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Week Dec 25, 1909

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Let us show you the new
Pocket Edition
Gillette Safety Razor
TERRY CASlT CHEMIST   1
| i« [S.E. coiner Fort and Douglas 2
I ^_uui_o_a._u_a_iuuioaJiJUUuuutJ^
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. e.
_svwmv_
?   HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St.
Telephone 83
J-jtainmnmiBoopoopoooftqoE
Vol. VI.   No.
ZE
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
I CHRISTMAS GREETINGS
The Editor of The Week extends the
, heartiest Christmas greetings to all the
readers of his journal, in the hope that
' any criticism which may have appeared
1 in these columns during thc present year
of grace will leave no sting during this
'festive season.    With the coming of the
j New Year The Week will enter upon
its seventh year of publication; it has had
the usual .vicissitudes of a weekly journal
struggling for  a clientele which would
I make it self supporting.    This gaol ha3
[heen   reached   in   1901),   and  would no
doubt have been reached sooner if The
Week had been less aggressive and more
^ complaisant.    There are, however, suffi-
' cient papers governed by considerations
»of expediency,   and  there  is  no  raison
I d'etre for the existence of The Week except as a fearless,  independent journal,
I prepared to criticize, and if needs be fight
' anything which it conceives to be detri-
I mental to the public interest.    This has
. been its policy from the beginning, and
the growing favour which it is receiving
1 at the hands of subscribers and advertisers is the best testimony that its line
of action is approved, and that the public
realizes its utility in the field wliieh it has
chosen.   The Week can always be counted
on to voice a public grievance, without
1 fear or favour.    Most of the issues for
whicli it has contended have in the long
run been accepted by the public, and if it
has .administered a few hard knocks in
the fight it can at least claim that it has
I-, never indulged in personalities, has never
' been actuated by unfair motives, and has
confined itself strictly to matters of pub-
lie interest.    If those whom it has criticized feel any  resentment it should "be
mollified in view of the above considerations, for, after all, public men have no
better friend than fearless, honest criticism, and The Week has never said anything which would prevent it exchanging
tho   heartiest   Christinas  greetings  even
with those whom it has most severely criticized.
THE CITY COUNCIL
Out of consideration for the spirit of
Christmas-tide The AYeek defers further
comment upon the action of the City
Council with reference to Smith's Hill Eeservoir until next Aveek. It would, however, point out that thc proceedings at
Monday night's meeting fully justify all
that it has said about thc Council, W. L.
Adams, and Smith's Hill Eeservoir. Several aldermen repudiated the suggestion
tliat they had been guilty of concealing
anything in connection with the construction of the Eeservoir. The Week wishes
to put itself right on this point; it never
even suggested that they had knowledge
of the defects at the time the work was
going on; what it did say was, that they
bad concealed information which had •
come to them from reliable sources since
the work was completed, and had so constituted themselves '"accessories aftor the
event." This statement, cannot be disputed, because up to date no official manifesto of any kind has tyecn issued by
Mayor or Council, although their own
engineer has informed them of serious
defects which will cost upwards of $10,-
000 to remedy. As to W. L. Adams,
nothing more need be said. Even if it is
Christmas-time justice compels one to say
that hc is "down and out." His last
letter settles the matter, and Aldermen
who have hitherto stood up for him were
constrained to admit on Monday that they
wanted no more of him. With respect to
the Eeservoir it is still filling very slowly,
and leaking faster every day. The view
of The Week is that no alderman who has
Under the Mantelpiece
Under the mantelpiece, years ago,
Three little stockings hung,
Three little heads three pillows pressed,
Three little heads that needed rest
When the evening shadows clung.
And oh, the joy of the morning bright
When pattering feet dispelled the night
And baby voices that crowed delight
Prattled in baby tongue!
Under the mantelpiece, years ago
Three little dolls were found;
Three little dollies for three little girls,
Three little dollies with flaxen curls
And talk=springs that had to be wound.
And oh, the love that was lavished then,
The kisses that sounded again and again,
The whispered secrets that travelled when
The dollies were freshly gown'd!
Under the mantelpiece, years ago,
Three little babies played;
Three little babies with Christmas toys===
Three little fairies===and oh, the noise
And the wonderful mess they made!
But, heigh=ho, that was a decade ago;
Those babies are grown, and they're married, you know,
But they've come home for Christmas with Dad; and lo!
Each brings her own little maid!
And under the mantel again to=night
Three little stockings are hung,
Three little heads three pillows press,
Three little heads that are weary, I guess,
Cuddle the quilts among.
And oh, the joy of the morning bright
When pattering feet dispel the night
And baby voices that crow delight
Prattle in baby tongue.
Victoria, B.C., December, 1909
—C. L. Armstrong.
been a member of the City Council this
year can avoid a share of the responsibility for the "Smith's Hill Fiasco," and
no alderman of 1909 should be on the
nominating ticket for 1910.
THE LATE CITY ENGINEER
Mr. C. II. Topp has at last done the
only thing consistent with self respect, and
the maintenance of his personal dignity,
in resigning  the position of  City  Engineer.    If hc had done so several years
ago hc would have gained immeasurably
in public esteem, and his action would
probably have led to a reformation in civic
affairs.    The Week has been decidedly
severe in its criticism of Mr. Topp as
City Engineer, and all that it has said was
more than justified by his own statement
to the Council when handing in his resignation.   He said that the blame for the
muddle in civic work could not fairly be
placed upon his shoulders, that he had
been hampered and interfered with by
several aldermen, who undertook to countermand his orders and to hold communication with, and presumably give instructions to, his subordinate officers.   The impeachment was not denied, and several aldermen who spoke, including the Mayor,
confirmed Mr. Topp's statement.   This is
almost identically what The Week has
said on more than one occasion.    It has
time and again received information that
certain aldermen habitually assumed authority over Mr. Topp's department as if
they, and not he, were the official head.
This should have been resented sooner,
but no one will regret that it has led to
Mr. Topp's resignation since it has brought
about an exposure of these discreditable
tactics, and has at the same time enabled
him to secure a more lucrative and less
exacting position.   It is now for the ratepayers to say whether they approve of
aldermen who interfere with cily officials,
and are too cowardly to   'own up" until
they are exposed.    These men have cost
Mr. Topp his position, and might have
occasioned him pecuniary loss.    They do
not seem to have eared for that, and they
still have the effrontery to appeal for the
suffrages of the electorate.    Tlieir names
will be published next week.   Thoy shall
eat their Christmas turkey in peace before
being pilloried  in  the  columns  of The
Week.
Original Poem, written especially for Thc Week
CHURCH GOING
Christmas would at least appear to be
a good time to discuss church going, and
the Colonist has paved tlie way by publishing a  symposium on the subject to
whicli contributions have been made by
nearly all the ministers in tbe City.   The
majority consider that Victoria is not a
church-going city, a conclusion with which
The Week agrees, but when they come to
assign the reasons for this, it is singular
that not om; 1ms the frankness to endorse
the opinion  held and expressed  by nine-
tentlis of the laity, which is that laxity in
church-going is mainly due to weakness in
the pastorate.   Some lay the blame on the
climate, others on the traditions of Victoria, but the real reason is that thc men
who enter the Christian ministry are as a
rule less intelligent than the average members of their congregations, and unfortunately are not. aware of the fact:.   The truth
is, that, the Christian ministry in Canada
does not attract the best, intellects of the
community, and men will not go Sunday
after Sunday to listen to the twaddle that
is dished up under the heading of "ser-
mon."    The  remedy is, to pay stipends
large-enough to attract the best men, and
to  insist on   personal   lil ness  as well  as
educational attainments.   When this standard has been attained there will be no
difficulty in filling the churches. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
Christmas Logic
Year by year Groucho, the Monk,
increases his family, and we hear
more wails and lamentations at the
approach of Christmas. "A season of
bills," says Groucho. "A season of
giving away more than you can afford to people who don't require it."
But I think, and you think, that we
could better afford to do away with
Groucho, than with Christmas.
Christmas is essentially a children's
feast. Show me a man or woman
who doesn't like children, and I will
show you a man and woman, who
aren't meant to live on this earth.
Children are thc salt of the earth;
if they lose their Christmas, they also
lose their Saviour.
Little things like these arc worth
keeping in mind. Just because you
and I, the people who read the papers, are growing old, it is no reason
why we should deprive the kids of the
fun we had when wc were their age.
And yet that is the modern tendency.
We need to change that. You can't
keep kids "Christians" unless you
manage to make them realize that on
one day of the year the author of
Christianity was born.
There are too many people abroad
just now, who make it an object in
life to abuse old superstitions. I don't
suppose that either you or I ever
really believed in Santa Claus, but
we loved to pretend that we did. Why
deprive the modern child of these
ideas? He, or she, is modern enough,
as we all know, without our helping.
There's many a child at the present
day, who would be all the better for
a more extensive knowledge of Hans
Andersen, Grimm, and other childish
books. They may seem silly to adult
minds, though I confess that I still
read them with pleasure; but I am
convinced of one thing; they are less
harmful to the child, than are many
books which they arc reading at present.
1 am inclined to believe that people
are shy about Christmas. They feel
that they have got too old for Christmas festivities. It is too much the
fashion to decry the greatest feast
which the Church holds. The man
in thc street feels that it is "up to
him" to profess a lordly disdain for
such frivolities. This same man in
the street feels very lonely on Christmas Day itself, when all his friends
and relations arc celebrating, and he
is left out in the cold.
A somewhat long and varied experience has shown me that the only person who really "kicks" at this season of the year, is the man who is
absolutely alone; who is dull, and
■who would give anything to join in
with some party and havc a good
time. Groucho is usually Groucho.
because he hasn't anyone to celebrate
with.
Of course when we coinc down to
fine points, wc have to admit that the
bachelor ought to be married. That
may be so, but then there would be
no more bachelors; and what would
the young unmarried girls do then?
We have got to have bachelors, and
we have got to have Christmas. Let's
make it as cheery for the former as
possible; then they are less likely to
be  bachelors  next  year.
I have often thought for myself
what a pity it is that a man of substance in this Western country will
pick up a young fellow lately out
from thc C d Country, stand him a
drink, wish him a Merry Christmas
and all the rest of it, and then leave
him. How much better it would bc
if the first man were to say, "Come
along and have your Christmas dinner with me, old man.'' It would help
out a lot.
The latest report from the Y.M.C.A.
showed that there were more boys
in thc penitentiaries and reformatories
of Canada than there were in the
Y.M.C.A. Don't you think that this
is largely due to thc laxity of parents,
who have allowed their children to
grow up with a small idea of what
Christmas and Christ's birth mean?
Isn't there something in that?
Thinking Christmasward, we suggest for you—
If you were expecting some sort of a little remembrance from a relative or friend, would you not be
delighted to receive
A hamper of Q. H. Mumm's Champagne
Now put your friend in your place and act accordingly,
Christmas and Mumm's seem to go hand in hand
—Christmas, the greatest of all Festivals, G. H.
Mumm & Co.'s Champagne, the greatest of all Wines.
Your licensed grocer or wine merchant can supply you
with this best of all Champagne. Do not accept an
inferior substitute, ask for G. H. Mumm's Champagne and
insist upon getting it. You can procure it in "spits" if
you prefer that size.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents for B. C.
Victoria Vancouver Nelson
Something New
We are now able to oiler to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, a er use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz. $2.70
TEASPOONS •  " 3.15
DESSERTSPOONS   " 495
TABLESPOONS    " S<*S
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " 5*5
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4-95
TABLE KNIVES  " 5-40
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Build Up a Reserve Now
Now, while your earning power is good, why not convert part of
it into a Cash Reserve that will, later on, yield a competence for
old age?   You can easily do it by regularly depositing a part of your
income in
The Dominion Bank
One dollar and upwards opens an account, and with systematic
saving and Compound Interest, the fund will rapidly accumulate.
Begin today.
VICTORIA, B.C., BRANCH
Temporary Offices Broad and Fort Streets
C. E. THOMAS, Manager.
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'yP-
1
Good Skates
Good Instructors
SKATING
Assembly Rink, Fort St.
Morning  10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening    7.45 to 10.00
Good Music Good Time
1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
__
Chas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec. _,_ m
Ir
F, Caselton, Manager 8
I
Oldest and most up-to-date 1$ ]
Undertaking Establishment t&
in B. 0.
Established 1867
I
3 Telephones—48,   sg4,   1905,   305,   or   404. !j_
hmmmmmtmtmm_m_mt^^
cASMachine Ihat Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street
Office Supplies
Christmas Cheer and New Year Gladness is
augmented by filling the cup of Friendship With
Buchanan's ^ED SEAL or HOUSE OF
COMNONS Scotch Whisky. Sold everywhere.
%ADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
TO OUR PATRONS
We shall be very pleased to have you connect any extra lights
and small motors required for your Christmas Trade, but we must
just be informed of the number so that we may ascertain whether
our transformers and meters are of sufficiently large capacity to
carry the extra load. When no notice is given and damage is done
to our equipment, by such overload same will be charged to
consumers.
B. C. ELECTRIC RY. CO. Limited
Box 560
Light and Power Department
Phone 1609
Please the Kiddies
With an Xmas Tree
Our up-to-the-minute stock of Christmas Tree Ornaments and
Table Decorations is at its best. Better come and make selection
now.   Everything required awaits you here.
Tinsel Garlands, red, green and pink, 1 doz. yds. up from aoc
Tinsel Ornaments, from 25c down to  ioc
Xmas Tree Ornaments, immense choice  25c
Xmas Candles, per box  20c
Xmas Candle Holders, per dozen  15c
Xmas Tree Fireworks, per box  ioc
Bon-Bons With Caps, from $1.00 down to  25c
Bon Bons With Music, from $1.00 down to 25c
Bon-Bons with Toys, from $1.00 down to 25c
Xmas Stockings, $2.75, $1.50, $1.00, 50c, 25c, and 15c
Paper Bells, soc, 20c, ioc, 5c and two for 5c
Paper Garlands, two for    25c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 35, 1909
On last Saturday afternoon Mrs.
Henry Croft, Dunsmuir Road, was
hostess of a delightful Children's
fancy dress ball, about seventy-five
young people being invited. The hall
which was devoted to dancing was
very artistically decorated with large
crimson bells, hot house flowers and
garlands of evergreens. The refreshment table was most elaborately decorated with silver arches, greenery
and crimson carnations, and numerous red bells. Miss Thain's orchestra supplied the music for the afternoon. Those present were: Master
Jack Matson (Gentleman of the 17th
century), Master Turner Matson (Old
King Cole), Miss Vivian Matson (Ma-
damedu Barry), Miss Mabel Rhodes
(Fairy), Miss E. Rhodes (Japanese
girl), Miss B. Robertson (Red-Riding
Hood), Master N. Robertson (Scout),
Miss M. Hollyer (Sweet Thirteen),
Master J. Hollyer (Chef), Master B.
Robertsan (Indian Chief), Master Joe
Jones (Neapolitan Fisherman), Master Russel Ker (Scotsman), Master
Ted Bums (Turk), Master Torquhie
(Prince Charlie), Master F. Holland
(Don Pedro), Master B. Holland
(Don Pedro), Master B. Holland
(Clown), Master Robin Watt (Fisherman), Master B. Watt (Minstrel),
Miss Margaret McBride (Dutch girl),
Miss Ruth McBride (Doll), Miss Dorothy Naires (Early Victorian), Master
Tom Lampman (Pirate), Miss Eleanor Monteith (Red-Riding Hood),
Miss Vyvian Combe (Puritan)), Miss
C. Dundas (Little Miss Muffett),
Master A. Musgrave (A. B. of H. M.
S. Egeria), Miss Y. Langworthy
(Pink Fairy), Miss Muriel Hinde
(Fairy), Master Joe Hinde and Master Paul Hinde (Greek Pirates), Master Walter Hughes and Master Gordon Hughes (Red Pierrots), Miss Joy
and Miss Betty Phillips (Kate Green-
away), Miss A. Pemberton (Vivan-
diere), Miss Mabel Eberts (Poudre),
Master Claire Russell (Highlander),
Miss Y. Pemberton (Kate Green-
away, Miss N. Pownell (Little Red-
Riding Hood), Master John Helmcken (Gingerbread Man), Miss C.
Helmcken (Hydrangea), Miss .Mary
Wightman (China Girl), Miss Helen
Strefeild (Punchinello), Miss B.
Stretfeild (Lady of 1666), Miss Betty
Kirk (16th Century), Miss Flora
Burns (Empress Josephine), Miss
Baby Courtney (Page), Miss Patricia
Bums (Princess Patricia), Miss Inez
Ker (Japanese Girl), Master Bobby
Harvey (Pierrot), Miss Maud Scott
(Gainsborough Lady), Miss Ivis
James (Madame Butterfly), Master
Douglas Prentice (Scotsman), Miss K.
Oliver (Fishwife), Miss Davida Ker
(Spanish Gypsy), Master Billy Ridg-.
way-Wilson (Knave of Hearts), Master Percy Ridgway-Wilson (Page),
Miss Emily Hannington (Queen of
Hearts), Master Ernest Hannington
(Zulu Chief), Master Francis Pemberton (Little Lord Fauntleroy), Miss
Yickie Jones (Cherry Pipe), Miss P.
Pemberton (Dutch Girl), Miss Gladys
Peters (Daffodil), Miss Daisy Wilson
(Water Lily), Miss Punnett (Fairy),
Master Norman Stirling (Boy Blue),
Master Walter Rebbeck (Bisun of
Nelson's day), Master Matthews
(Peter Pan). The grown-up people
present were: Judge and Mrs. Lamp-
man, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. Hasell,
Miss Bryden, Miss Green, Mrs. Musgrave, Miss Macdonald, Captain Macdonald, Mrs. Rhodes, Mrs. Courtney,
Mrs. Langworthy, Mrs. Pemberton,
Mr. and Mrs. Dundas, Mrs. Scott,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Coles. My Tye, Mrs.
H. Barnard, Miss Jessie Bell, Mr. and
Mrs. Warner, Mrs. Harvey, Mr. and
Mrs. Oliver, Colonel and Mrs. Peters
ancl others.
* *   *
Mr. C. E. Powell was a* visitor to
Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Miss Baby Holmes from Vancouver visited the city during the week.
* *   *
Miss Lillian Burt, who hns been
visiting in    Vancouver    for thc last
three months is again in Victoria.
* *   *
Last Friday afternoon Mrs. Charles
E. Wilson gave ;i charming children's
party in honour of her little son's second birthday. About twenty-four
little people were present and each
one was presented with a gift.
* *   *
The Bachelors' Ball given on Monday night by tlie "Men of the Hour"
was attended by a large number of
people. The dance was held in the
Broad Street Hall, which was very
artistically decorated with Xmas
greenery, and the flags off the Egeria,
Japanese flowers and fans extended
from  the rafters of the ceiling, and
the lights were covered by small Japanese lanterns. A very elaborate supper was served in the "Cafe" below
the hall. Miss Thain's orchestra supplied the music for the evening. Some
of those present were: Mrs. Genge,
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. T. S. Gore,
Mrs. Arthur Gore. Mrs. Lampman,
Mrs. Tye, Mrs. Walter Langley, Mrs.
Elliot, Mrs. Harry Pooley, Mrs. Slater, Miss Perry, Miss Mason, Miss
Doris Mason, Miss Lorna Eberts,
Miss Dorothy Williams, Miss Heyland, Miss Day, Miss Helmcken,
Miss Fell, Miss Hannington, Miss
O'Leary, Miss King, Mrs. Wilson,
Misses Lugrin, Misses MacDowell,
Misses Pitts, Miss Savage, Miss Arbuthnot, Misses Blackwood, Miss
Langley, Miss Hilda Page, Miss Dorothy Spencer, Miss Johnson, Miss
Bryden, Misses Blakemore, Miss
Eberts, Miss Cross and the Messrs.
Roger Monteith, Arthur Gore, Lowry,
Arbuckle, Cambie, Wilmot, Pitts,
Trewartha - James, Captain Parry,
Johnson, Barnes, Angus, Young,
Capt. Macdonald, Coeburn, Bromley,
Bridgman, Spalding, Holmes, Mr.
Coolcq, Hoard, Rockfort*, J. Mason,
Lawson, Landry, Hebden, A. T. Goward, Hopgood, Raymur, Jeffson, Templeman, Bullen, Bruce Irving and
others. The chaperones for the evening were: Mrs. E. E. Blackwood, Mrs.
Genge, Mrs. Basil Combe, Mrs. Lamp-
man, Mrs. T. S. Gore and Mrs. Beauchamp Tye.
* *   *
Mr. W. A. Churton, from Vancouver, spent Monday and Tuesday in
Victoria on business.
* *   *
Mr. J. M. Btiffncr from Atlin is a
guest to the city.
* *   *
Mrs. J. Minto, who has been visiting in Seattle, returned home last
Saturday.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
Miss Gladys Perry, niece of Colonel
and Mrs. E. G. Prior, well known
here, and Mr. George Johnston, of
same city.
A Woman's Diplomacy
It was the Chicago man's turn, and
he told this one:
"Diplomacy, you know, is a remarkable agent. The other day a
lady said to her husband:
" 'James, I have decided to do without a new fall dress, and with the
money it would cost I shall have
mother here for a nice long visit.'
"James turned on her ccitedly.
'What, wear that old -.brown cloth
thing another season? I guess not!'
he exclaimed vehemently. 'You go
right down to your tailor's today and
order something handsome. Remember, please, that as my wife you have
a certain position to maintain!'
"The wife bowed her head in submission. On her lips played a peculiar smile."
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week Dec. 20
Overture  Lucile Elwell
PICTURES
Moore & St. Claire
Singing, Dancing and Talking
FRED  EDWARDS
Character Singing Comedian
BARNUM, GABRIEL CO.
Comedy Musical Act
GEORGIA SISTERS
Singers and Dancers
A. T. ELWELL
Pictured Melody
BIOGRAPH
Perfectly Frank
From an advertisement of a cafe
in the program of the Gaiety Theatre,
Toronto):
"OPEN TILL MIDTIGHT."
—Punch.
UP=TO=DATE BILL
WEEK DECEMBER 20
The New Grand
Telephone 618.
SULLIVAN • CONSIDINE,    Proprietors.
M.n»t«m«nt of MOST. JAMIESON.
