation of the report, the
department will take steps to exclude
all cattle, sheep and swine from Great
Britain. The importation of live
animals from Britain, mostly thoroughbred stock, amounts to over half
a million dollars annually.
Mine Purchase
The famous old Highland mine at
Ainsworth, which at one time was the
largest shipper in Canada, having
shipped in one year one-third of the
lead produced in the Dominion, and
whicli was closed last January, has
been acquired by thc Kootenay Silver Lead Mines, Ltd., a new company
just incorporated, with a capital stock
of two millions, by leading capitalists
of Vancouver and Spokane.
Work Started on Alberta Central
It is reported that twenty-five teams
and a large force of men started
work today on the construction of the
Alberta Central railway breaking
ground west of the Calgary and Edmonton railway between the bend of
the Red Deer river and the town of
that name. The force of men and
teams will be increased as fast as
the required labour can be secured.
This is the line for which a charter
was secured last session from thc
Dominion parliament and it will run
to the Rocky mountains and on west
through the central portions of the
province.
Mr. Martin Disappointed
Mr. Joseph Martin, M.P. for East
St. Pancras, in the British House of
Commons, arrived in Toronto recently from New York.
In discussing at some length thc
present outlook of British politics,
Mr. Martin frankly admitted that hc
was disappointed with the Liberal
policy.
The present government, he said,
was showing a regrettable lack of
decision in conducting thc campaign
against the lords. It had gone to
thc people with thc cry of "abolition
of the lords' veto," but now the entire
situation was tied up by equivocation
on the question.
Questioned regarding the budget,
Mr. Martin said he thought the terms
of taxation were not understood by
Canadians, otherwise they would be
unanimous in expressing approval of
them.
that they had no jurisdiction to prevent the exhibition of the fight pictures, even if they wished to do so.
It was pointed out that the city council issued licenses to the theatres and
they might possibly be dealt with in
that way or by a by-law, but while
the police had power to see that the
regulations of the council were carried
out, the commissioners had no right
in themselves to legislate against any
particular class of moving pictures
not already pronounced upon by law.
In view of this the commissioners decided that they would take no action
in one way or another, and it now
seems to be left to the city council
to deal with.
Fight Pictures
A special meeting of the police
commissioners of Vancouver recently
considered the question of prohibiting the display of the Jeffries-Johnson fight moving pictures. At the
request of the mayor and Commissioners White and Von Cramer, Mr.
G. H. Cowan, city solicitor, was on
hand. After consulting with the solicitor, the commissioners  concluded
Back from Teslin
Isaac Taylor, Captain Henderson
and James Richards have lately returned to Whitehorse from Teslin to
which place they went in the launch
Pelican, taking a cargo of provisions
for the Taylor & Drury store at that
place. The party remained at Teslin
only fourteen hours. The timely arrival of the launch relieved a "grub"
shortage which had caused belts in
the Teslin vicinity to be buckled in
the last hole.
Two men, Thomson and Wilson,
who had been prospecting in the
Leard country since last fall, were at
Teslin building a boat with which to
carry supplies ot their camp, the trip
necessitating a four-mile portage over
thc range to the Mackenzie river valley. The men claim to have found
good placer prospects. Thompson and
Wilson also have property on Iron
creek.
Jack Blick of Livingstone, expects
to do considerable development work
on Iron creek next winter, he having
a group of claims there.
Rev. C. C. Brett, who accompanied
the Taylor party to Teslin, remained
in charge of the Episcopal mission
at that place.
YACHTING NOTE
Mr. J. S. Gibb, ex-commodoi
the Victoria Yacht Club, has reti
from a trip to Europe, and his 1
friends are glad to hear he is gr
improved in  health.
Mr. D'O. Rochfort, the Hone
Secretary, has returned from a
to Stewart City, Portland Canal.
The beautiful schooner 3
"Anemone IV," has been purcl
by Mr. C. D. Taylor, and is no'
the Victoria Machinery ways t
overhauled for a long cruise.
