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Week Mar 26, 1910

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Let us show you the new
Pocket Edition
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TERRY CASH CHEMIST   5
^ S.U. coiner Fort and Douglas 2
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The ^tfeek
» British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
KQ «'6 S 6 A B 8 0 511R K * 15 M *"*VYg0
jj   HALL & WALKER   j
Agents 3
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY 2
COMPANY'S  COAL 3
1232 Government St. Telephone 83   *_
OBOOBBOOOPO<_.)l^B1)Bgng|
Vol. VII.    No. 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 36, 1910
One Dollar Per Annum
JUDGE LAMPMAN'S COMMISSION
The determination of the Government
to investigate the charges which have been
freely bandied about the streets of Victoria,
during the past few weeks, in connection
with the administration of the Police Commissioners, will be generally applauded.
There has been no charge against the Commissioners themselves, but it is alleged that
blackmail is levied on the  professional
amblers, and on the keepers of disorderly
houses, and in thc interests of justice and
decency the parties who levy this blackmail ought to be exposed, and those who
enefit by it, directly, or indirectly, must
hare the odium of being associated with
nauseous and illegal proceeding.     The
tatements made in the last issue of The
iVeek have arrested widespread attention,
nd have made it impossible for the Government to allow the matter to rest longer.
Since publishing those statements, further
Information has come to hand, especially
|n connection with the administration of
ffairs in the "restricted district."    This
formation is in the possession of the
police Commissioners and can be made
vailable as evidence before the Connnis-
[ion.   It is to  the  effect  that  sums  of
.oney, ranging  from  $250   to  $500   a
onth per house are being paid by the
nants of certain houses under the guise
ff rent.   As such a figure would purchase
e property outright, even at the most
ated prices every year, it is obvious
■iat the term "rent" is a mis-nomer.  The
formation received by The Week is to
be effect that the bulk of this money is
jimply hush-money, and its disposition ap-
ears to be known to a sufficient number
if persons to ensure the facts being disposed before the Commission.   One thing
certain, that the appointment of Judge
ampman and his counsel, Mr. Harold B.
Itobertson, will afford the keenest satisfac-
ion to every section of the community,
jxcept  the  wrong-doers.   As   it  is  the
vowed intention of the Attorney-General
get to the bottom of the matter, it is
|egrettable that the legal formalities ne-
ssitated limiting the investigation, in the
rst instance, to the administration of the
resent Commissioners, but The Week is
formed that this does not preclude an
tension of the powers of the Commission,
the Commissioner himself should find
necessary to make such an application.
INFLUENCE OF HALLEY'S COMET
It was a liberal education to be pre-
ent at the meeting of the City Council
In Monday  last.    Evidently the public
■nought so, for several hundred persons
Ittended, and perhaps rather indiscreetly,
Ittemptcd to infuse a little ginger into the
[roccedings, only, however, to be prompt-
sat on by the Mayor.    The Week has
aought that the present Council was a
light improvement on its predecessors, but
fter Monday night it is difficult to cherish
lie illusion.    The talk was superficial;
Irejudice was obvious, ancl obstinacy was
1 predominant feature.   Take the case of
Jrs. King!   Here was a woman, who had
pen censured in the strongest terms by
Judge  of   the   Supreme   Court,   and
those conduct had been so detestable that
le  Judge  expressed  surprise   that  the
Diincil should have allowed her to remain
the position of matron at the Isolation
lospital.    Further, the Medical  Officer
j Health had, some months ago, preferred
I serious charge against her, whicli has
en sustained in the Courts, and had de
manded that she be dismissed. Even if
this were not enough, it is a matter of
common knowledge, that, although a City
employee, she had done her best to persuade tlie mother of the child which died
at the Isolation Hospital, to sue for damages. Yet in face of these facts, the Council decided to retain her, and, what is
still more amazing, in a full meeting there
were only two votes in favour of her dismissal. Such a decision is simply staggering. The Week has nothing against
Mrs. King, except what has been proved
in open Court, and what is known to the
general public; and on these proved facts,
it is absolutely impossible to justify her
employment by the City. In view of the
decision of the Council it would be interesting to know upon what grounds it
would consent to the dismissal of any
one of its employees. Its action in connection with the Smith's Hill Reservoir
is hardly more intelligible. Not that The
Week believes that an investigation by
Royal Commission is the best course to
adopt, but the decision to burke'investigation altogether, is, in face of the known
facts, quite beyond the comprehension of
ordinary mortals. The most amazing
statement made at the meeting was that
which fell from the lips of Aid. Banner-
man, to the effect that no one thought .Mr."
Adams was to blame. Readers of The
Week are aware that, however negligent
the foreman and the workmen may have
been, Mr. Adams is chiefly to blame for
the whole fiasco, in consequence of his
having furnished, a defective specification.
AVhen Aid. Bannerman has mastered this
fact, he will be more competent to discuss
the situation. Whilst opposed to a Royal
Commission, The Week hoped that for
once the Council would act consistently
with its previous vote on the subject, and
resolve to hold an independent investigation; now that it has so conspicuously
failed to appreciate the necessities of the
case nothing remains but for the ratepayers to apply for a Royal Commission,
which will, of course, be granted.
CIVIC REFORM
Mayor Morley thinks that the present,
system has broken down and he is plunging wildly for some nostrum which he
would fain substitute. The Week has already pointed out that it is not the system, but its "head," which is a failure.
It has also pointed out, and has emphasized the fact, that most of the evils complained of result from divided authority,
and interference on the part of the Mayor
and Aldermen. In support of this it cites
the statement of Mr. Topp; it would also
refer to what has already appeared in the
pages of The Week that Mr. Bryson, during the first few weeks of his engagement, made a similar complaint and
threatened to resign. On Tuesday of this
week he actually did resign, as a protest
against the impertinent interference of
the Mayor, but by special request, did not
insist on the resignation. Then we havc
the well-known fact that the acting City
Engineer and the Chairman of the Streets
Committee united in demanding the dismissal of Supt. Warwick, but that they
were over-ruled by the Council. During
the present week the Mayor had the
effrontery to blame Mr. Bryson for not
exercising authority, and assured him that
he had absolute control in his department.
Yet, whenever Mr. Bryson attempts to
exercise an authority which clashes with
the pet notions of the aldermen, his instructions are disregarded. A correspondent of a local paper has very properly
called attention to the fact that the Smith's
Hill fiasco would not have occurred if the
Water Commissioner had discharged the
functions which properly pertain to his
office. A Water Commissioner should be
the controlling head of all affairs in his
department, and cannot slough his responsibility by engaging a consulting engineer.
It was, at least, incumbent on him, especially as that engineer was an absentee,
to see that the work was carried out in a
proper manner; that no inferior cement
was used, and that the workmen did not
have to labour under conditions which rendered efficiency almost impossible. Once
again, it is clear that there was no "head."
It is not the system but the administration
which stands discredited, and as the head
of the administration either does not know,
or will not admit, the fact, there is no
help for it unless the ratepayers themselves make a move. Their first move is
to seek a Royal Commission, when its findings are available it should be possible to
get rid for ever of the estimable, but,
muddle-headed gentlemen, whose incompetency has brought the City into such
disrepute.
CIVIC FINANCES
In spite of reiterated statements to the
contrary, and a very ingenious attempt on
the part of the local daily press to keep
up its courage by whistling, it is an undoubted fact that the City finances are
in a bad way.   The two out-standing features are that there is a deficit of $100,000,
as a legacy from last year's Council to be
provided for; and that the rate of taxation, 26 mills, is almost the highest in
the Dominion, and that it is next to impossible to increase it.    With respect to
the deficit, nothing need be said at present, because it will have to be met, and
everything necessary to be said can well
afford to wait until the investigation is
concluded.    But there is another matter
which should not be delayed a moment. It
is one which The Week has referred to
several times, without producing any tangible result.   If anyone interested in the
subject of taxation will take the trouble
to consult the assessment roll, he will make
some very remarkable discoveries.     For
instance, he will find that a property which
recently changed hands for a sum approximating $300,000 is, and for a long time
has been, assessed at a little over $30,000.
He will find that three city lots which
were  recently sold for $15,000  are assessed at $3,000.    He will find that a
well-known    property    on    Government
Street, for which in the month of February last the sum of $125,000 was offered
and refused, is assessed at a little over
$30,000.    He will   find  lots  for  which
$80,000 was refused assessed at $26,500.
If he will check up the assessments of
most of the business property, he will find
that the basis averages considerably less
than   one-fourth  of  the  present  market
price, or of the figure at which any holder
would sell.   On the other hand, if he will
study the assessments of the residential
sections, he will find that they vary from
one-half to  three-fourths of the market
value.   Now, Victoria is a city of homes,
and while business men are welcome, most
people will agree that it, is far more important to attract a large number of residents, and thereby add to the permanent
population, than to secure an increase in
the already excessive number of stores. In
any event, the assessment roll shows tliat,
whilst the business firm is encouraged by
a low assessment, the home-seeker is discouraged by a high one. What is wanted
is, not only a very general increase in tlie
assessments of inside property, but an
equalization of assessment. There are
anomalies of the most startling character,
and The Week is speaking by the book
when it declares, that if inside property
were assessed in anything like the same
ratio as residential property, and if very
glaring inequalities were remedied, the
rate of taxation could easily be lowered to
20 mills, the same as in Vancouver. This
must not be construed as an attack upon
Mr. Northcott; it is, however, an attack
upon the system', which proceeds from the
basis of old valuations, rather than present day values. In any event the City
has outgrown the capacity of the Assessor's
office. While everyone has the utmost confidence in Mr. Northcott's administration,
it is certain that an independent assessment by outsiders, subject to revision and
appeal would once for all solve the problem, and place the assessment roll on a
sound basis.
COLONIAL REPRESENTATION
The Colonist does not favour the idea
of Colonial representation in the House of
Lords. Just what this statement means
is not very obvious, because Canada, for
instance, already has two brilliant representatives in Lord Strathcona and Lord
Mount Stephen. Presumably, however, it
had reference to representation by election. This is a little premature, but the
Colonist will no doubt progress at a sufficient rate to be able to "line up" with the
opinions of the age, when the day of
Colonial representation arrives. It must
not be forgotten that the scheme of Mr.
Chamberlain included an Imperial Council, to which the Colonial conventions already held approximated. It is a far call
from Imperial Councils to Colonial Representation in the Upper House. However
the present crisis may bring about a modification in the constitution of the Lords, it
is not likely to register any marked progress in that direction. The difficulties
in the way as suggested by the Colonist,
do not seem to apply. If nothing were
necessary but to find "men of wealth,
leisure, talent and aptitude," they could
be found in all the colonies; and if to
these, enthusiasm for the Imperial idea and
the willingness to make sacrifices for the
defence of the Empire were added, Canada alone, would have to be excluded.
But something more is needed, and that
something is the working out of the central idea of Imperial Federation. Canada
is far more concerned about the possibility
of losing a few dollars through the United
States' Tariff, than about cementing union
with the Mother Country, if the cement
is to cost anything. And this attitude is
not because she lacks men of wealth, but
because she has not yet grasped the fundamental principles of Imperial Federation.
THE WEEK APOLOGISES
In last issue reference was made to the
filthy condition of Trounce Avenue.
Whilst the complaint was fully justified, it
should have been so worded as to place
the blame on the right shoulders. Its condition will be sufficiently explained when
The Week points out that the poor, unfortunate sweeper receives the munificent
sum of $6 per month to keep it clean from
Broad to Government Street. This sum
is contributed by property owners whose
frontage is valued as high as $3,000 a foot. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH  26, 1910
The Week is the Best Advertising Medium in
British Columbia, Exchanges with Every Paper in
the Province, and with a good many in the
Dominion.   The Week circulates to Paid
Subscribers in the following places:
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
ESQUIMALT
ALDERMERE
ARMSTRONG
ALBERNI
ASHCROFT
ARROWHEAD
BEAVER POINT
SALT SPRING ISLAND
BEATON
BANFF, Alta.
CAMP McKINNEY
CRANBROOK
COWICHAN STATION
COWICHAN  LAKE
CAMBORNE
CHEMAINUS
CROFTON
PETERBOROUGH, Ont.
MONTREAL, Que.
CARIBOO, B.C.
CLAYOQUOT, B.C.
SECHART, B.C.
WINNIPEG, Man.
CARSON, B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
COLQUITZ, B.C.
CHILLIWACK, B.C.
OTTAWA, ONT.
ISO-MILE HOUSE, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
METCHOSIN, B.C.
TULAMUN CITY, B.C.