LEO COOPER AND ROSINA
ZALESKA
The Dramatic Sensation of
Vaudeville
"The Operator"
Mirthful Musicians
GARDNER, RANKIN and
GRIFFIN
In Their Delightful  Musical  and
Comical Melange
Those Talkative  Fellows
ECKERT and FRANCIS
"Wireless Telegraphy"
EDGAR BERGER
In  Startling Equilibristic  Accom-
ments, Featuring the Slide
for Life
THOS. J. PRICE
'We're   Growing   Old   Together"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
With all the Pomp and Magnificence which has always characterized
its Brilliant Success, Samuel E.
Rork's spectacular production of the
brilliant  musical  extravaganza
The Land of Nod
A stage full of people and an amazing array of superb costumes, scenery and electrical effects.
SEE The Card Castles, The Peppermint River, The Sandman's Palace, The Magic Mirror, The Dancing
Dolls.
HEAR Lady Love, The Same Old
Moon, Bonnie Brier Bush, I Could
Learn to Love You, How Was I to
Know, and six dozen other sparkling,
crisp features.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Seat sale opens Thursday December 23rd.
Special Notice
Five  cents car fare  all  this  week
will take you as far as the
Victoria
Theatre
and ten cents more will admit you
to see the London Bioscope and a
Grand Amateur Entertainment.
A whole evening's amusement for a
small  price.
Special Saturday Matinee for children—Five Cents.
Hints for
Diamond Brooches, $50 to..$500
Diamond Earrings, $25 to $500
Diamond  Rings, $7.00 to $375
Earrings, $1.25 to  $150
Necklets, $1.25 to   $100
Watches, $15 to  $700
Gold Watch Chains, $5 to $45
Silver Watch Chains, $1.25 to $3
Pearl Brooches, $3.00 to...$50
Gold Brooches, $5.00 to  $75
Bracelet Watches, $5.00 to $50
Gold Bracelets, $5.00 to .. .$175
Blouse Pins, $1.50 to  $15
Muff Chains, $1.00 to  $300
Hand Bags, $1.75 to  $28
Hair Combs, $1.00 to  $15
Silver Toilet Sets, $15 to .. .$65
Ebony Toilet Sets, $2.75 to $15
Opera Glasses, $4.00 to —$35
Fans, $1.25 to   $10
Silver Photo Frames, 50c to $18
Clocks, $2.50 to  $50
Cut Glass Articles, soc to..$100
Silver Tea Service, $12 to.. .$75
Hand Bags, $3.00 to  $25
Toilet Sets in cases $3.00 to $20
W. H. Wilkerson, the Jeweler
Telephone 1606 9t5 GOVERNMENT STREET
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete change of programme on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance:  2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
Admission - Ten Cents
ndJLFTK
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;   Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
♦THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
REMINISCENCES
BY BOHEMIAN
I often think of the opening chapters of Barrie's beautiful story "The
Little Minister." I remember reading
the story when it first came out and
every chapter appealed to mc, but,
the opening chapter gripped, and will
always remain as a precious memory.
It recalls reminiscences of sundered
friendships, and of days which live
only in the memory, for their fruition
has passed, and there is no tangible
evidence that they ever were.
The most precious thing in life is
a. true friend, and thc noblest sentiment genuine friendship. It is not
tinged by the red rose of passion,
and hardly by the delicate pink of
emotion, but it knits and grows
through community of interest, oneness of purpose, and profound sympathy.
It is the crudest irony of fate which
decrees that nearly all friendships are
short-lived, the few exceptions onlj
tending to establish the rule. Some
of them die a violent death, after a
paroxysm of anger or reproach, others
cool off under the spell of growing
indifference, whilst some are terminated deliberately and of set purpose,
as a matter of convenience or policy.
I sometimes think that a precious
friendship is always too precious to
last. Life would be too full of supreme happiness if the purest friendships could be continuous, and so it
comes about that at the moment of
reminiscence, most men and women
look back on a friendship which covered a brief period, but was very
sweet while it lasted. So sweet, that
Ithough it be terminated its fragrance
jwill never pass away, and of it one
may truly say—
"Deep in our hearts
It dwells for evermore."
I
i It is rarely possible to revive sundered friendships. Something has
been lost in the process of separation
which can never bc recovered, which
makes another r'approchement impossible.
I remember reading in a very entertaining novel a paragraph which I
could not forget. A man and a woman had been excellent friends for
several years. Circumstances seemed
to point to the necessity for a severance. They faced the ordeal bravely,
and philosophically, as becomes good
friends who understand each other;
but who can plumb the pathos of his
remark: "I suppose if we should ever
meet again in the years to come I
should raise my hat, ancl you would
bow," and therein lies thc tragedy of
a severed friendship.
It seems impossible that intimacy
should decline to conventionality, and
yet, that is its fate, ancl the gladness
of Christmastide so near at hand but
adds to the irony of that fate. Perhaps the sanest ancl wisest reflection
is to bc found in that hackneyed poem
"Maud Muller," ancl its closing lines:
"Ah, well, for us all some fond hope
lies,
Deeply buried from human eyes."
The Land of Nod
The very agreeable announcement
is made that Samuel E. Rork's production of extravaganza, "The Land
of Nod," will be seen at the Victoria
Theatre Monday, December 27th. It
was a genuine delight from all points
of view, combining a charming musical score with a plcntitudc of comedy
of the most exhilarating and enjoyable kind. It is a show which keeps
thc spectators constantly applauding
or laughing, which is, after all, what
people go to the theatre for when a
performance of this character comes
along. Those who arc responsible for
"The Land of Nod" accomplished
something worth while when they put
this entertainment together. We don't
expect a plot when we go to an extravaganza ancl we don't want one.
Genuinely funny comedians, talented
ancl accomplished.'vocalists, graceful
dancing, pretty girls, beautiful electrical effects, "stunning" costumes, brilliant coloring, ceaseless animation—
something "doing" all the time—these
are the things which most people like
when they visit the theatre, ancl these
arc things which the Rork management has provided with lavish prodigality in "The Land of Nod." It is an
immensely enjoyable show, as all will
attest who saw it last winter, and the
strong hit which it made then is so
well remembered that there will very
likely be a lively scramble for seats
when the sale opens Thursday, December 23rd, The cast is still headed
by Kno Wilson. Two other important members of this season's cast arc
Neil McNeil ancl Anna McNabb.
Eskitology
A little iglo now and then
Is relished by the Eskimen.
—Nashville Tennessean.
A little  whale  oil,  well  frapped,
Is  relished   by  the' Eskimaid.
—Washington Herald.
A little gumdrop, this is truth,
Is relished by the Eskitooth.
—Detroit Free Press.
A little blubber, raw or b'ilccl,
Is relished by the Eskichild.
—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
The all of which shows just how hard
The grind is for the Eskibard.
—Buffalo Evening News.
But poets might detect a gap,
'Tween truth and Peary's Eskimap.
—Brooklyn Eagle.
And think that Peary, in straits dire,
Rejoiced to find an Eskiliar.
—Florida Times-Union.
A little pemmican to chaw
Is welcomed by thc Eskima.
—Chicago Record-Herald.
Wc could keep this up all fall
But fear 'twould make the Eskibawl.
—St. Louis Times.
'Tis said two gumdrops and a knife
Will buy a man on Eskivvife.
•'*'—Houston Post.
 75?!	
His Occupation
"The place where I work," said the
Irishman to the Hebrew, "there are
a hundred Jews, ancl I wish there
were Wvv thousand."
Thc Hebrew promptly bought the
Irishman a  drink.
"And where do you work?" further inquired the Israelite, after Pat
had   drunk   his   fill.
"In a cemetery," laughed the Irishman.
Too Big a Job
While studying her Sabbath School
lesson, nine-year-old Elizabeth was
much puzzled by the statement that
Solomon "repaired the breaches of
David his lather." This was to her
mind a remarkable statement, and
quite incomprehensible. After pondering it deeply, she asked one of
the older members of the family for
an  explanation,  saying  that she  did
For Mayor
Some say
Some say
Some say
Hi
0
T
enderson
liver
urner
No doubt, before the polls close there'll be a HOT time. Let's hope
so. At any rate, give the question of your printing a TURN-OR two in
your mind. We have the facilities and capabilities for putting it, as the
phraseology of the day goes, ALL-OVER the others for that fine touch
which is disassociated with any other than the very best work.
Phone 220
THOS. R. CUSACK
Courtney and Gordon Streets.
not think any man could "mend the
breeches of a whole city."
There Are Others
A big-hearted Irish politician in a
Western city had just left a theatre
one night when hc was approached
by a  beggar,  who said:
"Heaven bless yonr bright, benevolent face! A little charity, sir, for a
poor  cripple."
Thc politician gave the man some
coins, saying:
"Ancl how arc* you crippled, old
man?"
"Financially, sir," answered the beggar, as hc made off.
Hard to Suit.
"That editor is certainly getting
hard to suit," the author remarked
in a discouraged voice, gazing sadly
at a heavy  envelope  upon  his  table.
"What is the matter?" asked the
cheerful friend, who gets a regular
salary.
"Oh, he returns this story with the
comment that it is too bald. Last
week he wrote that he didn't care for
stories of the hair-raising kind. What
can you do with a man like that?"
"He Laughs Best "
Tommy came out of a room in
which his father was tacking down
carpet.   Hc was crying lustily.
"Why, Tommy, what's the matter?"
asked his mother.
"P-p-p-papa hit his linger with the
hammer," sobbed Tommy.
"Well, you needn't cry at a thing
like that," comforted the mother.
"Why didn't you laugh?"
"I did," sobbed Tommy disconsolate.
WATER NOTICE
Form No. 1
183
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V of
the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicants. The British
Columbia Canning Company, Limited of
Victoria, B. C, Canners and Sawmillers.
(b) The name of the lake, stream or
source (if unnamed, the description is)
unnamed stream running in a southerly
direction through lot 3, range 2, Coast
District.
(c) The point of diversion: 1,200 feet
from head of creek.
(d) The quantity of water applied for
(in cubic feet per second)  four..
(e) The character of the proposed
works: Water will be used by means
of a dam, ditch, flume, pipe, hydraulic
ram and other necessary appliances.
(f) The premises on whieh the water
is to be used (describe same): The
said lot 3, arnge 2, Coast District (which
is owned by the applicants in fee simple) and the foreshores thereof.
(g) The purposes for whichthe water
is to be used:  "Steam".
(i) Head Oflice of above Company in
B. G, is in Wharf St., Victoria, B.C.
The Company is licensed under the
"Companies Act, 1897." Capita] £40,-
000 in 10,000 preference shares of £1
each and 40,000 ordinary of 15s each
all paid up with objects (inter alia) "to
carry on salmon fishery and canning
business and any other business which
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on in connection with the above and to acquire
any rights or privileges which the company may think necessary."
(k) This notice was posted on the
15th day of December, 1909, and application will be made to the Commissioner
on the 31st day of January.  1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses of
any riparian proprietors or licensees
who or whose Iands are likely to be
affected by the proposed works, either
above or below the outlet. Only the applicants.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.
Victoria, B.C.
Recent Observations
Watered stock runs deep.
Whom the gods love die rich.
He jests at scars who never bought
mining stock.
Hc is wise enough who can keep
the fact that he is a fool from being
discovered.
Virtue is ts own reward, but seldom objects to a slight monetary
gratuity on the side.
Many a man thinks he has got religion when he has merely become
rich enough so that he can afford to
be good.—Ellis O. Jones. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
THE SIGN OF THE EAST
(By Walter B. Anderson)
(Original Story for The Week)
All rights reserved.
Some years ago my partner and 1
were cruising some timber limits on
Vancouver's Island, in the country ly
ing back of Seymour Narrows. We
had been in the woods from Sep
tember until December 18th, when
snow began to fall on the higher
levels, and the weather got cold and
extremely threatening. Knowing the
danger of a very heavy snowfall at
short notice in that part of the coun*
try, we at once decided to break camp
and pull out for the beach, and quickly acting on this decision, we started
that day to tramp out the forty odd
miles to Menzies' Bay, where our
boat was stowed, and our extra supplies were stored in a cabin. Our
packs, though not large, were nevertheless quite heavy enough to make
travelling through a rough country
comparatively slow, and in the short
days of midwinter, the distance
spanned between dawn and dusk was
not great.
The first day out, we got clear of
the snow, and hoped that we might
yet get out before a further fall, but
the next morning we awoke to find
our canvass fly heavily weighted,
while the fast falling flakes were rapidly coating the landscape with a fair
white mantle. From that time on,
we had heavy going. Fortunately,
having started at the first evil signs,
we in a measure kept ahead of the
snow, for we were ever descending,
and the snowfall was not yet general, but was gradually creeping down
to the coast from the high interior
land. Still, it was enough to greatly
impede our progress, and as it kept
on snowing lightly, and the sky looked angry, we were beset with anxiety
as wc stumbled ahead, lest we would
be enveloped in one of the overwhelming snowfalls so common to
the coast, from the effect of the warm,
moist air off the ocean, meeting the
colder air of the mountain ranges.
In this case we would have difficulty
in making our objective. Day after
day, we stumbled through the muffling snow, which got deeper as we
floundered on. The storm was gaining on us. At last, on the seventh
day out, we struck the head of a
valley which led right down to the
scacoast, and with lighter hearts we
tramped wearily onward, hoping to
make the shore before nightfall.
About noon, the snow began to fall
with inconceivable thickness. One
could not see for five yards ahead,
and except that our watches told us
it was midday, we would have supposed that night was drawing in. The
snow now quickly deepened as we
wearily toiled on. Under drooping
branches of the hemlock trees, now
fashioned into Esquimaux igloos by
the glistening snow, we sometimes
saw deer standing huddled up, waiting for the storm to cease, when they,
too, would trek for the seashore,
where scanty grazing would be found.
Everywhere was quiet, as of death.
The whole world seemed to be ____,
and was being covered up quietly and
quickly with an overwhelming shroud
of white. Steering by a pocket compass, we kept ever pushing onward,
not once stopping to rest. The clinging, feathery snow was now to our
knees, and while we were warm in
the depths of the forest, we wcre getting very tired, and thought we might
yet be forced to camp for the night.
About 3 o'clock in the afternoon, we
suddenly smelt smoke; the pungent,
balsamic smoke of burning fir. Wondering greatly, we turned a little, and
traced it up to where, in a quad-
range formed by some fallen trees,
under a bit of shelter formed of
pieces of bark laid sloping against
the huge trunks, sat an old Indian.
In front of him burned a small fire,
and by his side stood an old fashioned musket. He smiled when he
saw us, and bade us warm ourselves
as calmly and courteously as if he
were seated in his lodge at home.
"What are you doing here?" we ask
ed.    He smiled again.    "I  was out
hunting," he answered, "and the snow
came.    I could not see where to go,
so I made a fire to wait until I could
get  out."   "Come  with  us,"   I   said.
"The snow is going to be very deep,
then   you   cannot   go."      "Yes,   the
snow will be deep," he said.    "I will
go!   Have you a 'cheekamun'—(compass)  to show us the way?"    I told
him  we  had,  and he  picked  up  his
gun and prepared to go.   He was dry
and   comfortable,   but  except   for   a
small piece of dried salmon, he was
without food.   In the quickly deepening snow the gathering of fuel would
have  become  impossible  in  a  short
time, and the chances of his pulling
through were all against him.   Yet he
was quite undisturbed, fully prepared
to fight the sullen elements as had his
savage forbears through the long forgotten ages,    and   under conditions
that would   have   sent   the average
white     man     aimlessly    wandering
through the forest, crazy with  fear.
Though old, our new companion was
still active, and kept well up in our
broken trail, and after two more hours
of as hard travelling as I have ever
experienced,   we  debouched  at  dark
close to our snug little cabin on thc
beach.    A roaring fire, and a  warm
supper soon put us all on the best of
terms  with  ourselves,  and  with  the
rest of the world.   Outside, the snow
still fell in blinding volume. The wind
had  begun    to  rise,    and  humming
down the wide stone chimney, drew
the  smoke  and  sparks up from the
sputtering logs in fantastic wreaths.
The Indian  lay on the floor  of the
cabin   in  characteristic  position,   his
feet   to   the   warm   blaze,   his   back
propped against an empty box.    His
fingers toyed idly with a bit of split
cedar, his eyes fixed steadily on the
flame of the  fire.    When the storm
ceased, he would pull his canoe from
the nook in which he had hidden it,
and calmly paddle a few' miles to his
home, as unconcernedly as though he
had been away for one hour, instead
of   facing   death   in   the  woods   for
many.   Sam and I lay on our bunks,
smoking the  pipes  of happy  peace.
"Well Sawitza," I said, "I think you
would have    died   out   there in the
woods with this big storm on."    He
did  not answer for a moment,  but
still gazed dreamily into the heart of
the   fire.   "Is   tomorrow   the   white
man's Christmas?" he asked.   I started up.   "By Jingo, so it is!" I said.
I   had  forgotten  that  it was.    "But
why do you ask?"   "I knew it was,"
he said, "and I knew, because it was,
that something would come to help
me.   See!   You came with your little
'cheekamin.' (compass) and wc came
to the sea, and to your warm cabin,
where you had plenty of dry wood
and   food.   Tomorrow,   we   will   get
wild geese and make a feast.    Listen!
I  will tell you a story.    Long ago,
oh! very long ago, a man of my tribe
was a great chief.    He was very tall
and powerful, and excelled in all manly  arts.    He  was  a  famous   hunter
and a  great warrior.    His   strength
was so great that he could break the
strongest war bows of his fellows as
if they wcre a child's toys, while his
own was so   strong   that   no other
member of the tribe could so much
as   string  it.    One  day,  he   crossed
over  to  this  very bay  to  hunt  elk.
He hid his canoe where mine is hidden now, and thinking all was safe,
he went up the valley in  search of
the game.     Three    days    he stayed
away,  filially  killing  a  monster  elk,
which  he  prepared  for  packing  out
to the beach.    Now mark you; when
he crossed over into the bay, a band
of hostiles    lay    concealed    in their
canoe behind    a little    point to the
north.   Wetaka, the hunter, was one
who they had long sought, for he had
led his tribe against theirs in many
battles,   taken   many   canoes,   many
heads, and many captives. And he had
single handed often vanquished small
parties, killing some and bring their
Whatshalll
give my wife
for Christmas?
Only two shopping days remain, and many
good, thoughtful, British Columbia husbands are
still trying to solve the problem "What to give."
Let us solve it for you with the fine suggestion—
A GAS RANGE
The very heart of the home is in the kitchen. Make the kitchen clean, comfortable and convenient and you will bring happiness to the housewife. A Gas Range or Gas
Stove would lighten her burden by reducing housework one-half. A Gas Radiator would
also make a fine present to a housekeeper, a bachelor girl, or bachelor man. Our prices
range from $4 up.    Easy terms on Gas Ranges and Radiators if desired.
VICTORIA GAS CO., LTD., CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS
heads in triumph to his own village.
Therefore, when they saw his well
remembered form, they laid a plan
for his destruction and so following
cautiously after seeing him land, they
hid their own canoe in a convenient
spot, and being afraid to follow into
the forest, they lay in wait for his
return. On the third day, Wetaka
came out from the valley, staggering
under his load of elk meat. On either
side of the narrow, busn fringed pathway, close to the beach lay the hostile warriors. Two bore strong cords
of twisted spruce roots. The rest
carried arms. For the three days
they had thus lain in ambush, half
the party relieving the other until at
last the quarry came into view. As
he stepped unwarily into the ambush,
he was surrounded, seized from behind, and securely bound, not, however, before his mighty strength had
enabled him to cast aside his load,
and inflict fatal wounds on two of
the party, and severe ones on three
others, with his stone battle axe. The
weight of numbers prevailed ere long,
and he was carried to the shore, and
thrown down helpless to await his
captors' pleasure. Huge quantities of
the elk were cooked, and a little feast
was indulged in, seasoned with
many jests and gibes at the bound
captive's expense. After eating their
fill, the captors hastily launched their
canoe, and with Wetaka lying in the
bottom, they quickly paddled away
for their village. Two days elapsed
before the bay was reached in which
was the home of the hostiles, and
once the point was rounded, their victorious song apprised the still distant
tribcspeople of their return with
honour. When they landed, the beach
was thronged with the villagers, who
with exultant cries saw thc mighty
Wetaka, the terror of their tribe, lilted bodily from the canoe helpless as
a child. From then on for several
days, there was a continuous round
of feasting, dancing and torturing of
the prisoner, and though some counselled his immediate beheading, on
the grounds that so doughty a foe
should have no chance to escape, the
execution was set for a certain day;
meanwhile, every indignity the savage mind could suggest was heaped
upon him. During all this time, Wetaka had not spoken one word, nor
had he partaken of food, but upon thc
evening of the last day, he raised his
voice and roared a warning at them
in so terrible a voice that thc boys
and women who were taunting and
torturing him started away from him
in fright. "Listen, ye sneaking dogs!
Yc have crept upon me unawares, like
snakes crawling through the grass.
True, I am now your captive. My
arms are tied, and I am helpless. Ye
have tortured me and reviled mc, and
tomorrow ye will kill me. Let it be
so! I shall die as I have lived, a
brave warrior, and I spit upon yc all,
Real Estate
Buy now.   Sure advance in the Spring.
A few special buys we have to offer
ACREAGE AT OAK BAY
Good for subdivision. Six acres with cottage, $9,400.
Terms.
RESIDENCE
New 6-roomed (and reception hall), story-and-half
bungalow; piped for furnace; all modem improvements; good locality; $3,800.     Easy terms.
INSIDE PROPERTY
Full-sized lot (60x120) on Fort Street; improved;
$18,000.
RESIDENCE LOTS
Three large lots on St. Charles Street, 62x124;
$1,100 each.
Three lots on Grant Street at $550 each.
Oreen <£ Burdick Bros.
Insurance and Financial Agents
Corner Langley and Broughton Streets
Telephone 44
P.O. Box 162
ARTHUR BERWICK
VICTORIA
First Class Pianoforte
and Organ
TUNER AND REPAIRER
Lull! Collnrd & Collard, London, Eng.
Postal communications receive prompt attention.
ye reptiles. But one more word and
I have done. This night ye shall see
a sign of lire in thc sky, and if 1 die
that lire shall  destroy ye all  to the
youngest  infant.    I  have done."    At
these  words, a deathlike  silence fell
upon the band.   A child whimpered,
(Continued on Page 8) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
OUT OF THE MOUTH OF BABES
(By L. McLeod Gould)
(Original Story for The  Week)
Six o'clock was just striking when
Bob's relief came in to take the night
shift at the hotel bar, and Bob with
a grunt of satisfaction turned to the
alcove to change his white coat and
vest for the garments of respectable
civilization.
