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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Nov 27, 1909

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Let us show you the new
Pocket Edition
Gillette Safety Razor
IERRY CASH CHEMIST
[S.E. coiner Fort and Douglas ;
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria, B. 6.
)m__vr_v_imm-____'ivt
HALL & WALKER   5
Agents
WELLIN6T0N   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Government St
Telephones! •
Vol. VI.   No.
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
THE FORWARD MOVEMENT
British Columbia has voted for "the
forward movement." The vote is practically unanimous, for when the Local
Legislature gets aboard with a through
ticket from the Yellowhead Pass to Barkley Sound it is not likely that any member
f)f the nominal opposition will be left behind, and so the spectacle will be present-
led of a solid vote for the policy which the
ILiberal party has fought tooth and nail
lin the press, on the platform and at the
[polls. The victory is due to Mr. Mc-
TBride's personality and to the splendid
■(progressive policy which he was able to
^lay before the electors. The former factor
was the more potent, because the policy
bould not be stated in its entirety, and
fmuch had to be taken on trust, but the
lelectors were not afraid to trust the Pre-
imier, and were quite prepared to accept
[his pledge to see that the brief memoran-
[dum of agreement was elaborated into a
iBill which would secure all the advantages which the Province has a right to ex-
[pect; the foremost among these being some
[definite control of rates.
[MR. McBRIDE'S PERSONALITY
In referring to Mr. McBride's person-
I ality it is impossible to speak without enthusiasm, lie has impressed himself on
the electors so much that no criticism has
the slightest effect in weakening his hold.
* lie has come to be regarded not only as
' ono of the most capable and conscientious
of Canada's public men, but as one of the
most sincere and devoted of all those who
deem it an honour to serve tlieir country.
At one time his pluck and daring were
most admired, later on his administrative
capacity, but today in addition to these
he is everywhere spoken of in terms of
affection. No one who heard it will ever
forget the touching reference whicli Mr.
Tatlow made to the Premier at the annual
meeting of the Conservative Association in
Victoria, and this feeling of affection is
growing on every hand. People realise
that Mr. McBride is a native and loyal
son of Britisli Columbia, who is prepared
to fight its battles against all-comers, and
whose dearest wish is to carve his name in
the Provincial temple of fame. It is all
very well for a reptile press to fing mud at
this man, the people have thrice declared
that they take no stock in such a campaign, and this time Mr. McBride has
emerged from the contest with an enhanced
reputation, and a mandate of which any
premier might well be proud since it conveys so much of confidence, and since the
electorate has been willing to accept so
much on faith.
ELECTORAL METHODS
The result must be interpreted as a
direct condemnation of the electoral
methods of the Liberal Party. They had
before them a great issue, they were not
big enough to rise to the occasion. John
Oliver as a member of a critical opposition, was more or less effective because
like every free lance he occasionally drew
blood, but John Oliver with the responsibilities of leadership on his shoulders, and
confronted with the necessity for shaking
a constructive policy sank into insignificance. His idea of construction was farcical. The people wanted a railway policy
and John himself has been clamouring for
it for six years. When Mr. McBride came
along with something which Avas at least
specific and practical, Mr. Oliver made
the fatal mistake of jumping on it with
both feet before ascertaining whether he
had any substitute to offer. One speaker
said the people asked for bread and John
offered them a stone, but a listener said
The Provincial Campaign
"No, a pebble," and even that is too tattering to the ridiculous, disconnected project which the member for Delta endeavoured to portray on his celebrated map.
NO SUBSIDIES
The Opposition made another great
mistake in falling back upon subsidies as
the alternative to Mr. McBride's proposal
of a guarantee. The Province has long
ago said the last word on subsidies, and
its endorsement of Mr. McBride's attitude
on the question should have been a sufficient warning to the Opposition, but Mr.
Oliver and his followers ldtrn nothing, and
so for the third time ran against a stone
wall. They made the further very palpable error of urging that the Province
should say ditto to Ottawa by supplementing all the Dominion subsidies which have
been granted for the Province. Conservative speakers found it very easy to gain
the sympathy of their audiences by urging
that Britisli Columbia was capable of
framing its own railway policy, and declined to follow the lead of Ottawa.
MACKENZIE & MANN
Another serious error of the Opposition was in attacking the bonafides of
Messrs. Mackenzie & Mann; even the exigencies of political warfare should huve
excused the Liberal Party from branding
the greatest railroad builders in the world
as "tricksters" and "fakirs," who were deliberately conspiring with Premier McBride to put a bogus scheme before the
electors without any intention of carrying
out its provisions. No more didiculous
criticism was ever offered. The record of
Mackenzie & Mann is too high to be affected by political criticism of auy kind,
and the weakness of the position taken up
by Mr. Oliver and his party was well illustrated by reference to the confidence
which has been reposed in the Canadian
.Northern by the Liberal Premiers of the
prairie provinces, as well as by the Lib.-ral
Government at Ottawa. .Just what Mackenzie Ac Mann had to gain by joining with
Mr. McBride in any such a conspiracy is
not obvious to the average intellect, because if they never meant to build the
rnilwny they certainly could not benefit
by the proposed guarantee; still the suggestion is not more simple than many
others which were made during the campaign.
POLITICAL SUTTEE
Still another gigantic error was made
by importing Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper,
K.C..MG., into the campaign. The Liberals tried to disavow connection witli this
part of the scheme, but the Liberal Press
was a unit in praising the attitude taken
up by Sir Hibbert, and in spite of the
fact that he was announced to have been
brought out by prominent Conservatives
the only gentleman who escorted him from
Vancouver was a Liberal of whom it would
be too complimentary to say that he was
"prominent"; and the only Victorian who
had the courage to appear on the platform
with him, has so successfully obscured his
Conservatism that he has always been
classed as a Liberal. The Week has dealt
with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper before;
nil it has to say now is that by liis malicious personal attack on Mr. McBride he
has alienated the sympathy! of every loyal
Conservative in the Province, and has
most effectively performed the operation of
political "suttee." So able a man might
have criticized the proposed measure effectively if he had confined himself to
the known facts, and the reasonable inferences which they suggested, but when
a man of his calibre descended to common
vulgar abuse, and the composition of insulting and inferior doggerel without
rhyme or reason, he lowered himself to
the level of the political party with which
for the nonce he elected to be identified,
and with which hereafter he will have
to find his home. No public man of parts
ever made a greater blunder. After sulking in his tent for five years Achilles has
emerged, and luckily the world now knows
just where he stands.
THANKS TO THE VICTORIA TIMES
The thanks of the Conservative Party
throughout the Province are due to the
Victoria Timse for its very important contribution to their success.   The editorials
of the Times made Azotes for the Conservatives every day, and added hosts to the
number of Mr. McBride's personal friends.
He has always claimed that it Avas the best
asset of his Party, and that the more it.
abused him the better the people rallied
round him, and it is inevitable that the
kind of campaigning conducted by the
Times should have this effect.    Personal
abuse is the natural  resort of the 1111111
Avith a bad case, or the man who lacks
the ability to argue the case he has.   The
Times does not even pretend to argue, il
begins with mud-slinging and continues
the operation all through the chapter.   For
five years it has persistently slandered Mr.
McBride and Mr. . F. Green, its language
lias been of the coarsest and its insinuations of the vilest.   If a tithe of what it
has said had been true, neither of these
men could have remained in llic Province,
much less in public life.   But how utterly
groundless all the charges are is best evidenced by the fact that Mr. McBride has
been returned by enormously bigger majorities each  time,   and that today  the
Liberal  opposition  is  practically   wiped
out.    As to Mr. Green, to him belongs the
credit of having organized the most successful campaign ever conducted in a Canadian Province.   He has done this without a breath of suspicion as to unfair
methods, and has received his vindication
not only at the hnnds of the Premier, who
has just been so splendidly acclaimed, but
at the hands of one of the largest and most
enthusiastic public audiences ever gathered
in  Victoria.    Moreover,  in spite of all
that his detractors can say, Mr. Green as
the President of the Provincial and local
Conservative  Associations, is one of the
foremost and most trusted men in Provincial affairs.   In common with Mr. McBride he too has much for Avhich to thank
the Victoria Times, for so persistent and
unreasoned has been its abuse of him that
its constant attitude has come to be regarded as the highest compliment, and the
best testimony to Mr. Green's worth and
efficiency.
LOCAL FEATURES
It is impossible to conclude any re-
vieAV of the election Avithout referring to
local conditions in and around Victoria.
The most satisfactory feature is that the
A-ote in Victoria shoAvs that the people have
decided to shake off the shackles of old
fogyism, and ally themselves with "a for-
Avard movement."   It sIioavs that they are
awake to the splendid possibilities which
Mr. McBride has outlined, and which will
be realized by means of his railway policy.
It shoAvs that Victoria is tired of "freaks"
and professional politicians Avho have outlived their usefulness, and it shoAvs that
they have as little use for the local organ
of the Hon. William Templeman as they
have for that gentleman himself. Victoria
has for many years lain under the imputation of being sIoav and sleepy but a new
era has diiAvned and hereafter, and for
many years to come, it will 1'oIIoav the lead
of Premier McBride, and assist in carrying out his progressive policy. It is not
too much to hope that this emancipation
from the thraldom of a dead past in political affairs Avill be followed by a similar
aAvakening in Municipal matters, and that
hereafter the 'freaks," who have done so
much to muddle civic affairs Avill not be
accounted fit for a place even on the
Liberal ticket.
CONSERVATIVE ORGANIZATION
The Premier paid a highly appreciated
compliment to the Conservative press, but
he paid one even better deserved to the
Party organization and The Week Avishes
to emphasize all that he said in this connection. Victoria is essentially a Conservative City, it Avould never have Avandered
to the fold of Liberalism but for the blandishments of Mr. Templeman, Victoria
has found him out and sent him to Coventry. It no longer regards his organ,
and hereafter if the corps d'esprit which
uoav characterizes the Party is maintained
local Liberalism will remain in the obscurity to Avhich it has been relegated.