The Shawnigan Lake Regatta
be held on Saturday, July 30th,
will include sailing and motor
races. Admiral Lane of the P
International Power Boat Associ
will be asked to advise as to
handicapping of the power boa
this regatta.
An excellent group of the of
of the last International Regatti
been taken by J. Savannah, of
city.
King George has intimated hi
tention of offering a cup to the 1
Yacht Squadron to be sailed fi
Cowes in August.
The   Kamloops   Motor   Boat
Regatta took place on July 27th
proved  a  great  success.
A move has been made to hurr
work on Dredger Rock, the cot
tion of which will greatly imj
the  entrance to Victoria Harbc
It is regrettable that the dish--
from the Empress Hotel is dischi
at the retaining wall. It is impo:
to leave a clean boat there, a
grease will make it in a shocking
dition in a few hours. Steps s
be taken  to obviate this nuisat
An optimist is one who would
believe that everything ls all
than  know   the   truth.
The Inspired Press:—A kiss. THE WEEK, SATUEDAY, JULY 30, 1910
It
'he Sword
and the Word
(By Reeves Shaw)
I.
y had thrashed it out in the In-
"ourts, argued, counter-argued,
ed and wrestled with the law.
Cirwan had won.
Y gave him a dinner at his club
cutta, and he gave them a ban-
>ack.    For a week or two  he
1 his old friends with every ex-
ance the season and the city of-
and made new ones at a pace
outstripped    all    limits.    And
fellow in the land, even those
remotest  hill  stations  where
ews   had   only   just    trickled
h,   stood   and  drank  to   Dick
's  luck,  for he had  provided
he and his old humorist of an
with the most amusing sensa-
ley had known for years, and
new he was one of the best.
when,   the  pledgings   and   the
tions finally done, he stepped
on board  the  English-bound
perfect crowd of men fore-
d on the quay to shout him
ore good-bye.   And two paces
him   on   thc   gangway,   two
behind  him  on  the   deck,  al-
Ivo paces behind him, trod Lata
six  foot  four  in  his  turban,
mperturbable, monumental, the
r drawn in his hand.
e   thousand  a  year  in  front
, and that old angel of death
behind!   It'll drive Dick crazy
ar or less," someone prophe-
it! He'll be a kind of open-
iic-hall turn for a little while,
n nobody will take any notice
t. The money will be a pretty
anodyne for Dickie's nerves."
you    Hallo,   they're    off!
, Dick, old man! Good luck!"
an came to the vessel's side
t an answer, and Lata Singh
obediently after him. The
of the scimitar fell across
's back.
le journey home Kirwan, the
ompanionable of men at the
table, the freest and merriest
concerts that followed, was
ly silent and suppressed the
ie day lasted. It was remark-
it when evening 'came Lata
relinquished his guardianship,
ck's lips were released from
fetters. A man who had
ied with him since the second
entually found courage to ap-
the subject,
y have you always got this old
about you?" he asked. "Con-
d old nuisance he seems to me,
g your pardon."
I't you know?" replied Dick,
ed. "I thought everybody
ng in this world had the story
•Vhere  have  you  been   buried
been in Tenasserim for the
ree years.    What's the joke?"
grinned, rather painfully.
joke's a bit long drawn out,"
d, "and it has to go on till
d relic hands in his checks to
er god he patronises, or till the
make a slip and his scimitar
s the contract. He's a sort
ing guest with me, and three
id a year's the figure."
pays   you   three   thousand  a
1, that was the sum bequeathed
and he waltzes around with it
shape of make-weight. I sup-
oughtn't to grumble, 'cos I
hard enough to get hold of
as a restricter of conversation
very lid. I scarcely dare say
lest it should prove to be my
re say I'm a bit dull, but "
k here, it is tiring work ex-
what every news rag in India
daily columns about for the
ee months. But nuttily, it's
My old uncle died, up in
and left the whole of his
to me. That was famous;
•e was one condition, which is
st diabolically stupid a one
old apoplectic ass could im-
I was never to speak a cer
tain word in the English language."
