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Week Feb 8, 1908

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Array nnmn -reTf tyy oTTinrsTnnnnnfTi
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville, Vaacoaver.
■!l_LMJL»JtJUULMJUUJUtA«JUUUlJ
Vol. V.   No. %
Victoria Edition
The Week
ft British Columbia Review,/^
Published at Victoria and Vancouver/By (3
I
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY
The course pursued by the
An Appeal.      Colonist in connection with
the    grave    constitutional
question which in one phase or another
has been under discussion in the local
Legislature for about three weeks, has been
marked by sinuosity and zigzagging of the
most conspicuous type.    At one time it
has pretended to defend the attitude of
the Government, which from the first contended that the Lieutenant-Governor was
primarily an executor officer of the Dominion Government to which authority alone
he was answerable for the discharge of his
gubernatorial duties.    It contended further that in reserving his assent to the
Bowser Bill he had not acted in an unconstitutional manner.    After dodging the
issue, and in columns of editorial reflection, seeking to convey the impression that
lit was supporting the Government but
I in reality insiduously dropping suggestions
lof an adverse character, the Colonist came
lout with an editorial last week whieh
■clearly showed the cloven hoof.    As the
I debates in the House wore on it became
[more and more evident that the attitude
lof the Government would not only be justified by constitutional practice and pre-
|cew,ent, but that it would be sustained by
lthe House.   At this stage the Editor of
lthe Colonist repented himself of his previous attitude, and fearing that the opportunity to get in a blow at the Lieutenant-
Jovernor was slipping away, it maliciously
[suggested that even if the McBride Ad-
linistration had cleared its skirts, the
jovernor had not cleared his, and that the
attack should be diverted in his direction,
tllie Week made a reference to this attitude in its last issue.   Since then it has
[been spending some of its spare time in
[searching through the old files of the
|Colonist, and has made a discovery which
cannot fail to be of interest to all who
■[have studied the important question now
■under consideration.   In 1897 the gentle-
Iman who now presides over its editorial
■columns  occupied  the  same  responsible
[position, it may therefore not be uninter-
lesting to make an appeal from the Philip
lof 1908 to the Philip of 1897 in order that
[The Week may not be charged with mis-
I representing or  in  the   slightest  degree
I distorting the editorials written at the for-
Imer date, it will make no comment what-
jever upon them, but simply reprint thein
[verbatim at the foot of these remarks and
[asks its readers to weigh the observations
[therein contained and notice how they compare with the utterances of the Colonist
on the same subject during the last few
Iweeks.    Perhaps The Week may be per-
litted a closing reflection, which is that
|f as alleged in the editorial of May 11,
11897, the Times cannot answer the state-
Inent of constitutional law, bearing on this
Jmbject, as put forward in the Colonist a
[nost effectual answer is found in the Col-
Inist itself, if one will balance the editorials of 1897 against those of 1908.   In
jionclusion, The Week protests "That it
[s monstrously extravagant to run type-
letting machines and a printing press in
»rder to be able to snarl at your opponents, when for two bits a day our contemporary might hire a small boy to make
EDITORIAL
nnnnnnnf r_nrr_rs_x__wi raw i
Stewart WilUaaM R. CJanlan   ■
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
_i PORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
■mj ft m« p" ■»*«<■''■>'>»■■»■» ■"i
Onb Dollar Per Anhum
faces at the Times and the Lieutenant-
Governor" :
VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST, MAY 9, 1897.
"It is interesting to note that this is the
second occasion upon which a Lieutenant-
Governor of British Columbia has reserved
an Act for the approval of the Governor-
General, -the first occasion having been in
1877, when Lieut-Governor Richards reserved the Act in Amendment to the Gold
Mining' Amendment Act of 1872. The
Act of 1877 constituted the Gold Commissioners judicial officers, and assent was
withheld on the ground that the Federal
Parliament only had the right to appoint
Judges, and the action of the Lieutenant-
Governor in that case was upheld by the
Dominion Government.
"On page 658 the same writer says that
the Lieutenant-Governors in withholding
their assent to Bills 'are to act, not merely
on their own discretion, but subject to
instructions,' citing for this position Section 55 of the British North America
Aot, 1867, and Sir John Macdonald's report on the Ontario Orange Bills of 1873.
He adds that, in the absence of instructions, they are thrown upon their own
discretion, with such assistance as their
ministers may give them, but there is no
obligation upon the Lieutenant-Governor
to accept the advice tendered him by his
Ministry on such a matter, and he is under
no obligation whatever to consult them. He
may ignore them wholly, and the fact that
he may choose to ignore them is no reason
why the Ministry should resign, for, as
we have pointed out, the Lieutenant-
Governor occupies the dual position of
representing the Federal authority and of
Chief Executive of the Province.   *   *   *
"A vote of want of confidence could not
be based upon such action on the part of
the Lieutenant-Governor for obvious reasons, and as the withholding of the assent
is not made known until after supply has
been voted, the Legislature cannot declare
their disapproval of his act by refusing
to vote supply. In fact the case presented
is one fhat has no parallel in the parliamentary practice of the British Empire,
for in no other part of it do the same constitutional conditions exist as in Canada.
It so happens in regard to this particular
measure that it did not receive ministerial
support, but this is only an incident of the
transaction and touches no material point
involved in it. The act is that of the
Lieutenant-Goveror and not an act of the
Licutenant-Governor-in-Council. *   *   *
"The Lieutenant-Governor has not
given his reasons for withholding his assent
to this Bill, nor has he informed the Legislature whether in point of fact he received
instructions from Ottawa. It is not difficult, however, to suggest a reason why the
Federal authorities may have desired to
have assent to this measure withheld. Negotiations are now pending for a treaty
with Japan, and the whole subject of Canada's relations with tlie Orient must
shortly be dealt witli. In the meantime it
is not desirable that anyone of the Provinces should complicate the situation by
special legislation."
VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST,  MAY 11,  1897.
"Our plan is simply to state the facts
without embellishment. Our opposition
contemporaries being unable to answer the
facts and being unequal to the appreciation
of the policy of telling the truth always,
invariably represent that something is be
ing concealed. When those contemporaries grow wiser, if they ever do, they will
know that the most potent of all explanations is the true explanation, and when
they are confronted with a statement which
they cannot refute, they will learn to regard it as likely to be true. The Times
cannot answer the statement of constitutional law bearing on this subject as put
forward in the Colonist; it cannot answer
the suggested reasons why the Federal
Government may have instructed the
Lieutenant-Governor to withhold his assent from the Bill referred to; it cannot
even controvert the arguments in favour
of such a Course. It is in a hole anyway.
It dare not say that the Lieutenant-
Governor did wrong, for if it did it might
be condemning its friends at Ottawa. It
dare not say he did right, for it has not
sufficient courage to give its political
opponents credit for anything. It can only
snarl. NOW, WE PROTEST THAT IT
IS MONSTROUSLY EXTRAVAGANT
TO RUN TYPESETTING MACHINES AND A PRINTING PRESS
IN ORDER TO BE ABLE TO SNARL
AT YOUR OPPONENT, WHEN FOR
TWO BITS A DAY OUR CONTEMPORARY MIGHT HIRE A SMALL
BOY TO MAKE FACES AT THE
COLONIST AND THE GOVERNMENT."
It is difficult to know where
Blocks and to begin when commenting
Blockheads.      upon the miserable fiasco of
the Government Street paving. No wonder that a local editor throws
up his hands in despair and begs to be
excused, but even the most charitable disposition can hardly plead justification for
silence in view of the disgraceful result,
which is making Victoria Municipal management a laughing stock. All men make
mistakes, but fortunately many of our
mistakes are excusable. The Editor who
declined to criticise sapiently quoted that
if strict justice were dispensed none of
us could hope to see salvation. But there
are mistakes which are inexcusable, and
one sueh has been committed on the long-
suffering ratepayers of Victoria. Just who
is responsible 'for the system adopted in
the re-paving of Government Street, The
Week does not know, and therefore is the
less embarrased in declaring that if he is
a eity employee, lie ought to be discharged
right away. Common sense without special experience was sufficient to enable
all the citizens who watched the paving
process, to conclude that it would be a
failure. A few civil engineers who saw
it could point out exactly where its defects lay, and were amazed that tlie authorities should allow such a ridiculous process to be adopted. In England all successful wood paving lias been done by the
aid of boiled pitch and tar; this fills the
interstices, excludes water and binds the
blocks together. The foundation may be
either concrete made with cement, or
heated pebbles dropped in a pitch and tar
solution; it not only forms a splendid conglomerate but is impervious to moisture.
The Government Street pavement was laid
upon a concrete foundation, but this foundation was not new, and had heen worn
into an undulating form. The hollows,
instead of being rounded up with fresh
concrete, if that were to be tlie system
adopted, were simply filled with loose sand.
The blocks were laid on the sand without
any tamping, and were literally chucked
together just as children place loose bricks
when playing. The first rain storm naturally carried all the sand from underneath
the blocks, and rushed it down the sewers,
leaving the blocks to settle into the undulations of the foundation. In consequence
the pavement is absolutely valueless; it
will all have to be done over again, and
unfortunately the blocks which project
above the surface, and this probably
applies to 10 per cent., are being damaged
by the traffic now passing over them, which
is breaking off the edges. The writer has
superintended the laying of wood blocks>
stone sets, and asphaltum on streets in the
Old Country, and can safely say that never
since street paving was introduced, would
the work done on Government Street have
been tolerated for even a moment. If the
property owners have any pluck at all, they
will to a man, sign a legal protest against
the manner in which the work has been
done and refuse to pay their assessment
until it is properly executed. This will
involve a radical change. There must be
side gutters along the curb stones; the
street must be properly crowned where it
is now much too flat; the foundation must
be rounded up to a true curve, so that
the blocks when set will present an even
surface, and all spaces between the blocks
must be closely filled with a mixture of
boiled pitch and tar. This leaves untouched the question of crcosoting the
blocks. An expert examination would
show that the creosoting is a failure, either
the mixture or the machinery is defective.
A cursory examination of a split block
will show that the penetration of the liquid
is only partial. This means that it will
be quite ineffective to prevent decay.
Blocks which lack this protection absorb
moisture and decay very quickly. An
examination of the old blocks now being
taken up and which have only been down
one-third of the time estimated, will show
that the bulk of them are thoroughly rotted
inside. No one wishes to be hard on the
new City Council; they are not responsible for the system which was decided on
long before their advent to power, but
someone is responsible and he should be
dealt with in a manner which public interest demands. If this is not done, and
if the City Council does not call in an
experienced engineer to carry this work
through it will have to share the odium
which must attach to everyone connected
with it.
Making
Good.
Tliere is an old book containing maxims with which
the present generation has
less familiarity than its
predecessors. It has a word of warning
for the man of whom all men speak well,
and if there were the slightest danger of
the Provincial Secretary catching that American disease, commonly called "swelled
head," it might not be appropriate to refer him to Luke 6, 26. But no such warning is necessary, in spite of the fact that
Dr. Young has attained the unique distinction of having introduced a Bill of
the first magnitude without arousing a
word of criticism and on the other hand
receiving the commendations of the Members of the House and public press without distinction of party. On another
occasion The Week will devote space to
a consideration of the University Bill in
detail; for the present suffice it to say that
Dr. Young has produced a splendid
measure which in every sense justifies the
high opinion formed of his abilities. He
has "made good."
______* THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
The Merchants Bank
Cana  i
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Fundi  4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
I    At The Street    \
\ Corner h
By THB LOUNOER
tyft^/uf^/*i^/»<
•UNOER ^
Habitual readers of this column will
admit that first and foremost of the
subjects which I have kept before the
public for the past two years, that of
sanitation has occupied perhaps the
most important position. I am too
modest to claim any share of the
credit for the recent cleansing of the
Augean stable, to which the city authorities have put their hands, and I
am quite content to see reforms carried out without troubling about the
procuring cause.
At the same time I am not a little
proud that such an advance has been
made in this direction during the last
six months. The cleaning up of Chinatown and adjacent streets and alleys has never been so thoroughly
done "within the memory of the oldest inhabitant." Credit is due to,
someone for the demolition of unsightly and dangerous buildings, for
the improved condition of some of
our streets and sidewalks, and for discontinuing the dumping of garbage
on James Bay flats.
I am willing to regard all these
achievements as merely coincident
with my reform programme so long
as the good work continues to go on.
What I now want to point out is
what I have stated in these columns
again and again, viz., that the city
bye-laws have always been strong enough to prevent the accumulation of
nuisances and to procure their speedy
removal. The trouble has been lack
of enforcement. By some means public opinion has been aroused and keyed up to a higher pitch in respect of
hygienic observances; I therefore
trust there will be no relaxing of ef-
ort, but that there will be a rigid enforcement of all provisions affecting
the public health.
In this connection I have read with
much interest the proposed additional
bye-laws introduced into the Council
by Alderman Henderson. These bye-
laws are decidedly stricter than any
which have gone before, but not a bit
more stringent than the circumstances
of the case demand. Accumulations
of filth are breeders of disease, but
where owing to fortunate climatic
conditions, epidemic diseases do not
ensue, none the less does the public
health suffer in disorganized conditions and lowered vitality. I hope that
every one of Alderman Henderson's
proposals will be endorsed, and that
once they become bye-laws of the city
they will be enforced with the utmost strictness.
It must not, however, be forgotten
tllat these most excellent provisions
for the more frequent removing of
garbage and other refuse will necessitate improved scavenging facilities,
The ashbin will have to be emptied
oftener, and I venture to suggest that
the   time   has- come   when   the   city
should instal a more comprehensive
and satisfactory system, and especially
when it should introduce closed
carts for the removal of all refuse of
this class.
I do not know what the city authorities think of the new pavement on
Government Street, but as the subject
has been dealt with by my editor, I
will content myself with saying that
the' contention which I quoted in this
column last week has been speedily
vindicated.; The foundation of sand
has been washed away by the first
storm, and at the moment of writing,
those blocks which are not floating an
incli-w. two above' -their normal level
are resting in the various hollows and
cavities which had been formed in
the concrete foundation, the whole
presenting an interesting study in undulations.
I know that the sand has disappeared, because I lounged round four
sewer gratings during the storm on
Wednesday, and saw it being carried
down by the rain water. An ex-alderman resented my criticism and remarked that it would have been all
right but for the rain.
Even newspapers sometimes ask
foolish questions, and a great family
daily published not a thousand miles
from Victoria, in commenting this
week on the proposal of Seattle capitalists to spend $150,000 on an up-to-
date office block for this city, asked
why Victoria capitalists did not undertake the project. Ther is only one
reason, and I thought every newspaper man at any rate, knew it. Victoria capitalists prefer to realize 3 per
cent, on their money by depositing it
with the local banks, to be shipped
out to ailciate the money stringency
in the East, rather than to invest it
in a 10 per cent, business block in
Victoria. If anyone doubts this, I
will ask them to consider the following fact, that there was on the thirty-
first of December, 1907, a little over
$11,000,000 on deposit with Victoria
banks, of which less than $2,000,000
had been reinvested in Vritish Columbia.   Verb sap.
Dr. Fagan is not the first scientific
expert who has been "hoist with his
own petard." Greater men than he
have come within an ace of losing
their lives, but few have sacrificed the
lives of three hundred harmless creatures, to demonstrate that oxygen is
life. The animals in question were
not accumlated for this purpose,
they were intended to demonstrate
far more advanced principles of medical science; but, alas! they were
doomed to illustrate a mere rudimentary principle.
A general impression round the
clubs is that the Colonist came a cropper in its bout with Aldermen Meston
and Gleason. I hear on good authority that the offending paragraph was
a paid advertisement; if so, the editor
should frankly state the fact. As it
stands, it was run as a news item, for
the compilation as well as the publication of it the editor is responsible.
Perhaps some day Alderman Gleason
will realize that he will greatly increase his popularity by frankly making thc admission that in the field of
social reform "there are others." It
will be a sad spectacle for Victoria to
lay claim to being the only city since
Old Testament days reduced to the
possession of "one righteous man."
Without expressing any personal
opinion on the subject of woman's
suffrage, I will venture to make the
assertion that if its advocates would
arrange for a house to house canvas
by reliable parties and secure a vote
for or against from every woman
over twenty-one years of age in Victoria, a very small minority would be
found to favour the proposal.
I venture to say further that if my
surmise should prove to be wrong
and the majority wcre in favour, the
Government would without the
slightest hesitation give legislative effect to the plebiscite. This is the only
rational way to go about it, for I am
convinced that the legitimate wishes
of its advocates stand in great danger
of being disappointed if they rely
upon something approaching the Suffragist movement at home.
I have been asked to say a word
about the Alexandra Literary Club.
It was my good fortune to attend several  meetings  of  this  admirable  so
ciety last fall, and I am now free to
confess that while I went to scoff I
remained to—admire. The very brief
reports of its meetings which appear
in the daily press convey no adequate
idea of the popularity of the Club and
the excellence of its programme.
While it is mainly for ladies, gentlemen of literary and artistic tastes are
admitted as guests. The topics are
carefully selected and the speakers
are invariably experts in their line.
The popular impression that ladies'
meetings are mainly for tea and gossip has no application to the Alexandra Club. The committee deserves
credit for the painstaking manner in
which it seeks to keep alive some
practical interest in those subjects
which tend to preserve culture and
refinement. Any lady who holds
aloof is depriving herself of an opportunity of rounding out her social pleasures with the pursuit of intellectual
studies. The members of the Alexandra Club keep their light burning at
the shrine of literature and art.
QJn
rt^»-^r.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
V( TORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Best Buy.
BEST  BUT  IN  VICTORIA  OP  BUSI-
NESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAT.
Double Corner on Wharf and Qovernment streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has the Post Offlce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled ln the City of Viotoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Qovernment, the City Council and the
C. P. R.   Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing Interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land;
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing  160 acres,  more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
IE   BEST
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THI
THE REPUTATION OF       mm
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
It world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
By Appointment to H. M. the King.
A REVOLUTION IN FRUIT CULTURE.
V FLUID
The Winter Spray-Fluid kills the eggs of insects and mites
and the spores of Fungi.
V2 FLUID
The Summer Spray-Fluid is deadly to Aphis, Psylla, and Scale
Insects, and does not injure leaf or blossom. One spraying a year
with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. COOPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
Sole Agents for British Columbia.
E. G. PRIOR &e©..
LTD.
LTY.
WLMw
VICTORIA, B.C.
Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
full particulars of these wonderful insecticides.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff avaitable at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The Y. B. 6. Novelty Works
"~~~3rarE AimQvz, abtxbtzo   abb   ABCHrrnoTTOAi,
DBBXOMBD WOBK HABB TO OBDEB.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
1000 Granville Street     11 ::      11       1:      VAJCOOUVBB, B. O.
T. LtCAIB,  .Proprietor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.    .
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908
The Light Fantastic.
[At the Empress Hotel for the Cause
of Charity.
Arrangements for the fancy dress
ball which is to be held in the Empress Hotel on the 18th in aid of St.
Joseph's hospital are being carried on
apace. The committee in charge is
hard at work, and will spare no effort
to make this ball the most brilliant
social event in the history of Victoria. It is expected that a large
number of people will come to Victoria from outside points to attend,
as the magnificent Empress Hotel is
being widely spoken of all along the
coast, due no doubt to the fact that
the newspapermen who were so royally entertained here by the officials
of the C.P.R., having returned home,
are now writing elaborate descriptions
o{ Victoria's palatial hostelry.
The committee wish to announce
that the price of the tickets, viz., $3.00,
includes everything in connection with
the ball. A rumour is afloat to the
effect that in addition to the price
of the ticket, an extra charge is to
be made for supper. This is not so.
The price paid for the ticket covers
everything. Although the ball is to
be fancy dress, it will not be compulsory to wear fancy dress. Many
of the ladies will appear in poudre,
and those of the gentlemen who do
not care to wear fancy dress or coat
facings, will wear the regular evening
dress. Masks, however, will not be
permitted.
Final arrangements for the music
have been completed, the committee
having secured an orchestra of twelve
of the best musicians in the city, and
the musical programme which is now
in course of preparation will be one
of the finest ever heard in British
Columbia. The ball programme, which
will be something new to Victorians,
is already being prepared, and is a
very dainty and attractive piece of
work. Although being unique in design, it is all that art and good taste
can suggest, the paper and pencils
to be used having been imported specially for the occasion. The sale of
tickets up to date has been very large,
and mail orders are already beginning
to come in from outside points, press
notices having appear in several of
the sound papers as far south as Portland, where interest in the big event
is evidently being aroused. Tickets
are now on sale at Fletcher Bros.,
Mrs. Aaronson's, M. W, Waitt &
Co.'s, Victoria Book & Stationery
Co., Hibben & Co.'s, C. F. Redfern's,
the J. M. Whitney Company, and
Challoner & Mitchell's.
The sale will close on Saturday,
Feb. 15, after which date tickets cannot be purchased under any consideration. This action is necessary on
account of the extensive preparations
which will have to be undergone by
the hotel management in connection
with the supper, which is to be a
most elaborate one, and which will
necessitate a knowledge of the exact
number of people who will be present.
Therefore, those who have not yet
secured their tickets are requested to
do so at the earliest possible date,
either from the members of the committee or from any of the stores
where they have been placed on sale.
The following are the names of
the Committees in charge:
Ladies' Committee — Mrs. Robin
Dunsmuir, Mrs. R. II. Pooley, Miss
E. Sehl and Mrs. Hermann Robertson.
Knights of Columbus Committee—
Messrs. F. J. Sehl, A. B. Stewart,
Jno. Hart, Wm. H. P. Sweeney, and
Frank C. Clarke (Hon Sec'y)
Floor Committee—Messrs. H. A.
Bromley, F. J. Sehl, R. H. Pooley,
J. H. Lawson, Jr., and Col. Gregory.
A great deal of interest is being
taken in the affair in Vancouver as
will be seen by the following which
is taken from a recent issue of the
Vancouver Province:
"An event that is causing considerable comment in social circles all
along the coast is the fancy dress ball
which is to be given in aid of St.
Joseph's Hospital, in thc Empress
Hotel, the magnificent new C. P. R.
structure   in   Victoria,   on   February
18, fancy dress or poudre for ladies
and fancy dress or coat facings for
gentlemen will be in order and will
create an eminently beautiful spectacle in contrast to the spacious and
magnificent room and superb appointments of the big hotel. The matter of
music is being given special attention,
a picked orchestra of twelve of the
best available musicians have been secured and the programme, though varied, will be the best that has ever
been heard in British Columbia.
Final arrangements with the management of the Hotel have been completed by the ladies in charge: Mrs.
Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. R. H. Pooley,
Miss Sehl and Mrs. Hermann Robertson, assisted by a committee of the
Knights of Columbus who are taking an active interest in the affair,
and are co-operating with the ladies.
The entire lower floor of the hotel
has been placed at their disposal, including the lounging room, palm room
and ladies' room.
pattern of pink roses. The curtains
are pink and the furniture grey, with
Rose du Barry seats, which, like all
furniture in the hotel, were made to
order.
The lounging room is of immense
size, extending fully half thc length
of the hotel. It is beautifully lighted
and cheery, and the two great fireplaces will render it equally homelike.
The striking feature of this immense
hall are the white pillars, which run
through the place in stately rows.
Each pillar boasts a double bad of
beaten brass, from which depend four
electric light fixtures, which were specially designed, each depicting a
Rocky Mountain shep's head, with a
light in the ground glass bowl upon
each head, and another in a pear-
shaped glass hanging from the mouth.