The best security for this is to be found
in the support, of so large a majority of
the younger men of the City. The Young
Conservative Association has attracted
most of the youth nnd promise of its OAvn
Party, and has absorbed the larger element
of lhe Young Liberal Association nnd it
is no exaggeration to say that today young
Victoria stnnds firmly with lhe Conservative Party. To the enthusiasm and energy
of its youthful adherence much of the recent success is due.
VICTORIA'S FUTURE    .
The future lies with Mr AlcBride. He
elaborated his oavu policy, he selected the
moment at which to lay it before the constituencies, and having received their mandate he is entrusted with the carrying out
of a policy which he has declared will
place British Columbia in its rightful position as the foremost Province of the Dominion.    Mr. McBride has made good at
the polls, he will make good in the House,
and he will have inaugurated a period of
prosperity and advancement so far reaching in its effect that even he is unable to
place a limit to its possibilities.    He has
expressed the opinion that the completion
of the Barkley Sound railway within four
years Avill treble the population and wealth
of Victoria.   That may seem an extravagant estimate, but is it more extravagant
than the opinion of Lord Strathcona that
within tAventy years Vancouver will have
a population of half a million ?   It is only
those who are not acquainted with the resources of Vancouver Island, or who are
born pessimists, Avho are unable to accept
Mr. McBride's prediction, nut the people
Avho knoAV and believe in their Province
helped yesterday to swell the magnificent
majorities Avhich have once more placed
the business control of British Columbia
in the hands of a man who has demonstrated his ability to handle it in a manner which is the envy of the other Provinces and the despair of the Opposition. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
* Social and *
J Personal. J
I1 'J.' M' '1' 'J! 'I' 't* IT TT IT V TT IT
'' Mrs. W. E. Scott and child are
visiting Mrs. Henry Croft, Dunsmuir
Road.
* *   *
Mis. Rissmillar was one of last
week's hostess.es at, a bridge party.
Mrs.   E.   C.   Greenwood  and   Miss
Beckett, who have been visiting the
city for some time, left last Sunday
evening for their home in Spokane.
!.*: *    *    *
. Mrs. J. H. Greer is visiting in
Vancouver.
* *   *
' Mr.  W. A. Ellison from San Juan
i's* a guest in thc city.
:, *.. *    *   *
. Mr. P. Walker paid a business trip
to  Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. W. L. Gunn and daughter,
who have been guests in the city for
the   last   month,   left   last   Tuesday
evening  for  their  home   in   Vernon.
* *   *
I Mr. C. H. Dickie, from Duncans,
js  registered    at  the    King  Edward
Hotel.
* *   *
"Mr. J. Fred Richie from Prince Rupert is visiting Victoria.
* *   *
*,. Mr. J. H. Doran of Toronto is paying a business trip to the city.
* *   *
Mrs. George Powell from Vancouver is visiting her relatives in Victoria.
* *   *
■hMrs. Henry Croft, Dunsmuir Road,
was hostess of a very jolly children's
party given on Saturday in honour
of Miss E. Scott, who is staying with
her.
* *   *
[.Mrs. James A. Macdonell from
Vancouver is a guest at the Empress
Hotel.
Miss Eleanore Robson gave a very
delightful card party at the home of
her parents, Esquimalt Road, on last
Wednesday evening. The earlier
pArt of the evening was devoted to
cards, and after that dancing commenced and kept up until a late hour.
Some of those present were: Miss
Ethel Gibson, Miss Beatrice Fort,
&Jjss Edith Brown, Miss Mary Boggs,
Masters Charlie Brown, Robert Fort,
Tom Brown, George Fort and others.
*     *     *
'Mrs. A. 0. Wheeler, who has been
visiting the city, left recently for her
home in Calgary.
*.  *   *
■A very quiet wedding took place
recently at Ashcroft, when Mr. Robt.
Graham of Tatlayoco Lake, was
united in marriage with Mrs. M. McRae of Vancouver. Rev. Magnus
Henderson officiated at the ceremony
the couple being married at thc
Presbyterian  Manse.
* *   *
1! *.: *
Mrs. Jervis Wake of this city spent
couple of days at Crofton during
e' week.
i ■■.: *     *     *
1 Mr. and Mrs. Brymer Schreiber,
from Prince Rupert, are on a visit to
Victoria for a few days.
ii1
LOWEST
PRICES
are given here in
SEA GRASS AND RATTAN
CHAIRS
' They make a nice addition to
the drawing or sitting room. All
•   are priced very low for Christ-
;. mas trade.
Chinaware and
Novelties
'   of every description.   Come in.
LEE DYE & CO.
Next Fire Hall
Cormorant St. --Victoria
"I am prescribing C. Carnegie & Co.'s Swedish Porter
in my practice and find it much superior to any other
preparation of a similar nature."
This unasked for testimony of C. J. Ringnell, M.D., a
leading physician of Minneapolis, Minn., U.S., regarding
Carnegie's Porter should be well ,noted by the people of
British Columbia.
Another fact that should be dwelt upon: Carnegie's
Swedish Porter not only passed the severe analysis of the
Pure Food Commission, but it passed with high honors.
Most of the leading medical men of the day recommend
in your home for your wife and family.
YOU should drink this pure Porter during the rainy
season; it will save YOU many a doctor's bill. Have it
in your home for your wife and family.
Do not accept an inferior porter. If your grocer cannot supply you with the genuine "Carnegie's"—which is
Brewed and bottled in Gothenburg, Sweden,—kindly
Phone us and we will give you the name of a dealer who
handles this best of all Porters.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors for B.C., Cor. Fort and Wharf Sts.,
Victoria;  Vancouver and Nelson.
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A   GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, a er use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per do*.   $3.70
TEASPOONS  " 3.15
DESSERTSPOONS   " 4-9S
TABLESPOONS  " 5-85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " 5-85
DESSERT KNIVES    " 4.95
TABLE KNIVES    " 5-4«>
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in  British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash  discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Good Skates Good Instructors
SKATING
Assembly Rink, Fort St.
Morning  10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening     7.45 to 10.00
Good Music Good Time
Build Up a Reserve Now
Now, while your earning power is good, why not convert part-of
it into a Cash Reserve that will, later on, yield a competence for
old age? You can easily do it by regularly depositing a part of your
income in
The Dominion Bank
One dollar and upwards opens an account, and with systematic
saving and Compound Interest, the fund will rapidly accumulate.
Begin today.
VICTORIA, B.C., BRANCH
Temporary Offices Broad and Fort Streets
C. E. THOMAS, Manager.
|f:«ww:*j«t««»i»^^^^
V* -J
IB. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y j
1016 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec.
i
P, Caselton, Manager tl
Oldest ancl most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867
41
or   404.
Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,
<A Machine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street       - Office Supplies
JAS. BUCHANAN & CO.'S Red Seal and
y Black and White Scotch Whiskies have that
delicate, fine flavor that denotes Age and Care
in production.
RADIGER & JANION
8 and 10 Yates St. Wholesale Commission Agents
BRILLIANT LIGHT
Attracts trade after dark. The current of Xmas
trade will find an inviting channel through the
store lighted brilliantly with the famous
Tungsten Lamps
Prices and full information on application. Call
in and see us.
B. C. Electric Railway Company, Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
118
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two miles east of
the outlet of the Yakoun River, Graham
Island, post marked W.E., S.W. Cor.;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
119
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., Intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two milas east of
the mouth of the Yakoun River, post
marked W.E., N.W. Cor.; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; tnence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
120
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south and two miles east of
the outlet of the Yakoun River, post
marked W.E., N.E. Cor.; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing  640  acres,   more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that William Ellis, of
Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two mlles south of the mouth of the
Yakoun River and on the east bank,
post marked W. E„ N.W. Cor.; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement; and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated October 13, 1909.
WILLIAM ELLIS,
oct 13 Matthew Yomans, Aeent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
One of the most fashionable wed-
lings   of  the  season   took  place   in
Vancouver  at  St.   Paul's  church   on
November   it7h,   when   Mr.   Walter
jrant  Morden  (son of Captain and
■Irs. Morden of Toronto), and Miss
)oris Henshaw, daughter of Mr. and
Irs.  C.  J.  Henshaw  of Vancouver,
fere united in the holy bonds of mat-
imony.    The  Rev.  A.  W.  De  Pen-
ier  performed the  ceremony.     The
ride was given away by her father
•nd looked very charming in her wed-
ling gown  of white  duchesse  satin,
jchly   embroidered    in   seed   pearls
fith trimmings of Honiton lace.  The
pily ornament she wore was a beau-
jful diamond and pearl necklace, the
'ift of the groom.    She was supported by seven bridesmaids, all wearing
Afferent    colored    crepe    dc    chene
(owns made in a clinging style, and
fearing graceful fichues caught up on
he left side with pink rosebuds, cavalier hats with long drooping white
Jiumes adding a very smart effect to
heir costumes. The bridesmaids were
^liss Atkins, Miss Jukes, Miss Davis,
Miss   Walker,   Miss   Gravclcy,   Miss
&reen,   Miss   Bell-Irving,   Miss   Eva
Loewen,   made   a   very   pretty   little
paid  of honour.    The  groom's   best
nan was Mr. Clifford Brown of Winnipeg'.     The   groomsmen   were    the
Hon. G. Broderick, Mr. Ricketts, Mr.
Beecher,  Mr.  Manson,  Mr.   Higgins,
Mr. Toole, Mr. Cambie, Mr. Sweeney
and Mr. Von Roggan.   After the ceremony  was  over  a  great  number  of
friends gathered at the home of the
bride's   parents,   where   a recherche
breakfast awaited them.    The young
couple  were  the  recipients  of  large
number of very handsome presents.
* *   *
Miss  Nellie  Woodrow  from  Vancouver is registered at the  Empress
Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. Jeffrey from Vancouver was a
visitor to the city during the week.
. Captain and Mrs. Troup and Miss
Troup left last Sunday evening for
an extended trip to the Old Country.
* *   *
.Mr.  Cecil    Fox    from  Vancouver
spent a few days of last week in Victoria.
* *   v
Bishop Perrin, who has been visiting in Portland, returned home during the week.