"That seems easy enough."
"Yes," went on Kirwan heatedly,
"but the beastly word wasn't named!
That's where my trouble comes in.
There are millions and millions of
words in the dear old dictionary, and
I can shout 'em all but one to my
heart's delight. But as I don't know
which is the one that has a scratch
against it, I'm practically debarred
from the whole lot."
"But the Indian?"
"He's the umpire. He knows the
word. He 'doesn't say anything—
simply watches—and if I speak thc
word he'll 'out' me. I've swung round
a dozen times when I've accidentally
used a word I haven't 'tried' before,
to find that grinless lump of old
bronze holding his sword as rigid as
ever. The perfect (-gravity of the
chap is nerve-breaking. He was a
sort of faithful servant of the old
man's, and he looks upon his office
as an inviolate duty to the dead. He
knocks off, thank goodness, every evening at six, and then I'm free to say
whatever I like till next morning at
ten, when he pops up again."
His listener nodded.
"He looks as though he'd carry
out his part to the letter," he remarked. "But the legacy is worth
some worry."
"That's why I fought for it," said
Dick. "Three thousand a year to a
chap who was struggling on a hundred and fifty! My cousins; of course,
went for the will out and out. Said
it proved his insanity up to the hilt,
and they wanted to share in the
boodle. They're not his sons—he
was a bachelor—but another branch.
I stuck to* my guns, and appealed
through every miserable court there
is in the land. I had out the most
swagger counsel at the English Bar,
and he pulled their learned legs for
all he was worth. Argued that the
old man was a purist in speech, and
that if he cared to endow the suppression of a word he considered
vulgar or unpleasant, he had every
right to do so. If I cared to accept
the condition, my right to the legacy
was indisputable, and so on. As for
his sanity, a dozen of 'em and more
swooped down from Benares to swear
to that. They called for Lata Singh
to go in the box, but my K.C. upped
and objected in fine style. He said
it would be destroying the fundamental purpose of the will, which was
without a doubt to put a premium on
deliberate and carefully-chosen speech
if the barred word was allowed to
become known. Well, he beat 'em,
and they decided in my favour. So
the money's mine. And my cousins'
maledictions are mine, and Lata
Singh, too, and so will be the edge
of his bally old scythe one of these
days, I'm thinking. And then all the
plunder, every penny of it, will revert to my cousins, who won't waste
any of it building a mausoleum for
me, you bet."
"It's strange, very strange," murmured his friend. "I think if I were
you I'd learn French."
"Yes, or the deaf and dumb alphabet, or the language of flowers, or
something else wildly convivial!"
snapped Kirwan. "Don't be a fool;
come and have a drink. I know I
can ask for a whisky-and-soda; they
were the first words I ventured."
II.
In the Strand Kirwan was a
serious rival to the excitement of a
Lord Mayor's Show. Everybody
turned to stare at the elegantly
dressed young gentleman, so closely
shadowed by his fierce-looking bodyguard, whose spotless white robes
and shining sword emphasized so
marvellously the everyday dreariness
of London. Little boys ran after them
in the street till they discovered it
was not an advertisement for a new
exhibition, and a knife-grinder pleasantly offered to operate professionally on the scimitar at contract rates.
Through it all Kirwan swore; he had
discovered, with no little satisfaction,
and at great personal risk, that all
his expletives were passable.
He had tried at first remaining at
home all day and sleeping mostly
during the prohibited hours, but this
method of shirking his responsibilities soon wearied him. There was no
fun in living unless you could be out
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in the daytime, and in spite of Lata
Singh's irksome presence he had perforce to get about as usual. Only
he could not go to his club, for the
committee refused to elect the Indian
as a member.