Between the rows of pillars are other
brass chandeliers, in.which the sheep's
head again figures. They are both
quaint and artistic, and when lit up
the hall makes a very brilliant scene.
PADEREWSKI
In entering the hotel by the porte
cochere, at the south end of the building, which will probably be used as
the main entrance on the night of the
ball, one finds himself in a magnificent oak-panelled hall, designedly
patterned after the ancient baronial
halls of the great mansions of England. Carved oak paneling extends
up the walls to a height of about ten
feet; the ceiling finished in yellow, is
very heavily beamed with oak timbers
terminated at cither end by small
carved medallions, representing the
beaver, the lion, the crown and lhe
thistle. Great pillars sheathed in oak,
with massive carved oaken capitals,
support the ceilings, the whole effect
being one of artistic strength coupled
-ith solid wealth. A great screen of
carved oak divides thc hall from the
palm room, but terminated in time to
leave an inetrrupted coup d'ocil
through the spacious lounging room
beyond. But in the midst of tllis reproduction of old world splendour the
twentieth century emphatically asserts
itself in the ladies' sitting room. It is
a most enchanting room. The walls
are panelled high with oak, ancl there
is a superb, heavily carved oak mantle, with thc ceiling in elaborately
moulded relief. The colour scheme is
artistic and restful, grey and pink being the prevailing hues. Round the
walls runs a broad frieze of chubby
cupids, and on the floor lies a beautiful   grey  carpet,  hand-tufted   with   a
At the back of the lounging room is
the palm room, a large apartment
done in green, with a circular dome
of oriental glass surmounting it. The
pillars here are twined round with
vines. This room will be converted
into a card-room for the use of those
who do not care to dance.
The ballroom is the most gorgeous
of the different rooms. It lies along
the north end of the hotel, and the
prevailing colour is rich red. The
wood used is all imported, the ceiling
with its heavy beams and the massive
pillars being all of Australian rosewood. This, to the uninitiated, looks
not unlike mahognay, though the
grain is different, and lends itself
equally well to decorative work, as
this room can testify. Thc great
beams which cross the ceiling at close
intervals are richly carved. The pillars are plain, but on the ceiling there
are scrolls, arabesques and fancy figures covering the entire surface of thc
beams. This treatment contrasts with
the reliance on line and absence of
florid work which characterizes the
rest of the building. Appended from
the ceiling at spaces of about two feet
apart and running the entire length
and breadth of the room, are beautiful
brass chandeliers with their clusters
cf electric globes, and when lighted
the effect is most brilliant. The floor
is of Australian red bean, which
makes an ideal surface for dancing.
Never in the social history of the
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES' BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St,
VICTORIA. B. C.     .
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
VICTORIA
1
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimate* and
designs lurnlshed.
HOLLY TREES
Prieai tnm ag eaats to fcoo, according
to tkx. Write lor seed aed tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A R.ald.atial •■ i Day School (or Boy.
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department, First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
Pacific Coast has a ball been given
amidst such sumptuous surroundings,
and considering the object for which
it is being given it should be exceptionally well patronized. It is not
often that aid is solicited by Victoria's oldest hospital, St. Joseph's,
and as the expense of building the
new wing is so heavy ($60,000 approximately) it is hoped that every on:
will work to make this dance a success. The price of the tickets has
been placed at $,., and may he secured
from Frank C. Clarke, honorary secretary, Box 705, Victoria.
There crossed the Atlantic both
ways last year 3,000,000 persons, and
yet no place looks lonelier than thc
sea—there's so much of it.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and vauder 11
artists while in the Capital city, alt. el
other kindred bohemian..
WRIQHT * FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men end
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. TMEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Moet Popular $1 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur-?
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Btectrte
lighted. Tub aad shower bath, and laundry le
connection.  The miners' heme.
••DANNY" DBANE. Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates (1.00 per day and up.   Cafe to
Connection.
GREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,  B. C,
Leading Hotel of th. Kootenays.
J. PRBD HUME,      -      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON, B. C.
The home oi the Industrial Workers
ofthe Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandlleh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in Ui-J City.
11.80 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write ior "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
eao roBT btmet    h    vxotobxa.
TZOHAB 0__.T_.M_—-.
BaUder  and  •eaeral  Contractor.
Tender,   rlvai   on   Brick, Stone   an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Fleorinj
Odea, Bank, Store and Saloen Flttlafi
Pile Driving, Wharves aad Dook I
constructed and rapalred.
YMTOBUu THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 8, 1908
Incorporated 1901.1
Capital, f500.000.ee
Capital Increased
ln HOT
to ... 12,000,tOO.OO
Subscribed
Capital,    $110,1(0
Beserve . . (50,0*0]
Surplus, Jan. tt,   .
1907  .  .  »110,00»|
J. B. KATKEBS, Oan. Hi.
IV   CLOSING   UF   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hastings St., West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Prevlncial Bevlew and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE.WEEK" PUBLISHING
.^COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1114  Qovernment Street..Victoria, B.C.
Ill  Hastings  ,'  Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKEMOBH..Manager and Bditor
The Broken Road.
Since A. E. W. Mason startlei the
itcrary world with his popular novel,
"Four Feathers," raariy things have
happened. His pen, ever busy, has
brought him added fame. His proclivities for public service have led
him into the political arena, and he
has gained a seat in the British House
of Commons. It is also reported that
he has inherited a substantial fortune
from a maiden aunt. All of these are
excellent things in every way, but
political fame would have been purchased at too high a price if it had
led Mr. Mason to neglect thc cult for
which he is so eminently adapted, and
to forget his first love amid more
arduous and exciting occupations.
This has been the experience of
more than one writer of promise, and
it may come to Mr. Mason, but his
latest book lends no encouragement
to the fear. "The Broken Road" is in
many respects equal to "Four Feathers." It is characterized by the
same easy diction and chaste style.
The author uses nervous English and
uses it so that it is in his hands a
flexible and pliant instrument. In this
story is no excess of verbiage and no
clouding of thc issue. I recently reviewed Mr. W. J. Dawson's new
book, "A Prophet in Babylon," and
found it two hundred pages too long
for its purpose. Mr. Mason's story
runs to little over four hundred pages
and is not a word too long. The construction is good, the plot carefully
work out. I read it at a sitting, because 1 could not lay it down, and
from my standpoint, at any rate, that
is the highest recommendation novel
could have.
There is a distinction about Mr.
Mason's work; he has learned to write
in short sentences, which are snappy
without being jerky. He has a vivid
imagination. His descriptions are
picturesque, and the scene he depicts
invariably materializes in the mind of
the reader. He indulges in no circumlocution, but plunges at once "in
medias res." In the intricacies of his
plot he never buries his characters,
nor keeps them behind the scenes
long enough for interest to wane. As
chapter si.cceeds chapter, the reader
finds himself saying, "It was just
time that so-and-so reappeared." Every section of the story dovetails well
with its fellows. Now, all these things
in my opinion go far to ensure an in
teresting if not a fascinating novel.
They go largely to constitute the craft
of novel-writing, and they are the
nique of a writer's work which may
tend to the mechanical and the artificial, but if the wires be skilfully hidden, the taste is not offended. After
all, we know that there are strings to
the puppets and that someone pulls
them, but as 'long as they are not visible we nurse the delusion that the
marionettes are real men and women.
Not that there is anything artificial
about "The Broken Road," but it excels rather on the lines I have indicated than in epigram, philosophy, or
even in profundity of thought.
It is a story of India, and it is due
to Mr. Mason to say that even when
one remembers what Kipling and
Flora Annie Steele have done for that
mysterious country, Mr. Mason has
not failed to reproduce the atmosphere, and to more than suggest the
indefinable sensation of subtlety and
mysticism which pervades the Oriental character. I do not think that it
ever entered the author's mind that he
was writing a novel with a purpose; I
think, rather, that the purpose grew
out of the novel, and is possibly more
apparent to the reader than to the
writer, but before I reached the end
of the book. I found that it had gripped me and that all the glamour of
British administration under conditions never existent before, possessed
mc wholly.
"The Broken Road," the theme of
the book, that great road which the
father of the hero had started, and
which it was incumbent upon his successors to push up to the very slopes
of the Himalayas, is a simile of the.
great task that lies before the British
Government in India. The history of
our administration tells of ma"ny a
broken road, of many a delayed project, of many a thwarted design, but
not one of them is abandoned; sooner
or later they must all go on to completion.
It is the certainty of this which constitutes the strength of our grip upon
the Empire, which we should lose in
a day if it were relaxed. Mr. Mason
excels in drawing picturesque characters, and in weaving a human story
of infinite tenderness with the sterner
features of his plot.
First we get the hero, Linforth,
whose father had been killed in an uprising among the frontier tribes; to
Linforth was bequeathed the task of
finishing the Broken Road. Then we
have Shere Ali, a Prince, and son of
a native Prince, educated at Eton and
Oxford, imbibing Western ideas, an
accomplished English gentleman but
for the tell-tale tan. We see him recalled at a critical stage in the history
of his native state, Chiltistan, but not
before he had conceived a violent affection for an English girl. This girl,
although only twenty-three years of
age, was a widow. She had her
failings, but like many widows was intensely fascinating; indeed, Violet
Oliver is probably the best drawn
character in the book, and in spite of
her frivolity and love of pleasure, had
a certain independence of character
and unerring corectness of judgment
and sense of honor which render her
very attractive. Linforth loved her,
too, and so he and Shere Ali, from being like brothers, gradually drifted
apart, separated by the unbridgeable
chasm.
Later the scene shifts entirely to
India, and Mullahs play an important
part in the story and we get a glimpse
of religious fantacism. Ralston, the
commissioner who presides over a
large district, including Chiltistan, is
an ideal representative of the Home
Government, aristocratic, honourable,
sagacious, courteous. Under his direction, Linforth undertakes important
commissions.
Meanwhile, Shere Ali puts his fate
to the test and proposes to Violet Oliver, only to find that there is a barrier
which no white woman may pass
without declassing herself. Then
comes the conflict between his Oriental instincts and his Occidental training, and he curses the day that he was
sent to England to be educated, there
to imbibe the principles of Western
civilization, only to find on his return
that they availed him nothing against
the racial handicap of his birth.
He flings aside every restraint, and
after plunging into recklessness, becomes a ready tool in the hands of
the Mullahs to foment rebellion in his
native state. Linforth is the instrument to suppress the uprising, and in
a few vivid chapters Mr. Mason depicts with fidelity and impressiveness
a typical native rebellion, crushed, as
so many native rebellions have been
crushed, by the superior organization
and morale of a small British force.
I will not spoil the story for my lady
readers by telling them how the love
episode ends. The book is well worth
reading for that, apart from its absorbing interest as a sketch of Indian
administration and a study in racial
differences.
The value of the book lies in its
suggestiveness. Reliable authorities
tell us that the seething unrest which
is never long absent, is to-day more
turbulent than for many years among
our Indian subjects. After every allowance is made for the influence of
religious fanatics, there still remains
the great question of the genius of
Indian government. The demand of
the native peoples for a larger share
in the government of the country is
becoming more insistent and is a logical corollary of higher education. Just
how the demand will ultimately be
met it may be too soon even to surmise, but that it will be met and met
in a spirit of reasonable concession,
no man can doubt.
The policy of the British Government has ever been to extend the privilege of representative government
to conquered peoples. There are a
thousand reasons why this privilege
will have to be more carefully safeguarded in the case of India than in
that of any other country with which
we have had to deal. This surmise
becomes a certainty in view of the
enormous preponderance in numbers,
the deep religious divergencies, and
the unfathomable mysticism of the
Oriental mind. But while these furnish to-day the greatest problem
which our statesmen have to consider,
the successive triumphs of British administration justify the belief that
they will be solved as effectually and
probably with greater success than
some of the great problems which
have confronted them in other parts
of the world and in other stages of
our history.
In view of the present condition of
affairs in India, Mr. Mason's book is
not only entertaining, but apposite,
while it is not profound, it is so interesting that no one who takes it up
will wish to lay it down until the end
of the story has been reached.
["The Broken Road," by A. E. W.
Mason. Publisher, McLeod & Allan,
Toronto; price $1.50; on sale at thc
Victoria Book and Stationary Store,
Government Street, Victoria.]
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH
PADEREWSKI
PRICES $4.00, $3.00 and $2.00.
GALLERY $1.50.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Wednesday,
February 12th.
FEBRUARY 12TH
JOS. M. GAITES
Offers
MISS CHERIDAH SIMPSON
In De Koven, Klein and Cook's
Masterpiece.
Red Feather
COMPANY OF 7s
AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA
COMPLETE  PRODUCTION
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Nothing Daintier
Than a Pan
But alas, few things more perishable. How many ladies have
used the pretty, modish trifle, but a few times when the filmy lace
or spangled covering is torn or tarnished. Fans, too, have a
sad habit of losing themselves entirely. The Victoria social
season is now in full swing and coming balls and entertainments
will, doubtl.ess, suggest to many ladies the necessity of new
Fans. Lovely Fan creations are here. Fans in profusion. Fans
for every costume.    Prices start at 75c.
FASHIONS IN JEWELRY.
are constantly studied here. Where formerly one Necklace had
to serve for many gowns, it is now necessary for choice dressers
to have a separate Necklace for each gown. The wonderful
blending of tones possible in semi-precious stones appeals to
smart women when they note our collection.
—Parisian Pearl Collars from $1.00 to $20.00.
—Fancy Hair Combs for evening wear, from $1.25.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
DIAMOND  MERCHANTS  AND  SILVERSMITHS
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home I
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
"Old Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heav
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie", "In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that: These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars;
comic song-hits and minstrel  humor;  perfect dance music j  classic
\w  symphonies—entertainment of every sort for every mood and every
Vs.  occasion ; and all to be heard at its best on the Victor tr Berliner
\ o\   Gram-o-phone.
%  *_. (_\    Any Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly play
*V 0 *»\ Victor Records for you.  Call and ask to near
\'°r \\ them, and get him to tell you about the
~   \     \ % <*/\ easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
\    \     \>^ %k\ *—u8e ^le c0UP°n.
\    '*'•*,     \     \'/w _>\ Tta Qarilmr I
\   V  \   \_\
*> ■
Xo.
_ '„*
v_*<
Tbe Berliner Gmn-o-ptnme
Company of Cinida, Ltd.
MMIUU.   608
You can always      __.      ^^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar j(V\#    13 •     ^an ^ers.
Union Made. (D1 fl si t"
Havana Filler.       WlJ|tlI
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
, THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8   1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffling-
I ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupa-
I'tion Gentleman, intends to apply for
I a special timber licence over the fol-
| lowing described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
I chains north of the northeast corner of
section  12,  thence forty  chains  north,
I one hundred and  twenty chains  west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty   chains   east  to   point   of   commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands;
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north  to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
noi'tneast coiner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north to place of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON   VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following  described  land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
326, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commeucemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated   November  15,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7 th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Vietoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 131.93; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1^07.
THOMAS MiLLER BAIRD.
STAN les:  WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
ii. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains', thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert,   Kathleen Lake.
TAKE NOTICE liml Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., lumberman, intends
to apply for a special timber license
over the following  described lands:
8. Commencing ul a post planted at
the southwest corner uf T. L. 16,381, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains  to commencement.
Stalled November 3011),  1907.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of T. L. 13,046, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 140 chains; thence south
20 chains to T. L. 13,045; thonce following north line of T. L. 13,046 east
and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th,  1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Deo. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
DISTRICT OI  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., of Vancouver, occupation,  , Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about S acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly,
parellel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479.
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
I
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thenee
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. G—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18546, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 6,  Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission tu
purchase the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest cornei", thence north 40 chs.:
thence east 40 cliains; thence south 40
chains', thence west 40 chains to placo
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5, and containing 160 acres, more or
less,
Dated 23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(o) Commenolng at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,746, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim C"; thenee south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thenee south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December 6th, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec.  10th,  1907,
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot 192, on
Quatsino Narrows, marked "E. A. W.'s
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence
east about 30 chains to T. L. 14,467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thenee
north and west along shore to Indian
Reserve; thence south and west along
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 Thomas D. Harris, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
aviout 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S, W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; tnence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and ln an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thenee
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and In an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
SO chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Qua
tham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7~Commencing at a post planted
aboi t 40 ehains distant and ln an east-
tRthur Gore.
Manager
TIMBER MAPS
Office Phonc 1534,
Resioence 4-38
posted up to date every day
ELECTRIC BLUEPRINTS, MAP CO
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS. SZ  L AHr.l FY '  c-r_» «- <r -r
BLUE PRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   tah en  up in British C,
olumhia.
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" Is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Auckland, in the
Colony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is one million pounds, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred pounds each.
The head office of the Company ln
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose
address is Victoria ,B,C„ ls the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 28th day of November,
one thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To carry on the business of fire and
marine Insurance in all Its branches or
such of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as are
Incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Dec.  14.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chatns.
21st December,  1907.
MAX.  J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mlle south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chainB;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thenoe
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thenco east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains', thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of lioeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December ISth, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post plantod about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 8U
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of cornei* post of claims No. 3 and 4;
thence north 80 cluiins; thonce west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
bated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
cornor iiest of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 040 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.  IS ED. BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District ot Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M, J. Kinney, ot
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumbermau,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line Intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marbie
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked tbe 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the Bald
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thenee southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a polut intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends lo apply for permission lo
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore llne a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small Island on
north  line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,  of  Vancouver,  occupation,
intends to apply for permission
to  lease the following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thencs following high water mark south and
west to Uie southeast corner of Lot 108;
thence eaat flve chains; thenoe north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about SO chains to a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commeneement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MIJINQ CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herr!?! MacGregor.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coaat of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY McMICKBNKBEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I„ New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands;
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; theno.e east 80 chains',
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about ono mile south of lot No. 24 IA,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thenca south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated. December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
cornor post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6-—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 6; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
SO chains; thence east 80 chains', thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
B.C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP end BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilsou
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Tlmbor Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following deacrlbed
lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this posl planted on the cust
side of the Bay about one-third ot a
mile from the point at the mouth ot the
Bay, being the southwest corner posl;
theuce east 80 chains; ihence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains lo beach;
thence south along beach lo point ot
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  25,   1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young. Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
Superstructure of Swiag Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the office of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the office of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner In
the sum of two hu.idred and fifty ({250)
dollars, which shall bo forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to tho
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, lu
the sum of (1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner ln the sum of $3,000 for
tho Uue fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond boing supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed ln the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
NEW    WESTMINSTER     LAND    DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, Intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 18187;
thence east 80 chains along tho north
llne of T. L. 181S7; thence north 80
chains along the west line of T. L.
12602; thence east 80 chnins along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thonce north
SO chains along the west llne of T. L.
12503; thence In a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less,
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of
Iowa Palls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 30
days after date.
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 1, which ls on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
it cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north 80 chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commeneement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,
S.W. No. 3, which Is 20 chains distant
In a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell
Lake; thence east 80 chains; north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 4, which is one mile distant
in a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east of
T. L. 14864, thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 6, which ls one mile distant In
a northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mile east of T. L.
14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 6, which is situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thenee west 40
ehains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 7, which is about four miles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west*
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chatns to point of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 8, which ls flve miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  16th,  1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which is four miles' distant
in a northerly direction ti _m Crown
Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
ehains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which is two miles distant
in a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chatns;
south 80 chains to poinl: of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which is flve and one-quarter mlles distant in a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Lake; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  17,  1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which Is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
33. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner, marked "W.
E. S„ N.W., No. 33," which is five
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain; thence south
Po chains, east 8o chains, north So
chains, west 8o chains to point of
commencement.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which is three miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80  chains  to  point  of  commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 35, which
is marked W.E.S.,  N.E. which
ls flve miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain; tnence
south 80 chains; west 80 chatns; north
80 chains; east 80 chatns; to point of
commencement,
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 36, which Is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one-half a mile south of
Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 37, S.E.. which is flve miles distant In a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which Is flve miles distant
in a southwesterly direction from West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chalng; wcstlO chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
at the. southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
mlles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it Joins the line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. .0—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 40, which is three and one-half
miles ln a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
Joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 41—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
In an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No, 42—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 42, which ls four miles distant
In an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on lino Block 110; thence
east 80 chains;  north  80 chains; west
80  chains; south  80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 43, which Is one and one-half
miles distant in a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
it joins the line of Block 110, thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Block 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which is marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and in a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 160 chains', east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 47, which ls two miles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where it joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which Is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 60—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 60, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No, 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 51, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where It
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chainB; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 16. 1907.
No, 62—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which is six mlles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it joins line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chaing; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 53—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 63, which Is six miles ln a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where it joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 64—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 54, which is two and one-half
miles distant ln an easterly direction
from the north end of West lake, thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 55—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 66, which is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; west 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11.        Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands;
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands;
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date liereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands;
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
.10, which Is two and one-quarte*.- miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.   19th,   1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thenee east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 100 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec. 19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wl-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 1G0 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains',
thence west SO chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 26; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E, No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which ls eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point cf commencement,
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 16, which ls eight and one-half
mlles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to  point  of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a'post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant ln a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
mlles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S? E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half
miles distant In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S„ S.W., No. 18, which ls nine and
one-half miles In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thenco east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
miles distant ln a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which is ten and one-half miles distant
in ;-*. northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
nt the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which Is eleven and one-
half mlles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east SO chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec, 18th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half mlles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mlle north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, whioh is seven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which ls seven and one-
half miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chatns; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east
to point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half
mlles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; SO
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
W.  E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.   2,  situate  ou  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west SO chalna;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked  December 16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, Intends to apply foi*
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 36 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; tiience west to the shore ol
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2,
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mlle west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
5, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thenee north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907,
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains: thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted   at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17,  1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains.
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907.
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of tho
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250), which shall be forfeited
if tlie party tendering decline or neglect ,
to enter Into contract when called upo'n
to do so, or fall to complete tho work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution  of  the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed |
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
Tho lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 80 Public Works Engineer. <
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H. |
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's •
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence |
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT.
Distriot of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman S_. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains -j
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan  11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 ohalns; thence
south 80 chains; thence' east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of J
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
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Fine New Rug Styles.
Rugs and Squares are the choice of many when they want floor coverings. The
artistic, economical and hygienic side appeals to them. These points of merit have
created a large and increasing demand for Rugs of various weaves, and, to meet this
demand, to satisfy it fully, we have, this season, stocked a larger and better stock
than ever before, and now offer you a splendid selection in many different makes. All
these are dependable. They are of the same excellent quality as our Carpets, coming
from the same makers, in many cases, and they carry with them the same guarantee
of goodness. We offer such a variety of sizes that we are sure you can find one
to "fit" that room of yours, and a style you'll like.   Better see these today.
TEMPLETON'S  SEAMLESS  AXMINSTER  RUGS—NEW STYLES.
These are handsome, rich Rugs with a deep pile. They are made by a house
famous for the high quality of its products. You'll be pleased with the dainty designs
and colorings.
Size 9 ft. x 12 ft., each $50.00
Size 10 ft. 6 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $60.00
Size 9 ft. x 7 ft. 6 in., each  $32.00
Size 6 ft. x 9 ft., each  $25.00
HARD WEARING SQUARES FROM SCOTLAND-FOR LITTLE.