MILNES  LANDING
MILNES* LAND'G, B.C.
HOSMER, B.C.
PRESTON, Ont.
TOD INLET, B.C.
WILMER, B.C.
SASKATOON, Sask.
PORT SIMPSON, B.C.
COUTLEE, B.C.
FOUR-MILE HOUSE,
V.I., B.C.
KERRISDALE, B.C.
GLACIER, B.C.
LOWER NICOLA, B.C.
BRANDON, Man.
DAWSON, Y.T.
MT. SICKER, B.C.
REGINA, Sask.
HAMILTON, Ont.
COMAPLIX
CALGARY, Alta.
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
ENDERBY
EHOLT
GRANITE CREEK
GRAND FORKS
GOLDEN
GREENWOOD
GANGES HARBOUR
Salt Spring Island
GALIANO ISLAND
HEDLEY
HAGANS
HAZELTON
KELOWNA
KEATINGS
KEREMEOS
COWICHAN BAY, B.C.
EDMONTON, Alta.
QUESNEL FORKS, B.C.
FIFE, B.C.
EHOLT, B.C.
HALCYON, B.C.
BULLION, B.C.
COMOX, B.C.
AGASSIZ, B.C.
PRINCE ALBERT, Sask.
ATLIN, B.C.
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
ISLANDS, B.C.
QUATSINO, B.C.
ROCK CREEK, B.C.
GATEWAY, B.C.
PENDER ISLAND, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
NAHUM, B.C.
NORTHPORT ,B.C.
GABRIOLA  ISL., B.C.
TULFORD   HARBOUR,
B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
CORFIELD, B.C.
FRENCH CREEK, B.C.
SLOCAN JCT., B.C.
COBBLE HILL, B.C.
KISPIOX VALLEY, B.C.
FERGUSON, B.C.
CRESTON, B.C.
PEACHLAND, B.C.
HALIFAX, N.S.
BELLA COOLA, B.C.
TORONTO, Ont.
KAMLOOPS
KITSALAS
KASLO
LORNE CREEK
MIDWAY
MAYNE ISLAND
MARYSVILLE
MOYIE
NICOLA
NICOLA LAKE
NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO
NELSON
NEW DENVER
NORTH SAANICH
ARLINGTON P.O.
NEW ALBERNI
NEW WESTMINSTER
PENTICTON
LADYSMITH, B.C.
DELTA, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
NANTON, Alta.
BEAUMONT, B.C.
SOOKE, B.C.
MISSION CITY, B.C.
KITLUMGAR, B.C.
OKANAGAN, B.C.
STETTLER, Alta.
EPWORTH, B.C.
SODA CREEK, B.C.
KENORA, Ont.
MITLAKATLA, B.C.
HARRISON HOT
SPRINGS, B.C.
HORNBY ISLAND, B.C.
LYTTON, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
CLINTON, B.C.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE,
B.C.
PARRY SOUND, Ont.
ST. JOHN'S, P.Q.
ALMONTE, Ont.
WESTHOLME, B.C.
EBURNE, B.C.
GOLDSTREAM, B.C.
SARDIS, B.C.
SANDON, B.C.
MINSKUISH, B.C.
FOREMAN, Alta.
GABRIOLA ISL., B.C.
WHITEMORSE, Y.T.
MONTE CREEK, B.C.
PHOENIX
PRINCEON
PORT ESSINGTON
PRINCE RUPERT
PARKSVILLE
ROCK CREEK
REVELSTOKE
ROSSLAND
SLUGGETT
SLOCAN CITY
SIDNEY
STEWART CITY
TURGOOSE
TRAIL
VERNON
WARDNER
YMIR
PIER ISLAND, B.C.
WHITEWATER, B.C.
WILLIAM HEAD, B.C.
SOMENOS, B.C.
MOUNT TOLMIE, B.C.
COBOURG SIDING, B.C
NORTHSIDNEY, B.C.
FIELD, B.C.
PINE ISLAND, B.C.
SILVERTON, B.C.
SEATTLE, Wash.
STRAITS SETTLEM'TS
BALLARD, Wash.
CHICAKO, ILL.
PORTLAND, Ore.
LODI, Cal.
GRANGEVILLE, Idaho.
TACOMA, Wash.
SPOKANE, Wash.
SANTA CRUZ, Cal.
DULUTH, Minn.
SAN ANGEL, Mex.
STEPHEN, Minn.
NEW YORK, N.Y.
CHICAPOO FALLS,
LONDON, Eng.
BIRMINGHAM, Eng.
BROXBURNE,
Herts., Eng.
BRIDGEWORTH,
Salop, Eng.
CAMBRIDGE, Eng.
GLASTONBURY, Eng.
j    At The Street   J
I Corner s
*~«4*fW*»'^/*£
p By THB LO
By THB LOUNQER
About a dozen yards from the Government Street end of Belleville
Street, and situated so as to touch the
sidewalk on the top of the grass slope
leading down to the harbour, is a
small water tap. It is placed there
to facilitate the proper watering of
the said grass slope, so that the first
appearance of the City Beautiful may
strike all new-comers favourably.
But it is indeed a pity that this tap
was not placed about three inches
lower down the bank; it would have
been as efficacious there, and would
not have proved the public menace
which it now undoubtedly is. I happened to be on the Embankment last
Sunday when the boat came in. One
man, evidently a stranger to the city,
(he had probably been accustomed to
places where the most important thoroughfares are properly lighted)
caught his foot in the tap, and
plunged headlong down the bank.
Fortunately, he managed to recover
himself about half way down, otherwise he would certainly have met a
watery reception,   if   not   a watery
grave. Immediately afterwards, two
ladies caught their feet in just the
same way, and had it not been for
the ready assistance of passers-by,
they would likewise have shared the
same fate.
This is on a par with a case that 1
mentioned last week. It is the lack
of lighting which is at the root of all
the evil, though I admit that I cannot see why it should not have occurred to the intelligent person responsible for the exact location of
the water-tap referred to, that he
was having it placed in a somewhat
menacing position. So long as it remains as it does, and so long as the
lighting is so atrocious, I recommend
that when the hour of twilight arrives, a man and boat be stationed
exactly below this tap, and that incandescent life-buoys be placed in
convenient positions. It would be a
terrible thing if a new arrival were
to be drowned within two minutes of
landing; it would seem such an inhospitable welcome, to say nothing
of all the wealth, which he, or she,
might have for spending purposes,
and which would be lost to the city
for ever, bar the little bit which
might accrue to the undertakers.
*     *     *
I have heard a rumour on the
street corner, and I trust that it is
only a rumour, that there is a movement on foot to abolish all boxes in
public restaurants.   I can hardly be
lieve that such a step is practicable,
but if it is, and if such a step be
taken I feel sure that a veritable howl of
indignation, and justifiable indignation, will be raised. If parties are allowed the privilege of a private dining-
room at an hotel, surely they should
be allowed the semi-privacy of a box
in a public room. Many people cannot afford to dine in what are known
as first-class houses, but at the same
time find the company gathered at
the various public tables in cheaper
establishments decidedly uncongenial.
Why should they be debarred from
making use of the boxes, which do
provide a certain amount of seclusion? Of course, the answer will be
that the movement is on foot because women are taken in there for
meals. Well, why shouldn't they be?
Aren't women supposed to eat? Must
every woman have her meals either
in her own house, in that of a friend
or at a public table? Must all women have the means necessary to dine
at expensive places, where there can
be no prejudice against the surrounding society. Why may not 'Arry
take his 'Arriet to a two-bit joint,
there to sit and dine in the semi-
seclusion which a box confers? Why?
Just because this Puritanical spirt of
ultra-religion, which may be more
concisely called hypocrisy, is so rampant at the present time, that it is
ready to see fault in every institution
which might possibly be the means
Good Skates     Good Instructors     Good Music     Good Time
SKATING
Morning    10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to  4.30
Evening    7-45 to 10.00
LADIES   FREE  AT  ALL  SESSIONS
Assembly Rink
Fort St.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock  in  British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash  discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
o4S_achine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street
Office Supplies
What can be more enjoyable than a glass
of sparkling Burgundy or genuine imported,
high grade, Claret? If you want the best
ask for SCHMIDT'S.
RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street 'British Columbia Agents
Some Suggestions From
ROSS' DELICATESSEN
Roast Veal, per lb 50c
Roast Pork, per lb 50c
Jellied Tongue, per lb 50c
Jellied Veal, per lb 35c
Head Cheese, per lb   15c
Pork and Beans, per tin  15c
Macaroni Cheese, tin   15c
Pressed Brisket Beef, per lb 30c
Potato Salad, per lb aoc
Veal and Ham Pies, 2 for  25c
Pork Pies, 2 for    25c
Steak Pies, each  ioc
Pork Sausage, per lb aoc
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 5a and 1590 1317 Government Street
of concealing some vice. Because
those people who are conscious most
of sin within are anxious to make
their light shine more brightly before their fellowmen. Because sincerity is rapidly going out of the
world, and a spirit of postured pandering to the feelings of one party
or another is just as quickly coming
in.   Ugh!
* *     *
Petty, finicking legislation of the
kind referred to is just the very thing
to drive the man who would otherwise
be a decent, and perhaps God-fearing
citizen into excesses, which he would
not otherwise have contemplated. Maj
is a contrary beast. Even St. Paul
realised that, as those of my readers
who know the epistles will allow. Tell
him not to do a thing which he had
not thought of doing, and he will immediately want to do it, and will in all
probablity carry out his purpose, and
the last state of that man is worse
than the first.
* *     *
Is Sunday, as at present observed
in Canada, what it was meant to be?
A day of rest? A day on which, after
those religious observances which are
open to all, innocent recreation may
be indulged in? It may be at present, to a certain extent, but I canl
see the day coming when we shall ]
have to revert to Fox's Book of Martyrs and the other books which madel
the first day in the week a moral |
and mental torture for all young people, and for most of their elders.]
Even now Sunday in Victoria takes!
the place of "Black Monday" for thel
average bachelor, who has not thel
means to play golf, and on days when]
the weather prevents him from walk-1
ing, boating or other less expensive!
amusements. Church, restaurant, bed-j
room, the Free Library (where it isl
almost impossible to get a seat), con-l
stitute his various rendezvous. There!
are clubs, but we can't all afford them.l
Heaven help Canada if the present!
Pharisees go much further in theirl
legislative Christianity, because asl
sure as little green apples were cre-[
ated to grow on apple trees, there willj
be such a national revulsion that the1
days of Charles II will be swallowed
up in the shades of obscurity in com-|
parison with it.
*     *     *
What curious freaks one does meetl
when   one   goes   out  without   one'$
(Continued on Page 8) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH a6, 1910
Colonel Peters was a visitor to
Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Miss McNeil is making a short stay
in Vancouver visiting friends.
* *   *
Mr. C. H. Dickie, from Duncans, is
in town for a few days, and while
here is registered at the Empress.
* *     *
Rev. T. E. Heneage was one of
last week's visitors to Vancouver.
* *     *
The Victoria Nurses' Club will hold
a dance in the A.O.U.W. Hall on
April 6th.
* *     *
Mr. H. H. Malcolm from Nanaimo
spent a few days of the week in
Victoria.
* *     *
Mr. Robin Dunsmuir left town last
Friday for an extended trip to Peru.
* *     *
Mr. W. Moresby is paying a business visit to Toronto.
* *   *
Mr. W. E. Norris, from Vancouver,
spent a couple of days in Victoria on
business.
On March 17th, St. Patrick's Day,
Mrs. R. S. Day, Rockland Avenue,
was hostess of a very jolly tea and
"miscellaneous shower," given in
honour of Miss Ethel Brown, whose
marriage is to take place shortly.
The house was very prettily decorated with flowers and spring greenery. Miss Brown looked very charming in a handsome green cloth gown,
was the recipient of a great many
very pretty and useful presents. The
numerous gifts were put into a large
iron caldron, suspended from a tripod,
made out of oak branches; this was
placed in the centre of the room and
the guests formed a circle round it,
and each in turn presented Miss
Brown with a gift. Some of those
present were: Miss Foster, Misses
Pitts, Miss Eberts, Miss Mason, Miss
Monteith, Mis N. Newcombe, Miss B.
Monteith, Miss Rome, Miss Nevada
Raymur, Miss G. Bridgman, Miss
Heyland, Miss Hannington, Miss B.
Gaudin, Miss Savage, Miss Harvey,
Miss Marie Cross, Mrs. Alexis Martin, Miss A. King, Miss Hilda Page,
Miss Dupont, Miss Phipps, Miss
Helmcken, Miss D. McTavish, Mrs.
