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Week Dec 7, 1912

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 L. McLeod Gould
Public Stenographer
Copying, Mailing, Editing, Expert
Journalistic Work and Adv't
Writing
Accuracy, Despatch, Privacy
1208 Government Street Phone 1283
The Week
A British eolambte Newspaper sod Review.
PMblishtd at VlcferU, B. 6.
HALL ftf WALKER
Agenti
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St.
Telephone 83
■
One Dollar Per Annum
Vol. X.   No.
w
Tenth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
Tenth Year
THE NAVAL POLICY—Mr. Borden has announced the naval policy
on the floor of the House, He has
done so in the presence of illustrious personages and a distinguished assembly. His
announcement has been received with general and generous applause and at its conclusion the whole House rose and sang
"God Save the King." The only speech
made after Mr. Borden's was by Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the Leader of the Opposition,
who confined himself to a declaration of
"equal loyalty" on the part of the Opposition. We thus have the spectacle of an
epoch-making and historic announcement
of policy received in its main principles by
a united House of Parliament. For whatever differences may develop when the details of the measure corpe to. be; discussed
on the second reading, it is clear both from
its reception ancl from the very broad spirit
of compromise in which it was conceived
that there will be no serious opposition, ana
that what has been designated, though
erroneously, the emergency vote, will receive the support of both political parties.
Difficulties To Be Overcome
It is probably the desire to secure such
an end which has led Mr. Borden so far
away from what was understood to be the
original intention of the Government. Before proceeding to discuss the measure in
detail The Week wishes to recognise in the
fullest sense the importance and the significance of Mr. Borden's proposals, and to
give him all the credit possible for having
steered a difficult and delicate negotiation
to the point where the final goal of success is well within sight. If his pronouncement is somewhat inconsistent, this is probably due far more to the difficulties whicii
had to be encountered in reconciling conflicting opinions than to any lack of desire
on Mr. Borden's part to do all that he
could as responsible leader of the Government towards the assistance of the Motherland and towards the meeting of Canada's
obligation. Whatever differences of opinion
there may be on the details and however
objectionable some of the features of the
proposal may be to the purely non-partisan
mind, the great factor remains that Mr.
Borden has evolved a measure which carries Canada forward to the ranks of those
outlying portions of the Empire which have
felt called upon to come to the aid of the
Motherland in her hour of need.
Solidarity of the Empire
It is true that Canada cannot claim the*
honour of having led the way; in fact she
is the last of the great Colonies to take
effective action, but she has had difficulties
to overcome which are peculiar to her own
people and which did not present themselves to the other Colonies, and if it proves
that Mr. Borden has surmounted these he
at least deserves the credit for having initiated a policy whicii will ultimately place
Canada in her right relation to the Motherland and the Empire. The effect will be
tremendous; the alignment of all the Colonies revolutionizes the Imperial aspect of
British affairs. Every part of the Empire
has now spoken; every part of the Empire
is to be a contributor to the Imperial Navy,
and in the first instance, at any rate, every
unit of that Navy will be, as it should be,
under the control of the British Admiralty.
This makes for cohesion and solidarity as
well as for efficiency. For the first time
a broader significance is given to the heroic
declaration whicii Shakespeare penned
nearly four hundred years ago:
"Come all the world in arms, we nothing rue,
"If England to herself do prove but true."        ,,
It is no longer England, or even Britain,
the little Isle in the North Sea, whicii since
the destruction of the Armada has been
Mistress of the Sea, but it is the Greater
Britain, the England at home and the
Britain beyond the Sea that stands today as
a unit against the world. It is inconceivable that in face of such a solidarity the
glorious traditions of the past shall be •
dimmed. It is certain that the British
Empire has "renewed her strength" in her
children, and will "go on from strength to
strength."
Two Branches of Policy
On the threshold of such a development
it may appear almost ungracious to criticise and yet it is as certain that the present
naval policy would never have been matured
as it is certain that it will never be carried
to a satisfactory issue if there had not been
wide-spread discussion and if the people
of Canada had not taken a very conspicuous part in "licking it into shape." The
Week 'has always maintained that in this
matter of a Canadian contribution to Imperial Naval Defence, the people were in
advance of their leaders; that they were
more sensible of their obligations; that they
were more anxious to recover their self-
respect by discharging them, and that they
were prepared to be more generous than
the politicians and even some of the would-
be statesmen tried to make out. The Week
has always maintained that the naval policy
of the * Canadian. Government naturally
divides itself into two parts; the first, a
gift to meet conditions of emergency. The
second, an elaborate, well-digested scheme
which would form the permanent policy.
This division was in the main accepted by
Mr. Borden and recognised as the true solution of the problem. It has for a long
time been an open secret that he intended
to propose an emergency "gift," but he
time and again declared that this was not
to complicate the matter of the permanent,
policy. It was on this undertaking that the
Cabinet was formed and it was because he
regarded the proposals as a breach of this
agreement that Mr. Monk resigned.
A Distinction Destroyed
Mr. Borden's programme, as outlined, is
a violation of this principle in several important details, as it is also a violation of
the promise that no steps should be taken
in connection with the permanent naval
policy without an appeal to the country.
The distinction between an emergency contribution and a permanent policy is obvious;
the former is undoubtedly within the discretion of any Government; 'the latter
could not well be adopted without an appeal
to the country, if the traditions of constitutional usage were to be respected. The
only way in which Mt. Borden could have
maintained the two principles involved was
by keeping them separate and distinct. He
has combined them. To be consistent with
the idea which he has all along conveyed,
his present proposals should not have gone
beyond the offer of a free gift, a direct contribution by Canada to Imperial Naval Defence; a gift unhampered by any restrictions, any negotiations or any reference to
the future.