For a low priced square that will stand a whole lot of hard wear aud abuse we
think you'll find nothing that can beat these Kilmarnock Scotch Squares. They
come in several attractive designs and colorings. We list here four sizes—see these
squares:—
Size 7 ft. 6 in. x 9 ft., each  $6.75
Size 9 ft. x 9 ft., each $8.00
HERE ARE SOME EXTRA CHOICE BRUS SELS SQUARES
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in., each $9.25
Size 10 ft. 6 in. x 12 ft., each  $12.50
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in., each $21.00
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in., each $22.50
Size 9 ft. x 12 ft., each $22.50
Size 11 f. t3 in. x 12 ft, each $28.00
Size 3 yds. x lV_\ yds., each  $24.00
Size 3 yds. x 4 yds., each $27.50
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 12 ft, each $28.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $32.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each.. ,.$33.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 12 ft, each $34.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in, x 13 ft. 6 in., each.. i.. $37.00
Detailed Descriptions of Colorings and Designs, etc., etc., would be superfluous.
It's necessary to see these lines to properly appreciate their superiority. Delighted
to show you.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF SPLENDID RUGS—SMYRNAS
For a rich rug with a double life, get a SMYRNA. The double surface gives you
two rugs. When one side looks the "worse-for-wear" just turn the rug and you have
another new one.    There is a great choice of sizes and prices. Come in and see them.
Size 18 x 36 in., each $1.25
Size 26 x 54 in., each   $3.00
Size 30 x 60 in., each  $3.75
Size 36 x 72 in., each  $5.00
Size 9 x 10 ft. 6 in., each  $30.00
Size 9 x 12 ft., each   $35.00
Size 9x15 ft, each $50.00
Size 18 x 36 in., each  $1.75
Size 30 x 60 in.; each  $4.50
Size 3 x 12 ft., each  $14.00
Size 3x15 ft., each  $18.00
Size 9x9 ft., each  $30.00
TEMPLETON'S  UNEQUALLED  AXMINSTER CARPET.
Axminster, body, at, per yard  $2.00
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.00
Axminster, body, at, per yard   $2.25
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.25
Axminster, body, at, per yard $2.25
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.00
Axminster, body, at, per yard $3.00
Axminster, border, at, per yard    .       $2.75
Axminster, body, at, per yard $3.50
Axminster, border, at, per yard $3.25
Specials in Fire Sets.
We are making an effort to clear out our entire stock of Fenders, Fire Sets, Suites,
Spark Guards and Fire Furniture. Just the other day we received a shipment from
a leading British house. We were promised delivery of this in time for Christmas
business. Had it arrived then we do not think a single piece would how be in our
store. The styles are new and nice and Christmas shoppers could not have "resisted"
them. We do not want to carry this into the Summer time, so we are pricing these
at figures that should move the lot in a hurry.   Come in and see these prices:
WROUGHT IRON FIRE SETS
FIRE SETS—In wrought iron. Three
pieces, shovel, poker and tongs. Three
pieces for    $2.00
FIRE SET—Wrought iron. Three pieces,
shovel, poker and tongs.   Per set...$2.50
FIRE SET—Three-piece set, poker, tongs
and shovel. Made in wrought iron. Per
set    $2>25
FIRE SET—Three-piece set, consisting of
shovel, poker and tongs. Wrought iron.
Per set  $^75
FIRE SET—Wrought iron set of three
pieces, shovel, poker and tongs. Per set
of three pieces —, $3-oo
Above prices are for carpets madeand laid by experienced men. Best workmanship.
STYLISH BRASS FIRE SETS
FIRE SET—In brass, three pieces, consisting of shovel, poker and tongs. Per
set   $2.00
FIRE SET—Three-piece brass set, poker,
shovel and tongs. Neat style. Per set $3.75
FIRE SET—Another brass style in three-
piece set that is excellent value, at, per
set $4.00
FIRE SET—A three-piece set in brass of
very stylish design. Good value at, per
set $4.50
FIRE SET—Brass set, in three pieces,
shovel, poker and tongs. Nice design.
Per set  $5.50
SEVERAL NICE STYLES IN WROUGHT   IRON FIRE SETS ON STANDS.
FIRE SETS—A nice style in five-piece set. Set consists of shovel, poker, tongs
and brush on stand. Made in wrought iron in pretty design. We have several
styles in this class of Fire Set and a choice of pricings. These are most useful.
Prices range at, per set, $9.00, $9*oo, $8.00, and  $6.50
SOME BRASS FENDER STYLES BRASS AND IRON FENDERS
KERB—In brass.  Size 54x12 in., for..$6.50 FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in lang.
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for..$14.00        At,  each    $2.25
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for..$16.00 FENDER—In brass and iron, 36 in. long.
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for. ,$25.00        At, each  $4.50
KERB—In brass. Size 54x12 in., for. .$30.00 FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in. long.
KERB—In brass. Size 54x12 in., for. ,$35.00        At each   $4-25
FENDER—n brass and iron, 36 in. long.
Many   other   styles   in   Brass,   Wrought        At,  each $4.00
Copper Iron, etc.    Come in and see the FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in. long.
showing. At, each  $4.75
EVERYTHING FOR THE GRATE EX- FENDER—In brass and iron, 48 in. long.
CEPT THE COAL OR WOOD. At, each  $5.00
SOME HANDSOME STYLES IN BRASS HE ARTH SUITES.
HEARTH SUITE—A pretty style, in all
brass. Consists of Fender, Shovel, Poker,
Tongs and Stop. Excellent value, at, per
suite $16.00
HEARTH SUITE—Another all brass style
that is fine value. Five pieces. One of
our very newest styles.   Price $24.00
HEARTH SUITE—Here is another of our
very latest arrivals and one that at the
price asked is fine value. All brass.
At  $25.00
HEARTH SUITE—An excellent style in
all brass and one that would be an ornament to the finest room. Five pieces.
At $35.00
WEILER BROS.
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS, VICTORIA, B. Q_
SHOP BY MAIL.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION.
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* Social and *
t Personal. $
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't' 'It 'J.' 'i' 'i' 'i' '*' v 'i* *** **"»"*'
Mr. George Courtney spent Tuesday in Vancouver.
* *   *
Westminster has returned home after
spending a few days in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. Beauchamp Pinder left during
the week for Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Parry of Cowichan
are paying a vsiit in the city.
* *   *
Mr. A. W. Harvey spent a few
days in Seattle during the week.
* *   *
Mrs.  Durand  gave  a small  bridge
party on Wednesday afternoon.
* *   *
Mrs.  Ethelbert Scholefield has returned from a visit to  New Westminster.
* *   *
Mr. Holmes of^ the Bank of B. N.
A., in this city, is spending a short
holiday at Grand Prairie.
* *   *
Miss Eva Holmes is the guest of
Iher sister, Mrs. Marpole, in Van-
I couver.
* *   *
Dr. Todd, who has been spending a
Ifew months in Victoria with his
lmother, Mrs. J. H. Todd, started for
|the East on Tuesday morning.
* *   *
Mrs. Rocke Robertson has returned
Ifrom  Vancouver  where   she   accom-
|panied her niece, Miss Lorna Eberts,
in her way to Montreal.
* *   *
Mr. Leslie Foote of the Hugo Ross
fRealty Company here, has gone to
{Harrison  Hot  Springs  in  the  hopes
Df improving his health. He has
|been  laid  up  with a  bad  attack  of
jrippe,
Mr. and Mrs. Phipps ancl child of
Cobble Hill were registered at the
New England at the beginning of the
week. Mrs. Phipps left on Sunday
for England where she will stay with
relations for a year or more.
* *   *
Lieut. V. R. Brandon was a passenger by the Empress of China on
her last trip from the Orient He
spent a few days in Victoria before
proceeding to England. Mr. Brandon
was a midshipman on H.M.S. War-
spite during her last commission at
Esquimalt, and he was later second-
lieutenant on H.M.S. Egeria three
years ago.
* *   *
Miss Tuck of "Roccabella" is the
hostess this afternoon at a "Profile"
tea. Some of the guests are Miss
Monteith, Miss Tiny Monteith, Miss
A. Angus, Miss Blackwood, Miss V.
Blackwood, Miss Phipps, Miss
Browne, Miss King, Miss Newcombe,
Miss Hanington and Miss Mason.
* *   *
The Misses Blackwood entertained
a few friends at Five Hundred last
Saturday evening. The prizes were
won by Miss King and Mr. Landry.
The other guests included the Misses
Arbuthnot, Moresby, Troupe, McDonald (Winnipeg), Clute, and the
Messrs. Kerne, Teddy and Henry
King, McCurdy, Holmes, Boyer, C.
Pitts and John Arbuckle.
* *   *
The Tuesday Skating Club was not
so well patronized this week, partly
owing to the bad weather, no doubt.
Some of the few present at the rink
were Miss M. Little, Miss Nora
Coombe, Mr. Holmes, Miss Winona
Troupe, Mr. Arbuckle, Miss P. Irving, Miss 0. Irving, Mr. Barton, Mr.
McDougal, Miss V. Mason, Mr. Harvey, Miss Newcombe, Mr. Harold
Eberts, Mr. R. Monteith, Miss Blackwood, Miss Viva Blackwood, and
Miss  Wigley.
* He      *
The recent cold spell afforded a
few days excellent skating at Colwood. Some of those to take advantage of the opportunities offered last
Saturday and Sunday were Com-
manderand Mrs. Allgood, Captain
Hughes,    Captain    Learmonth,    Mrs.
Genge, Dr. and Mrs. Robertson, Mrs.
H. Pooley, Mr. J. Bridgman, the
Misses Irving, Mr. M. J. Johnson,
Miss Monteith, Mr. Gore, Mr. A. W.
Harvey, Mr. B. Prior, Miss Bulwer,
Miss Rebbeck, Miss Loenholm, the
Misses Hickey, Mr. Walace, Mr.
Troupe, Mr. T. O. McKay, Mrs. Walter Langley, Mrs. Eliot, Miss Mason,
Miss Sehl, Mr. and Mrs. Burton, Miss
Phipps, Mrs. Ambery, Miss P. Mason,
Miss Troupe, Miss Nicholles, Miss
Coombe, Mr. T. King, Miss Little,
Mr. Boyer, Mr. Jephson, Miss Griffiths, Mr. D'Arcy, Mr. McDougal,
Miss Mackay, Mr. Harvey, Mr. Harold Eberts, Miss Mabel Eberts, Mr.
Henry King, Miss Blakemore and
Miss Barbara Blakemore.
*   •)*   *
One of the prettiest weddings that
has ever been solemnized in Victoria,
took place on Wednesday afternoon
at Christ Church Cathedral between
Mr. Edward Guy Warner, eldest son
of Mr. E. H, Warner, of Quorn Hall,
Leicestershire, England, and Miss
Gladys Muriel Green, youngest
daughter of the late Rev. Y. W. Green
and Mrs. Hasell of Victoria, B.C.
The Rev. Canon Beanlands performed
thc ceremony, and the service was
fully choral. Thc church was beautifully decorated with evergreens, and
yellow daffodils and narcissus. Thc
bride, who entered the church on the
arm of her step-father. Dr. Hasell,
was dressed in a very simple Empire
robe of white ivory satin, with yoke
and sleeves of rare old lace, and pearl
ornaments, and veil of tulle with coronet of orange blossoms, and she carried a magnificent bouquet of bride
roses and lillies-of-the-valley. Her
only jewelry was a diamond and ruby
ring, the gift of the groom, and a
dainty pearly necklace. The bridesmaids were the Misses Evelyn Tilton,
Helen Peters, Marguerite Little and
Gladys Perry. They wcre gowned in
dainty robes of fine ecru brussels net
over tulle, with Greek gold braid
trimmings on the skirts, and the
bodices were made with lace sleeves
and yokes, also bordered with gold
trimming, and rileeved with pale blue
panne girdles edged with gold. They
wore pale blue aigrettes and gold
bands  in  their  hair,  and  plain  gold
bracelets, the gift of the groom, and
carried dainty bouquets of yellow
daffodils. The groom was supported
by Mr. Bromley, and the ushers were
Mr. Clifford Brown, Mr. Basil Prior,
and Dr. Dolbey. Mrs, Hasel, who
gave the bride away, wore a biscuit-
coloured robe of crepe de chine, with
hat and ostrich feather boa to match.
After the ceremony, an informal reception was held at the Driard, where
the same colour scheme was carried
out in the decorations. At one end
of the large drawing-room a beautiful
wedding bell was lilting composed of
white narcissus and maiden hair fern,
and under this was placed the cake,
which thc bride cut after the usual
toasts and speeches had been made.
At half past four the bridal couple
left by the Chippewa for Seattle en
route to Portland, where the honeymoon is to be spent. The bride's going-away costume was of brown corduroy velvet with brown fur hat to
match, and lovely mink collarette and
muff. Some of tbe many invited
guests were His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir,
Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Mrs. C. E. Pooley
and the Misses Pooley, Mr. and Mrs.
Garnet, Mrs. J. H, Todd, Mr. and
Mrs. Arundel, Mrs. Harry Pooley.
Mrs. II. Barnard, Dr. and Mrs. H.
Robertson, Mrs. O. M. Jones, Mrs.
Bodwell, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Freeman,
Col. and Mrs. Prior, Col. and Mrs.
Jones, Mrs. Stevenson, Mr. and Mrs.
F. Pemberton, Miss J. Bell, Mrs.
Shallcross, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Griffiths, Mr. and Mrs. Worsfold, Mrs.
and Miss Walker, Dr. and Miss Newcombe, Mr. C. Newcombe. Mr. W.
Newcombe, Mrs. Eliot, Mrs. Baiss,
Mrs. W. H. Langley, Mrs. Phillips.
Mrs. Geo. Gillespie, Miss Gillespie.
Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. and the Misses
Butchart, Mrs. A. T. Watt, Mr. and
Mrs. C.'irew Gibson, Mr. Maurice
Hills, Mr. S. Powell, Mr. and Mrs.
Croft, Miss P. Drake, Miss Mason,
Miss Coombe, Mrs. and Miss Ethel
Tilton, Miss Payne, Miss Allison
Beanlands, Canon and Mrs. Beanlands, Miss Schubert, Miss Fitzgib-
bon, Mrs. Oliver, Mr. and Mrs. C.
E. Wilson and Mrs. Kirk.
Was Honoured.
Advices received in this city from
Oakland, California, state that at the
recent convention of the Pacific Coast
Advertising Men's Association, Mr.
Percy F, Godenrath, of Vancouver,
manager of Westward Ho!, was honoured with the position of Vice-President for British Columbia. The next
convention of the Association will be
held in June in Portland, Ore., when
it is expected a large delegation of
British Columbia newspapermen and
advertising promoters will be on hand.
Theatrical Notes.
The New Grand programme this
week is a highly satisfactory one.
The best turn is that of Donelly and
Tielda Rotali, whose singing and
dancing arc very effective. Kanza
and Arno are also good in their eccentric turn. The others are all up to
the average and thc show as a whole
sustains the reputation of the New
Grand.
Pantages.
The boards at Pantages are held
this week by Bartholdi's troupe of
thirty-five trained cycling and acrobatic cockatoos. Thc entertainment
is unique and exceedingly attractive
and no one should miss it.
Grace  George.
Grace George and Reeves Smith
gave a delightful performance of Vic-
torien Sardou's "Divorcons" on
Thursday night at the Victoria
Theatre. Both were perfect and fairly divided the honours. Such prolonged uncontrolled laughter was perhaps never been heard in the Victoria
Theatre and that is the highest cdm-
mendatinn of a pure comedy.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District nf Renfrew,
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C.. occupation Timber
Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special
tlmher licence over the followlnR do-
scrlhccl  lands:
Claim No. 7—CommencinK nl a post
planted south live and onc-linlf miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
IT. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
nn Cheewhat Lake; thence north 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thenco
south SO chains; thence east SO chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 2(ith Au/fust, 11107. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by Its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 4, 1908.
In consequence of the American
Federation of Musicians of this city
declaring through their official paper,
the Sth Regiment Band unfair to all
Trades and Labor Unions, I wish to
make it known through your valuable paper that the members of the
above-mentioned band and other
musicians of the city have organized
a ational Union of Musicians and
have been duly affiliated with the National Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada.
E. F. DAWSON,
Sec'y Local 66, Victoria, B.C.
The Constitutional Question.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. sth, 1908.
To the Editor of The Week.
The Constitution on its Dominion
summit at Ottawa appears to enjoy
a pure and serene atmosphere, but
on its western slope there is a good
deal of malaria. Let us get rid of
this malaria also all animus against
the Lieutenant-Governor, because malaria is unhealthy and animus is bad.
Animus is harmless without matter to
work upon, and like Delta thunder
breaks no bones.
In the year 1867 the supreme sovereign power—the Imperial Parliament—granted autonomy to Canada,
inhabited by people of British and
French descent, it thereby became
self-legislative and governing, it
nevertheless is a dependent state subject to the legislation of the Imperial
Parliament . Since 1867 the Imperial
Parliament has had only partial and
indeed a very limited control over
Canada's internal affairs. The federal
principle creates a division of the
function of government between the
Dominion and the several Provinces,
but it is a matter of purely internal
concern of which no external country or community can take any cognizance unless the Dominion Parliament has power to make such laws.
In the distribution of legislative and
consequently of executive power,
granted by the constitution all powers
not specifically ceded to the Province
remain in the Dominion Parliament.
Since the King is a constituent part
of the Parliament of Canada (Section 17) his assent is therefore necessary before any Bill which has passed
through the Dominion Parliament can
become law. The Governor-General
as his representative is therefore vested with the power to assent to bills,
or he may refuse assent or he may-
reserve the Bill for the signification
of His Majesty's pleasure. (See Sections ss, 56 and 57 of the B.N.A. Act.
See also the Colonial Law Validity
Act (1865) 28 and 29 Victoria (Imperial) c. 63, sec. 42).
By the B.N.A. Act, 1867, the power
of confirming or disallowing Provincial Acts is vested in the Governor-
General acting under the advice of his
constitutional advisers. The validity
of Provincial Legislation is also within the jurisdiction of our Provincial
and Dominion Courts, with appeal to
the Lords of the Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council.
Prior to the year 1878 Colonial Governors were generally given royal instructions in the form following:—
Extract   from  the   Despatch  of  the
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
Dated Downing Street, 8th May,
1869, and No. 85.
I have the honour to acknowledge
the receipt of your despatch No, 23,
of the nth March, asking for instructions as to thc course which you
should pursue with regard to any Act
of the Provincial Legislatures which
might relate to any of the classes of
subjects mentioned in the "th paragraph of the royal instructions, or
which might, in your opinion, be un
constitutional, or in excess of the
power of the local body.
The prohibitions in the 7th paragraph of the royal instructions, with
one qualifiaation, rest on the ground
of imperial policy, and therefore the
Governor-General of the Dominion IS
NOT AT LIBERTY, EVEN ON
THE ADVICE OF HIS MINISTERS, to sanction or assent to any
provincial law in violation of them.
He would, indeed, BE BOUND TO
INSTRUCT the Lieutenant-Governor
of the Province not to give such assent.
The qualification to which I have
above referred is this, that while the
Governor-General is not at liberty to
sanction the passing of a law making
any donation or gratuity to himself,
it would be for his ministers to consider whether they should advise him
to consent to a donation by the Province to the Lieutenant-Governor, and
he would be at liberty to follow that
advice with regard to the second
point. If the Governor-General were
advised by his ministry to disallow
any provincial Act as illegal or unconstitutional, it would, in general, be
his duty to follow that advice, whether
or not he concurred in that opinion.
If he were advised by his ministry
to sanction any Act which appeared to
him illegal, it would be his duty to
withhold his sanction, and refer the
question to the Secretary of State
for instructions.
The same course might be taken if
the Act recommended for his sanction
by his ministers appeared gravely unconstitutional; but it is impossible to
relieve the Governor-General from the
duty of judging, with respect to each
particular case, whether the objection
to an Act, not of doubtful legality, is
sufficiently grave as under all circumstances to warrant a refusal to act
at once on the advice tendered to him.
Copy of the 7th Section of the Royal
Instructions Referred To.
VII. And for the execution of so
much of the powers vested in you
by virtue of "The British North America Act, 1867," name to Bills passed
by the Houses of Parliament, or that
you withhold our assent therefrom, or
that you reserve such Bills for the
signification of Our pleasure thereon,
it is Our will and pleasure that when
any Bill is presented to you for Our
assent, of either of the classes hereinafter specified, you shall (unless you
think proper to withhold Our assent
from the same) reserve the same for
the signification of Our pleasure thereon; subject, nevertheless, to your discretion, in case you should be of
opinion that an URGENT NECESSITY EXISTS, REQUIRING THAT
SUCH BILL BE BROUGHT INTO
IMMEDIATE OPERATION, in
which case you are authorized to assent to such Bill in Our name, transmitting to us by the earliest opportunity the Bill so assented, with your
reasons for assenting thereto, that is
to say:*—
1. Any Bill for the divorce of persons joined together in Holy Matrimony.
2. Any Bill whereby any grant of
land or money, or other donation or
gratuity, may be made to yourself.
3 .Any Bill whereby any paper or
other currency may be made a legal
tender, except the coin of the realm,
or other gold or silver coin.
4. Any Bill imposing differential
duties.
5. Any Bill, the provision of which
shall appear inconsistent with obligations imposed upon Us by treaty.
6. Any Bill interfering with the discipline or control of Our forces in
Our said Dominion.
". Any Bill of an extraordinary nature and importance, whereby Our
prerogative, or the rights and property of Our subjects not residing in
Our said Dominion, or the Trade and
Shipping of the United Kingdom and
its dependencies may he prejudiced.
8. Any Bill containing provisions to
which Our assent has been refused,
or which has been disallowed by Us.
Tn 1878 the Royal instructions were
amended particularly omitting Section
7, as to the reservation of certain
Bills, and at and since the appointment of the Marquis of Lome, I believe   it   to   be   thc   fact   that   Royal
instructions have not been given to
the Governor General, carrying out
the suggestion of the Honourable Edward Blake, Minister of Justice, that
consistent with the spirit of the constitution of Canada legislation should
be completed on the advice and responsibility of Her Majesty's Privy
Council for Canada, subject to the
reserve power over Bills for the signification of the Queen's pleasure.
(Section 56). This Imperial power
of disallowing Dominion statutes is
not limited to Imperial interests but
also to subjects not within the legislative competency of the Dominion
Parliament.
It would appear that in so far as
other communities in the Empire are
concerned Canadians form one political entity for which thc Governor-
General alone can speak for these
matters affecting external states or
communities which take place within
Canadian jurisdiction, and that the
Imperial Government is responsible
for any action which affects an external community.
Since the Federal Union, in matters
affecting the Empire, the Secretary
of State for the Colonies communicates and looks to the Governor-General as the representative of the King.
The external affairs of the Dominion
or the Provinces (if any) are the external affairs of the Imperial Government.
The Order in Council dated the
29th November, 1862, (already published by you) states that the same
principles and reasons that apply to
the Dominion Government and Parliament apply mutatis mutandis, to
the Provincial Governments and Legislatures apparently with the exception that when a Lieutenant-Governor
refuses or declines to act on the advice of his provincial ministers that
he should assent to a Bill passed
with the advice and consent of the
Legislative Assembly, he cannot reserve the Bill for the assent of the
Governor-General on the advice of
his ministers without instructions, except in a case of "extreme necessity,"
and that can seldom if ever arise.