Whether Lata Singn enjoyed his
job or not it is impossible to say, but
it certainly never seemed to bore him.
Sharp to the tick of the clock he
appeared, always erect, always shin-
ingly clean, and always expressionless and silent. With a polite bow
he faded away the moment his appointed day was done. Out of sheer
good fellowship Kirwan had at times
endeavoured to chat *lth him. Lata
Singh reproved him masterfully with
a glance, but no word escaped him.
His mission was to adjudicate on
speech, not to encourage it. He was
a warder, not a cor.ipanion. Kirwan
was comprehensively snubbed. So
the months came, passed, and returned, and Kirwan lost his hold on the
London public as a sight to be gaped
at; the edge had worn off the novelty, but not off the sword. And Kir-
wan's nerves had become frayed like
the ends of an honest man's trousers.
He had contracted the disease of
stuttering as well as a slight leeward
twist in the neck, the result of adopting tactics. For when a new untried
word was on his tongue he would just
let go a single syllable of it, repeat it
more loudly, try the next syllable,
and then swing round his head to see
if there wcre any change for the
worse in Lata Singh's bearing. The
habit became chronic; his neck permanently biassed.
And then there was Winifred.
Winifred was the beginning of the
end. In the evenings when Kirwan
was unattached, as it were, she was
divine. She adored him, and frankly
told him so. But she positively refused to become one of the circus.
"No, Dickie, dear," she had said to
him; "it cannot be. I wouldn't mind
marrying you in the least; I'd love
it. But I'm not going to join the
troupe. Its' no good pleading, Dickie,
really! To think that a slip of the
tongue might make me a widow any
day! Why, the word might be in the
marriage service, and there would bc
a pretty how-d'ye-do! You can't get
married in your close time."
So Kirwan writhed and despaired,
fretting himself to distraction.    If hc
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dismissed Lata Singh and resigned
the three thousand a year he wouldn't
be worth marrying, and if he kept
them Winifred wouldn't havc him. He
felt like one of those Christmas penny
puzzles where you have to get tiny
beads into tinier holes; when you
waggle one in you waggle the other
out. His only chance was to bribe
thc Indian—to bribe him magnificent-
(Contlnued on Page 12)
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TIIE WEEK,  SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1910
!
:.
The Sword and the Word
(Continued from Page 11)
ly—out of his vigilance. But Lata,
the scoundrel, was above that sort of
thing, and when Kirwan did just mention it in a friendly sort of way, he
made a slight, suggestive movement
of the scimitar, frowned hard, and
glared, and that was all. But it was
quite enough for Kirwan.
It had been perfectly apparent to
Kirwan that Lata Singh was not the
only person who persistently followed him about. For instance, there
was the hungry-looking man with a
camera, who was always on the other
side of the road. He was a newspaper man who lived in the hope of
getting a "special" with a particularly
good thrill in it. His ambition was
that Lata's great effort, when it did
occur, should happen in Piccadilly
Circus in thc afternoon. It would be
a pity to waste it in some obscure
quarter. Moreover, it might mean a
difference of twenty pounds to him.
And there was also the rat-like individual who thought he looked the
proper detective. Kirwan knew him
too; hc was the representative of the
cousins, the people who would get
the yearly three thousand if Lata
Singh was called upon to play with
his sword. Pleasant people to stroll
in the Park with I
It was the rat-like gentleman who
called at Kirwan's rooms one evening. He fussed about for a long
while, thinking he was being clever,
and hoping he would secure.an advantage. Then when he discovered
Kirwan was as shrewd as his temper
was short, he got to business.
His clients were tired of waiting.
They made an offer. Kirwan, they
were satisfied, was sick of the absurd and nerve-shattering condition
by which he kept the inheritance.
Well, all or nothing for one of them.
It should be legally arranged. They
would renounce all rights if he
would agree to the test.
Kirwan agreed in a hurry. He
thanked them for the idea. His solicitors would wait upon their solicitors to draw up the agreements. A
week from that day they could all
meet, at eleven o'clock in the morning,
in his study.
