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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Feb 22, 1908

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 M
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Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
i    Commission and Real Estate Agents.
I MO Granville, Vancouver.
A«juLi»ij»_txi_ojuuuuLt_ta_t up
Victoria Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
foi,. V.   No. 4
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908
)pen to
Question.
nissioner.
The Week entertains a very
high opinion of Mr. G. 0.
Buchanan of Kaslo, the Dominion Lead Bounty Coni-
His opinion on public ques-
ions has frequently been quoted in these
.olumns with approval.   As a pioneer of
he Kootenays and as an expert authority
in all matters connected with Metallifer-
nis mining he is entitled to the highest
■espect.   Moreover, Mr. Buchanan is ad-
nittedly a man of the highest integrity,
mt he is not infallible and either because
ie is afflicted at times with obliquity of
'ision or because,  like most specialists,
■/hen once he gets away from his own
abject his opinion loses its value, he has
ailed to grasp the salient features of the
mber question and to give expression to
lem in an interview reported in the Vic-
>ria Times on Thursday last.    It is not
ecessary to follow Mr. Buchanan through
.1 the ramifications of his interview, but
ie or two significant features may be
ointed out.   In this connection it may not
3 amiss to recall the fact that within the
ist few weeks a large and influential depu-
ition of lumbermen with delegates from
rery part of the Province waited upon
e Provincial Government seeking cer-
in modifications in the timber laws the
ost important of these was a lengthening
the term of lease from twenty-one years
forty-two or in the alternative to such
ne as the lands should have been de-
ided of timber.    The grounds of this
plication were two-fold.    First, that a
ort tenure of occupancy led to a method
lumbering which took out the best tim-
r and left the balance unprotected and
the mercy of forest fires.   The deputa-
>n pointed out that the surest way to
eserve the forests was to give the licensee
interest in the Jast stick of timber. Thc
iond argument was that owing to the
'•antic scale upon which the lumbering
d milling industry is now conducted, inlying the expenditure of millions of clol-
■s, a lease for twenty-one years is not
ig enough to admit of a return of tlie
11 benefits which should be derived from
investment of so large a capital and
at in consequence considerable difficulty
is being experienced in securing the notary financial  aid to develop  timber
ids.   Incidentally with this latter qucs-
m was also raised tliat of security of
lie.    Considering that, these views were
It forward by the represent a lives of the
i'gest industry of the Province it is in-
note    how    widely    Mr.
^hanan differs from them.    He takes
ground that "the Government, under
license system, never intended to con-
more timber than that required for1
■mediate use."   Surely on reflection Mr.
.hanan will not defend this contention.
;s he seriously suggest that it would be
Isible  to  secure capital in the large
punts    necessary   to    develop   timber
|its, build logging roads, clean out log-
streams ancl erect mills if there were
security of tenure?    As a matter of
it was not possible to secure  this
lital as long as the licenses were rencw-
fe annually without any proviso for a
EDITORIAL
longer term.   It was not until the Government made thein renewable for twenty-one
years that capital could be attracted and
that the industry was in a measure transferred from the American to the Canadian
side of the line.    Mr. Buchanan is not
quite ingenuous when he says that "the
Legislature only desired to let out of their
hands so much timber as was required foi'
immediate purposes, retaining the balance
for a better price later on."   As a matter
of fact the Government has not in the
slightest degree parted with control over
the price.   Its "better price" must always
mean increased royalty and it has persistently refused even under the strongest
pressure from the industry to tie its hands
in this regard.    Mr. Buchanan declares
that in a few years British Columbia will
have a practical monopoly of lumber and
tliat in less than twenty years timber will
be worth ten dollars to twelve dollars per
thousand feet.   He may be a true prophet
but he. should be fair enough to admit
■ that the Provincial Government will be
in a position to exact this or any other
royalty the conditions justify.   He would
also, if he were a fair controversialist, admit that permanency of tenure would not
affect the question of price, but the most
untenable statement put forward by Mr.
Buchanan is that "any beneficial change
now granted would accrue chiefly to the
benefit of Foreign speculators and enable
them in years to come to more effectually
cinch the resident British Columbia mill
owner."   He prefaces this declaration by
a statement that "most of the timber lands
taken up have already been disposed of
at nominal prices, mostly to aliens."   He
is probably the last man who is entitled
to make such a complaint, at any rate there
are men in this Province who, thanks to
the liberal policy of the Provincial Government, have been able to acquire timber
lands and to dispose of them to aliens and
others at a profit which only a Croesus
would consider  "nominal," but let that
pass.   Whoever holds timber lands today
in British Columbia has acquired them in
accordance with the Statutes, has paid the
legitimate dues and is liable to pay increased royalty at any time and without
any limitation except such as may be imposed by the condition existing from time
to time.    The policy of the Government
has been consistent ancl the result has justified it.   Three to four years ago the bulk
of the logs cut in British Columbia were
being exported to Washington State and
converted into lumber at the Puget Sound
Mills south of the line.    Then came the
Legislation prohibiting the exportation of
logs.    "Pari passu" with this the Government had to take steps which would encourage the staking of timber limits within
tho Province and the development of the
lumber industry.    Those steps have produced the desired results, large areas of
timber have been taken up in a comparatively short time.   It has been shown that
the Government retains absolute control
over the licenses, royalty whicli will a':
all times determine tlie revenue to be derived from the timber lands.   How in face
of this Mr. Buchanan can consistently constitute himself a critic of their policy, and
how he can contend that there has been
any "sacrifice of value" is not easy to understand.     When   he   declares   that   the
royalty can never be increased to any appreciable extent "because many mills are
located where they have access to inferior
timber only" he is begging the question.
Such mills are the exception and do not
in any sense govern the case. It is rather
singular that when asked what course he
advocated Mr. Buchanan should have developed a remarkable aptitude for being
"wise after the event." Instead of suggesting what the Government should do he
practically recites what they have actually
done, which is to discontinue the issuance
of licenses and to make a full investigation
before altering the law. The AVeek ventures to say that Mr. Buchanan would not
have been half so emphatic in his endorsation of this policy if it had been adopted
months ago. The greater wisdom will
now be shown by assisting investors in timber lands to proceed to lumbering and
milling. Without an element of speculation there would be development, especially
in new districts. It is the fore-runner of
industry; the Provincial Government has
been singularly successful in the first part
of its programme, that it will be equally
successful in developing the industry on
permanent lines there can be no doubt.
In any event there is no ground for Mr.
Buchanan's criticism of their financial
policy nor any justification for the concluding comment of the Times that "the
available timber wealth of the Province
has been dissipated by the Government."
The Provincial Government
Enforcing has been prompt to take the
The Law. necessary steps for the en
forcement of Mr. Bowser's
Xatal Act. Both in Victoria ancl Vancouver Japanese immigrants who could not
qualify under the educational test of that
Act have been refused admission, ancl
others who insisted on landing have been
arrested. In order that there should bc
no delay in determining the legal status
of these persons Habeas Corpus proceedings have been instituted, and already the
Chief Justice is dealing with the initial
case at Vancouver. As the matter is still
sub-judice it would be unbecoming to make
any comment, although the majority of
persons must have noted with gratification
his comment that the Anglo-Japanese
Treaty was a more important factor in
the case than the Federal Laws. Whatever his decision may be au appeal will be
rushed in the first instance to the Supreme
Court and subsequently to the Privy Council. As the matter involved is one of
extreme delicacy affecting the "amour
propre" of Great Britain's ally, it is certain that no unnecessary delay will take
place in pressing it to a final decision.
Meanwhile it is gratifying to note tliat
the settlement of a grave constitutional
question is proceeding with decorum and
that all parlies concerned are exercising
the most admirable restraint. It is also
worthy of note that the Provincial Government and the much maligned Attorney-
General have devised a means which is
rapidly determining this important issue
by the most satisfactory ancl indeed the
only impeccable method. It says not a
little for the acumen of these gentlemen
that they should have been able to force
this issue before the highest tribunal in
the Empire, and by their judicial attitude
to compel the Federal Government to
acquiesce in the reference. The whole
trend of events justifies those who from
the beginning of the dispute claimed that
the British Constitution provided adequate
machinery to solve all Imperial problems.
3 irrrrrr* rsrrrwrro wr
Stewart Willlaw K. C Jiataa
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AMD
REAL tSTATE A6IRTS
.     |i FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
e§JUUt_MXttt«»>»tft80JUUU.^
One Dollar Pbr Annu-
The result also shows that the Provincial Government have evidenced a better
acquaintance with that machinery than the
Federal Ministers.
In the "Correspondence"
Baiting the columns of this issue of The
Police. "Week will be found a letter
from Mr. J. A. Aikman, tak-
exception to some criticism to which he
was subjected last week.    Mr. Aikman's
complaint is that he did not bait the Police and that he is not fairly characterized
as "a successful Police Court Lawyer."
With   respect   to   the   latter   complaint
The Week has given Mr. Aikman more
credit than he deserves ancl his modesty
will not allow him to accept the compliment it is hereby withdrawn.    As Mr.
Aikman wishes his legal reputation to rest
rather upon his success in the Civil Courts
it would be ungracious to refuse him the
consolation even if his claim runs counter
to the popular impression.    With reference to the other charge The Week never
ventures into the field of criticism without
making sure of its facts iu advance which
explains why it has never had to withdraw.
In the present case it is fortified by the report of the Colonist and by the verbal
testimony of three gentlemen, one a Barrister, who were in Court at thc time the
regrettable incident occurred.    These gentlemen all agreed, as even the Colonist report set forth, that Mr. Aikman charged
a Police witness with manufacturing evidence to secure the conviction of his client,
and that to the main charge he added
several remarks of a general character impugning' the integrity of the force.   Under
these circumstances whilst publishing Mr.
Aikman's letter, ancl with a spirit of fairness and with a desire to let the public
hear both sides, The Week endorses every
word which it said on the subject.    It now
goes a step further to declare that having regard to the public interest, to the
administration of justice, and to the difficulties which the Police Force has to contend with in the discharge of its onerous
duty—not the least of which at times is
a contumacious lawyer—the last man who
should cast any imputation upon them is
a member of a learned profession charged
with   the   conduct   of   important   cases.
There is less justification for this in Victoria than perhaps iu any city in the West.
The Week is in receipt id'
Fruit several conuniuiications on
Inspection. the subject of Friut Inspection. Those from officials
are simply au attempt to shift the responsibility from one to the other. Those from
the general public are in full endorsation
of the complaints voiced in The Week to
the effect that inferior fruit, improperly
graded, and much of it unfit for concmnp-
tiini, is on sale in Victoria. This fact
also has been made clear—that every box
of apples requires three Inspectors to pronounce upon its deficiency:—the fruit Inspector, a Dominion officer, can only deal
with grading and marking; tht.' Pest Inspector, a Provincial Officer, can only deal
with posts; and the Medical Officer, of
Health, is the only person authorized to
condemn rotten fruit. Until all these
powers are vested in one mnn the public,
cannot be protected. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2a, 1908.
Notes on
Provincial News
Visitors to Victoria.
Amon the visitors to Victoria during the present week, one of the most
conspicuous is Mr. T. G. Procter, of
Nelson. He is here to interview the
Government on behalf of the City of
Nelson with respect to their application for increased borrowing powers,
to enable them to raise $85,000 to
duplicate their power plant.
They have already borrowed within
$40,000 of the authorized limit, and
without special powers cannot finance
the proposed scheme. The necessity
for the additional plant arises from
the fact that the West Kootenay
Power Company is seeking to impose
an exorbitant rate for emergency service. At present the city only has
one unit, and when this breaks down
it is left in darkness or must fall back
upon the West Kootenay Company.
The Week understands that Mr. Proctor has made satisfactory progress
with his negotiations, and on every
ground it is to be hoped that the
authority will be granted.
Many a Slip.
A highly unique marriage romance
was enacted in Spokane this week.
Half an hour before the ceremony
was to take place an old flame of thc
bride appeared on the scene. He
pressed his suit with such ardour that
the bridegroom-to-be, who had furnished the cash for the bride's trousseau and the wedding ring, was discarded, and a hasty marriage was performed between the bride and her
new-found lover. The victimized
would-be bridegroom is to be congratulated on his narrow escape. The
bride was an assistant to a "beauty
doctor," and is described as a good-
looking damsel—with both syllables
accented.
Strain a Point.
The Westminster Daily News
voices the complaint of the pressmen
at the inadequate accommodation provided for them in the Local Legislature. The complaint is well founded,
and it is to be hoped that the Government will at least double the accommodation before next Session. This
can easily be done without detracting
from the architectural features of the
hall, by adding two wings to the
present gallery. The News, as usual,
strains a point when it says that there
is any discrimination against representatives of the opposition press.
The statement is as ridiculous as it
is untrue.
Doing Well.
Letters from England indicate that
Mr. Martin Burrell is doing good
work for the Province. The series
of lectures which he has ararnged to
deliver cover a lot of ground, especially in districts from which desirable immigrants should be obtained.
In the last issue of the Grand Forks
Gazette there is a very interesting letter relating some of Mr. Burrell's experiences. He was particularly fascinated by the popular Irishman, T.
P. O'Connor, who told him that he
hoped soon to visit British Columbia.
No man could do the Province more
permanent benefit through the medium of the press than "T. P."
Enterprise.
Cranbrook is forging ahead. All
the reports from the lumber capital
of East Kootenay speak of prosperity.
The latest news is that early in April
the Imperial Bank will erect a fine
new building. The Canadian Bank
of Commerce has been established in
Cranbrook nine years, so that there is
no lack of banking facilities. The
Cranbrook Herald is justified in its
conclusion that the financiers of this
country have faith in the future of
Cranbrook.
Knows Its Business.
The Phoenix Pioneer knows its
business and atends to it strictly. The
whole of the reading matter on thc
front page is devoted to mining and
mining interests. Ther is more reliable information about the great industry of the Kootenay on this front
page than can be found in all the
other newspapers of the interior.
There is no better record of the progress of the mining industry than the
file of the Phoenix Pioneer.
Not Sports.
The managers of the Rossland
Winter Carnival are not sports. They
have treated the Nelson hockey team
very unfairly, and in the end will be
none the better for it. The Rossland
Committee wished to force a man
named Winn upon the Nelson team as
referee in the deciding round of the
hockey series. Nelson has had some
experience of Mr. Winn before-time,
and refused to accept him. The Rossland Committee were obdurate, with
the result that Nelson refused to play,
and the Rossland men wcre such poor
sports that they were content to win
by default. The least that a committee can do is to show courtesy to
visitors. What the Rossland Committee did was to keep strings on the
cup.   This is hardly sportsmanlike.
False Reasoning.
The Nelson Daily News, in opposing the increase in the coal tax, does
so on the ground that it will not be
the collieries but the consumers who
will have to bear the main portion of
the increased taxation. Even if this
were true, it would not be a valid argument against equalizing taxation
and making each industry bear its fair
share. But carried to its legitimate
issue, the argument of the News
would render taxation impossible.
The writer loses sight of the fact
that the Finance Minister was careful to fortify his position by showing
that the profits of coal mining were
well able to bear the additional impost. Any increase in the selling
price of coal is out of the question,
especially now that a movement is
fairly under way for investigating the
whole question of coal operation,
looking to a general reduction in the
price of fuel.
A Promising Mine.
The Kootenaian of the 6th instant
gives an interesting account of the
Bluebell mine. This celebarted property is situated at the newly named
town of Riondel in the Ainsworth
district. It is undergoing extensive
development and has been splendidly
equipped with modern plant under the
direction of the well-known mining
engineer, Mr. S. S. Fowler.
"I'm afraid we can't afford a turkey, my dear."
"Well, I only expected to get a
small  one, George."
"See here, don't you get a small one
for mc to carve."—Exchange.
A Curious Dialogue.
A most bloodthirsty dialogue was
being performed. The father of the
leading woman came, as usual, to the
stage door and asked the doorkeeper:
"Has my daughter gone yet?"
"No, she is still on the stage; she
will not die for some minutes."
"Will you be kind enough to tell
her as soon as she is dead that I am
waiting for her at the theatre cafe?"
—II Mooto per Ridcre.
The Merchants Bank
Cana a
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Hud Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR.
Manager.
"Young man, do you know anything about soldiering?" asked the
recruiting sergeant, bluntly.
"A—a little, sir," faltered the chappy with white hands and pink cheek..
"And what has been your experience?"
"I—I have been using a pair of
military brushes for over ten years,
sir."—Chicago News.
"What's thc matter, John?"
"Got caught stcalin' apples at Mr.
Binx's."
"Did hc thrash you?"
"No; made me eat apples. Boo-
hoo-hoo!"—Exchange.
Short-Lived Ambition.
Disguested Wife—Say, niggah, eber
sence Ah married yo' yo's dun nuffin
'cept sit round de house. Doan' yo'
eber feci enny ambishion?
Lazy Husband—Ah feels ambishion
w'en All's sit-in1 round hyah, honey;
but jes' 's soon 's Ah stahts to wo'k
Ah  gits  discouraged.—Judge.
MORE PRIZES FOR THE ESSAY
WRITERS
A communication has been received
from A C Flumerfelt, the well-known
capitalist, part of which is as follows:
I will offer prizes to the value of
$350 (three hundred and fifty dollars)
divided as follows:
For the best essay on the questions
propounded below, viz, A, B and C,
relating to:
The Province of British Columbia  $50
The provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba   $50
The  Provinces  of   Quebec and
Ontario $50
The Provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince
Edward Island   $50
A. Enumerate the nationalities and
also give number of languages spoken
in the province written upon.
B. Outline the requirements of
such provinces to insure continuous,
reasonably rapid development, and
with harmony.
C. State the countries from which
immigration should be drawn, and the
best method of attracting and successfully inducing such immigration to
the provinces in question, having due
regard to existing trade cond'tions.
For the most exhaustive, lucid essay on the questions as below, viz.:
D, E and F, respecting Canada as a
whole, I will offer a first prize of
$100; second, $50.
D. Enumerate the nationalities
now resident in Canada; also give
number of languages spoken.
E. Outline .the requirements necessary to insure continuous, reasonably
rapid devolpment and with industrial
harmony.
F. State from what countries
should immigration be drawn and the
best method of attracting and successfully inducing such immigration to
Canada, having due regard to existing
trade conditions.
The prizes, at the option of each
winner, may be taken in money, a
piece of silver suitably engraved, or
presented to any of the public charities. Thc competition is to close on
the first of May next, and letters
should bc addressed to IMMIGRATION, P. O. Drawer 690, Victoria,
B. C, thc same not to be opened, except by committee, are unlimited as
to length, but must be signed or accompanied by the card of the writer,
with memo, on the face of the envelope, indicating thc contents of the
enclosure. Well - known political
economists and educationalists of
Canada will be requested to judge and
award the prizes for these essays, my
intention being to publish them in
pamphlet form and distribute broadcast, in the hope that such distribution will afford to the several provinces information respecting each
other.
Hungry Hank—I feel sorry fer de
lady wot lives in dat mansion on de
hill.    She is absolutely destitute.
Sauntering Saul—Destitute?
Hungry Hank—Yes. Destitute uv
generosity.—Chicago Daily News.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
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V FLUID
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V2 FLUID
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with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. eOOPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
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Established 1867
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52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselton, Manager.
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An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
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Phones Nos. 48, 303, 404 or 394, Victoria.
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Offices, Churches. Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture
1000 Oran-rtUe Street     :■     1: TAJrOOtJTBm, n. o
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Investigate the
"Cushman" Harine fioto
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Str
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908
__.
A Lady's Letter *
 ^
f By BABETTE. T
ear Madge:
Today I am going to tell you about
e ways and wiles of the Mexican
aiden. There is really nothing se-
ous to be said about her. You can
o more lecture about a dainty in-
onstant and fragile woman than you
an put paint on a Cloisonne vase,
fapoleon once said that women are
ie poesy of God. The idea is good,
ut it needs classification. None
vould try write hexamiters on a Mex-
:an maiden; one might on a German
r the angular Briton, but for the
Mexican one needs the lightest of
Jrecian iamics.
She is delicate and good to look
pon. When she steps from her car-
age to the sidewalk she discloses
ie shapliest feet fitting naturally in-
o the tiniest of shoes, and her small
ands are a study that the worst of
len would hardly spoil by squeez-
lg. She carries herself with an air
f self-conscious attractiveness, and
xpects men to notice her charms.
ier hair is coiffttred to perfection,
nd her face usually owes its shades
the paint-box and powder puff,
tit her eyes glisten brightly and as-
ire one that there is a soul behind
e dainty picture.
Unfortunately it is not the beauty
e  Anglo Saxons like to see.     Wc
efer the charm gained by exercise
[id good health; the charm of cheeks
ade  red  and body made  lithe  by
veiling in the fresh and warm sun-
iiine.    The  beauty  of the  Mexican
a thing served up with care and
tidy.    Her toilet table is the  pan-
[y of her comeliness and she knows
st how a good serving will set off
indifferent dish.   She is a terrible
atter-box, and when she gets with
lot  of  friends  they   all   talk  and
[ugh   at   once.    Man   is   the   chief,
it for the exercise of her wit and
e    does    not   spare    her    friends'
[ovios"   (lovers).    She  says  worst
tigs of a man than she really means,
fiile men,  I  venture  to say,  mean
[irse things than they really say.
t vvas again a Frenchman who said
t the  "Lord by His  divine fore-
;ht, did not give beards to women
fcause they would have to keep sift while being shaved."   The Mex-
|n girl would surely find a way.