That the Lieutenant-Governor only
reserves a Bill as a Federal Officer
and is alone responsible to the Dominion Government. It also appears
from the report of the Minister of
Justice approved by His Excellency
the Governor-General in Council on
the 29th of February, 1876, that the
Earl of Carnarvon, the Secretary of
State for the Colonies, acting on the
advice of the Imperial Law Officers
instructed His Excellency the Governor-General that whether a Provincial Act should be allowed was a
matter in which His Excellency
should act on his own individual discretion, and in which he could not
be guided by the advice of his responsible ministers. The noble Earl
was also of the opinion, that the Canadian Constitution did not contemplate any interference with legislation intra vires the Provincial Legislature. A previous Order in Council
had been approved on the 9th of
June, 1868, dealing with the powers
of disallowance of the Imperial Government with respect to Colonial Acts,
and it was stated that the same power
of disallowance had been conferred
by the B.N.A. Act on the Federal
Government, and that in considering
whether a Provincial Act should be
disallowed or sanctioned the Federal
Government must also consider
whether a Provincial Act should be
disallowed, or sanctioned the Federal
Government must also consider
whether it affected the interests of
the whole Dominion or not, also
whether it be unconstitutional, whether ultra vires, and in cases of concurrent jurisdiction whether it clashes
with the legislation of the general
Parliament. Section 95. dealing with
immigration into the Province provides that Provincial Legislation shall
havc effect as long as it is not repugnant to any Dominion Act. This
section is cited in the preamble to
the current Bowser Bill. A further
question at issue in 1875-1876 between
the noble Earl and tlie Governor-
General in Council was whether the
power of disallowance of Dominion
Statutes was by Section 56 vested in
the Queen or the Queen in  Council.
"Have you ever seen niggers in a cake-walk?"
asked a Victoria lady the other day of a man who
had just returned from New York. "No!" was
his reply, "though I have seen niggers in
abundance."  She is still looking for the joke.
It as the great Tallyrand who wrote, "I find nonsense singularly
refreshing!" It is, but so is Lemp's Beer—often more refreshing
than nonsense, because it is the right kind of Beer. People who
have tried Lemp's Beer for themselves know how good it is—a
food and a tonic. Once you test for yourself you need no further
urging to insist upon Lemp's at your Club, Hotel, Bar or Cafe,
or for use in your own household. If your dealer does not handle
Lemp's Beer, 'phone
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Distributors for B.C.
By Section 90 this provision was extended and applied to the Legislature
of the several Provinces by the substitution of the Lieutenant Governor
for the Governor-General and the
Governor-General for the Queen.
The position taken by the Minister of Justice was that the power,
—the disallowance of Provincial Acts
—dnd the signification of pleasure on
Bills reserved, must be accomplished
by Order in Council and that a Governor who thinks it necessary that a
Provincial Act should be disallowed
must find ministers who will take thc
responsibility of advising its disallowance whilst ministers who think
it necessary that a Provincial Act
should be disallowed must resign unless they can secure the assent of the
Governor to its disallowance. Ministers being in every case responsible
to Parliament for the course taken.
The noble Earl suggested that a rigid
rule of action should not be established.
The rule proposed by the noble
Earl was that, "the Governor-General
after having had recourse to the advice of his ministers whom the Parliament holds answerable for advising
him as to all public Acts, (though not
in all cases for the Acts themselves)
may properly be required to give his
own individual decision as to allowance or disallowance."
The Hon. Edward Blake submitted
that the plan proposed by the noble
Earl was not in accordance with the
constitution: that His Excellency's
Ministers were responsible- not merely for the advice given, but also for
the action taken, that the Canadian
Parliament has the right to call them
to account not merely for what is
proposed, but for what is done is
practically their doing. The importance to the people of the advice given
by the Ministers is in precise proportion to its effectiveness.
The Minister of Justice, however,
agreed with the view of the noble
Earl, "that if it be the right and duty
of thc Governor to act in any case
contrary to thc advice of his Ministers they cannot be held responsible
for the action, and should not feel
themselves justified, on account of it,
in retiring from administration of
public affairs. But these are the results that render it difficult to come
to the conclusion that any such right
or duty can properly devolve upon
the Governors; because they show
that his action would bc an exercise
of power for which thc free people
over which he rules could find no
man whom they could call to account."
The noble Earl also assumed that
although the Dominion Parliament
could not hold thc Ministers responsible for thc Governor-General's act
ing contrary to their advice, the Parliament could demand to know the
advice they gave.
It is submitted, that it follows,
from what has already been stated
that  the   Lieutenant-Governor in  re
serving his assent to a Bill, contrary
to the advice given by his Provincial
Ministers and without instructions, is
answerable only to the Federal authorities and the Provincial Government
are not responsible for his action.
Since His Honor the Lieutenant-
Governor could only act as a Federal
Officer in reserving his assent to the
Bowser Bill it seems to follow that
his Honour's conduct is not a subject of inquiry by the local Legislature.
The only constitutional advice the
Premier could give was for His
Honour to assent to the Bill.
It is suggested that without instructions His Honour cannot reserve
his assent, but the Order in Council
nevertheless provides for a case of
"extreme necessity." Here "exception probat regulam."
Did the "extreme necessity" arise
for His Honour to reserve his assent s
to the Bowser Bill? The circumstances are so well known that it is
unnecessary for me to repeat them.
My reply is this, so far I have not
heard that the Federal authorities
have claimed that His Honour acted
unconstitutionally or violated any constitutional practice.
1 now ask a question. What does
the case of "extreme necessity" mean?
Should a Lieutenant-Governor assent
to a Bill containing provisions which
had at least four times hitherto been
disallowed by the Governor-General
in Council?   I think not.
S. PERRY MILLS.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 3rd, 1908.
Bonspiel.
Nelson has held its usual annual
bonspiel, in which the disposition of
no less than eight cups was determined. Of the eight, Greenwood won
three, Rossland two, Nelson two, and
Cranbrook one. The bonspiel was a
success in every way, Nelson fully
maintaining its splendid reputation for
hospitality. The spell of frost which
just reached the Coast made itself evident in Nelson, when during the last
day of the bonspiel the thermometer
registered six above zero.
"Shakmut," a powerful story of Sitka
in the times of the Russian occupancy,
by Captain Clive Phillips-Wolley, has
been purchased by the publishers of
"Westward Ho!" and the opening
chapters appear in the February issue. It will run as a serial and will
doubtless prove a notable addition to
the literary contents of the magazine.
In the department, "Builders of the
West," W. A. Harken has a capital
pen picture of A. C. Flumerfelt. A
bright two-colour cover-design, a
superb frontispiece, and a score of
clever articles and departments make
the mid-winter number an absorbing
one for the magazine reader. Besides,
"Westward Ho!" has the unique distinction of being the only independent
standard monthly published in Canada
that sells at the popular price of 10
cents. THE WBBK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
MISS
CHERIDAH
SIMPSON
AS
RED FEATHER
The Famous Prima Donna in Klein &   Cook's "Red Feather, at the Victoria
Theatre, February 12.
% ilusic and      |
$   The Drama.*
Victoria Theatre, February 12—"Red
Feather."
"Red  Feather"   is  the  title   of  an
opera that is at once unique and original.   Its story is told with sympathy
simplicity and ultra modernity.    The
1 people and incidents that move 111 the
kaleidoscopic  circle  of  the  author's
[romance are all pleasing.   The melodious colony of the opera moves most
of the time under the high lights of
chromatic scenes and costumes.   Th*.
compound is tinctured subtly with the
I alchemy of music conceived in moods
both joyous and plaintive.   There are
periodical  moments   of   humour,   of
drollery, of epigram, and of amusing
ideas  following  each  other  in  rapid
succession, that appeal to man's every
faculty.    A really excellent cast and
ensemble   has   been   assembled   by
Manager  Joseph   M.   Gaites   for  the
I presentation   of   Messrs.  Dc   Kovcn,
I Klein & Cook's splendid comic opera,
"Red Feather," whicli is headed   this
I season by Miss Cheridah Simpson, the
j eminent prima donna sopr.anq, and in-
[ eludes Lyman Wheeler, William   11.
j Conley, Richard Karl, Gus  Vaughan,
Frank  Smith,   Sarah   Edwards,  Julia
Curtis, and Prof. De Witt Coolman,
I leader of Red Feather's own orchestra.
The New Grand.
Next week's bill is promised to include no less  than four  big feature
acts, and the show should be one of
the best of the season.   Cvimmins and
Gore, Dan and Rosa, will be seen in
a comedy sketch entitled "What are
the wild waves saying?" hich has been
I a  success  in   every  country   on   the
I globe; the four Brown Uros. and Doc
Kealey havc a musical act that is cer-
| tain to be a winner.   The brothers ;irc
[experts on almost every instrument,
Ifrom  the  xylophone  to  the   golden
Ichimcs, and Kealey, who makes up as
la black-face minstrel, is declared to
Ibe one of the best burnt-cork artists
Ion the circuit.    Rose and  Severance
Ihave a most laughable sketch, entitled
■"The Automobile Disaster."   De Witt
lYoun and Lister will present a jug-
Igling act that is said to bc clever and
[novel in the extreme; Fred Primrose
lis billed as "That  Minstrel  Cotnedi-
lan"; Thos. J. Price will sing the illus-
Itrated   song,  "To-night,   Sweetheart,
iTo-night," and new moving pictures
and a new overture by the orchestra
will fill out the programme
Good News.
In a letter to a relative, Montague
Davys states that he has about closed
a deal by which he ancl his associates
will secure control of the Silver King
mine at Nelson, and of the Hall Mines
smelter. It is understood that Mr.
Davys has a lease of both, and that
he has raised sufficient capital to assure thorough development of the
mine. Everyone who knows him will
rejoice if this turns out to be a fact.
No mining man deserves better of the
Kootenay; he is the pluckiest and
most persistent man who ever tackled
a mining proposition.
A Commercial Club.
Among the smaller towns of the
Kootenay which have recently come
to the front, Nakusp is one of the
most conspicuous. Thre years ago
there were probably not more than
fifty or sixty inhabitants of the beautiful little town on Uper Arrow
Lake. Now, thanks to a genuine
boom in fruit lands, the population is
in the neighbourhood of three hundred, and it has just been decided to
establish a Commercial Club on lines
resembling the boards of trade of the
larger cities. This is a progressive
move, and one which, if judicially developed, will be effective in making
known the attractions and possibili
ties of Nakusp to the district for fruit
growing and gardening.
Between Kamloops and Revelstoke
there is a healthy rivalry, which will
do neither any harm. On Wednesday
last the general meeting of thc British Columbia Exchange was held at
Revelstoke; it was largely atended,
and the interests, especially of the
fruit-growing industry, were advanced. Some time in the future
Kamloops will entertain the Provincial Convention of the Conservative
Association. The last meeting was
held in Vancouver, when upwards of
four hundred delegates attended.
Kamloops and Revelstoke fought hard
for the honour of the next convention,
and as Kamloops won it would be
well to look a head a little and make
sure that there will be suitable accommodation for three or four hundred delegates. If the hotel accommodation of Kamloops is equal to
this, there must have been recent additions of whicli The Week is not advised; but no doubt those who are
responsible for thc invitation will see
to it that suitable provision is made.
WEEK 10TH FEBRUARY
The New Grand
SULLIVAN * COMISINE,    Proprl.torm.
Manai>m*nt *f KBIT. JAMIESON.
DAN ROSA
CRIMMINS AND GORE
Comedy Sketch
"What Are the Wild Waves
Saying?"
FOUR BROWN BROTHERS
and
DOC. KEALEY
High Class Comedy Musical Act.
ROSE AND SEVERANCE
Comedy Sketch
"The Automobile Disaster"
DE WITTE YOUNG AND
SISTER
"The College Boy Juggler"
FRED. PRIMROSE
That Minstrel Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Tonight Sweetheart, Tonight"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C-.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinee., (any pert of house)....10o
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor lOe
Boxes    10c
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
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For particulars write or call
THE   SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.C.
B. A. MacMlllan.
LADIES        SWEDISH
GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
UR.     BJORNFELT,      SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
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Room 2, Vernon Bile, Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most com-
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sundries.
»&*   Richardson
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
iTHE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable. *
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The but household coul in the marke  ar
current ratei.   Anthracite coal ior sale.
34 Breed Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for  the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
n 1 fcJX 125 a„4 Trade Mark8
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Gran" ille St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Check* at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTORIA, B. 0.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
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for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
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and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
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be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write,
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M. J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
TWO WAYS
OF GETTING A
DRESS SUIT.
One way is to go to a high
priced Tailor and pay him anywhere from $50 to a $100 for a
Suit. The other way (and the
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good tailoring—just as fine fabric and pay us
$27-50i $30.00 or $35.00
ALLEN & CO.
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Wardrobe
iaoi   GOVERNMENT  ST.,
Victoria, B. C.
'■
:
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in thc
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has heen laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 8, 1908,
Sporting
Comment.
The committee that was appointed
by the Vancouver Island Football Association to select a team to play
against the Mainland, will journey to
Ladysmith to-day, where they will
witness the first test match, between
two teams that have been selected by
this committee. This is a very important engagement, as from this
match the committee will make a
comparison of the different players,
with a view of selecting the eleven
best to run up against the Mainland.
So far, the committee. has shown
great judgment in selecting the team,
and with the complete selection we
have but one objection to make. It
might have been an oversight, but an
injustice has been done to a player
who should have the opportunity of
trying for his place. In selecting the
teams, the vote for right half of the
"A" team resulted in a tie between
Dufty and Shanks, and on another
vote being taken, Dufty was selected.
With this we have no objection, but
when the first vote resulted in a tie,
the player who did not get the place
on the "A" team should have been put
on the "B" team. On a tie vote being registered, it is very evident that
there is a difference of opinion regarding their respective ability, and if
Shanks had been placed at right half
on the "B" team the committeemen
would be able to make a closer comparison of the two players. As we
have already said, it might have been
an oversight, and as there is another
match to be played before the final
selection is made ti is quite possible
that another line-up may be tried.
From the twenty-three players whose
names were mentioned, it is safe to
say that a team can be selected that
will uphold the honour of Vancouver
Island with credit not only to the association which they represent, but to
themselves individually.
The Esquimalt United and the
Ladysmith teams proved themselves
the winners in their matches on Saturday last, the former defeating the
Y. M. C. A. at Oak Bay, and the latter downing the Bays at Ladysmith.
The former game was very interesting and was anybody's right up to
the call of time, tht final score being
2—0. In the latter game the Bays
were lucky in getting off with such a
small score, considering the team
they took up. Once more the local
athletes have had to suffer owing to
the bosses of several of the players
not being supporters of football. It
is very regrettable that Victoria teams
on their away games have invariably
to travel with a weakened team. It is
this that keeps Victoria in the rut, and
unless the business men of the city
allow their employees a little latitude,
Victoria will never occupy the position in sports that she should do. To
have good athletic teams representing
a city is a first-class advertisement,
but as yet Victoria business men do
not realize the fact. It is hoped that
the business men of the city who have
men in their employ who take part in
any athletic games in which the honour of Victoria is concerned will
stretch a point and allow them to accompany the team.
The last senior rugby match of the
season will bc played at Oak Bay this
afternoon, when the Nanaimo Hornets line up against the locals. On
the last occasion, when these teams
met, the locals proved the strongest,
and it is expected that they will repeat the performance to-day.
From a Victoria standpoint, the result of the lacrosse meeting at Vancouver can hardly be said to bc satisfactory. It was expected that the
representatives of the clubs on the
Mainland would see the wisdom of
taking Victoria back into thc fold, but
it was not to bc. New Westminster,
with their usual show of generosity,
have decided to challenge for the Minto cup, and were adverse to placing
two teams in the field. This on the
part of the Royal City team, is a very
poor policy, as time will certainly
show. The result of the meeting is
that Victoria will for another season
at least have to put up with interme
diate lacrosse. After being turned
down in this manner by the New
Westminster delegates, it is up to the
Victoria players to assert themselves
and demand that the Royal City team
hand the Kilmarnock Cup back to the
directors, for as a professional team
they have no right in retaining it. It
was acknowledged at the meeting that
the players who took part in the
games against the Tecumsehs of Toronto are professionals, by the fact
that an application will be made to
the C. A. A. U. for the reinstatement
of these players. But at present the
players who won this cup are professionals, and as a team they have no
right to retain the cup, and it is for
the locals to take the first steps towards having it returned to the directors. The result of the meeting is
rather a disappointment, as we are
confident that a senior team could be.
chosen from players at present in this
city who would compare favourably
with the best on the Mainland. Despite this, however, we wish the Victoria club every success, and The
Week will always be ready to assist
the club in any manner which lies in
its power.
It is very seldom that I have to find
fault with the athletic clubs of Vancouver, but in this instance I have to
agree with "Tattler" in the Vancouver
News-Advertiser, when he says that
the Island football taems are paving
the way for the introduction of
straight professionalism, by the importation of players from the Mainland on the promise of good situations. I cannot, however, agree with
him when he says the principle of the
Island teams is to "get the championship of British Columbia; get it honestly if you can, but- get it." This is
ndt correct, but regarding his former
statement he is just about right. It
is a well-known fact that several of
the Island teams have ex-Mainlanders
on their line-up, some of whom have
also made trips to the Mainland since
taking up their residence on the Island, to assist their old team mates to
win. I admit that the Island association allows amateurs and professionals to play together, but in passing that resolution I hardly think the
representatives of the various clubs
were doing so with the intention of
allowing any such practices as these.
It is well known that it was exactly
by the same tactics that lacrosse and
baseball were put to the bad in this
city, and I would be extremely sorry
to see association football go the same
way after the hold the game has taken on the public. Already there are
rumblings of discontent. As yet they
are slight, but they enlarge as they go
along, and unless the executive checks
the bud at the start they will have a
serious proposition to face later.
There are players sufficient and to
spare on Vancouver Island from
which could be selected teams to beat
the Mainlanders without having to go
to the trouble to have them take up
their residence on the Island with offers of inducements. If you cannot
win without importing players, it will
be far better to lose, as the time will
undoubtedly come when the Island
will be able to produce a team of
home brews that will take the mea
sure of anything that can be got together on the Mainland, and in addition to this the supporters of the Island teams would be better pleased
to see a team of home brews representing a club even if they were defeated. I hope that something will
be done to put a stop to this practice
before it assumes such proportions
that it will be hard to overthrow.
UMPIRE.
De Wolf Hopper
On Monday night De Wolf Hopper
gave one of the best performances in
his career at the Victoria theatre. A
packed house was kept in roars of
laughter by "Happyland." After the
evergreen star the centre of interest
was petite, dainty, bewitching Marguerite Clark. She recalled the Edna
Wallace Hopper of fifteen years ago.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENORAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Cemmencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 100
WILLIAM ROSS.    '
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and ln a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St, James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb.l GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Grand Fancy Dress Ball
in aid of St. Joseph's Hospital, will be held in
THE EMPRESS HOTEL
ON TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18TH, AT 8.30
Tickets are now on sale at M. W. Waitt & Co.'s, thc J. M,
Whitney Co.'s, C. E. Rcclfern's, Challoner & Mitchell's, The
Victoria Book & Stationery Co.'s, T. N. Hibben & Co.'s, Fletcher
Bros., and Mrs. Aaronson's, Government Street.
While fancy dress or poudre will bc en regie, neither is com
pulsory.
TICKETS $3.00 EACH
Royal Ladies Hade "Cheeses"
Many Years Ago.
Merely curtseys, called "Cheeses" from the appearance of the
wide skirt when surtseying. These, however, are the appetizing,
20th Century kind, people eat with appreciation.
Genuine Imported Swiss Cheese, per lb 50c
Roquefort, per lb 65c
Gorgonzola, per lb 65c
Edam Cheese, each $1.00
Camembert, per glass jar  15c and 50c
De Brie Cereme 50c
Sap Sago (herb cheese), each  15c
Neuf Chatel, each  ioc
German Breakfast, two for  15c
Canadian Cream Cheese  ioc
Brick Cream, per lb 30c
Maclaren's Imperial  20c, 35c and 65c
Grated Parmesan, per bottle  25c and 50c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
0<X>0<>0<>0000<X>00-000000000<»000<>0000
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only place
where you oan
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te  season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street. Victoria, B. C.
ooo<x>ooo<>ooo<xx>oooooooo<x><><xx>o<x>oooooooo<>ooooooo<>ood
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
Your Coal Bills
What will they amount to
this winter? Whether you
burn hard or soft coal a great
percentage of the
AVAILABLE
HEATING
POWER IS GAS
Soft coal is fully one-half
gas. Why not dispense with
coal and wood? Use a Gas
Heater and save money, time
and trouble. Let us show
you some Gas Radiators—the
best heaters known.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS. rtnnnrrirrrv»oToTn_TrinnnnfTfe
Kingsford Smith & Co. I
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Graoville, Vancouver.
QUtAAJUlJUUUUUUUUUUUUtAAAAA!'
Vancouver Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
amnnrmnnr
Stewart Williana
R. C. Janion
'#b'L. V.   No. 2
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908
The important event of the
J The Lumber Week in political circles has
I Question. been a gathering of  dele
gates from all points in the
Province to present to the Government a
petition for certain amendments in the
timber regulations.    It is not necessary
here to canvas all the paragraphs of the
petition, because many of them refer to
matters of detail about which there is little
or no controversy.   It may, however, not
[be out of place to refer to the most important requests of the delegation.    Be-
!ore doing so a word as to its personnel.
11 the largest lumber firms were repre-
;©nted.    Such men as Archie Leitch, of
ranbrook, Cameron of Rat Portage and
ancouver,  Heaps of Vancouver,  Lind-
nark of Revelstoke, Patterson of ■ Van-
loiiver   and  Palmer  of  Chemainus   are
lousehold names among all who are associated with the lumbering industry. These
;nen who constitute the backbone of the
elegation, numbering more than sixty,
ere able to state the case from every
tandpoint and with every advantage of
xperience and accurate knowledge.    No
overnment could afford to disregard their
epresentations and there is every reason
believe that since their case was based
pon  broad   considerations,  looking  not
nly to the improvement of the investors'
osition but to the protection and preservation of the forests, it will be favourably
lealt with..  The chief point aimed at is
secure fixity and permanence of tenure,
der the existing regulations timber li-
nces are renewable yearly for a term of
enty-one years on payment of $140 per
uare mile for each renewal.   The finan-
al institution 1 which stand behind the
inhering industry, point ont with justice
at twenty-one years is too short a period
recoup investors for the outlay of such
rge capital amounts as are necessary to
rry on the lumbering industry on the
ale prevalent nowadays.    Lumbering is
) longer a simple matter, it has developed
to a concern which requires oftentimes
iillions to handle and control. Whilst the
nailer investor of $50,000 or $100,000
well protected by a twenty-one years'
ure of occupation, one of $1,000,000 or
,000,000 cannot secure adequate returns
thin that period.    This is acting as a
r to the investment of capital even after
ber limits have been secured.    Then
tare is the further uncertainty, not how-
er  shared by the  Government,   as  to
aether the title of an annual licence is
solutely a good one, even for twenty-one
iars.    It will be easily understood that
liy uncertainty on either of these points
ust act as a restriction to investment and
11st greatly increase the difficulties of
ising necessary capital.   The first inten-
n of the lumbermen was to ask for a
!rty-two years' lease, but subsequently the
ser course was adopted, of asking for
ilticient time to admit of the timber be-
2 exhausted, and as every year means
additional licence fee this can work no
clship on the Province.    On the other
id, as was very properly pointed out by
delegation, it will remove the incentive
Ireckless logging consequent on the rush
bet at the best timber during the short
iod available without any care for the
servation of what is left.    By giving
holder a permanent interest in all tlie
.hjj-r on his limits, the Province makes
Blatter of self interest for him to pro-
that timber, ancl by increasing his
profits, adding to the revenues of the
wince.    It seems to Tlie Week tliat
1 these arguments in favour of exten-
a are unanswerable.   The Government
EDITORIAL
is hardly likely to refuse these reasonable
concessions,.if the delegation has been able
to convince them that the concessions are
justifiable. The foregoing arguments appear to The Week to be conclusive on that
point, but it might not be impossible to
secure something in the nature of a quid
pro quo, by providing now for an increase
in the royalty on lumber based upon a
sliding scale. For instance, if it were
fixed at 75 cents for two years, and $1.00
for the following two, any element of uncertainty as. to the action of the Government in the matter of royalty would be
removed, and at the end of four years it
could be dealt with again, with due regard
to the conditions than existing. The final
word to be spoken.on this important subject is that no body of men is so well able
to appreciate the importance of stability
in any enterprise, as the members of a
Government, and the policy outlined above
is the one most needed to impart that
element to the financial phase of the lumbering industry.
soundness, can hardly be held responsible
at all, because it would be ridiculous to
suppose that Dr. Robertson, the medical
health officer, can be expected to go around
looking for rotten fruit. If any comes
under his notice he has the power to condemn it, and that is all that can be said.