Dupont, Mrs. Shalcross, Mrs. Jacobs,
May Robson, at the Victoria Theatre, Friday, April 4th
liss   Mara,   Miss   Fitzgibbon,   Miss
kittle and Miss Perry.
* *   *
Mrs. and Miss Whipse, from Port-
ind, Ore., are guests in the city for
few days.
* *   *
Mrs. Cleland and Mrs. T. Reid left
|ist Friday via the Northern Pacific
ta a trip to Castle Rock, Wash.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Wilson have re-
irned from a visit to Seattle.
* *   *
Captain Gillen of Work Point bar-
cks, has returned, to Victoria after
ending a holiday of some months in
East.
Mr. William Taynton of this city
is enjoying a brief holiday in Vancouver.
* *   *
Miss Mason and Miss Doris Mason
are spending the Easter holidays with
their aunt at Quamichan Lake.
* *   *
The engagement has been announced recently of Dr. Darrell Hannng-
ton, formerly of this city, but now of
Wilmer, B.C., to Miss Janet Riddock,
of Glasgow, Scotland. Dr. Hannington is the second son of Dr. and Mrs.
Ernest Hannington of this city, and
his many friends here will be very
interested to hear of his engagement.
NEW BAGS
For Easter
Of course every lady must
have a new Satchel to match
or harmonize properly with her
new Easter Suit. We have just
received a remarkably smart
consignment of the most
charming and exclusive ideas
exploited in almost every conceivable leather.
Prices $3.00 to $25.00
Your inspection cordially invited. Remember we are always
glad to have you call and look
around even if you do not desire to purchase.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Fuel  for Public Buildings
Whole or separate sealed tenders will
be received by the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works up to and Including Monday, the 28th day of March, 1910, for
supplying and delivering best lump and
washed nut coal required at the Provincial Government Buildings at Victoria, Vancouver and New Westminster,
B.C., as enumerated hereunder, during
the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1911,
to be delivered in such quantities and
at such times as may be directed during the period above stated.
The approximate annual consumption
of coal at each of the buildings named
is as follows:—
Best lump coal in sacks—
Parliament Buildings. Victoria. .230 tons
Government House, Victoria... .110   "
Court House, Victoria  60   "
Jail, Victoria 100   "
Court House, Vancouver  88   "
Normal School, Vancouver  50   "
Court House, New Westminster. 70   "
Provincial Hospital for Insane,
New Westminster  60   "
Jail, New Westminster  40   "
Washed nut coal in bulk—
Provincial Hospital for Insane,
New Westminster  1200   "
The above-mentioned quantities are
not guaranteed; the quantity actually re*
quired may be under or above the figures
sttitfid
Tenders to be based on ton of 2,240 lbs,
Each delivery must be accompanied
by an official weigh-master's certlflcate,
where such official exists.
Whole tenders shall be accompanied
by a cheque in the sum of $300, and
separate tenders by a cheque in the sum
of $100 on a chartered bank of Canada,
made payable to the Hon. the Minister
of Public Works, which will be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter into the contract when called
upon to do so.
The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned upon the execution of
the contract.
The Department is not bound to ac*
cept the lowest or any tender.
Tenders must be signed by the actual
signature of the tenderers.
Forms of tender can be furnished on
application to the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver; Government Agent;
New Westminster,  or the undersigned.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 15th March, 1910.
mchl9
Mr. C. D. Gibbons from Cowichan
is n town for a few days.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hilton of this
city  have  left  on an  extended  visit
to England.
+   *   *
Mrs. Theodore Monk, Beacon Hill,
was hostess last Tuesday evening of
a very enjoyable card party.
* *   *
Mrs. Pearse leaves town shortly
for a visit to the Continent. She will
be accompanied by Miss Burns,
grand-daughter of Senator Macdonald.
(Continued on Page 8)
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and  Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete  change of programme  on Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance:  2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30, p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
fldmission - Ten Cents
riflJEJTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;  Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of March 28
Hunt's
Musical Comedy
Company
In the screamingly funny
Musical Comedy
THE DEVIL
UP TO
DATE
Ten large musical numbers;
20 people, including the famous
Queen City Quartette; 12 pretty
girls.
Matinee daily; two performances nightly.
Prices—15c, 25c; boxes, 50c.
THE
New Grand
Week of March 28
MR. AND MRS. JAMES
McCANN
And Their Company in
"Uncle Charles of Charleston"
"Vaudeville's  Artistic  Feature"
GUISE
In a Delightful Vocal Creation.
"Cleverest Yet"
FRANK WHITMAN
"The Dancing Violinist"
FOX and WARD
The Thorough Exponents of
Minstrelsy
THOS J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA i
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ?6, 1910
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208   Government St.,   Victoria, B.C,
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
John Houston
REMINISCENCES
By William Blakemore
• Among the many obituaries of John
Houston, which have appeared during
,'the past few weeks, I think the most
interesting and accurate is from the
pen of Col. Lowery, which was print-
jed as an editorial in the "Greenwood
'Ledge." It betrays insight and sympathy, as well as a nice perception
of some of the outstanding characteristics of a remarkable man. The tribute is printed elsewhere in the current issue.
i I first met John Houston when I
went to live in Nelson, in the fall of
1902. He was then editing "The
Tribune"; was member for Nelson in
the Provincial Legislature, and had
just been turned down by Lt.-Gov.
Joly. I think that this was the turning point in his career. There are
some who hold the view that the
peculiar streak in his nature would
always have prevented him from attaining success; but at this time he
had reached a position of influence,
such as few men in the Kootenay, or
^ven in the Province, enjoyed. If he
'had attained the summit of his ambition in the administration of a department, he would undoubtedly have
left his mark on the legislation of the
Province. I do not regard the fear
that he would have kicked over the
traces and have been an impossible
colleague, well-founded, because he
worked for years with a band of his
faithful colleagues in Nelson without
once assuming that dictatorial attitude which was natural to him when
opposed. Be that as it may, there is
no doubt that the action of the Lt-
Governor was a grievous disappointment to Mr. Houston. It aroused
all the vindictiveness of his nature,
and from that time to the day of his
death he never recovered his poise.
My associations with him were always of the pleasantest character,
and his dealings with me, fair and
even generous to the extreme. He it
was who led me into the field of
journalism, in which I have dabbled
ever since, content to acknowledge
him as my master. It occurred in this
wise. He had to attend the session
of the Provincial Legislature in 1904,
and wanted someone to run "The
Tribune" during his absence. Doubting whether I would undertake it, he
sent a friend to find out. When I
promptly accepted the offer he expressed himself as qui ,e content to go
to Victoria. I regardt 1 the offer as a
compliment, becr.ase I knew how
much he loved his paper, and how
anxious he was that during his absence, it should not in any way misrepresent him. Looking back on that
time, I think, that if I erred at all, it
was in the direction of out-Heroding
Herod. At any rate, Mr. Houston
was so well satisfied that on his return he refused to take hold of the
paper; and his generosity was shown
by the fact that he insisted on my
taking the whole of his salary as manager and editor, although it was considerably more than we had agreed
upon.
At this time he had just been elected mayor of Nelson, for the third or
fourth time, I forget which, and as
he was receiving a salary, and as the
construction of the new waterworks,
claimed most of his time, I continued
to run "The Tribune."
In this connection I want to do
justice to one of the most striking
features of Mr. Houston's character.
His excessive care in money matters.
I have in my possession now the account books of "The Tribune," carefully   kept   in   his   own  handwriting.
They are neat and accurate, and always balanced. I regard it as wonderful that a man of such a Bohemian
disposition and of such a volatile
temperament, should have been able
to keep accounts at all, still less to
keep them with a degree of accuracy
which few newspaper men in the Province could emulate. Although he
was practically "the whole show," he
never trespassed upon the authority
of the directors and shareholders of
"The Tribune Publishing Co., Ltd."
He held his statutory meetings, kept
the minutes and carried out the resolutions which were passed.
I can testify to many acts of charity on the part of Mr. Houston. No
one will ever know how many old acquaintances came to that Tribune office, and came away with an additional
dollar in their pocket. They were invariably received in a brusque manner,
and not infrequently with an oath;
but they understood John Houston,
and before one could turn round, they
would be sitting at the table recalling
some reminiscence of pioneer days;
then Mr. Houston would invent some
excuse to send me away, in order
that he might have an opportunity of
exercising a little surreptitious charity. In this respect, his actions were
governed' by the utmost delicacy and
considerateness.
The year 1905 was a bad one for
John Houston. The paper barely paid
its way in consequence of the competition of "The Daily News"; in fact,
but for the personality of Mr. Houston and the loyalty of his friends, it
would have been a heavy loser. Then
he became terribly bothered about
civic affairs; the waterworks project
was railroaded through, and he set his
heart upon making it a success; but
after he had done his best he had to
face a heavy law-suit with the West
Kootenay Power & Light Co. I think
his disappointment in connection with
this project, and the fact that he was
unable to get once more into the political rut, added to the growing
stringency of his finances, finally
caused him to break down. At any
rate he shook the dust of Nelson from
off his feet and started on that aimless wandering through the Western
States, which finished up at Goldfield,
Nevada, where he arrived penniless
and worn out.
The indomitable spirit of the man
was well illustrated in his experience
here. I know that his main purpose
in heading for Goldfield was to seek
out John McKane, who had become
a multi-millionaire, no doubt fully expecting that he had not forgotten old
times, and would recall how, when
he contested Kootenay, Mr. Houston
had been his most stalwart supporter
and had left no stone unturned to
ensure his success. But the veteran
journalist was doomed to disappointment. John McKane found that it
was not convenient to "stake" his
old friend, who was driven once more
to the compositor's stand, and for
more than a year set type at a daily
wage.
Tiring of Nevada, and seeing no
prospect of bettering his position, Mr.
Houston landed once more in Victoria; put in an appearance at the
Legislative Assembly, although he
took practically no part in the work
of the session, and before its close,
drifted south, and for a few months
was lost sight of. Then in the Spring
of 1907 to everyone's surprise he
turned up in Victoria again and announced his intention of starting a
paper in Prince Rupert. He admitted
to the writer that hc had no money,
but that a friend was going to lend
him $500 and that the American Type
Founder's Co. would furnish him with
a printing plant "on time." A few
weeks later he struck off his first
impression of the "Prince Rupert Empire."
His doings in the "last West" city
are a matter of common knowledge;
how when he was refused a site
for a printing office, he staked a mineral claim, held it down for two years
and allowed many settlers to camp
alongside of him without charge. How
hc advocated temperance, public utilities, and fought the liquor men and
the grafters; how, tiring of his new
stamping ground, and realizing that
with the sale of the townsite lots hc
would have to abandon his claim, he
sold out for about $10,000; how, after
paying all his liabilities he had $7,000
left, and resolved to seek an entirely
new country, he headed for Mexico.
This was the time when some people
said that British Columbia had seen
the last of John Houston, while those
who knew him were certain that his
absence would be brief. The latter
were correct. Three months satisfied
his "wanderlust" and he returned to
Victoria a wiser and sadder, and needless to say a poorer man. For his
trip had cost him $4,000.
I asked him what on earth had put
it in his head to go to Mexico; and
he frankly replied that he was seeking
a new sensation, and that he thought
hc had exhausted thc possibilities of
Canada. I asked him why he came
back, and he said, because it was no
country for a white man, and anyhow, he was too old to learn a new
language, and if he did learn one, it
wouldn't be to enable him to talk to a
benighted greaser.
Then it was that he conceived thc
idea of going to Fort George. I
furnished him with a lot of information about the country and all the
available blue prints, showing what
land had been taken up, and what was
still available. He said that he intended to speculate with what little money
he had left, and he thought that in a
few years he would make a fortune,
and after many experiences, vowed
that he knew how to keep it.
A few months later, returning from
the Yellow Head Pass along the
Fraser, I met Mr. Houston for the
last time at Fort George. We spent
a very pleasant day together, and
with old-time courtesy he insisted on
entertaining me at the Hudson's Bay
House. I had the pleasure of helping him to build his shack and to set
up his printing plant, and at his request wrote the first article for the
"Fort George Tribune." This was
early in November last. Mr. Houston was anything but well, and was
clearly living on his nerves. He looked haggard and white. I strongly
urged him to come down to Victoria
for the winter, but he wouldn't listen
to it. He spent three months in a
single boarded shack, full of chinks
and cracks, with no heater except a
small drum and I much fear without
many other comforts, which could
alone have rendered life endurable in
the depth of winter. To the last he
preserved his indomitable spirit, and
fine courage. His paper speaks for
itself and has not published a line
which the writer or his many friends
need regret. In three short months
he secured for Fort George what he
had previously secured for Prince Rupert, better postal facilities. He continued to fight the drink traffic, and
had mapped out an extensive programme progressive in character.