(She is the most capricious of wo-
n.   She changes her plans without
me or reason, and shows little or
concern if the plans of man are
bilt by her actions.   Her ideas and
ipressions, her likes and dislikes, are
ally  under  thc  dominion  of  her
'irice.   What pleases her one minute
pleases her the next, and the man
0 is favoured with her smiles in
: morning is met with  frowns  in
'.  afternoon.    She  loves  naturally
dominate and expects man to bow
[jectedly to the ordeal.    She rules
11 and caresses him into obedience
the same breath.    She is haughty
th   him   if   the   mood   seizes   her,
f,t flattery is the straw which whisks
[r  off the  pedestal.    She  loves  to
d, but is also ready to be led.   The
trices are due to nothing more than
[(vivid and quick imagination.    She
lids too little and thinks too much.
|ie time that ought to bc spent in
8 practice of womanly arts, and the
ding  of  soothing books  is  given
the exercise of imagination,
tihe is not above mild plots to delve her parents and prefers a court-
from   beneath   her   balcony   by
nlight.   I  can  never  figure  out
she prefers to see her lover alter
hours of daylight; perhaps it is
,ausc the less she sees of him the
re she can imagine or perhaps she
ifraid  of  the  opinion  of  others.
a common failing among her set
;ive  in dread of thc  opinion of
ety.
lie seeks emotions and feigns them
pften that she hardly knows a
l-uine one when it conies to her.
is a sweetheart I am told she is
fxacting and assertive little tyrant;
wife, she is an humble and self-
sing  companion.    The   treatment
she serves her "noivios" (beaux) has
always been a source of amusement
to me. When he is present she pretends to be blind to his advances. He
may wait half an hour under her window before she will condescend to
appear on the balcony, though she
has probably seen him all the time
from behind the partly closed
shutters.
He must be ready to dance attendance on her when she goes out, and
to be rewarded usually by the cold
shoulder and an occasional command.
When he is absent she stays away
from dances because she thinks he
would not like her to go if he is not
there.
She tells all her friends how "triste"
she feels, and rarely goes out except
to mass in the early morning.
She lives in an age which sneers at
chivalry and she clings to the battered
shreds of it. Her failings and virtues
are the simplest in the repertoire of
her sex, and she would prefer the
solid gallantry of old to the subtle
phrases of today.
It is a shame after all to let the
breath of criticism touch her. The
trouble is that she lives too much
under restraint, and her parents are
to blame for that.
And whether dressed demurely with
black mantilla for mass or decked
out in all her finery for the "Alameda" she is always a dainty and
attractive picture and though she does
not often captivate the heart at least
claims admiration from the Anglo-
Saxon.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must bc
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona (Ides. In no case will It be
divulged without consent.
in this city than I, and there are not
many men here who have seen the
result of the work that they have done
in the way of keeping the city practically free from crime more than
myself.
i     In   cross-examining   the   constable
who was giving evidence in the case
which you refer to I had occasion to
I test the memory of the witness and
to suggest to him that he might be
mistaken.    In doing so, I only acted
within my rights as counsel and in no
, way transgressed those rights.
j    The Chief of Police did object to
my cross-examination, but I was up-
, held by the Court, and as far as any
I feeling either by the Chief of Police
■ or myself was concerned, there was
none.     I   might   also   add   that   the
I accused in the case you refer to was
' dismissed by the  Magistrate.
I    Another statement that appears in
I the  said  article   is  that  "Mr.  J.   A.
Aikman is regarded with justice as a
successful    Police    Court    Lawyer.'
That may or may not be correct, but
I   do  not  think   it  fair  to  brand  :t
member of the legal profession with
being a successful Police Court Lawyer, especially in view of the fact that
I have been equally if not more successful  in  the   Civil  Courts,  as  the
records of the different Civil Courts
in this City will show.
You must know that one of the
first lessons that is instilled into a
lawyer is to work his hardest for the
interests of his client, especially in
matters where the liberty of the subject is involved, and this is all I ever
do, always having due regard for the
rules of evidence, and paying proper
respect to the ethics of the profession.
I trust that you will give this letter
equal   prominence  in  The  Week  to
that which you gave your Editorial.
Yours  truly,
J. A. AIKMAN.
life, and I don't owe them or anybody
else a blamed cent!"—Chicago Trib*
une.
"I see one of our battleships reported fast in the mud."
"Well?"
"I was just thinking that a ship
fast in the mud ought to be a record-
breaker on the open sea."—Philadelphia Ledger.
Editor The Week:
Victoria, Feb. 17th,  1908.
Dear Sir,—In reading the Editorials
of your valuable paper published on
thc 15th instant, I was much surprised
to scc an article headed "Baiting thc
Police," in which you refer to mc as
originating the suggestion that our
Chief of Police was attempting to
manufacture evidence or hoodwink the
Court. That statement, sir, is a deliberate falsehood and whoever gave
you the information has wilfully stated an untruth, either that or the person who gave you the information is
ignorant of the rules of evidence and
the rights of Counsel upon cross-examination and he has imagined that
a policeman's statement in his examination must go unchallenged.
I might say that Chief of Police
Langley an" the whole force under
him have not a more ardent admirer
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES* BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Qovernment Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
Readvertlsed from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT |
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co.,  of A'ancouver,  B.C.,
loggers,  Intends  to npply for a special
timber   licence   over   the   following  de-'
scribed lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted SO
chains north from thc northeast corner of T.L. 11,81)2; thence north -10
chains; thence east 10 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 120 chains; thence west SO
chnins to point of commencement. 1
Dated 14th day of October, 1007.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO.,  LTD.
Feb. 22 CO. P. Olts, Agent.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Time's Joyous Flight.
Solemn   Man—"Do   you   hear   the
clock slowly ticking?   Do you know |
what day it is ever bringing nearer?' 1
Cheerful   Man—"Yes,   pay   day."— I
Table Talk, Melbourne. !
Disputed the Proposition.
"All that you are, my friend," said
thc lecturer, singling out an elderl-/
man sitting in a front seat who appeared to be deeply interested—"all
that you are, I repeat, you owe to
heredity and environment."
"Gosh!" exclaimed the elderly man,
turning red with indignation, "I never
had no dealin' with that firm in my
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates and
design, (urntihcd.
j   TRAVELLERS' GUIDE   I
 VICTOBIA	
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol nil theatrical aud raudev Ue
artists while in tbe Capital city, al. * ol
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT * FALCONER, Praprl.t.ra.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $1 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur)
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Etectrte
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.  The miners' home.
•• OANNY " DBANE. Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
QREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot th* Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Worker!
olthe Kootenays.
W. E. HcCandlish,     -     Proprietor
HOLLY TREES
Prieae htm m ctati to fcao, -Mcerding
to doe.   Write for teed mk tree eata-
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Beet Family Hotel in ths City.
$1.90 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,       Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price Hat.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Broken.
eao ro»T stbeet    ii    viotobia.
THOMAS OATTESAU,
Builder aad Otnaral  Contractor.
Tenders   glvea  on  Brick, Stent   an
Frame, Alteration!, Parquetry Flaorlni
OBce, Bank, Btora and Saloon Fitting!
Pll* Driving, Wharves and Deck Shad:
construct*! and repaired.
TXOTOmiA.
J THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1908
Incorporated llti
Capital, »600,0*M.M
Capital Increased
ln 1107
to ...II.OOMM.M
Subscribed
Capital,    flIMM
Beserve . . »••■•••
Surplus, Jan. M
1307   .  .  $U0,*M
J. >. XATSEBS, -Sen. Xaa.
IN   CLOSING   UP   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
328 Hastings St., Weat
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published  every  Saturday by
"IHE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
&_% Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
526   Hastings Street Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Fresh Fields and
Pastures New.
1 dare say that when the title of this
article mets the reader's eye, he will
conclude that, like the proverbial
youth, with the return of spring-tide
I am directing my thoughts to those
subjects which are perenially associated with the rejuvenescence of
things. For once he will be mistaken,
I am thinking only of a book which
I read this week. It is a book of absorbing and, in parts, of thrilling interest. It is written by one of the
most accomplished and successful of
living authors, and in it he breaks up
entirely new ground, which suggests
the title of this article. The book is
"Arethusa," the author F. Marion
Crawford, and the venue Constantinople.
Mr. Crawford's literary career may
be divided into three chapters. The
first, lhe Italian, in which he cultivated a new field with rare insight and
profound literary skill. 'The Roman
Singer," "Saracinesca," and "St. II-
ario" are masterpieces of Italian fiction. They reproduce not only the
incidents, customs and manners -of
Italian society, but they recreate its
very atmosphere, and he who has
revelled in these pages has lived in
Italy.
Then we pass to Chapter Two, in
which Mr. Crawford was lured from
his first love and declined upon the
banalties of American life. The subject did not suit his artistic temperament, and hc felt very much as David
did when he had on the Goliath's armour. Hc was lighting social evils of
which he had no experience and no
instinctive knowledge. Thc result
was crudity and immaturity; thc effect
was bizarre.
It is true that before opening chapter number 3, Mr. Crawford stopped
by the way to give us "Marcella," but
he has now fairly launched into "fresh
fields and pastures new."
"Arethusa" is a story of Constantinople. The action occurs during thc
period when "knights wcre still bold
and barons, or tlieir equivalent, held
their sway." The hero is a soldier
and a statesman, full of the daring
and courage which in thc good old
days were always sufficient to win a
woman's love. Thc heroine added to
traditional beauty and charm the gift
of high intelligence, devotion and
bravery. The malignant influences in
the shape of an unworthy and unscrupulous rival and a seditious interloper, are skilfully portrayed. The
stumbling-block is personified by a
timorous, unstable monarch, who has
been made a prisoner in his own palace and who hesitates, at the very moment of ripe insurrection, to emerge
at the head of his faithful retainers.
By a clever device, the substitution
of another man who bears a strong
resemblance to the king, the troops
are deceived and rally round his standard, which marches to success.
When victory has ben attained, the
weak-kneed sovereign emerges from
his retreat and is reinstated.
Ther arc some briliant chapters,
teeming with adventure and romance.
Once again Mr. Crawford litis recreated the atmosphere of the country
in which he has placed the action of
his story. The duplicity, thc cunning,
the intrigue, the politesse, the diplomacy of the Oriental character are
faithfully portrayed. The author
makes one realize to what an extent
Oriental sovereigns are merely pawns
in the game of government, and how
little the "masters of the administration" are influenced by the great principles which are recognized as the
foundation of good government.
It would be a mistake, however,
were I to leave the impression that
Mr. Crawford's book deals with problems, or is overloaded with weighty
matter. It is a romance, pure and
simple, almost as fanciful and aery as
the "Prisoner of Zenda," in places as
earnest and convincing as "Ivanhoe."
The technique is perfect, literary
craftsmanship is manifest on everv
page. There is more finish than in
any of the author's recent works. Evidently he has been less hurried and
has sacrificed nothing to his well-
known limpid style.
Mr. Crawford is one of the few
modern writers of fiction who knows
how to develop the feminine character, it might be too much to say that
he understands woman; indeed, ic.
one brilliant chapter hc declares that
no man knows anything about a woman, not even in this age of sub-conscious knowledge, because since she
knows nothing about herself there is
nothing to convey. Be this as it may,
everyone knows how tenderly and
sympathetically he handles his women, and Arethusa is no exception
to the rule. She is a woman with
whom any man would fall in love, and
towards the end of the book, when
she willingly submits to the most
fiendish torture rather than divulge
the information which will incriminate her lover, Mr. Crawford achieves
a magnificent success. He devises a
novel method of torture, so thrilling
and so realistic that the chapter is
almost too painful to read, but with
the instinct of the true artist he
relieves the situation at the critical
moment.
I recommend all my readers to get
"Arethusa." There is not a dull page;
everything is bright, entertaining and
artistic; it illustrates the marriage
of a literary craftsman to a romance,
a union which cannot fail to produce
delight for all who can appreciate a
work of art.
[Arethusa, by F. Marion Crawford.
Price $1.50, at thc Victoria Book and
Stationery Co.]
VANCOUVER'S    FIRST    HORSE
SHOW.
"Based on the present number of
entries, the disposal of practically
every box, and the splendid contributions in thc shape of handsome prizes
from loyal horsemen in Portland, Tacoma, Victoria and my own city, Vancouver's first horse show, to be held
March 19, 20 and 21, gives promise of
every success," said Percy F. Godenrath, press agent for the show, who
was in Victoria this week, en route to
Portland, Ore., to promote the interest in the forthcoming event.
"The show will be held in the Drill
Hall, which has a seating capacity of
1,500, and of the 52 boxes every one
will be sold before the close of the
month," he continued. The entries
are coming in rapidly, and there is
every reason to believe that every
event will be filled. The Portland
Hunt Club is sending a carload; John
W. Considine, who has contributed a
handsome silver cup, will send a
string of his best from Seattle; Tacoma will be represented, and Victoria,
New Westminster and Vancouver, besides points in the interior of British
Columbia have already sent in scores
of entries.
"Many handsome trophies, silver
cups, medals, gold watches, and even
carts and harness sets have been donated for prizes, until just before I
left home the Executive Committee
estimated that they had ben presented
with over $5,000 worth of prizes.
Among the out-of-town donations are
handsome silver cups from the Colonist Printing and Publishing Co., J.
A. Mitchell, and others of Victoria;
the Portland Hunt Club and T. S.
McGrath, of Portland; John W. Considine, of Seattle, and dozens of other
lovers of the horse. Advices already
received by the Executive indicate
that Vancouver's first horse show will
be liberally patronized, and advantage
taken of the special cheap rates which
will be in force for the occasion," he
concluded.
ELECTRICAL FACTS.
1. That the Electric Lighting Inspector comes under no department of
the Corporation.
2. That on inquiry the City Engineer does not know where he. is to be
found.
3. That each firm keeps a book in
which all new installations and repairs are recorded, to be read by the
Inspector every day.
4. That the Inspector calls to see
the book on an average about twice
a week, sometimes less.
5. That the inspection ticket should
be given the next day after inspection.
6. That this is not recived sometimes till over two weeks, thereby disarranging business.
7. That there are on an average two
installations a day, according to permits in daily papers.
8. That inspection takes one hour
at the most, not counting walking
time.
9. That the inspection fees should
be paid into the treasury and certificates obtained therefrom on payment
of fees. No fees to be paid to Inspector.
10. That the by-laws should state
certain items and not leave to the
"discretion of the Inspector."
11. That the section of the by-law
relating to the carrying capacity of
wires should be adhered to.
12. That according to Inspector
only four lights are allowed in No. 14
wire (capacity 12 amperes).
13. That 32 candle power lamps approximate 1 ampere; thus 12 number
32 candle power lamps could be run
on No. 14 wire and not exceed the
limit.
14. That few people use 32 candle-
power lamps, mostly 16, 10 and 6.
15. That the above shows the absurdity of Fact 12.
16. That wire is at present used according to "Inspector's discretion,"
with a carrying capacity of 23 amperes
and a 3-ampere meter installed by the
Electric Company.   Re Fact 11.
Realism.
One night two soldiers, ayoungster
nnd a veteran, were trying to sleep
by the roadside. Said the youngster:
"How many people at home don't
know where we are!"
"Ay, lad!" said the veteran, "and
how many thousands of 'em don't
care a damn.   Go to sleep."—Bellman.
Bachelor—Before the wedding you
told me that married life would bc
one grand, swet song.
Benedict (gloomily)—Yes, and since
then I have found it is one grand,
sweet refrain.
Bachelor—Refrain?
Benedict—Yes, my wife insists that
I refrain from cards, refrain from
smoking, and refrain from the club.—
Chicago News.
Silver=Mounted
Oak Ware
We have just received a new consignment of these beautiful
goods, always popular as Wedding Gifts, always in good taste.
They are the best English plate on nickel silver, the Oak is British
"Heart of Oak."   A wide choice:
Butter Dishes, Butter Trowels, Salad Bowls,
Biscuit Jars, Mustard Pots, Pepper Mills, Salt
Cellars, Chocolate Pots, Chopped Ice Bowls,
Spirit Stands, etc., etc.
MSt
VICTORIA. B.O
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home!
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
"Old Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heav
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie","In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that:   These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars;
comic song-hits and minstrel humor j  perfect dance music ; classic
'■*■ a_\ symphonies—entertainment of every sort for every mood and every
"v^^N. occasion ; and all to be heard at its best on the Fitter tr Berliner
\\ £\   Gram-o-phone.
\ w\
^ ••.    \ <$> ^$fc\ Victor Records for you.
V *"■
Any Vulot or Berliner dealer will gladly play
Victor Records for you.   Call and ask to near
, V \ \ them, and get him to tell you about the
W "-TX easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
\   _ "*&\_ —U8e tlle C0UP0U-
j.\ \ \ \% -VV    Till Berliner Gmw-ptoni
>\\\  VyV^-     Conpuy of cuida, LM.
V\\\N
MMTHU.   608
You can always      _—      ^^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar |V|#    _\____\%     tnan others.
Cigar
Made by S.* A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 190&.
/ICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
SE NOTICE! tbat Frank Buffling-
rooman of Victoria, B.C., occupa-
Qentleman, intends lo apply for
'cial timber licence over the fol-
S described lands:
imenelng at a post planted twenty
i north of the northeast corner ol
n 12, thence forty chains north,
iundied and twenty chains west,
chains south and one hundred and
y chains east to point of com-
tment.
ed 21st December, 1907.
4.NK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
8 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
SE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
nan of Victoria, B.C., occupation
eman, intends to apply for a spe-
:imber licence over the following
bed lands:
imencing at a post planted at the
west corner of section 21, thence
i chains east, eighty chains south,
i  chains  west  and  eighty  chains
to point of commencement,
ed 21st December, 1U07.
ANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
.8 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
KE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
nan of Victoria, B.C., occupation
eman, intends to apply fur a spe-
_imber licence over the following
Ibed  lands:
nmencing at a post planted at the
cast  corner  of  section  20,  thence
1 chains west, eighty chains south,
y  chains   east  and  eighty  chains
to place of commencement,
ed  21st December,  li)07.
ANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
KE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
ood of Victoria, occupation Timber
ers, intends to apply for a special
ir licence over the following de-
id lands:
im No. 1—Commencing at a post
ed 80 chains west of southwest
r of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
e south 80 chains; thence west 80
s to point of commencement.
:atod 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
KE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
ood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
ers, intends to apply for a special
ir licence over the following de-
sd lands:
im No. 2—Commencing at a post
ed 80 chains west of southwest cor-
if Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
SO chains; thence wost SO chains;
e south 80 chains; thence east SO
s to point of commencement,
;ated 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY   WOOD.
18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
KE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
oud of Victoria, occupation Timber
er, intends to apply for a special
ir licence over the following deed lands:
,im No. 3—Commencing at a post
ed 80 chains west of southwest cor-
>f Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
:e west 60 chains; thence north 40
is to point of commencement,
uated 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
KE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
ood of Victoria, occupation Timber
lers, Intends to apply for a special
_r licence over the following deed lands:
ilm No. 5—Commencing at a post
;ed 40 chains west of the north-
corner of Timber Limit No. 18644,
ie north 160 chains; thence east 40
is; thence 'south 160 chains; thence
40 chains to point of commence-
cated 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
.KE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
ood of Victoria, occupation Timber
ters, intends to apply for a special
er licence over the following deed lands:
tim No. 6—Commencing at a posl
ed 40 chains west and 10 chains
i of the southwest corner of tim-
limit No. 18646, thence west 40
is; thence north 40 chains; thence
80 chains; thence south about 60
is; thence easterly along shore 120
is; thence north about 60 chains to
: of commencement,
cated 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
18
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
326, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated   November   16,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
.KE NOTICE that William Croteau
.ldermere,  B.C., occupation Farmer,
ids to apply for permission to pur-
_ the following described land:
mmencing at a post planted at the
•iwest corner; thence north 20 chains
[cClure Lake; thence along McClure
i ln an east southerly direction 43
is,   more  or  less;   thence  west  40
is to place of beginning and mak-
40 acres more or less, and known
ie southwest fractional quarter sec-
of 36, township 6, Range 6.
ited November 20, 1907.
18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
iKE NOTICE  that  Jennie  Croteau
Udermere,   B.C.,   occupation   house-
Intends to apply for permission to
hase the following described  land:
mmencing at a post planted at the
hwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
ce east 40 chains; thence south 40
ns; thence west 40 chains to place
jeglnning and known as the north-
quarter section of 30, Tp, 6, Rge.
nd   containing  160  acres,   more  or
lted 23rd of November, 1907.
18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
Best Buy.
BEST   BUY  IN  VICTORIA OF  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
DISTRICT OI  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parallel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
I
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
bas ihe Post Offlce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled tn the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $62,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mlle west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
tbence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W,  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap In-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
tlie following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 cliains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south SO chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south  80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and ln an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
Ihence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
Arthur Gore TlhJlDtTO   AAA DQ 0fF<™ Phonl /-554
Manager     i liyiD___\lX PTl_rirO   Residence 438
posted up to date every day.
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTi, MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHAN CERY     CHAMBERS.
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   ST/fEET
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny a//
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other L an ds  taken  up  in British Columbia.
Blue Prints  can be   obtained at short no fir-'
let Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half mlles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L, W. Kingsley, Agent.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Residential aad Day School lor Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg-*
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper Scliool. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A.,LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Now Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMlcken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
26 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.   2nd,   1907.
Dec 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I„ New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241 A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tiience north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thonce west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains',
thonce east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence nortli 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one mlle south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thenco east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 6; thence
wost 40 chains; thence north 160 chains
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Chnnnel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mlle oast of claim No. 6; thenco north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Chan*
nel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chainB; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing ai a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on uorth bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; tbence west
80 chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
ou nortli bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; ihence west 80 chalus; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; tbence
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   13th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of com*
mencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. ID—Commencing at a post planted aboul one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
tiience east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4;
thence north SO chains; thenco west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains; Ihence
east SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December ICth, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 6*10 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. IS ED. BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE tbat M. J. Kinney, ot
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side ot Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Ageut.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line Intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
& PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
B.C.
Timber^ Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-ai Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, Sth January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fra30r River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about ISO chains
to a point Intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small Island on
north  line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent
NOTICE TO -JUWIWACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser Rtver.
Superstructure of Swing span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. 0. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition ot
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the ollice of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
tlie offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Eacli tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or cerllllcale
uf deposit uu a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to tne order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner ln
the sum of two hundred and llfty U-60J
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
pally tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to du so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner ln the sum of (3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Worka Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District. .
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a jpeclal
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted south live and one-half miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
H. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
on Cheewhat Lake; thenco north 80
chains: thence west SO chains; tnence
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 26th August, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of  Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from thc northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thenco east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November  24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber 'licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains,  to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEO.  B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
■hore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1_ miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca,
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked In my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 cbalns; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west lfO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or loss.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Cammenclng at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thenco oast 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Coid Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,   1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 160 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mlle in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 ehains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commence*
ment containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which ls seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 16, which ls eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
16 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to  point  of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant In a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which ls nine and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which Is nine and
one-half miles In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half mlles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chainB north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
mlles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east SO chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which is ten and one-half mlles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain arid four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon Rivor; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains', south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907,
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south SO chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 25—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains,
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner inarked W.E.S,,
N.E., No. 20, which is seven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south SO chains; west SO chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which Is eight and one-
quarter miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east
to  point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 19, 1907.