"Pretty good of you to be so smart
on time, Jim," he said; "I was fraid
that seeing as how it was Christmas
, Eve you  might  slip   over  the  hour
without thinking."
"Well, I probably should have done,
if it hadn't been for your impressing
it so strongly on me last night that
you wanted to be off in good time
tonight to meet your Pal for your
annual," rejoined the other, as he
slipped into his official rig and cast
a cursory glance over the bottles.
"Thanks; I did want to get off early, sure enough." Bob lounged up
to the bar as he spoke. "Come on,
Jim, we'll have a Christmas drink
together on me; min'e rye. Now
don't forget," went on, as after the
chin-chin hc shoved his glass over
the counter, that little Thomas will
be in some time tonight; he's the
chap I told you about who'll take my
shift tomorrow and till I come back.
I introduced him to the boss, and all
I want you to do is just to put him
wise to the bar when you've a slack
time; he's a good mixer and as
straight as a die. I guess I shan't be
back till after the New Year. Goodnight; be good to yourself."
Bob took the cigar proffered by
his colleague, buttoned up his overcoat, and with a nod and a smile here
and there went through the swing
doors out into the stormy night. It
was a night such as is most common
in Victoria about Christmas time;
there was a fine sleet blowing, urged
on by a sharp wind, which would not
have proved cold had it not been for
the damp that lay behind it. It was
not by any means an old-fashioned
Christmas Eve such as Dickens would
have loved to portray, with a fine
powdered snow just crisped by the
frost, gleaming under a sky emblazoned with stars and constellations.
But then, Dickens is said to have
been the real founder of our ideal
Christmas, and few ideals are ever
realized. At all events it was a very
unpleasant evening on which to be
abroad, and one which made those
who had happy memories think of the
far different conditions under which
they had spent the same glad season
of the year. And Bob was one of
these.
"Oh, hell!" he muttered to himself,
as he half staggered onto Yates St.
"This is a pretty way for me to be
spending Christmas Eve"; and his
mind wandered incontrovertably back
to the days of his childhood and
early manhood, when Christmas had
meant something more to him and his
then associates, than it had done for
many a long year. "Oh, hell!" he repeated, as turning into Government
street he encountered a yet more furious blast; "the sooner I meet Dick
the better; I'm getting a proper fit of
the blues."
Robert Wendell Charteris, to give
him his full name, was not an uncommon type to be met in the West.
A youthful indiscretion, or rather a
scries of them, had sent him out to
redeem himself in the great Western
world, and a small allowance to keep
body and soul together had been
made him. The cure had acted as
most such cures do. All freedom
from restraint having been removed
he had "gone the whole hog" and
had indisputably found tliat the portion of hogs is husks. Then had
come the rcaotion and the period during which he had furnished many a
paving-stone for the infernal regions.
The good, ingrained in him, had prevented him from ever becoming that
most detestable of creatures, the
"bum-sot," and now he had a good
job, as far as wages went, as bartender in a first-class hotel.    He had
learnt the work thoroughly and was
considered an expert, but three times
a year he went off on a premeditated
"jag"; and it is something to his
credit that his services were so valued
that he was allowed to obtain a substitute on these occasions, and still
hold down his job. Christmas was
one of the seasons when he was accustomed to "get out for a good
time." His version would have been
that then was when he felt most desirous of drowning recollection; but
he had found, as have many others,
that recollection has an awkward
knack of swimming. And so on this
particular Christmas Eve we find Bob
j wandering off to meet his boon companion for a dinner, a show and ?
prolonged  spree.
"The Grotto" was a blaze of light
when Bob entered it, and there was
a fair sprinkling of customers taking an appetizer before dinner,
amongst whom was easily visible the
gigantic form of "Dick" Williams,
the boon companion already mentioned. Like most really big men he
was the soul of good-temper and the
quality seemed to radiate from every
fibre of his being. Perfectly sober
he was somewhat taciturn and showed his natural reserve; half-drunk he
was the merriest, best-natured man in
God's world; there were few who had
seen him totally drunk, but he had
the reputation of being the most untamed demon from the pit on such
occasions. At the time of Bob's entrance he was in his most delightful
mood and cheerily greeted his bosom
pal.
"Hello, Bob!" he called. "Just in
time; I'm stuck. Third time running,
too; it ought to bc a dry drink on
mc, but who cares on Christmas Eve.
Come on, get in there, all. Put 'em
up quick, so as I'M get my revenge."
The bottles were put up and were
followed by the dice. After a few
more rounds thc two friends went out
for supper. They had arranged to
have a snack of some kind first at
"The Poodle Dog," then a look at
tlie show, to bc followed by a regular
supper, and later the night was to
commence. Such had been the programme for the last half-dozen
Christmas Eves. But there was an
inkling in thc back of Dick's head
that something was wrong this particular night.
"What's wrong, old buck," he said,
as thc two turned out of Trounce
Avenue? "You look as blue as the
Capri Grotto, which isn't much compliment to the one we've just left"
It might be mentioned here that
Dick was much of the same extraction
as Bob, and had had his spell of fine
weather life in the Old Country, and
was popularly known as a "has-
been."
"Dunno," replied Bob. "Things
don't seem right tonight; doesn't
seem like Christmas to me somehow.
Tell you what it is, old man; you
know 111c well enough to know I'm
not exactly kicking, but you and I
wcre both brought up much the same
way, and we used to look forward to
Christmas, as kids; and it was the
finest time of tlle year and all that.
And we used to look forward to coming down to breakfast and seeing all
the presents on the table, or perhaps
you had a Christmas tree; wc didn't.
Wc used to crawl down in the morning with our little parcels in our
hands and try and shuffle them on the
right plates without anybody seeing
us; and those of us who wcre down
first used to look out of the window
so as not to embarrass the late-com-
crs. And then after prayers we used
to wander to our places in a nonchalant sort of way and seem fearfully and horribly surprised to discover these mysterious packages.
And now what is it? Hell! Wc set
out with the strict determination of
getting drunk in the dead hope of
forgetting everything decent we ever
knew and of waking up when all the
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Christmassy feeling is off everybody.
It isn't good enough, Dick, and I'm
sick of it."
Dick turned a humorous eye on his
companion and expressed his opinion
that after a few oysters and a generous supper he would shortly be
feeling better. Which wasn't very
wise of him, as he soon found.
"Oh, you and your suppers! I'm
sick of them," snapped Bob. And
anyway you ought to know better
than suggest oysters to a man who
has been soaking up whisky like I've
been. T'll go in with you and eat
with you, and see the show with you,
but I don't feel like going round the
town with you afterwards, and that's
a fact. I should have thought that
an Old Countryman like yourself
could have felt like I do occasionally,
without rubbing it in."
This time the other didn't say anything; in fact he didn't feel like
speaking a word. Great big man
though he was, something seemed to
go wrong in his throat, as his memory swept back over a score of
years and a vision of an old rectory
stood in his mind. He felt an unreasoning irritation against this little
man on his right who had compelled
him to think of things he had long
ago made up his mind to forget.
However, "The Poodle Dog" lights
wcre ahead, and therein lay salvation.
"Oh, come on," he said; "havc supper and get your grouch over. You'll
bc all right in an hour and as bad as
the worst of us."
With these words he led the way
in and presently the two were seated
in a private box discussing a regular
Christmas dinner. But though Bob
soon lost what Dick called his
"grouch," he didn't seem to get quite
reconciled to his surroundings, and
later on when thc two were smoking
their cigars over coffee and liquors
he gave vent to his feelings.
"Look here, old man," he said, "I
don't want to be a spoil-sport, but
somehow I don't feel in line tonight.
I'll make a bargain with you. We'll
stroll round from here to the "New
Grand" via Broad Street and Government, and if I see anything which
makes mc feel that I could do more
good in Victoria with my little wad
than just spending it on myself, you
just cut mc out, and go on by yourself; you can easily find some other
pal to trot round with.   Ave you on?"
"Sure, Mike," replied the other with
. whimsical smile. "But what's your
game?"
"Can't you understand a thing since
you've been in God's own country for
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refugees?" This was from Bob.
"Can't you see that there are times
when a poor, God-forsaken fellow like
myself gets a sort of an idea that
he's making a mess of his life. Damn
it all," said Bob, as he was throwing his overcoat on, can't you see that
there arc sometimes in every chaps'
lives where they see that they have
made fools of themselves, and want
to get out straight, and do just a
little something for others?"
There was a brief silence. Dick
was evidently considering the proposition, and meantime both the
friends were getting their overcoats
on. All of a sudden the big man
turned round.
"I'll come in, Bob," he said, "and
what you do, I'll do. We've both
been brought up together, much as
a muchness, and we'll stick it out.
We'll drop into "The Driard" and
cement   the  compact.
And so they did. Leaving "The
Driard" the two walked down Broad
Street till they reached Government,
thence to the right and opposite
"Wilson's" they met their fate. Yet,
who shall dare to call it their fate?
Certainly not I, their chronicler.
There they met that which certainly
influenced their future career.
At the corner of Trounce Avenue
and Government Street may always
bc seen a small collection of boys.
The C.P.R. telegraph office is next
door, and it is a favourite stand for
newsboys. On this particular night
tllis stand seemed deserted but as
the two friends walked on a boy hailed them crying out: "The Evening
Times." He was a singularly wretched boy. Although the night was wet
and cold he had no overcoat, and
there were places where his flannel
shirt showed through his outer garments. His cap was bedraggled, his
boots flapped as he walked; and yet
there was an air about the youngster
which seemed to show that either he
or his parents had known bctter
times.
"Paper, sir; all the latest news; ;ill
about the big wreck." Buy a paper,
sir; Christmas Eve, sir."
Thc words hung in Bob's car. Suddenly he turned to his pal.
"Hang it all, Dick," he said; "this
is where we part; I'm going to see
that this poor forgotten kid gets his
Christmas. I've had the feeling all
over me this night. I'm sick of thinking of myself every Christmas time,
and waking up with a head. I'm going to try the other game and play THE WEEK, SATURDAY. DECEMBER 25, 1909
it off on some other bloke.   Quit me
and find another pal."
"That's all right, Bob," rejoined the
other; "we'll see it out together, at
least until I feel that the game gets
less uninteresting than a vaudeville
show.    Let's see the finish."
Bob turned and beckoned to the
kid. "How many papers have you"
he said.
"Four," replied the youngster.
"Follow me," said Bob, and hc
promptly led the way into "Wilson's."
A smart young clerk came up to attend to the order. All that Bob said
was that he should gaze upon the kid
until he had got his size firmly fixed
in his head, and that when he should
outfit him from head to toe regardless
of expense. The order was that one
good suit, coat, waistcoat and
breeches should be supplied, and two
suits of underclothing, with six pair
of socks. And the kid got them, and
Bob paid cash. But that wasn't the
big surprise.    That came later.
Bob had left his friend at the door,
thinking he wouldn't see him again
for a few days.   Judge of his surprise
I when Dick suddenly appeared with
another small youngster in tow.
"Fit him out same as the first kid,"
roared   Dick,   "and don't   take   any
longer about it."
And it was done.
. _   The  two  friends   sauntered   out  a
little   later  with   diminished  wads.
"Well what d'you think of it, Bob?"
. said one. This little recollection
freak of yours has put us both on
thc bum to the extent of about thirty-
five dollars or so apiece, and how are
we going to tide over Christmas?"
' "You can't blame me, old man,"
said the other;  "I  put you wise to
i skin out. I've made plans to dine tomorrow with Mrs. Green, and I'm going to order the turkey right away
now. The kid guaranteed me a good
reception and I'm going. I believe
there are a few turkeys still at either
"Goodacre's" or "Porter's". By the
way that was Green's kid I bought
an outfit for. I knew his father some
years back.
. "Guess I'll scc you some time after
New Year, Bob," came the answer.
Don't think I'll have the merry time
1 had last year, because you've put
the stuffings on mc. But I'll see what
I  can do."
Thc chronicler is at a loss here; he
knows that Bob had a merry Christmas dinner in thc house of a poor
widow and that there was a merry-
featured youngster handing round
bread-sauce in a new suit of clothes.
But Dick disappeared before the New
Year had had a chance to get old?
Perhaps he was a missing baronet.
CHRISTMAS A LA MODE
(By W. Carey Wonderly)
lt was Rose-Marie who, marking
thc day of my last visit on the calendar, made the discovery, and Rose-
Marie straightway told Mother, and
Mother told me.
I was to belong to Father on
Christmas day!
This may sound a bit confusing at
first, for most little girls belong equally to their parents, I know, but I,
Willettc Warrington, don't. Ever
since I can remember, Mother has
lived in our nice apartment in Central Park West, and Father has lived
down in the Fifties, just off thc
Avenue. And I belong to Mother year
in and year out excepting three days
in each month, and for these three
days I belong to Father. It is not
at all a pleasant arrangement, I must
confess, for when Rose-Marie packs
my little suit-case and takes mc down
to Fifty-something Street I feel just
perfectly terrible about leaving
Mother, but when, three days later,
she comes down to take me home to
Central Park West, I feel equally as
sorry for Father. For I think Father
is the dearest, handsomest father that
ever lived, just as Mother is the
sweetest, loveliest mother in all the
world.
If we could only live together in
one house, just Father, Mother and
me, and if I could only belong equally to them as other little girls belong
equally to their parents, how very,
very nice it would be! .
I once said something like this to
Rose-Marie, only Rose-Marie is quite
old and doesn't always understand
little girls, so she just shook her head
and told me never to mention such a
thing to Mother.
"Never, never, never, Miss Billie,"
she said, and because it has become
second nature with Mother and me to
always mind her, I never have mentioned it.
You see, Rose-Marie is very fond
of giving orders and of being obeyed.
Sometimes she talks to Mother until
Mother cries. She was Mother's
nurse when Mother was a girl in
New Orleans, and later, when Mother
married Father and came to live in
New York, she came, too. Then I
came to Mother, and Rose-Marie became my nurse, only she never
stopped being Mother's, and she
scolds us both whenever she can find
the slightest excuse for doing so. Still
I love her dearly, and Mother loves
her, and I know that Rose-Marie
would gladly die for either of us.
When she made the discovery that
my next visit to Fifty-something
Street would fall upon the twenty-
fifth of December, she was quite ready
to cry her little black eyes out.
"Perhaps Mr. William won't send
the carriage for Miss Billie after all,"
she said hopefully.
"Then you must get a carriage and
take her down to him,-Rose-Marie,"
said Mother, drying her pretty eyes.
"Billie belongs to Mr. Warrington on
the twenty-fifth, and that is all there
is to it. No doubt he will send the
carriage on the twenty-fourth, and she
will stay over until the twenty-sixth,
so get her clothes ready, please."
Rose-Marie gave a little snort, and
went over to the kitchen to cry. And
Father, sure enough, sent the brougham on the morning of the twenty-
fourth.
Rose-Marie had my clothes all
packed in the wicker suit-case, and
Mother and I were standing at the
front window when the carriage stopped at the door of our apartment-
building.
"Billie, Billie, dear!" cried Mother,
clasping me tightly in her arms when
she caught sight of the carriage which
was to take me away.
"Don't you want me to go,
Mother?" I asked, a little unsteadily.
"Want you to go!" she cried. Then
she hesitated and added, very calm
and self-possessed: "Of course I always want you with me, Billie dear,
but then so does your father want
you, and for thc next three days you
belong to him.   So I want you to go."
"But now—and tomorrow Christmas-day! Oh, Mother, won't I see
you tomorrow—won't I see you on
Christmas-day?" I cried, clinging fast
to her pretty gown.
"I'm afraid not, sweetheart," she
said gently.
"Mother!"
"Don't—don't,  Billie!" she begged.
"But I want you—I want you,
Mother, on Christmas-day, of all days
in the year," I said.
She nodded softly, and held me as
if she would never let me go again.
"But don't you want your father,
too, Billie dear?" she asked. "Oh,
I know you do, you must! So run
along.   Dear little girl, run—quickly!"
She let me go and pushed me gently from her, and I knew by the smile
in her big brown eyes that the tears
were very near. Mother always smiles
when she is going to cry, and when
Mother cries her eyes dou't become
red and her face drawn and ugly as
most folk's do. Mother is always
charming, even when she cries.
I called to Rose-Marie and sent her
in the other room, and then while they
were consoling each other, I slipped
away and ran downstairs to the waiting carriage.
"Good-morning, Johns." I said to
Father's coachman, and he touched
his hat and wished me a smiling good-
morning in return.
"I am going down to Father's alone
today," I next told him. "Rose-
Marie is going to stay with Mother.
So will you please go in the hall and
get my suit-case and bring it out?"
Johns is very nice. He fetched my
suit-case and helped mc into the
brougham, and was ever so kind and
considerate about my comfort—just
for all the world as if I were a grown
lady like Mother.
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"There, I'm ready. Go slowly,
Johns; the asphalt must be slippery,"
I   said,  with  a  little  nod.
Father always says that the asphalt
streets are treacherous for horses af-1
ter a rain or snow, and there had
been a light flurry early in the morn- j
ing. Johns touched his hat and re-!
plied, "Very good, miss," and wc!
moved slowly down the Avenue.
Father was waiting for mc on the |
steps of the Cordova, and when he
saw the brougham halt under the
marquise and just one little girl step
out, his face went al! a-grin, and hc
picked nie up then and there and
kissed me.
"Well,  well,  well!    Where's  Rose-
Marie?" he asked, and then I told him j
she had stopped at home.    But I did !
not say a word about Mother's tears
to him, because that would only make
him sorry, and Father is always  so j
happy and alive.
"So you came all the way down by |
yourself?" he laughed next. "Hello,
you arc getting to be a big boy,
aren't you?"
"A  big boy"!—did you  hear him?
1 am Father's boy and Mother's
girl, for Rose-Marie says Father was
terribly disappointed when he learned
that I was not a really-truly boy.
Mother cried and named me Willettc,
for Mather's name is William, but
that didn't seem to help-much somehow.
I wish you could scc Father's rooms
in the Cordova. They arc ever so
nice, with dark walls and gay rugs
and big, substantial-looking furniture.
There's an open fireplace and a huge
old settle with 110 end of red cushions
in his den, and it is here we sit of an
evening, side by side, and talk until
bedtime. Somehow I can't help
thinking how sweet and comfy
Mother would look at one end of the
old sofa.
After we had gone up in the eleva
tor to Father's apartments, he turned
to me and asked mc about the day's
programme. He always leaves everything to me and treats me in every
way as if I were a grown-up and not
a little girl.
"I'd like to go down to the shops
after luncheon," I told him promptly.
"Good! Jolly! And where shall we
lunch?" he asked next.       x
I looked at him, not quite certain.
There is a lovely restaurant in thc
Cordova and sometimes we take our
meals there, and again we have them
sent up to the apartment—wc always
have our breakfast sent up.
"Suppose we go down to one of thc
more quiet of the big hotels, and lunch
tliere. Will that do, Billie-boy?" he
asked presently.
He always does think of the very
nicest things! A big hotel downtown! I was glad I had brought my
pretty new frock with the hand embroidery. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
So Mrs. Johns, who is Father's
man's wife, hurried in and changed
my dress, and in a little while I was
all ready. When Father saw me, he
gravely extended his hand, and we
shook.
"You look bully, Bill," he said, with
an approving nod of his handsome,
head.   "Good, old man!"
We took a hansom this time. Somehow I like hansoms, and »o does
Father. We were both laughing gaily
as we entered ours and drove away.
On the Avenue everything and everybody was all a-bustle. Christmas
was in the very air. Against the curtains of the residences on either side
of the way wreaths of holly and evergreens were hung. The entrances of
all the big hotels and smart clubs
were filled with laughing, talking
people.
Even the faces of the passers-by
were bright with the season's greeting.   It was lovely!
Then our hansom turned sharply
on the snow-carpeted asphalt, and we
rolled up to the door of thc hotel
where we were to lunch.
I can't tell you all about our little
luncheon, but we were ever so gay,
and Father and I ordered together,
he consulting me first before choosing a dish. It is a way Father has,
and it makes even a little girl feel as
if she were an empress.
After luncheon we entered our hansom again and were driven away to
one of the big shops, where, as
Father put it, one can buy everything
from a collar-button to a steam-
launch. Rose-Marie says men do not
like shopping, but then Rose-Marie
doesn't know everything in the world,
and Father and I had a beautiful
time. We bought all sorts of gifts
for just everybody, and Father didn't
look while I selected his present and
I didn't look while he selected mine.
"Now," I said, as we came out of
the department-store, "I want to buy
Mother's  gift."
"Why, of course," said Father hurriedly. "What do you want? Where
do you want to go? I'll tell the
cabby."
"I haven't decided what to get," I
said slowly. "What do you think?
Can't you suggest something, Father?"
He shook his head. "I'm afraid I
can't, Billie," he told me quietly. "Get
whatever you think your mother will
like—I know she will appreciate it all
the more if you select it yourself."
He put me in the hansom and,
jumping in himself, told the man to
drive slowly up the Avenue. This
would give me time to decide upon
the present and where it should be
' purchased. I was wavering between :V
set of silver for her Antoinette desk
and a pair of green Majolica jars for
her favorite dwarf pines when our
hansom was caught in a block. There
were two carriages, a motor-car,, a
surface-car, and,' three policemen, and
I knew it was going to take us some
time to get out of the confusion. So
I sat up and watched.
Directly abreast of our hansom was
another one, ours going north, our
neighbours coming south, and as I
turned my head I looked straight into
Mother's eyes! She was the sole occupant of the south-coming cab.
"Mother!" I shouted. "Oh, Mother,
Mother!"
"Billie!" she cried. Wc had both
seen each other together, just as we
always see everything together.
"What is thc trouble?" began
Father, when he, too, turned his head
and looked into Mother's lovely eyes.
She nodded her head in his direction.
"How-de-do, Will?" she said softly.
I saw Father clench his hands tightly; then, "How-de-do, Nell?" he returned.   "Awful block, isn't it?"
"Oh, very bad," said Mother; but
she was looking at me sitting so
proudly at Father's side, and presently I caught the suspicion of a tear in
her eyes. Directly a big lump came
in my throat. I saw how it was—
Mother was thinking of Christmas
and of her little girl, and I was sorry,
sorry for her and for Father, too.
Thc three of us were quite uncomfortable during the next five minutes.
Somehow the policeman couldn't
straighten out the block, and a steady
line of vehicles pouring into the
Avenue from the side street added to
the confusion. The surface-cars
banged their bells, the policemen
shouted, and the cabbies swore—all
except one, that is, and he sat perfectly still on his box and talked beautifully to heaven. And all the while
Our hansom was jammed tightly next
to Mother's, and we sat staring straight at each other and saying
not a word.