Then the secret malady, which for a
long time had been sapping his
strength, overcame him, and he started towards civilization and succour
too late.
It is safe to say that today the man
who was most reviled of anyone in the
annals of British Columbia has not an
enemy. If it were not irreverent, I
would say that in the truest sense, his
foes have become his foot-stool.
There could have been no more fitting climax to his stormy career than
that accorded by the citizens of Nelson. While his work had benefited
many parts of the Province, it was
the capital of the Kootenay, which
he had laid under the deepest obligation, and which had been the scene of
his most spectacular triumphs. When
he left Nelson, his vagaries had alienated many of his old-time supporters,
but they all came back, and brought
with them to the side of his grave,
not a few who had always been found
in the ranks opposing him. Nelson
honoured itself in honouring the memory of John Houston, and showed
a fine, but just, discrimination between the gold and the dross. There
was a time when the dross of his
faults obscured the brightness of his
better self; but that time has passed,
and thc Province is able to discern
that John Houston was a true man
with a big heart and a big brain.
There are many incidents in his
career of  which  I  could speak,  but
there are three which I select to close
this very inadequate tribute, and yet
I think that they serve to throw an
important light on some matters, in
which my readers will be deeply interested.
One day, as I sat in "The Tribune"
office, an old grey-whiskered gentleman walked in, and asked for Mr.
Houston. I told him that he was in
Victoria, attending to his Parliamentary business. He expressed regret,
and said that he had come all the
way from St. Paul to see his old
friend. We chatted for a long time,
and he told me that he had not seen
Mr. Houston for forty years, but that
they had been boys together. He
said that Mr. Houston's father was a
farmer, none too well off, a devout
Presbyterian and a strict disciplinarian, who reared his children on oatmeal porridge and the fear of the
Lord. His view was that John ran
away from home, because he found
Presbyterianism too constipating, but
he declared that he could not be an
irreligious man at the bottom. He
gave me a very interesting piece of
information, which was subsequently
confirmed by Mr. Houston himself,
that the latter was descended from
French parentage, his grcat-great-
grand-father having been a Huguenot,
who took refuge in Scotland and married a Scottish woman. This, no
doubt, accounts for the streak of excitability, at times verging on insanity, which characterized Mr. Houston.
When I have seen him on the political platform, literally foaming and
raging, I have more than once been
reminded of Communist leaders,
whom I saw on the barricades in
Paris in 1871. At other times he conjured up suggestions of the incarnate
spirit  if  the  Carmagnole.
The next incident is one which has
never been in print, and which I
should have hesitated to publish, during Mr. Houston's lifetime, but in
justice to his memory, I think that it
should be published now. When he
left Nelson he had a rough time, and
after spending some weeks in San
Francisco, started for Goldfield but
lacked sufficient funds to reach his
destination. Forty miles from the
goal he had to dismount and to take
to the "ties." He said that it was a
hot summer day; he had not a cent
in his pocket, nor a crumb to eat.
After walking twenty miles he felt
"dead beat," and sat down by the
side of the track to rest. Whilst
fumbling in his pockets he felt a
piece of paper which had previously:
escaped his attention, turiosity led
him to pull it out; it was dirty, creased and crumpled, but on opening it
he was thunder-struck to find that it
was a marked cheque for $5,000,
which had been handed him by a
well-known firm of contractors in
Nelson, as a guarantee of their ability to fulfil a contract with the city.
It had been placed in his custody as
Mayor, and after he left, had been
searched for in every nook and cranny of the City Hall and the Law
Courts, No one knew where it was
but John Houston; and no one knew
where he was. Needless to say, the
contractors, the bank and the civic
authorities were all a little nervous.
Telling me the story, Mr. Houston
said: "The minute I saw what it was
I made up my mind that there was
only one thing to do; I was hungry and
pretty well done up. If I ever reached
Goldfield with that cheque, there
was no knowing what I might do; so I
tore it up into a thousand fragments
and tossed it away; and that, was the
last of Tierney & MacBeth's marked
cheque." I doubt if any incident in
Mr. Houston's life is at once more
creditable or more humiliating or if
many of his detractors would have
been capable of the sacrifice.
The one event in Mr. Houston's1
life of the greatest interest to the
public, is that concerning which the
whole truth has never been made
known, but with respect to which I
have had the privilege of hearing both
sides; and in justice to two men of
far more than ordinary note, I am
going to tell it. I refer to the action
of Lt.-Govcrnor Joly in refusing to accept the nomination of Mr. Houston
for a port-folio. With the constitutional and legal aspects of the ques
tion I have nothing to do. The governor may, or may not have been
wrong, but it is a fact that Premier
McBride proffered Mr. Houston's
name in perfect good faith, and that
Sir Henri, entirely on his own volition, declined to accept it. He did
so in the kindest manner, and endorsed the suggestion of the Premier
that the difficulty in the way of acceptance could easily be removed by
Mr. Houston himself, and intimated
that if the name were re-submitted at
a later date, the way having been
cleared, he would not have to renew
his objections. In the most delicate
manner possible the Premier conveyed
this to Mr. Houston, and urged him
to accept the situation and to wait till
the end of the session, promising that
if he did so, the nomination would be
renewed. Mr. Houston not only refused to act on the Premier's advice,
but declined to believe that his rejection was at the hands of the Lt.-
Governor.
Then ensued that regrettable period
of hostility to the Government, which
no friendly offices were adequate to
quell.    I venture to think that I got
as near solving the problem as was
possible, when at the commencement
of the session of 1906, I induced the
Premier   to    consent    to    meet Mr.[
Houston  at my rooms  to talk overl
the situation with a view to re-estab-|
lish  peace.    I  arranged for this interview with Mr. Houston's consent,
and it was fixed for a time to suit
his convenience, but at the last moment  his  pride gained  the  mastery,
and he refused to keep the. appointment.    Thereafter, reconciliation was
impossible, and nothing that I could
do  or  say  weakened   his  conviction!
that he  had been  sacrificed, not by.
thc Lt.-Governor, but by the Govern-I
ment.    Personally, I can testify thai
the  Premier  has  always  entertainerf
the kindliest   feelings    towards   Mrl
Houston and that he left no stoni
unturned to terminate a condition 0
affairs which occasioned him genuim
sorrow.
I would not attempt an analysil
of Mr. Houston's character, it was toq
complex; but I can speak with conl
fidence of his high ideals, indomitf
able courage, generosity, industry,
hatred of hypocrisy, clearness o|
vision, intellectual capacity and
skill in the use of the English lan|
guage, such as is possessed by fev
journalists whom I have ever metl
and which in a man of his lack ol
education proves him to have beeJ
endowed with some of the earl
marks of genius, I had intended tq
illustrate this by some extracts fron
his editorials, and will do so in
subsequent issue, having already writl
ten at a greater length than I in|
tended.
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Beard, ol
Victoria, gentleman, intends to applf
for permission to purchase the follow
ing described lands:—Commencing at
post planted at north-east corner ol
Lot 248; thence north 30 chains; thencf
east 50 chains; thence south 30 chainsl
thence west 50 chains to place of coml
mencement, and containing 150 acre!]
more or less,
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ROBERT BEARD,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agen^
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Arrow Park School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribe!
"Tender for School Building, ArroT
Park,' will be received by the HonouJ
able the Minister Qf Public Works ul
to and Including the 31st day of MarcH
1910, for the erection and completion cL
of a large one-room frame school-builcl
ing in the Ymir Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, art
forms of tender may be seen on an!
after the 7th day of March, 1910,
the offlce of the Government Agent
Nelson; the offlce of the Governmerl
Agent at Revelstoke; the offlce of thf
Secretary of the School Board, J. li
Pennock, Arrow Park, and at the D|
partment of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompania
by an accepted bank cheque or oertli
cate of deposit on a chartered bank 1
Canada, made payable to the Honourab
the Minister of Public Works, for ■
sum equivalent to ten per cent, of tl
amount of the tender, which shall 1
forfeited if the party tendering declil
to enter into contract when called upl
to do so, or if, he fail to complete tl
work contracted for. The cheques j
certificates of depostt of unsuccessfl
tenderers will be returned to them upl
the execution of the contract. r
Tenders will not be considered unle*
made out on the forms supplied, sign
with the actual signature of the ta
derer, and enclosed in the envelori
furnished. L
The lowest or any tender not necj
sarily accepted.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engind
Department Public Works, 1
mch 5      Victoria, B.C., March 2nd, 19| THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
Will Have Two Millions
Dominion Stock & Bond Corporation to Increase Capital
Plan Ten-Story Office Building for Vancouver
No review of the progress made in
Vancouver and the Province generally
during 1909, would be complete without reference to the growth of the
Dominion Stock & Bond Corporation,
Limited.   This institution has eclipsed,
the records  of many older financial
concerns, and its recently published)
statement of profits constitute a re-i
markable record  of  progress  during
the last few months.   And now comes
the news that the scope of its activities is to be greatly widened, and
the capitalization increased to $2,000,-j
000,   among   the   contemplated   pro-!
jects of the Directors being the erection   of   a    magnificent    ten-storey
building of brick and stone, which
will form a valuable addition to Vancouver's rapidly growing number of
fine office buildings. i
Needless to say that from the very
beginning the history of the Dominion
Stock & Bond Corporation has been
one of remarkable success. It has
succeeded in gaining a record second
to none in the Province for thoroughness of business methods and fairness
of dealing. A keen desire to be foremost in the financial world has ledj
basement will be from 1,500 to 2,000
safe-deposit vaults of various sizes.
Every effort will be made to make
this building the finest ever built in
Vancouver, and the best that modern
architecture, engineering and construction can produce. It will be
heated by steam, and there will be
hot and cold water, electricity, gas,
compressed air, telephone, signal and
fire alarm systems, A large modern
building of this type commands publicity for itself and all its tenants,
and offices will be in continuous
demand. Negotiations are now in
progress to secure a valuable site in
the heart of Vancouver. The building will cost somewhere in the neighbourhood of $600,000.
It is not the intention of the Directors to let the increase in the
capitalization, together with the new
activities and developments retard its
present activities. Sales of real estate are being pushed through as
rapidly as possible, and the demand
for property in Vancouver and North
Vancouver ensures a busy summer.
The banking department will be
opened in a few weeks' time.
.*•» ■-
the Hon. Price Ellison, Chief Commissioner of Lands for British Columbia, and President of the Imperial
Fire Underwriters' Corporation, Ltd.
The Directors include such prominent men as J. Arbuthnot, President
of the South 1Vellington Coal Company, Ltd., and the Pacific Coast
Coal & Coke Co., Ltd; M. Carlin, President of the Canadian Northern Coal
Co., Ltd., Saanich Lumber Co., Ltd.,
and Barclay Sound Cedar Co., Ltd.,
Vice-President of the Bank of Vancouver; J. A. Harvey, K.C, Barrister-
at-law, Director of the Bank of Vancouver; and Arthur E. Hepburn,
A.I.M.E., C.I.M.E., R.S.A., Consulting Mining Engineer. Mr. George H.
Salmon will continue to occupy his
present position as Managing Director.
The certified statement of the auditors for the three months ending January 31st, 1910, shows undivided profits of over thirty per cent. (30%) for
the quarter on its present capitalization, which augurs extremely well for
shareholders, and indicates that before long blocks of stock will be
guarded as zealously as those of the
older Trust Companies and long established banks.
Only 16,000 shares of $100 each are
offered for subscription. A great
number of applications have already
been received, and more are coming
daily. All shares are being sold at
par, and the full amount received
paid into the treasury, less expenses
for the sale of stock.
Dominion Stock & Bond Building
Ito the connection which the Corpor-
[ation now enjoys, and its position in
(the forefront of the commercial life
lof Vancouver. And this is all the
Imore praiseworthy because thc
■growth of the business has invari-
lably been characterized by perman-
|ence and stability.
Originally  established  to  buy and
|scll  real  estate,  to  invest  funds  for
clients, and handle bonds and debentures,  it is  now  proposed  to  widen
lhe field of the Corporation's activities   in   thc   nature  of   a   Loan   and
pavings business,  administer  estates,
Invest  funds   for   clients,   and   other
fluties of a fiduciary nature.   The head
pffice is in Vancouver, and a branch
conducted  at   Nanaimo,   where  a
nost satisfactory connection has been
forked up.   The intention is to open
Ither branches in different towns and
pties throughout the Province as op-
ortunity offers.