W.  E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Sectll
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chain"
thence north 160 chains; thence east ■
chains; thence south 160 chains to poll
of commencement, and containing 61
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted 1
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Sectil
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chainl
thence north 160 chains; thence east I
chains; thence south 160 chains to poll
of commencement, and containing 61
acres, more or les3.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted 1
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Sectloi
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chain!
thence north 160 chains; thence east 1
hains; thence south 160 chains to poll
of commencement, and containing 64
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted .»
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Sectloi
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chainsl
thence north 160 chains; thence west -il
chains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 641
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907. .
9. Commencing at a post planted al
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, SectloJ
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chainsl
thence north 160 chains; thence east 41
chains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 64f
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907. _
10. Commencing at a post planted al
north-west corner of T. L. 16196, Sectloi
1, Township 83; thence east 40 chainsl
thence north 160 chains; thence west 41
chains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 64|
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
HL^HI
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.   No.   2,   situate  on  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where tlie C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; easl 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE tliat Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shoro of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE tllat George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for tne
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
6, Township 33; thenco west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
i. Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted   at
£wS
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
■Files.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tender!, sil
perscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridal
North Arm, Fraser River," will be re
ceived by the Honourable th* Chid
Commissioner of Lands and Work]
Victoria, B. C, up to and Including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1901
for furnishing and delivering at th
bridge site on the North Arm of tr.
Fraser River, on the line of tha CemJ
tery Road, lir and cedar piles. I
About six hundred  (600)  will be rl
quired, varying in length from twentl
(20) to forty-five (46) feet.   They mu_T
be  straight,  sound,  and  not  less  tha
ten   (10 inches  at  the small and.   '
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be oil
tained on application to the underl
signed. [
Tenderers must state the prica pJ
lineal foot for piles delivered. 1
The successful tenderer will be fun]
ished with a list giving the nunibd
of piles required and the length of eacl
Each tender must be accompanied u
an accepted bank cheque or certlllcal
of deposit on a chartered bank of Cd
nada, made payable to the order of tO
Honourable the Chief Commiasioner, \
the sum of two hundred and fifty dol
lars ((250), which shall be forfeit*
If the party tendering decline or ueglej
lo enter into contract when culled upJ
to do so, or fall to complete the woj
contracted for. The cheques or cere
flcates of deposit of unsuccessful tel
tenderers will be returned to them ul
on  the execution  of  the  contract.     I
Tenders will not be considered unlel
made out on the form supplied, sign!
with the actual signatures of the tel
derers, and enclosed ln the envelope ful
nlshed. I
The lowest or any tender not necel
sarlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Worka Englned
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle,
Victoria, B.C., Merchant, and James L
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Col
tractor, intend to apply for a specil
timber licence over the following dl
scribed lands: I
No. 4—Commencing at a post plants
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson]
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, belli
the northeast corner post; thence wei
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thenl
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chaif
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.]
NEW    WESTMINSTER     LAND     DH
TRICT.
District of New Wastmlnatar.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chai
dier, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupatld
Broker, Intends to apply for a specil
timber licence over the following dl
scribed lands: f
No. 1—Commencing at a post plantA
ten chains south of the southeast col
ner of D. L. 1413; thence north iii
chains; thence east 40 chains; thenl
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chain]
to place of commencement, and contaltl
lng 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan  11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle ,
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and Jaml
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C„ Col
tractor, Intend to apply for a specil
timber licence over the following dl
scribed lands: f
No. 1—Commencing at a post plantl
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson]
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, bell
the southeast corner post; thence norl
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; then]
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chaif
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle,
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
McLauchlan,   of   Victoria,   B.  C„   ecl
tractor,  intend  to  apply  for a  speel
licence   over    the    following   describl
lands: I
No. 2—Commencing at a post plant!
about 4 miles to the west of Robinsoil
Bight on a small unnamed creek, bell
the northeast corner post; thenco Wfl
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; then!
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chall
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE, .
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
How to Save Money on
on Your Carpet
Purchases.
It is very poor economy to purchase cheap Carpets-
Carpets of unknown worth. The old saying', "The best
is the cheapest," is especially true of Carpets, and the
safest and most economical way is to purchase Carpets
of known worth, made by reliable houses and sold by
people with a reputation for "goodness" in Carpets.
In these days there are many inferior quality Carpets
made t olook the equal of the good sorts, and unsuspecting people who are not "well up" in Carpet quality have
unpleasant experience with the short life of these.
Usually, one lesson is sufficient. It shouldn 't be necessary
though, ancl if you thoroughly investigate our Carpet
offerings, we guarantee you no disappointments. Just
at present, shipments of new Spring styles are arriving
ancl being rapidly placed on show, and the styles so far
received are excellent examples of master workmanship.
We especially invite you to visit the Carpet Department
today—or any clay.
SPRING STYLES ARE PLEASING.
O/X-rfNOOOOOOOO-OOOOOO©^
loooooo<xxP>o<xx>oooo-oo©^
Spring Styles in New Muslins.
A SPLENDID SHOWING OF LATEST IDEAS.
When you start to plan for Spring Cleaning, plan new
curtains and plan to see our showing of curtains and curtain materials. We have just received an unusually large
shipment of new Lace, Madras and Swiss Muslin and
Casement Fabrics and suitable trimmings for the making
of curtains for every style of window, and adapted to
every room. These goods were personally selected for
their artistic and wearing qualities, and, buying in such
immense quantities, we were fortunate in securing favorable price concessions, ancl are in a position to offer you
artistic goods at the price usually asked for materials
wholly devoid of "character."   Investigate!
Swiss Muslin—In white and ecru. Pretty coin spot, sprig
and bow knot designs. Low priced at, per yard, 25c
and 20c
Swiss Muslins—In the colored muslins we show a great
variety of patterns and at a popular price. See these
at, per yard, 35c and  30c
White Grenadine—A light, dainty muslin with scalloped
border, suitable for sash ancl other' curtains, Price,
per yard  20c
Scotch Madras Muslins—We have this popular material
in cream shade, many pretty designs, ranging in price
from, per yard, 85c to   30c
Scotch Madras Muslins—In cream and white and bordered for sash curtaius. Pretty designs. This comes
30 inches wide.   Price, per yard 30c
Tasseled Madras Muslin—This is a popular curtain material and has much to commend it; 45 inches wide,
at, per yard  40c
Colored Madras Muslin—A great choice of attractive designs in several colorings, such as yellow, Nile green,
rose and blue.   Per yard  40c
Colored Madras Muslin—This is an especially attractive
line and a very popular one. The stained glass window
effect pleases.   Per yard  75c
Colored Madras Muslin—We have an excellent assortment
of colored Madras muslins. A wide range of designs
-and colorings at, per yard  50c
These materials can be made into the daintiest of curtains by yourself or in our own factory. Our experience is at your service—make use of it.
SPECIAL VALUES IN NOTTINGHAM LACE
CURTAINS.
Last week Ave unpacked more than sixty new designs
in Nottingham Lace Curtains. Before the advent of this
big shipment we had what we, and many others, considered a very creditable showing, but the addition of
several hundred pairs embracing more than sixty new
designs easily places our showing of Nottingham Curtains
far in the lead.
In these new designs are to be seen the latest creations
of the World's best makers of curtains. They havo
special features, such as the Hang-Easy Top, and others
which are lacking in some makes—little items perhaps,
but combine to make a better curtain. The range of
pricings permits of great choice. You'll (ind every pair
the best possible value at the price asked. If you want a
low priced curtain investigate the style we offer at
seventy-five cents per pair. You could pay $1.25 to $1.50
at some stores ancl get no better.
PRICES RANGE FROM, PER PAIR, $14 DOWN TO 75c
WEILER BROS.
Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
Try Our Satisfactory flail Order  Service,
loooooooooooooooooo^^
NEW CRETONNESandCHlNTZES
So much of the coming glory of the most delightful of
seasons is reflected in the new Cretonnes and Chintzes
the whole Curtain aud Drapery department has taken on
the air of spring. Each year designs are improved and
colorings made more beautiful, ancl this season's efforts
easily surpasses all previous attempts. Even with all
this extra goodness the prices are, if anything, lower
than before and certainly low enough to make their use
more popular. These materials may he used for a great
many purposes and are particularly adapted for curtains,
drapes, loose covers, etc. We offer you such a great
choice of designs ancl color combinations you will experience no difficulty in finding one to suit you and harmonize
perfectly with any other furnishings. Ask to see our new
Art Designs which are selling at Twenty cents a yard,
lt is unusually good value. Make your selection now
while the assortment is complete.
British Cretonne—A specially nice line in a variety of
pretty tapestry and floral effects. Splendid value at
the price marked.   Per yard   20c
British Chintz—A fine range of pretty and attractive designs in Green and Yellow, Rose and Green, Pink and
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British Chintz—Artistic designs on jaspar ground. This
style is suitable for long curtains, 48 inches wide and
sold at, per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and conventional designs, that
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Priced at, per yard, 35c, 30c and 25c
British Chintz—A very pretty and serviceable Chintz with
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It makes the less liable to soil, yet does not detract
from the daintiness.   Price, per yard  40c
Sporting
Comment.
The Nanaimo Football team again
demonstrated   their   superiority   over
he other teams on the Island by de-
eating   the   Y.M.C.A.   at   Oak   Bay
1st Saturday, in a game which showed
ilainly that they have a good compilation and will take a lot of beat-
ng.   Considering the condition of the
ield the game was very fast but the
day was considerably marred by the
eas  of  mud.   The  Y.M.C.A.  played
good game  but they were  not as
iggressive   as   tlieir   opponents,   the
inly forward of any use being Sparks
nd  he was  too  closely watched to
|e effective.   The visiting forward on
e  other hand showed  considerable
ash to their play and it was this that
on them the game.   This game gave
ie supporters of the All Island team
1 opportunity to get a line on some
the players who have been selected
represent the  Island  League.    In
e majority of instances thc choice
is  been  well  made  but  this  game
lowed   plainly   that   my   contention
garding  Harley    of    the  Nanaimo
m was right.    On his showing of
st Saturday he has no right to the
isition which  hc  has  been selected
fill.     He is very weak and had it
t been for Hewitt behind him  he
mid have been responsible for sev-
il   goals;   in   addition   to   this   the
rwards  who were  opposed to him
ere also weak and what he had to
do he failed badly. Hewitt, who will
play full back, is a dashing player,
but very rough and unless he cuts out
some of the rough work he will have
many fouls given against- him. He is
too good a player to indulge in these
tactics and it is up to his team mates
to make him play closer to the rules.
On Saturday he was responsible for
one of the goals scored by the Y. M.
C. A. which was scored from a penalty given against him. This style of
play will make it hard for the Islanders to win and hc should be cautioned
before going on the field. Tackeray
demonstrated clearly that he is entitled to the position held by Harley
and it is safe to say that he will be
the one chosen for the second match.
If the team was to bc picked a week
from today it is safe to say that
Sparks would be selected and it is
more than likely that he will be given
a chance in the second match.
While the Y.M.C.A. and Nanaimo
were battling for supremacy the Esquimalt and J.B.A.A. were also trying conclusions, the result being a
win for the former. The losers ran
up against a streak of hard luck in
being forced to play a man short for
the greater part of the match as the
result of thc rulings of the referee.
This is the first game in the series
in which a player has been ruled'off
and to have three sent to thc dressing
room in one game leaves the impression that the previous officials
have been very easy or else the referee on Saturday was more inclined
to show his authority. In all events
his  rulings did the Bays out of two
points as with their full team they
would have undoubtedly won, as it
was they had the better of the play,
but were unable to find the goal.
It is very seldom that 1 have to
find fault with a referee, but I certainly think he made a mistake when
he ordered the players from the field,
and by the decision of the executive
board it is very apparent that they
had their doubts as to the wisdom of
his action.
I am pleased to learn that an effort
is being made to place a baseball
team in the field this season to represent this city. A few years ago Victoria enjoyed the reputation of having
one of tlle best semi-professional
teams on the Coast, and there is no
reason why the same conditions could
not exist again this year.
For the past twenty years the athletes of Victoria have enjoyed the
reputation of being good losers, and
it is a very late date for the junior
teams to commence complaining
about thc treatment they receive at
the hands of the referees. It is admitted that a referee is not infallible,
but this does not give the losing team
the right to put the blame of their defeat on his shoulders. I like to see a
team play to win; if they win, they
will get credit for it, and if they lose,
let them give their opponents credit
for beating them. Thc North Ward
junior football team is a good aggregation for their size, but this does not
prevent them from being beaten, and
the excuses they offer for their defeat
last Saturday are, to say the least,
very small.
been accustomed to?"
"Oh, father, I am sure of it. He's
supported an automobile for six
months, and that's more than you
have ever been able to do."—Detroit
Free Press.
"For two cents I'd knock your block
off," said the angry man.
"Well, you don't expect mc to furnish your working capital, du you?"
responded the other and calmer one.
— Philadelphia  Ledger.
The latest achievement of Longboat
in beating three relay runners in a
live-mile race is something that
should set all athletes thinking. It
is a wonderful performance, and I
can hardly blame the amateurs of thc
United States for trying to have him
barred from the Olympic games, for
it is only by this method that they
can beat him.
It is not too early for the local lacrosse players to get busy. 'I'he time
will soon be here when they will be
out playing, and the organization nf
the club should be all complete before
thc first practice. Get busy, boys, and
you will show the Mainlanders that
they made a mistake in refusing your
application into the senior league.
When It Became Personal.
Vick-Senn—I had ever so many
chances to marry someboyd that
amounted to something, anil 1 threw
myself away mi you.
Her Husband (unexpectedly spunking up)—In my case it was quite different, madam. Ynu were absolutely
the last resort. Every nther girl had
refused me.—Chicago Tribune.
The Spoil,
"Our grocery was robbed last
night," remarked the landlady, as she
passed the butler to the star boarder.
"Is this a part of the spoil?" asked
he, sniffing at it doubtfully.
The local athletes ran up against a
snag when they journeyed to Vancouver last week, and only succeeded in
winning one game, and to their credit
it was the girls of the local High
School who accomplished the trick.
Two rugby football matches and basket-ball match went to Vancouver.
Just as tllis goes tn press, 1 learn
that Goward and Schwengers have
consented to play for thc Y. M. C. A.
for the balance of the season, Good
news fnr soccer enthusiasts,
u:mp iri:.
A Test of Riches.
"How du you know that young man
can support ynu in the way you have
Lawyer (tn bucolic client who has
called tn settle an account that cun
tains, among other items, a number of
unexpected charges I—Why don't you
come inside instead nf standing there
in the doorway?
Client (warily)—Xn, thankee, mister. I'd raythcr not, 1 knows what
you're after. You'd be charging mc
rent if 1 did!—Punch. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
Staking the Mountain
Echo.
By Arthur P. Woollacott.
(Continued from last issue)
Letherdale sized up the situation:
"Tony," he said, gripping the other's
wrist, "cover your man. Keep him covered, make him turn and hold him there
until we get this business untangled.
I'll handle Loring."
"Twining!" the young man sung out
with the coolest insinuation, "you high-
living, low-down lobster, just you take a
squint at me—for the good of your
health."
Loring wheeled at the sound of Tony's
voice and looked into the muzzle of Letherdale's revolver. He jerked his head
with furious impatience and told the
guide to go and sit on himself.
"Why in the devil don't you count,
Letherdale?" Twining cried with icy,
stinging deliberation.
"See here, Twining," said Tony in the
peculiar voice a man assumes when he
is looking for trouble, "I'll bet you this
here gun what I've got pointing plum at
that bump on the back of your head that
you're gritting your teeth to stop them
chatterin'. You're mere mush with a
brogue, and no man at all."
His way of putting it was so downright insulting that Twining swung
around at him, took in the posture of affairs and choked: "What—" he exclaimed, "who—you tin-whipped scum.
If you interfere any further—by heaven,
if I don't cane you! Letherdale! will
you do us the kindness to proceed. If
ever I involve myself again with such
another lump of unleavened impudence
as this cursed friend of yours, eat me!
by heaven!"
Tony smiled at him sweetly: "All the
same, if there's any shooting to be clone,
you've got to talk to me first, see!"
"Shooting!" Twining fairly screamed.
"Letherdale, can you persuade this—
this—" he indicated Tony with a shoulder, "to obliterate himself." His wrath
got the better of him and he dashed at
Genelle, who, however, stood his ground,
with an eye glinting along the barrel.
"Easy there!" he ripped out wamingly,
"or I'll hurt you sure."
Letherdale jumped between them.
"Drop this Twining. I don't know what
vour trouble is, but this game is called
off."
"And what in the devil will you do?"
he cried flaring at Letherdale.
" Tug you—double quick, too."
"I see," he drawled, with his usual
coolness, and the faintest suspicion of a
smile. "You, as gentlemen of—ah—
honour, desire an explanation. Loring,
please explain, and let us get on."
"You're a way off there," Loring returned; "there's nothing that would interest these men unless it is a difference
of opinion as to what constitutes honourable procedure. Letherdale, you and
Genelle go off somewhere and look at
the scenery." He put his gun under his
arm and lit a cigarette.
"Right you are," said Twining; "the
pair of you may consider yourselves relieved from further responsibility. Any
interference on vour part will be at vour
risk."
He clucked into his tent and brought
out a scientific instrument with a bell
attachment which he wound up and set
going. Finding that it worked satisfactorily, he wound it up again.
"We'll fire at the tenth stroke, you understand."
Thc backwoodsmen were ignored.
"Jump 'em," suggested Tony quietly.
Letherdale nodded and turned to give the
Indians a signal to stand by, but they
were staring fixedly with heads thrust
forward at something in the fringe of
berry bushes.
The men had scarcely turned when the
cursed machine began striking clearly,
insistently like strokes of doom. Letherdale heard thc Indians utter an exclamation of alarm, and saw Loring who
was facing the river bending forward
like one fascinated by some horror. Tony
was in the act of edging off his last boot
with his toe, and then hc began creeping
towards Twining like a cat. Five—six
—seven—. Letherdale lost count for he
heard something like a woman's agonised "oh!" from somewhere. A shot
rang out, and Tony and Twining's voices
were mixed up in a fearful tumult. The
Indians yelled and Loring toppled forward ; his revolver flew out of his hand,
and he flung out on the ground with
arms spread wide. The whole air
seemed alive with voices and noises.
As Letherdale bent over Loring he saw
Tony struggling with Twining and Long
Jim bounding to his assistance.
"Where is it, old fellow," cried Letherdale, lifting the Doctor very carefully.
"Good God! Letherdale, did you see
it?" he cried staring,
"Are you hit?"
"Hit ?" He began feeling around with
decided interest. "Oh—I don't know,
hardly. No. I stumbled. Get a brand
and see what's in the bushes."
There was a rational air about him
that was reassuring. Letherdale got a
brand and flashed it over the thicket by
the river, but beyond a few eddies likt
those made by a paddle nothing was seen.
When Letherdale turned his attention
to Twining, Long Jim was already sitting on the man's legs while Tony was
perched on his breast, preaching at him
in a fatherly way.
"No sirree, no one blows no one's
brains out in this here country for noth-
in. Why, man, the climate's dead agin'
it, bein' kind of relaxin'. Consider these
magnificent solitudes, and ask yourself
if the Almighty didn't know what He
was a-doin'. This here country, I tell
you, was speshully made to accommodate a mighty big swear, and if you can't
get satisfaction that way you're no expert in the English language."
Twining's bosom began to heave, ancl
Tony bobbed up and clown looking surprised, but when his victim exploded in
a fit of hysterical laughter, he jumped
off suddenly with a half scared grin on
his face. Long Jim rolled off the man's
legs and the party stood around the prostrate form, contemplating him. His face
presently turned purple, ancl he seemed
to have some sort of trouble with his
stomach for he kept clutching at it with
both hands, rolling his head from side
to side and gasping to Letherdale for
water, which he got at once, for he had
never seen anyone in such a fix before
and was afraid that the man would hurt
himself and therefore flung a basin of
water full in his face, which brought him
to with a gasp ancl an awful snortle.
He got up and retired to his tent where
for an hour or two after he was heard,
gurgling, exploding and swearing sternly to himself.
The Indians on being questioned swore
positively that they had seen a white-
faced woman staring at them through the
screen of bushes with great round eyes
and lips that looked as if she wanted to
speak. Letherdale was bothered by a
persistent notion that they were being
watched from the top of the bluff across
the river, and did not sleep much, or feel
like a rational being until he began moving around in the chilly dawn.
After an early breakfast Twining
stepped over to the group around Letherdale's camp-fire: "It seems to me," he
said, trimming a cigar, "that you men
were premature to say the least of it.
The Doctor and I recognized that we
were running each other very closely in
this affair and it was my idea to settle
the matter by first blood in a little quick-
firing target practice. Fortunately beyond an accidental discharge, no damage
was done."
The men were taken aback—for a moment. Twining was plausible but not
entirely convincing. He turned to the
Doctor: "I'll toss you now, Doctor, for
the right of entering a record. There's
no sense in rushing down over twenty
or thirtv miles of dangerous waterway
to end up in all probability in an unseemly scramble in the Recorder's
Office."
"That's further presumption on your
part. I'm not aware that you were justified in coining up here in the first
place."
"Well!" the other returned with significant emphasis, glancing at the men for
appreciation, "surely you're game!"
Letherdale stepped into the breach:
"We've got to toss for the road, anyhow. She's risen a foot and she's dangerous. It would be going plum to disaster to run two canoes abreast through
so many narrow gorges, rapids and logjams."
The guides tossed; Genelle won and
was given twenty second's start which
put him comfortably around a bend.
Then with a whoop Letherdale's outfit
cut loose ancl went flying down like a
toboggan. Tliere were so many sudden
twists, back-shoots, and boiling could-
rons that they were every instant in jeopardy of their lives.   Tony set the pace
in his reckless way and kept the lead.
Water was shipped a dozen times in half
as many miles and in spite of energetic
baling on the part of the passengers the
canoes were on the point of being swamped when they reached the lake. Here
they pulled even, had lunch together and
ran abreast to the next river where Tony
again won the toss and was given ten
seconds' start.