But when I saw Mother in tears—
and my eyes are sharp where Mother
is concerned—I arose to the occasion,
as Rose-Marie would say, and simply
made conversation.
"I've been shopping," I said, and
held up my little gun-metal purse
Father had bought me at Tiffany's.
"There's ever so many people in the
shops, aren't there?"
"Yes, ever so many," smiled
Mother, and she nodded her appreciation of my purse.
"Have you been out very long?" I
asked next.
Really it is hard to make conversation sometimes.
"Yes—no. No; I came away just
after luncheon," she replied, still smiling.
"Father and I luncheoned downtown," I told her.
"That was a charming idea," she
returned.
"It was Father's idea!" I cried.
She lowered her eyes and said nothing, and Father, who had been silently
listening, turned his head and called
sharply to a newsboy.
Just then a policeman came up to
Mother's hansom and shouted to the
cabby. It seemed that the left wheel
of Mother's hansom was locked in the
right wheel of another carriage in
such a way as to render it unsafe to
pull out. The policeman suggested
that Mother get out of the cab and
find another one, as the block was
really very bad, and traffic was practically at a standstill all around.
"But—-I can't get out," hesitated
Mother. "There is not room on the
ground for me to place my foot even.
I don't see what I can do."
And the policeman, who of course
knew nothing of our affairs, said:
"Step across into the hansom next
to you, ma'am. Its wheels are safe,
and I'm thinking the line will be
moving north first."
Poor Mother flushed cruelly antj
said not a word, but just sat there
looking with pleading eyes at Father.
But Father didn't move and neither
did he speak, so I took the situation in
my two small hands and said:
"Father, won't you help Mother into our cab?"
Then the big policeman stared until
his face grew red, but the next minute
hc turned away whistling "New York
Town." I knew the tune because the
pretty actress who has the apartment
across from ours in Central Park
West plays it quite often on her
piano.
Directly I spoke to Father, he was
all attention and politeness. He stood
up and held out his hand to Mother,
and carefully helped her across into
our hansom. I believe Mother would
never have come only she knew that
a great many persons had heard me
and were watching us, and so she
yielded gracefully, as Mother alone
can.
When she was in our cab and sitting down with me squeezed in between Father and herself, she raised
her eyes and said quietly:
"Thank you, Will."
A moment later the line started,
slowly moving northward, and our
hansom went with the others, Father
and Mother and I sitting side by side.
It seemed so good just to think of
it, although I knew it all came of an
accident alone, that I could have
shouted with joy in thc most unladylike manner. But Mother says I must
always remember that T am a gantle-
woman, even if I am only six going
on seven, so you see it would never
in the world have done for me to
havc shouted in the street.
After we had gone two blocks uptown, Father spoke—very quietly and
with tightly pressed lips.
"I'll speak to the man and tell him
to stop at the next corner.   Then I'll
get out, and you and Billie can have
the cab to yourselves."
"There is no need for you to get
cMerry Christmas!    When the glass is filled with good Wine, and
the heart is filled with good feeling
A VOTRE SANTE
The Christmas Toast
The toast for the King of all Festivals must, of course, be given
in the King of all Wines—G. H. Mumm & Co's Champagne. No
Christmas is complete without Mumm's "Extra Dry" or "Selected
Brut," the Champagnes that are used evclusively at all the high class
banquets and best functions throughout the civilized world.
Do not allow your dealer to provide you with an inferior substitute for this best of all brands of Champagne. Insist upon being
supplied with G. A. Mumm & Co's.
Why not Champagne for the Christmas Present)
A small hamper containing one dozen "splits" of G. H. Mumm
& Co's "Extra Dry" would make a splennid gift for a lady or man.
For an invalid, such a present would be very apt. Your licensed
grocer can supply you with a small hamper of Mumm's Champagne.
cPither & Leiser, Sole Agents for British Columbia
VICTORIA VANCOUVER
NELSON
(greetings
An Xmas gift for yourself, your wife and family, and
one that will give untold pleasure to all is one of our new
1910 BUICK MOTOR CARS
The most reliable, up-to-date and reasonably priced cars
of the season.
Large consignment just arrived
Western Motor Si Supply Co.
R. P. Clark, General Manager
Cor. Government and Superior Streets
Telephone 695; or, if line is busy, 2067
out, Will," Mother told him quickly,
other hansom."
"I  wouldn't have you do that for
the world," he returned. "I shall leave
you   at   thc   next   corner;    that   is
"It is 1 who am the intruder.   Have
(Continued on Page n)
THE SIGN IN THE EAST
(Continued from Page 5)
to be instantly stilled by thc mother.
A dog gave a low, mournful howl,
when a well aimed billet caused him
to yelp sharply, when again was utter
silence. In silence the captive was
led into the death lodge, and watched
by guards for the first time silent.
Outside, the warriors' sat about the
watch fire, casting glances, incredulous yet fearful, at the gradually
glooming sky. The women and children slunk away to bed, and night
fell dark and black.   Soon, a glimmer
of light appeared in the East, and
quickly showed out bright and strong,
a huge tongue of flame from zenith
to horizon. Horrified, the warriors
cowered vvith hands clasped over eyes
to shut out thc fearful sight, and
from the Death lodge, again came
Wetaka's fearsome voice. "See, that
of which I warned you has come.
Beware your doom, O race of reptiles!"
In awe the warriors trembled
through all that fearful night, and
when dawn paled the mystic fire, they
arose, went to the Death Lodge and
cast off Wetaka's bonds. "Go, great
Wetaka, we are as your slaves. Take
of all you desire, and we will bear
you in honour to your home, but save
us from the fire, for we are sore
afraid. Come, Wetaka, greatest of
Doctor men." Then the gong was
beaten, and a great feast prepared.
All day they feasted, danced and sang,
and on the morrow a fleet of canoes
bore Wetaka, with the chief
daughter as his bride, and a grea
store of presents, to his home. Ther
again, did they feast and rejoice fo
many days, and ever after the twi
tribes were united in firm friendshi-f
and never again was the fire seen ii
the sky. Now the night it was seei
was the same as this night, and th
day of Wetaka's release was what yoi
white men call Christmas. Therefon
when I lay in the snow out yonde
in the forest today, I knew that some
thing would come to help me, jus
as Wetaka was saved so long ago oi
this night. That is all." The Indiai
again gazed dreamily into the fire
his hawk-like face lit up by the rudd;
flame like a bronze carving. San
and I watched him for a while, think
ing of his strange, wild story. Thei
we shook down our blankets, ani
soon were dreaming of wild Indiai
tribes whose war cries rang on thes
shores "before the white man came. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
THE MECCA FOR THE HOLIDAY SHOPPERS
AN UNRIVALLED EXHIBITION OF PRACTICAL PRESENTS READY FOR YOU HERE
What Shall I
Give Him ?
Has the question looked so large and hard to
you? No need to worry with such a list as this to
choose from. Fact is this is but a hint to the
goocl things for men folk, to bc found at this
store—there is a great collection of useful gift
pieces here.
And there you have the solution of "What to
give a man?" Send him something useful—something that he can use almost daily, and you'll
please him, Tn the list below you'll find a host of
such gifts and every one of such magnificent style
as to please the artistic taste as well. We could
quote prices but they would mean nothing—one
must see the articles to properly appreciate their
worth. You'll find every item in this store plainly marked and
you'll find the values the best in thc city. Of course you know
"Weiler Quality."
Smokers' Cabinets
Smokers' Sets
Shaving Mirrors
Shaving Brushes
Shaving Mugs
Office Desks
Sectional Bookcases
Card Tables
Willow Easy Chairs
Foot Rests
Medicine Cabinets
Morris Chairs
Easy Chairs
Couches
Steins
Corkscrews
Manicure Sets
Liquer Sets
Electric Lamps
Students' Lamps
Photo Frames
Writing Sets
Stationery Holders
Book Racks
Ink Stands
Tie Racks
Cut Glass Decanters
Fireplace Furniture
Cellarettes
Magazine Stands
GIFTS FOR THE YOUNG FOLK
If you have some little folk you are going to "remember" this
Christmas you would do well to inspect our offerings for the kiddies. Many useful little furniture pieces are offered. Chairs,
rockers, reed chairs and rockers, cribs, tea sets, etc. Little gift
things that'll stand lots of hard usage—wear and tear that toys
cannot outlive.
Kindergarten Sets—An ideal gift for the little folk. This set consists of a table and two chairs. Strongly made and nicely
finished in either red or golden.    Per set  $2.25
A Wonderful
Assortment of
Five Dollar Gifts
_ Hundreds of people who figure
that five dollars should buy an
excellent gift will find this assumption splendidly justified when they
see among the new china and
glass arrivals the gorgeous things
at this popular price.
^ We have this season the largest assortment we have ever
presented.
•J It not only includes conservative varieties in simple decorations
but an almost unlimited variety
of novelty patterns that are most
effective.
fl But, you must see to appreciate.
What Shall I
Give Her ?
Nowhere else in this city will you find such a
magnificent collection of gift things designed specially to please the feminine fancies. And every
item a serviceable, sensible remembrance—something that your lady friend is sure to appreciate.
There are a thousand and one things offered
here—tilings which may be enjoyed not only by
the recipient but also by the entire household—
and by thc donor besides. And they needn't
cost much, either. A visit will convince you that
our claims are reasonable—that we have the
grandest collection of holiday merchandise ever
presented Victorians and that these items are remarkably low-priced.
The list below gives a few hints for those looking for a
gift for a lady. Special attention is directed to our magnificent
stock of china and silverware:—
Reed Chairs
Easy Willow Chairs
Kitchen Cabinets
Reed Rockers
Ottomans
Wicker Workbaskets
Wicker Cake Curates
Sectional Bookcases
Jardiniere Stands
Medicine Cabinets
Cheval Mirrors
Ladies' Desks
Morris Chairs
Easy Chairs
Couches
Music Cabinets
Magazine Racks
Library Tables
Tea Tables
China Cabinets
Bridge Tables
Framed Pictures
Handsome Mirrors
Dressing Tables
Down Quilts
Sofa Cushions
Hearth Rugs
Table Covers
Tray Cloths
Pillow Slips
Table Linen
Hemstitched Sheets
Art Table Covers
Mexican Drawnwork
D'Oylies
Satin Marseilles sh
Satin Marseilles
Quilts
Oriental Rugs
Lace Curtains
China Ornaments
China Vases
China Tea Sets
China Dinner Sets
China Chocolate Sets
Fancy Plates
Silverware
Silver and Oak Ware
Manicure Sets
Salad Sets
Reading Lamps .
Electric Lamps
Brass Goods
Photo Frames
Stationery Holders
Writing Sets
Jardinieres
Book Racks
COUNTRY ORDERS
Packed and Shipped
Your only shipping charge Is freight
WEILER BROS.
Home Furnishers Since 1862, at Victoria, B.C.
SHOP TODAY
SHOP EARLY
SHOP HERE
SHOP AGAIN
An Unique Ballet in the Bib Musical Extravaganza
"The Land of Nod"
Not What He Expected
Last Christmas Day a postman was
hurrying along on his round, when he
was accosted by a lady at the door
of a large house.
"Arc you the regular postman?"
"Yes, mum."
"Do you come in the morning?"
"Yes, mum."
"And in the afternoon?"
"Yes, mum," eagerly.
"Oh, then, it must have been you
who broke our bell!"
gishly-iiclincd   student   observed thc
headless,    armless,    footless    statue,
and wrote underneath:
"God pity Defeat I"
He Was Taking No Chances
While riding on an electric car, during his first visit to the city, a farmer passed the yard of a monument
company, where gravestones and
monuments were displayed. Turning
to his host, he remarked in an awe-
stricken voice:
"They dew bury 'em close in the
city, don't they?"
In a corridor of a certain University building there is a large replica
of "The  Winged Victory."    A wag-
Reflections of a Spinster
When kissing becomes a fine art
it ceases to bc a pleasure.
A kiss night and morning is the
badge of settled domesticity.
For a kiss to mean anything it
must mean everything.
A man regards kissing as a hors
d'aeuvre; a woman regards it as a
raison d'etre.
The Manchu's Dogs
At a country club near Washington
sonic members were swapping rather
"tall" stories touching the intelligence
of tlieir respective dogs, when a reserved chap in the corner spoke up.
Said lie:
"Those are good stories; but thc
best dog story I ever heard was of
Chinese origin. I'll tell it as I got
it at Shanghai, where I was stationed
for some time.
For Mayor
TO   THE   ELECTORS   OF   THE
CITY OF VICTORIA
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:
I beg to announce that I am a candidate for Mayor at the approaching
election. After having served as Alderman for three years I now respectfully solicit your vote and influence for the more important position,
and promise to do my utmost for the
progress and betterment of our city.
My views have already been published, and will bc more fully explained
from thc platform. My principal objects are:
Thc securing of Sooke as a water
supply.
Thc introduction of more efficient
management of the public works department.
The stricter guarding of public
morals.
A systematic improvement in making and beautifying our streets and
parks.
A. HENDERSON.
"A Manchu had three dogs. Returning home on one occasion, he
found them on his couch of teak-
wood and marble. Hc whipped the
dogs and drove them forth.
"Thc next evening when the Manchu came home the dogs were lying
on the floor. Rut he placed his hand
on the couch and found that it was
warm from their bodies. Therefore
hc whipped the dogs again.
"The third night, returning home, a
little earlier than usual, hc found the
dogs sitting before the couch blowing on it to cool it!"
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
180
In the matter of the Estate of Andrew
McAfee, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims or demand
against the Estate of Andrew McAfee,
deceased, who died on or about the 2nd
day of November, 1909, are requested
to send, by post prepaid, or to deliver
to the undersigned their names and addresses, with full particulars of their
claims, and particulars of all securities
(If any) held by them, duly verified, on
or before the 10th day of January, 1910.
Dated this 10th day of December, 1909.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
No.  918 Government Street, Victoria,
B.C., Solicitors for the Executor,
dec 11
No. 402 179
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897"
She Spoke Truth
"I am undone!" shrieked the Tragedy Queen, as she threw her arms
upward with a  wild gesture.
"Yes," agreed the Villain, as lie
stole a surreptitious glance behind
her back; "two buttons at the top
and three at thc bottom."
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Ml-
chlgan-Fuget Sound Lumber Company,"
an Extra-Provincial Company, has this
day been registered as a company under the "Companies' Act, 1897," to carry
out or effect all or any of the objects
of the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Detroit in the
State  of  Michigan.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided Into flve thousand shares of ten
dollars each.
The head offlce of the company In this
Province Is situate at No. 1114 Langley
street, Victoria, and William John Taylor, Barrlster-at-law, whose address ls
Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for the
Company not empowered to issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is thirty years from the 22nd day
of November, A.D.  1909.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia,  this  third day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which  this Company
has been established and registered are:
Buying, selling, manufacturing and dealing In forest products,
dec 11
A man is as great a fool as a clever
woman thinks it worth while to make
him.
Masterful men are finally mastered,
because they fail to measure the staying power of woman.
Between two evils, it is better to
wed a talkative lobster than a self-
satisfied clam.
177
______
&M
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Sewerage Works, Prince Rupert,"
will be received by the Honorable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Wednesday, the 19th of January,
1910, for the construction and completion of a portion of the permanent system of sewerage at Prince Rupert, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 7th day of December, 1909, at
the office of the undersigned, Public
Works Department, Victoria, B.C., at the
offices of the Government Agent, and
of Mr. James H. Bacon, Harbor Engineer, Prince Rupert, B.C.; at the offlce of the Government Agent, New
Westminster, B.C., and at the offlce of
the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honorable
the Minister of Public Works, in the
sum of flve hundred dollars, which shall
be forfeited If the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called
upon to do so, or If he fall to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques
or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
A guarantee bond in the sum of fifteen thousand dollars will be required
as security for the faithful performance and completion of the work.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 2nd December, 1909.
dec 4
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
One Touch of Christmas Makes the
Whole World Kin
The crowded streets, the brilliantly decorated stores, the glowing Xmas Tree, the interchange of gifts and greetings and the services
in the churches are the chief features of Christmas observance. One might aver that the giving of presents is really the chief
feature, for this has become a source of great delight to kind-hearted people who love this great festival because it gives them an
opportunity to contribute to the happiness of others—the true joy of giving. To paraphrase Shakespeare, "This one touch of
Christmas makes the whole world kin"—makes one almost clairvoyant in knowing the desire of another. Almost instinctively this
season we turn our attention to the serviceable offering.
A Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, either of which are delightfully cheery and a charming addition to any residence,
will prove one of the most thoughtful and acceptable presents for either lady or man who "batches," even if only
one room forms "home." A furnace may be baulky, or
out altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous,
wood or coal fire entail labor in re-lighting; but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus;
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off. It can
be brought into service in a second without work, so
different from fire-building. It will not only give the required warmth, but will at once dispense a genial air of
hospitality. As a little heat is required almost every day
of the year in British Columbia, a Gas Radiator, or a Gas
Grate will form a most appropriate Christmas offering.
For every housewife there is a "Merry Xmas" in a Gas
Range. She will revel in the possession of such a present,
appreciating the saving in time, strength and worry, the
cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of gas for cooking
purposes. Henceforth she will have no kindlings to buy,
no coal to carry in, no ashes to take out, no blinding,
choking smoke in starting wood or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no fear of fire from overheated flues. Early breakfast will have no terrors for her;
just as easy will she be able to get up a late supper for
unexpected guests. If she has a dinner to cook which
takes hours, she will set the Range right and she will find
it hours later just exactly as she left it. Nothing uncertain
about a Gas Range; it is as hot at the beginning as it
ever gets.   What could be better for a Christmas Gift?
A  VISIT  TO   OUR  SHOWROOMS   WILL   SUGGEST   MANY   SPLENDID   IDEAS   FOR   PRACTICAL   CHRISTMAS
PRESENTS.     YOU  ARE  MOST  CORDIALLY WELCOME,   WHETHER   TO   PURCHASE   OR   MERELY   TO   LOOK.
The Victoria Gas Company Limited
Tetephone 123
COR FORT AND LANGLEY STS.
At the Street Corner
By the lounger
I always rather dread these Christinas "Loungers"; they have to be so
much in the same style, and it is hard
to be original. However, there is always one thing permitted, and that is
to wish all the readers of the column
a Merry Christmas and a Happy New
Year. Readers, please consider yourselves wished it with all the fervency
with which a mere hanger-on at the
street corners can confer. My wishes
are no less sincere because I am a
nonentity. I do honestly hope that
you all will really have a very good
time at this festive season of the
year.
Now, there is a class of person of
whom I wish to talk, who appeal to
me and I believe to a good many
other people about Christmas time.
I refer to the unattached bachelor. I
belong to the class myself, but I have
no complaint coming as to Christmas
festivities. There was one Christmas,
which I spent in Calgary, having arrived at eight o'clock in thc morning
of Christmas Day. Being an Englishman, fresh out from the Old Country, where we have some respect for
our laws, and Christmas Day falling
on a Sunday, I naturally had rather
a miserable day. 1 didn't then understand that there are laws here
which arc meant to be evaded. If 1
had been wiser I might have fared
better; as it was I met a Good Samaritan who introduced me to the Club;
where I satisfied both my conscience
and my desire without breaking cither
the law of God or the Dominion of
(well whatever part of the world I
was in).
Since then 1 am to bc classed
among the lucky ones, as I met good
friends, and have always been splendidly entertained at Christmas, and
have an invitation for the coming festival, to which I am looking forward
with all the eagerness which a
"Lounger" is supposed to exhibit.
. But there is many a poor man for
whom I feel sorry.   When I say "poor
. .. mem
man" I do not mean a poverty-
stricken person; he can be looked after by the various charitable institutions, which do such excellent work
in all our provincial towns. I refer
to the homeless bachelor; such an
one as myself; the inhabitant of a
bed-sitting room, but not like myself, the fortunate possessor of friends
vho will invite him to share the genial
fare of the season.
Such a man becomes a cynic; naturally so. It is only human nature
for him to scoff at Christmas. "A
beastly season," he says; "nothing but
bills coming in: nothing to do; stay
in bed all day." And how can you
blame him And at the same time,
how can you cure his complaint? You
can't do it. I'm not talking about
thc sort of man who is a pauper; not
about the sort of man to whom a
good suit of clothes would be a blessing; but about the gentleman with
moderate means, who hasn't had
either the pleasure or the opportunity of meeting what I might call decent and respectable families in our
midst, and who is therefore compelled to spend his Christmas alone.
1 confess that I do not see a solution to the problem.    And yet there
must be one.    If I may be so bold as
tn say so, I think that the real fault
lies in the general conduct of the Anglican Church.   I am a High Churchman  myself,  so  far as  my religious
principles  extend;   I  do  not  pretend
to   bc   an   enthusiastic   one.     But   I
would like those members of the An-'
glican  Church,  who  happen  to  read,
this paragraph, to compare the atti-
tude of the Roman Catholic Church, I
in regard to its members in this country, with that of the Anglican. Their;
opinion  must he  the same as  mine,'
viz., that the  Anglican  Church  does
not look after    the    members of its
flock, as closely as docs the  Roman
Church.    Ancl  that is  why you  will
always  find  that  the  homeless,   disconsolate bachelor is, in (jo per cent
of the cases the son of an Anglican
parson.
Of course I expect to be called
down, for these remarks. I should
like to be.   But I want it to he under
stood that if there is any "calling
Lounger." The Editor of this paper
is not at all responsible for what I
say, but he will gladly furnish my
name and address to any member of
the Anglican Church who would like
to contest anything I have said. And
I would just as gladly meet any such
gentleman, and endeavour to prove
my contention.
Now wc have done with my Christmas remarks, and wc will just genially
"lounge" round together on subjects
which will appeal to us all.
And first I would like to express
my surprise, (I may have done this
before), as to thc system of furnishing electric lights in the majority of
houses in the cities of Vancouver and
Victoria. Dear reader, have you never
gone into your sitting-room, or it
may have been your bed-room, and
furtively embraced thc darkness? A
burglar, hiding behind the sideboard,
or secreted under thc bed, might have
thought you were looking for somebody you expected to meet; but hc
would have been disappointed; you
were merely trying to find the electric
light. Both hands were out-spread;
the body was bent forward; the attitude was tense, and all of a sudden,
after minutes of anxious expectation,
the bulb hit you on the nose. I
know; I have been there myself.