J Plans are now being prepared by
■homas Hooper, Architect, for a ten-
lorey building of brick and stone, to
pnsist of 310 offices and 12 stores of
Ifferent  sizes.   In   the  ground-floor
Shareholders will participate in thc
present earnings, which shows the
wisdom of buying stock in an established and growing business, instead
of in a new enterprise where success
is problematical, profits uncertain, and
too long period of delay incidental to
building up a business inevitable.
The location of thc present offices
of the Dominion Stock & Bond Corporation is a fine one, being on thc
ground floor of the Winch Building,
on Hastings Street, next to the new
Post Oflice.
As an institution is only the lengthened shadow of a man, the success
of any financial organization depends
almost wholly on the character and
ability of the men at the head of
affairs. The Dominion Stock & Bond
Corporation is particularly fortunate
in having on its Board of Directors
men of the greatest prominence in
thc Province—men who have proved
successful in all their undertakings
and earned a reputation for enterprise, initiative, shrewdness, and integrity.
The President of the Corporation is
Death of Houston
When John Houston died in Quesnel the other day the West lost one
of its most fearless, industrious and
picturesque journalists. Since the
days of '71 in Virginia City John
had been identified with the fourth
estate in all the states between Alaska
and Mexico. A little over twenty
years ago he came into B. C. and
since then his name has become almost a household word in this province. He.published papers at Donald, New Westminster, Nelson, Ainsworth, Kaslo, New Denver, Rossland,
Prince Rupert and Fort George. With
the exception of three, they were all
pioneer papers—the first in camp.
Houston was fearless and used his
papers as a rule to further his political aims and ideals. He was egotistical and could not brook opposition. If he could not rule an individual or a party he would fight
them to a red finale. He was troubled
with a weak digestion and a cranky
liver, and these two demons often
caused him to abuse his friends and
act in a manner that lead the thoughtful to exclaim that the wall is only a
knifeblade seam between genius and
insanity. His heart was big as an
ox when you found thc key to it, but
his hatred was intense if you threw
mud at his ideals, theories and plans.
He was a fighter, mentally and physically and this quality made him a
hero in the eyes of the men who
blazed the trails in thc wild, rich and
beautiful West. John did not love the
tenderfeet or the "Johncomclatelies,'
as hc was wont to call them. Hc
was a natural pioneer, and the fresh,
rough life of a new camp appealed
more to him than the white shirts of
an effete, even if perfumed civilization, lie was blunt in his manner,
hut those who knew him best could
ever see the broad vein of gold that
ran through his formation. Death
pays many a debt and makes our
enemies throw bouquets where once
they heaved rocks, so since John
climbed the golden stairs to push
clouds with the angels, all, both friend
and foe, are eager to decorate his bier
with the flowers of love, and regret
that nature in its ruthless march had
caused him to drop his able pen and
cross the divide into that mysterious
territory that lie '-eyond the grave
from which no pro cctnr has ever
returned.—Gre nu _ u i_edge.
Terrier fanciers held in the convenient and central quarters of Labour
Hall on Tuesday evening and the appearance of this new subsidiary club
is a fresh illustration of the soundness of the law of supply and demand.
Further, the earnestness and practical enthusiasm which marked this, the
first meeting to discuss the situation,
the kindling eye, the wrapt attention
of the well known dog-men who
were there, augurs well for the future
prosperity and soundness of the new
club. Prominence was given at this
initial meeting to the fact that the
Victoria Terrier Club is in no sense
antagonistic to the Victoria City Kennel Club under whose auspices it will
live and move and have its being
and it may be taken for granted that
the concentration of effort in the furthering of the interests of the Terrier Division of dogdom will strengthen the hand of our general kennel
club and will bring many recruits
under the spell of the dog world. It
is foreseen that revived interest in
the various breeds of "Terriers" will
increase the attractiveness of our dog
shows from the point of view of the
ordinary person whose tastes and opportunities do not allow the keeping
up of a kennel of shooting dogs and
that larger gate receipts will result
at our big annual dog show when the
many classes of Terriers are better
catered for in the premium List than
has been possible in the past without
such a club as that to which reference is here made and which The
Week takes pleasure in this short
notice in introducing to Victoria with
its best wishes for success. After
the Vancouver Dog Show on Friday
and Saturday next another meeting
of the Victoria Terrier Club will be
held when the formative stage of its
existence will be succeeded by an
elected permanent personel, whose
names will be a guarantee that our
latest, our youngest club, has the true
ring of sportsmen about it.
A TERRIER LOVER.
Victoria, March 23rd, 1910.
Editor  The  Week.
The Victoria City Kennel Club is
to be congratulated on the formation
of the new Association whose name
will very soon bc as widely known as
is the parent club itself. The Terrier Club, whose correct designation
is the Victoria Terrier Club, was
duly   inaugurated   at   a   meeting   of
MUSIC
AND   THE   STAGE
New Grand Theatre
Crowded houses have been in evidence at the above popular house.
Ray W. Snow as a monologist, is
distinctly good. The Berrinis in
Grand Opera were well worth hearing. Mora, of Mcira & Mora, was
excellent and captiviated the house.
Her turn reminded me of London
music hall, which is more than can
be said of the average colonial vaudeville houses.
* *   *
Pantages Theatre
The Hunt Musical Comedy Company have been holding thc hoards
at Pantages for the past two weeks,
and theatre-goers iu Victoria will bc
glad to know that they still have another week to fill. There is some
excellent singing, Iwo of the members having peculiarly good voices.
The Hunt Co, give good, clean shows;
burlesque, of    course,    but  amusing
enough,
* *   *
Victoria Theatre
Owing to Friday being "Good Friday" it is impossible for Tin* Week
to give a criticism on the Lambardi
Grand Opera Co. in ihis issue. A
full report will appear next week.
MOMUS.
Mark Hambourg
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Hambourg will
arrive shortly in the city and will
stay for some time at the Empress
Hotel. Mr. Hambourg is the world
renowned pianist and he will give a
recital at the Victoria Theatre on the
evening of Wednesday, March 30th.
Mrs. Hambourg is a daughter of Sir
Kenneth Muir Mackenzie, clerk of the
crown and permanent secretary of the
lord chancellor. During their stay
here Mr. and Mrs. Hambourg will be
entertained by the Alexandra Club,
thc Canadian Club and the Ladies'
Musical Club. Mr. Hambourg met
with  a  wonderful  reception in Van
couver, the theatre being sold out on
the opening day of the sale of seats.
G. W. L. Marshall-Hall, composer,
professor and director of the University and Conservatoire of Melbourne,
after attending one of the great
pianist's recitals given recently In
that city, says, in the course of a
very eloquent article: "I do not
know who there is in the old world
to equal Mark Hambourg, to surpass
him there is no one. We had the
privilege to hear him first as a youth,
then as a young man, and now we
have him among us as a thoroughly
ripened artist in his full manhood. I
do not know if I have ever heard this
beautiful work (Waldstein Sonata of
Beethoven) quite so perfectly interpreted; I am sure it has never made
so deep an impression on my mind.
Mr. Hambourg's tenderness is the
tenderness of a powerful, energetic
nature; not of a timid, gentle spirit
It is never petty, never weakly sentimental, never tentative; but always
masterful, noble, dignified and impressive."
*   *   *
Robert Edeson
Robert Edeson, who comes here
for his annual local visit at the Victoria Theatre on Thursday, March 31,
will present for the first time in this
city, a new American play, called
"A Man's A Man," which is said to
be in many respects the most adequate vehicle Mr. Edeson has had
since he first became a star ten years
ago, is a virile drama based on an
interesting phase of contemporaneous
American life, and seems bound to
provoke widespread discussion because of its original and daring treatment of the evils of dishonest divorce laws. The action of the play
is laid in New York City and in the
capitol of a Western State, which just
at present is very much in the public
eye because of the elasticity of its divorce laws. In the role of Townsend'
Hewitt, Mr. Edeson is said to have
found a characterization worthy to
rank with his remarkable portraits of
the Indian athlete in "Strongheart,"
and the engineer-hero in his first
great success, "Soldiers of Fortune."
In "A Man's A Man" he will be surrounded by one of the most adaquate
supporting companies ever seen here.
*   *   *
New Grand Theatre
We have the word of many critics
that no better comedy drama than
"Uncle Charles of Charleston," which
comes to the Grand next week, has
ever been constructed. It is the
story of the gallant burglar, of the
"Raffles" type, who mingles thieving
and sentiment; who gives good advice,
while he despoils his victims; and
who averts a domestic tragedy by a
little piece of diplomatic acting that
is delightful. To tell the plot would
be to mar the pleasure of those who
are to see it. Suffice to say that Mr.
and Mrs. McCann and their associates,
according to these critics, present a
most finished performance of this
charming playlet.
An artistic feature is that presented
by "Guise," the world's famous impersonator, who possesses the most
remarkable voice in vaudeville. The
costumes of this feature are thc most
stunning Parisian creations the stage
has ever known. In his female impersonations, "Guise" is so artistic
and so perfect that even tlie most
discerning "f that sex could scarcely
realize Ite is a man. Ile will bc one
of the hig surprises of the programme
next week.
Frank Whitman, the Dancing Violinist, is rightly named. We have had
violinists of various kinds, hut none
that combined the dancing of the feet
with the music of this delicate string
instrument. Mr. Whitman's idea is
a distinct novelty and may bc given
a pleasant reception when he appears
here on  Monday.
The renowned minstrel men, Fox
& Ward, havc again taken a plunge
into vaudeville. These burnt cork
artists havc just concluded a starring
engagement with Al Field's Minstrels,
and their return to vaudeville is an
important event in recent theatricals.
They will provoke unlimited merriment with their new songs and original  sayings.
Thc regular illustrated song, moving pictures and orchestral selections
will be billed as usual. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
I
RENFREW LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Eernard Ryan, of
Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains east and about
64 chains north of the north-west corner of Lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 64 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence north 64 chains; thence east 64
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 409 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,  191U.
BERNARD RYAN,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
IMPORTANT SALE OF
Freehold Property
NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS
Aberdeen School
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School-building, Aberdeen," wtll be
received by the Hon. the Minister of
Public Works, up to and including llth
day of April, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a large one-room frame
School-building in the Chilliwack Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 21st of March, 1910, at the
offices of the Government Agent. New
Westminster; the Secretary of the
School Board, William Merryfield, Esq.,
Mt. Lehman; and the Department of
Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
by the actual signature of the tenderer,
and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 18th March, 1910.
mch 19
RICHMOND DISTRICT
Marine Drive, Point Grey.—Road Metal.
Sealed Tenders, indorsed "Tenders for
Road Metal," will be received by the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to and Including the 31st instant, for
furnishing and delivering on board a
scow at the Provincial Government
Wharf, situated at the end of Imperial
Street, Lot 540, Point Grey, crushed
granite required for metalling the
Marine Drive.
The maximum quantity required will
probably  be  about   12,000  cubic  yards.
Specifications can be obtained from
the Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria; Government
Agent's Offlce, New Westminster; and
from Mr. E. McBride, Road Superintendent, 39 Fairfield Block, Granville Street,
Vancouver, on and after the 19th instant.
Each Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
bank of Canada for the sum of one
thousand ($1,000) dollars, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so,
or fail to complete the work contracted
for. The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution  of the contract.
No tender will be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
Tlie lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 17th March, 1910.
mch 19
Christ Church Cathedral
In his sermon on Sunday morning,
dealing with the observance of Holy
Week, the Bishop strongly deprecated the fact that an opera was to be
performed at the theatre on the evening of Good Friday. It was one more
sign of the downward movement so
far as the observance of religion is
concerned in this city. It would be
illegal in England and impossible in
the East of Canada. Hc appealed to
those members of his congregation
who were lovers of music and attended the theatre, not only to abstain
from this opera, but to use all their
influence in persuading others to do
the same. They would, perhaps, be
called bigots and fanatics, but that
would make no difference to those
who wished to follow the good example set in earlier days in Victoria,
and who had true reverence for their
Lord and Master, and would feel it an
insult to Him to be present at a theatre on the anniversary of His death
day.
Dudley—I bought some mining
stock nearly a year ago and the fellow who sold it to me declared the
company was already in operation.
I'll bet they haven't sunk a single
hole yet.
Wise—Oh! I wouldn't say that;
they must at least, have the hole
in which they're going to leave the
stockholders."