This stretch was good going except in
one place where the stream divided, the
larger part doubling back into a nest
of rocks while a little ditch of water shot
straight on like a mill race. Tony's
canoe disappeared down the race in a
twinkling. Letherdale gave the signal
to his men who put in every ounce they
had to get way enough on to carry the
craft over the top of the back shoot.
Down they went at a terrific speed, with
a force that sent them foaming along
the very edge of the terrace of water.
Half the canoe was in the mill-race when
a swirl caught the stern and jammed her
broadside onto an angle of rock. The
Indians yelled, whipped out the poles and
dug her on, but Long Jim's stick caught
in a crevice and he was sprung out like
a man from a catapult. A hundred yards
was passed over before the craft could
be snubbed, and then two minutes were
lost in picking up their man, which, at
the rate they were going meant over a
thousand yards.
What Letherdale said going down the
last half mile of the river had the odor
of brimstone. When salt water was
reached Genelle was seen a good half
mile out making a bee line for Haddington's house—a white speck on the farther shore, about three miles away.
Letherdale stood up and scanned the
straits. The flood was coming down at
a swinging clip and he cut up half a
mile with the river current to meet it.
Tony evidently calculated getting over on
the dead slack but Letherdale's only
chance was in making a bid for the flood.
Presently the current caught the bow
and with a good six-knot current under
them they went foaming down in an
oblique line for the mining recorder's
office. Never would he forget that spurt.
His reputation was at stake. His men
understood and had stripped to the waist.
The movements of their brown, glistening muscular backs reminded him of a
double team of bays crowding down on
the home stretch. Haddington afterwards said he heard their war-grunts
long before he located the canoe.
The flag-ship was playing some lively
music as they swept into the fleet, which
screwed them up another notch. A
hoarse cheer from hundreds of sailors
descended on them like an avalanche.
They flung up their paddles ancl dashed
on. "By George! that's the third canoe
that has come tearing out of that river
within the last hour," Letherdale heard
someone say.
The flood now struck Tony and began
carrying him down: it would have been
a waste of time to stem it; he therefore
turned and dashed for a point on shore
about two hundred yards below the office.
A gay spot of color moved quickly
along the green, through a flock of
geese, and halted a moment at the office
gate. It was a woman who after looking at the canoes, ran lightly up the
steps and disappeared within.
Twining's outfit struck the beach while
the other was still nearly two hundred
yards out. He leapt ashore and plunged
heavily up the shingle with Tony on his
heels encouraging him; "Go it old hoss,
keep her up!" he was heard to say.
Twining twisted his head over his
shoulder and snapped out: "Shut up
you noisy ass!"
In that instant he plunged headlong
into the flock of geese, and was swallowed up like magic. A most unholy
cackling rent the air, and Twining was
a mere blurr under a white-winged scrimmage of noise and motion. But he found
his feet minus his hat, at which an old
gander was viciously pecking, and with
a swing of his foot right and left he
sent a bird reeling lifeless on either hand.
Letherdale's canoe was now ashore and
Loring immediately shot up the beach,
but as he was not used to the shingle,
the guide got ahead of him. The men
were now about even, each making for
an opposite door. Letherdale took the
front entrance and got in first. Haddington was filling out a form and nodded to the guide with a look of surprise.
The latter observed a well-dressed woman seated at a window commanding a
view of the green, but he did not recognise her as her features were screened
by a newspaper which she had hastily
taken up as he entered.
There came a rush of feet up the steps
and with the merest pretence of a preliminary warning the doors were assailed. Loring's opened first. Twining's
was slightly jammed, but his voice came
through the panels in stentorian tones:
"Mining Recorder, I have a mineral
claim to record. Look at the clock; note
the time. I claim priority," half of
which was uttered as he strode in with
papers fluttering in his outstretched
hands.
Loring was quick on his feet, and covered the ground deftly with papers extended, and a compelling gesture which
had its effect on Haddington, who had
leapt up at the commencement of the
racket, dropping his glasses, and with
his gray military moustache bristling
with ire.
"Who   in "   he   began   forcibly,
glancing either way. "Gentlemen! what
do you mean? There's a bell. What
imp—er,—gentlemen, I certainly did not
expect you."
His hands reached out for the papers.
Loring thrust his into the right hand,
closing the fingers over them with his
own, saying rapidly: "Record the Mountain Echo Mineral Claim. Observe!
these papers are in your hands first!"
Twining's papers were tickling the
Recorder's left palm which closed on
them. He held both sets up, looked at
them, then at the clock and uttered his
statement impartially:
"Gentlemen! Mr. Twining, you certainly intimated your intention to record
a mineral claim exactly six seconds before Dr. Loring did, but I must say that
his papers were in my hands before
your's were."
"Be good enough to make a note of
the circumstances," said Twining with
the superior air of an aristocrat.
Haddington nodded stiffly.
The newspaper began to rustle audibly
and the woman behind it was evidently
moved by something she relished hugely.
Twining got sight of her and his manner at once underwent a striking alteration. His hands went up to his tangled
hair, yet he instantly became the insinuating modern gallant, ready at a moment to diffuse his personality in the
most approved style.
He glanced quickly about the room
and went immediately into a frantic fit
of subdued pantomime, for there, standing in the doorway, looking as portentously innocent as a volcano, was Tony
with a limp goose held up by the neck
in either hand.
"Here's this here game Cap'n," he
drawled, holding them out at arm's
length and coming forward with what
looked like bashfulness.
Twining squirmed, threatened him
horribly and motioned him out; "Here!
take these here things," said Genelle, as
if fearing the scorn of multitudes. He
thrust them into Twining's hands, saying: "Nagle's a' comin'."
Already, the. stubborn little rancher
was in the door, glowering at Twining
with a bitter-looking eye. The geese slid
to the floor, and Twining began diffusing himself with great affability in
Nagle's direction; but that little chap
meant business and was bent on having
his say out.
"Mr. Haddington," she said, putting
down the paper ancl looking straight at
him, "will you please send those forms
to me when you have finished them.
"Oh!" she added in apology, when she
became aware of the presence of Letherdale and others. "Mr. Letherdale," she
exclaimed, rising to greet him. "I'm so
glad to see you!"
It was Eleanor Newcombe at her best,
and charmingly sweet she certainly was:
her features were merry with laughter,
but with another feeling giving the eyes
a softer look—memories that came
crowding back with a rush that threatened to engulf her.
"Dear Mr. Letherdale!" she murmured, with considerable warmth. He wondered at her effusiveness. Some notable
pshchological revolution must have annihilated her sense of time, for it was only
a day or two since, that he had seen her
last. She recovered herself with an effort and gave herself over to her sensations of mirth. She glanced in Twining's direction and looked a little difficulty at Dr. Loring. Letherdale saw
that she wanted to get away quickly:
"I'm coming this evening," he said, "and
vou'll tell me, Eleanor, all about yourself."
(To be continued.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
"*•
At The Street
Corner
By THB LOW-KJER
I If I were given to extravagant lan-
tage, I should say that the greatest
■cial event which has ever taken
ace since the early settlers camped
Victoria more than fifty years ago,
bcurred on Tuesday evening last,
hen the Charity Ball was held at
e Empress Hotel.
Although I lounged about the
10ms and corridors of this -magnifi-
:nt hostelry from 9 p.m. till 3 a.m.,
id absorbed every detail of the func-
on, I am quite unable adequately to
Iiscribe its  splendours.
The  artistic  decoration,   the   har-
onious  colouring and the  brilliant
fining of the rooms furnished a fit-
ig  background  for  the  panorama,
ie  gaily-dressed, constantly-moving
rong,   the   hum   of   converse,   the
ounding evidence of happiness, all
iicated   that   the   gay   crowd   had
lived  the  problem most aptly   ex-
lessed  in  the  phrase,  "La  joie  de
>re."
It was a cosmopolitan and a happy
pwd; every class was represented;
distinctions which regulate what
called  "society"  functions   were
lspicuous    by   their   absence,    or
nifested themselves only in the in-
change of personal courtesy among
*se   who   move   in   the same   set.
ce every set did likewise, there was
evidence of aloofness and no isola-
The  Lieutenant-Governor,   the
fef Justice,  the  Premier,  Counsel,
Wholesaler, the Retailer, the Re-
I'ter and the Mechanic all rubbed
nilders, Cast into the huge cruci-
j of a social but not a society func-
|i,  charity  became  the  dissolvent,
all went merrily,
f I say anything now which sav-
s of criticism, I hope it will be
lerstood that my sole object is to
linate any deficiencies from similar
nts in the future. As a function,
affair was a huge success; as a
Ice it was not. Seven hundred and
tickets were sold, and practically
|ry ticket was represented in per-
yet at no time could more than
j people take part in the dancing,
ch means that more than half the
ild-be dancers had to stand or sit
here should have been a more
•erful orchestra stationed near the
of the staircase, where it would
Ie been heard equally well in .the
ng-room, and the  hall and both
rs could have been used for danc-
The palm room was almost de-
Ied,   because   everybody  thronged
he hall, whereas it would have fared plenty of room for the sitters-
who  could  have  witnessed   the
Icing through the portieres.
Hiile the supper was excellent, it
entirely insufficient for so large
Jowd, with the result that after the
sitting the choice items on the
m were exhausted. There should
e been at least a third more of the
t provisions, and the billiard-room
well as the grill-room could have
n used. I know ladies who, with
ir escorts, stood outside the sup-
(-room door for nearly two hours
are they could gain admittance.
Item number 3.—In deference to
Irons and ladies no longer in their
youth, there should have been 't
square dances. It would have
led grace to the function, and
pld have furnished a much desired
Drtunity to display some very
litiful costumes. I think that if
dance  committee  had   not  been
1 posed exclusively of young people
deficiency would not have passed,
:h suggests that in future it might
veil to add a matron to the com-
ee.
also heard it whispered that thc
committee made no attempt to
the dancers posted as to what
transpiring, and that they were
Ie concerned about dancing themes than in attending to their pre-
ptive duties. I do not endorse this
iplaint,   but  have   been  asked   to
voice it on the authority of a number
of those who take this view.
On the whole, I think litle fault can
fairly be found. There were only two
things which jarred on my sense of
fitness. The one was the decidedly
objectionable fancy character assumed
by one lady, who shall, of course, be
nameless, but whose display brought
blushes to cheeks which were even
rouged; the other the behaviour of a
stout, elderly man, in Oriental garb,
who, in excess of joy, abandoned himself to the worship of Bacchus. These,
however, were but specks on an almost flawless panorama.
The function was rendered possible for the first time in Victoria by
the. opening of the Empress Hotel.
Just how great a need it fills was
well demonstrated on Tuesday night.
It renders social functions of the
most brilliant kind possible, and if the
enterprising and wealthy corporation
whicli owns it could only be induced
to add a large hall suitable for dances,
chamber concerts, conventions, and
similar gatherings, they would not
only round out their programme in
Victoria, but would ensure profit as
well as popularity for themselves.
CC<n
ftc*^**.
THE CANADIAN MAGAZINE.
The Canadian Magazine for February is more than ever distinctly Canadian. It starts off with an illustrated
article by Frank Yeigh, entiled "The
Cariboo Trail," and some of the other
most important contributions are as
follows: "The Washington of the
North," by M. 0. Scott, illustrated,
being an account of the work done by
the Ottawa Improvement Commission
to beautify the Capital; "The Last
Letters of Wolfe and Montcalm," by
H. V. Ross; an outline of the "Canadian Immigration Policy," by W. S.
Wallace; "The Art of St. Thomas
Smith," by R. Holmes, with reproductions of some of Mr. Smith's pictures;
"The Trade Into the North," by
Aubrey Ftilerton, illustrated, and an
article entitled "The Canadian Flag,"
by John S. Ewart, K.C, of Ottawa.
"Madam," said the doctor who had
been called at 2 a.m., after examining
the patient, "send at once for the clergyman and also for a lawyer if you
want to make your will."
"Good gracious!" exclaimed the
horrified patient, "is it as bad as that?"
"Oh, there is no danger at all," replied the M. D. "But I don't want to
be the only one who has had his
slumbers disturbed for nothing."--
Chicago News.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thenee east 80 chains; thence south SO
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS.  CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 26, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located  January 25,  1908.
WILLIAM  EDWARD  NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent,
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the SW. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement;  640 acres,  more or
less.
Located January  25,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;   640  acres,   more  or  less.
Located January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thenee west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18.
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
ohains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement;  640 acres,  more or  less.
Located January 25,  1908.
WELLINGTON  McALPINE,
Feb. 22       Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
if-Vt-pMeQ
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
$27.50, $!10, $S5.
ALLEN & CO.     1
Fit=Reform Wardrobe I
Victoria, B. C. J
Vi_^JH_^_i___ik_k__tA____^J^_te__l_^__«_kJ^ft 1
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road,  Vancouver
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
WEEK 17TH FEBRUARY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COMIDIHE,    Pr*»rlat»ra.
Manaitmant >f ROIT. JAMieSON.
CARLISLE'S DOG AND PONY
CIRCUS
Including    "Tom,"    the    World's
Greatest Talking Pony.
ALVA YORK
English Singing Comedienne.
SEYMOUR EMILIE
HOWE and EDWARDS
Comedy Sketch
"The Arrival of Mr. Dooley."
THE PIOTTES
Character Singers
"The Italian and His Sweetheart."
EDDIE POWERS
Blackface Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"There's Another Picture in My
Mama's Frame.
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pearl Fisher."
"The Exciting Ride."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"IL BACIO."
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house).... 10c
Evening a, Balcony  lOo
Lower Floor  10c
Boxes    Itc
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night  Performances
8 and 9.15
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH A  THOROUGH
BUSINESS COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
Instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE   SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.O.
E. A. MacMillan.
LADIES MEDICAL   GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
MR.     BJORNFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
^°Nayyy   Richardson
I'iKar Store.
Phone 34s
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
|THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yatea St, Victoria B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
rictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  ai
current rates.  Anthracite coal Ar sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for  the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C
P
HTENTS  and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTORIA, B. O. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1908,
•"_•"
«_*.*
AT THE EMPRESS DANCE.
■*_!___ -___» aia ■>!■ ■!■ tfli tit butt tii tit tii A tIt
X Social and        *
$ Personal. $
__.■__. ^i. ____■__» __________ _________ ____■_• __________ A______M*M*A ^___L_0 _______• ^J_M ftAfl
The Fancy Dress Ball at the Empress last Tuesday proved itself both
socially and financially a huge success. About seven hundred guests
thronged the spacious halls and corridors, which were beautifully decorated for the occasion. Miss Thain's orchestra was placed in the alcove on a
raised dais. The orchestra, which had
been carefully selected by its leader,
consisted of twelve of the best musicians to be obtained in the town.
Among the most praiseworthy costumes were: Mrs. R. H. Pooley, very
handsome yellow satin Chinese costume; Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, in black
velvet and gold embroidery, as "Tlie
Merry Widow"; Mrs. Roy Troupe's
costume as "San Toy,' was very beautifully carried out; Mrs. H. Barnard,
as an Hungarian peasant; Miss G.
Hickey made a very striking Eastern
dancing girl; Mr. and Mrs. B. Tye, as
Buster Brown and Mary Jane, created
great amusement; Mr. Macgill as Uncle Sam; Mrs. Macgill, a Toreodor;
Miss Evelyn Tilton, a beautiful Des-
demona; Miss Newcombe made an
excellent witch; Mr. Donald (Vancouver) was rather a shy Buster Brown,
and Mr. K, Schofield was also a Buster; Mr. J. Musgrave, a native of
South America; Miss Pooley, Rouge-
et-Noir; Miss V. Pooley was very
handsome as Night; Miss Newling's,
as Cleopatra, was well carried out;
Miss Dorothy Bulwer made a very
pretty Eastern dancing girl; Mr. Harvey, Italian fisherman; Miss Marie
Gaudin, an Italian peasant; Miss K.
Gaudin, as Xmas; Miss Mellon, Hussar; Mr. Cecil Berkeley, Squire Bantam; Mr. Charles Newcombe, Knight
of the Boston Garter; Mr. J. Abbott,
Country Squire! Miss J. Abbott, Hussar (white); Miss Fitzgibbon, Puritan; Miss J. Langley, Summer Girl;
Miss V. Mason, Carmen; Miss D.
Mason, Dancing Girl; Capt. Hughes,
Mephisto, His Satanic Majesty; Mr.
Hogoty, Paddy; Mr. Hodgson, Jacji
Tar; Mr. M. Mason, Sam Tong; Mrs.
J. VV. Laing, Punchinello; Mrs. W.
Langley, Grass Widow; Miss VV. Lugrin, Carmen; Miss N. Lugrin, Butterfly; Mr. B. Tye, Cowboy; Miss G
Lucas, Cowgirl; Miss Hall, Cingalee;
Miss Locke, Chinese Girl; Miss
Troupe, Gypsy; Miss V. Bolton,
Dutch Girl; Miss Blackwood, Ladies'
Field; Mrs. Stvetlicld, Xmas; Mrs. C.
Pooley, Bo-Peep; Mr. Colin Hogg.
Pierrot; Mr. C. Pooley, Charles I.;
Miss Emma Sehl, Lady of tlie Snow;
Mrs. C. \l. Wilson, Pergola nf Roses;
Miss M. Little, Cingalee; Miss Gillespie, Highlander; Mr. McDougall,
Highlander; and Capt. D. McDonald.
Mrs, Lagan, Kate Greenway, Miss T.
Monteith, Dancing of the Girl; Miss
Heyland, Dancing Girl.
Among the cithers were: Thc Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir;
Premier and JIrs. McBride, Chief
Justice and Mrs. Hunter, Judge Martin and Mrs. Martin, Commander and
Airs. Allgood, Captain and Mrs.
Troupe, Justice and Mrs. Trving, Justice Morrison, Sir Chas. H. Tupper,
Lady Tupper, Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
Macdonald, Dr. and Mrs. King, G
R. Naden, M.P.P., Mr. W. Blakemore,
Miss Barbara Blakemore, Consul and
Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Ker,
Dr. and Mrs. 0. M. Jones, Dr. J. D.
and Mrs. Helmcken, Dr. Herman
and Mrs. Robertson, Dr. Dolby, Mrs.
Higgins, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Genge,
Mr. and Mrs. Bulen, Dr. Fagan, Mr.
and Mrs. G Matthews, Mr. and Mrs.
C. E. Pooley, and many others.
*   *   *
Mr. R. P. Roberts, of Kuper Island,
spent thc week-end in Victoria, the
guest of Captain and Mrs. Gaudin, of
Craigflower Road.
Mrs.  Tatlow is visiting friends  in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Finch-Page, New Westminster,
is in Victoria for a short stay.
* *   *
Mr. Ralph Lowndes, of Vancouver,
is the guest of Mr. Henry Bulwer,
Esquimalt Road.
Mr. W. A. Kingscote and Mr. Anthony Williams were registered at the
Balmoral during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Matson entertained at a
Bridge tournament on Thursday evening, for Esquimalt people.
* *   *
Miss Mackay, who has been confined to the house with rheumatism,
is out again.
* *   *
Mr. Boyer is taking Mr. Keefer's
place in the bank at Duncans, while
the latter is having holidays.
* *   *
Mrs. Williams-Freeman and Mr.
Frank Hall came down from Duncans
for the Empress Ball on Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. V. Tunis, of
Vancouver, were clown for the Ball,
returning home the next morning.
* *   *
Captain and Mrs. Wolley and Miss
Wolley were registered at the Balmoral during the week.
Captain and Mrs. Parry have arrived from England, and are registered at the Empress.
* *   *
Mrs. F. B. Pemberton left for Vancouver on Wednesday morning, en
route to England, to see her son, who
is at school there.
* '*   *
Mr. Herbert Aspland, formerly of
Victoria, is renewing old acquaintances. He has just arrived from
California.
Mr. P. W. Keefer, of the Bank of
British North America, Duncans, is
spending a short holiday with his parents at their home on Pemberton
Road.
* *   *
Sir Charles H. Tupper, Lady Tupper and Miss Frances Tupper, C.
Spencer, Mr. ancl Mrs. Curtis, Arthur
Brown Jukes, Mr. and Mrs. Abbott
were among the numerous Vancouverites who attended the ball.
* *   *
Mrs. T. S. Gore gave a Bridge party
last Monday at her residence at Oak
Bay. The guests were: Mrs. W. F.
Bullen, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Phip-
pen, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Matthews,
Mrs. Gibson, Mrs. Harvey, Mrs.
Tuck, Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Griffiths.
+   *   *
Miss Heneage entertained a few
friends al tea on Saturday afternoon
last, prior lo her departure for Thetis
Island. Some of those present wcre
Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Herman Robertson, the Misses Gertrude and Aline
Mackay, Miss J. Crease, Mr. Lindlay
Crease, Miss Musgrave, Mrs. Bridgman, Mrs. Allgood, and Mrs. Luxton.
Professional Ethics.
"You will have to send for another
doctor,' said the one who had be> n
called, after A glance at the patient.
"Am I so sick as that?'' gasped the
sufferer.
"I don't k.i:w just how sick you
are," replied ihe man of med'cine,
"but I know you're thel awyer who
cross-examined me when I appeared
as an expert witness. My conscience
won't let me kill you, and I'll bc
hanged if I want to cure you. Good
day."—Philadelphia Ledger.
There Are Judges and Judges.
"I'm shober as a judge," quoth he,
Though he was "frisky";
"Oh, yes," she sneered, "you're sober
As a judge of whiskey."
—Exchange.
Her Greatest Need.
"Dr. Stiles insists," said Mrs.
Woodby, "that I must spend the winter in Florida. He says I need a
change."
"Yes," replied her husband,
promptly, "you need a change—
that's a fact."
"Ah, you admit it, then?"
"Yes, you need a change of doctors."—Philadelphia Press.
A Wise Youth.
An urchin of some eight summers
ran into the house the other clay, and,
addressing his grandma, who was
quietly darning socks by the kitchen
fire, said:
"Grandma, can you eat nuts?"
"No, my clear," was thc reply, "I
lost all my teeth years ago."
"Then," said the youngster, producing a quantity of Brazil nuts, "hold
these while I go out and get some
more."—Pick-Me-Up.
Receipt for Fine Prune Marmalade.