But why? Why don't wc have sensible installments? Most of the hotels
have them. In thc majority of the
latter you just press a little button as
soon as you enter your room, and
lo, there is light! I never saw the
absurd installation which prevails in
tllis country, in England; and yet
England is supposed to bc behind the
times. Can any one private individual
or one connected with the electric
lighting of this Province, tell mc what
particular advantage is possessed by
the eccentric system here employed?
Possibly it might be a cheaper installation; I am not sufficient electrical
expert lo know; possibly it might bc
an installation instituted by the married women of the country, as a test
of their husbands' sobriety; not being
a married man I cannot tell. But
undoubtedly, there must be some ex-
down" to be done it is to bc on "The
planation for such an idiotic general
installation, and I want to know what
it is.
I made a complimentary allusion
not long ago to the Moving Picture
Shows of Victoria, and I have no wish
to take anything back. I think that
they are good, clean shows, and I
have been glad to sec the number of
young lads of an undeterminable age
attending them. These latter, will
never learn anything wrong from
these shows, and they may pick up
a lot of more or less useful information. But occasionally the educated
man sees some quaint mistakes. For
instance, at a show I saw last week,
Nero was represented with a beard;
now, I am open to correction, but my
classical lore tells me that Nero grew
one beard, which was sacrificed to
Jupiter Capitolinus; moreover he was
represented with black hair, whereas,
unless I am greatly mistaken, Tacitus
tells us that hc was fair-haired. Again,
if any of the old frescoes which I have
myself seen in Pompeii are correct,
no Roman of Nero's time ever wore
a toga which looked like an embroidered nightshirt. And ancient Greece,
which Nero worshipped, never produced a lyre after the pattern of that
on which the unfortunate Emperor
was depicted as playing.
I don't suppose that it makes much
difference, because there is not one
man in a hundred who would "spot"
discrepancies such as these; and it is
certainly not the fault of the local
companies, because they take what is
sent; and most of it is very good stuff
indeed. But one is inclined to wonder
why the original company, the company who takes the pictures, is not
a little more careful as to detail.
Poor old Nero! I have always felt
rather sorry for him, as having been
held up to countless generations as
the epitome of everything bad. He
really had hard luck. He had an
abominable mother in the shape of
Aggripina, who fully deserved murdering, though I must confess that it
was in rather bad taste of her son to
take the job on. Rome was much
better burnt than otherwise, and it
was a great stroke of policy to put the
blame on the Christians who were
not "much class" just then. (Of
course this is heretical). Personally,
I have always rather admired Nero
with exception to his attitude of suicide, when it came down to cases, and
then he seemed a wee bit cowardly.
But it is a funny thing that, seeing
how Nero has always been abused, so
many people call their favourite dog
by his name.
I have seen a lot in the daily papprs
with regard to the desecration of Beacon Hill Park. I regret that I have
been too busy to go and spend ' an
hour or so up there, as I consider
that is just the. sort of thing for whicli
I am employed. But I shall ;riiost
certainly do it, and if I do happen
to' come across anything reprehensible, I'll "get 'em; you betcher life,"
to use the euphonious language of the
country.
We have heard a great deal about
the paving of the City sidewalks and
I havc said that in my opinion, though
there is is still a great deal to do, a
good work has been done. But I do
think that more attention should be
paid to lighting. The other night,
somewhere about midnight, I was on
my way home; just as I reached the
junction of Fort and Douglas the arc
light went out; at least it didn't exactly go out, but it went "buzzy." That
is thc best description I can givfr;
you probably have all seen an arc
light do the same. There is no real
reason for it. Why should it happen?
That's another thing I want to know.
I'm here to know things, but I have
always found that when I ask these
pertinent questions, nobody ever gets
up and answers them. Perhaps they
don't know now! P'raps so; p'raps
not.
Well, anyhow, wc don't want to do
any "kicking" at this season of the
year. It doesn't suit my disposition
any more than it does yours. So
just once more, and to show that I
mean it, I will say "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year" to all
readers of The Week, and to those
unfortunates who don't know good literature when it is put in front of
their noses, and therefore don't take
the paper, from LOUNGER. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1909
11
CHRISTMAS A LA MODE
(Continued from Page 8)
Jhim stop, please, and I will find an-
Isettled."
Mother put out her hand and let
I it rest lightly on Father's arm.
"Will,"   she   cried,   "please   don't
j make me feel worse than I already
Wo.  I was forced in your cab, by acci-
I dent it is true, but, nevertheless, I did
allow you to help me enter it.   But
that   was   because—people    were—
watching us—and I thought—it best.
Now that we are out of the tangle,
I must thank you and ask you to set
pe down—at once!   Else I shall never
forgive you."
"You have already promised me
that," said Father, with a queer,
strange  laugh.
And they continued to talk, and the
hansom continued on its way, and nobody but myself noticed that we had
igot well up-town and were within two
blocks of the apartment-building in
Central Park West, where Mother and
^1 live.
So, quite unobserved, I spoke up the
tube to the cabby, and said:
"The Strathmore, and quickly,
'please!"
We turned down a cross street into
another, and before one could say
"Jack Robinson" we had stopped at
the door of the Strathmore.
"Oh!" cried Mother.
"What is this?" frowned Father.
But he leaped out on the snow-
covered pavement and gave Mother
his hand. A moment later we all hurried up the steps and—stopped in the
lobby!
"Thank you," said Mother. "You
are very kind."
Father laughed. "Oh, not at all," he
told her. "This is not a case of being
kind—exactly."
Mother stroked the fur of her pretty sable muff, but Father showed no
inclination to go. People whom we
knew came down in the elevator and
nodded to Mother and me as they
went out, and Mother moved uncomfortably, but still Father stayed.
Then, "Won't you come in—for a
little—a cup of tea, perhaps?" asked
Mother, slowly.
I don't know what Father would
have answered, so I took no chances.
I threw my arms around his neck and
whispered that he must—I wanted to
show him where the Majolica jars
were to go.
"Do come!" I cried, and looked at
Mother to further second my invitation.
"Yes, do," she said, without raising
her eyes.
"Thanks, I will!" cried Father, and
we all went up in the elevator together.
When wc were safely in Mother's
pretty sitting-room and I had securely
locked the door, I slipped away and
left them together. Somehow it seemed as if they would get along better
without me just then,' and, besides, I
think I had helped a lot as it was for
a mere little girl, don't you?
An hour later—it seemed hours and
hours later, although it really wasn't,
of course—I went back and found
Mother in Father's arms. "Never
again,"I heard her say, and right away
I knew what that meant.
"Oh, won't we have a bully Christmas?" I cried joyfully. "Father and
Mother and I—what a lovely, lovely
time we'll have together!"
"You can wager anything you own
that wc will," laughed Father. Whv
it will be a regular Christmas a la
Mode, eh, Nell?"
And then he kissed Mother, and
Mother hid her happy face on his
broad shoulder, and I was oh, so
happy!
Merry Christmas, indeed!
What Axe the Trumps of Life?
(By Alfred B. Mackay)
"What are the trumps of life?
"Hearts," said the maiden fair;
"Por sweetheart,  maid,  or wife,
Love Is beyond compare."
"No," said the heartless flirt,
"Diamonds the trumps shall be;
Hearts are as cheap as dirt;
Give wealth and power to me."
•'No,"   said the man  blase,
"Clubs are the trumps we want;
Such gauds for the young and gay,
But Clubs for the bon vivant."
Then the gravedigger said:
"Vanities soon are past;
The earth shall be your bed,
And Spades must win at last!"
The Farm-Wife
(By Beginald Wright Kauftman)
Where ends the road across the hill?
I do not know—I do not know;
But all day long and all the night
I long to go—I long to go!
It runs so straight beneath the sun,
So white beneath the moon;
lt call.-i me from my work and dreams,
And I must answer—soon.
I bolt my door, I do my tasks,
I kiss  my goodman's cheek—
Yet I cannot hear my baby's laugh
For what the Road would speak.
Where ends the road?   I only know
Here, from the pasture-bars,
It ls familiar to the sun
And mistress to the stars.
178
NOTICE
FBOVXHCXAX LEGISLATIVE
ASSEMBLY
FSIVATE BILLS
Copies of Bills, Petitions, and notices
as published must be deposited with,
and all fees paid to, the Clerk of the
House, not later than 12th January,
1910.
Petitions for Bills will not be received by the House after 31st January,
1910.
Bills must be presented to the House
not  later  than  10th  February,  1910.
Reports from  Standing Committee on
Bills will not be received by the Houso
after 17th February,  1910.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk, Legislative Assembly.
Victoria, lst November, 1909.
nov 20
182
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVIN-
VINCIAL  COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 550.
This is to certify that "Dodwell and
Company, Limited," is authorised and
licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends, except the
construction  and  working  of  railways.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of London, England.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is two hundred thousand
pounds, divided into eight thousand
shares of twenty-five pounds each.
The head ofllce of the Compuny in
this Province ls situate at Victoria, and
Norman Hardie, Merchant, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Given   under   my   hand   and   Seal   of
Offlce  at  Victoria,   Province of British
Columbia,  this tenth day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Coompanies.
The objects for which this Company
has been  established  and  licensed are:
To acquire and take over as a going
concern and to carry on the businesses
now carried on by George Benjamin
Dodwell and Arthur John Hepburn
Carlill, In the Colony of Hong Kong, at
Shanghai and Hankow, in the Empire of
China; at Kobe and Yokohama, in the
Empire of Japan; at Tacoma, in the
State of Washington, and at Portland,
in the State of Oregon, in the United
States of America; at Victoria, in the
Province of British Columbia. In the
Dominion of Canada; and at Dock
House, Billlter Street, in the City of
London, under the style or firm of
"Dodwell, Carlill and Company," either
with or without all or any of the real
and personal property and assets of the
proprietors of that business used in
connection therewith or belonging thereto—and either subject or not subject
to the liabilities of the said firm or
any of them and with a view thereto
to adopt and carry into effect (either
witli or without modifications) an
Agreement dated the 30th day of August. 1898, and made between the said
George Benjamin Dodwell and Arthur
John Hepburn Carlill of the one part,
and Philip Charles Emll Dennys (a
Trustee for the above named company)
of the other part.
To carry on, develop, and continue
as Joint Stock Company, Limited, and
as a going concern the businesses referred to ln the said Agreement, and
such other businesses in connection
with the above-mentioned businesses as
are customarily or usually carried on
In connection therewith or are naturally
incident to such businesses.
To carry on the businesses of merchants, exporters, and importers, shipowners, carriers, agents brokers, storekeepers, and contractors, and the business of marine insurance in all its
brandies, and in particular without prejudice to tlie generality of the foregoing words to make or effect insurances
on ships, vessels, boats and craft of all
kinds, and on goods, merchandise, live
or dead stock, luggage, effects, specie,
bullion, or other property, respondentia
and bottomry, interests, commission^,
profits and freights, and to carry on
all kinds of transit, insurance business,
and generally every kind of insurance
and re-Insurance business, except the
Issuing of Policies of Assurance upon
human life.
To carry on any other business which
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on In connection with the above, or calculated directly or Indirectly to enhance the value
of or render more profitable any of the
company's property.
To buy, sell, manufacture, and deal In
goods, wares, and merchandise of every
description.
To purchase or by other means acquire any freehold, leasehold or other
property for any estate or Interest whatever, and any rights, privileges or easements over or In respect of any pn,
perty, and any buildings, factories,,
mills, works, wharves, roads, railways,
tramways, machinery, engines, rolling
stock, plant, live and dead stock, ships,
or shares In ships, barges, or things,
and any real or personal property or
rights whatsoever and wheresoever situ-
nte, which may be necessary for or may
be conveniently used with or may enhance the value of any other property
of the company.
To purchase or by other means acquire
and protect, prolong and renew, whether
In the United Kingdom or elsewhere,
nny patents, patent rights, brevets d'ln-
vention, licenses, protections, concessions, trade secrets, and secret processes which may appear likely to be
advantageous or useful to the company,
and to use and turn to account ano
to manufacture under or grant licenses
or privileges in respect of the same,
and to expend money In experimenting
upon, testing and in improving or seek
ing to Improve any patents, inventions,
or rights which the Company may acquire or propose to acquire.
To build, construct, maintain, alter,
enlarge, pull down and remove or replace any buildings, factories, mills,
offices, warehouses, works, WTiarves,
roads, railways, hydraulic or electric
works, or any other works for applying,
transmitting, or supplying energy In
any form, machinery, engines, walls,
fences, banks, dams, sluices, or watercourses, and to clear sites for the same
and to work, manage and control the
same.
To acquire and undertake the whole
or any part of the business, goodwill,
and assets of any person, firm or company carrying on or proposing to carry
on any of the businesses which this
company is authorized to carry on, and
as part of the consideration for such
acquisition to undertake all or any of
the liabilities of such person, firm or
company, or to acquire an Interest in
amalgamate with or enter into any arrangement for sharing profits or ror
co-operation or for limiting competition or for mutual assistance with any
such person, firm or company, and to
give or accept by way of consideration
for any of the acts or things aforesaid,
or property acquired, any shares, debentures or securities that may be
agreed upon and to hold and retain or
sell, mortgage, and deal with any shares,
debentures or securities so received.
To promote any other company for
the purpose of acquiring all or any of
the property and undertaking any of
the liabilities of this company, or oi
undertaking any business or operations
which may appear likely to assist ui
benefit this company or to enhance tne
value of any property or business of
this company.
To search for, get, win, work, raise,
make marketable and use, sell and dispose of coal, oil, iron, clay, precious
and other metals, minerals and other
substances or products on, within or under any property of the company, and
to grant prospecting and mining and
other licenses, rights or privileges for
such purposes.
To sell or otherwise dispose of the
whole or any part of the undertaking
of the company either together or in
portions for such consideration as the
company may think fit, and in particular for shares, debentures or securities
of any company purchasing the  same.
To invest and deal with the moneys
of the company not immediately required upon such securities and In such
manner as may from time to time be
determined.
To lend and advance money or give
credit to such persons and on sucn
terms as may seem expedient, and in
particular to customers and others having dealings with the company, and to
give guarantees or become security for
any such persons.
To borrow or raise money in such
manner as the Company shall think fit,
and in particular by the Issue of debentures or debenture stock, perpetual or
otherwise, and to secure the repayment
of any money borrowed or raised by
mortgage, charge, or lien upon the whole
or any part of the company's property
or assets, whether present or future,
Including Its uncalled capital, and also
by a similar mortgage, charge or lien
to secure and guarantee the performance by the company of any obligation
or  liability  it  may undertake.
To draw, make, accept, endorse, discount, execute and Issue promissory
notes, bills of exchange, bills of ladins,
warrants, debentures find other negotiable or transferable Instruments.
To apply for, promote and obtain any
Act of Parliament, Provisional Order,
or license of the Board of Trade, or
other authority for enabling the company to carry any of Its objects Into
effect, or for effecting any modification
of the company's constitution, or for
any other purpose which may seem expedient, and to oppose any proceedings
or applications which may seem calculated directly or indirectly to prejudice
the company's interests.
To Improve, manage, cultivate, develop, exchange, let on lease, or otherwise
mortgage, sell, dispose of, turn to account, grant rights, and privileges in
respect of or otherwise deal with all
or any part of the property and rights
of the eompany.
To enter into any arrangements with
any Governments or authorities, supreme, municipal, local or otherwise, oi
any corporations, companies, or persons
tliat may seem conducive to the company's objects, or any of them, and to
ority, corporation, company or person,
any charters, contracts, decrees, rights,
privileges, and concessions which the
company may think desirable, and to
carry out, exercise, and comply with
any such charters, contracts, decrees,
lights, privileges and concessions.
To subscribe for, take, purchase or
otherwise acquire and hold shares or
other interest in or securities of an,
other company.
To act as agents or brokers and as
trustee for any person, firm or company,
and to undertake and perform sub-contracts, and also to act in any of the
businesses of the company through or
by means of agents, brokers, sub-contractors or others.
To remunerate any person, firm or
company rendering services to this company, whether by cash payment or ny
the allotment to him or them of shares
or securities of the company, credited
as paid up in full or in part or otherwise.
To pay all or any expenses incurred
in connection with the formation, promotion and Incorporation of the company.
To support and subscribe to any
charitable or public object and any
Institution, society, or club, which may
be for the benefit of the company or its
employees, or may be connected with
any town or place where the company
carries on business; and to give pensions, gratuities, or charitable aid to
any person or persons who may have
served the company, or to the wives,
children or other relatives of such persons, and to form and contribute to
provident and benefit funds for the
benefit of any persons employed by the
company.
To distribute among the Members of
the Company ln kind any property of
the Company, and in particular any
shares, debentures or securities of other
companies belonging to this company,
or of which this company may have
the power of disposing, but so that no
distribution amounting to a reduction of
capital be made, except with the sanction (If any) for the time being required by law.
To procure the company to be registered or recognized in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or In
any Colony or Dependency, and in any
foreign country or place.
To do all or any of the above mentioned things In any part of the workl,
and as principals, agents, contractors,
trustees, or otherwise, and either alone
or In conjunction  with others.
To do all such other things as may be
deemed Incidental or conducive to the
attainment of the nbove objects, or any
of them.
FOT7* FEB OEWT. OV
DEPOSIT.
We pay four per erat. interest
on dtpoiiti of fl (on* dollar)
and np, withdrawable _7 ch__a._
Spocial attention given to de-
potiti made by uaiL
Paid np Capital over 91,000,000
Anoti over   -      -      3,000,000
B. O. FEBKABEBT LOAB OO,
1310  Government Street,
▼lotorla, B.O.
Xmas Gift
For Mother
One of the sweetest and most
graceful   of   gifts   is   Perfume.
An unrivalled stock here. Priced
right for purchasers.   Come in
and try them.    See our fine
Cologne at 6oc, $i up
Lavender Water at soc,
7SC, $1.50 up
"Lorna," a  delightful  perfume,
made    from    Devonshire    wild
flowers, is one we can well recommend.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
k*:«^:-»:*©k«*k*:-^:-:*k*k*:-:*k*
%
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
Tho Army
ISSL Richardson!
I Phone 346 S
I 1
♦WiiWmWmWhWhWmVWmWmWhW-m'h'h'IiJ
J The Working f
Man Comes
Here
because he gets a good
square meal
20c.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Rooms, 35c and up.
Telephone 841.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
•\ Milne Block, 568 Johnson St. |
VICTORIA, B.C.
:«««{»:»m:»»{t-?!»s»»aa»»R«»s»:
The
Victor
Victrola
Is the most perfect of all disc
machines on the market today. There is no scratch with
this instrument, as the record
and reproducer are out of
sight and hearing.
M.W. WAITT
& CO. UNITED
The House of Highest Quality
HERBERT KENT, Manager
WING ON
Employment Agent
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone   _
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
WE S0UCIT
A TRIAL
if In order to convince you that
§ we are prompt, careful and
g   moderate in our charges.
i
i
The Pacific
Transfer
Co.
if   NO. 4, FORT ST., VICTORIA.
i
I A. E. KENT, Proprietor
V
_
in —
it
§      Leave your checks with us.
Pkoit W.
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co.
1218 Langley St.  -  Victoria,'B.C.
I SEE BOLDEN
§     THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
§
it
1 Fort Street "miwttT' i ■
12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 35, 1909
WAGE SLAVES
these—every mother's son of them, locked in
bonded servitude, just the same as the negroes
of the South in the ante-bellum days. See the
gaunt, hungry, haunted look depicted on their
faces ? Incessant toil, day in and day out the
same old thing, and at the end of the year wind
up with nothing but a job.
Don't be like this pathetic trio! Strike out
for yourself — one good investment in California
oil shares is worth a lifetime of labor.
There is money to be made in California oil!
You must admit this! It is the biggest industry
in the State, and growing every minute.
This corporation owns One Hundred Acres
of absolutely proven oil land — Forty Acres in
Coalinga, California, and Sixty Acres in Midway,
California.    These are the world's biggest fields.
All about us are big producing wells. We
are at work on our Midway holdings, and we
should be in oil by April. When we get oil, this
stock, now at Twenty-five Cents per Share,
should be worth One Dollar, maybe Five Dollars.
There is only a limited block for sale at this
figure.
The company is incorporated under the laws
of British Columbia, and is officered by men of
repute and integrity—so you may be assured of
a square deal.
Whenever you put your money in the ground
—for oil, gold, copper, zinc or whatnot — it is a
gamble, pure and simple. But this is the best
gamble you ever saw in your life, and the returns
should be big enough to satisfy everybody.
This advertisement will not appear for long
We have already about all the capital we
require. When you see this advertisement next
week you might find shares have gone to Fifty'
Cents, perhaps One Dollar. You can buy them
now for Twenty-five Cents.
Open till 9.00 o'clock evenings.    Send for
prospectus.   This price won't be quoted long.
TERMS—Half cash, remainder thirty and
sixty days.
OFFICERS—President, FRANK TUHTEN, President Royal Loan & Trust Co., Vancouver, B.C.;
Vice-President, ANDREW GRAY, Marine Iron
Works, Victoria; Secretary and Treasurer,
HUGH E. SPRINGER, Real Estate, Vancouver.
DIRECTORS - GEORGE E. MACDONALD, Mac-
donald-Marpole Co., Ltd., Vancouver; THOMAS
ARNOT KER, Brackman-Ker Milling Co., Victoria; JOHN N. REDMOND, Real Estate and
Loans, Vancouver; CHARLES A. LEE, Attor-
ney-at-Law, San Francisco.
FIELD MANAGER—H. H. BLOOD, Coalinga and
Midway.
Watch Us Grow Dividends
Fill out this application today;  tomorrow may bc too late.
Royal Loan & Trust Co., Uniited,
Fiscal Agents, 6SS View Street, Victoria, B.C.
Enclosed please find $ as payment for	
Shares of stock in the Canadian Pacific Oil Co. of British Columbia,
Limited, at 25c per share, fully paid and non-assessable.
Name  	
Address W-WIMKKKHKINHHKKIKIKIMHNRNKKKk
The Canadian Pacific Oil Company of B. C, Limited
ROYAL LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY, LTD., Fiscal Agents
638 VIEW STREET, VICTORIA, B.C. nrvii ooo e_rs_ oTrrrrerjTnnnrTn
£   Let us show you the new 3
F    Pocket Edition
Gillette Safety Razor
TERRY CASH CHEMIST   i
p [S.E. comer Fort an J Douglas 3
The Week
,. 21 British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
rmnnrmnnr _ a a»*wenr*JV5tnr|?