They all came—his solicitors, their
solicitors, his senior cousin, and of
course, and most important of them
all, Lata Singh.
It was a very pretty little group,
and only the Indian was at all himself. The men of law complained
amongst themselves that the proceedings were unusual; there was no precedent for the case; they hoped they
were acting rightly. Kirwan's cousin
often felt like calling the arrangement
off, but saved himself again and again
by thinking of the three thousand a
year, most of which would be his.
Kirwan himself clung to Winifred
(only figuratively, of course; Winifred
wasn't there) to give him courage,
but was very pale, and prone to be
pessimistic. But Lata Singh was as
brown and as stately and as silent
as ever, taking his usual position immediately behind thc trembling Dick.
A lawyer coughed, and Kirwan
started.
"I think you may begin now, sir,"
he said, taking up a book upon the
table. "Mr. Sumpster is satisfied that
the calculations have been correctly
made."
Thc book was a dictionary, divided
by a blue ribbon into two equal parts.
A red line was drawn under the word
"lecturer."
"I finish at 'lecturer'?" said Dick,
"According to this dictionary, that
word is the last in thc first half. You
can begin if you like at 'lectureship'
and  finish  at  'zythum,'"
"No, I'll take thc first part, thank
you. And it is thoroughly understood and properly arranged that if I
recite every word in my portion of
the dictionary to the satisfaction of
thc witnesses here and come through
without—accident, that my cousin
here relinquishes all claims, now and
in futurity, to my money, and that
without fear of loss I can kick this
confounded rascal of a cut-throat Indian out of my life for evermore.
That is right, isn't it?"
"Precisely.    But if  thc word  you
are not to speak happens to be in the
first part of the dictionary "
"Lata Singh will carry out his instructions, ancl I sha'n't havc any
time to argue the matter with my
cousin. All right, here goes." He
turned to the Indian: "Listening,
you old brute? A, aback, abacus,
abaft, abandon " He started reading in a clear voice, but after thc
first column reached a speed to whicii
his  cousin objected.
"Slower, please—slower," he pleaded. "It isn't fair; Lata Singh might
not catch it."
"Abomination," said Kirwan, slowing down; "he'll hear it right enough.
The next is Latin; I'll give that a
miss."
And so he went on, leaning slightly
forward on the table, with Lata Singh,
rigid and tireless, behind him. It
was no easy work reading aloud a
dictionary to that curious council,
each of whom was almost as nervous
as he himself. But he plugged along
bravely, for if he got to "lecturer"
without mishap it would mean happiness and freedom and Winnifred all
his life. It would bc the happiest
moment of his life when he booted
Lata Singh out of his existence, and
he could do so without losing his
money, since his cousin had renounced
his rights. But if that beastly word
was in the first half of the dictionary
he would never get to "lecturer," and
then there would be an end to him,
and his money and Winifred and all.
His cousin would get everything—
even Winifred most likely, Kirwan
grimly thought. But his uncle would
never have been such an ass as to
take a word from the first half of the
dictionary, surely! He finished the
A's, took a drink of brandy and water,
and plunged into the B's. At "beloved" he had a nasty shock, for Lata
Singh moved his foot, and Kirwan
swung round, expecting to see the
scimitar whirling down.
But it was all right; the Indian's
arm was held in its customary stiffness, and the sunlight that streamed
through the windows just caught the
blade as it curved, level with his
cheek.
"Fool I am!" muttered Kirwan.
"He wouldn't give me time to look
round; the sword wouldn't whirl; it
would just flick. What a horrid lot
of C's there are!"
At the end of that letter they
halted for lunch. Kirwan, very tired,
was nevertheless in good spirits. He
enjoyed his meal as much as any
of them; considerably more than his
cousin. He had accomplished slightly more than a third of his task, and
had got over some ghastly words of
whose existence he had never dreamt.