This is a French recipe and particularly valuable in seasons
when fruit is scarce: Take 6 line, large cooking apples, peel,
plunge in cold water, then put them over a slow fire, together with
the juice of 2 lemons and half a pound of sugar. When well
stewed, split and stone two and a half pounds of prunes and put
them to stew with the apples, and enough water to prevent burning.
When all appears well dissolved, beat it through a strainer bowl
and lastly through a sieve. Mould if you like, or put away in small
glass jars, to cut in thin slices for the ornamentation of pastry,
or to be eaten with cream.
FRENCH PRUNES, nice, new, 3 lbs 25c
FRENCH   PRUNES,  per  lb ioc
FRENCH PRUNES, extra large, 2 lbs 25c
FANCY PRUNES, per package   ioc
DIXI H. ROSS & GO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
•oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real.
Grill in Britisli
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te   season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street. Victoria, B. C.
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000c
No Hope.
Young Wife—Doctor, can't you
give mc any hope?
Knowing Physician—I am afraid
not, madam. While your husband's
age is against him, his vitality ensures his recovery.—Baltimore American.
Could Not Miss.
"I would like to find a girl radically different from myself."
"Never mind, Charley; you will
find plenty of bright girls.—New
York Telegram.
Quite a Difference.
"What docs Vernon do for a living?"
"Hc works in a paint shop."
"Why, I understand he was a writer
for the magazines."
"Well, you asked me what he did
for a living."—Bohemian.
The Only Way.
Cassidy—Ah, well, no wan kin prc-
vint w'ats past an' gone.
Casey—Ye could if yc only acted
quick enough.
Cassidy—Go 'long, man! How
could yer?
Casey—Stop it before it happens.—
Philadelphia Press.
Even There.
"Dear," saidt he melancholy wife,
"if you die first, you will wait for me
there on that far shore, won't you?"
"I guess so," replied her husband,
with a yawn; "I've always had to
wait for you wherever I go."—Catholic Standard and Times.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phillppl,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range ., Poudrier Survey; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thenco south 80 chains; thence west SO
chains to place of beginning, being said
section  21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent.
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find tbat well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
"Be not simply good, be good
for Something."
It's a great thing to be a
good cook and it is so easy
if you
Cook With Gas
Nothing but the most satisfactory results if you follow our simple instructions.
Won't you call and let us
show you some new ranges.
Splendid values. Illustrated
catalogue free for the asking.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS. fxr_T_T__iiT(Ttt%%*rrr_i_-_-fr
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
MO GraoviUe,
Vaacoaver.
U_H.1_t.l-t JUUUUUU.M.» f » « « K
aa!
Vancouver Edition
The Week
A British Colombia Review,
Published at Vietoria aud Vancouver B. C.
f ol. V.    No. 4
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908
sgnnnnnrr-n
s   Stewart WiUlaas
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
f 1 FONT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
LuU_JUUUU_UAAAA_UJUUtl«A°
Ons Dollar Pbk Annb
There will be general re-
Ihe Budget joicing at the splendid
|peech. showing which the Honour
able- Mr. Tatlow lias been
[ble to lay before the House in the Budget
peech which he delivered on Thursday.,
/ith a surplus of about a $1,250,000 it is
t difficult for Finance Ministers to be
ipular, and the large grants which tlie
overnment has been able to make to the
ublic Works are naturally very gratify-,
g both to the Members and their consti-
ents.    To be  able  to  vote   more than
00,000 under this head as well as to pay
almost as much of the Provincial debt
an achievement as remarkable as it is
tifying.   Moreover, the judicious policy
the Government has raised tlie Revenues
the Province to a figure which will
ke administration an easy "matter.  The
distribution and equalization of taxation
1 also be a popular move, but not more
oular than the promised reduction in
personal property tax.    The most dras-
proposal of the Government is involved
the increase of indemnities to Members
Ministers   and   the superannuation
tures of the Civil Service Bill.   None
these have been subjected to serious
icism; the public recognizes that a ses-
*ial indemnity of .$800 was totally in-
iquate and the increase to $1,200 is only
onably moderate.    It is safe to say
of the forty-two Members of the Local
islature there is not one who will make
.ent out of the increased indemnity,
h reference to the Ministerial stipend,
as been raised from $4,000 to $5,000.
Week which was the first to advocate
|i these increases, and to suggest the
.Tint, regrets that the increase in the
isterial stipend is not in tbe same pro-
ion as in the Sessional indemnity—it
ld have   been  $6,000.    However, a
e has been made in the right direction,
;e is no greater mistake than to under-
men in the public service.    British
nubia today has a Ministry of which
country might well be proud;  finan-
y it is on velvet, and can afford to
iunerate  them in some  adequate de-
With  reference to what may be
3d the consolidation of the Civil Scr-
tliis cannot but be a popular measure
e it is one of justice and one which
tend to increase the efficiency of the
administration.     Altogether   tho
E DITORI AL
lulled into any sense of false security as
to the position which they hold in the
public regard.   It is probable that in amy
community a.majority of the people regard
strong drink as an evil, it is also probable
that a small majority regard it as a necessary evil.   It is this small majority which
has hitherto maintained the trade.     The
strength of the temperance party lies mainly in the abuse of the traffic, the weakness
of the trade lies in its failure to exercise
proper restraint over those engaged in it.
Incidents like that which occurred in Victoria a week ago when a poor drunken
sailor lost his-life appal the public conscience and lend weight to the demand for
drastic  measures.     On  the  other  hand
where the law is strictly enforced and
drink is not abused there is little or no
hostile sentiment,  and  even temperance
people are willing to "live and let live."
This is the cruix of the whole question,
tlie enforcement of the law.    There are
few "places in Canada where if the law
were enforced  to  the  very  letter  there
would be any cause for complaint.   Under
these circumstances the greatest complaint
would cease because tliere would be no
drunkenness.   In every part of Canada it
is an offence to supply liquor to a drunken
man and yet the offence is permitted every
day in almost every town.   The Licensed
Victuallers will some  day wake up  to
realize the fact that in tolerating this laxity in their ranks they  are their own
greatest enemies; their trade is a legitimate
one, sanctioned by the laws of the country,
in their ranks are to be found some of the
most estimable men.   Their business, properly conducted, is above reproach, and it
has again and again been demonstrated
that   under   such   circumstances   public
opinion will not tolerate their suppression.
Let them take warning; let them insist on
the observance of tlie law not only as a
duty to the public, but as an act of self-
preservation lest worse things befall them.
lie
licial outlook today and the Statesman-
Imanner in which the position has been
lied reflects the highest credit upon
[Minister of Finance and the Govern-
The contrast in this respect bell 1904 and 1908 is as remarkable as
■Jontrast between the stagnation of the
er period and the abounding pros-'
• of the latter.
liquor
The   Week    has   recently
called attention to the Universal   growth   of   public
opinion in the direction of
I stringent control of the liquor traffic,
ould be well if those engaged in the
would carefully study the signs of
limes and not allow themselves to be
The strictures of The Week
The Climax.      on the remarkable attitude
of Mr. Justice Martin towards his judicial duties received a remarkable justification on Wednesday last
when lie initiated a new departure in the
art of playing at cross purposes with his
"learned brothers." The incident, which
occurred in the Appeal Court at Victoria,
has been so widely reported in the daily
press that it need not be repeated. It
furnishes enough evidence that Mr. Justice Martin's mind does not work in thc
same manner as that of the man who is
made of common clay. It is a good many
years since Shakespeare wrote: "But in
the nice sharp quillets of thc war good
faith I am no wiser than a daw," and if
Mr. Justice Martin is right the statement
must still hold good as far as the average
mortal is concerned. Why a Chief Justice who has a right to issue an instruction
to a colleague has not also a right to countermand it must for ever remain a puzzle
to a layman. It is an equal puzzle to
know why the considerations which influenced Mr. Justice Martin at 2.15 p.m. to
abandon an untenable and illogical position did not weigh with him at 11.30 a.m.
of the same clay. It would also be interesting to know upon what principle his
"learned brothers" could exonerate him
from the liability to sit if, as he claimed,
he had been assigned to that duty, and yet
this was the loop-hole through whicli he
elected to make his escape. In spite of
his amusing vagaries Mr. Justice Martin
has in defence of his peculiar conclusions
invariably exhibited considerable intelligence and mental dexterity. On this
occasion, however, he was hopelessly
illogical, and when he stooped to charge
his brother Judges with partiality he lowered himself beneath the dignity of a.
petty Judge. The matter lies in a nutshell. As The Week stated in last issue
Mr. Justice Martin has been willing to
gratify his obvious personal spleen at the
expense of the public service. He has
now gone a step further; by his trucn-
lence and his unreasoning attack upon the
partiality of his colleagues he has declassed himself and brought contempt upon the judicial bench for whose dignity
he has been such a pertinacious stickler.
This should be the last of his vagaries, the
public interest demands that he should be
translated to a sphere in which a long-
suffering people would not be compelled to
foot the bill for his ludicrous amusements.
every loyal Canadian and every loyal
Britisher will discountenance a course of
action which would complicate matters or
in the slightest degree retard an amicable
settlement. It is intolerable that blatant
demogogues of the Gothard type' should
be allowed to imperil the cause of law
and order. Too much licence has already
been allowed such men and it is not because The Week is opposed to Asiatic Exclusion, but because it objects to alien
interference in Canadian affairs and the
domination of alien agitators that it protests against the decision of the Vancouver
The Vancouver branch of
Reaping With the . Asiatic . Exclusion
The Whirlwind.  League has long ago sown
to the wind, it is now beginning to reap with the whirlwind. In
last issue The Week gave some particulars
of the inner working of the Parent Society whicli originated among the thugs
of San Francisco and has terminated in
the North American Asiatic Exclusion
League. The recent meeting of the Vancouver Branch would not indicate that
more moderate counsels are yet prevailing
in the party. In spite of the impassioned
appeal of the Secretary, Mr. Gordon
Grant, and several other gentlemen who
supported him, the meeting took the bit
iu its teeth and literally bolted. If the
fire-eaters led by the same S. Gothard who
was paid by the Vancouver World to attend the Seattle Convention, are allowed
to have their way the 7th March will see
a monster parade and it may see many
other things, which Vancouver would regret for years to come. The English
speaking peoples of the World, rejoice in
tlie privilege of free speech, and very properly are impatient of its control in the
slightest degree; but neither privilege nor
freedom can be pleaded as an excuse for
language which incites to racial hatred
and armed rebellion. Tliere is a point
at whicli, in tlie interests of both, authority
should intervene; and authority is acting
strictly within its most constitutional right
when it steps in to prevent a function
which is likely to lead to a breach of the
peace. An impromptu parade on a former
occasion led to rioting, disorder and damage ; in addition it gave Vancouver a
black eye in every part of the civilized
world. A repetition of the parade would
in all probability lead to even more serious results and it should be prohibited.
If the City Council lacks tlie wisdom or
the courage to issue an edict to this effect
the Provincial Government should do so,
and if necessary should enforce its edict.
Tlie settlement of the Asiatic Exclusion
question does not necessitate any recourse
to parades ancl least of all to arms; it is
proceeding expeditiously along constitutional lines, and every lover of freedom
League to hold another parade. It has on
former occasions criticised the action of
the Secretary in supporting the attitude
of the League it has the.greater pleasure
in commanding him for the stand he has
now taken which is the only one consistent
with loyalty.
Everyone sympathises with
Mr. Balfour      the aim of the Socialist to
On Socialism,    improve  the  condition  of
the   working   classes.   No
man who has studied the question thoroughly and has mastered its intricacies can
logically defend the methods which they
advocate.   In the latest English despatches
to hand is the report of a speech delivered
by Mr. Balfour at the Annual Meeting
of the London City Conservative Association.   Mr. Balfour cannot be regarded as
an extremist on any subject,    lt is true
he is a party man, but it is also true that
his party zeal has never satisfied his supporters.   He possesses a powerful intellect,
is a man of culture with a philosophical
bent and a touch of other worldliness.   In
the speech under consideration he made
some important references to Socialism.
His remarks possess tlie merit of seriousness, incisiveness, and lucidity.    He declared that Socialism had hoisted its flag
and meant to fight under the fanatical
colors   of   general   spoliation.     Within
thirty-six hours the English Labour Party
had announced themselves advocates of a
scheme of social reconstruction which had
found advocates in many countries, but
had been carried in none.   A scheme which
would not only destroy our commercial,
financial    and    manufacturing    position
among the nations of the world, but which
would be the greatest calamity tliat had
ever happened not to the rich but to the
poor.    He emphasized the important dictum that the greatness of the country in
the past, the present and the future depended upon private initiative.    His fair-
mindedness was manifested in the statement that between the two ideals of social
construction held by the Unionist party on
tlie one hand  and  the Socinlist 011  the
other the great fight of the future would
be waged.   Both were agreed that it was
11 duty to ameliorate the condition of the
less fortunate but there was an impassable
gulf between them as to how it should be
done.   Mr. Balfour's final declaration was
one of the highest importance and significance, the utterance of a statesman and
a philosopher;   he said that at the basis
of all social legislation there must be that
security of property, that recognition of
the value of individual effort upon whicli
all successful societies had hitherto been
based, and upon which as long as human
nature existed successful societies must be
based.   These are indeed words of wisdom
and if their pregnancy and truth could
only be realized by the men who are leading tho Socialist party they would, if sincere, join hands with organized governments iu seeking the attainment of the
programme which they profess to have at
heart. THE WKKK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
Notes on
Provincial News
Visitors to Victoria.
Amon the visitors to Victoria during the present week, one of the most
conspicuous is Mr. T. G. Procter, of
Nelson. He is here to interview the
Government on behalf of the City of
Nelson with respect to their application for increased borrowing powers,
to enable them to raise $85,000 to
duplicate their power plant.
They have already borrowed within
$40,000 of the authorized limit, and
without special powers cannot finance
the proposed scheme. The necessity
for the additional plant arises from
the fact that the West Kootenay
Power Company is seeking to impose
an exorbitant rate for emergency service. At present the city only has
one unit, and when this breaks down
it is left in darkness or must fall back
upon the West Kootenay Company.
The Week understands that Mr. Proctor has made satisfactory progress
with his negotiations, and on every
ground it is. to be hoped that the
authority will be granted.
Many a Slip.
A highly unique marriage romance
was enacted in Spokane this week.
Half an hour before the ceremony
was to take place an old flame of thc
bride appeared on the scene. He
pressed his suit with such ardour that
the bridegroom-to-be, who had furnished the cash for the bride's trousseau and the wedding ring, was discarded, and a hasty marriage was performed between the bride and her
new-found lover. The victimized
would-be bridegroom is to be congratulated on his narrow escape. The
bride was an assistant to a "beauty
doctor," and is described as a good-
looking damsel—with both syllables
accented.
Strain a Point.
The Westminster Daily News
voices the complaint of the pressmen
at the inadequate accommodation provided for them in the Local Legislature. The complaint is well founded,
and it is to be hoped that the Government will at least double the accommodation before next Session. This
can easily be done without detracting
from the architectural features of the
hall, by adding two wings to the
present gallery. The News, as usual,
strains a point when it says that there
is any discrimination against representatives of the opposition press.
The statement is as ridiculous as it
is untrue.
Doing Well.
Letters from England indicate that
Mr. Martin Burrell is doing good
work for the Province. The series
of lectures whicli he has aramged to
deliver cover a lot of ground, espe
cially in districts from which desirable immigrants should be obtained.
In the last issue of thc Grand Forks
Gazette there is a very interesting letter relating some of Mr. Burrell's experiences. He was particularly fascinated by thc popular Irishman, T.
P. O'Connor, who told him that he
hoped soon to visit British Columbia.
No man could do thc Province more
permanent benefit through thc medium of thc press than "T. P."
page than can be found in. all the
other newspapers of the. interior.
There is no better record of the progress of the mining industry than the
file of the Phoenix Pioneer.
Not Sports.
The managers of the Rossland
Winter Carnival are not sports. They
have treated the Nelson hockey team
very unfairly, and in the end will be
none the better for it. The Rossland
Committee wished to force a man
named Winn upon the Nelson team as
referee in the deciding round of the
hockey series. Nelson has had some
experience,of Mr. Winn before-time,
and refused to accept him. The Rossland Committee were obdurate, with
the result that Nelson refused to play,
and the Rossland men were such poor
sports that they were content to win
by default. The least that a committee can do is to show courtesy to
visitors. What the Rossland Committee did was to keep strings on the
cup.   This is hardly sportsmanlike.
False Reasoning.
The Nelson Daily :News, in opposing the increase in the .coal tax, does
so on the ground that if will not be
the collieries but the consumers who
will have to bear the main portion of
the increased taxation. Even if this
were true, it would not be a valid argument against equalizing taxation
and making each industry bear its fair
share. But carried to its legitimate
issue, the argument of the News
would render taxation impossible.
The writer loses sight of the .fact
that the Finance Minister was careful to fortify his position by showing
that the profits of coal mining were
well able to bear the additional impost. Any increase in the selling
price of coal is out of the question,
especially now that a movement is
fairly under way for investigating the
whole question of coal operation,
looking to a general reduction in the
price of fuel.
A Promising Mine.
The Kootenaian of the 6th instant
gives an interesting account of the
Bluebell mine. This celcbarted property is situated at the newly named
town of Riondel in the Ainsworth
district. It is undergoing extensive
development and has been splendidly
equipped with modern plant under the
direction of the well-known mining
engineer, Mr. S. S. Fowler.
"I'm afraid we can't afford a turkey, my dear."
"Well, I only expected to get a
small  one, George."
"See here, don't you get a small one
for me to carve."—Exchange.
A Curious Dialogue.
A most bloodthirsty dialogue was
being performed. The father of the
leading woman came, as usual, to the
stage door and asked the doorkeeper:
"Has my daughter gone yet?"
"No, she is Still on the stage; she
will not die for some minutes."
"Will you be kind enough to tell
her as soon as she is dead that I am
wailing for her at the theatre cafe?"
—II Mooto per Riderc.
The Merchants Bank
Cana a
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest   allowed   quarterly
highest current rate.
at
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
Enterprise.
Cranbrook is forging ahead. All
the reports from the lumber capital
of East Kootenay speak of prosperity.
The latest news is that early in April
the Imperial Bank will erect a fine
new building. The Canadian Bank
of Commerce has been established in
Cranbrook nine years, so that there is
no lack of banking facilities. Thc
Cranbrook Herald is justified in its
conclusion that the financiers of this
country have faith in the future of
Cranbrook.
"Young man, do you know anything about soldiering?" asked the
recruiting sergeant, bluntly.
"A—a little, sir," faltered the chappy with white hands and pink cheeks.
"And what has been your experience?"
"I—I have been using a pair of
military brushes for over ten years,
sir."—Chicago News.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
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The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
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"What's thc matter, John?"
"Got caught stealin' apples at Mr.
Binx's."
"Did he thrash you?"
"No; made me eat apples. Boo-
hoo-hoo!"—Exchange.
Knows Its Business.
Thc Phoenix Pioneer knows its
business and atends to it strictly. The
whole of thc reading matter on thc
front page is devoted to mining and
mining interests. Ther is more reliable information about the great industry of the Kootenay on this front
Short-Lived Ambition.
Disguested Wife—Say, niggah, eber
sencc Ah married yo' yo's dun nuffiii
'cept sit round de house. Doan' yo'
eber feel enny ambishion?
Lazy Husband—Ah feels ambishion
w'en Ah's sittin' round hyah, honey;
but jes' 's soon 's Ah stahts to wo'k
Ah  gits  discouraged.—Judge.
  i
MORE PRIZES FOR THE ESSAY
WRITERS
A communication has been received
from A C Flumerfelt, the well-known
capitalist, part of which is as follows:
I will offer prizes to the value of
$350 (three hundred and fifty dollars)
divided as follows:
For the best essay on the questions
propounded below, viz, A, B and C,
relating to:
The Province of British Columbia  $50
The provinces  of Alberta,  Saskatchewan and Manitoba  ....$50
The  Provinces  of   Quebec  and
Ontario $50
The Provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince
Edward Island   $50
A. Enumerate the nationalities and
also give number of languages spoken
in the province written upon.
B. Outline thc requirements of
such provinces to insure continuous,
reasonably rapid development, and
with harmony.
C. State the countries from which
immigration should he drawn, and the
best method of attracting and successfully inducing such immigration to
the provinces in question, having due
regard to existing trade cond'tions.
For the most exhaustive, lucid essay on the questions as below, viz.:
D, E and F, respecting Canada as a
whole, I will offer a first prize of
$100; second, $50.
D. Enumerate the nationalities
now resident in Canada; also give
number of languages spoken.
E. Outline the requirements necessary to insure continuous, reasonably
rapid devolpment and with industrial
harmony.
F. State from what countries
should immigration be drawn and the
best method of attracting and successfully inducing such immigration to
Canada, having due regard to existing
trade conditions.
Thc prizes, at the option of each
winner, may be taken in money, a
piece of silver suitably engraved, or
presented to any of the public charities. The competition is to close on
the first of May next, and letters
should be addressed to IMMIGRATION, P. O. Drawer 690, Victoria,
B. C, thc same not to be opened, except by committee, are unlimited as
to length, but must be signed or accompanied by the card of the writer,
with memo, on the face of the envelope, indicating the contents of the
enclosure. Well - known political
economists and educationalists of
Canada will be requested to judge and
award the prizes for these essays, my
intention being to publish them in
pamphlet form and distribute broadcast, in the hope that such distribution will afford to thc several provinces information respecting each
other.
Hungry Hank—I feel sorry fer dc
lady wot lives in dat mansion on de
hill.    She is absolutely destitute.
Sauntering Saul—Destitute?
Hungry Hank—Yes. Destitute uv
generosity.—Chicago Daily News.
By Appointment to H. M. the King.
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with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
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Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908
.   $
t A Lady's Letter *
' By  BABETTE. Y
r *
tear Madge:
Today I am going to tell you about
ie ways and wiles of the Mexican
laiden. There is really nothing se-
ious to be said about her. You can
o more lecture about a dainty in-
onstant and fragile woman than you
an put paint on a Cloisonne vase,
fapoleon once said that women are
ie poesy of God. The idea is good,
ut it needs classification. None
fould try write hexamiters on a Mex-
:an maiden; one might on a German
r the angular Briton, but for the
lexican one needs the lightest of
Irecian iamics.