* *   *
Mr, W, Moresby spent a few days
of the week in Vancouver on business.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Gibson, from Vancouver,
was the guest of his parents in this
city.
* *   *
Miss Howell is visiting friends in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. George Olipliant from Seattle
paid the city a flying visit,
* *   *
Mr. Ross Turner, from Vancouver,
is the guest of Mr. ancl Mrs. A. Gibson, Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
On Wednesday of last week a marriage tok place between Mr. Frank
R. Danccy and Miss Yolande M.
Gamier, both of this city. The Rev.
E. A. Roberts officiated at the ceremony at the home of Mr. A. S. Dan-
cey, the groom's brother. Miss Jessie Collis made a very charming
bridesmaid and Mr. Charles W. Thor-
ton acted as best man. The bride
received a great number of handsome
presents. Mr. and Mrs. Danccy left
the next day for their future home
in Butte, Montana.
* *   *
Mr. Frank Cattcral left last Thursday for a trip to California.
* *   *
Mr. Clifford Brown from Winipeg
is a visitor to the city.
Miss G. Cambie from Vancouver
spent the week-end in Victoria as
the guest of Mrs. Rome, Fort street.
* *   *
Captain Parry of H. M. S. Egeria
is again in the city after an extended
trip to the North.
* *   *
Mr. Harold English from Los Angeles   is   registered  at  the   Empress
Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Bone, Rockland Avenue, was
hostess on Saturday last of a most
delightful dance, given in honor of
the coming out of her youngest
daughter, Miss Genevieve Bone. Mrs.
Bone wore a beautiful gown of pearl
grey crepe de chine. Mrs. F. Bone,
in black grenedine, with handsome
trimmings, assisted her mother-in-
law in receiving her guests. Her
daughter, Mrs. A. E. McMicking.
wore a dress of cream satin with real
lace trimmings. Miss Hone wore
pale pink crepe cle chine. Miss Genevieve Bone, who made a very pretty
debutante, appeared in a beautiful
dress of ivory Liberty satin with silver trimmings. Miss Thain's orchestra supplied the music for the evening ancl dancing was kept up until an
early hour in the morning. About
ninety young people were present.
The house was very prettily decor-
Pted with red carnations, chrysanthemums, and autumn leaves.
* * *
Hon. C. E. Pooley, who has been
visiting Seattle, returned to town during the week.
Mrs. Tatlow gave a small tea on
Thursday last in honor of Mrs. Barclay of Ashcroft and Miss Cambie
from Vancouver. Mrs. Tatlow's sis-
tei    assisted    her   in    receiving   her
guests.
* *   *
Miss Phyllis Green entertained a
few of her friends at a small tea given
last Thursday week at the residence
of her mother, Mrs. Hasell. Cadboro
Bay Road. Some of those present
were Miss Eberts, Miss Lorna Eberts.
Miss Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Mrs.
Guy Warner, Mrs. an Miss Elliott,
Miss Fitzgibbon, Miss Mara, Miss
Combe, Miss Fanny Drake, Miss'
Newcombe ancl others.
* *   *
Miss Jinks Langley is visiting
friends in Metchosin.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy from Chemainus spent a few days in the city
as the  guest of  Mrs.  W.   Monteith,
Esquimalt.
* *   *
Miss Violet Hickey and Mr. P.
Hickey came over from Vancouver on
Tuesday evening.
* *   *
Mrs. George Jay was hostess of a
very charming bridge party given last
Tuesday afternoon, a great number
of her friends being present.
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week Nov. 29
VIRGINIA LAWRENCE & CO.
Society Comedy Players
GOODHUE & BURGESS
Instrumental and Vocal Musicians
MISS EVELYN GILBERT
Character  Artiste
ED REEVES
Dancing Monologuist
ARTHUR ELWELL
Pictured Ballad
BIOGRAPH
Animated Pictures
..SJHEATR
S.V> -i-V IEJME4MANAGJ"
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30
Emmet Devoy
In  His Comedy Fantasy
In Dreamland
A Company of Unusual Merit
Novel, Electric, Mystifying, Magical
and Artistic Scenic Effects
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $j.oo.
Seats on sale, 10 a.m. Saturday, November 27th,
UP=TO=DATE BILL
WEEK NOVEMBER 22
The New Grand
Telephone 618
SULLIVAN * CONSIDINE,    Prep-litor-*.
Manac*m«nt of ROUT  JAMIESON
Joe Flo
WHITEHEAD  and  GRIERSON
Tn   Original   Laughter,  Clever
Dances and Melody Galore
THE THREE KELTONS
Unique Dancing and Musical
Offering
LES JUNDTS
European Novelty Equilibrists
JIMMY WALL
That Party in Black
"Scuse Me"
THOS. J. PRICE
'Won't  You  Waltz 'Home Sweet
Home' With Me."
NEW  MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
Special Notice
F"ive  cents  car  fare  all  this  week
will take you as far as the
Victoria
Theatre
and ten cents more will admit you
to see the London Bioscope and a
Grand Amateur Entertainment.
A whole evening's amusement for a
small  price.
Special Saturday Matinee for children—Five Cents.
Tick! Tock!      Tick! Tock!
Give a Clock
As a Mission Clock will harmonize well with any furniture
or surroundings it forms a very pleasing present. See our fine
display of "Early English" or "Mission" design, ranging from
$3.00 up to $35.00
FINE TIMEKEEPERS
Any clock or other article selected now will be cheerfully
laid aside for you until Xmas without any deposit being paid.
Come in and look around. A visit here places you under
no obligation to purchase.
Don't forget to purchase a set of our Xmas Pudding Charms,
Hall Mark Silver, $1.25 Set contains thimble, horseshoe, button
and three-penny piece. Nothing like these "charms" to create
merriment Xmastime or anytime.
W. H. Wilkerson, the Jeweler
Telephone 1606 915 GOVERNMENT STREET
Interesting
Instructive
ROMANO
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until ti p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and  Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
EMPRESS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to look at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete  change of programme  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance: 2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents.
Admission - Ten Cents
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;   Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
Features of Campaigning
Apart altogether from the political
aspects of an electoral campaign there
are many features of interest which
afford food for reflection. Indeed,
there is no occasion on which it is
more profitable to take a flying trip
through the country.
In Canada and especially in British
Columbia population is sparse, one
may ride mile after mile and only
come across an occasional ranch
house, but at election time it is' astonishing how many people will forgather in an apparently uninhabited
country, and it is equally astonishing
to find that they arc deeply interested in all the important topics of debate.
Farmers are proverbially politicians,
and proverbially obstinate in maintaining their views, they are the
hardest men in the world to talk over,
and must be approached with caution
and with a due regard for their susceptibilities. In this Province I havc
met with no body of men quite so
enthusiastic about the advantages of
railway transportation. Talk railways
and they will always prick up their
ears, and give the closest attention.
There is magic in the word, and no
wonder at it, for how many pioneer
farmers have demonstrated the capacity of their land to grow all kinds of
crops and yet have been able to raise
nothing but vegetables and a little
grain and hay for their horses and
cattle, because there was no means of
getting the produce to market.
I know one man who lived uncle'
these conditions in one of the most
fertile valleys in British Columbia fr
fort) -two years. By that time he was
sixty-six years of age, hc never gavf
up hope, and today hc is disposing o<
the yield of mure than one thousand
acres of land, and netting an annua*
profit of $30,000. No wonder men oi
:this class welcomed Mr. McBride's
railway policy.
Another conspicuous feature of thi
recent campaign has been the largt
attendance of women at the publii
meetings in almost every part of thi
Province. One would think that a
long speech, of which the discussion
of a railway policy was the principle
'feature, would be tiresome to a degree, and that few women would care
to listen to it even for a short time,
'but, during the last month I have
seen meetings like one at Cobden for
instance consisting of 150 people, of
which at least fifty were women. They
j followed the argument, took their
j share in the applause, and stayed to
the end. I noticed that they were
I particularly interested in reference to
ithe progress and development which
: would be ensured by the building ot
the railway, and no wonder at it when
one thinks of the brave part which
the women of Canada bear in every
kind of pioneer work. To the women
more than to the men increased prosperity means a little more ease and
comfort.
This time I noticed a conspicuous
decline in personal abuse,* on the platform. And the time has almost arrived when this kind of campaign material will be confined to the columns
of such papers as the Victoria Times.
I noticed frequently how the mere approach to personal reflections froze
the audience, and how such remarks
were invariably received with a chilling silence; surely one of the most
hopeful signs of the times.
It requires no high standard of intelligence to determine that an argument is not strengthened when one is
driven to the necessity of blackguarding their opponents. Men who trans-
gross in this direction speedily discover that their audience have no
sympathy with their attitude and that
their after remarks are far less effective for the  break.   I  am  proud
to believe that in this particular respect the West is setting an excellent
example to the East. In Ontoria ancl
Nova Scotia the old custom of sailing into your opponent still prevails
but, anywhere West of Winnipeg, the
custom is becoming unfashionable,
and in British Columbia is even unpopular.
I went to one small town which I
had not visited before, and being
anxious to adapt myself as well as I
could to the requirements of the case
I asked some members of the Committee what kind of audience he might
expect, and what line of talk would
be most effective. They told me of a
well known Liberal orator who had
been there the previous night, and
had treated them to a perfervid oration, accompanied by tremendous
gesticulation and demonstration, but
although his reputation is high they
assured me that he produced little effect and they advised a calm, argu-
mentive talk with facts, explanations,
and logical argument. I promised to
try. It may or may not have been
effective but the people seemed interested, and in the ultimate issue a seat
which was considered very uncertain
went Conservative. I do not know
that I made a single vote, I am content to know that at any rate the
speech did not put the Liberal in.
Apart from my own experience I
think it is a tribute to the high intelligence of British Columbia audiences
that they should evince such a decided preference for quiet argumentative discussion.
One thing is certain that a political
campaign furnishes the best possible
opportunity for making acquaintances.
Any man who goes out at such a
time to work for his Party, becomes
a personage of some importance, and
generally of much greater importance than when he stays at home.
It is realized that he is there to some
extent in a representative capacity.