"Behoovefully" had appeared to him
a word to which any decent man
might object, and he had hurried
across it. There were others, too,
which appeared frightfully ugly and
disagreeable, and several times hc
sighed thankfully at the conclusion of
a strange and terrifying word. It was
a pretty tough ordeal to endure.
At two o'clock the recital recommenced, Kirwan's cousin listened to
each word anxiously, grieving that
every time Dick opened his mouth it
brought him nearer to his fortune,
yet fearing that any moment the Indian might take action and thc blow
fall. The strain on Kirwan was bad
enough, but to his watching cousin
it was still worse. Soon it became intolerable.
"Stop!" he cried. "This can't go
on!    I retract my offer!"
"No, you don't!" replied Kirwan
firmly. "I've started, and I go
through with it. If you withdraw
now you forfeit."
He appealed to the lawyers, and
they agreed with him.
Dick pounded along so well that
he was into the G's by half-past three,
but then the effort began to tell on
him terribly. The continual repetition
of meaningless words was maddening; the brain, insulted by such abuse,
refused to continue; the pages swam
before his eyes; hc could see nothing.
Hc was obliged to rest for a while,
and strong tea steadied his nerves a
bit.
Through thc forest of H's he
stumbled, into the wearying and endless  negations  of  the  I's.    Hc  ap
pealed against this useless labour; he
had said all the affirmatives, surely it
was unnecessary to repeat them just
with'"in" stuck before them? His
uncle could not object to "inaccurate" if hc had no quarrel with "accurate," or to "inattentive" if he
passed "attentive"?
"I insist. Take 'sane," for example.
He might have had a reasonable prejudice against 'insane,'" replied his
cousin.
So Dick had to thrust along through
all the bracken of denials, twenty
pages of them, and he was so exhausted with his work that he forgot
the danger of thc Indian behind him.
He had in a way passed out of consciousness now, and had become a
mere talking-machine. Lata Singh's
scimitar might have fallen without
his regretting it.
An hour or so more and he was in
the final letter; the two preceding
ones had been swiftly dealt with. And
as Kirwan realised that his task was
almost over, that he was almost free,
understanding and fear returned to
him. If thc fatal word should be in
the last few columns, how ironic 't
would be! Added to his physical
fatigue was now a mental torment;
he scarce dared to speak the words,
so fearful was he that he should be
robbed of all in the moment of victory. Then reaction came, and a
bout of strength, and he shouted' them
boldly and brazenly.
There were only five words to go
when Lata Singh sneezed. It was excusable, because for five hours he had
been standing in a draught. But
Kirwan shot a good foot into the air,
and the other men were startled into
their favourite, and not their company, expletives.
Lata Singh bowed his apology, but
it was a quarter of an hour before
Kirwan could finish those five words.
And he couldn't even do it then without fainting.
They congratulated him; they shook
hands all round, and Kirwan's cousin said he was glad it had turned out
like that. Kirwan himself was sufficiently alive to grin at the lie. But
instead of dispersing they hung about.
"Well, good-bye," said Kirwan, for
he wanted to have a bit of sleep before he journeyed forth to see Winifred. "And you had better say goodbye to Lata Singh, too, for I pack
him off to his home, sweet home tomorrow."
"Good-bye,"  said  his  cousin;  "but
_____•)
"Well?"
"Oh, come, since it is all over, just
for natural curiosity's sake let us
know, let us find out what is the
word!"
"Oh, hang thc word! I'm sick of
it!" cried Kirwan. "Well, get it out
of the unemployed cut-throat now if
you can."
They clustered round the Indian—
all of them except Dick—who dropped
into an easy-chair and watched them
idly. They fired questions at him
singly and collectively. But Lata
Singh only gazed at them sternly, I
and said nothing. j
Kirwan lazily scribbled a line in the
Indian's native language on a piece of
paper. "Speak," it said; "tell everything, I command you." He handed
it to one of the men.