She is  delicate and  good to look
pon.   When she steps from her car-
iage  to  the  sidewalk  she  discloses
ie shapliest feet fitting naturally in-
. the tiniest of shoes, and her small
ands are a study that the worst of
len would hardly  spoil  by  squeez-
ig.    She carries herself with an air
f  self-conscious   attractiveness,   and
pects  men  to  notice  her  charms.
[er  hair  is  coiffured  to  perfection,
d her face usually owes its shades
the  paint-box   and   powder  puff,
it her eyes glisten brightly and as-
ire one that there is a soul behind
e dainty picture.
Unfortunately it is not the beauty
e Anglo Saxons like to see.     Wc
efer the charm gained by exercise
d good health-; the charm of cheeks
ade  red  and  body  made  lithe  by
veiling in the fresh and warm sun-
ine.    The  beauty  of the  Mexican
a thing served up with care and
ndy.    Her toilet table is the pans' of her comeliness and she knows
st how a good serving will set off
indifferent dish.   She is a terrible
atter-box, and when she gets with
lot  of  friends   they  all   talk  and
igh   at   once.     Man   is   the   chief,
t for the exercise of her wit and
does    not   spare    her    friends'
ovios"   (lovers).    She  says  worst
iigs of a man than she really means,
ile men, I venture to say, mean
rse. things than they really say.
t was again a Frenchman who said
lit the "Lord by His  divine fore-
flit, did not give beards to women
:ause they would have to keep si-
t while being shaved."   The Mex-
11 girl would surely find a way.
|5he is the most capricious of worn   She changes her plans without
me or reason, and shows little or
concern if the plans of man are
ilt by lier actions.   Her ideas and
ressions, her likes and dislikes, are
jially  under  the   dominion  of  her
jirice.  What pleases her one minute
'pleases her the next, and the man
0 is favoured with her smiles in
morning' is met with  frowns in
afternoon.    She  loves ' naturally
dominate and* expects man to bow
ectedly to the ordeal.     She rules
and caresses him into obedience
tlie same breath.    She is haughty
h   him   if   the   mood   seizes   her,
flattery is the straw which whisks
off  the  pedestal.    She  loves  to
d, but is also ready to be led.   The
prices are due to nothing more than
vivid and quick imagination.    She
[ids too little and thinks too much,
e time that ought to be spent in
practice of womanly arts, and the
ding of soothing books  is  given
the exercise of imagination.
he is not above mild plots to de-
e her parents and prefers a court-
from   beneath   her   balcony   by
nlight.   I   can   never   figure   out
she prefers to see her lover alicr
hours of daylight;  perhaps it is
uise the less she sees of him the
e she can imagine or perhaps she
fraid   of  the  opinion   of  others,
a common failing among her set
ivc  in  dread  of  the  opinion  of
iety,
ie seeks emotions and feigns them
often that she hardly knows a
ine one when it comes to her.
|s a sweetheart >I am told she is
xacting and assertive little tyrant;
wife, she is an humble and self-
tng  companion.    The   treatment
she serves her "noivios" (beaux) has
always been a source of amusement
to me. When he is present she pretends to be blind tn his advances. He
may wait half an hour under her window before she will condescend to
appear on the balcony, though she
has probably seen him all the time
from behind the partly closed
shutters.
He must be ready to dance attendance on her when she goes out, and
to be rewarded usually by the cold
shoulder and an occasional command.
When he is absent she stays away
from dances because she thinks he
would not like her to go if he is not
there.
She tells all her friends how "triste"
she feels, and rarely goes out except
to mass in the early morning.
She. lives in an age which sneers at
chivalry and she clings to the battered
shreds of it. Her failings and virtues
are the simplest in the repertoire of
her sex, and she would prefer the
solid gallantry of old to the subtle
phrases of today.
It is a shame after all to let the
breath of criticism touch her. The
trouble is that she lives too much
under restraint, and her parents are
to blame for that.
And whether dressed demurely with
black mantilla for mass or decked
out in all her finery for the "Alameda" she is always a dainty and
attractive picture and though she does
not often captivate the heart at least
claims admiration from the Anglo-
Saxon.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not  Involve religious controversy.
Communications will be inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona tides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
in this city than I, and there are not
many men here who have seen the
result of the work that they have done
in the way of keeping the city practically free from crime more than
myself.
In   cross-examining   the   constable
who was giving evidence in the case
which you refer to I had occasion to
test the memory of the witness and
to suggest to him that he might be
mistaken.    In doing so, I only acted
within'my rights as counsel and in no
way transgressed those rights.
I    The Chief of Police did object to i
my cross-examination, but I was up-
, held by the Court, and as far as any
I feeling either by the Chief of Police
\ or myself was concerned, there was
none.     I   might   also   add   that   the
accused in the case you refer to was
' dismissed by the  Magistrate.
j    Another statement that appears in
j the  said  article  is  that  "Mr.  J.   A.
Aikman is regarded with justice as a
successful    Police    Court    Lawyer.'
That may or may not be correct, but
I   do   not  think  it  fair  to  brand  a
member of the. legal profession with
being a successful Police Court Lawyer, especially in view of the fact that
I have been equally if not more successful   in  the   Civil   Courts, as   the
records of the different Civil Courts
in this City will show.
You must know that one of the
first lessons that is instilled into a
lawyer is to work his hardest for the
interests of his client, especially in
matters where the liberty of the subject is involved, and this is all I ever
do, always having due regard for the
rules of evidence, and paying proper
respect to the ethics of the profession.
I trust that you will give this letter
equal  prominence  in  The  Week  to
that which you gave your Editorial.
Yours  truly,
J. A. AIKMAN.
life, and I don't owe them or anybody
else a blamed cent!"—Chicago Trib
une.
I  TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
1
VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and f.ude-f Ue
artists while in the Capital city, ali* of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT ft FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular fa a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur •
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
"I see one of our battleships reported fast in the mud."
"Well?"
"I was just thinking that a ship
fast in the mud ought to be a record-
breaker on the open sea."—Philadelphia Ledger.
Editor The Week;
Victoria, Feb.  17th,  1908.
Dear Sir,—In reading the Editorials
of your- valuable paper published on
the 15th instant, I was much surprised
to see an article headed "Baiting the
Police," in which you refer to me as
originating the suggestion that our
Chief of Police was attempting to
manufacture evidence or hoodwink the
Court. That statement, sir, is a deliberate falsehood and whoever gave
you the information has wilfully stated an untruth, either that or the person who gave you the information is
ignorant of the rules of evidence and
the rights of Counsel upon cross-examination and he has imagined that
a policeman's statement in his examination must go unchallenged.
I might say that Chief of Police
Langley and the whole force under
him have not a more ardent admirer
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES' BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION   FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Tates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
Readvertised from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTKR LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to npply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted SO
chnins north from the northeast corner of T.L. 11,$92; thence norih 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 40 chains;
thenee south 120 chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 1.4th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER  TIMBER &
TRADING CO.,  LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Time's Joyous Flight.
Solemn Man—"Do you hear the
clock slowly ticking? Do you know
what day it is ever bringing nearer?'
Cheerful Man—"Yes, pay day."—
Tabic Talk, Melbourne.
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
Disputed the Proposition.
"Al! that you are, my friend," said
the lecturer, singling out an eldcrlv
man sitting in a front seat who appeared to be deeply interested—"all
that you are, I repeat, you owe to
heredity and environment."
"Gosh!" exclaimed the elderly man,
turning red with indignation, "I never
had no dealin' with that firm in my
In up-to-dato ity lea.   E.timatei and
deKi[in furnished.
HOLLY TREES
Print fawn is carta _» fcoo, -morto*
lo tiM.   Write lor ieod mi trw eata-
JAY * CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water ijstem. Electri*
lighted. Tub aad shower bath, and laundry In
connection.   The miner.' home.
•• DANNY " DEANE. Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
R05SLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
GREEN & SH1TH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kaotenaya.
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
Th* home of the Induatrial Worker!
of the Kootenay..
W. E. ncCandllsh,     -      Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotol in the City.
$1.80 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price Hat.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write ior "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
aao *obt stbebt    h    tiotobu.
THOMAS 0-.~_.__._-__.
Bnllder  wad  Q*a*ral  Oantrartor.
T*nd*r* five* en Brick, Stone an
Frame. Alteration*, Parquetry Fleorlni
OSIce, Bank, Stere and Baleen Ftttlafi
Pll* Driving, Wharf** and Dock 8b*d:
conatructad aad r«palr*d. : i
THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1908
I
Incorporated 11*6*
Capital. »6»0.»M.MJ
Capiul inereaaed
S .%,m,....^
Reserve . . »».»»*
Surplus, Jm. «,
1907 . . $HM««i
J.:
nr closing up estates
•ither as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
of high intelligence, devotion and
bravery. The malignant influences in
the shape of an unworthy and unscrupulous rival and a seditious interloper, are skilfully portrayed. The
stumbling-block is personified by a
timorous, unstable monarch, who has
been made a prisoner in his own palace and who hesitates, at the very moment of ripe insurrection, to emerge
at the head of his faithful retainers.
1,500, and of the 52 boxes every one
will be sold before the close of the
month," he continued. The entries
are coming in rapidly, and there is
every reason to believe that every
event will be filled. The Portland
Hunt Club is sending a carload; John
W. Considine, who has contributed a
handsome silver cup, will send a
string of his best from Seattle; Tacoma will be represented, and Victoria,
By a clever device, the substitution   New Westminster and Vancouver, be
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
338 Hastings St, West
Vancouver, B. C
of another man who bears a strong
resemblance to the king, the troops
are deceived and rally round his standard, which marches to success.
When victory has ben attained, the
weak-kneed sovereign emerges from
his retreat and is reinstated.
Ther are some briliant chapters,
teeming with adventure and romance.
Once   again   Mr.   Crawford  has    re
sides points in the interior of British
Columbia have already sent in scores
of entries.
"Many handsome trophies, silver
cups, medals, gold watches, and even
carts and harness sets have been donated for prizes, until just before I
left home the Executive Committee
estimated that they had ben presented I
with   over   $5,000   worth   of   prizes
created the atmosphere of the country   Among the out-of-town donations are
in which he has placed the action of
his story.   The duplicity, the cunning,
the intrigue, the politesse, the diplomacy  of the  Oriental  character  are
faithfully    portrayed.     The    author
makes one realize to what an extent
Oriental sovereigns are merely pawns
in the game of government, and how
little the "masters of the administration" are influenced by the great principles which are  recognized   as   the
foundation of good government.
It  would  be  a   mistake,  however,
were I to leave the impression   that
Mr. Crawford's book deals with problems, or is overloaded with weighty
matter.    It is a romance, pure   and
simple, almost as fanciful and aery as
the "Prisoner of Zenda," in places as
earnest and convincing as "Ivanhoe."
The   technique   is   perfect,   literary
craftsmanship is manifest   on   everv
. page.    There is more finish than in
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor any of the suthor's recent works. Evi-
========r========r======;  dently he has been less hurried and
has  sacrificed  nothing to  his  well-
Fresh Fields and       known limPid *&*■
Mr.   Crawford is  one  of the few
PflStlireS   NeW , raodern writers of fiction who knows
i how to develop the feminine charac-
I dare say that when the title of this ter> ;t m'Kht be to0 much to say that
article mets the reader's eye, he will he understands woman; indeed, i_i
conclude that, like the proverbial one brilliant chapter he declares that
youth, with the return of spring-tide no man knows anything about a wo-
I am directing my thoughts to those man. not even in this age of sub-con-
subjects which are perenially asso- scious knowledge, because since she
ciated with the rejuvenescence of knows nothing about herself there is
things. For once he will be mistaken, nothing to convey. Be this as it may,
I am thinking only of a book which everyone knows how tenderly and
I read this week. It is a book of ab- sympathetically he handles his women, and Arethusa is no exception
to the rule.    She is a woman   with
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE..WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published st VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
%%V_ Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
handsome silver cups from the Col
onist Printing and Publishing Co., J.
A. Mitchell, and others of Victoria;
the Portland Hunt Club and T. S.
McGrath, of Portland; John W. Considine, of Seattle, and dozens of other
loVers of the horse. Advices already
received by the Executive indicate
that Vancouver's first horse show will
be liberally patronized, and advantage
taken of the special cheap rates which
will be in force for the occasion," he
concluded.
ELECTRICAL FACTS.
sorbing and, in parts, of thrilling interest. It is written by one of the
most accomplished and successful of whom any man would fall in love, and
living authors, and in it he breaks up
entirely new ground, which suggests
the title of this article. The book is
"Arethusa," the author F. Marion
Crawford, and the venue Constantinople.
Mr. Crawford's literary career may
towards the end of the book, when
she willingly submits to the most
fiendish torture rather than divulge
the information which will incriminate her lover, Mr. Crawford achieves
a magnificent success. He devises a
novel method of torture, so thrilling
be divided into three chapters.    The and  so  realistic that the chaPter  is
almost too painful to read, but with
the  instinct  of  the  true  artist   he
relieves  the  situation  at the  critical
moment.
first, the Italian, in which he cultivated a new field with rare insight and
profound literary skill. 'The Roman
Singer," "Saracinesca," and "St. II-
ario" are masterpieces of Italian fiction. They reproduce not only the
incidents,  customs  and  manners  of
I recommend all my readers to get
"Arethusa."   There is not a dull page;
everything is bright, entertaining and
______________________________________________________________ artistic;   it   illustrates   the   marriage
Italian society, but they recreate its  of _. literary craftsman to a romance>
a union which cannot fail to produce
very atmosphere, and he who has
revelled in these pages has lived in
Italy.
Then we pass to Chapter Two, in
which Mr. Crawford was lured from
his first love and declined upon the
banaltics of American life. The subject did not suit his artistic temperament, and he felt very much as David
did when he had on the Goliath's armour. He was fighting social evils of
which he had no experience and no
instinctive knowledge. The result
was crudity and immaturity; the effect
was bizarre.
It is true that before opening chap-
delight for a
work of art.
who can appreciate a
J$lh/-e>?rir4Jt^.
1. That the Electric Lighting Inspector comes under no department of
the Corporation.
2. That on inquiry the City Engineer does not know where he is to be
found.
3. That each firm keeps a book in
which all new installations and repairs are recorded, to be read by the
Inspector every day.
4. That the Inspector calls to see
the book on an average about twice
a week, sometimes less.
5. That the inspection ticket should
be given the next day after inspection.
6. That this is not recived sometimes till over two weeks, thereby disarranging business.
7. That there are on an average two
installations a day, according to pel
mits in daily papers.
8. That inspection takes one hour
at the most, not counting walking
time. ^^_
9. That the inspection fees should
be paid into the treasury and certificates obtained therefrom on payment
of fees. No fees to be paid to Inspector.
10. That the by-laws should state
certain items and not leave to the
"discretion of the Inspector."
11. That the section of the by-law
relating to the carrying capacity of
wires should be adhered to.
12. That according to Inspector
only four lights are allowed in No. 14
wire (capacity 12 amperes).
13. That 32 candle power lamps approximate 1 ampere; thus 12 number
32 candle power lamps could be run
on No. 14 wire and not exceed the
limit.
14. That few people use 32 candle-
power lamps, mostly 16, 10 and 6.
15. That the above shows the absurdity of Fact 12.
16. That wire is at present used according to "Inspector's discretion,"
with a carrying capacity of 23 amperes
and a 3-ampere meter installed by the
Electric Company.   Re Fact II.
[Arethusa, by F. Marion Crawford.
Price $1.50, at the Victoria Book and
Stationery Co.]
VANCOUVER'S    FIRST
SHOW.
"Based on the present number of
ter number 3, Mr. Crawford stopped entries, the disposal of practically
by the way to give us "Marcclla," but every box, and the splendid contribu-
he has now fairly launched into "fresh tions in the shape of handsome prizes
fields and pastures new." from loyal horsemen in Portland, Ta-
"Arethusa" is a story of Constanti- coma, Victoria and my own city, Van-
nople. The action occurs during the couver's first horse show, to be held
period when "knights wcre still hold March 19, 20 and 21, gives promise of
and barons, or their equivalent, held every success," said Percy F. Goden-
their sway." The hero is a soldier rath, press agent for the show, who
and a statesman, full of the daring was in Victoria this week, en route to
and courage which in the good old Portland, Ore., to promote the inter-
days were always sufficient to win a est in the forthcoming event,
woman's love. The heroine added to "The show will be held in the Drill
traditional beauty and charm the gift Hall, which has a seating capacity of
Realism.
One night two soldiers, ayoungster
and a veteran, were trying to sleep
HORSE   by the roadside.   Said the youngster:
"How   many  people   at   home   don't
know where we are!"
"Ay, lad I" said the veteran, "and
how many thousands of 'em don't
care a damn.   Go to sleep."—Bellman.
Bachelor—Before the wedding you
told me that married life would be
one grand, swet song.
Benedict (gloomily)—Yes, and since
then I have found it is one grand,
sweet refrain.
Bachelor—Refrain?
Benedict—Yes, my wife insists that
I refrain from cards, refrain from
smoking, and refrain from the club-
Chicago News.
Silver=Mounted
Oak Ware
We have just received a new consignment of these beautiful
goods, always popular as Wedding Gifts, always in good taste.
They are the best English plate on nickel silver, the Oak is British
"Heart of Oak."   A wide choice:
Butter Dishes, Butter Trowels, Salad Bowls,
Biscuit Jars, Mustard Pots, Pepper Mills, Salt
Cellars, Chocolate Pots, Chopped Ice Bowls,
Spirit Stands, etc., etc.
*5?Wl
'C$__*>
VICTORIA. B.O
MS
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home!
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
"Old Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heav
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie","In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that:   These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest rtsrs;
^\  comic song-hits and minstrel humor j perfect dance music ; classic
7^o\ symphonies—entertainment of every sort for every mood end every
VV ^V occasion j and all to be heard at its best on the Fitter tr Berliner
79 *_ *£*\ Gram-o-phon..
_ '**   Q(\.   An> Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly play
.,     <t, Q "»\ Victor Records for you.  C»U and aslc to hear
°V-* \\ them, and get hint to tell you about the
f   ''••     * V,--yX easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
V   \    \\t V\ —use the coupon.
A \\\ \S h\   imiemmrflmiiHni
\ \ \\ %V»X    *■■« rt *"*> ■*
\ \ \.\
608
You can always      — _      ^-^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar |Vl#    D*     than otners#
Cigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffllng-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of tho northeast corner ol
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north  to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 11107.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty cliains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated 2lst December,  11)07.
FRANK BUFFINGTON  VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No.  1—Commencing at a post
planted   80   chains   west   of  southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, tiience
j north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
' thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
; chains   to  point  of  commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
(Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
theuce south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
|jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
|3. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser,  intends to apply for a special
limber   licence   over   the   following  de-
cribed lands:
IClaim No. 3—Commencing at a post
ilanted 80 chains west of southwest cor-
ier of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
ast 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
hence west 60 chains; thence north 40
ihalns to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
I;. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Irulsers, intends to apply for a special
Imber licence over the following de-
cribed lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
lanted 40 chains west of the north-
rest corner of Timber Limit No. 18644,
fience north 160 chains; thence east 40
J hains; thence south 160 chains; thence
'est 40 chains to point of commence-
lent.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
an 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
1 TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
J. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Irulsers, Intends to apply for a special
mber licence over  the  following de-
Tibed  lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
lanted 40 chains west and 10 chains
auth of the southwest corner of timer limit No. 18546, thence west 40
hains; thence north 40 chains; thence
'est 80 chains; thence south about 60
hains; thence easterly along shore 120
hains; thence north about 60 chains to
olnt of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD,
jin. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
ITAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
1 Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
Jtends to apply for permission to pur-
lase the following described land:
■Commencing at a post planted at the
lithwest corner; thence north 20 chains
[McClure Lake; thence along McClure
ke In an east southerly direction 43
I tins, more or less; thence west 40
Uns to place of beginning and mak-
; 40 acres more or less, and known
the southwest fractional quarter sec-
n of 86, township 6, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
|i. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
'AKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
Aldermere, B.C., occupation house-
e, intends to apply for permission to
•chase the following described land:
!ommencing at a post planted at the
thwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
nee east 40 chains; thence south 40
ins; thence west 40 chains to placo
beginning and known as the north-
jt quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
and   containing   160   acres,   more   or
Sated 23rd of November, 1907.
18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated  November  16,  1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
Best Buy.
BEST   BUY   IN  VICTORIA   OF   BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
DISTRICT OB  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at tlie
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parallel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
I
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontnge on James Bay. This property
has lh* Post Ofllce to tha North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to tha West of lt.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by tha Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $62,500.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cant.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
cliains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap In-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December,  1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
mlles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
Arthur Gore
frt -4 m a *_ £ fl
TIMBER MAPS tZ^S
^\M%J   Residence 4381
eyery day.
ELECTRIC BLUEPRINTS* MAP CO.
V/CTOR/A. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS. SZ LANISI F Y ' .CT»ff t
BLUEPRINTING
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Cbhiplete    set of Maps shovy/ny a//
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lan ds  taken  up in British Columbia.
Blue   Prints   Can be    obtained nt sAnr-f   nni-ii
let Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. IS J. J. TEMPLETON.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A ■•sldeatial aad Day School for Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Careful Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line SO chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mils south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 6; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 1G0 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence soutli 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 6*10 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241 A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about ono-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence nortli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. S—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing ai a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about oue mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10 i
on north bank of small river emptying
iuto Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; tnence west 80 chains; thence soutli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south ot
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
cliains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thenoe
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on tlie north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of cornei' post of claims No. 3 and 4;
(hence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; tiience
east SO chains lo point of commencement, containing 610 acres, more or less.
Dated December 10th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains,
theuce west SO chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 610 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ED. BROWN
B.C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February,  1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday,  13th February,  1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, bf
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
SIS.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore Una on tbe
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
_c PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 180 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, Including small island on
north  line of  section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
NOTICE TU COW TRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Bwiaff Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. 0. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the oflice of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of tho Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must bo accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to tne order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner ln
the sum uf two hundred and fifty U260J
dollars, which shall bo forfeited If the
parly tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of tlie contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands: „
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted south five and one-half miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
H. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
on Cheewhat Lake; thence north 80
chains; thonce west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 26th August, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District  of  Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence nortli 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907. 1
.