He is making common cause with a
large number of his fellows, and so
becomes the centre of a group. He
would shake hands with scores of
men whom he lias never met before,
ancl as long as the intelligent electors continue to relegate local option
to the background, like sensible people, he will probably take a drink
with most of them. When the election is over he will be forgotten by a
large percentage of his new acquaintance but not by all, and whenever he
travels that way again he will be sure
to find someone who remembers him
and who will extend the glad hand.
I have taken part in six campaigns,
Federal and Provincial, in British
Columbia, and now wherever I go 1
find at least a few friends. This is
the social aspect of the question and
by no means the least pleasant or
profitable.
Of the humours of the campaign
much might be said, and more than I
have space for, but I think the most
humourous man I ran across during
the campaign was the candidate who
took himself too seriously, and failed
to induce a majority of the electors in
two constituencies to regard him as
other than a joke. Today I understand that he is sleeping off the effects
of a bad dream in Delta.
The Joy That Killed.
Senator Tillman was praising the
humour of a Republican Congressman, says an exchange. "His humor,
however," he concluded, "is rather
grim. I told him the other day about
a mutual acquaintance who had died,
a man he had never liked.
" 'And his wife is dead, too,' I said.
'He himself died on Monday. His
wife died two days later. The papers
didn't say what killed her."
" 'She was tickled to death, I
guess,' said the congressman grimly.'
Asking Too Much.
"What did you raise in your garden?" asked the interested.
"You ask too much," replied Mr.
Crosslots. "You can't expect me to
be enough of a botanist to give the
correct names of every weed that
grows."
The elections once more being over
c/Lffairs again in normal state
Now's the time to get to business-
Is your printing up-to-date ?
If it isn't-Try Cusack
If it is—Try Cusack, anyhow
The telephone number is 220
(2__/%f_mJ^**ftiw_^_./\l»S%ftQ
!    At The Street    f
I Corner l
£ By THE LOUNOER /»
r09*^^*f^^mw1/*****rtyp__wi'^^^^
I wonder why it is that so few
people, living in this part of the
world, are able to pronounce the name
of the Royal City correctly. Whether
it is due to the atmosphere or merely
to ignorance I do not pretend to say,
but the fact remains that for every
one person who can say "New Westminster," there are at least a hundred, and more probably a thous-
an, who insist on saying "New Westminister." Why that additional "i"?
The Native Son is absolutely incapable of leaving it out, and his example is so infectious that newcomers unconsciously imitate him,
with the result, that if you hear anyone pronounce the word properly you
may be perfectly safe in wagering that
he has come out fresh from the Old
Country within the past three
months.
There is neither rhyme nor reason
for this. One can understand the
lack of classical knowledge which
makes the Michigander put the accent
in "Orion" on the first syllable; the
Colquhounds, Mainwarings and Leve-
son-Gowers are unavoidable traps for
the uninitiated, and the unwary may
be excused for falling into them. But
there is no excuse for the mistake
above mentioned, and it is ridiculous
that the people of the province as a
whole, are unable to give the correct
pronunciation to the name of one of
the largest and most important cities
on the Pacific Coast.
What a relief it is to me to think
that by the time these lines appear
in print the elections will be over.
The average man in the street is both
a bore, and a fool, with his everlasting query, "How do you think the
election will go?" The person questioned, knowing absolutely no more
than the first party, invariably answers on the basis of the wish being
father to the thought. And so it goes
on, all day and every day, until the
man whose place of business is at
the street corners, feels inclined to
write his political views, and reasons
for the same, together with a prophecy as to the probable result on a
large placard, and walk the streets, so
that he who runs may read.
As a rule the people who thus
spend their time, like the ancient
Athenians, trotting up and down to
see some new thing, are the very
ones who are least likely to be affected by the election results. The
big men of the country and the politicians have their own convictions,
and keep them to themselves. The
bona fide workingman, of whom we
always hear so much at times like
the present, doesn't profess to understand much about politics, and doesn't
believe that they are going to affect
him much anyway. Those who do
most of the street-corner politics, and
profess to speak with conviction and
feeling, are like the lilies of the field
in all but fragrance and aspect; for
them the two-bit meal will still cost
25c, and the five-cent beer will still
be sold for a nickel.
And then there is another class of
bore who will insist on the fact that
every other person is making something out of the elections. "Pretty
busy just now, I suppose," he says,
"working on the election, aren't you?"
A denial has no value for him. He
sees in everyone a man more fortunate than himself, who has secured
a job, which he does not hesitate to
class as "a bit of graft." He is suspicious of all whom he meets, and if
the soft impeachment of being a political grafter is indignantly repudiated,
he goes on his way, mentally classifying you as a liar into the bargain.
Now I have rather a serious indictment to make against this Western
Country, but before I go on to make
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A. POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
RUPERT   DISTRICT.
17
NOTICE is hereby given that I inten
applying to the Assistant Commlsslone
of Lands at Alberni for a license t
prospect for Coal under the followin
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz
Commencing at the South-east corne
of Lot 51, thence south one mile; wes
one mile; north one mile and east on
mile to place of beginning.
September 30th,  1909.
CHARLY NORDSTROM,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agen
it I want every reader of this columr
who may happen to know "Th
Lounger" in persona propria, as I be
lieve the Latins have it, to under
stand that I am ,myself, in no wa.
a complainant. I have not suffered i:
any way in the manner which I shal
endeavour to portray; I am, as is m;
wont, merely trying to voice the com
plaints of others, who have poure*
out their woes into my always sym
pathetic ear. Therefore take warning
and let no person, who may be ac
quainted with my facial lineament
point the finger of scorn at me ii
the street, and say with the unbeau
tiful grammar, which is such an in
tegral feature of our modern life
"That's him." "Cos it ain't; see kid?
The question with which I propos
to deal, and which I have introduce!
in such detail, for fear of mis-con
struction, is with regard to th<
well-known, and muchly-advertisei
(through cow-boy stories of th'
West) hospitality of the West. Thi
average person, who has never beei
away from his little home in Easter:
(Concluded on Page 8) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
IMPORTED HOLIDAY CHINA
 IS HERE	
DAINTY OR PRACTICAL—SUITABLE FOR USE OR SHOW—LITTLE PRICED
Striking originality characterizes these advance shipments of Xmas china—just unpacked today. Gloriously flower
laden, rich with gold, lovely with tinted grounds, their elegance is undeniable. These pieces are a taste of what we shall have
to offer for this Xmas business—the fruits of careful personal selection.
Our purchases have been more lavish than ever before and they have been personally selected in the great trade
centres—not chosen from catalogues or photographs. These large purchases have secured for us very favorable pricings and
the result is splendid values for you.
An excellent time to select a Xmas gift piece. Come in today and make your selection. Never was good merchandise
so reasonable.
"ROYAL WETTINA" VASES FROM 25c
The gift, thought and economy are brought together in
an unusual degree in these "Royal Wettina" vases just unpacked. This is an advance Xmas shipment and it discloses
some of the best values in Xmas china it has ever been our
good fortune to place price tickets on.
The shapes are new, the decorations charming and the
prices the lowest such superior ware has been offered. You'll
be surprised at what we can offer you at  25c
Others priced at 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.75 and $3.00
ROYAL WORCESTER REPRODUCTIONS
In these vases you get exact reproductions of famous
Royal Worcester at but a fraction of the cost of the original.
But to get them you'll have to speak quickly for we have
but one of a kind in the majority of pieces.
We promise you some of the daintiest china ever offered
in the city at such prices.   Certainly an excellent opportunity
to secure a splendid gift piece.   Come in today and make
your selection.   Only a few pieces.
Priced at  $3.50, $6.00, $6.50, $8.50 and $10
Direct Importations From Germany's Leading Pottery
German china makers are famed for their products and certainly such productions as these deserve praise. These
pieces of dainty tableware are direct importations, selected from the finest productions of one of Germany's leading makers.
The decorations are pleasing—a dainty treatment in heavy gold.   Handle the ware and you'll see the splendid quality.
Cups and Saucers, at $2.75, $2.50 and $1.75
Plates, at per dozen, $21.00, $15.00 and $12.00
Dainty Chocolate Set—Violet decoration—pot and six cups
and saucers.     Priced at  $7.00
Some Novelties From World-Famous Wedgwood House
The mere mention of Wedgwood is sufficient guarantee of quality to those with even the most elementary knowledge
of china and china makers. The superior finish and quality of the ware and the beautiful decorations are well known the
world over. We have lately received some excellent novelties in pottery from this famous house. Many pieces are shown in
one of our Government street windows and are worth inspection.   Here are a few of the recent additions:
Bedroom Sets—These are new, and the ciaze in the Old
Land and through the United States, consist of candle
stick, match tray and cover, pitcher and tray. A choice
of several pretty decorations.   Priced at, per set $3.50
Salad Sets—Thirteen-piece sets, consisting of bowl, and 12
plates, priced at $8.00 and $7.50
Tea Pots—Several sizes, in green—a pleasing shade. Neat
shapes.   Priced at 75c, 50c and 40c
Salad Sets—Several very handsome patterns—the very
newest. These sets consist of 14 pieces—platter or tray,
bowl and 12 plates.   Priced at $10.00, $6.00 and $4.00
Tea Sets—Black Basalt tea sets consisting of teapot, sugar
and cream. Charming shapes, something new. Priced
at $S-oo, $4.50 and  $4.00
Baskets and Plates—We have these in round and oval shapes,
two new pieces, at $1.50, $1.25 and  $1.00
WARM
BEDDING
Didn't the frost in that northeast breeze of
Saturday morn whisper "more blankets" to you?
It was a little taste of what you must expect
before summer winds blow again. It's better to
be prepared than to shiver—better to do the selecting before, than after. Why not make some
selections from this, stock, tomorrow? . You'll
never find better blankets or fairer prices—do it
now.
"COMFORT" ALL WOOL BLANKET
Pair—$3.50
Our "Comfort" All Wool Blanket is a very low-
priced blanket and one that we can recom- •
mend to those looking for blankets around
this price. Measure 60x80 inches—6 lbs., at
per pair  $3.50
The "Bermuda" is a blanket of liberal proportions—64x84 inches—and excellent value.