Stewart Williams & Co., duly instructed, will sell by Public Auction on
Thursday, March 31
at  ll  o'clock at the premises
1937 BLANCHARD ST., VICTORIA
subject  to  such  conditions  as  may
then be read; all that
Valuable Freehold
Property
situated at the corner of Blanchard
and Pembroke streets, in the city of
Victoria, and known as "Maplehurst,"
the same being part of suburban five-
acre lot number one, with the dwelling-house and buildings thereon, and
well adapted for subdividing into lots.
The property has a frontage on
Blanchard street of 336 ft. 6 in., more
or less, by an average depth of 397
feet, more or less, and contains three
acres, more or less.
For further particulars apply to the
auctioneer, 637 Fort street, or to
Messrs. Pooley, Luxton & Pooley,
Chancery Chambers, Victoria, B.C.,
solicitors to the vendor.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird, Jr.,
of San Juan, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner
of Lot 109; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
T. M. BAIRD, Jr.,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Thrasher,
of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-west corner of Lot 247, thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
SAMUEL THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
Auctioneer, STEWART WILLIAMS
Preliminary Notice
IMPORTANT SALE OF
Cordwood Equipment
Stewart Williams & Co., duly instructed by AN MAIR, Esq., will sell
by PUBLIC AUCTION on his farm
on the BURNSIDE ROAD on
Tuesday, March 29
Commencing at n o'clock
The Whole of His Up-to-date
Machinery, Wagons,
Tools, Etc.
For getting out Cordwood
Pair of Good Ponies, Spring Carts,
Buggies, Harness, Household
Furniture, Etc.
Including: 3 horse-power Portable
Saw, very strong Cordwood Wagon,
50 Cords of Wood, Blacksmith Outfit,
Light Express, Phaeton, Double and
Single Harness, Dump Cart and Harness, Tarpaulings, Stump Puller and
200 ft. of Wire Rope, Harrows, Cultivators, Seeders, Separator (nearly
new), l/_ horse power English Stuart
Water Cooled Gasoline Engine, English Stuart Lathe, 6-inch Swing
Screw-Cutting with soft centre and
independent chuck, a quantity of
Tools, Pair of Fast Driving Ponies,
Two Cows, Calf, 15 Chickens and the
whole of the Household Furniture.
Particulars later, or from
STEWART WILLIAMS, Auctioneer
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Percy Walls, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Lot
206; thence north 60 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence east 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 25th, 1910.
PERCY WALLS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Speck, of Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of S. Douglas'; thence north 70 chains;
thence east 20 chains; thence south 70
chains; thence west 20 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 140
acres, more or less.
Dated  January  26th,  1910.
JOHN WILLIAM SPECK,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Thrasher,
of Victoria, farmer, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted besides J. W. Williams'
post; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 35 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 36 chains to place of commencement end containing 280 acres,
more or less.
Dated  January  26th,  1910.
ABRAM THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 chains west of
the north-west corner of lot 248; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 20
chains to place of commencement, anu
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
LORENZO ALEXANDER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Steer, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted half a
mile east of the southeast corner of lot
397, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thenoe west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.
JOHN STEER,
feb 26 Mathew Yeoman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter east of the northeast corner of lot 437, being the southwest corner of land applied for; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less. This
land lies east of north end of Kundis
Island.
FRANK DEMERS,
feb  26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Rose Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the northeast oorner of lot
437, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
ROSE DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTI.ICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, M. L. H, Steer, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mlle east of the southeast corner
of lot 397, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 cliains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing about 640
acres more or less.
M. L. H. STEER,
fab  26 Mathew Yeoman,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mary Glguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half ta mile east of the southeast corner of lot 397, being the southeast corner of land applied for; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to the point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
MARY GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Auger, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mile east of the northeast corner of lot 435, being the northwest cor-
near of land applied for; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; then-* j
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
EMMA AUGER,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Richard Glguere,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on tho following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one-half mile east of lot 436, the northeast corner of lot 436, being the northeast corner of land applied for; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains:
thenee east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
RICHARD GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Arcadus Giguere,
of Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
miles east of the northeast corner of
lot 435, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 ehains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
ARCADUS  GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Giguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the northeast corner of
lot 435, being the southeast corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 cnains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point,
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
EMMA GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mark Strong, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the northeast corner
of lot 437, being the northwest corner
ot lnnd applied for; thence south 80
chnins; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
MARK STRONG,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter east of the
northeast corner of lot 437, being the
southeast corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point of commencing,
containing 640 acres more or less. This
land lies 3 miles east of the north end
of Kumdis Island,  Massett Inlet.
JOHN  DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, George Wheeler,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
GEORGE   WHEELER,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Bert Pollard, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; therice west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acrea more or less.
BERT POLLARD,
feb  26 John Demers,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph Boyle, of
Seattle,  Wash.,  intend  to apply  for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of A. P. No. 25768; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
JOSEPH  BOYLE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Gus. Wincell, of
Seattle,  Wash.,   intend  to  apply  for  a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of A. P., 26768; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
GUS. WINCELL,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, James Mullln, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the southeast corner of A.
P., 25768; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less,
JAMES MULLIN,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, JoJhn Quinn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
T, L„ 35388; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
JOHN QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Qulnn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence north 80 chains; thenee
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EWARD QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Williams,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mlle eost of the southeast corner of
lot 355. thence south 80 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement,  containing  640  acres  more
EDWARD WILLIAMS,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Parson, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EDWARD PARSON,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, James Twalt, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 365, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of com- _
mencement, containing 640 acres more I
or less. P^*-*
JAMES TWAIT,
feb  26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Sam Lee, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
SAM LEE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Minard Bachelor,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
MINARD BACHELOR,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Huff, ef
Seattle Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 365, thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing |
640 acres more or less.
EDWARD HUFF,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, William Boyle, of
Seattle,  Wash.,   intend  to  apply  for a
license to prospect for coal on the fol-1
lowing described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of T.  L. No.  36388; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; 1
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80 j
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM BOYLE,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph Courtney,
of Seattle, Wash.,  intend to apply for \
a  license to prospect  for coal on  the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 356, thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thenee
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
JAMES  COURTNEY,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I. Lloyd Allan, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the !
southeast corner of lot 356, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
LLOYD ALLAN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.     J
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Morgan, of I
Seattle,  Wash.,   intend  to  apply  for  a ]
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 365, thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
FRANK MORGAN,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Claws Pearson, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
CLAWS PEARSON,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Clarance Baldwin, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply
for a license to prospect for coal on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence north
80 chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640  acres more or  less.
CLARANCE BALDWIN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Boyle, of Se
attle, Wash., intend to apply ror a li
cense to prospect for coal on  the fol
lowing described iands:—
Commencing at a post planted at th
southeast corner of T. L. No. 35388
thence north 80 chains; thence west 8
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenc
east 80 chains, to point of commencef
ment, containing 640 acres more or less
JOHN BOYLE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent. THE WEKK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
No. .71   GtirM.
'KINOSTON PATTON
NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN
Jl_btU NO   1)1    ..INCH   _.*.
•SS-y NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN
Na. .00   nom-m cm-
SENORA PATTERN '
no an.   tum.im
NBW BRILLIANT PATTERN
NO.  ...     TWMOll*
' KINOSTON PATTERN
-vy.,
•,W>
'~':'y
kz
SI       ■•INCH   1-tuCID
_____f. NEW BRILLIANT PATTGRNI
jur_^_>.^'r\y~\^' V
SEND CUT GLASS
To the "After Easter Bride"—Send Libbey
CUT GLASS—of all her gifts, most welcome. You cannot send anything at the price that'll he
more appreciated. But let it be ' Libbey's." Her first thought will be: "Is it Libbey's ?" If it isn't—
disappointment. If it is—unrestrained delight. The name is graven in each piece—none genuine
without it.
We are the sole agents for this beautiful glass, and if you anticipate the purchase of a wedding gift,
we strongly advise that you see our magnificent display in our special cut-glass room.
Libbey cut-glass is conceded to be the World's standard, and our cut-glass room is the finest in
Western Canada, if not in the whole Dominion.    Don't miss the exhibit.
Nappies, from, each   $2.50
Bowls, from, each  $8.00
Vases, from, each  $3.50
Sugars and Creams, per pair $10.00
Water Jugs, from, each $7.50
Water Bottles, from, each  $6.00
Decanters, from, each $10.00
Butter Dishes, from, each  $5.00
Comports, from, each  .$6.00
Flower Baskets, from, each  .$10.00
Punch Bpwls, small size, at $30.00
Finger Bowls, at, per doz $35.00
Ice Plates, at, per doz $45.00
Tumblers, at, per doz $20.00
Oil Bottles, from, each  $3.50
Candlesticks, from, each  $6.00
Ice Tubs, from, each  $15.00
Rose Bowls, from, each $7.00
Knife and Fork Rests, from, pair $4.00
Loving Cups, from  $16.00
Puff Boxes, from, each $9.00
Hair Receivers, from $9.00
Large Ice Cream Plates, at  $15.00
Perfume Bottles, from  .$7.00
/ibba     "KM    Comooti
SOMERSET PATTEI..
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VIOTORIA, B.O.
PUBLIC SCHOOL DESKS
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tenders
Ifor School Desks," will be received by
lthe Hon. the Minister of Public Works
lup to the 31st March, 1910, for supply-
ling and delivering the following school
I desks ready for shipment to places
Ito be hereafter designated to the order
lof the Department at Vancouver or Vic-
I toria, B.C., on or before the 14th May
| next:—
Single Desks
Size No. 6 500
Size No. 3 600
Size No. 2 300
Single Bears
Size No. 5   40
Size No. 3 100
Size No. 2 100
The name of the desk and maker to
| be mentioned in tenders.
No tender will be entertained unless
J accompanied by an accepted cheque on
la chartered bank of Canada, payable to
lthe Hon. the Minister of Public Works,
I or by cash, in the amount of one hun-
Idred and fifty dollars ($150), which will
lhe forfeited If the party tendering de-
I cline to enter into contract when called
I upon to do so, or if he fail to complete
| the contract.
Cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will
| be returned upon signing of contract.
The Department is not bound to ac-
I cept the lowest or any tender.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
I Department of Public Works,
|mchl9   Victoria, B.C., 17th March, 1910.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE, that I, William Buck-
I land, intends to apply for a license to
l prospect for coal on the following <__-
I scribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
I southeast corner of Section 29, Town-
Iship 6, Graham Island, being the south-
I east corner of land applied for; thence
Inorth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
Ithence south 80 chains; thence east 80
Ichains to point of commencement, co..-
I taining 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February  26th,  1910.
WILLIAM  BUCKLAND.
| mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that George Wheeler,
Itntends to apply for a license to pros-
Ipect for coal on the following described
| lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
Inorthwest corner of Section 16, Town-
Iship 6, Graham Island, being the north-
Iwest corner of land applied for; thence
least 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
Ithence west 80 chains; thence north 80
Ichains to point of commencement, containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
GEORGE WHEELER,
■mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that William Mostyn
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the of llowing described lands:--*-
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Samuel Thrasher's;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated January  24th,  1910.
WILLIAM MOSTYN THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Ag«nt.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth Casheir
Williams, of San Juan, married woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 204; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement; containing 320 acres,  more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ELIZABETH CASHIER WILLIAMS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles Cleveland intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Section 26, Township 6, Graham Island, being the southwest corner of land applied for; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres  more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
CHARLES CLEVELAND,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, Bert Wheeler,
intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
BE.-RT WHEELER,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE   NOTICE    that   Harry   Percy
Simpson, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends
to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a  post   planted   20   chains
east of L. Alexander's post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south  80 chains;  thence east 20 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated  January  24th,  1910.
HARRY  PERCY  SIMPSON,
I feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
. PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT
PUBLIC NOTICE ls hereby given that,
under and by virtue of this Act, a
Commission has been Issued to His
Honour Peter Secord Lampman, of the
City of Victoria, Judge ot the County
Court of Victoria, for the purpose of
holding inquiry into all actions of the
Commissioners of Police for the City of
Victoria, for the year 1910, in connection
with the administration of their.public
duties.
The said Commissioner will hold his
first sitting in the County Court room,
at the Court House, on Wednesday, the
30th day of March, 1910, at the hour of
10 o'clock in the forenoon, of which all
persons interested are hereby to take
notice and to govern themselves accordingly.
HENRY ESSON YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Offlce,
24th March, 1910.
mch24
TBE   CIVIL  SERVICE   ADIEU
TO HOSES
Adieu, respected chr.rlshed friend,
In parting thus our hearts are sore;
No  lingering sign  can  e'er portend,
That we may never see thee more.