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineea.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following de
scribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Port St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 ehains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON,
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenee
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON,
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 ehains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  November   24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 ehains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 aeres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of satd arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1% miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked In my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Wat*
son, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to ap*
ply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two mites south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS,
jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
SKEENA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
mlles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chain.:
to point of commencement, containing
;160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR. NOAKES.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
IS minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   ■   VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SflSH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,   1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chatns, west 160 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec. 19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile ln northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Tl Lake ln northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mlle north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, Intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chainB; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which Is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
30 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest, corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 ehains to point of commencement.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 16, which is eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S„ S.E. No. 16, which is nine mlles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
Of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chatns to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which ls nine and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which is nine and
one-half miles ln a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chatns; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
miles distant In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which ls ten and one-half miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 2S—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east SO chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No, 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 25—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant ln a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which ls ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; SO chains east
to  point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S,,
S.E. No. 31, which ls ten and one-half
mlles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 19,  1907.
W. E. SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.   2,   situate  on  tho  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   4V
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked December  ICth,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that FranclB Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore ot
Narrows; thence soutli along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following do-
scribed lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thenCe south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
6, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains',
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 83; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted  at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dee. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
____v _____
&M
NOTICE TO LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Hies.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at th*
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying ln length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts. will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of plies required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ((260), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the ten- .
derers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necei-
sarlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. SO Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of \
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan,  of Victoria,   B.  C,   Con-
tractor,  intend  to apply  for a special j
timber  licence  over  the  following  described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted 1
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's*I
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west I
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thencel
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains ]
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER    LAND    DISTRICT.
District of Naw Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman 1. Chandler,   of   Vancouver,    B. C„   ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special j
timber  licence over the following   de-
scribed lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D.  L.  1413;   thence north    160 '
chains;   thence  east  40  chains;   thence j
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains |
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle ofl
Victoria, B, C, Merchant, and James I
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Con-1
tractor, Intend to apply for a special I
timber licence over the following described lands: 1
No. 1—Commencing at a post plantedl
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's!
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chatns; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, ol
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James Hi
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, conl
tractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following describe!
lands: ]
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson'J
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence wesl
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thencd
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chain!
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
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How to Save Money on
on Your Carpet
Purchases.
It is very poor economy to purchase cheap Carpets-
Carpets of unknown worth. The old saying, "The best
is the cheapest," is especially true of Carpets, and the
safest and most economical way is to purchase Carpets
of known worth, made by reliable houses and sold by
people with a reputation for "goodness" in Carpets.
In these days there are many inferior quality Carpets
made t olook the equal of the good sorts, and unsuspecting people who are not "well up" in Carpet quality have
unpleasant experience with the short life of these.
Usually, one lesson is sufficient. It- shouldn't be necessary
though, and if you thoroughly investigate our Carpet
offerings, we guarantee you no disappointments. Just
at present, shipments of new Spring styles are arriving
and being rapidly placed on show, and the styles so far
received are excellent examples of master workmanship.
We especially invite you to visit the Carpet Department
today—or any day.
SPRING STYLES ARE PLEASING.
WEILER BROS.
Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
Try Our Satisfactory Hail Order  Service.
Spring Styles in New Muslins.
A SPLENDID SHOWING OF LATEST IDEAS.
When you start to plan for Spring Cleaning, plan new
curtains and plan to see our showing of curtains and curtain materials. We have just received an unusually large
shipment of new Lace, Madras and Swiss Muslin and
Casement Fabrics and suitable trimmings for the making
of curtains for every style of window, and adapted to
every room. These goods were personally selected for
their artistic and wearing qualities, and, buying in such
immense quantities, we were fortunate in securing favorable price concessions, and are in a position to offer you
artistic goods at the price usually asked for materials
wholly devoid of "character."   Investigate 1
Swiss Muslin—In white and ecru. Pretty coin spot, sprig
and bow knot designs. Low priced at, per yard, 25c
and 20c
Swiss Muslins—In the colored muslins we show a great
variety of patterns and at a popular price. See these
at, per yard, 35c and 30c
White Grenadine—A light, dainty muslin with scalloped
border, suitable for sash and other curtains. Price,
per yard  20c
Scotch Madras Muslins—We have this popular material
in cream shade, many pretty designs, ranging in price
from, per yard, 85c to   30c
Scotch Madras Muslins—In cream and white and bordered for sash curtains. Pretty designs. This comes
30 inches wide.   Price, per yard 30c
Tasseled Madras Muslin—This is a popular curtain material and has much to commend it; 45 inches wide,
at, per yard  40c
Colored Madras Muslin—A great choice of attractive designs iu several colorings, such as yellow, Nile green,
rose and blue.   Per yard  40c
Colored Madras Muslin—This is an especially attractive
line and a very popular one. The stained glass window
effect pleases.   Per yard 75c
Colored Madras Muslin—We have an excellent assortment
of colored Madras muslins. A wide range of designs
and colorings at, per yard  50c
These materials can be made into tho daintiest of curtains by yourself or in our own factory. Our experience is at your service—make use of it.
SPECIAL VALUES IN NOTTINGHAM LACE
CURTAINS.
Last week we unpacked more than sixty new designs
in Nottingham Lace Curtains. Before the advent of this
big shipment we had what we, and many others, considered a very creditable showing, but the addition of
several hundred pairs embracing more than sixty new
designs easily places our showing of Nottingham Curtains
far in the lead.
In these new designs are to be seen the latest creations
of the World's best makers of curtains. They have
special features, such as the Hang-Easy Top, and others
which are lacking in some makes—little items perhaps,
but combine to make a better curtain. The range of
pricings permits of great choice. You'll find every pair
the best possible value at the price asked. If you want a
low priced curtain investigate the style we offer at
seventy-five cents per pair. You could pay $1.25 to $1.50
at some stores and get no better.
PRICES RANGE FROM, PER PAIR, $14 DOWN TO 75c
NEW CRETONNESand CHINTZES
So much of the coming glory of the most delightful of
seasons is reflected in the new Cretonnes and Chintzes
the whole Curtain aud Drapery department has taken on
the air of spring. Each year designs are improved and
colorings made more beautiful, and this season's efforts
easily surpasses all previous attempts. Even with all
this extra goodness the prices are, if anything, lower
than before aud certainly low enough to make their use
more popular. These materials may be used for a great
many purposes and are particularly adapted for curtains,
drapes, loose covers, etc. We offer you such a great
choice of designs and color combinations you will experience no difficulty in finding one to suit you and harmonize
perfectly with any other furnishings. Ask to sec our new
Art Designs whicli are selling at Twenty cents a yard.
It is unusually good value. Make your selection now
while the ajiortment is complete.
British Cretonne—A specially nice line in a variety of
pretty tapestry and floral effects. Splendid value at
the price marked.   Per yard    20c
British Chintz—A flue range of pretty and attractive designs in Green and Yellow, Rose and Green, Pink and
Green, with blue ribbon.  Per yard 40c
British Chintz—Artistic designs on jaspar ground. This
style is suitable for long curtains, 48 inches wide and
sold at, per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and conventional designs, that
are bright and cheerful we show a splendid range.
Priced at, per yard, 35c, 30c and  25c
British Chintz—A very pretty and serviceable Chintz with
artistic designs, in various colorings on a jasper
ground has a softening influence on the whole effect.
It makes the less liable to soil, yet does not detract
from the daintiness.   Price, per yard 40c
Joooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooooooooooooooooooooo
^porting
Comment.
The Nanaimo Football team again
imonstrated their superiority over
e other teams on the Island by de-
ating the Y.M.C.A. at Oak Bay
it Saturday, in a game which showed
ainly fhat they have a good corn-
nation and will take a lot of beat-
g. Considering the condition of thc
:ld the game was very fast but the
ay was considerably marred by the
as of mud. The Y.M.C.A. played
good game but they were not as
;gressive as their opponents, the
ily forward of any use being Sparks
d he was too closely watched to
effective. The visiting forward on
other hand showed considerable
sh to their play and it was this that
[n them the game. This game gave
supporters of the All Island team
J opportunity to get a line on some
■the players who have been selected
^represent the Island League. In
majority of instances the choice
been well made but this game
Jwed plainly that my contention
arding Harley of the Nanaimo
\n was right. On his showing of
Saturday he has no right to the
lition which he has been selected
|ill. He is very weak and had it
been for Hewitt behind him he
lild have been responsible for sev-
goals; in addition to this the
yards who were opposed to him
also weak and what he had to
do he failed badly. Hewitt, who will
play full back, is a dashing player,
but very rough and unless he cuts out
some of the rough work he will have
many fouls given against- him. He is
too good a player to indulge in these
tactics and it is up to his team mates
to make him play closer to the rules.
On Saturday he was responsible for
one of the goals scored by the Y. M.
C. A. whicli was scored from a penalty given against him. This style of
play will make it hard for the Islanders to win and he should be cautioned
before going on the field. Tackeray
demonstrated clearly that he is entitled to the position held by Harley
and it is safe to say that he will be
the one chosen for the second match.
If the team was to be picked a week
from today it is safe to say that
Sparks would be selected and it is
more than likely that he will bc given
a chance in the second match.
While the Y.M.C.A. and Nanaimo
were battling for supremacy the Esquimalt and J.B.A.A. were also trying conclusions, the result being a
win for the former. The losers ran
up against a streak of hard luck in
being forced to play a man short for
the greater part of the match as the
result of the rulings of the referee.
This is the lirst game in the series
in which a player has been ruled off
and to have three sent to the dressing
room ii. one game leaves the impression that the previous officials
have been very easy or else the referee on Saturday was more inclined
to show his authority. In all events
his rulings did the Bays out of two
points as with their full team they
would have undoubtedly won, as it
was they had the better of the play,
but were unable to find the goal.
It is very seldom that I have to
find fault with a referee, but I certainly think he made a mistake when
he ordered the players from the field,
and by the decision of the executive
board it is very apparent that they
had their doubts as to the wisdom of
his action.
I am pleased to learn that an effort
is being made to place a baseball
team in the field this season to represent this city. A few years ago Victoria enjoyed the reputation of having
one of the best semi-professional
teams on the Coast, and there is no
reason why the same conditions could
not exist again this year.
For the past twenty years the athletes of Victoria have enjoyed the
reputation of being good losers, and
it is a very late date for the junior
teams to commence complaining
about the treatment they receive at
thc hands of the referees. It is admitted that a referee is not infallible,
but this does not give the losing team
the right to put the blame of their defeat on his shoulders. I like to see a
team play to win; if they win, they
will get credit for it, and if they lose,
let them give their opponents credit
for beating them. The North Ward
junior football team is a good aggregation for their size, but this does not
prevent them from being beaten, and
the excuses they offer for their defeat
last Saturday are, to say the least,
very small.
been accustomed to?"
"Oh, father, I am sure of it. He's
supported an automobile for six
months, and that's more than you
have ever been able to do."—Detroit
Free Press.
"For two cents I'd knock your block
off," said thc angry man,
"Well, you don't expect me to furnish your working capital, do you?"
responded the other and calmer one.
—Philadelphia Ledger.
The latest achievement of Longboat
in beating three relay runners in a
five-mile race is something that
should set all athletes thinking, lt
is a wonderful performance, and I
can hardly blame the amateurs of thc
United States for trying to have him
barred from the Olympic games, for
it is only by this method that they
can beat him.
It is not too early for thc local lacrosse players to get busy. The time
will soon be here when they will be
out playing, and thc organization of
the club should be all complete before
thc first practice. Get busy, boys, and
you will show the Mainlanders that
they made a mistake in refusing your
application into thc senior league.
When It Became Personal.
Vick-Scnn—I had ever so many
chances to marry someboyd that
amounted to something, and I threw
myself away on you.
Her Husband (unexpectedly spunking up)—In my case it was finite different, madam. You were absolutely
the last resort. Every other girl had
refused mc.—Chicago Tribune.
The Spoil.
"Our grocery was robbed last
night," remarked the landlady, as she
passed the butter to the star boarder.
"Is tllis a part of the spoil?" asked
he, sniffing at it doubtfully.
The local athletes ran up against a
snag when they journeyed to Vancouver last week, and only succeeded in
winning one game, and to their credit
it was the girls of the local High
School who accomplished thc trick.
Two rugby football matches and basket-ball match went to Vancouver.
Just as this goes to press, I learn
that Goward and Schwengers have
consented to play for the Y. M. C. A.
for thc balance of the season. Good
news for soccer enthusiasts,
UMPIRE.
A Test of Riches.
"How do you know that young man
can support you in the way you havo
Lawyer (to bucolic client who has
called to settle an account that con
tains, among other items, a number of
unexpected charges)—Why don't you
come inside instead of standing there
in the doorway?
Client (warily)—No, thankee, mister. I'd rayther not. I knows what
you're after. You'd be charging me
rent if I did!—Punch. Staking the Mountain
Echo.
By Arthur P. Woollacott.
(Continued from last issue)
Letherdale sized up the situation:
"Tony," he said, gripping the other's
wrist, "cover your man. Keep him covered, make him turn and hold him there
until we get this business untangled.
I'll handle Loring." ■
"Twining!" the young man sung out
with the coolest insinuation, "you high-
living, low-down lobster, just you take a
squint at me—for the good of your
health."
Loring wheeled at the sound of Tony's
voice and looked into the muzzle of Letherdale's revolver.    He jerked his head
with  furious  impatience and  told  the
• guide to go and sit on himself.
"Why in the devil don't you count,
Letherdale?" Twining cried with icy,
stinging deliberation.
"See here, Twining," said Tony in the
peculiar voice a man assumes when he
is looking for trouble, "I'll bet you this
here gun what I've got pointing plum at
that bump on the back of your head that
you're gritting your teeth to stop them
chatterin'. You're mere mush with a
brogue, and no man at all."
His way of putting it was so downright insulting that Twining swung
around at him, took in the posture of affairs and choked: "What—" he exclaimed, "who—you tin-whipped scum.
If you interfere any further—by heaven,
if I don't cane you! Letherdale! will
you do us the kindness to proceed. If
ever I involve myself again with such
another lump of unleavened impudence
as this cursed friend of yours, eat me!
by heaven!"
Tony smiled at him sweetly: "All the
same, if there's any shooting to be done,
you've got to talk to me first, see!"
"Shooting!" Twining fairly screamed.
"Letherdale, can you persuade this—
this—" he indicated Tony with a shoulder, "to obliterate himself." His wrath
got the better of him and he dashed at
Genelle, who, however, stood his ground,
with an eye glinting along the barrel.
"Easy there!" he ripped out warningly,
"or I'll hurt you sure."
Letherdale jumped between them.
"Drop this Twining. I don't know what
your trouble is, but this game is called
off."
"And what in the devil will you do?"
he cried flaring at Letherdale.
"Jug you—double quick, too."
"I see," he drawled, with his usual
coolness, and the faintest suspicion of a
smile. "You, as gentlemen of—ah—
honour, desire an explanation. Loring,
please explain, and let us get on."
"You're a way off there," Loring returned ; "there's nothing that would interest these men unless it is a difference
of opinion as to what constitutes honourable procedure. Letherdale, you and
Genelle go off somewhere ancl look at
the scenery." He put his gun under his
arm and lit a cigarette.
"Right you are," said Twining; "the
pair of you may consider yourselves relieved from further responsibility. Any
interference on vour part will be at your
risk."
He ducked into his tent and brought
out a scientific instrument with a bell
attachment which he wound up and set
going. Finding that it worked satisfactorily, he wound it up again.
"We'll fire at the tenth stroke, you understand."
The backwoodsmen were ignored.
"Jump 'em," suggested Tony quietly.
Letherdale nodded and turned to give the
Indians a signal to stand by, but they
were staring fixedly with heads thrust
forward at something in the fringe of
berry bushes.
The men had scarcely turned when the
cursed machine began striking clearly,
insistently like strokes of doom. Letherdale heard the Indians titter an exclamation of alarm, and saw Loring who
was facing the river bending forward
like one fascinated by some horror. Tonv
was in the act of edging off his last boot
with his toe, and then he began creeping
towards Twining like a cat. Five—six
—seven—. Letherdale lost count for he
heard something like a woman's agonised "oh!" from somewhere. A shot
rang out, and Tony and Twining's voices
were mixed up in a fearful tumult. The
Indians yelled and Loring toppled forward ; his revolver flew out of his hand,
and he flung out on the ground with
arms spread wide. The whole air
seemed alive with voices and noises.
As Letherdale bent over Loring he saw
Tony struggling with Twining and Long
Jim bounding to his assistance..
"Where is it, old fellow," cried Letherdale, lifting the Doctor, very carefully.
"Good God! Letherdale, did you see
it?" he cried staring.
"Are you hit?"
"Hit ?" He began feeling around with
decided interest. "Oh—I don't know,
hardly. No. I stumbled. Get a brand
and see what's in the bushes."
There was a rational air about him
that was reassuring. Letherdale got a
brand and flashed it over the thicket by
the river, but beyond a few eddies likt
those made by a paddle nothing was seen.
When Letherdale turned his attention
to Twining, Long Jim was already sitting on the man's legs while Tony was
perched on his breast, preaching at him
in a fatherly way.
"No sirree, no one blows no one's
brains out in this here country for noth-
in. Why, man, the. climate's dead agin'
it, bein' kind of relaxin'. Consider these
magnificent solitudes, and ask yourself
if the Almighty didn't know what He
was a-doin'. This here country, I tell
you, was speshully made to accommodate a mighty big swear, and"if you can't
get satisfaction that way you're no expert in the English language."
Twining's bosom began to heave, and
Tony bobbed up and clown looking surprised, but when his victim exploded in
a fit of hysterical laughter, he jumped
off suddenly with a half scared grin on
his face. Long Jim rolled off the man's
legs and the party stood around the prostrate form, contemplating him. His face
presently turned purple, and he seemed
to have some sort of trouble with his
stomach for he kept clutching at it with
both hands, rolling his head from side
to side and gasping to Letherdale for
water, which he got at once, for he had
never seen anyone in such a fix before
and was afraid that the man would hurt
himself ancl therefore flung a basin of
water full in his face, which brought him
to with a gasp and an awful snortle.
He got up and retired to his tent where
for an hour or two after he was heard,
gurgling, exploding and swearing sternly to himself.
The Indians on being questioned swore
positively that they had seen a white-
faced woman staring at them through the
screen of bush:s with great round eyes
and lips that looked as .if she wanted to
speak. Letherdale was bothered by a
persistent notion that they were being
watched from the top of the bluff across
the river, and did not sleep much, or feel
like a rational being until he began moving around in the chilly dawn.
After an early breakfast Twining
stepped over to the group around Letherdale's camp-fire: "It seems to me," he
said, trimming a cigar, "that you men
were premature to say the least of it.
The Doctor and I recognized that we
were running each other very closely in
this affair and it was my idea to settle
the matter by first blood in a little quick-
firing target practice. Fortunately beyond an accidental discharge, no damage
was done."
The men were taken aback—for a moment. Twining was plausible but not
entirely convincing. He turned to the
Doctor: "I'll toss you now, Doctor, for
the right of entering a record. There's
no sense in rushing down over twenty
or thirty miles of dangerous waterway
to end up in all probability in an unseemly scramble in the Recorder's
Office."
"That's further presumption on your
part. I'm not aware that you were justified in coming up here in the first
place."
"Well!" the other returned with significant emphasis, glancing at the men for
appreciation, "surely you're game!"
Letherdale stepped into the breach:
"We've got to toss for the road, anyhow. She's risen a foot and she's dangerous. It would be going plum to disaster to run two canoes abreast through
so many narrow gorges, rapids and logjams."
The guides tossed; Genelle won ancl
was given twenty second's start which
put him comfortably around a bend.
Then with a whoop Letherdale's outfit
cut loose ancl went flying clown like a
toboggan. There were so many sudden
twists, back-shoots, ancl boiling could-
rons that they were every instant in jeopardy of their lives.   Tony set the pace
in his reckless way and kept the lead.
Water was shipped a dozen times in half
. as many miles and in spite of energetic
baling on the part of the passengers the
canoes were on the point of being swamped when they reached the lake. Here
they pulled even, had lunch together and
ran abreast to the next river where Tony
again won the toss and was given ten
seconds' start.
• This stretch was good going except in
one place where the stream divided, the
larger part doubling back into a nest
of rocks while a little ditch of water shot
straight on like a mill race. Tony's
canoe disappeared down the race in a
twinkling. Letherdale gave the signal
to his men who put in every ounce they
had to get way enough on to carry the
craft over the top of the back shoot.
Down they went at a terrific speed, with
a force that sent them foaming along
the very edge of* the terrace of water.
Half the canoe was in the mill-race when
a swirl caught the stern and jammed her
broadside onto an angle of rock. The
Indians yelled, whipped out the poles and
dug her on, but Long Jim's stick caught
in a crevice and he was sprung out like
a man from a catapult. A hundred yards
was passed over before the craft could
be snubbed, and then two minutes were
lost in picking up their man, which, at
the rate they were going meant over a
thousand yards.
What Letherdale said going down the
last half mile of the river had the odor
of brimstone. When salt water was
reached Genelle was seen a good half
mile out making a bee line for Haddington's house—a white speck on the farther shore, about three miles away.
Letherdale stood up and scanned the
straits. The flood was coining down at
a swinging clip and he cut up half a
mile with the river current to meet it.
Tony evidently calculated getting over on
the dead slack but Letherdale's only
chance was in making a bid for the flood.
Presently the current caught the bow
ancl with a good six-knot current under
them they went foaming down in an
oblique line for the mining recorder's
office. Never would he forget that spurt.
His reputation was at stake. His men
understood ancl had stripped to the waist.
The movements of their brown, glistening muscular backs reminded him of a
double team of bays crowding down on
the home stretch. Haddington afterwards said he heard their war-grunts
long before he located the canoe.
The flag-ship was playing some lively
music as they swept into the fleet, which
screwed them up another notch. A
hoarse cheer from hundreds of sailors
descended on* them like an avalanche.
They flung up their paddles ancl dashed
on. "By George! that's the third canoe
that has come tearing out of that river
within the last hour," Letherdale heard
someone say.
The flood now struck Tony and began
carrying him down: it would have been
a waste of time to stem it; he therefore
turned and dashed for a point on shore
about two hundred yards below the office.