HALL & WALKER
jj Agents
E WEL^tNGTON   COLLIERY
j° COMPANY'S  COAL
£  1232 Government St. Telephone 83
Saj> g 9,«mt.-?»»m>» a a a a»a a mutt
Vol. VI.   No
777
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
One Dollar Per Annum
SMITH'S HILL RESERVOIR
Unfortunately Smith's Hill Reservoir
is one of the legacies which the Old Year
has bequeathed to the New, and which will
not "down." Until the responsibility for
this "fiasco" is landed on somebody's
shoulders, The Week will be reluctantly
compelled to keep the more salient features
of the case before the public. Once in a
while, in a moment of generous impulse,
the Water Commissioner promised to issue
periodical bulletins on the progress of the
disease, and more particularly on the
heighth of the water in the reservoir, and
the amount of leakage. Like an historic
personage of very ancient date he repented himself of his promise, and no
bulletins have been issued. The Week,
however, continues to make investigations
on its own account, and is able to report
that there has been no appreciable addition to the depth of water in the reservoir
during the last fortnight; it still stands at
about six feet, and leaks like, a sieve.
Turning to one or two matters of construction, which have not been brought
'to the front by any of the critics of W. L.
Adams' chef d'oeuvre, The Week wishes
# state that by no means can the engineer
from San Francisco be acquitted of blame
•for the present condition of the reservoir.
Under the most favourable circumstances
for lum he would at least havc to share
that blame with someone else, because he
selected his own superintendent, and any
professional man who is allowed that' privilege must assume responsibility for wi
follows. Now for once, to put the ca.
before the horse, it may be remarked that
the workmanship was bad, even if the
specification had been all light. It was
bad in two respects: first, in that the mixing of the concrete was not properly done;
and second, in that the method adopted of
putting the concrete into position after it
had been mixed was of the faultiest kind.
The mixing was due to carelessness or indifference on the part of the workmen, who
either were not adequately supervised, or
who intentionally disobeyed orders. Be
that as it may, it is a well known fact
that the mixing Avas not properly done',
and that therefore the mixture was not
suitable for the purpose for which it was
intended. It was on discovering this, and
failing to get his remedy that Mr. Icke
resigned. As to the putting of the concrete into the walls, the system adopted
could not have been worse. A wooden
apron was constructed and placed the full
height of the sloping walls of the reservoir,
nearly thirty feet. The distance between
this wooden apron and the rubble wall
within, was supposed to be eight inches,
but owing to the unevenness of the wall it
would not b' half that distance i many
places. The concrete was then poured into
the space between the apron and the wall,
in the expectation that it would flow to the
bottom. To assist it long poles were used,
and with these the workmen prodded the
material. It does riot take an expert engineer to premise what the condition of a
concrete wall would be under these circumstances. When the apron was removed its
condition was apparent, for it was found
that in each section there were holes into
which the fingers could easily be thrust,
and in each case the gravel in the concrete,
being the heavier portion, had developed a
tendency to sink to the bottom, thus destroying the homogeneity of the concrete,
and rendering it extremely permeable to
water. From this it will be seen that
there was really nothing to prevent leakage
but the smear of rich concrete whicli was
ultimately placed on the inside of the
walls. Many people knew of this at the
time, and the engineer who resigned was
not the only one who spoke of it. It is all
very well for the City Council to screen
itself behind W. L. Adams; no doubt he
is responsible and it is an easy way out
of the difficulty for them to say: "Having
engaged him to supervise the work, we left
it to him." The argument, however,
smacks more of sophistry than logic, because no man would keep his mouth closed
if he saw his own house being built in this
manner, even though he was paying an
architect to supervise the work. It yet remains to be explained why the Mayor did
not acquaint the Council and the public
with conditions whicli were sufficiently explained by Mr. Icke at the time he resigned. Now a word as to the specification : Any engineer knows that concrete
in which cement forms one-ninth, or one-
tenth, is for practical purposes not concrete at all. No engineer who understood
his work would dream of specifying less
than one-fifth. W. L. Adams specified
one of cement to three of sand, and five of
gravel. This is one-ninth, and therefore
it is clear that AV. L. Adams authorized a
defective specification, which in any event
could not have resulted in satisfactory
work. Up to date he has evinced no disposition to come to Victoria and consult
with the Council, or any persons whom
they might appoint. ro one wishes to be
unfair to W.-L. A-dai 1, and if his defec-
t; _ pecification has ">'* dn rendered .^re
■' , ive by in'!er\;}_j'*.wt)i'k*Hiansk,i.',; he
Ot to make the fact clear, in order that
the _ . ponsibility may at least be shared.
In that spirit of fairness which should
prevail at all times, but which is j >rliap.
peculiarly apposite at the present season,
The Week suggests that Mr. Adams be invited to come'to Victoria to examine the
reservoir, to consider the complaints -which
have been made and to let the costs follow
the verdict. Meanwhile The AVeek also
suggests that whether Mr. Adams comes or
not, an independent engineer should be engaged to examine and report, and in this
connection would respectfully remind the
Mayor and Council that there are several
engineers jn the City of the highest professional status, and one Mr. Mohun, who
is acknowledged to be one of the highest
authorities on hydraulics in the Dominion.
No doubt the consent of the Government
could be obtained for Mr. Mohun's undertaking an inspection and report. Meanwhile The AVeek can only express its extreme regret that tlio Mayor could not see
his way to claim tlie $100 which it offered
conditionally as a Christmas present to
two of the most deserving charities in the
Province. Unfortunately his failure to accept the challenge is only open to one interpretation.
THE MAYORAi v ONTEST
The date of the Municipal elections is
within hailing distance. As time goes on
the qualifications of Mr. AA7. E. Oliver for
the position become more apparent. The
Colonist has stated that he is the only candidate who has shown a grasp of the situation, and that in itself must be regarded
as an important recommendation. Victoria has reached a crisis in its municipal
history, and needs a man at the helm who
is capable of grasping the situation.   Re
cent Councils have muddled along without
a head, but A^ictoria is awake and things
are moving, and "muddling" must be a
thing of the past. There are three important matters demanding skilful handling, which must be dealt with during the
coming year: the AVater Question, the
Streets and the Assessment Roll. The
ratepayers are not ready to :vote on any
definite water scheme, simply because the
Mayor and Council have failed to take
advantage of. the repeated suggestion of
the Press to collect and publish reliable
data on all the suggested schemes. The
ignorance of the public on the general details is hardly less profound than that of
the Council, and the proposal to rush the
Sooke By-law to a vote at the next Municipal election is little short of ridiculous.
The Mayor apparently lacks the capacity
to state a case for the ratepayers, and
until we have a Mayor who is able to do
this it is idle to expect a favourable vote.
The candidate who says that Elk Lake will
suffice until Sooke Lake can be got ready
demonstrates his utter incapacity for the
office which he seeks. The only intelligent
proposal is that of Mr. Oliver. Hi's argument is unanswerable; he points out that
not only Victoria but the southern part of
Saanich peninsula is interested in any
water scheme which the Capital City may
bring forward, and that the only practical
and economic method of dealing with tho
question is on the broad basis of working
. out a scheme which will supply all municipalities, rather than one which will make
one municipality dependent upon another.
The details of this -proposal are yet'Jto*. be
worked out, but it is the only soifri'dpro-
*, :• position which has been advanced, and-
Mr. Oliver possesses the ability to work,jt
out. As to tho streets, the subject is sickening.   Every candidate, Mayoral and Al-
'•dernfaiiic, will promise reform in the street
work, but the point is that Aldermen Henderson and Turner have filled the position
of Chairman of the Streets Committee,
and Victorians know the result; enough-
said. With reference to the Assessment
Roll enough has not been said. The Victoria ratal is one of the highest in the
Dominion. The AATeek maintains that this
is due to low assessment and to unequal
assessment. For this it does,not ■ blame
Mr. Northcote, whose reputation is of the
highest, ancl who has rendered the City
invaluable service for many years. But
anyone who compares our Assessment Roll
with that of other cities, and anyone who
compares the assessments of various properties within this city, must realize that
drastic changes arc necessary, and that if
the Council could be induced to launch
out into an enlightened policy such as has
been adopted by other Canadian cities, and
have a re-assessment by outside experts,
the result would be to equalize taxation
and to reduce tlio rate very considerably.
This suggestion is uot offered by way of
criticism upon the present methods, but
as a suggestion in keeping with tho growth
of the city, and tlie requirements of the
times. There is little expectation that
such a policy would (be ndorsed by any
of the Mayoral cand' ites except Mr. ■
Oliver, and he is not a .111 pledge himself upon the question, but he is a man
who may be safely trusted to look at^the,
finances in an intelligent and enlightened
^manner, and some such consideration is
urgently needed, for there is a perennial
cry of lack of funds for nearly every important purpose. Sizing up the situation
Tlie AAreek believes that no man who has
L'.en a member of the retrogressive Coun
cils of the last few years is competent to
direct the affairs of the City. It therefore
urges the claims of Mr. Oliver, who has
been making a conspicuous success in the
neighbouring municipality while his competitors have been scoring a failure in
Victoria.
THE ISOLATION HOSPITAL
Nothing more conclusively demonstrates the incapacity, of the present Council than its action in the matter of the
Isolation Hospital. This hospital i's a
municipal institution, under the direction
of the Health Committee, and under the
control of the City Council. City By-la,w
344, Sub-section 25, defines the status of
the Health Officer with respect to the
Isolation Hospital, as the one person having a right to engage and discharge nurses
and other officials. On December 20th
Dr. Robertson.wrote a letter to the Council asking that.Mrs. King, the matron,
should be dismissed. He specified the
ground of his application, which was that
on November 7th the matron telephoned
to the mother of a child which had died
in the hospital on July 13th of malignant
diphtheria, stating that the child had during its illness been ill-treated by its nurse.
Dr. Robertson c'oh^idered that whether the
statement of the matron was true or false,
she was to blame for making it four
months after the death of the child. If
true it should have been made at the time
so that it could have been tested; if false
it should never have been made at all. In
this conclusion the public is likely to concur. No doubt Dr. Robertson could, under the By-law, and possibly should, have
dismissed the matron on his own responsibility, without referring the matter to
the Council, but those who use that argument are not personally acquainted with
Mrs. King. The action of Dr. Robertson
in demanding her resignation is a serious
one, and it is inconceivable that a gentleman of his high character and professional standing would have adopted such
a course except upon the strongest grounds.
'Clearly there can be no division of authority in such a matter. The Medical
Officer in charge must be supreme, or there
is an end to all discipline, and the hospital
might as well close its doors. But none of
these things trouble the City Council, and
its own officer is placed in the humiliating
position of having his request ignored in
a matter which directly concerns the
public interest and the public health.
THE BRITISH ELECTIONS
As time wears on it becomes more apparent that the real issue of the present
campaign is neither the Lords nor the
Budget, but Free Trade v. Tariff Reform.
The Week always maintained tliat the
fight would bc waged round this standard,
and now that a definite pronouncement
has been made as to tlie extent of Protection; proposed the matter has been reduced
to simple ternis. At the time of writing
it looks as if the Tariff Reformers are
gaining ground eveiy day, and that the
Unionists will have 1. decisive majority
over straight Liberals. It is by no means
so certain that they will have a majority
over Liberals, Laborites and Nationalists
combined. Tliere is this, however, to be
borne in mind, that the Lords would not
In? likely to count the Nationalist vote in
favour oij the Budget; they might fairly
argue tliat it was a simple Home Rule vote,
in which case if they had a majority over
the Government candidates, they would
probably claim tliat the country had ruled
against the Lloyd-Gcogro Budget.
V.*' THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
At The Street   ^
Corner \
By THB LOUNGER
"Hallo!—Yes.—Speaking.—Who   is
it? WHO,   do  you   say? What
express company? Oh the Satanic;
well, no; I don't think I shall be
able to help you out on your sidewalks again this year.—What's that?
 Call round a little later?    Well,
you can do so if you like, but I assure you that it will be a waste of
time. Said the    same   thing   last
year, did I? Ah well, that was different. Say, wait a minute, it might
be as well for you to send round a
small boy with a barrow, or one of
those little hand-carts, just in case,
you know. Just as well to be on
the safe side, but there won't be any
need for a team or anything of that
sort. Coming   round   on   Monday
morning, did you say? Oh, that's
absurd, just send that boy round
about the end of the month, and even
then I shan't have enough paving material to fill the bottom of his barrow.
 Thanks.   Well, so-long."
Yes, once more we have come
round to the time when road-makers
down below "get busy," and though
they depend entirely for their material on the offerings of humanity, I
have never heard that there has been
a shortage yet. There are those who
scoff at New Year resolutions, and
sneeringly ask what good there is in
making them, when they are sure to
be broken within the week. But if
there is truth in what the poet sings
regarding love, surely,
"It is better to have made resolves
Than never have resolved at all."
Let us grant that good resolution
•is not always, nay, is seldom followed
by good action; nevertheless, it must
be admitted that good action is in the
majority of cases preceded by good
resolution. There can't be any harm
in making good resolutions; so let's
make them, and incidentally so try
to fulfil them, that when the expressman above mentioned comes round,
we can give him the cheerful ha-ha,
and tell him to go to h—1.
But this little disquisition on the
moral aspect of the case, and I find
that as I grow older, I am becoming
more and more inclined to moralise,
must not prevent me from greeting
my readers with a friendly wish that
they may all have a happy and prosperous New Year. It seems indisputable that 1910 is to bring about
unparalleled development to the cities
of the Coast and also to Vancouver
Island. Victoria, herself, has done
more than just turn round in bed;
she has actually progressed to the
stretching and yawning stage, and the
close of the year which is ushered
in today, will see her out of bed, and
in a fair way to complete that toilette,
which when finished, will make her
one of the proudest, as she is now
the fairest, of the cities of Canada.
But there is a lot to be done yet,
and that brings me to a state of affairs which was called to my attention lately over the telephone. The
Friendly Aid Society, which has done
such a good and noble work in Victoria, has the misfortune to have its
offices opening out of the market.
Probably more than fifty per ecnt of
the people now residing in Victoria
are unaware that we have a market,
and I don't blame them. No one
could possibly recognise it under existing circumstances; they might bc
pardoned for supposing that they had
wandered by mistake into a junk
shop, or thc deserted barn of a bankrupt hardware firm. The floor is
worn into unsightly and dangerous
holes and is filthy with manure; heaped out against the sides of the buildings arc masses of pipe-jointing and
rolls of wire, scattered vaguely
around are out-of-date fire engines,
and several ancient-looking water
wagons. Through this heterogeneous mass, or rather mess, the ladies
"Hope will Brighten Days to Come
And Memory Gild the Past.".
We wish all our
Friends and Matrons
A Happy and
Prosperous oHpto Year
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets
Victoria, B.C.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple; pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Good Skates
Good Instructors
SKATING
Assembly Rink, Fort St.
Morning  10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening  7.4s to 10.00
Good Music Good Time
who attend the Friendly Aid Society's
meeting have to plough their way.
From their point of view the inaction
of the City is discourteous and ungrateful; from the point of view of
the average citizen it is unsanitary
and wasteful. Victoria is not too
well provided with public halls and
such like. The Old Market is surrounded by an excellent gallery, and
roofed with glass. If cleansed and
put into repair it would make an admirable ball-room, and could doubtless be leased for many other social
and public functions. If anyone
doubts the accuracy of my statements, and would like to see for himself, I will give him instruction as
to the best way of reaching this relic
of the past. The easiest way is to
walk straight through the waiting-
room of the V. & S. Railway.
* * *
I have received many replies with
respect to my little dollar competition
as to the best rendering of the Provincial motto in epigramatic form. I
print three of them below. The dollar goes to "A Carpet Knight." When
it is remembered that one of thc
glories of the Provincial Buildings is
the magnificent carpet on thc floor
of the House, into which is woven thc
Arms and Motto of the Province, the
witty and concise translation will be
appreciated.
"Splendor sine occasu."
I. "Warranted not to fade."
—A Carpet Knight. (Prize).
II. "O'er every clime from heat to thc
eternal  snows,
O'er every creed and colour, the
Sun of Empire glowi
In Splendour without setting.
III. "The real thing without lugs."
The second rendering is doubtless
very fine, but then it is too long, relates more to Empire than to Province, and lastly, and this is always a
bad fault, it uses the same word in
English as in Latin. I have forwarded the dollar to the winner, who
wishes to preserve his nom-de-plume.
Any Doubting Thomas can obtain his
name and address by applying to me
at this office. Personally I am rather
inclined to pat myself on the back
for the rendering which I evolved
after opening the competition. "The
light that will never fail" is rather
apt, ch, what?
*    *    *
I was not aware till the other day
that we had in Canada a living proof
of my pet theory of metempsychosis,
which being translated into the vulgar tongue, signifieth the transmigra*
tion of souls. I find that Mrs. Mala-
prop has come to life and is living
in our great Western country. Lest
I harm thc feelings of anyone whom
I know I will say to start with, that
I have never met thc lady, nor does
she live on the Coast, but thc following two stories were told me by an
ear-witness, who solemnly vouched
for their authenticity.
The good lady runs an hotel. Arrived there an American mater-fami-
lias suffering from a bad attack of
necrophobia. "Will it bc quite safe
for my children to drink milk at your
hotel?" she queried. "Certainly,
madam," vouchsafed thc hostess. "All
our milk before it is brought to table
is paralysed by the public anarchist."
Again on being questioned by a caller
as to thc health and progress of her
(Continued on Page 6)
Build Up a Reserve Now
Now, while your earning power is good, why not convert part of
it into a Cash Reserve that will, later on, yield a competence for
old age? You can easily do it by regularly depositing a part of your
income in
The Dominion Bank
One dollar and upwards opens an account, and with systematic
saving and Compound Interest, the fund will rapidly accumulate.
Begin today.
VICTORIA, B.C., BRANCH
Temporary Offices Broad and Fort Streets
C. E. THOMAS, Manager.
j B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y |
1016 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C. |
Ohas. Hayward, Pres. %
R. Hayward, Sec. H
m
F, Caselton, Manager 8
Oldest and most up-to-date ^
Undertaking Establishment %\
inB.O. §
Established 1867 '4
1
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404. $
cASMachine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street       -.-      -      -       Office Supplies
Christmas Cheer and New Year Gladness is
augmented by filling the cup of Friendship toith
"Buchanans %ED SEAL or HOUSE OF
COMNONS Scotch Whisky. Sold everywhere.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
Brilliant Light
FOR THE NEW YEAR
To do a good trade you need the best light possible. Victorians   are   realizing  this  rapidly  and  we  are  installing  many
TUNGSTEN   LAMPS
Best and most brilliant of all lights. Ring up 1609, when our
representative will be pleased to explain their merits and call upon
you at your convenience.
B. C. ELECTRIC RY. CO. Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets
May the happiest days of your past
Be the saddest days of your future.
A Happy cHew Year
To
Our Friends and
Customers
DIXI H. ROSS & co.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
Mr. Ross Turner, from Vancouver,
came over to Victoria to spend
Christmas with friends.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Saunders, from
Revelstoke, are guests in the city.
* *   *
Mr. B. Sweeney, from Vancouver,
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. E.
Pooley during the Christmas week.
* *   *
Mr. Thomas J. Dunn, of this city,
is visiting friends in Revelstoke.
Mr. and Mrs. Dundas and Mr. R.
G. Dundas from Shawnigan Lake,
are staying with friends in Victoria,
v   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. William T. Roper,
from  Cherry  Creek,  were  guests  in
the city for Christmas.
* *   *
Miss Florence Gillespie left last
Wednesday evening for an extended
trip to the Old Country.
Mr. C. Campbell, who has been
visiting in the city, returned during
the week to Alberni.
* *   *
Mr.  C.« B. Burns from Dawson is
registered at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Cambie and the Misses Cambie
from Vancouver spent Christmas in
the city as the guests of Mrs. R. G.
Tatlow.
* *   *
Miss G. MacKay spent Christmas
at South Pender Island as the guest
of Mrs. Spalding.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher and Mr. A.
Fletcher have returned to town after
spending the Christmas holidays in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Robert Wilmot has returned
to town after spending Christmas
with his parents in Vancouver.
* *   *
A very pretty wedding took place
recently between Miss Effie C. B.
. Croft, from Discovery Island, and
Mr. D. C. Hutchison of this city.
The ceremony was performed at St.
Paul's Church. The bride who looked
very charming was supported by her
sister, Miss Edith Croft, and the
groom's best man was Mr. William
Dixon. The young couple will spend
their honeymoon in Vancouver and
the Sound cities, and on their return
to Victoria they will take up their
residence on McPherson Avenue, Victoria West.
* *   *
Mr. W. H. Whittle, from the City
of Mexico, is a guest to the city.
* *   *
Mr. Walter Barton, from Winnipeg, and Mr. William Barton, from
Vancouver, spent Christmas with their
parents  in  this  city.
* *   *
On Christmas night the home of
the Hon. C. E. Pooley and Mrs. Pooley was the scene of a merry dance.
The rooms looked very pretty with
their Christmas decorations. A large
number of young people were present
and a very jolly evening was spent in
dancing and other Christmas amusements. Some of those present were:
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pooley, Captain Parry and officers of the Egeria,
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gore, Miss Monteith, Miss Lorna Eberts, Miss Mason, Mies Doris Mason, Miss Eberts,
Miss Irving, Mr. Bruce Irving, Mr.
R. G. Monteith, Mr. Young, Mr.
Barnes, Messrs. Gillespie, Mr. K. McCallum, Miss McCallum, Mr. Potts,
Mr. Lowry, Mr. M. Mason, Misses
Blackwood, Mr. Trewartha James,
Mr. John Arbuckle, Mr. Alders, Mr.
H. Davis, Mr. Muskett, Messrs.
Matthews, Miss MacDowell, Mr. Vil-
lies, Miss Bryden, Mr. Jephson, Miss
Combe, Mr. Gore-Langton, Mr. Colley, Miss Perry, Mr. George Johnston,
Captain MacDonald, Mr. Twigg, Mr.
Spalding, Mr. B. Sweeney, Miss
Bridgman, Mr. Foote, Mr. Barnes,
Miss Little, and others. Miss Thain's
orchestra played for the evening a
very fine selection of dance music.
* *   *
Miss Bowron, who has been staying with friends in Tacoma, is again
in town.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Angus McRae spent
Christmas with Mrs. Pudney of Nanaimo.
* *   *
Mr. Villier, from the Old Country,
spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs.
C. E. Pooley, Lampson Street.
* *   *
Miss Edith Davie is the guest of
Mrs. Burchell of Thetis Island.
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Roberts are visiting relatives in Seattle.