Now was there ever such a ridiculous arrangement in a matter affecting public interest? The red tape regulations which
divide the responsibility for one box of
fruit among three men having nothing iu
common, and who in no case work together,
effectually defeat the object of the inspee
tion. Meanwhile, under the present arrangement, fruit of any grade loaded with
pest or half-decayed, can be and is foisted
on the innocent purchaser pretty much on
the same principle as the fastidious Englishman declined to save a drowning man
because they had not been introduced. If
after this the Colonist still thinks that the
attitude of The Week is unreasonable, the
latter has the consolation of knowing that
the public Avill think otherwise.
Fruit
Inspection,
The editorial which appeared in the last issue of
The Week on the subject of
Fruit Inspection in Victoria
has resulted in a chorus of endorsation
from aggrieved purchasers, and a visit
from the acting Fruit Inspector. The
only dissentient voice was raised in the'
columns of the Colonist, which attacked
The AVeek for making this onslaught, and
charged it with being "unreasonable." If
it be unreasonable to tell the truth in a
matter affecting the public purse and the
public health regardless of the consequences to individuals, then is the charge
of the Colonist sustained, but such considerations have riever influenced The
Week and never will. The charge made
was the result of personal investigation
and the sacrifice of sundry dollars to purchase local grown apples, one-half of which
was unfit for consumption. In each case
the upper layers were large, rosy and attractive, underneath to the extent in some
cases of two-thirds of the box the fruit was
mean in size and of a quality unfit for
consumption. But in truth the acting
Fruit Inspector revealed a very interesting state of affairs for which he can hardly be held responsible. As the public is
probably unaware of the marvellous system of fruit inspection which prevails, it
may be as well to state the facts which are
that fruit inspection in Victoria is in the
hands of three responsible individuals. The
one person who inspects a box of fruit as
to its grading or can take any action with
respect thereto is Mr. Maxwell, the Dominion Fruit Inspector, ancl his territory
covers the whole of Vancouver Island and
a large part of the Mainland. If he inspected a box and found the grading all
right, though every apple may be infected
with a pest, though the box may contain
rotten fruit, he would be powerless to
act—red tape ties him down to grading.
Then along comes Mr. Wilkinson, the Provincial Fruit Inspector; his whole duty is
to look out for pests. If the apples are
free from "codlin moth," "or San Jose
scale," or similar insects, he cannot even
enter a protest though the apples may
range in size from a gooseberry to a cocoa-
nut, or though half of them may be rotten.
A third officer who could take action in
respect to the condition of the fruit as to
The junior member for
Dr. McGuire's Vancouver will win his
Petition. spurs if he makes good in
connection with the very
important subject upon which he is asking the local Legislature to petition the
Lieutenant-Governor. The petition asks
for an investigation into the conduct of
the coal industry in British Columbia.
The application is based upon the excessive
cost of fuel to the consumer, ancl the more
than suspicion that over a term of years
it would be found that Canadian consumers have been discriminated against in
favour of large purchasers South of the
line. On the latter subject little data is
available without investigation, although
from time to time sufficient has leaked out
to justify the Dominion Government in
inserting a special clause in a certain railway charter imposing penalties if coal were
sold under such conditions. With respect
to the former, every man who buys a.
ton of coal knows that he is paying more
than he ought. No one wishes to attack
the principle that capital must secure a
fair return if it is to be attracted to the
development of our natural resources, but
between this fair return and a clear profit
of two to three dollars a ton, tliere is a
happy medium, Avhich will still remunerate
the producer and yet allow relief to the
consumer. That happy medium would be
found as the result of an expert investigation by Commission. If the claims of
those who agree with Dr. McGuire are
proved to be wrong, no harm will have.
been clone, and indeed coal operators will
benefit by the removal of a stigma, under
which they must remain as long as the
allegations of excessive price remain unanswered. No more serious arraignment
could be formulated than that contained
in the speech of the Finance Minister when
proposing the coal tax. In justifying the
imposition of that tax, he quoted figures
which clearly showed not only that it Avas
justifiable but that there were other directions in which the Government might
find it necessary to interfere for the protection of thc Province. Dr. McGuire's
proposal is in no sense a party one, and
should receive the unanimous support of
tho Members, the investigation he asks for
is bound to come sooner or later, and now
is an excellent time.
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION ANO
REAL ESTATE A6EMTS
f 1 FORT ST. VICTORIA, S. C.
MAftJ-M innmii mjuuu
One Dollar Per Annum
Another Monarch has fallen
The Assassin, beneath the weapon of the
assassin. King Carlos of Portugal was in no sense a bad man; he had
just the average share of human frailty
with a touch more than the average of
human indolence. He reminds one forcibly of Rehoboam of old who took council of unwisdom, and so compassed hit*
own ruin. Either Carlos was unintelligent
or inordinately obstinate, there is no other
explanation possible of the fatuous course
which he elected to pursue. It is inconceivable that at this stage of advanced
thought, any monarch should be blind to
the fact that it is impossible to replace a
democracy with an autocracy. When the
most autocratic monarch, the Czar, has
been compelled to grant representative
Government to his people it is out of the
question for a country whicli has enjoyed
representative Government to take a retrograde step ancl decline upon Dictatorship.
Franco was poor King Carlos' evil genius.
His master is dead and the misguided instrument is fleeing for his life. The action of King Carlos suggests a striking
reflection in view of the fact that our own
King pointedly advised him to abandon his
idea of dictatorship and to revert to Constitutional Government. This only furnished another illustration of the wisdom
of King Edward, and also of the folly of
forming a friendly alliance with such a
monarch and yet disregarding his advice.
The monarchical form of Government is
demonstrably the best, but it may not
run to autocracy without dire results.
The information which Tho
The Grand Week was able to give its
Trunk Pacific,   readers last week has just
been accepted as true by the
Colonist ancl Times. They try to minimize tho full effect of the scoop by suggesting that the arrangement concluded
between Mr. Wainwright and the Provincial Government requires the endorsation
of President Hays before it becomes
effective. To whatever comfort they can
derive from this circumstance they are
welcome, the fact is that every detail has
been settled, that the Provincial Government is to get a one-fourth interest in the
Indian lands, that a contract for the construction of the first hundred miles East
from Prince Rupert has been executed
with Stewart & Welch, and that every obstacle to continuous construction has now
been removed. Furthermore, before leaving for the East Mr. Wainwright repeated
his previous declaration, that the railway
would bc completed within the original
charter period. This is the besl news
which The Week lias been able to announce since it commenced publication.
A few short months ago the
Significant Canadian Press was olmost
Omission. Jn a 8tate of panic at the
supposed unconstitutional
action of the House of Lords in daring
to veto legislation which had passed the
Commons. They joined the rabid Radical
papers of the Old Country in declaring
that "a grave constitutional crisis had
arisen," and they declared that the Lords
must either yield or be wiped off the face
of the earth. A few people who knew
something of English public opinion, of
English politics, and English tradition
ventured to suggest "hot air." They have
their justification, in the very lengthy and
portentous speech placed in the hands of
the King by his Ministers, ancl read by
His Majesty at the re-assembling of Parliament on Wednesday, not one word is
said about the Lords. THE WKKK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
The Merchants Bank
Cana  t
Established 1864.
Capital, full j paid $6,000,000
Reserve Fundi  4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch:R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
f By THE LOUNOER
Habitual readers of this column will
admit that first and foremost of the
subjects which I have kept before the
public for the past two years, that of
sanitation has occupied perhaps the
most important position. I am too
modest to claim any share of the
credit for the recent cleansing of the
Augean stable, to which the city authorities have put their hands, and I
am quite content to see reforms carried out without troubling about the
procuring cause.
At the same time I am not a little
proud that such an advance has been
made in this direction during the last
six months. The cleaning up of Chinatown and adjacent streets and alleys has never been so thoroughly
done "within the memory of the oldest inhabitant." Credit is due to
someone for the demolition of unsightly and dangerous buildings, for
the improved condition of some of
our streets and sidewalks, and for discontinuing the dumping of garbage
on James Bay flats.
I am willing to regard all these
achievements as merely coincident
with my reform programme so long
as the good work continues to go on.
What I now want to point out is
what I have stated in these columns
again and again, viz., that the city
bye-laws have always been strong enough to prevent the accumulation of
nuisances and to procure their speedy
removal. The trouble has been lack
of enforcement. By some means public opinion has been aroused and keyed up to a higher pitch in respect of
hygienic observances; I therefore
trust there will be no relaxing of ef-
ort, but that there will be a rigid enforcement of all provisions affecting
the public health,
In this connection I have read with
much interest the proposed additional
bye-laws introduced into the Council
by Alderman Henderson. These bye-
laws are decidedly stricter than any
which have gone before, but not a bit
more stringent than the circumstances
of the case demand. Accumulations
of filth are breeders of disease, but
where owing to fortunate climatic
conditions, epidemic diseases do not
ensue, none the less does the public
health suffer in disorganized conditions and lowered vitality. I hope that
every one of Alderman Henderson's
proposals will be endorsed, and that
once they become bye-laws of the city
they will be enforced with the utmost strictness.
It must not, however, be forgotten
that these most excellent provisions
for the more frequent removing of
garbage and other refuse will necessitate improved scavenging facilities.
The ashbin wil! have to be emptied
oftener, and I venture to suggest that
the  time  has   come  when  the  city
should instal a more comprehensive
and satisfactory system, and especially
when it should introduce closed
carts for the removal of all refuse of
this class.
I do not know what the city authorities think of the new pavement on
Government Street, but as the subject
has been dealt with by my editor, I
will content myself with saying that
the contention which I quoted in this
column last week has been speedily
vindicated. The foundation of sand
has been washed away by the first
storm, and at the moment of writing,
those blocks which are not floating an
inch or two above their normal level
are resting in the various hollows and
cavities which had been formed in
the concrete foundation, the whole
presenting an interesting study in undulations.
I know that the sand has disappear
ed, because I lounged round four
sewer gratings during the storm on
Wednesday, and saw it being carried
down by the rain water. An ex-alderman resented my criticism and remarked that it would have been all
right but for the rain.
Even newspapers sometimes ask
foolish questions, and a great family
daily published not a thousand miles
from Victoria, in commenting this
week on the proposal of Seattle capitalists to spend $150,000 on an up-to-
date office block for this city, asked
why Victoria capitalists did not undertake the project. Ther is only one
reason, and I thought every newspaper man at any rate, knew it. Victoria capitalists prefer to realize 3 per
cent, on their money by depositing it
with the local banks, to be shipped
out to alle/iate the money stringency
in the East, rather than to invest it
in a 10 per cent, business block in
Victoria. If anyone doubts this, I
will ask them to consider the following fact, that there was on the thirty-
first of December, 1907, a little over
$11,000,000 on deposit with Victoria
banks, of which less than $2,000,000
had been reinvested in Vritish Columbia.   Verb sap.
Dr. Fagan is not the first scientific
expert who has been "hoist with his
own petard." Greater men than he
have come within an ace of losing
their lives, but few have sacrificed the
lives of three hundred harmless creatures, to demonstrate that oxygen is
life. The animals in question were
not accumlated for this purpose,
they were intended to demonstrate
far more advanced principles of medical science; but, alas! they were
doomed to illustrate a mere rudimentary principle.
A general impression round the
clubs is that the Colonist came a cropper in its bout with Aldermen Meston
and Gleason. I hear on good authority that the offending paragraph was
a paid advertisement; if so, the editor
should frankly state the fact. As it
stands, it was run as a news item, for
the compilation as well as the publication of it the editor is responsible.
Perhaps some day Alderman Gleason
will realize that he will greatly increase his popularity by frankly mak
ing the admission that in the field of
social reform "there are others." It
will be a sad spectacle for Victoria to
lay claim to being the only city since
Old Testament days reduced to the
possession of "one righteous man."
Without expressing any personal
opinion on the subject of woman's
suffrage, I will venture to make the
assertion that if its advocates would
arrange for a house to house canvas
by reliable parties and secure a vote
for or against from every woman
over twenty-one years of age in Victoria, a very small minority would be
found to favour the proposal.
I venture to say further that if my
surmise should prove to be wrong
and the majority were in favour, the
Government would without the
slightest hesitation give legislative effect to the plebiscite. This is the only
rational way to go about it, for I am
convinced that the legitimate wishes
of its advocates stand in great danger
of being disappointed if they rely
upon something approaching the Suffragist movement at home.
I have been asked to say a word
about the Alexandra Literary Club.
It was my good fortune to attend several  meetings  of  this  admirable  so
ciety last fall, and I am now free to
confess that while I went to scoff I
remained to—admire. The very brief
reports of its meetings which appear
in the daily press convey no adequate
idea of the popularity of the Club and
the excellence of its programme.
While it is mainly for ladies, gentlemen of literary and artistic tastes are
admitted as guests. The topics are
carefully selected and the speakers
are invariably experts in their line.
The popular impression that ladies'
meetings are mainly for tea and gossip has no application to the Alexandra Club. The committee deserves
credit for the painstaking manner hi
which it seeks to keep alive some
practical interest in those subjects
which tend to preserve culture and
refinement. Any lady who holds
aloof is depriving herself of an opportunity of rounding out her social pleasures with the pursuit of intellectual
studies. The members of the Alexandra Club keep their light burning at
the shrine of literature and art.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
C&i
rt<-^rt-l",
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
Best Buy.
BEST  BUT  IN  VICTOBIA  OP  BUSINESS PBOPERTT. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMBS BAY.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has the Post Office to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site tha situation of these
lots ls unrivaled tn the City of Vietoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable improvements on
all sides of them by th* Provincial Qovernment, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing Interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
E10 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160  acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W. N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan IS J. J. Templeton, Agent.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF       g|j^ ??     j
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Il world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can he produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD  VERY OLD LIQUEUR 8COTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
tJrl
By Appointment to H. M. the King.
A REVOLUTION IN FRUIT CULTURE.
V FLUID
The Winter Spray-Fluid kills the eggs of insects and mites
and the spores of Fungi.
V2 FLUID
The Summer Spray-Fluid is deadly to Aphis, Psylla, and Scale
Insects, and does not injure leaf or blossom. One spraying a year
with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. COOPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
Sole Agents for British Columbia.
E. G. PRIOR & 60..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
full particulars of these wonderful insecticides.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Vlctoriu.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains', thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing  160  acres,  more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
The V. B. 6. Novelty Works
HBJU   ABTIQUB,  ABTXBTXO    AHS    ABOHXTBOTUBAL
DBU0.nO WOBK KASB TO OSDEB.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
10W Oranvllla Street      11      It      11 11       TABOOUTBB, B. O.
T.  LeOAXB,   Proprietor.
Investigate the \
"Cushman" flarine fiotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908
The Light Fantastic.
At the Empress Hotel for the Cause
of Charity.
Arrangements for the fancy dress
ball which is to be held in the Empress Hotel on the 18th in aid of St.
Joseph's hospital are being carried on
apace. The committee in charge is
hard at work, and will spare no effort
to make this ball the most brilliant
social event in the history of Vic-
|**tOria. It is expected that a large
number of people will come to Victoria from outside points to attend,
as the magnificent Empress Hotel is
being widely spoken of all along the
coast, due no doubt to the fact that
the newspapermen who were so royally entertained here by the officials
■of the C.P.R., having returned home,
are now writing elaborate descriptions
of Victoria's palatial hostelry.
The committee wish to announce
that the price of the tickets, viz., $3.00,
includes everything in connection with
tbe ball. A rumour is afloat to the
effect that in addition to the price
of the ticket, an extra charge is to
be made for supper. This is not so.
The price paid for the ticket covers
everything. Although the ball is to
be fancy dress, it will not be compulsory to wear fancy dress. Many
of the ladies will appear in poudre,
aad those of the gentlemen who do
not care to wear fancy dress or coat
facings, will wear the regular evening
dress. Masks, however, will not bc
I permitted.
Final  arrangements  for the music
I have been completed, the committee
having secured an orchestra of twelve
of the best musicians in the city, and
I the musical programme which is now
in course of preparation will be one
of the  finest  ever  heard  in  British
Columbia. The ball programme, which
will be something new to Victorians,
I is already being prepared, and is a
Ivery  dainty  and attractive  piece  of
[work.   Although being unique in de-
[sign, it is all that art and good taste
lean  suggest,  the  paper  and  pencils
Ito be used having been imported specially for the occasion.   The sale of
(tickets up to date has been very large,
land mail orders are already beginning
Ito come In from outside points, press
[notices  having appear  in  several  of
lthe sound papers as far south as Port-
lland, where interest in the big event
lis evidently being aroused.    Tickets
lare  now  on sale  at  Fletcher  Bros.,
IMrs.   Aaronson's,   M.   W.   Waitt   &
I Co.'s,   Victoria   Book   &   Stationery
I Co., Hibben & Co.'s, C. F. Redfern's,
lthe   J.   M.   Whitney   Company,   and
I Challoner & Mitchell's.
The sale will close on Saturday,
iFeb. 15, after which date tickets can-
Inot be purchased under any consideration. This action is necessary on
• account of the extensive preparations
[which will have to be undergone by
■ the hotel management in connection
I with the supper, which  is to be a
■ most elaborate one, and which will
[necessitate a knowledge of the exact
[number of people who will be present.
1 Therefore, those who have not yet
(secured their tickets are requested to
do so at the earliest possible date,
either from the members of the committee or from any of the stores
I where they have been placed on sale.
The following are the names of
I the Committees in charge:
Ladies' Committee — Mrs. Robin
[Dunsmuir, Mrs. R. H. Pooley, Mis-s
[E. Sehl and Mrs. Hermann Robert-
|son.
Knights of Columbus Committee—
|Messrs.  F.  J.  Sehl,  A   B.  Stewart,
Jno. Hart, Wm. H. P. Sweeney, and
|Frank C. Clarke (Hon Sec'y)
Floor Committee—Messrs. H. A.
Bromley, F. J. Sehl, R. H. Pooley,
|f. H. Lawson, Jr., and Col. Gregory.
A great deal of interest is being
[aken in the aifair in Vancouver as
■vill be seen by the following which
Is taken from a recent issue of the
Kancouver Province:
"An event that is causing consider-
lible comment in social circles all
long the coast is the fancy dress ball
Ivhich is to be given in aid of St.
Joseph's Hospitnl, in the Empress
Hotel, the magnificent new C. P. R.
■[structure   in   Victoria,   on   February
18, fancy dress or poudre for ladies
and fancy dress or coat facings for
gentlemen will be in order and will
create an eminently beautiful spectacle in contrast to the spacious and
magnificent room and superb appointments of the big hotel. The matter of
music is being given special attention,
a picked orchestra of twelve of the
best available musicians have been secured and the programme, though varied, will be the best that has ever
been heard in British Columbia.
Final arrangements with the management of the Hotel have been completed by the ladies in charge: Mrs.
Robin Dunsmuir, Mrs. R. H. Pooley,
Miss Sehl and Mrs. Hermann Robertson, assisted by a committee of the
Knights of Columbus who are taking an active interest in the affair,
and are co-operating with the ladies.
The entire lower floor of the hotel
has been placed at their disposal, including the lounging room, palm room
and ladies' room.
pattern of pink roses. The curtains
are pink and the furniture grey, with
Rose du Barry seats, which, like all
furniture in the hotel, were made to
order.
The lounging room is of immense
size, extending fully half the length
of the hotel. It is beautifully lighted
and cheery, and the two great fireplaces will render it equally homelike.
The striking feature of this immense
hall are the white pillars, which run
through the place in stately rows.
Each pillar boasts a double bad of
beaten brass, from which depend four
electric light fixtures, which were specially designed, each depicting a
Rocky Mountain shep's head, with a
light in the ground glass bowl upon
each head, and another in a pear-
shaped glass hanging from the mouth.
Between the rows of pillars are other
brass chandeliers, in which the sheep's
head again figures. They are both
quaint and artistic, and when lit up
the hall makes a very brilliant scene.
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES* BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
[
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
Thc home ol all theatrical and vaudev Mt
artitU while in the Capital city, alt* si
other kindred bohemiam.
WRIQHT A FALCONER, Preprl.Lra.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
BaafiPs Most Popular fa a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur*
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Btectit*
lighted. Tub aad ahower hatha and laundry la
connection.  The miaera' heme.
' DANNY " DEANE. Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Caft lit
Connection.
GREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of tha Kootentra.
J. FRED HUME,      -      Propriety,
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home ot the Industrial Worker!
otthe Kootenays.
W. E. HcCandllah,
Proprietor
PADEREWSKI
In entering the hotel by the porte
cocliere, at the soutli end of the building, which will .probably be used as
the main entrance on the night of tlie
ball, one finds himself in a magnificent oak-panelled hall, designedly
patterned after the ancient baronial
halls of the great '.mansions of England. Carved oak paneling extends
up the walls rto a height of about ten
feet; the ceiling finished in yellow, is
very heavily teimcd .with oak timbers
[terminated at (either end by smatl
■carved medalli-om-s, representing the
beaver, the lion, the icrown and the
thistle. Great pillar* sheathed in oak,
with massive carved oaken capitals,
support thc ceilings, the whole effect
being one of artistic strength coupled
■with solid wealth. A great screen of
carved oak divides the hall from the
palm room, but terminated in time to
leave an inetrruptcd coup d'oeil
through the spacious lounging room
beyond. But in the midst of this reproduction of old world splendour the
twentieth century emphatically asserts
itself in the ladies' sitting room. Tt is
a most enchanting room. Thc walls
are panelled high with oak, and there
is a superb, heavily carved oak mantle, with thc ceiling in elaborately
moulded relief. Thc colour scheme is
artistic and restful, grey ancl pink being thc prevailing hues. Round the
walls runs a broad frieze of chubby
cupids, and on thc floor lies a beautiful  grey  carpet,  hand-tufted  with   a
At the back of the lounging room is
the palm room, a large apartment
done in green, with a circular dome
of oriental glass surmounting it The
pillars here arc twined round with
vines. This room will be converted
into a card-room for the use of those
who do not care to dance.