Seven lbs., at per pair  $4.25
The "Popular" blanket is an 8-lb. blanket, measuring 66x86 inches inches. Just as popular as
the name implies.   Per pair $6.00
PURE FLEECE WOOL, GREAT VALUE
Pair—$6.30
Our "Eider Down" pure fleece wool blanket is
one of our best values. Made of selected wool, it
is a blanket that will give you good hard, long
service. These blankets come packed in separate
cartons—coming to you clean and fresh—
7-lb. 64x84 inches, per pair  $6.30
8-lb. 68x86 inches, per pair  $7.30
SKELDON SCOTCH BLANKETS
These new Skeldon Scotch blankets are wonderfully good values. They are made from the
very finest wool—beautiful, white, fleecy wool.
Imported direct from Ayrshire— __
7-lb. 68x86 inches, per pair  $6.75
8-lb. 76x84 inches, per pair  $7.50
UNIVERSAL BATH BLANKETS
6-lb. 62x85 inches, per pair  $6.50,
8-lb. 74x90 inches, per pair  $8.50
9-lb. 76x94 inches, per pair  $9.50'
10-lb. 78x100 inches, per pair  $10.50
Maish Cotton Comforts from $2.75
McLintock Down Comforts from $5.50
COUNTRY ORDERS
Packed and Shipped
Your only shipping charge Is freight
WEILER BROS.
Home Furnishers Since 1862, at Victoria, B.C.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE
FAMOUS "LIBBEY"
CUT GLASS
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE
OSTERMOOR MATTRESS
PRICE     -      -     -     $15.00
Before Storm
There's a grayness over the harbour
like fear on the face of a woman,
The sob of the waves has a sound
akin to a woman's cry,
And the deeps beyond the bar are
moaning with evil presage
Of a storm that will leap from its
lair in that dour northeastern sky.
Slowly the pale mists rise, like ghosts
of the sea, in the offing,
Creeping  all  wan   and  chilly   by
headland and sunken reef,
And a wind is wailing and keening
like a lost thing 'mid the islands,
Boding of wreck and tempest, plaining of dolour and grief.
Swiftly the   boats   come homeward,
over the grim bar crowding,
Like birds that flee to their shelter
in a hurry and affright,
Only the wild gray gulls that love
the cloud and the clamour
Will dare to tempt the ways of the
ravening sea tonight.
But the ship that sailed at the dawning,  manned by the lads  that love
ing, manned by the lads that love us
God help and pity her when the
storm is loosed on her track!
Oh, women, we pray tonight and keep
a vigil of sorrow
For t^iose we sped at the dawning
and may never welcome back!
—L, M. Montgomery, in the No
vember Canadian Magazine.
OLLA PODRIDA
&M^M«^«»
The Lowest Terms.
A man purchased some red flannel
shirts, guaranteed neither to shrink
nor fade. He reminded the clerk forcibly of that guaranty some weeks
later.
"Have you had any such difficulty
with them?" the clerk asked.
"No," replied the customer, "only
the other morning when I was dressing, my wife said to me, 'John, when
did  you   get   that   pink  coral   neck-
A Monopoly.
Some federal officers in the Civil
war once sought shelter for the night
in an old, tumbledown shack. About
2 o'clock a polecat announced its presence in its own peculiar way. A German sat up and looked helplessly
about him. The others were all sleeping peacefully.
"Moin Gott!" he exclaimed in tones
of despair. "All the resht ashleep
und I've got to smell it all!"
A  Difference.
The Plain Man (emphatically)—I
hold that there is no difference between genius and insanity.
The Poet (sadly)—You're wrong.
If a man can prove he's insane the
state will provide him with board and
clothes.
His Last Word.
"So your wife always lets you have
the last word in an argument?"
"Certainly," answered Mr. Meek-
ton. "It is necessary for me to have
the last v jnl in order to show that
I agree with   ier perfectly."
Overwork.
He was an undertaker,
Worked to beat the Dutch,
The Reaper got him—folks all say
He undertook too much.
Once Was Enough
Magistrate (discharging prisoner)—
Now, then, I would advise you to
keep away from bad company.
Prisoner (feelingly)—Thank you,
sir.   You won't see me here again.
Her Preference.
Said the brunette maid
To another quite fair;
For flirting 'tis said
You really don't care—
But it's oodles of fun
To flirt with a fan
"Fudge!" said the fair one,
"Give  me  a  fool  man."
A Mere Up.
Passerby—Here, boy, your dog has
bitten me on the ankle.
Dog Owner—Well, that's as high
as he could reach. You wouldn't
expect a little pup like him to bite
your neck, would yer?
ceremonies attended the turning of
the first shovelful of earth, by former
Governor J. H. McGraw, at the portage near the south entrance to
the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
grounds.
Positive Testimony.
"Have you ever seen the prisoner
at the bar?"
"Yes, judge, and he can drink like
a fish."
It Was a Success.
First Suburbanite—Was your garden any good this year?
Second Suburbanite—You bet it
was. It enabled our next-door neighbor's chickens to pull down the first
prize at the poultry show.
His Public Spirit
"Sir,  I wish to shake your hand."
"What for?"
"In recognition of the great sacrifice you arc making for the future
of your native city."
"You must have the wrong man;
I have just completed arrangements
to move away from the city."
"Yes, sir; that's what I had reference to."
To Fit the Situation.
Butcher—What can I send you today, Mrs. Styles?
Mrs. Styles—Send me a leg of mutton, and be sure it is from a black
sheep; we are in mourning, you
know.
Possible  Explanation.
"Say, ma," queried little Ida Innitt,
"why do women always cry at a wedding?"
"The married ones cry, my dear,
because they know how it is themselves, and the unmarried ones because they don't," replied Mrs. Innitt.
Actual work on the construction
of the Lake Washington ship canal
has been started. This project, which
has been agitated for many years, will
give Seattle a fresh water harbour,
something novel for an important seaport. By materially enlarging the
shipping facilities of the Northwest,
this undertaking is an important aid
to commerce, the success of which
means much to the whole state. The
federal government will share in the
expense    of    construction.    Suitable
Reaction
"My!" What a disposition that
black-haired Miss Tartun has."
"No wonder. You'd have a disposition just like hers if your misguided parents had named you Angelica
Sweet."
The Horses' Plea
An attractive placard, headed with
a picture of four horses and the
words "Please bc kind to us—We
work hard for you," is being circulated in Cincinnati by the Ohio Humane Society.   It reads as follows:
Please give us water often.   .   .
Please give us a moment's rest on
the way up the hill.
Please do not overload us. We are
doing our best.
Please don't use the whip. It is seldom necessary.
Please remember that we will respond
to a word as quickly as to a blow.
Please look out for our health and
don't work us when we are sick.
Please see that we are properly shod.
Please be sure that we have enough to
eat and that we are fed regularly.
Please keep us in such good condition that you'll be proud to drive
us.
Please sec that the harness fits and
does not chafe sore or tender
spots.
Please remember that two weeks' vacation each year will make us more
serviceable and valuable.
Remember we work hard for you.
A Pair of Toasts.
They were lined up in front of the
wet goods counter—the old bachelor
and the benedick.
"Here's to woman," said the benedick, "the morning star of our infancy, the day star of our manhood
and the evening star of our old age."
"Here's to our stars," rejoined the
bachelor, "and may they always be
kept at a telescope distance."
Good and Sufficient Cause.
Constable—Th' very idee of two
old men like you a-fighting! Ain't
ye ashamed o' yersclf, Uncle Rueb
Punkinfrost?
Uncle Rueb (still in the ring)—No
sir! He 'lowed his roomydism hurt
wuss'ii mine did, dad blame him!
Stung Again.
Percy Pickle (egotistically)—Yes, I
just love to go traveling for pleasure.
Miss Tabasco—Yes, it is a double
pleasure.
Percy Pickle—Double pleasure?
Miss Tabasco—Yes, a pleasure to
you and a pleasure to your acquaintances. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
Hints to Qvers of Gifts
A visit to our Showrooms will suggest many splendid ideas for practical
Christmas Presents
You are most cordially welcome, whether to purchase or merely to look
For every housewife there is a "Merry Xmas" in a Gas
Range. She will revel in the possession of such a present,
appreciating the saving in time, strength and worry, the
cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of gas for cooking
purposes. Henceforth she will have no kindlings to buy,
no coal to carry in, no ashes to take out, no blinding,
choking smoke in starting wood or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no fear of fire from overheated flues.. Early breakfast will have no terrors for her,
just as easy will she be able to get up a late supper for
unexpected guests. If she has a dinner to cook which
takes hours, she will set the Range right and she will find
it hours later just exactly as she left it. Nothing uncertain about a Gas Range, it is as hot at the beginning as it
ever gets. What could be better for a Christmas Gift?
A Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, either of which are
delightfully cheery and a charming addition to any residence, will prove one of the most thoughtful and acceptable presents for either lady or man who "batches," even
if only one room forms "home." A furnace may be baulky,
or out altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous,
wood or coal fire entail labor in relighting, but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus,
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off. It can
be brought into service in a second without work, so different from fire-building.1.. It wflll not only give the
required warmth, but will at once dispense a genial air of
hospitality. As a little heat is required almost every day
of the year in British Columbia, a Gas Radiator, or a Gas
Grate will form a  most appropriate   Christmas   offering.
Tb-SLRVfi-qiJICk-
The Victoria Gas Company Limited
Telephone 123
COR. FORT AND LANGLEY STS
SOCIAL.
I
Dr. and Mrs. Nelson have moved
from their residence on Blanchard
street,  and   now   reside  in   the  Oak
Bay district.
* *   *
Mrs. Charles Watson, of Vancouver, has been the guest of her son,
Mr.   Harry  Watson,  Victoria,  for  a
few days.
* *     *
Miss Margaret Johnson, Pandora
street, who has been spending a few
days at Craigflower with friends, returned last Saturday.
* *     *
Mr. and Mrs. Mackay Smith of
Vancouver left last Saturday for
Europe  where   they  will   spend   the
next  three  months.