No phantom thought can ease the pain,
Which  every  longing  hope  discloses,
That some fair wind may yet again
Waft hitherward our Moses.
In wonder then we'd stare and gaze,
And put our thinking cap on;
What brought him back, what new-born
craze
On which he'd wield his baton?
Perhaps an air-ship for the Pole,
If no ungenerous gale opposes,
He'd soar in space to reach the goal,
And carve his patronymic,  Moses.
With anxious hearts we'd watch the van,
As through the fog and mist lt paces,
In  elevated  view  to scan,
Whate'er his recent work embraces.
'Tis  done,  not one more word  remains,
His    nom-de-plume    the    farce    now
closes,
The  work   that  ten   months   taxed   the
brain
To "cinch" the "Job" for Moses.
At last he's through; the "Job" Is clone,
Through pressure or foreclosure;
But If for him Ills work has won
Fresh laurels, that's a poser.
"1'ls said he got eight thousand cold,
But no bouquet of roses;
Nor do our  hearts muoh  love enfold
For dear departed  Moses,
Adieu, whate'er mere chance may lack,
Still hopes are fondly urging,
That  no  spring breeze  may   waft   him
back,
To duplicate the purging.
Hut whilst away, If time affords,
And  none his plan  opposes,
He might remould the House of Lords,
And then be dubbed "Sir Moses."
Thrice welcome, if upon return,
With that bee in his bonnet;
We'll raise the song, each one in turn,
"The  Conquering Hero's  won  it."
Then, with due pomp and pleasantry,
With smiles and graceful poses,
We'll say in well meant irony,
"We're glad to see you, Moses."
STOP PRESS NOTES
The Victoria City Council is not in
the. habit of profiting to any considerable extent by the suggestions of The
Week; otherwise it would avoid some
of the glaring blunders which render
it a perennial source of ridicule to the
public. It may, however, take notice
and "sit up" when a professional man
of the status and ability of Mr. Griffith R. Hughes undertakes to say:
"Not for fifty thousand dollars will
I consent to get mixed up with that
jumble at the City Hall. They do
not know their own mind for a
minute. They delegate authority and
then take it away like children, and
have about as much savoir fairc and
knowledge of business matters as the
child unborn."
Thc Week learns with extreme regret of the resignation of Mr. A. W.
Vowell, Superintendent of Indian affairs for the Province. Mr. Vowell is
at once a gentleman of the old school
and a very capable man of affairs. He
has rendered conspicuous public service to the Province and the Dominion for nearly half a century. Report
says that he is not to be replaced;
if not, it will bc interesting to note
how a paternal government will administer tiie Indian Department in
this Province.
The Lambardi Opera Company presented "Madam Butterfly" at the Victoria Theatre on Thursday night. Extended comment is impossible this
week, but it would be unfair to postpone the statement that this is one
of thc finest operatic aggregations
ever heard in Victoria. The orchestra
h.-'.s not been surpassed, and the principals brilliantly sustained their parts.
Madame Calvi, as Madam Butterfly
achieved a notable success, and had
numerous recalls. Thc rendition of
"II Trovatore" at Saturday matinee
and "Lucia" on Saturday evening will
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V.
of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a
licence in the Renfrew Division of Victoria Water District;
(a) The name of Company in full,
West Coast Power Company, Limited.
The head office, 614 Fort Street, Victoria; capital, $10,000, divided into 100
shares of $100;   $500 paid up.
(b) The name of the lake, stream or
source (if unnamed, the description) is)
Gordon River.
(c) The point of diversion, about 100
yards below what is known as Newton's
No. 1 Camp and about one-quarter mile
above the big Canyon on Gordon River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for
(in cubic feet per second),  3,600.
(e) The character of the proposed
works is a power plant for generation
of electricity for Industrial purposes;
a dam or weir is to be placed across
river above the big Canyon and water
conveyed to Power House about two
miles below Newton's No. 1 Camp.
(f) The premises on which the water
is to be used (describe same): At some
point on the land along the bank of the
Gordon river about two miles below
Newton's No. 1 Camp.
(g) The purposes for which the water
Is to be used, Power Purposes.
(h) If for Irrigation describe the land
Intended to be irrigated, giving acreage, not for irrigation.
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe the
place where the water is to be returned
to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude between point of diversion and point of return. The water Is
to be returned to the Gordon rlver at a
point about two and one-half miles below Newton's No. 1 Camp. Difference
In  altitude,  about  350 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to
be occupied by the proposed works, 100
acres.
(k) This notice was posted on the 17th
day of Mnrch, 1910, and application
will be made lo the Commissioner on the
first day of May,  1910.
(1) Give the names nnd addresses of
any ripnrlnn proprietors or licensees who
or whose lnnds are likely to be affected
by the proposed works, either above or
below tbe outlet; The Crown, J. D.
Grlerson, Port Renfrew; A. G. Murray,
Port  Renfrew,  B.C.
Attach   copy   of   such   parts   of   the
Company's  memorandum  of association
as   authorize   the   proposed   application;
nnd  works.
Signature—
WKST COAST POWER
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Monro Alexander,  Director,
P.O. Address, P.O. Box 724, VIctorla.B.C.
be awaited by all music lovers, with
keen interest, and crowded houses are
a certainty.
The clerk of the weather says that
on Ihis occasion Easter eggs, witl betaken  "raw." ir
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
Why Not Make Ironing Day
a Pleasure ?
11 --ils ap
Hot Point Electric Flat Irons can do this,—they make laundry
work light. No trips back and forth to the kitchen stove—no
bending over a hot coal fire—no dirt—no dust. In the summertime they may be attached to electric power current on the veranda
where ironing may be done in coolness and comfort.
The economy of operation, freedom from dirt, fire, danger and
odor make these scientific devices particularly satisfactory and
desirable.
Hot Point Electric Flat Irons are greatly superior to any other
electric laundry iron procurable.
Come in any time and allow us to show you them in operation.
Let us explain how small is their cost to operate and maintain.
Price Complete, $5.00
B* C Electric Company, Ltd
Comer Fort and Langley Streets
Telephone J 609
Victoria, B. C.
At the Street Corner
By THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 2)
gun! John Bull has often been caricatured as a tourist, and perhaps he
deserves it. But there are others.
There has been a party of Americans,
presumably hailing from Seattle,
staying in town, who filled me with
astonishment and admiration. Admiration because they had the nerve,
which I lack, to go hatless. With
astonishment, because of the length
of their skirts. There was an elderly lady of about 70; she wore a hat
and long skirts. There was her
daughter, at least she kept on calling the other "Mommer," about 50.
At any rate there were "silver threads
amongst the gold." Her skirts were
midway twixt knee and ankle. Came
next a damsel of most uncertain age,
say 35. Skirts about two inches higher.
Then appeared what I presumed to be
the grand-daughter, aged anywher;
from 16 to 25. Skirts to the knee.
Truly the Yankees are a marvellous race, and the sooner that English
men and women get busy and copy
them and their independence, the
better for England and her Colonies.
In the meantime I am inclined to
think that so far as cartoonists go,
"John Bull" has given place to "Uncle
Sam."
*     *     *
Far be it from me to decry the
present building activity in the city.
Never have I seen the main streets
look as prosperous; as they do now,
and though the hoardings outside the
buildings are not picturesque, they
are most certainly very necessary.
But I do think that plank sidewalks
of a purely temporary nature, such as
the one outside the new Pemberton
Block, ought to be laid, wherever the
pedestrian would otherwise have to
go onto the road. On Government
street, perhaps, this is not so necessary, as on this thoroughfare there is
no mud;   but there are other places
where building is going on, and where
the unlucky man riding Shanks' mare,
has to paddle up to his ankles in veritable quagmires,
* *     *
I very much regretted the other
day that, owing to being short-sighted, I was unable to decipher the
somewhat obscured name of an express waggon which was being driven
down Yates street, drawn by a horse
which was, even to my inexperienced
eyes, in an obviously unfit condition
for work. The S.P.C.A. inspector obviously cannot be ubiquitous; I only
wish that he could be, and that thc
penalty for ill-treatment of dumb animals was a sound flogging together
with a term of imprisonment. At
times, animals, like children and men
and women too, deserve punishment,
but to work a sick horse is a deed
worthy only of a man who would
drive his wife out to do washing when
she was suffering from pneumonia.
* *     *
I notice that the Victoria Chemical
Works are building a new chimney.
It has already attained a pretty good
height, but it is still about four times
lower than I hope it will be, As a
matter of fact I was rather sorry to
see the chimney being built, as I had
either heard or read a report that the
works were going to be removed to
Esquimalt, which would be much
pleasanter for Victoria.   A case of:
"Very nice for Mary Ann;
Rather rough on Abraham."
Of course, we all appreciate the
Chemical Works—in the abstract—;
we know what a good thing it is for
the city to have manufactures which
increase the internal wealth of the
place. Somehow or other, though,
Chemical Works in the concrete are
not popular. They are all right for
people with bad colds, or who have
had the good fortune to lose the
sense of smell, but for the average
man they create somewhat of a nuisance.    Therefore, I say, that I hope
that, if the works are not to be removed, the chimney will aspire to out-
Babel, Babel, and thereby spare the
acute sensibilities of
cfa
SOCIETY
(Continued from Page 3)
Miss Winona Troup, who has been
confined to her home with illness, is
now able to be about again.
* *   *
Mrs. H. Dallas Helmcken will be
hostess this week of a luncheon to be
given at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Cambie is spending a few
days in Vancouver, visiting his relatives.
* *   *
Mr. H. Trewartha James has returned from a business trip spent in
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. Guy Goddard of the Lands and
Works Department, left town during
the week for a visit to New York.
* *   *
Mr. Thomas Meredith from New
Westminster, is a guest in the city.
* *   *
Miss Mowatt has returned from a
pleasant   holiday   spent   in   the   Old
Country visiting relatives.
*     *     *
Miss Bessie Foster left last Tuesday evening via the Northern Pacific
on a visit to Kansas City.
* *   *
Mrs. Harold Hartmann from Tacoma, is visiting her relatives in Victoria.
Sapper Given in Honor
of cMiss Catherine Hill
Miss Hill is the daughter if the ambassador of the
United States to Berlin and exceedingly popular. This
interesting function in her honor was held at the Hotel
Adlon, Berlin, Germany, February sth, 1910. Over seven
hundred guests attended and amongst them was His
Royal Highness, Prince Oscar of Prussia. The wine
used exclusively at this high class entertainment was G.
H. Mumm & Co.'s Champagne. This is but another instance to prove that G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Champagne is
as popular in Germany and elsewhere upon the continent
of Europe as it is on this continent with people who are
accustomed to being supplied with the choicest. No
high class banquet the world over is considered complete
without "Selected Brut" or "Extra Dry." When ordering champagne kindly see that you get the finest of all
brands, that bearing the label of "G. H. Mumm & Co.,"
the only genuine "Mumm." Pither & Leiser, wholesale
agents   for   B.   C,   Victoria,   Vancouver   and    Nelson.
Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  M.  Spencer  are
visiting in Vancouver.
* *   *
Colonel Hall was a visitor to Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Marpole, who
have been making a short stay in the
city, returned to their home in Vancouver during the week.
The marriage of Miss Mildred Macpherson and Mr. Joan Stuart Wother-
spoon, will take place in Montreal on
March 30th.
"'Whatever are you doing, darling,
with that nasty dust pan and brush?",
"Freddy told me to bring it in ane
sweep up Mrs. Smith's H's as sh*
drops them." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
Thursday, March 31
Henry B. Harris Presents
ROBERT EDESON
In His Greatest Success
Nan's a Nan
Prices—soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Seat sale opens Tuesday, March 29.
Friday, April 4
THIRD SEASON
L. S. Sire Presents America's
Greatest Comedienne
May Robson
In Her Great Success
THE
!EJUVENATION
OF
AUNT MARY
By Anne Warner
Prices—soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Seat sale opens Friday, April 1.
NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS
School Chase
[Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
pr School-house at Chase, B.C.," will be
bceived by the Hon. the Minister or
lublic Works up to and including the
7th day of April, 1910, for the erection
hd completion of a two-room frame
chool-house at Chase, B.C.
[Plans, specifications, contract, and
brms of tender may be seen on and
Iter the 21st day of March, 1910, at
he ofllce of the Qovernment Agent,
[amloops;  the  office of the Secretary
the School Board, James A. Graham,
Isq.,   Chase,   B.C.;   and  at  the  Public
yorks Department, Victoria, B.C.