The ballroom is the most gorgeous
of the different rooms. It lies along
the north end of thc hotel, and thc
prevailing colour is rich red. The
wood used is all imported, the ceiling
with its heavy beams and the massive
•pillars being all of Australian rosewood. This, to the uninitiated, looks
■.nut unlike mahognay, though the
grain is different, and lends itself
eqtnailly well to decorative work, as
thu room can testify. The great
beams which cross the ceiling at close
intervals are richly carved. The pillars are plain, but on thc ceiling there
are scrolls, arabesques and fancy figures covering the entire surface of thc
beams. This treatment contrasts with
thc reliance on line and absence of
florid work which characterizes the
rest of the building. Appended from
the ceiling at spaces of about twu feet
apart and running the entire length
and breadth of the room, are beautiful
brass chandeliers with their clusters
cf electric globes, and when lighted
the effect is most brilliant. The floor
is of Australian red bean, which
makes an ideal surface for dancing.
Never in the social history of the
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Kaaldeatlal aad Day School lor Boya
Handsome New Buildings. Larg***-
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D*
Principal
Re-openi after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
Pacific Coast has a ball been given
amidst such sumptuous surroundings,
and considering the object for which
it is being given it should be exceptionally well patronized. It is not
often that aid is solicited by Victoria's oldest hospital, St. Joseph's,
and as thc expense of building thc
new wing is so heavy ($60,000 approximately) it is hoped that every on:
will work to make this dance a success, Thc price of the tickets has
been placed at $3, and may bc secured
from Frank C. Clarke, honorary secretary, Box 70S, Victoria.
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Beet Family Holol in tlis City.
$1.90 a day.
Mm. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietreaa
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
There crossed thc Atlantic both
ways last year 3,000,000 persons, and
yet no place looks lonelier than thc
sea—there's so much of it.
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOOGS
Realty Brokers.
620 »OBT RBSKT      tl      VXOTOBU.
THOMAS OATTBBAU
Builder  and  •raaral  Contractor.
Tenders  tlvat   on   Brick, Ston*   an
Frame, Alteratlona, Parquetry Flaorlni
Offlce, Bank, Stora and Saloon Flttlagi
Pll* Drivlnc, Wharru aad Dock I
constructad and repaired.
TXOTOaiA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 8, 1908
Incorporated 1901
Capital, I600.000.0tj
Capital Increased
ln 1907 .
to  ...U,000,«0».O0
Subscribed .
Capital,   III0.M0
Reserve . . $BO,0*»0|
Surplus, Jan. I*.   ,
^^^i   1907  .  . |1I0,H
. B. KATHEBS, DM. Han.
nr closure up estates
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited
328 Hastings St., West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE iWEEK" PUBLISHING
.^COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
Sift  Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
IK  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Bdltor
The Broken Road.
Since A. E. W. Mason startle 1 the
Itcrary world wilh his popular no.el,
"Four Feathers," many things have
happened. His pen, ever busy, has
brought him added fame. His proclivities for public service have led
him into the political arena, and hc
has gained a scat in the British House
of Commons. It is also reported that
he has inherited a substantial fortune
from a maiden aunt. All of these are
excellent things in every way, but
political fame would have been purchased at too high a price if it had
led Mr. Mason to neglect the cult for
which he is so eminently adapted, and
to forget his first love amid more
arduous and exciting occupations.
This has been the experience of
more than one writer of promise, and
it may come to Mr. Mason, but his
latest book lends no encouragement
to the fear. "The Broken Road" is in
many respects equal to "Four Feathers." It is characterized by the
same easy diction and chaste style.
The author uses nervous English and
uses it so that it is in his hands a
flexible and pliant instrument. In this
story is no excess of verbiage and no
clouding of the issue. I recently reviewed Mr. W. J. Dawson's new
book, "A Prophet in Babylon," and
found it two hundred pages too long
for its purpose. Mr. Mason's story
runs to little over four hundred pages
and is not a word'too long. The construction is good, the plot carefully
work out. I read it at a sitting, because I could not lay it down, and
from my standpoint, at any rate, that
is the highest recommendation novel
could have.
There is a distinction about Mr.
Mason's work; he has learned to write
in short sentences, which are snappy
without being jerky. He has a vivid
imagination. His descriptions are
picturesque, and the scene he depicts
invariably materializes in the mind of
the reader. He indulges in no circumlocution, but plunges at once "in
medias res." In the intricacies of his
plot he never buries his characters,
nor keeps them behind the scenes
long enough for interest to wane. As
chapter succeeds chapter, the reader
finds himself saying, "It was just
time that so-and-so reappeared." Every section of the story dovetails well
with its fellows. Now, all these things
in my opinion go far to ensure an in
teresting if not a fascinating novel.
They go largely to constitute the craft
of novel-writing, and they are the
nique of a writer's work which may
tend to the mechanical and tlie artificial, but if the wires be skilfully hidden, the taste is not offended. After
all, we know that there are strings to
the puppets and that someone pulls
them, but as long as they are not visible we nurse the delusion that the
marionettes are real men and women.
Not that there is anything artificial
about "The Broken Road," but it excels rather on the lines I have indicated than in epigram, philosophy, or
even in profundity of thought.
It is a story of India, and it is due
to Mr. Mason to say that even when
one remembers what Kipling and
Flora Annie Steele have done for that
mysterious country, Mr. Mason has
.not failed to reproduce the atmosphere, and to more than suggest the
indefinable sensation of subtlety and
mysticism,which pervades the Oriental character. I do not think that it
ever entered the author's mind that he
was writing a novel with a purpose; I
think, rather, that the purpose grew
out of the novel, and is possibly more
apparent to the reader than to the
writer, but before? I reached the end
of the book. I found that it had gripped me and that all the glamour of
British administration under conditions never existent before, possessed,
me wholly.
"The Broken Road," the theme of
the book, that great road which the
father of the hero had started, and
which it was incumbent upon his successors to push up to the very slopes
of the Himalayas, is a simile of the
great task that lies before the British
Government in India. The history of
our administration tells of many a
broken road, of many a delayed project, of many a thwarted design, but
not one of them is abandoned; sooner
or later they must all go on to completion.
It is the certainty of this which constitutes the strength of our grip upon
the Empire, which we should lose in
a day if it were relaxed. Mr. Mason
excels in drawing picturesque characters, and in weaving a human story
of infinite tenderness with the sterner
features of his plot.
First we get the hero, Linforth,
whose father had been killed in an uprising among the frontier tribes; to
Linforth was bequeathed the task of
finishing the Broken Road. Then we
have Shere Ali, a Prince, and son of
a native Prince, educated at Eton and
Oxford, imbibing Western ideas, an
accomplished English gentleman but
for the tell-tale tan. We see him recalled at a critical stage in the history
of his native state, Chiltistan, but not
before he had conceived a violent affection for an English girl. This girl,
although only twenty-three years of
age, was a widow. She had her
failings, but like many widows was intensely fascinating; indeed, Violet
Oliver is probably the ■ best drawn
character in the book, and in spite of,
her frivolity arid Jove of pleasure/had
a certain independence of character
and unerring corectness of judgment
and sense of honor which render her
very attractive. Linforth loved her,
too, and so he and Shere Ali, from being like brothers, gradually drifted
apart, separated by the unbridgeable
chasm.
Later the scene shifts entirely to
India, and Mullahs play an important
part in the story and we get a glimpse
of religious fantacism. Ralston, the
commissioner who presides over a
large district, including Chiltistan, is
an ideal representative of the Home
Government, aristocratic, honourable,
sagacious, courteous. Under his direction, Linforth undertakes important
commissions.
Meanwhile, Shere Ali puts his fate
to the test and proposes to Violet Oliver, only to find that there is a barrier
which no white woman may pass
without declassing herself. Then
comes the conflict between his Orien*
tal instincts and his Occidental training, and he curses the day that he was
sent to England to be educated, there
to imbibe the principles of Western
civilization, only to find on his return
that they availed him nothing against
the racial handicap of his birth.
He flings aside every restraint, and
after plunging into recklessness, becomes a ready tool in the hands of
the Mullahs to foment rebellion in his
native state. Linforth is the instrument to suppress the uprising, and in
a few vivid chapters Mr. Mason depicts with fidelity and impressiveness
a typical native rebellion, crushed, as
so many native rebellions have been
crushed, by the superior organization
and morale of a small British force.
I will not spoil the story for my lady
readers by telling them how the love
episode ends. The book is well worth
reading for that, apart from its absorbing interest as a sketch of Indian
administration and a study in racial
differences.
The value of the book lies in its
suggestiveness. Reliable authorities
tell us that the seething unrest which
is never long absent, is to-day more
turbulent than for many years among
our Indian subjects. After every allowance is made for the influence of
religious fanatics, there still remains
the great question of the genius of
Indian government. The demand of
the native peoples for a larger share
in the government of the country is
becoming more insistent and is a logical corollary of higher education. Just
how the demand will ultimately be
met it may be too soon even to surmise, but that it will be met and met
in a spirit of reasonable concession,
no man can doubt. ?
The policy of the British Government has ever been to extend the privilege of representative government
to conquered peoples. There are a
thousand reasons why this privilege
will have to be more carefully safeguarded in the case of India than in
that of any other country with which
we have had to deal. This surmise
becomes a certainty in view of the
enormous preponderance in numbers,
the deep religious divergencies, and
the unfathomable mysticism of the
Oriental mind. But while these furnish to-day the greatest problem
which our statesmen have to consider,
the successive triumphs of British administration justify the belief that
they will be solved as effectually and
probably with greater success than
some of the great problems which
have confronted them in other parts
of the world and in other stages of
our history.
In view of the present condition of
affairs in India, Mr. Mason's book is
not only entertaining, but apposite,
while it is not profound, it is so interesting that no one who takes it up
will wish to lay it down until the end
of the story has been reached.
["The Broken Road," by A. E. W
Mason. Publisher, McLeod & Allan,
Toronto; price $1.50; on sale at the
Victoria Book and Stationary Store,
Government Street, Victoria.]
#«THEATR
/V<v^w'*"s'.  v.*.,',.
T-^r;*, USSEl a.'MANA'-1
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  14TH
PADEREWSKI
PRICES $4.00, $3.00 and $2.00.
GALLERY $1.50.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Wednesday,
February 12th.
FEBRUARY 12TH
JOS. M. GAITES
Offers
MISS CHERIDAH SIMPSON
In De Koven, Klein and Cook's
Masterpiece.
Red Feather
COMPANY OF 75
AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA
COMPLETE  PRODUCTION
Prices—-25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Nothing Daintier
Than a Pan
But alas, few things more perishable. How many ladies have
used the pretty, modish trifle, but a few times when the filmy lace
or spangled covering is torn or tarnished. Fans, too, have a
sad habit of losing themselves entirely. The Victoria social
season is now in full swing and coming balls and entertainments
will, doubtless, suggest to many ladies the necessity of new
Fans. Lovely Fan creations are here. Fans in profusion. Fans
for every costume.    Prices start at 75c.
FASHIONS IN JEWELRY.
are constantly studied here. Where formerly one Necklace had
to serve for many gowns, it is now necessary for choice dressers
to have a separate Necklace for each gown. The wonderful
blending of tones possible in semi-precious stones appeals to
smart women when they note our collection.
—Parisian Pearl Collars from $1.00 to $20.00.
—Fancy Hair Combs forevening wear, from $1.25.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
DIAMOND  MERCHANTS  AND  SILVERSMITHS
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home!
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
"Qld Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power I
No matter where you live you can hea?
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie","In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that: These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars;
"A\ comic song-hits and minstrel humor; perfect dance music ; classic
fi£o\ symphonies—entertainment of every sort for every mood and every
V&^V occasion ; and all to be heard at its best on the Victor tr Berliner
* *   <j\   Gram-o-phone.
°»-   »>\      Any Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly play
Victor Records for you,   Call and ask to bear
\\V
v\
them, and get hiin to tell you about the
\ % **? \ easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
'-.    \ <i ''Ax —U8e llle coupon,
%'</? >\        Tha Rarlkiw «
\
Tlie Berliner Gnffl-o-ptau
Company of Cuitfi, IM.
608
You can always      — -      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jVl#    D#     than others-
Cigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8   1908.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Prank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, Intends lo apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest eorner of section 21, thenee
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty cliains west and eighty chains
north  to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
TAKE NOTICE that  M. Brennan,  of DISTRICT OS  CASSIAR.
?oOClnJiiykfor00De?milssniona 'tT'JTit TAKB   N0TICE   that   The   Hldde"
followhiK   described   land- Creek  MlntnS Co"  °r Vancouver,  occu-
Comn fncing at a nost marked M   R   pation*  ' lntends to ^M for Per-
commencing at a post marked M. B. mission t0 lease the foUowlng described
Southeast  Corner,   situated    about
B.
40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
,.h-,i,_  _...,,„      ,  .   north one chain;  thenee  southwesterly
of==^r^2"— assess? se^sa^y
De. 14
MARK BRENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.   Kathleen  Lake.
TAKE NOTICE tliat Enoch A. White,
of Vietoria, B.C., lumberman, Intends
to apply for a special timber license
over  the  following described  lands:
8. Commencing at it post planted at
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "1*1 A. W.'s N.W.
corner   post   to   Claim   No.   8";   thenco
thence south about one chain forty links
to high  water mark and  thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 11107.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
nortneast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty ehains east and eighty chains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  11*07.
FRANK BUFFINGTON  VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
eorner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO ehains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE tliat T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Tlmbor
Cruisers', intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing' at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest eorner of Timber Limit No. 1BJ.98; thenee
north SO chains; thonce west 80 chains;
thenee south SO chains; thenee east SO
cliains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, l.)07.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY   WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE tllat T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
limber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thenee
east 1(10 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 00 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant,  intends to ap-
     ply   for  a  special   timber  licence  over
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;   the following described lands:
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO      No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
cliains   to  commencement. about G miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
Staked November 30lb,  1907. main  Quatham River,    S.    W.    corner;
District of Rupert, Kathleen Luke. thenee east 80 chains; thence north 80
1. Commencing at a post planted at chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence
the southeast corner uf T. L. 13,045, on south SO chains to point of commence-
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W. ment.
corner post lo Claim No. 1"; thenee 20t!l December, 1907.
east 40 cliains; thenee north 80 chains; No* 2—Commencing at a post planted
thenee west 140 cliains; thenee south about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
20 chains to T. L. 13,046; thenee fol- matn Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
lowing north line of T.  L.  13,0*16 east  thence 160 ehains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
and south to commencement
Staked November 30th,  1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and ln an easterly    direction    from    Quatham River,
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.      about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
(c) Commencing at a post planted at  thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,746, on  chains;   thence  east  80  chains;   thence
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.   soutn  80 chains,
corner post to Claim C"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains', thence east 40
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction    from    Quatham    River,
chains;  thence south 40 chains;  thence about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
east 20 chains; thence north SO chains; thence east  80 chains',  thence north 80
thence west  120 chains to commence- chains;  thence west JO chains; thence
ment. south 80 chains.
Dated11 vST B c"' Delicti,   1907 "* S-CoSme'ncing at a post planted
nftrtSn.■ „f■»„:,_,!_A„„? J    °_ '    i07, about i0 ehains distant and in an east-
K'l"up?rt  Quatsino Sound. erty direction from  east bank of Qua-
midL°rScl^,.nian?OS,tr.?la,'!l?d al tham  River'  about eight and one-half
fetES™™, 2!,^  V2'™0" mlIes east °f Ramsay Arm; thence west
«  w   1™"™J' ima, ,Ued   S, A;, W'3 s0 cl>ains* thence north 80 chains; thenee
J'f'-S™ el;nP ,h,fno    n"eDi; .a*!1,*-6 east 80 chains* then<* south 80 chains,
east  about  30  chains  to  T.  L.   14,407; 21st December  3907
.!SVn°jSLSL M,alMSj r-*"16?08..,east No- «—Commencing'at a post planted
about SO chains to Marble Creek; thence about 40 chains distant and in an east-
north and west along shore to Indian erly direction from east bank of Qua*
Reserve;  thence south and west along tham   River,  about  nine  and  one-hali
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows;   thence   following  shore  of   said
narrows   southwesterly   to   commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21
. __*half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chatns.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
Thomas D. Harris, Agent,   about 40 chains distant and in an east-
-
'""""£".,„ TIMBER MAPS &"£3£"
posted up to date every day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT L MAP CO
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS. SZ L _»__*, rv' *t_, r r-r
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan IS
TIMBER   LICENCES
ondother Lands  taken  up in British Columbia,
alee rrints can be   ohtainrr/ n+ *!,*_-+ „„+;_._.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO ehains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 ehains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 cliains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less,
Dated December 17 th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on nortli bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thenee north 160 chains;
thenee east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to poini
of commencement, containing 640 aeres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half mlles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 ehains; thence west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, lliei.ee east SO chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and contalnlnB 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated December ISth, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile soutb
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4;
thence north SO ehains; thence west SO
chains; thenee soulh SO chains; theuce
east so cliains to point of commencement, containing 6*10 acres, more or less.
Dned December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—-Commencing at a po.it planted
.ibout two miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one milo south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east 80 chaina; thenee south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thenee north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.   IS ED.  BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line Intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance ot about _..
ehains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thenee southerly following the shore llne a distance
of about 12U chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek,
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert. Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission lo
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, ihence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north  line  of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,  of Vancouver,  occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south aud
west to the southeast corner of Lot 108;
thence east live chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chalna to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. T Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite lo purchase the following deacrlbed
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at tills posl planted on the eust
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point al the mouth of lhe
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thonte east 80 ehnlns; thenee north So
chains; thence west 90 chains to beaeh;
thenoe south along beach to point ol
commencement; eontalnlng 40 acres,
more or less.
Stalled Nov.  25,   1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 7 George Young, Agont.
COMPANY.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 0—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18546, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 ehains to
point of eommeneement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 aeres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 5,  Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase  the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at tlie
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 49
chains; theuce west 40 chains to olacc
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5, ancl containing 160 acres, more or
less.
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU,
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL  orly direction  from  east bank of Qua-
"      '  tham River, about ten and one-half miles
east   of   Ramsy   Arm;   thence  west   80
chains;  thenee north 80 chains;  thence
east SO chains; thenee south SO chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
"Companies Act, 1897.'
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Provinee of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The  head  office  of  the Company  ls
situate at the City of Auckland, In   "
Colony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one million pounds, divided
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range i.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Ed.  Brown,   of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, Intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described  lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
la*   on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
thenco north 80 chains to shore line of
Into'ten thousan7Thare7o^one'hun"  Burke Channel; thenco west along shore
dred pounds each.
line  80  chains  more  or  less,   to  point
The   head   ofllce  of  the  Company   in  o£   commencement,   and  containing   640
this Province is situate at Victoria, and aofS?{Jf,°SL.0Il}J.M;.   .„„„
James   Hill   Lawson,   merchant,   whose
address ls Victoria ,B.C, Is tho attorney
for the Company.
Given   under  my
hand  and  seal  of
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
office  at  Victoria/Province  of   British  *$*$_. A0J.Rl?aln,s„; tbe"oe S'\sl160 ,c„haln?
Columbia, this 28th day of November,
ono thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been  established and licensed are:
To carry on the business of fire and
thenco north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 100 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 10th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
, u c.w iy un me ousmess oi lire ana „,„.,. ~ „,,,„ .....u .r t __. xt« i_, _
marine Insurance In nil lt» hrnnnhn-a nr about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
marine insurance in an its orancnes or        .     .     - a„„nmh nivor nnrirn r-hnn.
uch of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as are
Incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Dec.  14.
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Chan
nel, thence north 80 chains; thenee west
80 chains; thenco south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains to point of eommeneement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
       _       Dated December 16th,  1907.
-,„„,„._-_,„.__.._.„,,-„. . ,.„ „,„„„._„ No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT about one mile south of lot No 241A,
- « Si?tl]rttn.?i,?r??r JV.?stmlni..te'_;, , Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMlcken No. 3; thenee north 80 chains; thence
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker, east 80 chains; thenco south 80 chains;
Intends to apply for permission to lease thence west go chains to point of com-
the  following described land: mencement,   and   containing   640   acres,
Commencing at a post planted on the  more or less.
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
26 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence wost 20 chalng to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dee 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER
Dated December ICth, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 mlles south qf Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence enst 80 chains;
thenee south 80 chains; thence west 80
acres, ciia|ns to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December ICth  1907
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
  about  4   mlles  south  of  lot  No.   241A.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT Burke Channel, and two miles south of
District of New Westminster. _,   w.   eorner  of  Claim  No.   5;   thenee
TAKE   NOTICE   that  Frederick  Pat- west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
rick   Rogers   of  Vancouver,   occupation thenee east 40 chains; thence south 160
carpenter, intends to apply for permis- chains  to  point  of  commencement  and
slon to purchase the following described containing 640 acres, more or lesi.
land: Dated  December 17th,  1907.
Commencing at a post planted at the No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
S.  W.  corner of  Lot  1347,  G.  I.,   New about   four   and   one-half   mlles   south
Westminster   district;   thence   west 20 of lot  No.  241A,  Burke  Channel;  on  a
chains;  thence nortli  20 ehains;  thence hank   ot  a  small   river  about  one-hnlf
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains milo onst of claim No.  6; thence north
to  point  of  commencement,   eontalnlng SO chains; thenee enst 80 chains; thence
40 acres more or less. south 80 chains; thenoe west 80 chains
Dated  November  26th,   1907. to point of commencement and contaln-
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS, ing 640 acres more or less
Dec.14 Dated December 17th,  1907,
B.C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th  1'ebruary,  1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday,  13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
&£E
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby Riven thnt tho
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been ex-
terideil up to and Including Friday, the
31st day at January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the office of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the office of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited If the
party tendering declino or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourablo the Chief Commissioner, ln
Iho sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted  for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond bolng supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished,
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
NEW
WESTMINSTER
TRICT.
LAND     DIS-
Dlstrlct of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver. B. C, occupation
timber broker, Intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at 1 post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 18187;
thence east SO chains nlong the north
line of T. L. 1S1S7; thenee north 80
chains nlnng the wost line of T. L.
12502; thence oast SO ehnlns nlong the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence north
SO chains nlong the west line of T. L.
12503: thence In a southwesterly course
along the lino of lhe Capilano Wnter Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing  640  acres  of  lnnd,  more or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E, Simpson of
Iowa Palls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 30
days after date.
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 1, which is on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
lt cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north 80 chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,
S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant
In a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell
Lake; thence east 80 chains; north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 4, which Is one mile distant
In a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east of
T. L. 14864, thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains', east 80 chains; south 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. B, which is one mile distant In
a northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mlle east of T. L.
14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 6, which is situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thence west 40
ehains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 7, which is about four mlles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chatns; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.B. No. 8, which ls flve miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  16th,  1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which is four miles distant
in a northerly direction ti.im Crown
Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which is two miles distant
in a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts tbe north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which is flve and one-quarter miles distant in a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Lake; thence north 80 chains; west SO
chains; south SO chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  17,  1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which is six miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
33. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner, marked "W.
E. S., N.W., No. 33." which is five
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain; thence south
ft) chatns, east 8o chains, north 8o
chains, west 8o chains to point oi
commencement
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which Is three miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80  chains  to  point of commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 36, which
Is  marked  W.E.S.,  N.E. which
is flve miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S..
N.E. No. 36, which Is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one-half a mlle south of
Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
chains; south 80 chatns; east 80 chains;
north SO chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20th, 1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 37, S.E., which Is five miles distant ln a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which is five miles distant
in a southwesterly direction from West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chains; westlO chatns;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which ls three and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where lt joins the line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; wost
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains  lo point of commencement.