* *   *
Miss Pooley is visiting friends in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. E. Baynes Reed spent several
days of the week in Vancouver on
business.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. N. Shakespeare celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary last Wednesday, December 29th.
* *   *
Premier McBride is out of town on
business.
* *   *
Mr. Rothwell, from Duncans, was
a guest to the city for Christmas.
* *   *
Miss Bolton, from Vancouver, is
again in town, and is staying with her
parents at Esquimalt.
* *   *
Mr. Brakespear, from Duncans, was
a guest to the city during the week.
* *   *
A very pretty wedding of interest
to Victorians took place last Wednesday afternoon, at the Metropolitan
church at three o'clock, when the
Rev. T. E. Holling united in marriage
Mr. William Spencer and Miss Lillian T. Watts, both of this city. The
church was crowded with intimate
friends and relatives. The bride, who
looked very pretty in her wedding
gown of white satin trimmed with
real lace, entered the church on the
arm of her father, Mr. J. H. Watts.
Miss Vera Watts acted as maid of
honor and looked very pretty in a
white dress, with lace trimmings. The
bridesmaids were the Misses Sarah
and Ada Spencer, and wore very
handsome gowns of old mauve with
over dresses of white lace, their costumes being completed with large
black picture hats. The groom was
supported by his brother, Mr. David
Spencer, Jr., and the fololwing gentlemen acted as ushers: Mr. Herbert
Pendray, Mr. Geo. Crow, Mr. Bishop,
Mr. J. D. S. Spencer, M. B. MacLeod,
and Mr. J. Potts. After the wedding
ceremony was performed the party
drove to the home of the bride's parents, Pemberton Road, where a large
reception was held. The groom's
gift to the bride was a ruby scarf pin,
to the bridesmaids amethyst brooches
set with pearls. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer left in the evening on the Princess Charlotte for the Mainland on
their honeymoon tour. They intend
to return in about six months and
will then take up their residence on
Rockland Avenue.
BONO
If you had thought a heart
Was worth  the  keeping,
When passion could impart
More than the heart's quick leaping!
If you had taken pains
To   guard   love's   treasure,
When lqye forewent refrains
Of dalliance and leisure!
Had  you but done  these things,
Love  would  have   grown   new  wings
For  happy,  wider flight
And deeper-felt dcUgM!
—William   Stnithers.
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week Jan. 3
ANOTHER BIG SHOW
Z
h
a
r
d
n
a
CLASSIC DANSEUSE, IN HER
BEAUTIFUL   SPECTACULAR CREATION
SIX OTHER FEATURES
UP=TO=DATE BILL
WEEK JANUARY 3
The New Grand
Telephone 618
SULLIVAN _ CONSIDINE,    Preprlaton.
Management of HOST. JAMIESON.
AL. FREMONT & CO.
In Chas. W. Doty's Comedy
Drama
"The Way of the West"
EMERALD and DUPREE
London Music Hall Stars in
"A Hot Scotch"
COLUMBIA   COMEDY   FOUR
Dealers in Harmony and Fun
PROBST
America's  Foremost Whistler
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
Special Notice
Five cents car fare all this week
will take you as far as the
Victoria
Theatre
and ten cents more will admit you
to see the London Bioscope and a
Grand Amateur Entertainment.
A whole evening's amusement for a
small  price.
Special Snturdny Matinee fnr children—Five Cents.
"The year is dying in the night"
We are almost sorry to see this Old Year depart, for
it has brought us many new friends and many new
customers, doubling, nay, more than trebbling our business in such a manner that may be considered no less
than remarkable.
A Prosperous 19tO
A Happy cHew Year
is the wish we would convey to our old friends, new
friends and patrons, at the same time thanking them for
their generous support and soliciting a continuance of
tlieir favors.
W. H Wilkerson, the Jeweler
Telephone 1606 915 GOVERNMENT STREET
Interesting
Instructive
ROMANO
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete  change  of programme  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance:  2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
fldmission - Ten Cents
routine
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Qovernment
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;  Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
'THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St, Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
THE NEW YEAR
BY BOHEMIAN
Everybody is wishing everybody
else a Happy New Year, and as the
phrase is practically universal, it may
be not unfairly assumed that happiness is the goal of the human race,
the "summum bonum" of existence. I
have heard more than one argument
in support of the proposition that men
should not seek happiness, but that
they should rather live up to the
maxim: "Be good and you will be
happy." But human nature is not so
constituted; such a maxim may be all
very well for philosophers; all men,
however, are not philosophers, and it
will be very much nearer the dawn
of the millenium before the world
will cease to pursue happiness as the
chief object of life.
The wish, however, is probably
based upon the idea that the Fates
may in some way or other be propitiated, and vouchsafe immunity from
many of "the ills that flesh is heir
to," and the troubles which distract
the mind; and this is the unknown
quantity which perplexes mankind;
the uncertainty of life, the ignorance
of all it has in store for us, the impossibility of fore-telling what will
happen, even during the next moment,
the hope that the happening may be
conducive to peace and happiness.
These are the ideas which flit through
the brain, as one attempts to analyse
the seasonable greeting.
I remember many years ago seeing
a striking cartoon in Punch. It represented the New Year as a bright,
sunny infant, just stepping across the
threshold to commence the journey
of another year; immediately above
him the sky was clear; a little further small clouds began to gather,
while the horizon was overhung with
heavy black clouds. I imagine that
this is a fairly accurate picture of all
the years to come, as it is an accurate
reflex of all that have gone. There
are but two ingredients in the skies of
life, sunshine and shadow; at times
they brighten in an azure blue; at
times they darken to blackness, and
most of the time they preserve a
monotonous grey.
The only doubt about iqio is as to
the proportion in which the great
Artist will mix the shades. In spite
of the blatancy of agnosticism and thc
arrogance of materialism the world
still believes in an over-ruling Providence, and the poorest man on this
first of January in the year of out
Lord, one thousand nine hundred and
ten, is he who lacks faith in a guiding hand. To blind fate he lifts his
voice; his idol is deaf as well as
blind, and he is flung back upon his
own resources, whose faith depends
not on Providential destiny.
Some of us may think that there is
room for pessimism in forecasting the
near future. On the horizon loom
several dark clouds; the clash of
parties at home is fiercer than for
twenty-three years, and a new element is imported into the conflict.
The truculence and aggressiveness of
a rival Continental power are constant sources of uneasiness and
anxiety. The growing disregard for
the law in the New World, and the
universal weakening of the orthodox
Christian churches cannot bc viewed
without apprehension.
And yet there are counter-balancing influences.at workwhich may neutralize the efforts of all the demons
to I disrupt the peace of the world,
or to shake its faith. The conservatism and sanity of the British people,
the universal spread of the cosmopolitan, democratic spirit, and the permanence of that faith which is em
balmed iri lives rather than in creeds
will suffice to maintain the standard
of justice and truth. He who holds
this faith has no fear for the future,
and believes that while iqio may
bring its share of trouble and trial it
will find a solution of all the problems which confront it, and will
prove in no less a degree than its
predecessors "a happy New Year."
To Inspect Oil Fields
Andrew Gray, president of the Ma
rine Iron Works, and Thomas Arnot
Ker, of the Brackman-Ker Milling
Company, are going to California on
Sunday to inspect the holdings of the
Canadian Pacific Oil Company of
B. C, Limited. Mr. Gray is vice-president of this corporation, while Mr.
Ker is one of the directors. They
will spend about a fortnight in the
.field, taking in Coalinga, Midway,
Kern River and the other producing
districts. H. H. Blood, oil expert,
who has been in British Columbia for
the past week, delivered an address
on California oil in the board of trade
hall on Tuesday night. Mr. Andrew
Gray presided. Mr. Blood gave the
history of the California oil industry
during the past ten years when the
state produced $4,000,000 worth of oil
until today it is producing $30,000,000
worth. Mr. Blood left for California
last night.
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
Victoria Theatre
On the theory that comedians have
a weakness for serious roles, W. H.
Crane was asked if he had ever
wished to play "Hamlet." "No matter what I may have wished," the
actor replied, drily, "I never did play
'Hamlet.' Oh, no, I had too much regard for Shakespeare, my audience
and my reputation."
Then the chat drifted to plays, and
in particular to some of the big successes of recent years.
"Do you know," asked Mr. Crane,
"what has been the most successful
play of the century?"
The interviewer confessed himself
stumped. Then the actor continued:
"You will be surprised when I tell
you. The most successful play of
the century is without doubt "Ca-
mille," and when I was in Paris last
summer, a venerable old critic, now
eighty years of age, who wrote a review on the first production of the
piece, told me its history just as he
got it from the author a few days
after the opening performance.
"Alexandre Dumas, the younger,
wrote the story of 'Camille,' or, to
give it the original title, 'The Lady
of the Camelias,' in 1847, when he
was just twenty years old. It was
published in book form one year
later, and merely had what the
French call a success of curiosity. In
1849, Dumas was at Marseilles, living
in a sheap lodging-house. He dared
not enter Paris on account of his
debts. He wrote t& his father and
his friends, begging them to take him
out of pawn, as it were, but they
failed to respond financially. To relieve the boredom of his position he
decided to dramatize his story. He
wrote the first two acts in three days.
Then remittances arrived, he returned
to Paris, and in fifteen days he wrote
the three remaining acts of the piece.
And thus, 'Camille,' that famous five-
act drama, was written in eighteen
days. He took the play to the Theatre Historique, long since torn down,
but the censor prohibited its production. Dumas waited, and in 1850 offered it at the Theatre Vaudeville
where only light comedies were produced. The manager accepted it politely on account of the reputation
of thc author's father, and carelessly
placed it aside without even reading
it. For two years it accumulated a
coat of dust. Then the vaudeville
through a scries of failures was about
For Mayor
Some say
Some say
Some say
H.
0
T
enderson
liver
urner
No doubt, before the polls close there'll be a HOT time. Let's hope
so. At any rate, give the question of your printing a TURN-OR two in
your mind. We have the facilities and capabilities for putting it, as the
phraseology of the day goes, ALL-OVER the others for that fine touch
Which is disassociated with any other than the very best work.
Phone 220
THOS. R. CUSACK
Courtney and Gordon Streets.
I
______
to close its doors. In this emergency
a. young actor of the company called
Charles Fetcher, the afterwards famous Charles Fetcher, who had read
'Camille,' suggested to the manager
that he produce it. The manager,
however, when Fetcher told him there
was a death scene at the end of the
play, refused point blank, pointing
out that there had never been a death
scene on the stage of the vaudeville,
and that his audience would not accept such a thing. But Fetcher was
eager to play the leading part of
Armand—and, by the way, it made
him,—so finally after much entreaty,
it was decided to produce 'Camille.'
The play achieved an instantaneous
triumph, running over two hundred
consecutive nights, which in Paris, in
1852, was going some. Immediately
following its production in the French
capital, Matilda Heron, a celebrated
American actress, made an English
adaptation and brought it out in this
coutry. It was practically the first
problem play, as we use the term
now, ever seen on the American stage.
But people did not talk about problem
plays at that time. Now-a-days it is
a glib phrase.
"But 'Camille' has gone on and on,
it has been played in practically every
language, and it never fails to draw.
All the leading women and all the
stars want to have a try at it. It
was amongst the best things done by
Bernhardt, Duse and Modjeska—and
who that saw Clara Morris in it will
ever forget her? Verdi turned it into
an opera, 'La Traviata.' It is sung
season after season in all the opera
houses of the world, and all the
prima dona sopranos are willing to
break their necks to sing it. Generations of women have wept over it,
and will continue to weep over it. It
has been condemned over and over,
but it always draws. I tell you 'Camille' is the most successful play of
the century."
New Grand Theatre
It is pretty well all comedy that is
coming to the Grand next week and
it will surely be laughing week for
all vaudeville lovers.
A comedy turn direct from the London Music Halls and entitled "A Hot
Scotch" will be placed this week by
Emerald and Dupree, offering one of
the most popular London Music Hall
attractions. This act now playing an
American circuit for the first time
has earned good criticisms and has
become a' public favorite all along the
line.
Then there is the Columbia Comedy
Four, dealers in harmony and fun.
These are four men, a Dutchman, a
Sissy and two others. The reputation of the Sissy is here already and
he will be most acceptable on the
Grand stage. They are fun-makers
pure and simple and can never get
away from an encore.
"The Way of the West" is the title
of the comedy drama by Charles W.
Dotty that will be played for the
amusement of the Grand patrons all
next week by Al Fremont and Company. The Company included Mary
Freyheld and there is action throughout the story.
Probst, America's Whistler, scored
an emphatic hit in Vancouver. He
will be here Monday for the first
matinee. There is not a bird that
he cannot imitate, and the act is enhanced by stereopticon views of the
birds he does imitate for the audience.
Thomas J. Price will have a song
illustrated and the Moving Pictures
will be new again this week. Saturdays there will in future be two
matinees, the first commencing at
2.30 and the next at 3.45 and admission to children will be ten cents.
The best trimming for a woman's
hat is a good-humoured face.
mm_a___ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
3
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTOBIA, B.C.
Prosperity to tfoui
t
YES and an abundance of it.    May this year be the most prosperous you have ever
enjoyed and may happiness be your constant companion.   This city and this
great Western land is on the eve of "great times."   Prosperity smiles upon us
and prospects never were brighter.     May you share in it.
For months we have been planning to make 1910 our banner year—to make it eclipse
the record of 1909, the best year we have ever enjoyed. And if the best goods, the
biggest assortments, the fairest prices and honest merchandising will do it, the result is
assured.
.1
We have never been better prepared to supply the home-furnishing wants of British
Columbians.   Never have we shown better assortments.  A hearty invitation is extended
you to inspect the offerings.   Resolve—"That Weiler's is the store for me, through 1910."
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.C.
WATER NOTICB
Form No. 1
183
NOTICB is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V of
the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicants. The British
Columbia Canning Company, Limited of
Victoria, B. C, Canners and Sawmillers.
(b) The name of the lake, stream or
source (if unnamed, the description is)
unnamed stream running in a southerly
direction through lot 3, range 2, Coast
District.
(c) The point of diversion: 1,200 feet
from head of creek.
(d) The quantity of water applied for
(in cubic feet per second)  four.
(e) The character of the proposed
works: Water will be used by means
of a dam, ditch, flume, pipe, hydraulic
ram and other necessary appliances.
(f) The premises on which the water
is to be used (describe same): The
said lot 3, arnge 2, Coast District (which
is owned by the applicants in fee simple) and the foreshores thereof.
(g) The purposes for which the water
is to be used:  "Steam".
(i) Head Offlce of above Company In
B. C, is in Wharf St., Victoria, B.C.
The Company is licensed under the
"Companies Act, 1897." Capital £40,-
000 in 10,000 preference shares of £1
each and 40,000 ordinary of 15s each
all paid up with objects (inter alia) "to
carry on salmon fishery and canning
business and any other business which
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on in connection with the above and to acquire
any rights or privileges which the company may think necessary."
(k) This notice was posted on the
15th day of December, 1909, and application will be made to the Commissioner
on the 31st day of January.  1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses of
any riparian proprietors or licensees
who or whose lands are likely to be
affected by the proposed works, either
above or below the outlet. Only the applicants.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD,
Victoria, B.C.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles west of E. Todd's No. 2
location post, being "M. L. G." N. E.
corner; thence west eighty (80) chains;
south eighty (80) chains; east eighty
(80) chains; north eighty (80) chains
to point of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
M. L. GRIMMETT,
jan 1 Per A. B. Roberts, Agent.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles west of "E. Todd's" No.
two (2) location post, being "G. R. B."
S.E. corner; thence west eighty (80)
chains; north eighty (80) chains; east
eighty (80) chains; south eighty (80)
chains to point of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
G. R. BATES,
jan 1 Per Emmett Todd, Agent.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles west of "E. Todd's" No. 2
location post being "E. T." S. W. corner;
thence east eighty (80) cliains; north
eighty (80) chains; west eighty (80)
chains; south eighty (SO) chains to point
of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
EMMETT TODD,
jan 1 Locator.
•"•   NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles north of "E. Todd's" No.
three (3) location post, being "G. R. B."
N. AV. corner; thence south eighty (SO)
chains; east eighty (SO) chains; north
eighty (80) chains; west eighty (80)
chains to  the point  of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
G.  R. BATES,
jan  1 Per  E.  Todd,  Agent.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles north of E. Todd's No. 3
location post, being "A. B. R." N. E.
corner; thence south eighty (80) chains;
west eighty (SO) chains; north eighty
(80) chains; east eighty (80) chains to
point of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
A.   B.   ROBERTS,
jan 1 Locator.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles north of E. Todd's No. 3
location post, being "M. L. C." S. W.
corner; thence east eighty (80) chains;
north eighty (SO) chains; west eighty
(80) chains; south eighty (80) chains
to point of commencement. »
Dated lst December,  1909.
M. L. GRIMMETT,
jan 1 Per A. B. Roberts, Agent.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and  under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half (1%) miles from Otter Creek in a northerly direction or
Lot nine hundred and three (903), being M. L. G. N.E. corner post; thence
west eighty (SO) chains; south eighty
(SO) chains; east eighty (80) chains;
north eighty (SO) chains to point oi
commencement.
Dated lst December,  1909.
M. L. GRIMMETT,
jan 1 Per A. B. Roberts, Agent
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one (1) mile west of M. L. Grimmett's
No. 1 location post, being "G. R. B."
N.E. corner; thence west eighty (SO)
chains; south eighty (SO) chains; east
eighty (SO) chains; north eighty (80)
chains to point of commencement.
Dated  lst December,  1909.
G. R. BATES.
jan 1 Per E. Todd, Agent.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one (1) mile west of E, Todd's No. i
location post, being "A. B. R." N.E. corner; thence west eighty (80) chains;
south eighty (SO) chains; east eighty
(SO) chains; north eighty (80) chains
to   point   of   commencement.
Dated  lst December.  1909.
A. B. ROBERTS,
jan 1 Locator.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one (1) mile west of G. R. Bates' No.
1 location post, being "E. T." N. E.
corner; thence west eighty (80) chains;
south eighty (80) chains; east eighty
(80) chains; north eighty (80) chains
to point of commencement.
Dated lst December, 1909.
EMMETT   TODD,
jan 1 Locator.
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE Is hereby given that I Intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two (2) miles west of E. Todd's No. 2
location post, being; "A. B. R." N.W.
corner; tnence east eighty (80) chains;
south eighty (80) chains; west eighty
(SO) chains; north eighty (80) chains to
point of commencement.
Dated   lst   December,   1909.
A. B. ROBERTS,
jan 1 Locator.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
180
In the matter of the Estate of Andrew
McAfee, deceased
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims or demand
against the Estate of Andrew McAfee,
deceased, who died on or about the 2nd
day of November, 1909, are requested
to send, by post prepaid, or to deliver
to the undersigned their names and addresses, with full particulars of their
claims, and particulars of all securities
(if any) held by them, duly verified, on
or before the 10th day of January, 1910.
Dated this 10th day of December, 1909.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
No.  918  Government Street,  Victoria,
B.C., Solicitors for the Executor,
dec 11
No. 402 179
CERTIFICATE  OF   THE   REGISTRATION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897"
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Mi-
chigan-Puget Sound Lumber Company,"
an Extra-Provincial Company, has this
day been registered as a company under the "Companies' Act, 1897," to carry
out or effect all or any of the objects
of the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company Is
situate at the City of Detroit in the
State  of  Michigan.
Tho amount of the capital of the
Company ls fifty thousand dollars, divided Into five thousand shares of ton
dollars each.
The head office of the company in this
Province Is situate at No. 1114 Langley
street, Victoria, and William John Taylor, Barrlster-at-law, whose address Is
Victoria, B.C., is the attorney for the
Company not empowered to Issue and
transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the Company is thirty years from the 22nd day
of November, A.D.  1909.
Given  under  my   hand  and   seal   of
offlce  at  Victoria,   Province  of  British
Columbia,  this third day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and registered are:
Buying, selling, manufacturing and dealing In forest products,
dec 11
177
NICOLA DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on nnd under the
the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one (1) mile west of E. Todd's No. 1
location post, being "A. B. R." N. E.
corner; thence west eighty (80) chains;
south eighty (80) chains; east eighty
(SO) chains; north eighty (SO) chains
to point of commencement.
Dnted lst December, 1909.
A. B. ROBERTS,
jan 1 Locator.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Sewerage Works, Prince Rupert,"
will be received by the Honorable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Wednesday, the 19th of January,
1910, for the construction and completion of a portion of the permanent system of sewerage at Prince Rupert, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 7th day of December, 1909, at
the offlce of the undersigned, Public
Works Department, Victoria, B.C., at the
offices of the Government Agent, and
of Mr. James H. Bacon, Harbor En- .
glneer, Prince Rupert, B.C.; at the offlce of the Government Agent, New
Westminster, B.C., and at the offlce of
the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honorable
the Minister of Public Works, in the
sum of five hundred dollars, which shall
be forfeited If the party tendering decline to enter Into contract when called
upon to do so, or If he fall to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques
or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
A guarantee bond In the sum of fifteen thousand dollars will be required
as security for the faithful performance and completion of the work.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.', 2nd December, 1909.
dec 4
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
•
At the Street Corner
BY the lounger
(Continued  from  Page  2)
daughter, who is by way of being a
songstress, she made answer:—"Oh,
she's doing fine,  she is; she's up at
C * just  now,  and   they   say   that
she's quite a belladonna." Quaint, but
true.
*     *     *
I spent Christmas this year for the
first time in my life in Vancouver,
and I was amazed. I never felt quite
so much like the Queen of Sheba before. Of course I have seen the Terminal City many times, and have always realised what a busy and growing place it was and is; but I was not
prepared for the immense crowds
which swarmed up and down Hastings Street on Christmas eve, and
filled thc stores to over-flowing. The
merchants without exception say that
the volume of business done this year
is at least 50 per cent, better than
that done last year, while one firm
stated that they had exceeded previous figures by over 80 per cent.
Somebody has said something about
coming events casting their shadows
church-going. My editor is quite able
! to take care of himself in the contro-
] vcrsy, but I wish to remark parenthetically on an incident which has done
more har mto the cause of religion
than all the attacks of hostile critics.
I refer to the conduct of Rev. Dr.
Campbell, Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, in performing the
marriage ceremony between a girl of
fifteen and a boy of seventeen, who
had run away from Seattle. Subsequent proceedings in the American
Courts make the Doctor look like
"thirty censt," and the case is made
worse by the fact that the sheriff
doubted the statement made by the
youthful pair as to their correct ages.