I Bach proposal must be accompanied
' an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
deposit on a chartered bank of Ca-
ada, made payable to the Honourable
he Minister of Public Works, for a sum
buivalent to ten per-cent, of the
mount of the tender which shall be
prfelted If the party tendering decline
enter into contract when called upon
do so, or if he fail to complete the
lork contracted for. The cheques or
lert!_lcates of deposit of unsuccessful
pnderers will be returned to them upon
he execution of the contract.
1 Tenders will not be considered unless
bade out on the forms supplied, signed
rlth the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelopes ac-
fipted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer,
lublic Works Department,
1    Victoria, B.C., 18th March, 1910.
hchl9
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
School, Tappen Siding.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
lor School, Tappen Siding," will be re-
|9thceived by the Honourable the Minis-
pr of Public Works up to and including
he 29th day of March, 1910, for the
rection and completion of a large one-
loom frame school-building in the Kam-
bops Electoral District,
■ .Plans, Specifications, Contract and
forms of Tender may be seen on and
■fter the 8th day of March, 1910, at the
mice of the Secretary of the School
Board, J. A. Carlin, Kault, B.C., and at
Ve Department of Public Works, Vic-
brla.
J Each proposal  must be accompanied
ly an accepted bank cheque or certifl-
fete of deposit on a chartered bank of
fanada,  made  payable  to  the  Honour-
|ble the Minister of Public Works, for
1 sum equivalent to ten per cent, of the
mount of the tender, which  shall be
brfeited if the party tendering decline
enter into contract when called upon
do so, or if he fail to complete the
fork  contracted  for.    The  cheques  or
Jertiflcates  of  deposit of  unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
he xecution of the contract.
I Tenders will not be considered unless
lade out on the forms supplied, signed
llth  the  actual signature of the  ten-
prer,   and   enclosed  in   the   envelopes
urnished.
(The lowest or any tender not neces-
arlly accepted.
1 F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer,
lepartment of Public Works,
I Victoria, B.C., 5th March, 1910.
Ich 12
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
ITAKE NOTICE that Alexander Keay
f Everett, Wash., occupation Account-
It, intends to apply for permission to
lospect for coal on the following de-
Iribed  lands:
ICommencing at a post planted about
le mile east of Masset Inlet, Graham
Hand and about four miles S.E. of
ilkatla; post marked "A.K.S. S.W. Cor-
|r"; thence east 80 chains; thence
Irth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
lence south 80 chains to point of com-
bncement and containing 640 acres,
pre or less.
Date of staking Sept. 23, 1909.
ALEXANDER  KEAY,
t 23 F.  H.   Millard.
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone   orders    carefully   at
tended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
[•:*:-^-^M«*:-r*:-»Ka«:-:*:-:*:-:*K*K*
I I
I There's |
I Nothing half j
I So Sweet |
I In Life as |
| Love and 1
| Dudleigh's I
I Mixture 1
I SSL Richardson!
% Phone 346
ill
NOTICE
"Public Inquiries Act"
NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the above-named Act, Robert
S. Lennie, of the City of Nelson, Bar-
rister-at-Law; Day Hort MacDowall, of
the City of Victoria; and A. B. Erskine, of the City of Vancouver, have,
by order of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, been appointed
a Commission to inquire generally into
the business of Flre Insurance as carried on in the Province of British Columbia, including the placing of insurance by persons in British Columbia
with companies or associations in the
United States and other jurisdictions,
and to report in writing upon the results of the said investigation, and
especially as to the advisability and
best methods of Government supervision of the operations and financial
standing of all companies or associations carrying out the business of Fire
Insurance in this Province.
And as to compelling them to obtain
licences from the Province authorising
the transaction of said business:
And to furnish adequate security to
British Columbia policy-holders that all
valid claims they may have against
said companies or associations will be
promptly paid:
And notice is hereby given that sittings of the satd Commission, for the
purpose of making Inquiry Into matters
aforesaid, will be held at the following
points on the dates set opposite, viz.:—
Victoria,    March   Srd, 1910
Vancouver March   9th, 1910
Nelson March 15th, 1910
Special sittings may be fixed by the
Commissioners upon sufficient requests
from other sections of the Province.
And notice is also hereby given that
all interested parties may obtain from
any of the Commissioners subphoenas
for the attendance of witnesses at any
sittings of the Commission.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., 23rd February, 1910.
feb 26
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map  COWS Langley St. -  Victoria,'B.C.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Douglas,
of Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:*—Commencing at a
post planted about 42 chains west from
the north-east corner of lot 117, T. L.
36,048; thence north 70 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 70 chains;
thence west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 140 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
SAMUEL   DOUGLAS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that S. J. Milllkin,
of Midland, Ont., merchant, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 30 chains
south of Sec. 31, Tp. 12, at the northeast corner of S. Thrasher's claim;
thence north 30 chains to the south line
of Sec. 31, Tp. 12; east 80 chains; south
30 chains, west 80 chains.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
SAMUEL JOHN MILLIKIN.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that James Walker,
of Victoria, mechanic, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 64 chains north and
40 chains east of the north-east corner
of lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 24 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 24 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement and
containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
JAMES WALKER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that F. E. Randall, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
shore on the east line of T. L. 86,167;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
F.  E.   RANDALL,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John Weaver
Bridgman, of Victoria, broker, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted beside H. P. Simpson's;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 10
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east 30 chains; thence south 30 chains;
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 170 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ARTHUR JOHN WEAVER BRIDGMAN
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
__V_t\
th;M
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the reserve, notice of which was given ln
the Gazette of the 28th October, 1909,
reserving all foreshore abutting on the
East Coast of Vancouver Island, and
extending from the head of Saanich Inlet to the 52nd parallel of north latitude,
and all coal underlying the said foreshore, as well as the coal under the
sea fronting the said foreshore and
extending out therefrom a distance of
one mile, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., January Sth, 1910.
jan 8
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Armstrong, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation,
Master Mariner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted ln the
vicinity of Green Point, Thurlow Island,
Cardero Channel, at a post situate about
sixty chains in a south-easterly direction from said Green Point, and marked
"R.A.N.E."; thence 40 chains south;
thence 20 chains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence 20 chains east to the point
of commencement.
Dated February 8th, 1910.
ROBERT ARMSTRONG,
feb 19 Per Chas. McHardy, Agent
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRIST
District of Victoria
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Frances    J.I
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., married woman,  intends  to  apply  for permission'
to   purchase   the   following   described I
lands:—Commencing at a post planted I
at the N. E. corner of J. W. Williams';
thence east 60 chains; thence south 20I
chains;  thence west  60 chains; thence I
north 20 chains to place of commence- ■
ment and containing 120 acres, more or
Dated January 26th, 1910.
FRANCES   J.   THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Lots 7, 13, 27, 36, 36, 46, 61, 62, 63,
67, 68, 69, 91, 92, 93, 106. West half
of Lot 8 and West half of Lot 14
of Suburban Lots 37 and 45, Esquimau District.
NOTICE ls hereby  given that  it ls
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said lands, issued to
Mary  Elizabeth  Nicholson  on   the   2nd
day of December,  1890, and numbered
10806A.
Land Registry  Office,  Victoria,  B.C.,
the llth day of February, 1910.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
feb 19 Registrar-General of Titles
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four chains west
of the north-west corner of Lot 248;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 20
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or
Dated January 24th, 1910.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph William
Williams, of San Juan, rancher, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the Telegraph Trail about 8 chains south of the
south-east corner of lot 117, T. L. 36,-
048; thence south 8 chains to the north
line of T. L. 43,560; thence east 15
chains to the north-east corner of T. L.
43,660; thence south 60 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 70 chains;
thence west 65 chains to place of commencement and containing 292 ncres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
JOSEPH WILLIAM WILLIAMS,
feb 26
The Taylor Mill Co;
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
(see BOLDEN
8     THE CARPENTER AND
8 BUILDER.
I Fort Street
TOV» FEB OBIT, ov
DEPOSIT.
We pay (out per out latwwrt
on deposits of 91 (om dollar)
aad np, withdraw**!* by oheqn*.
■pteial attention firm to deposits mad* bjr malL
Paid np Capital otw 11,000,000
Assets ovtr   . 8,000,000
B. O. PEBHAHENT LOAB 00,
1810  OoT*rnm*nt 8tr**t,
Viotoria, E.O.
The McK. & R.
Nose Cup
A necessary addition to the
toilet. The removal of dust and
other filth which accumulates in
the nostrils of everyone living
in a city, is a hygienic necessity. The McKesson & Robbins
Nose Cup
PRICE 35c
Works wonders in cleansing the
nostrils and securing protection
from infectious diseases. It assures perfect breathing through
the nose and general improvement in the tone of the whole
system. Affords great relief to
catarrh sufferers.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Qovernment Street
Near Yates
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Annie A. Beard,
of Victoria, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner of the
south-west quarter of Sec. 32, Tp. 12,
Renfrew District; thence south 80
chains; thence west 10 chains to S. J.
Milliken's claim; thence north 30 chains;
thence east 10 chains to place of commencement, and containing 30 acres,
more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
ANNIE A. BEARD,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Leigh H. Mllll-
ken, of Vancouver, clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-east corner
of S. Thrasher's claim; thence north
30 chains to the south line of Sec. 31,
Tp. 12; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 10 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 210 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
LEIGH H.  MILLIKEN,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Ernest
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following deacrlbed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains east and about 64 chains north
of the north-west corner of Lot 262,
Renfrew District; thenco south 24
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 24 chains; thence west 80 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th, 1910.
HARVEY ERNEST THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent W
10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1910
Established Corporation Needs More Capital to
 Cope With Rapidly Growing Business	
Profits earned for the last four months are at the rate
of 120 per cent, per annum. Your opportunity to share
in profits of one  of the most  successful  financial
institutions in Canada
The re-organization of the DOMINION STOCK & BOND CORPORATION, LIMITED, rendered necessary
by the phenomenal growth and expansion of their business, offers investors a chance to share in the enormous profits
made by turning over Vancouver Real Estate, loaning money on first mortgages, the general Trust business transacted
by the Corporation, and the revenue from their ten-storey brick and stone Office Building, to be erected in a central
location.
In addition to this substantial income, shareholders will have other advantages in the shape of first privilege of
borrowing money on security, and in buying or selling Real Estate in Vancouver, or at any of the Branch Offices of the
Corporation, and their interests will be thoroughly safeguarded by experienced and competent men.
The Board of Directors includes a number of the most prominent and successful men in the Province, who
thoroughly investigated the business and earnings of the Corporation before joining the Board. Their names alone are
sufficient guarantee of the stability and high character of theproposition.
DIRECTORS
THE HON PRICE ELLISON, President
Chief Commissioner of Lands for British Columbia;
President of Imperial Fire Underwriters.
J. ARBUTHNOT
President of the South Wellington Coal Co., Ltd.,
and the Pacific Coast Coal Co., Ltd.
M. CARLIN
President of thc Canadian Northern Coal Co., Ltd.,
Saanich Lumber Co., Ltd., and Barclay Sound
Cedar Co., Ltd., Vice-President of the
Bank of Vancouver
J. A. HARVEY, K. C.
Barrister-at-Law, Director of the Bank of Vancouver.
ARTHUR  E.   HEPBURN
A.I.M.E., C.I.M.E..  E.S.A.
Consulting Mining Engineer.
GEORGE H. SALMON
Managing Director
SOLICITORS
TAYLOR   & -HARVEY
Imperial Bank, Vancouver, B.C.
BANKERS
IMPERIAL BANK OF CANADA
Vancouver, B.C.
AUDITORS
CHAMBERS & WILSON
Vancouver, B.C.
SECRETARY
CHAS.   HANCOCK
Winch Building, Vancouver, B.C.
REGISTERED OFFICE
WINCH BUILDING, HASTINGS ST.,
Vancouver, B.C.
The time is coming when you will not be able to work as hard as you do at present. Make the future safe.
Provide for your old age, and for your family. Increase your income by sharing in the profits of an established, conservatively managed and rapidly growing financial institution, where there is no element of risk or chance for loss. The
history of chartered Banks and Trust Companies in Western Canada demonstrates that shares will increase in value
with great rapidity.
SIXTEEN THOUSAND SHARES OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS each are now offered for subscription
on terms of $20 on application, $10 on allotment, and the balance at the rate of $10 at intervals of thirty days. Write
TODAY for copy of Prospectus and Statement of Earnings.
DOMINION STOCK & BOND CORPORATION, LTD.
Registered Office:   The Winch Building
Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.

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