* *     *
Major Charles McMillan has leased
his home in Victoria for the winter
months and with his wife and
daughter has taken up liis residence
at Glencoe Lodge, Vancouver,
* *   -i*
Mrs. J. R. Mite, who lias for the
past three months been the guest of
her mother, Mrs. Wall, left last Saturday night by the Tees for her home
in Quatsino. Mrs. Mite was accompanied by Miss Mite.
* *    *
On Friday, 19th inst., at 3 o'clock
in the afternoon, Mr. William John
Quick of Saanich and Miss Esther T.
Carmichael were united in holy matrimony by the Rev. Dr, Campbell, at
"The Cedars," Cordova Bay, the re
sidence of the bride's parents. Th*
bride, who looked charming, was at
tired in a lace robe over silk, trimmed
with satin ribbons and a directoire
girdle, her veil was fastened witli ;\
Scotch brooch, and a spray of white
heather, sent expressly from Scotland
for the occasion, and she carried .1
shower bouquet of white carnations
and roses. IIer bridesmaids wcre
Miss Paterson of Vancouver and Miss
Hampton of Victoria, a cousin of the
bride; who were dressed in pink nun's
veiling with white satin trimmings
and carried bouquets of pink and
white   carnations.   Tlie   groom   was
supported by Mr. G. Edwards of
Saanich. The bride's mother was
gowned in a princess robe of lavender velvet. The bridegroom's gift
to the bride was a gold chain with
locket and clasp, and to the bridesmaids, gold maple leaf brooches; the
bride presented the bridegroom with
a gold locket. The presents were numerous and costly, testifying to the
esteem in which the young couple
were held by their friends. After the
bridal party were photographed, thc
whole company repaired to the din-
ingroom where the wedding breakfast
was served and at which the usual
toasts were proposed and enthusiastically received. Music and dancing
beguiled the earlier part of the even-
'ir, the bride and bridegroom leaving
at to o'clock for the Sound, where the
honeymoon will bc spent, after which
they return to Saanich where they
will make tlieir home. The bride's
going-away dress consisted of a
brown Panama cloth suit and a fur
toque to match trimmed with pink-
velvet. Festivities were kept up to
• 11 early hour in the morning and the
guests were unanimous in their opinion as to the success of the evening.
* ■*•    *
Mrs. D. Mch tosh, 2311 McBride
avenue, formerly of 453 Quebec St.,
will receive in future .011 the third
Tuesday of each  month.
ir      Ht      if
Mrs. Charles Watson, of Vancou
ver, has been the guest of her son.
Mr. Harry Watson, Victoria, for a
few days.
* *    *
Mrs. and the Misses Pearson, who
have been spending the past month in
town, left last Sunday on their return to their home in Pasadena.
To Lovers .,1 the Horse.
An opportunity is now being offered the public of Victoria, in the
opening of a Riding School, at thc
Horse Show building, Exhibition
Grounds, whereby aspirants to horse-
hack riding may be able to bccoin
proficient at a reasonable cost, and
without the expense of providing
their own animals.    It has often been
noticed, the absence that prevails in
the number of devotees to eques-
trianship, and .in order that Victoria
may be in keeping with the times,
and show a progressive spirit in the
line of sport, a few of its influential
citizens recently discussed the advisability of forming a school, ancl the
proposition has now resulted in the
securing of thc services of Mr. J.
McCleeve, recently of the New York
Riding School, and who has had a
lifelong experience in the training
and management of horses, to manage a school for teaching pupils to
ride, and become acquainted with the
horse and its disposition.
It is not so very long ago that
Victoria could boast of a Hunt Club,
and  the  cry,
"Let's  join   the  glad  throng,
And go swinging along,
For   we'll   all   go  hunting  today,'
was as familiar to the ear as the "toot-
toot" of the automobile nowadays
Briefly, the objects of the introduction of a  Riding School are:
(1) To promote a more lively interest in the horse, and secure that attention  to the training and manage
ment   of   same,   so  desirable   at   the
present day.
(-') To foster and preserve the be-*l
and most beneficial outdoor exercise
(,il 'fo afford an opportunity for :,ii
lovers of horse-flesh to enjoy the delights of horse-back riding, at a rea-
onable cost.
(41 To create a greater enthusiasm in the horse-show ring, and
especially to permit local enthusiasts
to do credit to the city by being able
to compete with the best in any
arena.
(5) To provide local sports and
gymkhanas, tending to foster and
preserve that keen and delightful
sense of rivalry which can only be
secured in competitions wherein the
horse plays a most important part.
.Mr. McCleeve has already a number of horses, in the stables at the
Horse Show Building, at the disposal
of pupils, and class hours are now
being arranged for the teaching of
all who wish to come members.  The
171
RUPERT   DISTRICT
NOTICE  is  hereby  given   that  I   Intend applying to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Alberni for a license
to prospect for Coal  tinder the  following area North of uatslno Sound,  viz.:
Section li), Township 27, the Initial post
being at  the North-east corner.
September 30th.  1901).
NELLIE FLETT,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
158
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following described  lands:
Commencing at the S. E. Corner of
Section !>6, Sayward District; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; tiience east SO
chains; to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 14th day of October, 190!).
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
fees arc indeed very nominal in comparison with those charged by the
management of other riding schools
in such places as Vancouver, Seattle,
Spokane, etc. The fee for each lesson is $1.00. and taking into consideration the horse being supplied and
that every care and attention is given
by the teacher in his instruction it is
surely safe to say that the same is indeed reasonable ancl well within the
means of any aspirant to the accomplishment of such a splendid art ancl
exercise. Every convenience is provided for the members of the School
and comfortable quarters have been
laid off as dressing rooms; there is
also phone communication with the
offices and Riding School building.
Further information pertaining to
class, hours, etc., can be secured upon application to Mr. J. McCleeve,
Exhibition Grounds.
The Canny Scot.
To justify his repeated use of the
same witticism, as noted in three of
his plays, J. M. Barrie says: "We
Scots abhor waste. Did you ever
hear of the aged Saunders Carlyle,
who always drank off his whiskey to
the last drop tlie instant it was poured
ont  for him."
" 'Why do you drink down your
liquor in that quick, greedy way," a
stranger said to Saunders in a reproachful  tone.
" 'I once had one knocked over,' the
old  man  explained."
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
""Mstrlct of Queen Charlotte
Hi",
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, In
tends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two and one-half miles east of Kumdis
Island and one mile north of the Myer
Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J.  T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
1116
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles east of Kumdis Island and
three miles north of the Myer Lake
Trail, Graham Island; thence east 80
chains; thenee south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated  November 9,  1909.
J.  T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
170
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Begbie School.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for school-building, Begbie,"
will he received by the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, up to, and Including, the 3t0h day of November, 1909,
for the erection and completion of a
small one-room frame school-building In
the Begbie School District, Revelstoke
Electoral   District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender mny be seen on and
after the 18th day of November, 1909.
nt the ofllee of the Government Agent
at Revelstoke. and at the Department
of Public  Works,   Vietoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Cannda, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, for a
sum equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited If the party tendering decline
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or If he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
csrtlfieates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will he returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not he considered unless
mnde out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE.
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Lunds.
Victoria,  B.C., November 11 th. 1909.
nov 13 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1909
ROSS'S
Xmas Specialties
Just received another shipment of our famous Xmas Fruits.
Better than ever. Better bargains than ever offered before in
Victoria.   Among them:
Smith's Ground Almonds, per tin, 75c, 50c and  25c
Smith's Almonds (bulk), per lb 75c
Morton's Almonds, per tin, 50c and  25c
Almond Paste, per lb 60c
Valencia Almonds, per lb 50c
Jordan Almonds, per lb 75c
Soft Shell Almonds, per lb 20c
Tarragona Almonds, per Ib 25c
Bitter Almonds, per lb 75c
Pistachio Kernels, per ib $1.25
Salted Almonds, per lb $1.00
Turkish Delight (genuine Persian) stuffed with Almonds, box..50c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
I MUSIC AND     I
J     THE STAGE *
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"In Dreamland."
"In Dreamland," which will play
rai engagement of one night at the
Victoria Theatre on Tuesday, November 30, in its original form was
a phenomenally successful one-act
sketch. For two seasons it was the
headliner at all the leading vaudeville theatres in America and Canada.
So great was the demand for the
playlet, Emmet Devoy, its author,
Avho also enacts thc stellar role, decided to build it up into a full fledged
play  and  the   result   is   the   present
Klein is the author of the "Third
Degree." his latest play, which Henry
B. Harris will present in this city
shortly. Where one dealt Avith characters high in politics and speculative! commerce, in "The Third Degree" the story is laid in New York,
and deals with men and women in
society, and the methods of the police in wringing out confessions of
guilt through the sweating process
of the so-called third degree. The
play is said to be one of extreme
tensity.
The principal members of the company are Paul Everton, Fernanda
Eliscu, Malcolm Duncan, T. L. Coleman, A. H. Symmons, Irene Oshier,
Francis Bonn, E. A. Eberle, Alfred
Moore, II. H. Forseman ancl Ralph
Ramsay.
The New Grand.
At the Grand next week there will
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"  ,
ROSE MANNING
Contralto, English Grand Opera Singers and Symphony Oochestra
three-act offering which is duplicating the success of the dramette.
The Third Degree
Among the early offerings at the
Victoria Theatre on Monday, November 29th, is Henry B. Harris' production of Charles Klein's latest play,
"The Third Degree," fresh from its
run of seven months at the Hudson
Theatre, New York. It has been
some time since the author of "The
Lion and the Mouse" has contributed
a new play, and the announcement
that "The Third Degree" will be seen
here shortly, should create considerable box-office activity.
Charles Klein won fame and fortune by writing "The Lion and the
Mouse." Henry B. Harris, who produced it also  made a fortune.    Mr.
be a big full bill and the Monday
matinee will commence at three
promptly as arrangements have been
made by Sullivan and Considine to
avoid the members of the company
having to arrive late on the Seattle
boat. The feature of next week's
show is Joe Whitehead and Flo
Grierson who in Vancouver have
earned three recalls with their original melody and comedy dances and
imitations. This act will be the biggest hit of the bill from the laughing point of view.