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 40, which ls three and one-half
miles In a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where lt
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 41—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 42—Commencing at a post plnnted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 42, which Is four mlles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on lino Block 110; thence
east 80 chains;  north  80 chains;  west
80 chains;  south 80 chains  to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 43, which is one and one-half
miles distant in a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
it joins the line of Block 110, thence
north 80 chains; west 80 cliains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Block 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which is marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and ln a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 160 chains; east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 47, which is two miles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where it joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which ls three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 50—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 60, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 61, which is five miles from
the south end of West lake, where it
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 15. 1907.
No. 52—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which ls six miles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it joins line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 63—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 53, which is six miles in a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where it joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; cast
80 chains; soulh 80 chains; west SO
chains to point of commencement.
No. 64—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 64, which is two and one-half
miles distant ln an easterly direction
from the north end of West lake, thence
west 80 chains; north SO chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 56—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 66, which is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; west 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11.        Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
thc above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before thc issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,  1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 100 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked  Dec.  19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wl-Tl Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north ICO chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Tl Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chatns to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Tl Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. It. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains', thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
tho following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commeneement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.R.,
S.E. No. 16, which Is eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
16 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chatns; east 64
chains  to point  of  commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half
mlles distant In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half mlles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; soutli
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which is nine and
one-half miles In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which Is ten and one-half
mlles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing nt the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which is ten and one-half mlles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half mlles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
hnlf miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles in a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
enst SO chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 ehains;
east 80 chains; soutli 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north SO chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half mlles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which ls seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, whioh is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; SO chains east
to  point  of commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E, No. 31, which is ten and one-half
mlles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
W.  E. SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.  2,  situate  on  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same;  thence west SO chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked  December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE tliat Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, Intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tlie
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mlle from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post plantod at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of co nmencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
5, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains', thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted   at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
1, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 100 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of tho
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (46) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can bo obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars (»200), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fall to complete tho work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution of the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner»post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June  14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman S_. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chatns; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
Victoria, B. C„ Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
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Fine New Rug Styles.
Rugs and Squares are the choice of many when they want floor coverings. The
artistic, economical and hygienic side appeals to them. These points of merit have
created a large and increasing demand for Rugs of various weaves, and, to meet this
demand, to satisfy it fully, we have, this season, stocked a larger and better stock
than ever before, and now offer you a splendid selection in many different makes. All
these are dependable. They are of the same excellent quality as our Carpets, coming
from the same makers, in many cases, and they carry with them the same guarantee
of goodness. We offer such a variety of sizes that we are sure you can find one
to "fit" that room of yours, and a style you'll like.   Better see these today.
TEMPLETON'S  SEAMLESS  AXMINSTER   RUGS-NEW STYLES.
These are handsome, rich Rugs with a deep pile. They are made by a house
famous for the high quality of its products. You'll be pleased with the dainty designs
and colorings.
Size 9 ft. x 7 ft. 6 in., each $32.00
Size 6 ft. x 9 ft., each $25.00
Size 9 ft. x 12 ft., each $50.00
Size 10 ft. 6 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $60.00
HARD WEARING SQUARES FROM SCOTLAND—FOR LITTLE.
For a low priced square that will stand a whole lot of hard wear aud abuse we
think you'll find nothing that can beat these Kilmarnock Scotch Squares. They
come in several attractive designs and colorings. We list here four sizes—see these
squares:—
Size 7 ft. 6 in. x 9 ft, each $6.75
Size 9 ft. x 9 ft, each $8.00
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in., each $9.25
Size 10 ft. 6 in. x 12 ft, each  $12.50
HERE ARE SOME EXTRA CHOICE BRUS SELS SQUARES
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in;, each . .$21.00
Size 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6 in., each $22.50
Size 9 ft. x 12 ft, each $22.50
Size n f. t3 in. x 12 ft, each $28.00
Size 3 yds. x 3^ yds., each  $24.00
Size 3 yds. x 4 yds., each $27.50
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 12 ft, each $28.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $32.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $33.00
Size 11 ft. 3 in. x 12 ft, each $34.00
Size 11 ft 3 in. x 13 ft. 6 in., each $37.00
Detailed Descriptions of Colorings and Designs, etc., etc., would be superfluous.
It's necessary to see these lines to properly appreciate their superiority. Delighted
to show you.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF SPLENDID RUGS—SMYRNAS
For a rich rug with a double life, get a SMYRNA. The double surface gives you
two rugs. When one side looks the "worse-for-wear" just turn the rug and you have
another new one.    There is a great choice of sizes and prices. Come in and see them.
Size 18 x 36 in., each $1.25
Size 26 x 54 in., each   $3.00
Size 30 x 60 in., each  $3.75
Size 36 x 72 in., each  $5.00
Size 9 x 10 ft. 6 in., each  $30.00
Size 9 x 12 ft, each  $35.00
Size 9 x 15 ft, each $50.00
Size 18 x 36 in., each  $1.75
Size 30 x 60 in., each $4.50
Size 3 x 12 ft, each  $14.00
Size 3 x 15 ft, each  $18.00
Size 9x9 ft, each  $30.00
TEMPLETON'S   UNEQUALLED   AXMINSTER CARPET.
Axminster, body, at, per yard  $2.00
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.00
Axminster, body, at, per yard  $2.25
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.25
Axminster, body, at, per yard $2.25
Axminster, border, at, per yard $2.00
Axminster, body, at, per yard $3.00
Axminster, border, at, per yard    .       $2.75
Axminster, body, at, per yard $3.50
Axminster, border, at, per yard $3.25
Specials in Fire Sets.
We are making an effort to clear out our entire stock of Fenders, Fire Sets, Suites,
Spark Guards and Fire Furniture. Just the other day we received a shipment from
a leading British house. We were promised delivery of this in time for Christmas
business. Had it arrived then we do not think a single piece would now be in our
store. The styles are new and nice and Christmas shoppers could not have "resisted"
them. We do not want to carry this into the Summer time, so we are pricing these
at figures'that should move the lot in a hurry.   Come in and see these prices:
WROUGHT IRON FIRE SETS
FIRE SETS—In wrought iron. Three
pieces, shovel, poker and tongs. Three
pieces for   $2-00
FIRE SET—Wrought iron. Three pieces,
shovel, poker and tongs.   Per set...$2.50
FIRE SET—Three-piece set, poker, tongs
and shovel. Made in wrought iron. Per
set   $a-z5
FIRE SET—Three-piece set, consisting of
shovel, poker and tongs. Wrought iron.
Per set  $2-75
FIRE SET—Wrought iron set of three
pieces, shovel, poker and tongs. Per set
of three pieces  $3-oo
STYLISH BRASS FIRE SETS
FIRE SET—In brass, three pieces, consisting of shovel, poker and tongs. Per
set  $2.00
FIRE SET—Three-piece brass set, poker,
shovel and tongs. Neat style. Per set $3.75
FIRE SET—Another brass style in three-
piece set that is excellent value, at, per
set $4.00
FIRE SET—A three-piece set in brass of
very stylish design. Good value at, per
set  $4.50
FIRE SET—Brass set, in three pieces,
shovel, poker and tongs. Nice design.
Per set  $5.50
Above prices are for carpets madcand laid by experienced men.  Best workmanship.
SEVERAL NICE STYLES IN WROUGHT   IRON FIRE SETS ON STANDS.
FIRE SETS—A nice style in five-piece set. Set consists of shovel, poker, tongs
and brush on stand. Made in wrought iron in pretty design. We have several
styles in this class of Fire Set and a choice of pricings. These are most useful.
Prices range at, per set, $9.00, $9*oo, $8.00, and   $6.50
SOME BRASS FENDER STYLES BRASS AND IRON FENDERS
KERB—In brass. Size 54x12 in., for..$6.50 FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in lang.
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for. .$14.00        At,  each    $2.25
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for. .$16.00 FENDER—In brass and iron, 36 in. long.
KERB—In brass. Size 48x12 in., for. .$25.00        At, each  $4.50
KERB—In brass. Size 54x12 in., for. .$30.00 FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in. long.
KERB—In brass. Size 54x12 in., for. .$35.00        At each   $4.25
FENDER—n brass and iron, 36 in. long.
Many   other   styles   in   Brass,   Wrought        At,  each    $4.00
Copper Iron, etc.    Come in and see the FENDER—In brass and iron, 42 in. long.
showing. At, each  $4.75
EVERYTHING FOR THE GRATE EX- FENDER—In brass and iron, 48 in. long.
CEPT THE COAL OR WOOD. At, each     $5.00
SOME HANDSOME STYLES IN BRASS HE ARTH SUITES.
HEARTH SUITE—A pretty style, in all
brass. Consists of Fender, Shovel, Poker,
Tongs and Stop. Excellent value, at, per
suite $16.00
HEARTH SUITE—Another all brass style
that is fine value. Five pieces. One of
our very newest styles.   Price .... ,$24,00
HEARTH SUITE—Here is another of our
very latest arrivals and one that at the
price asked is fine value. All brass.
At  $25.00
HEARTH SUITE—An excellent style in
all brass and one that would be an ornament to the finest room. Five pieces.
At $35-oo
WEILER BROS.
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS, VICTORIA, B. Q_
SHOP BY MAIL.
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION.
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?^H*?^4*J^H?VT,P,F1T,-r
Social and        *
Personal. £
Mr. George Courtney spent Tues-
|lay in Vancouver.
/estminster has returned home after
nding a few days in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. Beauchamp Pinder left during
|:he week for Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Parry of Cowichan
|ire paying a vsiit in the city.
* *   *
Mr. A. W. Harvey spent a few
|jays in Seattle during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Durand gave a small bridge
|party on Wednesday afternoon.
* *   *
Mrs. Ethelbert Scholefield has relumed from a visit to New Westminister.
* *   *
Mr. Holmes of the Bank of B. N.
■_., in this city, is spending a short
|oliday at Grand Prairie.
* *   *
i Miss Eva Holmes is the guest of
ler sister, Mrs. Marpole, in Van-
fsuver.
* *   *
I1 Dr. Todd, who has been spending a
tw months in Victoria with his
lother, Mrs. J. H. Todd, started for
le East on Tuesday morning.
* *   *
[Mrs. Rocke Robertson has returned
nm Vancouver where she accom-
Jflied her niece, Miss Lorna Eberts,
her way to Montreal.
[Mr. Leslie Foote of the Hugo Ross
fealty Company here, has gone to
garrison Hot Springs in the hopes
improving his health. He has
;':en laid up with a bad attack of
ippe.
Mr. and Mrs. Phipps ancl child of
Cobble Hill were registered at the
New England at the beginning of the
week. Mrs. Phipps left on Sunday
for England where she will stay with
relations for a year or more.
* *   *
Lieut. V. R. Brandon was a passenger by the Empress of China on
her last trip from the Orient. He
spent a few days in Victoria before
proceeding to England. Mr. Brandon
was a midshipman on H.M.S. War-
spite during her last commission at
Esquimalt, and he was later second-
lieutenant on H.M.S. Egeria three
years ago.
* *   *
Miss Tuck of "Roccahella" is the
hostess this afternoon at a "Profile"
tea. Some of the guests are Miss
Monteith, Miss Tiny Monteith, Miss
A. Angus, Miss Blackwood, Miss V.
Blackwood, Miss Phipps, Miss
Browne, Miss King, Miss Newcombe,
Miss Hanington and Miss Mason.
* *   *
The Misses Blackwood entertained
a few friends at Five Hundred last
Saturday evening. The prizes were
won by Miss King and Mr. Landry.
The other guests included the Misses
Arbuthnot, Moresby, Troupe, McDonald (Winnipeg), Clute, and the
Messrs. Kerne, Teddy and Henry
King, McCurdy, Holmes, Boyer, C.
Pitts and John Arbuckle.
* *   *
The Tuesday Skating Club was not
so well patronized this week, partly
owing to the bad weather, no doubt
Some of the few present at the rink
were Miss M. Little, Miss Nora
Coombe, Mr. Holmes, Miss Winona
Troupe, Mr. Arbuckle, Miss P. Irving, Miss 0. Irving, Mr. Barton, Mr.
McDougal, Miss V. Mason, Mr. Harvey, Miss Newcombe, Mr. Harold
Eberts, Mr. R. Monteith, Miss Blackwood, Miss Viva Blackwood, and
Miss  Wigley.
* *   *
The recent cold spell afforded a
few days excellent skating at Colwood. Some of those to take advantage of the opportunities offered last
Saturday and Sunday were Com-
manderand Mrs. Allgood, Captain
Hughes,    Captain    Learmonth,    Mrs.
Genge, Dr. and Mrs. Robertson, Mrs.
H. Pooley, Mr. J. Bridgman, the
Misses Irving, Mr. M. J. Johnson,
Miss Monteith, Mr. Gore, Mr. A. W.
Harvey, Mr. B. Prior, Miss Bulwer,
Miss Rebbeck, Miss Loenholm, the
Misses Hickey, Mr. Walace, Mr.
Troupe, Mr. T. O. McKay, Mrs. Walter Langley, Mrs. Eliot, Miss Mason,
Miss Sehl, Mr. and Mrs. Burton, Miss
Phipps, Mrs. Ambery, Miss P. Mason,
Miss Troupe, Miss Nicholles, Miss
Coombe, Mr. T. King, Miss Little,
Mr. Boyer, Mr. Jephson, Miss Griffiths, Mr. D'Arcy, Mr. McDougal,
Miss Mackay, Mr. Harvey, Mr. Harold Eberts, Miss Mabel Eberts, Mr.
Henry King, Miss Blakemore and
Miss Barbara Blakemore.
One of the prettiest weddings that
has ever been solemnized in Victoria,
took place on Wednesday afternoon
at Christ Church Cathedral between
Mr. Edward Guy Warner, eldest son
of Mr. E. H. Warner, of Quorn Hall,
Leicestershire, England, and Miss
Gladys Muriel Green, youngest
daughter of the late Rev. Y. W. Green
and Mrs. Hasell of Victoria, B.C.
The Rev. Canon Beanlands performed
the ceremony, and the service was
fully choral. The church was beautifully decorated with evergreens, and
yellow daffodils and narcissus. The
bride, who entered the church on the
arm of her step-father. Dr. Hasell,
was dressed in a very simple Empire
robe of white ivory satin, with yoke
and sleeves of rare old lace, and pearl
ornaments, and veil of tulle with coronet of orange blossoms, and she carried a magnificent bouquet of bride
roses and lillies-of-the-valley. Her
only jewelry was a diamond and ruby
ring, the gift of the groom, and a
dainty pearly necklace. The bridesmaids wcre the Misses Evelyn Tilton,
Helen Peters, Marguerite Little and
Gladys Perry. They wcre gowned in
dainty robes of fine ecru brussels net
over tulle, with Greek gold braid
trimmings on the skirts, and the
bodices were made with lace sleeves
and yokes, also bordered with gold
trimming, and rilecved with pale blue
panne girdles edged with gold. They
wore pale blue aigrettes and gold
bands  in  their  hair, and  plain  gold
bracelets, the gift of the groom, and
carried dainty bouquets of yellow
daffodils. The groom was supported
by Mr. Bromley, and the ushers were
Mr. Clifford Brown, Mr. Basil Prior,
and Dr. Dolbey. Mrs. Hasel, who
gave the bride away, wore a biscuit-
coloured robe of crepe de chine, with
hat and ostrich feather boa to match.
After the ceremony, an informal reception was held at the Driard, where
the same colour scheme was carried
out in the decorations. At one end
of the large drawing-room a beautiful
wedding bell was hlung composed of
white narcissus and maiden hair fern,
and under this was placed the cake,
which the bride cut after the usual
toasts and speeches had been made.
At half past four the bridal couple
left by the Chippewa for Seattle en
route to Portland, where the honeymoon is to be spent. The bride's going-away costume was of brown corduroy velvet with brown fur hat to
match, and lovely mink collarette and
muff. Some of thc many invited
guests were His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir,
.Mrs. R, Dunsmuir, Mrs. C. E. Pooley
and the Misses Pooley, Mr. and Mrs.
Garnet, Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mr. and
Mrs. Arundel, Mrs. Harry Pooley.
Mrs. H. Barnard, Dr. and Mrs. H.
Robertson, Mrs. O. M. Jones, Mrs.
Bodwell, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Freeman,
Col. and Mrs. Prior, Col. and Mrs.
Jones, Mrs. Stevenson, Mr. and Mrs.
F. Pemberton, Miss J. Bell, Mrs.
Shallcross, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Griffiths, Mr. and Mrs. Worsfold, Mrs.
and Miss Walker, Dr. and Miss Newcombe, Mr. C. Newcombe, Mr. W.
Newcombe, Mrs. Eliot, Mrs. Baiss,
Mrs. W. H. Langley, Mrs. Phillips,
Mrs. Geo. Gillespie, Miss Gillespie.
Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. and the Misses
Butchart, Mrs. A. T. Watt, Mr. and
Mrs. Carew Gibson, Mr. Maurice
Hills, Mr. S. Powell, Mr. and Mrs.
Croft, Miss P. Drake, Miss Mason,
Miss Coombe, Mrs. and Miss Ethel
Tilton, Miss Payne, Miss Allison
Beanlands, Canon and Mrs. Beanlands, Miss Schubert, Miss Fitzgib-
bon, Mrs. Oliver, Mr. and Mrs. C.
ll. Wilson and Mrs. Kirk.
Was Honoured.
Advices received in this city from
Oakland, California, state that at the
recent convention of the Pacific Coast
Advertising Men's Association, Mr.
Percy F. Godenrath, of Vancouver,
manager of Westward Ho!, was honoured with the position of Vice-President for British Columbia. The next
convention of thc Association will be
held in June in Portland, Ore, when
it is expected a large delegation of
British Columbia newspapermen and
advertising promoters will be on hand.
Theatrical Notes.
The New Grand programme this
week is a highly satisfactory one.
The best turn is that of Dortelly and
Tielda Rotali, whose singing and
dancing arc very effective. Kanza
and Amo are also good in their eccentric turn. Thc others arc all up io
the average and the show hs a whole
sustains the reputation of the New
Grand.
Pantages.
The boards at Pantages are held
this week by Bartholdi's troupe of
thirty-live trained cycling and acrobatic cockatoos. The entertainment
is unique and exceedingly attractive
and no one should miss it.
Grace  George.
Grace George and Reeves Smith
gave a delightful performance of Vic-
torien Sardou's "Divorcons" on
Thursday night at the Victoria
Theatre. Both were perfect and fairly divided thc honours. Such prolonged uncontrolled laughter was perhaps never been heard in thc Victoria
Theatre and that is the highest commendation of a pure comedy.
VICTORIA LAND 111 STRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICB that Harvey Waters,
of Vietoria, Tt.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, Intends to npply for a special
timber licence over Iho followine described   lunds:
oinim No. 7—Commenolng nt a post
planted south live nnd one-half miles
and cast six mlles of W. C. Nelson nnd
II. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
"ii Cheewhat Lake; thenco north SO
chains: thence west Sn chnins; thenee
smith SO ehnlns; thonce enst SO chnins
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Loented on 2litli August, IU07. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will lt be
divulged without consent.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 4, 1908,
In consequence of the American
Federation of Musicians of this city
declaring through their official paper,
the. 5th Regiment Band unfair to all
Trades and Labor Unions, I wish to
make it known through your valuable paper that the members of the
above-mentioned band and other
musicians of the city have organized
a ational Union of Musicians and
have been duly affiliated with the National Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada.
E. F. DAWSON,
Sec'y Local 66, Victoria, B.C.
The Constitutional Question.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 5th, 1908.
To the Editor of The Week.
The Constitution on its Dominion
summit at Ottawa appears to enjoy
a pure and serene atmosphere, but
on its western slope there is a good
deal of malaria. Let us get rid of
this malaria also all animus against
the Lieutenant-Governor, because malaria is unhealthy and animus is bad.
Animus is harmless without matter to
work upon, and like Delta thunder
breaks no bones.
In the year 1867 the supreme sovereign power—the Imperial Parliament—granted autonomy to Canada,
inhabited by people of British and
French descent, it thereby became
self-legislative and governing, it
nevertheless is a dependent state subject to the legislation of the Imperial
Parliament . Since 1867 the Imperial
Parliament has had only partial and
indeed a very limited control over
Canada's internal affairs. The federal
principle creates a division of the
function of government between the
Dominion and the several Provinces,
but it is a matter of purely internal
concern of which no external country or community can take any cognizance unless the Dominion Parliament has power to make such laws.
In the distribution of legislative and
consequently of executive power,
granted by the constitution all powers
not specifically ceded to the Province
remain in the Dominion Parliament
Since the King is a constituent part
of the Parliament of Canada (Section 17) his assent is therefore necessary before any Bill which has passed
through the Dominion Parliament can
become law. The Governor-General
as his representative is therefore vested with thc power to assent to bills,
or he may refuse assent or he may
reserve the Bill for the signification
of His Majesty's pleasure. (See Sections 55, 56 and 57 of the B.N.A. Act.
See also the Colonial Law Validity
Act (1865) 28 and 29 Victoria (Imperial) c. 63, sec. 42).
By the B.N.A. Act, 1867, the power
of confirming or disallowing Provincial Acts is vested in the Governor-
General acting under the advice of his
constitutional advisers. The validity
of Provincial Legislation is also within the jurisdiction of our Provincial
and Dominion Courts, with appeal to
the Lords of the Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council.
Prior to the year 1878 Colonial Governors were generally given royal instructions in the form following:—
Extract   from  the  Despatch  of  the
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
Dated Downing Street, 8th May,
1869, and No. 85.
1 have the honour to acknowledge
the receipt of your despatch No. 23,
of thc nth March, asking for instructions as to thc course which you
should pursue with regard to any Act
of the Provincial Legislatures which
might relate to any of thc classes of
subjects mentioned in the 7th paragraph of the royal instructions, or
which might, in your opinion, be un
constitutional, or in excess of the
power of the local body.
The prohibitions in the 7th paragraph of the royal instructions, with
one qualification, rest on the ground
of imperial policy, and therefore the
Governor-General of the Dominion IS
NOT AT LIBERTY, EVEN ON
THE ADVICE OF HIS MINISTERS, to sanction or assent to any
provincial law in violation of ihem.
He would, indeed, BE BOUND TO
INSTRUCT the Lieutenant-Governor
of the Province not to give such assent.
The qualification to which I have
above referred is this, that while the
Governor-General is not at liberty to
sanction the passing of a law making
any donation or gratuity to himself,
it would be for his ministers to consider whether they should advise him
to consent to a donation by the Province to the Lieutenant-Governor, and
he would be at liberty to follow that
advice with regard to the second
point. If the Governor-General were
advised by his ministry to disallow
any provincial Act as illegal or unconstitutional, it would, in general, be
his duty to follow that advice, whether
or not he concurred in that opinion.
If he were advised by his ministry
to sanction any Act which appeared to
him illegal, it would be his duty to
withhold his sanction, and refer the
question to the Secretary of State
for instructions.
The same course might be taken if
the Act recommended for his sanction
by his ministers appeared gravely unconstitutional; but it is impossible to
relieve the Governor-General from the
duty of judging, with respect to each
particular case, whether the objection
to an Act, not of doubtful legality, is
sufficiently grave as under all circumstances to warrant a refusal to act
at once on the advice tendered to him.
Copy of the 7th Section of the Royal
Instructions Referred To.