"Give that to him. Perhaps he'll
only take instructions from me. I
can't speak the lingo, but he might
understand that."
Lata Singh took the paper and understood. Then hc became very excited, and in vigorous pantomime
showed his audience he was dumb.
"Then write," said Kirwan, and
pushed a pencil into his hand, and
again Lata Singh gathered his meaning. Kirwan watched him over his
shoulder as he carefully wrote:
"I am dumb. I am deaf. Have I
not obeyed the Sahib Kirwan's written  orders correctly?"
"He is deaf!" shrieked Kirwan. "Oh,
ye powers, hc is deaf! There is no
word, there was no word, and if
there had been hc couldn't have heard
it! And for eighteen months I've been
cringing in deadly fear of him and
his bit of harmless tin! Oh, heavens!
what an ass I've been—what asses,
thank the stars, you all havc been;
but I've been the top ass of the lot!
What a peach of an uncle with his
last little joke!"
"But " said his cousin.
"Oh, don't you see? The old idiot's
been following me round thinking hc
was protecting me from some danger
—life-entrusted-to-him sort of thing?
Uncle played that up to him properly, I bet. Oh, do go away; I want
to go and tell Winifred!"
Lata Singh did not return to India.
He had no friends or family there,
and he wished to remain with the
young Kirwan Sahib. So he did. But
he carries an umbrella instead of a
scimitar now, and he looks peaceful
enough when he plays in the Park
with the little Kirwans, who do not
yet know that their wcll-lovcd playmate was for a long time thc terror
of their father's life.
SOCIETY
Mrs.   Gardulo  and
at the Balmoral.
son  are  guests
Mr. Bert Green has returned from
Cowichan Lake.
* in - *
Mrs. Mitchener was one of this
week's  hostesses.
* *     *
Mr. V. Howard Potts left this
week for Stewart, B.C.
* *   *
Mr. Michael Cassidy motored up
to Cowichan Lake during the week.
* *     *
Miss Doris Mason left on Sunday
to visit Mrs. Burchell of Thetis Island.
* *   *
Mr. John Jukes of Vancouver came
over for Mrs. Dunsmuir's dance last
week.
Mr. Blackwood, Miss Blackwood
and party have returned from a trip
up Mount Ranier.
Mrs.   Boultbee   of  Vancouver  and
i child are the guests of her mother,
Mrs. Nicholles.
* *   *
Mr. Al. Gillespie, B.C.L.S., has returned from a survey of the Ellison
Townsite.
* *     *
Mr. and Mrs. Finch Page returned
during the week from a trip to the
Interior.
* *     *
Miss Dorothy Bulwer is staying
with Mrs. Nerontsos on Lescada
Island.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Robertson,
"Orcades," leave shortly on a pleasure
trip to the Old Country.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Keith Wilson have
taken up their residence in their new
home on the Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
Colonel and Mrs. Dupont are enjoying a couple of weeks at Harrison Hot Springs.
* *   *
Mrs. Tatlow and children are
spending the summer months at their
cottage at Finnerty's Beach.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Hasell, who have been
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Garnet
of Cobble Hill, have returned home.
Mr. and Mrs. Muskett and family
havc returned to town after a holiday
spent at Finnerty's Beach.
* *   *
Mrs. Watson (nee Flint) is the
guest of her mother, Mrs. Flint, Simcoe Street,
* *   *
Miss Gladys Perry spent the weekend in town, returning to Shawnigan
Lake early in the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Frank Green of Cowichan
Lake is the guest of Mrs. Robert
Swinnerton, during her stay in the
city.
*     *     *
Mr. H. Rhodes of Vancouver was
in thc city this week and during his
stay made the Balmoral his headquarters.