The Three Keltons, father, mother
and young daughter, with the daughter taking a leading part and giving
snme splendid buck dancing. Thc
act is said to be all quality and very
skilfully arranged. The act is modeled
on the old school of vaudeville and
will be refreshing and most entertaining.
Les Jundts is another act of good
class. It is an equilibrist act and
the man and woman taking part in it
make many notable features. The
hand-balancing is clean-cut, fast and
new and has been one of the best
draws in other cities tour. Jimmy
Walla, black face comedienne, has a
line of excellent humour and an eccentric way of telling things that
gets him loud laughter. He also
sings a couple of good songs.
Thomas J. Price will sing "Won't you
waltz 'Home Sweet Home' with
me," and Mr. Jamieson has some
moving pictures that are more than
usually interesting.
a. y. p.
Seattle, Wash.—With the closing of
the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition,
Washington State University, on
whose campus the fair Avas held, becomes a large beneficiary. The board
of regents inherit property valued at
1,658,088. Of this amount $600,000
represents permanent buildings erected by the State and loaned to the
Fair; $207,935 represents semi-permanent buildings put up by the State
now available for the University, and
the balance consists of improvements
to the campus and structures put up
by other interests, which have been
bequeathed to the University. This
makes the Seattle institution one of
the best equipped in the whole country.
The official figures show that 3,740,-
531 persons passed through the exposition gates during its 138 days. The
gross income to date amounts to $1,-
519,438.14, which will read a million
and a half when all collections have
been made. Admission netted $1,096,-
475, the remainder coming from concessions, revenues and other rentals.
After all debts have been paid, at
least a hundred thousand dollars will
be left to apportion among the original stockholders. In reviewing the success of the exposition, the Poht Intelligencer says: "As a simple matter
of justice, it ought to be said that the
newspapers of the State have helped
to make it a success; indeed, no other
single influence has contributed more
to the success of the exposition than
the influence of the intelligent and
progressive newspaper-makers of the
State."
Considerate Culprit.
"No," said the candid kleptomaniac;
"when I'm arrested for pilfering I
never give my real name. It would
compromise too many people."
"Indeed; and what is your name?"
inquired the magistrate.
"John Smith."
'/*^WHH.^.Hw.*t,,'.,*,H,H.-HW*^__WW*J'W
.'rf*www«rww*.wrtw*'Hrww-.*_-*F*?i9WHfr..
SI 8
I The Working |
Man Comes
Here
because he gets a good
square meal
20c.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS.
Rooms, 35c and up.
Telephone 841.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
\\ Milne Block, 568 Johnson St. {•{
VICTORIA, B.C. H
RUPERT   DISTRICT
17ii
NOTICE Is hereby given that I Intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Section 30, Township 27, the initial
post being at the South-east corner.
September 30th,  1909.
CHARLES MILLER,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
FOTTB FEB CEWT.
DEPOSIT.
OH
We pay •four pn osnt. Interest
ob deposits of |1 (on* dollar)
and np, withdrawable by ehsqiu.
Sptclal attention riven to de-
polite made by mail.
Paid np Capital over 91,000,000
Aneti over   -      •      9,000,000
B. O. r_._a_.-_-_ LOAJT CO.,
1310   Government   Street,
Viotoria, B.O.
FOR
HEALTH
AND
BEAUTY
Take good care of your complexion, aA'oid rich, greasy foods
and drink plenty of water between meals, and take a dose of
BOWES'
BLOOD
PURIFIER
every morning on arising. One
small dose of this great medicine at this time of the year will
keep your blood in perfect condition, and you'll never know
Avhat it is to have a pimple,
eruption, boil or blemish. $1.00
bottle—here  only.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
1228 Government Street
Near Yates
i'*iVW«^^WriWn'M-iAVi-Ml»WriMtViVM'{
I SEE BOLDEN 1
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
1 Fort Street i|
«-.hS-m-2-.S-2-.^-.2X-.S-2-2#^
RUPERT DISTRICT
172
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a license to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Section 20, Township -}7, the Initial post
being at  the  North-west  corner.
September 30th,  1909.
M. MILLER,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
RUPERT DISTRICT.
173
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz..
Section 29, Township 27, the initial post
being at the South-west corner.
September 30th, 1909.
J.  A. FLETT,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
RUPERT DISTRICT.
17*1
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
applying to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands at Alberni for a License to
prospect for Coal under the following
area North of Quatsino Sound, viz.:
Commencing at the South-east corner
of lot BI, thence south one mile; east
one mile; nortli one mile and west one
mile   to  plaoe  of  beginning.
September   30th.   1909.
G. A. AV. HEPBURN,
nov 20 Chris Nordstrom, Agent
NOTICE.
RECTIFICATION OF CROWN GRANT
New Westminster District.
Notice Is hereby given that ln pursuance of Section 98 of the Land Act, an
application will be made to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands—three months
after date—to have the Crown Grant or
Lot 226, Group 1, New Westminster
District, issued on the 17th day 01
April, 1875, to J. Roland Hett cancelled,
and a corrected Crown Grant of said
lot  226  issued  ln  lieu  thereof.
Dated at Victoria,  B.C., this 9th day
of October,   1909.
POOLEY, LUXTON & POOLEY,
Solicitors for the Owners of
oct. 16 said Lot.
M. W. WAITT
& CO. LIMITED
(The House of Quality)
HERBERT KENT. Manager
VICTOR
Gramophones
Are Sold
for as
little as
$1 a Week
CALL AND SEE
WING ON
Employment Agent
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 43
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material;
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
! WE SOLICIT
I ATRIAL!
!•!    ^_______________________________________________. if
_■ it
2!    ^^^^^^^f ft
tf   ft
if In order to convince you that |'{
tf we are prompt, cartful and '
#   moderate in our charges.
I  The Pacific
I    Transfer
Co.
i   NO. 4, FORT ST., VICTORIA.
A. E, KENT, Proprietor
Phone 24*.
j.j      Leave your checks with us.
IMM.WMMJMMMMMWHMHWH
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
134
TAKE NOTICE that William Q. Ewart
of Seattle, Wash., occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of Masset Inlet and about
six miles S.E. of Delkatle; post marked
"W.Q.E. N.W. Corner"; thence east 80
chains: thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Date of staking Sept, 24,  1909.
WILLIAM Q. EWART,
oct 23 F. II. Millard. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 47, 1909
At the Street Corner
By THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 4)
Canada, or the average person, who
wishes to ship the black sheep out
to the Colonies has an idea that We
(don't forget the capital) are the people, and that there is such an open
handedness about Us, that anybody
is bound to do well. Now, are these
things thus?
Isn't it a fact that we welcome the
new-comer, when he arrives with a
pocketful of cash;—and cut him cold,
when he's "broke"? Don't we love
the man who really has a "bunch" of
money coming by the next mail,—and
don't we fail to see him on the street
when it's all "blown in"? You, my
fellow dwellers in Western Canada,
deny this if you will; call me a renegade to the country of my adoption,
(if such a "bull" be permitted). I
can cite you, chapter and verse, instances of three such cases whicli
have come to my own persona
knowledge within the last week.
I don't see that any blame at
taches. The name of "Monty Woods"*
and that of others, still rankle sore
in the breasts of many who will read
these lines. By all means cut out
the old-time warm-heartedness, which
was such a feature in all the yarns
written on the subject of the dwellers
on the Pacific Coast. But at the same
time cut out those appeals to the
Eastern States, those fervid imaginations to England, which represent
this most favoured Province of the
Dominion, as a dwelling-place of
"suckers."
I regret the necessity which has
impelled me to use so much slang.
I don't often indulge in it, and I have
read Agnes Deans Cameron's remarks
in the "Pacific Monthly" anent the
same with much interest and a great
deal of appreciation. At the same
time there are some things which
can only be adequately expressed by
a liberal use of the same. And 1
feel that this is an occasion which
calls for expressions, which drive the
meaning further home than do the polite usages of conventional conversation.
I am open to correction, but 1 think
that Kipling once wrote something
about the West being West, and the
East being East; I think that it is
time that we let the world know that
things are vastly different now. The
West is just as much East, as the latter is itself; ancl it is only a question
as to where you start from. We already have the phrases "Nearer East,"
when we want to "roast" Turkey, (no
pun on Thanksgiving Day intended),
and "Further East" when we wish to
discuss Anglo-Russian politics. Starting from the right point, the Province of British Columbia is as East
as you like, and the general attitude
of its inhabitants at present would
out-East even Mecca. What do you
want, people? To be thc old-style
Western folk, or to be the up-to-date
community, which means money. Just
let thc newspaper people know, and
then there won't be such a demand
for those stories, which call for purely fictitious accounts of the open-
hearted generosity of thc West which
simply sees Want to relieve it, and
which never looks for a dollar in return, eader, according to your sex
and your temperament, you know
what we call that sort of a policy
now-a-days.
Let us close with a little review
on the weather. That is always a
safe topic for general discussion. I
havc heard opinions seriously put forward that the discovery of the North
Pole, whether by Cook or Peary, has
directly been responsible for the disgusting amount of rain we have had
lately. This can hardly be so. Old
prophets used to say that when this
famous discovery was made it would
rain "Scotch and Soda" for two weeks
on end; I have not noticed any such
phenomenon. Other fjilks say that
the axis of the earth is shifting; personally, 1 prefer to put the blame on
"Halley's Comet." Leave it at that.
I rejoice to think that it won't be
here again for some time to come; at
any rate, not until I have reproduced
my existence on this as an ostrich, or
some   other   kind    of   a dry   land,
peripatetic.
cfa
rtt*jX^.
Sporting Comment
The Victoria Rugby Club has shown
to the supporters of the game in this
city that the team representing the
local club this season is capable of
taking their place with the best of
them. The victory of the team at
Vancouver is highly creditable, but I
was somewhat disappointed as I figured on a larger margin, but in this
case one is as good as a dozen and
I have to congratulate the team on
their victory. From the press reports, it is shown that the locals were
in good condition and played thc
game from start lo finish, the back
division being exceptionally strong,
while they had the advantage of the
scrum at all time. The next game
takes place in Victoria next Saturday
and from the reports from Vancouver
the team is holding nightly practices.