VII. And for the execution of so
much of the powers vested in you
by virtue of "The British North America Act, 1867," name to Bills passed
by the Houses of Parliament, or that
you withhold our assent therefrom, or
that you reserve such Bills for the
signification of Our pleasure thereon,
it is Our will and pleasure that when
any Bill is presented to you for Our
assent, of either of the classes hereinafter specified, you shall (unless you
think proper to withhold Our assent
from the same) reserve the same for
the signification of Our pleasure thereon; subject, nevertheless, to your discretion, in case you should be of
opinion that an URGENT NECES
SITY EXISTS, REQUIRING THAT
SUCH BILL BE BROUGHT INTO
IMMEDIATE OPERATION, in
which case you are authorized to assent to such Bill in Our name, transmitting to us by the earliest opportunity the Bill so assented, with your
reasons for assenting thereto, that is
to say:—
1. Any Bill for the divorce of persons joined together in Holy Matrimony.
2. Any Bill whereby any grant of
land or money, or other donation or
gratuity, may be made to yourself.
3 .Any Bill whereby any paper or
other currency may be made a legal
tender, except the coin of the realm,
or other gold or silver coin.
4. Any Bill imposing differential
duties.
5. Any Bill, the provision of which
shall appear inconsistent with obligations imposed upon Us by treaty.
6. Any Bill interfering with the discipline or control of Our forces in
Our said Dominion.
7. Any Bill of an extraordinary nature and importance, whereby Our
prerogative, or the rights and property of Our subjects not residing in
Our said Dominion, or the Trade and
Shipping of the United Kingdom and
its dependencies may be prejudiced.
8. Any Bill containing provisions to
which Our assent has been refused,
or which has been disallowed by Us.
In 1878 thc Royal instructions were
amended particularly omitting Section
7, as to the reservation of certain
Bills, and at and since the appointment of the Martinis of Lome, 1 believe   it   to  be   the   fact  that   Royal
instructions have not been given to
the Governor General, carrying out
the suggestion of the Honourable Edward Blake, Minister of Justice, that
consistent with the spirit of the constitution of Canada legislation should
be completed on the advice and responsibility of Her Majesty's Privy
Council for Canada, subject to the
reserve power over Bills for the signification of the Queen's pleasure.
(Section 56). This Imperial power
of disallowing Dominion statutes is
not limited to Imperial interests but
also to subjects not within the legislative competency of the Dominion
Parliament.
It would appear that in so far as
other communities in the Empire are
concerned Canadians form one political entity for which the Governor-
General alone can speak for these
matters affecting external states or
communities which take place within
Canadian jurisdiction, and that the
Imperial Government is responsible
for any action which affects an external community.
Since the Federal Union, in matters
affecting the Empire, the Secretary
of State for the Colonies communicates and looks to the Governor-General as the representative of the King.
The external affairs of the Dominion
or the Provinces (if any) are the external affairs of the Imperial Government.
The Order in Council dated the
29th November, 1862, (already published by you) states that the same
principles and reasons that apply to
the Dominion Government and Parliament apply mutatis mutandis, to
the Provincial Governments and Legislatures apparently with the exception that when a Lieutenant-Governor
refuses or declines to act on the advice of his provincial ministers that
he should assent to a Bill passed
with the advice and consent of the
Legislative Assembly, he cannot reserve the Bill for the assent of the
Governor-General on the advice of
his ministers without instructions, except in a case of "extreme necessity,"
and that can seldom if ever arise.
That the Lieutenant-Governor only
reserves a Bill as a Federal Officer
and is alone responsible to the Dominion Government. It also appears
from the report of the Minister of
Justice approved by His Excellency
the Governor-General in Council on
the 29th of February, 1876, that the
Earl of Carnarvon, the Secretary of
State for the Colonies, acting on the
advice of the Imperial Law Officers
instructed His Excellency the Governor-General that whether a Provincial Act should be allowed was a
matter in which His Excellency
should act on his own individual discretion, and in which he could not
be guided by the advice of his responsible ministers. The noble Earl
was also of the opinion, that the Canadian Constitution did not contemplate any interference with legislation intra vires the Provincial Legislature. A previous Order in Council
had been approved on the 9th of
June, 1868, dealing with the powers
of disallowance of the Imperial Government with respect to Colonial Acts,
and it was stated that the same power
of disallowance had been conferred
by the B.N.A. Act on the Federal
Government and that in considering
whether a Provincial Act should be
disallowed or sanctioned the Federal
Government must also consider
whether a Provincial Act should be
disallowed, or sanctioned the Federal
Government must also consider
whether it affected the interests of
the whole Dominion or not, also
whether it be unconstitutional, whether ultra vires, and in cases of concurrent jurisdiction whether it clashes
with the legislation of the general
Parliament. Section 95, dealing with
immigration into the Province provides that Provincial Legislation shall
have effect as long as it is not repugnant to any Dominion Act. This
section is cited in the preamble to
the current Bowser Bill. A further
question at issue in 1875-1S76 between
thc noble Earl and thc Governor-
General in Council was whether the
power of disallowance of Dominion
Statutes was by Section 56 vested in
thc  Queen or the Queen  in  Council.
"Have you ever seen niggers in a cake-walk?"
asked a Victoria lady the other day of a man who
had just returned from New York. "No!" wag
his reply, "though I have seen niggers in
abundance."  She is still looking for the joke.
It as the great Tallyrand who wrote, "I find nonsense singularly
refreshing!" It is, but so is Lemp's Beer—often more refreshing
than nonsense, because it is the right kind of Beer. People who
have tried Lemp's Beer for themselves know how good it is—a
food and a tonic. Once you test for yourself you need no further
urging to insist upon Lemp's at your Club, Hotel, Bar or Cafe,
or for use in your own household. If your dealer does not handle
Lemp's Beer, 'phone
PITHER  &   LEISER
Sole Distributors for B. C.
By Section 90 this provision was extended and applied to the Legislature
of the several Provinces by the substitution of the Lieutenant Governor
for the Governor-General and the
Governor-General for the Queen.
The position taken by the Minister of Justice was that the power,
—the disallowance of Provincial Acts
—and the signification of pleasure on
Bills reserved, must be accomplished
by Order in Council and that a Governor who thinks it necessary that a
Provincial Act should be disallowed
must find ministers who will take thc
responsibility of advising its disallowance whilst ministers who think
it necessary that a Provincial Act
should be disallowed must resign unless they can secure the assent of the
Governor to its disallowance. Ministers being in every case responsible
to Parliament for the course taken.
The noble Earl suggested that a rigid
rule of action should not be established.
The rule proposed by the noble
Earl was that, "the Governor-General
after having had recourse to the advice of his ministers whom the Parliament holds answerable for advising
him as to all public Acts, (though not
in all cases for the Acts themselves)
may properly be required to give his
own individual decision as to allowance or disallowance."
The Hon. Edward Blake submitted
that the plan proposed by thc noble
Eari was not in accordance with the
constitution: that His Excellency's
Ministers were responsible not merely for the advice given, but also for
the action taken, that the Canadian
Parliament has the right to call them
to account not merely for what is
proposed, but for what is done is
practically their doing. The importance to the people of the advice given
by the Ministers is in precise proportion to its effectiveness.
The Minister of Justice, however,
agreed with the view of the noble
Earl, "that if it be the right and duty
of the Governor to act in any case
contrary to the advice of his Ministers they cannot be held responsible
for the action, and should not feel
themselves justified, on account of it,
in retiring from administration of
public affairs. But these are the results that render it difficult to come
to the conclusion that any such right
or duty can properly devolve upon
the Governors; because they show
that his action would be an exercise
of power for which the free people
over which he rules could find no
man whom they could call to account."
The noble Earl also assumed that
although the Dominion Parliament
could not hold the Ministers responsible for the Governor-General's acting contrary to their advice, the Parliament could demand to know the
advice they gave.
It is submitted, that it follows,
from what has already been stated
that  the   Lieutenant-Governor in  re
serving his assent to a Bill, contrary
to the advice given by his Provincial
Ministers and without instructions, is
answerable only to the Federal authorities and the Provincial Government
are not responsible for his action.
Since His Honor the Lieutenant-
Governor could only act as a Federal
Officer in reserving his assent to the
Bowser Bill it seems to follow that
his Honour's conduct is not a subject of inquiry by the local Legislature.
The only constitutional advice the
Premier could give was for His
Honour to assent to the Bill.
It is suggested that without instructions His Honour cannot reserve
his assent, but the Order in Council
nevertheless provides for a case of
"extreme necessity." Here "exception probat regulam."
Did the "extreme necessity" arise
for His Honour to reserve his assent
to the Bowser Bill? The circumstances are so well known that it is
unnecessary for me to repeat them.
My reply is this, so far I have not
heard that the Federal authorities
have claimed that His Honour acted
unconstitutionally or violated any constitutional practice.
I now ask a question. What does
the case of "extreme necessity" mean?
Should a Lieutenant-Governor assent
to a Bill containing provisions which
had at least four times hitherto been
disallowed by the Governor-General
in Council?   I think not.
S. PERRY MILLS.
Victoria, B.C., Feb. 3rd, 1908.
Bonspiel.
Nelson has held its usual annual
bonspiel, in which the disposition of
no less than eight cups was determined. Of the eight, Greenwood won
three, Rossland two, Nelson two, and
Cranbrook one. The bonspiel was a
success in every way, Nelson fully
maintaining its splendid reputation for
hospitality. The spell of frost which
just reached the Coast made itself evident in Nelson, when during the last
day of the bonspiel the thermometer
registered six above zero.
"Shakmut," a powerful story of Sitka
in the times of the Russian occupancy,
by Captain Clive Phillips-Wolley, has
been purchased by the publishers of
"Westward   Ho!"   and   the   opening
chapters appear in the  February issue.   It will run as a serial and will
doubtless prove a notable addition to
the literary contents of the magazine.
In the department, "Builders of the
West," W. A.  Harken has a capital)
pen picture of A.  C. Flumerfelt.    A
bright    two-colour    cover-design,   a'
superb  frontispiece,  ancl  a  score  aij
clever articles and departments  makel
the mid-winter number an absorbing ]
one for the magazine reader.   Besides,
"Westward Ho!" has the unique distinction of being the only independent
standard monthly published in Canada
that sells at the popular price of 10
cents. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
MISS
CHERIDAH
SIMPSON
A«
The Famous Prima Donna in Klein &   Cook's "Red Feather, at the Victoria
Theatre, February 12.
X ilusic and      $
I   The Drama. I
Victoria Theatre, February 12—"Red
Feather."
"Red  Feather"   is   the   title  of  an
opera that is at once unique and original.   Its story is told with sympathy
simplicity and ultra modernity.    The
oeople and incidents that move in the
Kaleidoscopic  circle  of  the   author's
romance are all pleasing.   The melodious colony of the opera moves most
-of the time under the high lights of
bhromatic scenes and costumes.   The
compound is tinctured subtly with the
jilchemy of music conceived in moods
both joyous and plaintive.   There are
periodical  moments   of   humour,   of
Irollery, of epigram, and of amusing
ideas  following  each  other  in  rapid
succession, that appeal to man's every
(faculty.    A really excellent cast and
ensemble   has   been   assembled   by
|Manager Joseph  M.  Gaites  for  the
presentation   of   Messrs.   De   Koven,
Clein & Cook's splendid comic opera,
J'Red Feather," which is headed   this
peason by Miss Cheridah Simpson, the
eminent prima donna soprano, and includes Lyman Wheeler, William   H.
IConley, Richard Karl, Gus Vaughan,
iFrank  Smith,   Sarah   Edwards,  Julia
■Curtis, and Prof. De Witt Coolman,
■leader of Red Feather's own orchestra.
The New Grand.
Next week's bill is promised to in-
I elude no less  than four  big feature
I acts, and the show should be one of
lthe best of the season.   Crimmins and
iGore, Dan and Rosa, will be seen in
la comedy sketch entitled "What are
■the wild waves saying?" hich has been
la  success  in  every  country  on  the
|globe; the four Brown Bros, and Doc
Cealey have a musical act that is certain to be a winner.   The brothers are
experts on almost every instrument,
Irom  the  xylophone  to   the   golden
fhimes, and Kealey, who makes up as
black-face minstrel, is declared to
lie one of the best burnt-cork artists
In the circuit.    Rose and  Severance
liave a most laughable sketch, entitled
(The Automobile Disaster."   De Witt
(<>un aud Lister will present a jug-
liing act that is said to be clever and
liovel in the extreme; Fred Primrose
Is billed as "That Minstrel Comedi-
kn"; Thos. J. Price will sing the illustrated   song,  "To-night,   Sweetheart,
To-night," and new moving pictures
and a new overture by the orchestra
will fill out the programme.
Good News.
In a letter to a relative, Montague
Davys states that he has about closed
a deal by which he and his associates
will secure control of the Silver King
mine at Nelson, and of the Hall Mines
smelter. It is understood that Mr.
Davys has a lease of both, and that
he has raised sufficient capital to assure thorough development of the
mine. Everyone who knows him will
rejoice if this turns out to be a fact.
No mining man deserves better of the
Kootenay; he is the pluckiest and
most persistent man who ever tackled
a mining proposition.'
A Commercial Club.
Among the smaller towns of the
Kootenay which have recently come
to the front, Nakusp is one of the
most conspicuous. Thre years ago
there were probably not more than
fifty or sixty inhabitants of the beautiful little town on Uper Arrow
Lake. Now, thanks to a genuine
boom in fruit lands, the population is
in the neighbourhood of three hundred, and it has just been decided to
establish a Commercial Club on lines
resembling the boards of trade of the
larger cities. This is a progressive
move, and one which, if judicially developed, will be effective in making
known the attractions and possibilities of Nakusp to the district for fruit
growing and gardening.
Between Kamloops and Revelstoke
there is a healthy rivalry, which will
do neither any harm. On Wednesday
last the general meeting of the British Columbia Exchange was held at
Revelstoke; it was largely atended,
and the interests, especially of thc
fruit-growing industry, were advanced. Some time in the future
Kamloops will entertain the Provincial Convention of the Conservative
Association. The last meeting was
held in Vancouver, when upwards of
four hundred delegates attended.
Kamloops and Revelstoke fought hard
for the honour of the next convention,
and as Kamloops won it would be
well to look a head a little and make
sure that there will be suitable accommodation for three or four hundred delegates. Tf the hotel accommodation of Kamloops is equal to
this, there must have been recent additions of which The Week is not advised; but no doubt those who are
responsible for the invitation will see
to it that suitable provision is made.
WEEK 10TH FEBRUARY
The New Grand
SULLIVAN A COIUIBIMK,    Proprietor*.
Manogtmont of ROBT. JAMIESON.
DAN ROSA
CRIMMINS AND GORE
Comedy Sketch
"What Are the Wild Waves
Saying?"
FOUR BROWN BROTHERS
and
DOC. KEALEY
High Class Comedy Musical Act.
ROSE AND SEVERANCE
Comedy Sketch
"The Automobile Disaster"
DE WITTE YOUNG AND
SISTER
"The College Boy Juggler"
FRED. PRIMROSE
That Minstrel Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Tonight Sweetheart, Tonight"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
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Evenings, Balcony  lOe
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1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.C.
E. A. MaoMiUan.
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TIMBER
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BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
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The days are getting Cold
iTHE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable. *
VISIT IT.
648 Yatei 8t, Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nmairao Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household eoal in tha marke  ar
current rates.   Anthracite coal Ar sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminst-r Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
rt 1 fcriVl S   ,„d Tnlde Mark,
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Vour Baggage Check* at thc
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No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
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VICTORIA, B. C.
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for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
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M.  J.  HENRY
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—small cash payment—one of the
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with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
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basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
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steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. VV.
Adelphi Block   -
DEAN
VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 8, 1908,
Sporting
Comment.
The committee that was appointed
by the Vancouver Island Football Association to select a team to play
against the Mainland, will journey to
Ladysmith to-day, where they will
witness the first test match, between
two teams that have been selected by
this committee. This is a very important engagement, as from this
match the committee will make a
comparison of the different players,
with a view of selecting the eleven
best to run up against the Mainland.
So far, the committee has shown
great judgment in selecting the team,
and with the complete selection we
have but one objection to make. It
might have been an oversight, but an
injustice has been done to a player
who should have the opportunity of
trying for his place. In selecting the
teams, the vote for right half of the
"A" team resulted in a tie between
Dufty and Shanks, and on another
vote being taken, Dufty was selected.
With this we have no objection, but
when the first vote resulted in a tie,
the player who did not get the place
on the "A" team should have been put
on the "B" team. On a tie vote being registered, it is very evident that
there is a difference of opinion regarding their respective ability, and if
Shanks had been placed at right half
on the "B" team the committeemen
would be able to make a closer comparison of the two players. As we
have already said, it might have been
an oversight, and as there is another
match to be played before the final
selection is made ti is quite possible
that another line-up may be tried.
From the twenty-three players whose
names were mentioned, it is safe to
say that a team can be selected that
will uphold the honour of Vancouver
Island with credit not only to the association which they represent, but to
themselves individually.
The Esquimalt United and the
Ladysmith teams proved themselves
the winners in their matches on Saturday last, the former defeating the
Y. M. C. A. at Oak Bay, and the latter downing the Bays at Ladysmith.
The former game was very interesting and was anybody's right up to
the call of time, the final score being
2—0. In the latter game the Bays
were lucky in getting off with such a
small score, considering the team
they took up. Once more the local
athletes have had to suffer owing to
the bosses of several of the players
not being supporters of football. It
is very regrettable that Victoria teams
on their away games have invariably
to travel with a weakened team, lt is
this that keeps Victoria in the rut, and
unless the business men of the city
allow their employees a little latitude,
Victoria will never occupy the position in sports that she should do. To
have good athletic teams representing
a city is a first-class advertisement,
but as yet Victoria business men do
not realize the fact. It is hoped that
the business men of thc city who havc
men in their employ who take part in
any athletic games in which the honour of Victoria is concerned will
stretch a point and allow them to accompany the team.
The last senior rugby match of the
season will be played at Oak Bay this
afternoon, when the Nanaimo Hornets line up against the locals. On
the last occasion, when these teams
met, the locals proved the strongest,
and it is expected that they will repeat the performance to-day.
From a Victoria standpoint, the result of the lacrosse meeting at Vancouver can hardly be said to bc satisfactory. It was expected that the
representatives of the clubs on the
Mainland would see the wisdom of
taking Victoria back into thc fold, but
it was not to be. New Westminster,
with their usual show of generosity,
have decided to challenge for the Minto cup, and were adverse to placing
two teams in thc field. This on the
part of thc Royal City team, is a very
poor policy, as time will certainly
show. The result of the meeting is
that Victoria will for another season
at least havc to put up with interme
diate lacrosse. After being turned
down in this manner by the New
Westminster delegates, it is up to the
Victoria players to assert themselves
and demand that the Royal City team
hand the Kilmarnock Cup back to the
directors, for as a professional team
they have no right in retaining it. It
was acknowledged at the meeting that
the players who took part in the
games against the Tecumsehs of Toronto are professionals, by the fact
that an application will be made to
the C A. A. U. for the reinstatement
of these players. But at present the
players who won this cup are professionals, and as a team they have no
right to retain the cup, and it is for
the locals to take the first steps towards having it returned to the directors. The result of the meeting is
rather a disappointment, as we are
confident that a senior team could be
chosen from players at present in this
city who would compare favourably
with the best on the Mainland. Despite this, however, we wish the Victoria club every success, and The
Week will always be ready to assist
the club in any manner which lies in
its power.
It is very seldom that I have to find
fault with the athletic clubs of Vancouver, but in this instance I have to
agree with "Tattler" in the Vancouver
News-Advertiser, when he says that
the Island football taems are paving
the way for the introduction of
straight professionalism, by the importation of players from the Mainland on the promise, of good situations. I cannot, however, agree with
him when he says the principle of the
Island teams is to "get the championship of British Columbia; get it honestly if you can, but get it." This is
not correct, but regarding his former
statement he is just about right. It
is a well-known fact that several of
the Island teams have ex-Mainlanders
on their line-up, some of whom have
also made trips to the Mainland since
taking up their residence on the Island, to assist their old team mates to
win. I admit that the Island association allows amateurs and professionals to play together, but in passing that resolution I hardly think the
representatives of the various clubs
were doing so with the intention of
allowing any such practices as these.
It is well known that it was exactly
by the same tactics that lacrosse and
baseball were put to the bad in this
city, and I would be extremely sorry
to see association football go the same
way after the hold the game has taken on the public. Already there are
rumblings of discontent. As yet they
are slight, but they enlarge as they go
along, and unless the executive checks
the bud at the start they will have a
serious proposition to face later.
There arc players sufficient and to
spare on Vancouver Island from
which could be selected teams to beat
thc Mainlanders without having to go
to the trouble to have them take up
their residence on the Island with offers of inducements. If you cannot
win without importing players, it will
be far better to lose, as thc time will
undoubtedly conic when the Island
will be able to produce a team of
home brews that will take the mea
sure of anything that can be got together on the Mainland, and in addition to this the supporters of the Island teams would be better pleased
to see a team of home brews representing a club even if they were defeated. I hope that something will
be done to put a stop to this practice
before it assumes such proportions
that it will be hard to overthrow.
UMPIRE.
De Wolf Hopper
On Monday night De Wolf Hopper
gave one of the best performances in
his career at the Victoria theatre. A
packed house was kept in roars of
laughter by "Happyland." After the
evergreen star the centre of interest
was petite, dainty, bewitching Marguerite Clark. She recalled the Edna
Wallace Hopper of fifteen years ago.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Cemmencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing ICO
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. 0. Noake, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commeneement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Grand Fancy Dress Ball
in aid of St. Joseph's Hospital, will be held in
THE EMPRESS HOTEL
ON TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18TH, AT 8.30
Tickets are now on sale :it M. W. Waitt & Co.'s, the J. M.
Whitney Co.'s, C. E. Rcdfern's, Challoner & Mitchell's, The
Victoria Book & Stationery Co.'s, T. N. Hibben & Co.'s, Fletcher
Bros., and Mrs. Aaronson's, Government Street.
While fancy dress or poudre will be en regie, neither is compulsory.
TICKETS $3.00 EACH
Royal Ladies flade "Cheeses"
Many Years Ago.
Merely curtseys, called "Cheeses" from the appearance of the
wide skirt when surtseying. These, however, are the appetizing,
20th Century kind, people eat with appreciation.
Genuine Imported Swiss Cheese, per lb 50c
Roquefort, per lb 65c
Gorgonzola, per lb 65c
Edam Cheese, each  $1.00
Camembert, per glass jar  15c and 50c
De Brie Cereme 50c
Sap Sago (herb cheese), each 15c
Neuf Chatel, each ioc
German Breakfast, two for  15c
Canadian Cream Cheese  ioc
Brick Cream, per lb 30c
Maclaren's Imperial 20c, 35c and 65c
Grated Parmesan, per bottle  25c and 50c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
O000©000000000<>0-000000<><^
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only place
where you oan
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te  season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
6<XXXX>0<><>000000<XX>000<>000<XKXKXKX>0000<>000000000<>0000
■
■ram
B'wiM
*' _,___¥      MoRsI
■lr'i-*_<".-.w.l™_______
ll______________________l<-^Pfs
■Ml
toll *?■'"'"•%v;*1B_-
■
WJM 1
.';»    ■*«.i«(.f/j™
J                            | j
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
Your Coal Bills
What will they amount to
this winter? Whether you
burn hard or soft coal a great
percentage of the
AVAILABLE
HEATING
POWER IS GAS
Soft coal is fully one-half
gas. Why not dispense with
coal and wood? Use a Gas
Heater and save money, time
and trouble. Let us show
you some Gas Radiators—the
best heaters known.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

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