* *   *
Miss Norah Coombe has returned
home   after   a   very   enjoyable   visit
spent at Shawnigan Lake withj
E. G. Prior.
*     *     *
Mrs.  Holden was hostess  ol
day   evening   last  at  an   impr|
dance at their summer house
country.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. George McCurl
turned during the week from
nia from  their  honeymoon  trj|
were guests at the Empress.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Butchart have I
invitations for thc marriage ol
second daughter, Miss Man
chart, to Mr. William Todd, oil
nesday, August 17, at two-thi)
Christ Church. A reception
held after the ceremony at "I|
St. Charles street.
Mrs. Dunsmuir's dance at
Park" last Friday proved a grel
cess in every way. Miss Thai|
chestra provided a very att|
programme. The house was
arranged with roses and swei|
mingled with trailing smilax.
the invited guests were Miss Cl
Miss Perry, Mrs. H. Pooley!
Eberts, Miss Lorna Eberts, Mif
son, Miss Doris Mason, Missj
Miss Pooley, Miss Irving, \\\
Irving, Miss Langley, Mrs.
Miss H. Peters, Miss Page,!
Troupe, Miss Monteith, Mrs. 3|
McDonald, and Captain Mel
Mr. H. Davis, Mr. Tilliard, Ml
kin, Mr. Monteith, Mr. Juki
Lowry, Mr. Martin, Mr. G|
Mr. Hills, Mr. Foot, Mr. BI
Mr. Eberts, Mr. Gore, Mr. Ca|
Twigg and many others.
* *   *
Mrs. Arthur Robertson, "Ol
gave a most delightful gardel
last week.    Refreshments we]
ed in the garden, the table beil
daintily arranged with Doroth;!
roses.   The guests amused thei
during thc afternoon with clcl
Among those present were: Mil
Gillespie,   Mrs.   Fletcher,   Mt.|
fith,  Mrs.   R.  Jones,   Mrs.
Mrs. F.  Pemberton, Mrs.  Bj|
Mrs.  Fort, Mrs. Atkins,  Mrs]
dy, Mrs. W. R. Higgins, Mrs.
gins, Mrs. Mohun, Mrs. McKaj
Pooley,  Mrs.  Warren,  Mrs.
not,   Mrs.   Trewartha   James!
Sclater,    Mrs. Charles,    Mrs.1'
Mrs.   McPhillips,   Mrs.   Bulle.'l
Rome, Mrs. Baynes Reed, Mi|
age   Mrs.   Maclure,   Mrs.   Shi'J
Mrs. Ritchie, Mrs. Todd, Mr:1!
ington, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Del
Mrs. J. Helmsken, Mrs. Greslcll
Little, Mrs. King, Mrs. Cross?]
Doual,   Mrs.   Raymour,   Mrs. t\
Robertson, Mrs. Freeman,  Mi
ly, Mrs. Weymond, Mrs. Woe']
the Misses Helmcken, Heylai.'l
vereux, Warren, McKay, Tull;'
lure and others.
Nathan  Straus, New York's ij]
philanthropist,    discussing   the
difficulties   that   confront   saniv
thelv  endeavouv  to  pass  laws
ling  the   pasteurization   of   mirl
"The legislatovs who oppose t J
bving fovwavd avguments about :
as that of the Maine milkman,
summeving in Maine, said to h«1
man severely:
" 'Look here, this milk of 51
half water and half chalk. yi\
you  mean  by advertising it  asj
" 'Madam,' said the milk-manuf
with reproachful dignity, 'to tc|
all things are pure.'"
Senator Cummins, of Iowa, }
cussing the child-labour probler
lobby of a Washington hotel tj
night. Said he: "When we const
Indifference with which so man l|
great men look upon the child-Ic
we can't help wondering If th
are  so very great,  after all.
The senator paused and smili
"An orator," he said, "was a
an  assemblage  of the people,
counted the people's wrongs,
passionately cried:
" 'Where are    Amevica's    gn
Why don't they take up the
our defense?    In the face of 01
fold wrongs, why do they rem]
immovable,  silent?'
" 'Because they're all cast ir
shouted a cynic In the rear.

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