This behooves the locals not to rest
on their oars but continue as they
having been doing already this season
and the result will be that the McKechnie cup and the championship of
B. C. will come back to this city after it has rested in the Mainland Metropolis for several years.
The city championship in soccer has
been practically won by the Victoria
West team. This is the second year
that this team has captured the premier honours and judging from their
style of play and the ability of the
players individually shows that they
should be able to hold their place
for some years to come. The games
this season were not up to the standard of last year, in fact the -quality of
football that is being handed up to
the patrons is of a poorer class than
was shown while the Garrison team
was so strong a few years ago. Every
effort should be made by the various
clubs to maintain the standard of
football otherwise the small crowds
that attend the games now will be
seriously  diminished.
Horse racing was started at Oakland last Saturday under the new law
which does not allow open betting,
thc oral system alone being in vogue.
1 cannot understand why oral betting
should be allowed if it is decided to
make betting a felony. It is better
for everyone if the association is in
a position to control those taking
bets but in the oral system this is
impossible and it leaves the way open
for many abuses.
UMPIRE.
The House of Lords
The British House of Lords has at
last taken the plunge in opposition to
the Lloyd George Budget of Socialism and its attendant step towards
confiscation. In giving his notice in
opposition to the Budget, Lord Lansdowne handled the subject very skilfully. It seems to have been thought
that the Opposition leader in the
Lords would move for the rejection
of the Finance Bill—thus giving the
Government the opportunity to go to
the country on a false and misleading
appeal for support in its fight against
the interference of the Upper Chamber with the supposed constitutional
right of the Commons to deal independently with money bills. Lord
Lansdowne deprived the Government
of any such confusing campaign material by avoiding any attempt to have
the Budget rejected, and by contenting himself with moving that the
House of Lords could not feel justified in passing the Finance Bill of this
year before its revolutionary provisions had been endorsed by the electorate.
This seems to the outsider like a
very reasonable attitude for anyone to
take. The Lloyd George legislation
is as revolutionary in character as
could well be conceived. What, then,
could be more in the public interests
than any movement calculated to giv*.'
the British people an opportunity to
say whether they approve such revolutionary measures?
It is expected that the British elections will take place in January. To
the results' of these elections every
citizen of the British Empire will look
forward with deep interest, if not with
anxiety. Those results will be very
far reaching. Great Britain's greatness has been built upon the system
with which it is now proposed to
tamper very seriously. Great Britain's commercial greatness for the future would seem to depend upon the
people's decision to put a stop to thc
foreign manufacturers' practice )f
making London and Liverpool dumping grounds for their surplus produc
tion, and to build up at home the factories that have been closed by unfair foreign competition—thus to giv.?
employment to the tens of thousands
of men who have been driven by starvation to flirt with the desperate and
destructive expedient that its promoters grotesquely describe as Socialism.
The verdict of January may or may
not settle finally the future British
fiscal policy, but that it will in any
case go far towards indicating
whether Britain's sun is declining or
still in the ascendant, there can be
little doubt. It is for this reason, and
for the further reason that in Bri
tain's destiny is bound up our own,
that we must feel an interest in the
approaching crisis^ almost as keen as
that felt by the real participants in
the fight.—Winnipeg Post, Nov. 20.
Rather a mean insinuation, that
made by the Free Press the other
clay concerning the late Sir John A.
Macdonald. In commenting on Mr.
W. T. Stead's fantastic stories to the
effect that he had had an interview
with the spirit of the late Mr. Gladstone, the Free Press suggested that
some of the Tories of today should
get into communication with the
spirit of Sir John—for Sir John, it
was claimed, would no doubt be fully
acquainted with all political events of
Canada since the time of his death.
This is a brutal suggestion—for if we
admit that Sir John knows everything
that has happened to his party since
he took his departure, we merely indirectly state that the departed chieftain has suffered' sixteen years of
most agonizing torture. Indeed if
any greater affliction could be visited
upon the man who made the Conservative party what it was twenty years
ago than a present knowledge of its
chaotic condition today, the imagination capable of such conception is
surely entitled to everlasting fame.
No, no, let us humanely believe that
Sir John is oblivious, and that thus
he enjoys a happiness which his successors in his party have reason to
envy.
Not Catching.
Much sobered by the importance
of thc news he had to communicate,
youthful Thomas strode into the
house and said breathlessly:
"Mother, they have a new baby
next door, and the lady over there is
awful sick. Mother, you ought to
go right in ancl see her."
"Yes, dear," said his mother, "I will
go over in a clay or two just as soon
as she gets better."
"Hut, mother," persisted Thomas.
"I think you ought to go in right
away, she is real sick, and maybe you
can do something to help."
"Yes, dear," said the mother patiently, "but wait a day or so until she
is just a little better."
Thomas seemed much dissatisfied at
his mother's apparent lack of neighborly interest, and then something
seemed to dawn upon him, for he
blurted out:
"Mother, you needn't be afraid—it
ain't catching."
The Canadian Magazine fo rNov-
cmber is very general in its interest.
The first article is entitled "The
Drama of the 'Ward'," by Augustus
Bridle, being a sociological study of
the development and revolution thai
has been taking place in the slum
section of Toronto. There are five
pen and ink illustrations by T. G.
Greene. "Where Nature's Gas is
King," by W. Lacey Amy, is a most
entertaining account of the growth of
Medicine Hat, ancl the place that natural gas has had in its development.
159
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following described lands:
Commencing at the north-east corner
of section 96, Sayward District, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 14th of October, 1909.
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
162
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles south-east of
Kumdis Bay and about one mile south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agenl
164
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two and one-half mlles east of Kumdis
Island and about one mile north of the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains  to  point  of commencement  and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
167
LICENSE    TO   AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY.
Companies Act, 1897.
CANADA:
Province of British Columbia,
No.  544.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the
"Rochester German Insurance Company
of Rochester, New York," is authorized
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which the
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company Is
situate at the City of Rochester, in the
County of Monroe, and State of New
York.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at Vancouver
and J. R. Waghorn, Insurance Agent,
whose address is Vancouver aforesaid,
Is the attorney for the Company.
Given under my Hand and Seal of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this eighth day of November, one thousand nine hundred and
nine.
(L.S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
Por the purpose of making Insurance on
dwelling houses, stores and all kinds of
buildings and household furniture, and
other property against loss or damage
by (ire, lightning, wind-storms, or tornadoes, and upon vessels, boats, cargoes,
goods, merchandise, freights and other
property against loss or damage by all
or any of the risks of lake, river, canal
and Inland navigation and transportation and to effect reinsurance of any
risks  taken by it.
160
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend to apply to the Assistant Commissioner of lands for a Licence to prospect for Coal and Petroleum on ana under the following described lands:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Section 98, Sayward District, thenct
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
nov. 6 R. ROSS NAPIER.
vMmwm,
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
8$^   Richardson
K Cigar Store.
Phone 346
It is splendidly illustrated. Miss Jean
Graham contributes a most readable
article entitled "In Delft Land," being
an appreciation of Mr. E. F. B. Johnston's collection of delftware. The
account of the capture and transportation to Canada of the Montana herd
of buffaloes is concluded by Nowton
MacTavish. The illustrations for this
article are even better than for the
first. Isabel Ecclcstone Mackay contributes a fine story, "New Lamps for
Old," with illustrations by J. W.
Beatty. Other articles are "Comedy
and Humour in the Bible," by J. D.
Logan; "A Literature of Warning,"
by W. D. McBride, with short stories
and poems by Canadian writers.
161
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles east of Kumdis  Island,  and
three  miles  north  of  the  Myer  Lake
Trail,  Graham  Island;  thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement and coontaln-
ing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov  13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
168
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on the following lands:
Commencing at  a  post  planted  one
and one-half miles south-east of Kumdis   >
Bay and about one mile south of the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;   j
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
cliains  to  point  of  commencement  and   '
containing 640 acres more or less. ,
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
161
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands, for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following described area:
Commencing at the north-east corner
of Section 102, Sayward District; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
A. W. McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent.
162
NOTICE is hereby given that I intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following described  lands:
Commencing at the S. E. Corner ot
Section 101, Sayward District; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated this 18th day of October, 1909.
A. W. McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent.
157
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one and one-half miles south-east of
Kumdis Bay and about one mlle south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island;
thence west. SO chnins; thenoe south 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commeneement and containing 640 acres more cr
Dated November 9,   1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
15S
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C.. occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one   and   one-half   miles   south-east   of
Kumdis Bay, and about one mile south
of the Myer Lake Trail, Grannm Island,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains;   thence  east   80   chains',   thence
south   to   point   of  commencement   and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
159
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, Intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing  at  a   post   planted   two
and one-half    miles    east    of    Kumdis
Island and about one mile north of the
Myer Lake Trail, Graham Island; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains;  thence north  80
chains;  to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated November 9,  1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
160
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. T. Johnson,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Realty, intends to apply for a license to prospect
for coal on  the following lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of the Myer Lake Trall,
Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated November 9, 1909.
J. T. JOHNSON,
nov   13 Matthew Yomans, Agent.
142
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that John Sheckels.
of Seattle, Wash., occupation Mechanic,
intends to apply for permission to proB-
pect for coal on the flolowing described
lands.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.E. Corner of Frank Demers coal location and two miles east and one and
a quarter miles south of the most westerly point on Gundas Island and on Graham Island, post marked "J. S., S.W.
corner"; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more  or  less.
Date of staking Sept. 25, 1909.
JOHN SHECKELS,
oct 23 F. H. Millard.
157
NOTICE is hereby given that I Intend
to apply to the Assistant Commissioner
of Lands for a Licence to prospect for
Coal and Petroleum on and under the
following  described  land:
Commencing at the north-west corner
of Section 97, Sayward District, thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains:
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated this 13th day of October, 1909.
A. W. McVITTIE,
nov 6 R. Ross Napier. Agent.

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