A gay spot of color moved quickly
along the green, through a flock of
geese, and halted a moment at the office
gate. It was a woman who after looking at the canoes, ran lightly up the
steps and disappeared within.
Twining's outfit struck the beach while
the other was still nearly two hundred
yards mt. He leapt ashore and plunged
heavily up the shingle with Tony on his
heels encouraging him: "Go it old hoss,
keep her up!" he was heard to say.
Twining twisted his head over his
shoulder and snapped out: "Shut up
you noisy ass!"
In that instant he plunged headlong
into the flock of geese, ancl was swallowed up like magic. A most unholy
cackling rent the air, and Twining was
a mere blurr under a white-winged scrimmage of noise and motion. But he found
his feet minus his hat, at which an old
gander was viciously pecking, ancl with
a swing of his foot right ancl left he
sent a bird reeling lifeless on either hand.
Letherdale's canoe was now ashore and
Loring immediately shot up the beach,
but as he was not used to the shingle,
the guide got ahead of him. The men
were now about even, each making for
an opposite door. Letherdale took the
front entrance and got in first. Haddington was filling out a form and nodded to the guide with a look of surprise..
The latter observed a well-dressed woman seated at a window commanding a
view of the green, but he did not recognise her as her features were screened
by a newspaper which she had hastily
taken up as he entered.
There came a rush of feet up the steps
and with the merest pretence of a preliminary warning the doors were assailed. Loring's opened first. Twining's
was slightly jammed, but his voice came
through the panels in stentorian tones:
"Mining Recorder, I have a mineral
claim to record. Look at the clock; note
the time. I claim priority," half of
which was uttered as he strode in with
papers fluttering in his outstretched
hands.
Loring was quick on his feet, and covered the ground deftly with papers extended, and a compelling gesture which
had its effect on Haddington, who had
leapt up at the commencement of the
racket, dropping his glasses, and with
his gray military moustache bristling
with ire.
"Who   in "   he   began   forcibly,
glancing either way. "Gentlemen! what
do you mean? There's a bell. What
imp—er,—gentlemen, I certainly did not
expect you."
His hands reached out for the papers.
Loring thrust his into the right hand,
closing the fingers over them with his
own, saying rapidly: "Record the Mountain Echo Mineral Claim. Observe!
these papers are in your hands first!"
Twining's papers were tickling the
Recorder's left palm which closed on
them. He held both sets up, looked at
them, then at the clock and uttered his
statement impartially:
"Gentlemen! Mr. Twining, you certainly intimated your intention to record
a mineral claim exactly six seconds before Dr. Loring did, but I must say that
his papers were in my hands before
your's were."
"Be good enough to make a note of
the circumstances," said Twining with
the superior air of an aristocrat.
Haddington nodded stiffly.
The newspaper began to rustle audibly
ancl the woman behind it was evidently
moved by something she relished hugely.
Twining got sight of her and his manner at once underwent a striking alteration. His hands went up to his tangled
hair, yet he instantly became the insinuating modern gallant, ready at a moment to diffuse his personality in the
most approved style.
He glanced quickly about the room
and went immediately into a frantic fit.
of subdued pantomime, for there, standing in the doorway, looking as portentously innocent as a volcano, was Tony
with a limp goose held up by the neck
in either hand.
"Here's this here game Cap'n," he
drawled, holding them out at arm's
length ancl coming forward with what
looked like bashfulness.
Twining squirmed, threatened him*
horribly and motioned him out: "Here!1
take these here things," said Genelle, as
if fearing the scorn of multitudes. He-
thrust them into Twining's hands, saying : "Nagle's a' comin'."
Already, the. stubborn little rancher-
was in the door, glowering at Twining;
with a bitter-looking eye. The geese slid
to the floor, ancl Twining began diffusing himself with great affability in
Nagle's direction; but that little chap
meant business and was bent on having
his say out.
"Mr. Haddington," she said, putting
clown the paper and looking straight at
him, "will you please send those forms
to me when you have finished them.
"Oh!" she added in apology, when she
became aware of the presence of Letherdale ancl others. "Mr. Letherdale," she
exclaimed, rising to greet him. "I'm so
glad to see you!"
It was Eleanor Newcombe at her best,
and charmingly sweet she certainly was;
her features were merry with laughter,
but with another feeling giving the eyes
a softer look—memories that came
crowding back with a rush that threatened to engulf her.
"Dear Mr. Letherdale!" she murmured, with considerable warmth. He wondered at her effusiveness. Some notable
pshchological revolution must have annihilated her sense of time, for it was only
a day or two since, that he had seen her
last. She recovered herself with an effort and gave herself over to her sensations of mirth. She glanced in Twining's direction ancl looked a little difficulty at Dr. Loring. Letherdale saw
that she wanted to get away quickly:
"I'm coming this evening," he said, "and
vott'll tell me, Eleanor, all about yourself."
(To be continued.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1908.
At The Street
Corner
If I were given to extravagant lan-
:uage, I should say that the greatest
ocial event which has ever taken
lace since the early settlers camped
.1 Victoria more than fifty years ago,
'Ccurred on Tuesday evening last,
.hen the Charity Ball was held at
lie Empress Hotel.
Although I lounged about thc
poms and corridors of this magnili-
ent hostelry from 9 p.m. till 3 a.m.,
nd absorbed every detail of the func-
ion, I am quite unable adequately to
escribe its splendours.
The artistic decoration, the har-
lonious colouring and the brilliant
ghting of the rooms furnished a fit-
ng background for the panorama,
he gaily-dressed, constantly-moving
irong, the hum of converse, the
rounding evidence of happiness, all
dicated that the gay crowd had
)lved the problem most aptly ex-
essed in the phrase, "La joie de
vre."
It was a cosmopolitan and a happy
owd; every class was represented;
e distinctions which regulate what
e called "society" functions were
nspicuous by their absence, or
untested themselves only in the in-
■change of personal courtesy among
ose who move in the same set.
tice every set did likewise, there was
evidence of aloofness and no isola-
111. The Lieutenant-Governor, the
lief Justice, the Premier, Counsel,
s Wholesaler, the Retailer, the Re-
rter and the Mechanic all rubbed
oulders. Cast into the huge cruci-
: of a social but not a society func-
11, charity became the dissolvent,
d all went merrily.
[f I say anything now which sav-
rs of criticism, I hope it will be
derstood that my sole object is to
iiinate any deficiencies from similar
snts in the future. As a function,
affair was a huge success; as a
ice it was not. Seven hundred and
y tickets were sold, and practically
ry ticket was represented in per-
1, yet at no time could more than
people take part in the dancing,
ich means that more than half the
uld-be dancers had to stand or sit
There should have been a more
verful orchestra stationed near the
it of the staircase, where it would
rt been heard equally well in the
ing-room, and the hall and both
hs could have been used for danc-
The palm room was almost de-
ted, because everybody thronged
the hall, whereas it would have fttr-
hed plenty of room for the sitters-
who   could have  witnessed  thc
icing through thc portieres.
Vhile the supper was excellent, it
s entirely insufficient for so large
:rowd, with the result that after the
it sitting the choice items on the
:nu were exhausted.   There should
ve been at least a third more of the
st provisions, and thc billiard-room
well as the grill-room could have
Sen used.    I know ladies who, with
eir escorts, stood outside the sup-
Ir-room door for nearly two hours
fore they could gain admittance.
Item   number  3.—In   deference   to
Itrons and ladies no longer in their
}t youth, there should have beet.  1
square dances. It would have
lied grace to the function, and
pld have furnished a much desired
lortttnity to display some very
lutiful  costumes.    I   think  that  if
dance committee had not been
nposed exclusively of young people
deficiency would not have passed,
Ich suggests that in future it might
Iwell to add a matron to the com-
|tee.
also heard it whispered that the
lir committee made no attempt to
|*p thc dancers posted as to what
transpiring, and that they were
Ire concerned about dancing them-
Ives than in attending to their pre-
riptivc duties. I do not endorse this
Implaint,  but  have  been  asked  to
voice it pn the.authority of a* number
of tho?e who take this view.
On the whole, I think litle fault can
fairly be found. There were only twq
tilings which jarred oh my sense of
fitness. The one was the decidedly
objectionable fancy character assumed
by one lady, who shall, of course, be
nameless, but whose display brought
blushes to cheeks which were even
rouged; the other the behaviour of a
stout, elderly man, in Oriental garb,
who, in excess of joy, abandoned himself to the worship of Bacchus. These,
however, were but specks on an almost flawless panorama.
The function was rendered possible for the first time in Victoria by
the opening of the Empress Hotel.
Just how great a need it fills was
well* demonstrated, oil Tuesday night.
It renders social functions of the
most brilliant kind possible, and if the
enterprising and wealthy corporation
which owns it, could only be induced
to add a large hall suitable for dances,
chamber concerts, conventions; and
similar gatherings, they would not
only round out their programme in
Victoria, but would ensure profit as
well as popularity for themselves.
ofa
THE CANADIAN MAGAZINE.
The Canadian Magazine for February is more than ever distinctly Canadian. It starts off with an illustrated
article by Frank Yeigh, entiled "The
Cariboo Trail," and some of the other
most important contributions are as
follows: "The Washington of the
North," by M. 0. Scott, illustrated,,
being an account of the work done by
the Ottawa Improvement Commission
to beautify the Capital; "The Last
Letters of Wolfe and Montcalm," by
H. V. Ross; an outline of the "Canadian Immigration Policy," by W. S.
Wallace; "The Art of St. Thomas
Smith," by R. Holmes, with reproductions of some of Mr. Smith's pictures;
"The Trade Into the North," by
Aubrey Fulerton, illustrated, and an
article entitled "The Canadian Flag,"
by John S. Ewart, K.C, of Ottawa.
"Madam," said the doctor who had
been called at 2 a.m., after examining
the patient, "send at once for the clergyman and also for a lawyer if you
want to make your will."
"Good gracious!" exclaimed the
horrified patient, "is it as bad as that?"
"Oh, there is no danger at all," replied the M. D. "But I don't want to
be the only one who has had his
slumbers disturbed for nothing."--
Chicago News.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 11108.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly ami
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner oC section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south SO
80 chains; thence west SO chains to
point of commencement; 040 acres, more
or less.
MRS.  CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains',
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thenee north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thonce south 80
chains; thence east 80 cliains to point
of commencement;  640 acres,  more  or
Located  January  25,  1908.
WILLIAM  EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
:10, township 18; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement;  640.acres,  more or
less. ' -
Located  January  25,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east So
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;   640  acres,   more  or  less.
Located January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No, 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thenee north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
ohalns; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted • about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township IS;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township IS;
thence north 80 chains; -thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement;. 640.acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON  McALPINE,
Feb. 22       Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
FOR THE BALL    !
Dress Suits
$27.50, $80, $85.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
Victoria, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
WEEK 17TH FEBRUARY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COftSIDINE,    Proprietors.
Manet* mint -I ROBT. JAHIESON.
CARLISLE'S DOG AND PONY
CIRCUS
Including   "Tom,"    the    World's
Greatest Talking Pony.
ALVA YORK
English Singing Comedienne.
SEYMOUR EMILIE
HOWE and EDWARDS
Comedy Sketch
"The Arrival of Mr. Dooley."
THE PIOTTES
Character Singers
"The Italian and His Sweetheart."
EDDIE POWERS
Blackface Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"There's Another Picture in My
Mama's Frame.
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pearl Fisher."
"The Exciting Ride."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"IL BACIO."
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....lte
Evenings, Balcony  l»o
Lower Floor  >0e
Boxes    Mc
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH  A  THOROUGH
BUSINESS COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE  SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.O.
E. A. MacMillan.
LADIES        MEDICAL   GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
MR.     BJORNFELT,      SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
Stfe?   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
JTHE
WILSON BAR
It Warm and Comfortable!"
VISIT IT.
648 Yatea St, Victoria B. C
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Nctoria Agents for the Nanaimo Colllerlet.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  tt
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C
P
rtlCNTS   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTORIA, B. O. *"•
THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 22, 1908,
:
vi/m.-
\ \ K \ \ \       \  \ v \\\ \
AT THE EflPRESS DANCE.
* Social and        *
£ Personal, $
The Fancy Dress Ball at the Empress last Tuesday proved itself both
socially and financially a huge success. About seven hundred guests
thronged the spacious halls and corridors, which were beautifully decorated for the occasion. Miss Thain's orchestra was placed in the alcove on a
raised dais. The orchestra, which had
been carefully selected by its leader,
consisted of twelve of the best musicians to be obtained in the town.
Among the most praiseworthy costumes were: Mrs. R. H. Pooley, very
handsome yellow satin Chinese costume; Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, in black
velvet and gold embroidery, as "The
Merry Widow"; Mrs. Roy Troupe's
costume as "San Toy,' was very beautifully carried out; Mrs. H. Barnard,
as an Hungarian peasant; Miss G.
Hickey made a very striking Eastern
dancing girl; Mr. and Mrs. B. Tye, as
Buster Brown and Mary Jane, created
great amusement; Mr. Macgill as Uncle Sam; Mrs. Macgill, a Toreodor;
Miss Evelyn Tilton, a beautiful Des-
demona; Miss Newcombe made an
excellent witch; Mr. Donald (Vancouver) was rather a shy Buster Brown,
and Mr. K. Schofield was also a Buster; Mr. J. Musgrave, a native of
South America; Miss Pooley, Rouge-
et-Noir; Miss V. Pooley was very
handsome as Night; Miss Ncwling's,
as Cleopatra, was well carried out;
Miss Dorothy Bulwer made a very
pretty Eastern dancing girl; Mr. Harvey, Italian fisherman; Miss Marie
Gaudin, an Italian peasant; Miss K.
Gaudin, as Xmas; Miss Mellon, Hussar; Mr. Cecil Berkeley, Squire Bantam; Mr. Charles Newcombe, Knight
of the Boston Garter; Mr. J. Abbott,
Country Squire! Miss J. Abbott, Hussar (white); Miss Fitzgibbon, Puritan; Miss J. Langley, Summer Girl;
Miss V. Mason, Carmen; Miss D.
Mason, Dancing Girl; Capt. Hughes,
Mephisto, His Satanic Majesty; Mr.
Hogoty, Paddy; Mr. Hodgson, Jacit
Tar; Mr. M. Mason, Sam Tong; Mrs.
J. W. Laing, Punchinello; Mrs. W.
Langley, Grass Widow; Miss W. Lugrin, Carmen; Miss N. Lugrin, Butterfly; Mr. B. Tye, Cowboy; Miss G.
Lucas, Cowgirl; Miss Hall, Cingalee;
Miss Locke, Chinese Girl; Miss
Troupe, Gypsy; Miss V. Bolton,
Dutch Girl; Miss Blackwood, Ladies'
Field; Mrs. Stretficld, Xmas; Mrs. C.
Pooley, Bo-Peep; Mr. Colin Hogg,
Pierrot; Mr. C. Pooley, Charles 1.;
Miss Emma Sehl, Lady of thc Snow;
Mrs. C. E. Wilson, Pergola of Roses;
Miss M. Little, Cingalee; Miss Gillespie, Highlander; Mr. McDougall,
Highlander; and Capt. D. McDonald,
Mrs. Lagan, Kate Greenway, Miss T.
Monteith, Dancing of the Girl; Miss
Heyland, Dancing Girl.
Among the others were: The Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir;
Premier and Mrs. McBride, Chief
Justice and Mrs. Hunter, Judge Martin and Mrs. Martin, Commander and
Mrs. Allgood, Captain and Mrs.
Troupe, Justice and Mrs. Irving, Justice Morrison, Sir Chas. H. Tupper,
Lady Tupper, Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
Macdonald, Dr. and Mrs. King, G.
R. Naden, M.P.P.. Mr. W. Blakemore,
Miss Barbara Blakemore, Consul and
Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Ker,
Dr. and Mrs. O. M. Jones, Dr. J. D.
and Mrs. Helmcken, Dr. Herman
and Mrs. Robertson, Dr. Dolby, Mrs.
Higgins, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Genge,
Mr. and Mrs. Btilen, Dr. Pagan, Mr.
and Mrs. G. Matthews, Mr. and Mrs.
C. E. Pooley, and many others.
*   *   *
Mr. R. P. Roberts, of Kuper Island,
spent the week-end in Victoria, tho
guest of Captain and Mrs. Gaudin, of
Craigflower Road.
Mrs. Tatlow is visiting friends  in
Vancouver.
* *   it-
Mr. Finch-Page, New Westminster,
is in Victoria for a short stay.
* *   #
Mr. Ralph Lowndes, of Vancouver,
is  the guest  of  Mr.  Henry  Bulwer,
Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
Mr. W. A. Kingscote and Mr. Anthony Williams were registered at the
Balmoral during the week.
Mrs. Matson entertained at a
Bridge tournament on Thursday evening, for Esquimalt people.
Miss Mackay, who has been confined to the house with rheumatism,
is out again.
* *   *
Mr. Boyer is taking Mr. Keefer's
place in the bank at Duncans, while
the latter is having holidays.
* *   #
Mrs. Williams-Freeman and Mr.
Frank Hall came down from Duncans
for the Empress Ball on Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. V. Innis, of
Vancouver, were down for the  Ball,
returning home the next morning.
* *   *
Captain and Mrs. Wolley and Miss
Wolley were registered at the Balmoral during the week.
Captain and Mrs. Parry have arrived from England, and are registered at the Empress.
Mrs. F. B. Pemberton left for Vancouver on Wednesday morning, en
route to England, to see her son, who
is at school there.
* #   #
Mr. Herbert Aspland, formerly of
Victoria, is renewing old acquaintances. He has just arrived from
California.
* *   *
Mr. P. W. Keefer, of the Bank of
Britisli North America, Duncans, is
spending a short holiday with his parents at their home on Pemberton
Road.
* *   #
Sir Charles H. Tupper, Lady Tupper and Miss Frances Tupper, C.
Spencer, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis, Arthur
Brown Jukes, Mr. and Mrs. Abbott
were among the numerous Vancouverites who attended the ball.
* *   *
Mrs. T. S. Gore gave a Bridge party
last Monday at her residence at Oak
Bay. The guests wcre: Mrs. W. F.
Bullen, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Phip-
pen, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Matthews,
Mrs.    Gibson,    Mrs.    Harvey,    Mrs.
Tuck, Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Griffiths.
* *   *
Miss Heneage entertained a few
friends at tea on Saturday afternoon
last, prior to her departure for Thetis
Island. Some of those present were
Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Herman Robertson, the Misses Gertrude and Aline
Mackay, Miss J. Crease, Mr. Lindlay
Crease, Miss Musgrave, Mrs. Bridgman, Mrs. Allgood, and Mrs. Luxton.
Professional Ethics.
"You will have to send for another
doctor," said the one who had be* n
called, after .1 glance at the patient.
"Am I so sick as that?" gasped the
sufferer.
"I don't knew just how sick you
are," replied ■ lie man of med'eine,
"but I know you're thel awyer, who
cross-examined me when I appeared
as an expert witness. My conscience
won't let me kill you, and I'll be
hanged if I want to cure you. Good
day."—Philadelphia Ledger.
There Are Judges and Judges.
"I'm shober as a judge," quoth he,
Though he was "frisky";
"Oh, yes," she sneered, "you're iober
As a judge of whiskey."
—Exchange.
Her Greatest Need.
"Dr. Stiles insists," said Mrs.
Woodby, "that I must spend the winter in Florida. He says I need a
change."
"Yes," replied her husband,
promptly, "you need a change—
that's a fact."
"Ah, you admit it, then?"
"Yes, you need a change of doctors."—Philadelphia Press.
A Wise Youth.
An urchin of some eight summers
ran into the house the other day, and,
addressing his grandma, who was
quietly darning socks by the kitchen
fire, said:
"Grandma, can you eat nuts?"
"No, my dear," was the reply, "I
lost all my teeth years ago."
"Then," said the youngster, producing a quantity of Brazil nuts, "hold
these while I go out and get some
more."—Pick-Me-Up.
No Hope.
Young Wife—Doctor, can't you
give me any hope?
Knowing Physician—I am afraid
not, madam. While your husband's
age is against him, his vitality ensures his recovery.—Baltimore American.
Could Not Miss.
"I would like to find a girl radically different from myself."
"Never mind, Charley; you will
find plenty of bright girls.—New
York Telegram.
Quite a Difference.
"What does Vernon do for a living?"
"He works in a paint shop."
"Why, I understand he was a writer
for the magazines."
"Well, you asked me what he did
for a living."—Bohemian.
The Only Way.
Cassidy—Ah, well, no wan kin pre-
vint w'ats past an' gone,
Casey—Ye could if ye only acted
quick enough.
Cassidy—Go 'long, man! How
could yer?
Casey—Stop it before it happens.—
Philadelphia Press.
Even There.
"Dear," saidt he melancholy wife,
"if you die first, you will wait for me
there on that far shore, won't you?"
"I guess so," replied her husband,
with a yawn; "I've always had to
wait for you wherever I go."—Catholic Standard and Times.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phllippl,
of Omaha, occupntion. Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thenee
north SO chains', thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains', thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21,
Dated January ISth, 190S.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. IB A. Olson, Agent.
Receipt for Fine Prune Marmalade.
This is a French recipe and particularly valuable in seasons
when fruit is scarce: Take 6 fine, large cooking apples, peel,
plunge in cold water, then put them over a slow fire, together with
the juice of 2 lemons and half a pound of sugar. When well
stewed, split and stone two and a.half pounds of prunes and put
them to stew with the apples, and enough water to prevent burning.
When all appears well dissolved, beat it through a strainer bowl
and lastly through a sieve. Mould if you like, or put away in small
glass jars, to cut in thin slices for the ornamentation of pastry,
or to be eaten with cream.
FRENCH PRUNES, nice, new, 3 lbs 25c
FRENCH  PRUNES,  per  lb 10c
FRENCH PRUNES, extra large, 2 lbs 25c
FANCY PRUNES, per package   10c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooooooooooo
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. 0., is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you oan
actually obtain
your ohoice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te  season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
"Be not simply good, be good
for Something."
It's a great thing to be a
good cook and it is so easy
if you
Cook With Gas
Nothing but the most satisfactory results if you follow our simple instructions.
Won't you call and let us
show you some new ranges.
Splendid values. Illustrated
catalogue free for the asking.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

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