There is far too ready a disposition
on the part of Victoria ministers to
play the role of the blacksmith of
Gretna Green always for a consideration. Probably the thing will go
on as long as there are a few dollars
in it, or until some irate parent from
across the Sound comes to Victoria
with a stout whip and administers
well-merited punishment.
*     #     *
I have been asked by several young
ladies who attended the dance given
in Assembly Hall a fortnight ago, to
register a protest against the use of
powdered   borax   for   polishing   the
Wm,
H. Crane and Margaret Dale, in Scene from "Father and the
Boys," Victoria Theatre, January 3
before; it augurs well for the future
of this little bit of the Garden of Eden
that the above should be the case.
Nor is Victoria behind. Perhaps
we can't point to figures as portentous as the above, but I understand
from the activity of the real estate
market, that if Adam and Eve were
living just now they would bc making big profits on choice sections.
Moreover the Christmas business was
far and away ahead of any previous
year.   Where's your kicker now?
* *     *
Honour to whom honour is due.
On this occasion it is done to Alderman Turner, the chairman of thc
Streets Committee, who yielded to the
urgent appeal of a local property
owner and inside of twenty-four hours
had three or four teams and a dozen
men working on Cook Street. Aid.
Turner is a man who does things,
while others "gas" about them. It is
true that the work has been suspended during the Christmas holidays,
hut I am sure that it is his intention
to have it finished early in thc New
Year, and to cover the coarse granite
stones with fine crushed material. I
have no doubt that he will also order
out the steam roller to finish the job
properly.
* *     *
A few people, but not many, havc
chjded "The Week" for it's remarks
in the last issue which were evoked
by   the    Colonist's    symposium    on
floor. This most objectionable and
unhealthy practice seems to have
taken root in Victoria; not only does
it destroy dark dresses, but it is extremely bad for the lungs. I know
towns in the Interior where its use is
no longer permitted, and I am sure
that the parties responsible for getting up public dances in Victoria will
bc willing to go to the little additional expense necessitated by using
the old-fashioned preparation of
bees-wax, which is unexcelled for the
purpose.
<&i
■^^c^g^
Festivities  at  Pender
The annual Christmas Tree was
held at Pender 011 Friday, December
19, 1909. The schoolroom was crowded by eight o'clock, everybody had
turned out to have a good time. The
room was most artistically decorated
with evergreens and flags and the
grand old Union Jack hung over the
Chairman's seat.
The programme consisted of recitations and songs by the children, any
they were most admirably rendered.
There were some very good glees and
songs by the Pender Musical Society,
and at 10 o'clock Father Xmas arrived by wireless aeroplane, late, but
FROM MALT AND HOPS ONLY
Victoria=Phoenix
Beer
THE ONE PURE BEER
We wish everyone a most Prosperous New Year
r- -^-_<^_^- -A  USSEE-fc MANAGE**
Monday, Jan. 3
Charles Frohman Presents
Wm. H. Crane
In His Greatest Laughing Success
Father and the Boys
George Ade's Best and Funniest
Comedy
Prices—joe, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Seat sale opens 10 a.m. Friday, December 31st.
FOR
School
Trustee
Ladies and Gentlemen:
I beg to offer myself as a candidate
for School Trustee at the forthcoming
Municipal Elections and respectfully
solicit your vote and influence.
Wm. P. Sweeney
his excuse was that he had missed
the trail owing to some Yankee having taken away the North Pole.
Every child received some nice present, ample justice was done to the
refreshments and everybody felt good
and happy. The singing of Auld
Lang Syne and God Save the King
brought a most enjoyable evening to
a close.
It is surely most noteworthy that
an island like Pender can furnish
with ease, a very good concert and
entertainment without drawing on
outside assistance. The new teacher,
Miss Hamilton, has earned a very
large mark, for the devotion and
pains she has bestowed upon the
school children in bringing them to
concert pitch, and there is one certain
fact, the department has a most promising teacher in this young lady.
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, a er use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz.   $2.70
TEASPOONS '.  " 3.15
DESSERTSPOONS  " 495
TABLESPOONS  " 5.85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " S-8S
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4-95
TABLE KNIVES  " 5-4<>
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Non   Scribit  Cujus  Carmina  Nemo
Legit
He was lean of figure and long of
hair,
And he twiddled his thumbs with an
absent air—
He was a country poet.
He wasn't a man of worldly means;
No currency jingled in his jeans—
For it's hard lines writing for magazines
When the magazines don't know it.
Transferred Their Affection
Among the domestic duties of a
young husband in Indianapolis is the
careful supervision of the toilets of
his wife's two dogs, one a Great Dane
and the other a by no means diminutive St. Bernard.
"Oh,  Marie,"  shouted  hubby from
the yard late one afternoon, "there's
not a flea on thc dogs now I"
"How splendid!" shouted back
Marie.   "Not a-single flea?"
"Nol" yelled Tom. "They're all on
me!"
Definition of Tact
Mrs. Pyne—"Mrs. Blank certainly
possesses a lot of tact."
Mrs. Hyne—"What is your definition of 'Tact'?"
Mrs. Pyne—"Tact is a woman's
ability to make her husband believe he
is having his own way."
The way to make good apple jam
is to pare good sour apples, core and
chop fine. To equal weight of good
brown sugar and apples add juice and
grated rind of three lemons and a
few pieces of white ginger root and
boil until the apple is clear and yellow. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal on and under the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
about three miles north of the Wendle
Coal exposures on the east bank of the
Bear River in the District of Cariboo;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
west SO chains to point of commencement.
October 25th, 1909.
MRS. J. ROWAN
jan 1 W. Blakemore, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal on and under the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
about three miles north of the Wendle
Coal exposures on the East Bank of
the Bear River in the District of Cariboo; thence North 80 chains; thenee
west SO chains; thence south 80 cliains;
thence east SO chains to point of commencement.
October 25th, 1909.
W. H. PRICE,
jan 1 W. Blakemore, Agent.
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  INSURANCE  COMPANY
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No.   549.
This is to certify that "The London
and Lancashire Plate Glass and Indemnity Company of Canada" is authorized
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Toronto, in the
Province of Ontario.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars, divided into two thousand flve hundred shares of one hundred
dollars each.
The head office of the Company in this
Province is situate at Vancouver, and
Robert Ward & Company, Limited Liability, whose address is Vancouver
aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company.
Given  under   my  Hand  and   Seal  of
Offlce  at  Victoria,  Province  of  Britlsn
Columbia,  this  third day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S.) "S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
The making and effecting of contracts
of insurance against loss or damage to
plate or other glass. The making of
contracts of insurance against loss or
damage by burglary, house-breaking, or
theft, including theft by servants, workpeople, casual employees or any other
person lawfully or unlawfully upon the
premises of the person insured.
For Mayor
TO   THE   ELECTORS   OF   THE
■ CITY OF VICTORIA
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:
I beg to announce that I am a candidate for Mayor at the approaching
election. After having served as Alderman for three years I now respectfully solicit your vote and influence for the more important position,
and promise to do my utmost for the
progress and betterment of our city.
My views have already been published, and will be more fully explained
from the platform. My principal objects are:
The securing of Sooke as a water
supply.
The introduction of more efficient
management of the public works department.
The stricter guarding of public
morals.
A systematic improvement in making and beautifying our streets and
parks.
A. HENDERSON.
FORESHORE LEASE
184
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Chichester Harris, of Victoria, B.C., intend, 60
days after date to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a lease of
the following Foreshore, viz.: Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot 66, Esquimalt District, thence northeasterly following the
sinuosites of the foreshore a distance ot
15 chains more or less to the northeast
corner of said lot 56.
J.  G HARRIS.
Dated December 16th,  1909.
dec  25
LAND  REGISTRY ACT
185
In the matter of an application for
Duplicate Certificates of Title to
Lots 785 and 778, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given that it is
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue Duplicate Certificates of Title to said lands, issued
to. Robert. Paterson. Rithet,. William
Fisher and William Fitzherbert Bullen
on the 7th day of May, 1886, and numbered 6874A and 6875A respectively.
Land  Registry  Offlce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the 22nd day of December, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
dec 25 Registrar-General of Titles.
HIDDEN LOVE
(By Reginald Wright Kauffman)
If you could see me weeping here before
The empty hearth that cannot make
a home,
I think, sometimes, my dear, unto my
door
Your steps would come.
If you could know my gladness when
your eyes
Meet mine, tired, in one swift Heaven-
born glance,
Up to  my window you would look, I
think,
As if by chance.
My darling!   If you knew I loved you,
how
So great a love and pure your own
must win,
Perhaps—perhaps  you'd  lift the  latch
even now
And enter in!
—From the French of Sully-
Prudhomme.
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal on and under the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
about one mile North of the Wendle
Coal exposures on the Western Bank of
the Bear River in the District of Cariboo; thence north 00 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
October 25th, 1909.
J. ROWAN,
Jan 1 W. Blakemore, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal on and under the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
about one mile North of the Wendle
Coal eposures on the West Bank of the
Bear River in the District of Cariboo;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
October 25th, 1909.
MRS. F. H. HEPBURN,
jan 1 W. Blakemore, Agent.
178
NOTICE
PROVINCIAL LEGISLATIVE
ASSEMBLY
PBIVATE BILLS
Copies of Bills, Petitions, and notices
as published must be deposited with,
and all fees paid to, the Clerk of the
House, not later than 12th January,
1910.
Petitions for Bills will not be received by the House after 31st January,
1910.
Bills must be presented to the House
not  later  than  10th  February,   1910.
Reports from  Standing Committee on
Bills will not be received by the House
after 17th  February,  1910.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk, Legislative Assembly.
Victoria, lst November, 1909.
nov 20
182
LICENSE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVIN-
VINCIAL  COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 550.
This is to certify that "Dodwell and
Company, Limited," is authorised and
licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends, except the
construction  and  working of railways.
The head offlce of the ■ Company is
situate at the City of London, England.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is two hundred thousand
pounds, divided into eight thousand
shares of twenty-five pounds each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
Norman Hardie, Merchant, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the Company. '
Given  under   my  hand  and   Seal   of
Offlce  at  Victoria,  Province  of British
Columbia, this tenth day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON.
Eegistrar of Joint Stock Coompanies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and  licensed are:
To acquire and take over as a going
concern and to carry on the businesses
now carried on by George Benjamin
Dodwell and Arthur John Hepburn
Carlill, in the Colony of Hong Kong, at
Shanghai and Hankow, in the Empire of
China; at Kobe and Yokohama, in the
Empire of Japan; at Tacoma, in the
State of Washington, and at Portland,
in the State of Oregon, in the United
States of America; at Victoria, in the
Province of British Columbia, in the
Dominion of Canada; and at Dock
House, Billiter Street, in the City of
London, under the style or firm of
"Dodwell, Carlill and Company," either
with or without all or any of the real
and personal property and assets of the
proprietors of that business used in
connection therewith or belonging thereto—and either subject or not subject
to the liabilities of the said firm or
any of them and with a view thereto
to adopt and carry into effect (either
with or without modifications) an
Agreement dated the 30th day of August, 1898, and made between the said
George Benjamin Dodwell and Arthur
John Hepburn Carlill of the one part,
and Philip Charles Emil Dennys (a
Trustee for the above named company)
of the other part.
To carry on, develop, and continue
as Joint Stock Company, Limited, and
as a going concern the businesses referred to in the said Agreement, and
sueh other businesses in connection
with the above-mentioned businesses as
are customarily or usually carried on
in connection therewith or are naturally
incident to such businesses.
To carry on the businesses of merchants, exporters, and importers, shipowners, carriers, agents brokers, storekeepers, and contractors, and the business of marine insurance in all its
branches, and in particular without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing words to make or effect insurances
on ships, vessels, boats and craft of all
kinds, and on goods, merchandise, live
or dead stock, luggage, effects, specie,
bullion, or other property, respondentia
and bottomry, interests, commission..,
profits and freights, and to carry on
all kinds of transit, Insurance business,
and generally every kind of insurance
and re-insurance business, except the
issuing of Policies of Assurance upon
human life.
To carry on any other business which
may seem to the Company capable of
being conveniently carried on in connection with the above, or calculated directly or indirectly to enhance the value
of or render more profitable any of the
company's property.
To buy, sell, manufacture, and deal ln
goods, wares, and merchandise of every
description.
To purchase or by other means acquire any freehold, leasehold or other
property for any estate or Interest whatever, and any rights, privileges or easements over or in respect of any pr.,
perty, and any buildings, factories,,
mills, works, wharves, roads, railways,
tramways, machinery, engines, rolling
stock, plant, live and dead stock, ships,
or shares in ships, barges, or things,
and any real or personal property or
rights whatsoever and wheresoever situate, which may be necessary for or may
be conveniently used with or may enhance the value of any other property
of the company.
To purchase or by other means acquire
and protect, prolong and renew, whether
in the United Kingdom or elsewhere,
any patents, patent rights, brevets d'in-
vention, licenses, protections, concessions, trade secrets, and secret processes which may appear likely to be
advantageous or useful to the company,
and to use and turn to account ana
to manufacture under or grant licenses
or privileges in respect of the same,
and to expend money in experimenting
upon, testing and in improving or seeking to improve any patents, inventions,
or rights which the Company may acquire or propose to acquire.
To build, construct, maintain, alter,
enlarge, pull down and remove or replace any buildings, factories, mills,
offices, warehouses, works, wTiarves,
roads, railways, hydraulic or electric
works, or any other works for applying,
transmitting, or supplying energy in
any form, machinery, engines, walls,
fences, banks, dams, sluices, or watercourses, and to clear sites for the same
and to work, manage and control the
same.
To acquire and undertake the whole
or any part of the business, goodwill,
and assets of any person, firm or company carrying on or proposing to carry
on any of the businesses which this
company is authorized to carry on, and
as part of the consideration for such
acquisition to undertake all or any of
the liabilities of such person, firm or
company, or to acquire an interest in
amalgamate with or enter into any arrangement for sharing profits or for
co-operation or for limiting competition or for mutual assistance with any
such person, firm or company, and to
give or accept by way of consideration
for any of the acts or things aforesaid,
or property acquired, any shares, debentures or securities that may be
agreed upon and to hold and retain or
sell, mortgage, and deal with any shares,
debentures or securities so received.
To promote any other company for
the purpose of acquiring all or any of
the property and undertaking any of
the liabilities of this company, or oi
undertaking any business or operations
which may appear likely to assist ui
benefit this company or to enhance tne
value of any property or business of
this company.
To search for, get, win, work, raise,
make marketable and use, sell and dispose of coal, oil, iron, clay, precious
and other metals, minerals and other
substances or products on, within or under any property of the company, and
to grant prospecting and mining and
other licenses, rights or privileges for
such purposes.
To sell or otherwise dispose of the
whole or any part of the undertaking
of the company either together or in
portions for such consideration as the
company may think fit, and in particular for shares, debentures or securities
of any company purchasing the same.
To invest and deal with the moneys
of the company not immediately required upon such securities and in such
manner as may from time to time be
determined.
To lend and advance money or give
credit to such persons and on sucn
terms as may seem expedient, and in
particular to customers and others having dealings with the company, and to
give guarantees or become security for
any such persons.
To borrow or raise money in such
manner as the Company shall think fit,
and in particular by the issue of debentures or debenture stock, perpetual or
otherwise, and to secure the repayment
of any money borrowed or raised by
mortgage, charge, or lien upon the whole
or any part of the company's property
or assets, whether present or future,
including its uncalled capital, and also
by a similar mortgage, charge or lien
to secure and guarantee the performance by the company of any obligation
or liability it  may  undertake.
To draw, make, accept, endorse, discount, execute and issue promissory
notes, bills of exchange, bills of lading,
warrants, debentures and other negotiable or transferable instruments.
To apply for, promote and obtain any
Act of Parliament, Provisional Order,
or license of the Board of Trade, or
other authority for enabling the company to carry any of its objects into
effect, or for effecting any modification
of the company's constitution, or for
any other purpose which may seem expedient, and to oppose any proceedings
or applications which may seem calculated directly or indirectly to prejudice
the company's Interests.
To improve, manage, cultivate, develop, exchange, let on lease, or otherwise
mortgage, sell, dispose of, turn to account, grant rights, and privileges in
respect of or otherwise deal with all
or any part of the property and rights
of the company.
To enter into any arrangements with
any Governments or authorities, supreme, municipal, local or otherwise, oi
any corporations, companies, or persons
that may seem conducive to the company's objects, or any of them, and to
ority, corporation, company or person,
any charters, contracts, decrees, rights,
privileges, and concessions which the
company may think desirable, and to
carry out, exercise, and comply with
any such charters, contracts, decrees,
rights, privileges and concessions.
To subscribe for, take, purchase or
otherwise acquire and hold shares or
other interest in or securities of an.,
other company.
To act as agents or brokers and as
trustee for any person, firm or company,
and to undertake and perform sub-contracts, and also to act in any of the
businesses of the company through or
by means of agents, brokers, sub-contractors or others.
To remunerate any person, firm or
company rendering services to this company, whether by cash payment or ny
the allotment to him or them of shares
or securities of the company, credited
as paid up in full or in part or otherwise.
To pay all or any expenses Incurred
in connection with the formation, promotion and incorporation of the company.
To support and subscribe to any
charitable or public object and any
Institution, society, or club, which may
be for the benefit of the company or Its
employees, or may be connected with
any town or place where the company
carries on business; and to give pensions, gratuities, or charitable aid to
any person or persons who may have
served the company, or to the wives,
children or other relatives of such persons, and to form and contribute to
provident and benefit funds for the
benefit of any persons employed by the
company.
To distribute among the Members of
the Company In kind any property of
the Company, and in particular any
shares, debentures or securities of other
companies belonging to this company,
or of which this company may have
the power of disposing, but so that no
distribution amounting to a reduction of
capital be made, except with the sanction (If any) for the time being required by law.
To procure the company to be registered or recognized In the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or in
any Colony or Dependency, and in any
foreign country or place.
To  do   all  or  any  of  the  above  men
tioned things in any part of the world,
and as principals, agents, contractors,
trustees, or otherwise, and either alone
or in conjunction with others.
To do all sueh other things as may be
deemed incidental or conducive to the
attainment of the above objects, or any
of them.
FOTO PEB CENT. ON
DEPOSIT.
We pay font per eent. iaterwrt
on deposits of 91 (one dollar)
and np, withdrawable by chequt.
Special attention given to de-
poiiti made by mail
Paid np Capital over $1,000,000
Assets over   -       -       3,000,000
C. PEBMANENT LOAN CO,
1210   Government   Street,
Victoria, B.O.
Vapor
Sulphur Baths
Will Cure
Rheumatism
Will open the 7,000,000 little
pores in the body and draw
from them all impurities, filth
germs and poisonous matter accumulated in the system. See
our fine
BATH CABINETS
$13, $9, $7.50
Come in and let us tell you
more about them. Ask for
free circular.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
The
Victor
Victrola
Is the most perfect of all disc
machines on the market today. There is no scratch with
this instrument, as the record
and reproducer are out of
sight and hearing.
1*1. W. WAITT
& CO. LIMITED
The House of Highest Quality
HERBERT KENT, Manager
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 93
VICTORIA. B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
»ttHMVftW<-)Vt/*)*)n'<tW.V«»V«VMiiWMWNW'>M
*
I
I
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
  «
  I
ISS. Richardson!
ti Phone 3_|6 §
K^.*K^MM.^.**J*MMMMMMMMMJtf^.^_&J*_M_MM.*
I The Working
Man Comes
Here
because he gets a good
square meal
20c.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
{•{ Milne Block, 568 Johnson St. jj
VICTORIA, B.C.
J»a««K:«'att»aa«»a«'S4«88:4a88}a
WE SOLICIT
A TRIAL
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we   are   prompt,   careful   and 8
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NO. 4, FORT ST., VICTORIA. \\
moderate in our charges.
The Pacific
Transfer
Co.
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A. E, KENT, Proprietor        ft
Phone 241. g
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;
Leave your checks with us.  «
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Frint &
Map Co.
{218 Lnngley St.  -   Victoria, ^.C.
•VmVWm'm'^Wm'n'hWnhWnWm'-nWm'n'mWi
I SEE BOLDEN 1
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J|j»»»M«tt8»»»»»»2«»_:«»»«s»: THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i, 1910
What Is Your Money Doing ?
Money in hand is worth whatever you can buy with it. Money in bank is
worth 4 per cent. Money wisely invested is worth whatever it earns—sometimes 10 per cent., sometimes 1,000 per cent., depending on how and where you put
it to work. Where is yourd ? Is it making a living for you, or are you simply
living for it ?
One hundred dollars spent buys comparatively little. One hundred dollars
saved grows slowly. One hundred dollars or so judiciously invested may mean
a comfortable income for life. That opportunity is here and now, in California
Oil. A great many people have the erroneous idea that small investments are
hardly worth while. That is a great mistake. If capitalists waited until they
had a large sum to invest, they never would have become such. It is the
judicious placing of the small amounts where they can be earning something every
day that soon brings wealth.
Thousands of men have reaped much from little, in this way, and if you take
advantage of this opportunity there is no reason why you should not do the same.
■
«
INTERIOR OF A CALIFORNIA OIL WELL
What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander —what is a good thing for
the rich is likewise a good thing for the man in moderate circumstances. Now,
then! Here are the circumstances! A corporation known as the Canadian
Pacific Oil Co. of B.C., Limited, incorporated in this Province, and officered by
some of the biggest men in Vancouver and Victoria, has acquired 740 acres of
oil land in California. One hundred acres of this is absolutely proven oil land.
There are big wells all around the property. Oil is the biggest money-maker in
the world—bigger than gold, lead, copper or zinc. It is making lucky investors
wealthy.
This corporation is drilling for oi!, and is already down 500 feet. To the
west of us, three-eighths of a mile, is the St. Lawrence well—one of the biggest
petroleum wells in America. Its depth is 2,500 feet. This company should
strike oil at the same strata, because the land formation is exactly the same.
The big men in this company have taken over most of the stock themselves, for
they see the immense possibilities. But there is a little stock on the market
yet- You can buy it for an investment or a speculation, if you like—it is selling
for 25c. per share, having a par value of $1.00. It is non-assessable. When the
company gets into oil the stock should jump to par overnight. It will pay, according to Mr. Blood, the oil expert, from 25 to 100 per cent.
How does this look to you ?
The Canadian Pacific Oil Company of B. C, Limited
ROYAL LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY, LTD., Fiscal Agents 638 VIEW STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.

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