The Navy League Resolution
This view has been upheld and strongly
enforced by the British Columbia Navy
League at its great public meeting held in
the Victoria Theatre as recently as October
30th. Then Sir Richard McBride made
an impressive speech and two historic letters
were read, one from Mr. Borden and the
other from Chief Justice Hunter.^ A resolution was passed in which it was specifically declared "that it is the*duty, interest
and wish of Canada to meet the Imperial
emergency by a prompt, adequate" and
UNCONDITIONAL gift to the Empire of
battleships or their equivalent, to be followed as soon as may be by a permanent
I policy which will assure to our Dominion
representation worthy of her dignity in the
defence of the Empire." In view of what
has'ttow transpired the letter from Mr.
Borden read'at that meeting can hardly
be overlooked.   In complimenting the Pre
sident of the Navy League the letter concludes : "In the East as well as in the West
we recognise with admiration your zealous
and indefatigable efforts in this cause, AND
YOU HAVE GOOD REASON TO BELIEVE THAT YOUR LABOURS
HAVE NOT BEEN IN VAIN." The
Week pointed out at the time that the interpretation placed upon this letter was .
hardly justified by a careful study of its
contents. It was nothing to the British
Columbia Navy League that Canada should
do something for the Empire; that was a
foregone conclusion.
Two Specific Requests
But the Navy League had made two
specific requests, requests which had been
supported, not only by Sir Richard McBride and the Provincial Government, but
by the people of British Columbia, who
had time and again endorsed the statement
of Sir Richard that "Canada could not do
too much to satisfy the people of British
Columbia." Those two specific requests
were for a prompt, adequate and "unconditional" gift and for the establishment of
a Fleet Unit on the Pacific Coast. The
"gift" is not unconditional; it therefore
ceases to be a gift. It is hampered by many
conditions, or if the word conditions is too
strong we may substitute provisions, which
are intended to receive all the consideration
due to specific conditions. If Mr. Borden
had made his gift unconditional and left
the British Admiralty free, as every receiver
of a gift is naturally free, to deal with it
as it saw fit, there is no possibility that
Canadian interests would have suffered, and
there would have been the great gain that
Canada would not have posed as making a
bargain, or adding stipulations. There
would have been the additional gain that
the question of the permanent naval policy
would have remained untouched and could
have been developed on its merits without
any reference to a gift which had been
called forth by an emergency. The Government would have had a free hand; the
Opposition would have had a free hand, and
the great constitutional questions involved
in any permanent policy would have been
dealt with on their merits.
Complicate the Situation
Mr. Borden's proposals complicate the
situation; the "gift" becomes a "loan" because the battleships to be constructed may
be removed from direct control of the British Admiralty and recalled to Canadian
waters "if desired by the Canadian Government whenever a Canadian Navy is
formed." As a feature of a permanent
naval policy this might or might not be a
desirable feature, depending entirely upon
the exigencies of the moment. As a stipulation, or even an understanding, in connection with an emergency contribution, it
is entirely out of place. Then the situation
is further complicated by the introduction
at this time of an arrangement whereby in
consideration of Canada furnishing the
money to build three battleships in the Old
Country, the Admiralty will make certain
purchases of naval equipment and place
orders for smaller craft with Canadian
manufacturers. No one objects to the principle, because everyone is anxious to see
ship-building established in Canada; we
have the natural resources and all the things
necessary for the up-buildings of a great
ship-building industry. What strikes us is
the inconsistency of anticipating this important feature of the case when dealing
with an emergency vote.
No Consistent Relation
It has no consistent relation to the present proposals; it could not logically be
considered except in relation to a permanent policy. In fact the more one considers
the present proposals, the more obvious it
appears that they must be regarded not so
much in the light of an emergency contrir
-      ■•■■_.
*   .   *
bution as of an instalment of the permanent '■
policy, although there are features which
preclude even that conception. It is not
easy to reconcile Mr. Borden's speech with
the text of the measure, the fourth clause
of which leaves the door wide open for the
imposition of many "terms, conditions and
arrangements" which at the present moment
may not even be contemplated. This stipulation, more than any other vitiates the
principle of a gift, and makes the contribution in the fullest sense of the term a conditional one. Indeed, the only answer to
this criticism is that we are not dealing
with an emergency contribution, but with
an instalment of a permanent policy. If so,
the whole aspect of affairs is changed and
.there are many other matters which should
be gone into before even the proposed
measure can be dealt with.
Fleet Unit on the Pacific
If it is to be regarded as an instalment of
a permanent policy, it should have dealt
with the subject of a Canadian Navy or
Fleet Units in Canadian waters, for as far
as British Columbia is concerned "no policy
will be satisfactory which does not provide for the establishment of a Fleet Unit
on the Pacific," ancl there is no reason to
believe that the people of Canada entertain
a different view with respect to the Atlantic.
The fact of the matter is that Mr. Borden
appears to have secured in connection wilh
his emergency contribution concessions
which properly belong to the determination
of a permanent policy. The only regret
which Canadians can have will be at the
manner in whicii it has been done. It can
never be a gratifying reflection that they
robbed their contribution of all its gracious-
ness by making it conditional, and that no
page of history will be able to record that
they made a "gift." It will be written
down forever that Canada alone of all the
Over-Seas Dominions made a "bargain"
with the Motherland. The assurance received from the British Government that
they will welcome the presence in London
of a Canadian Minister during the whole
or part of each year and that he will be
regularly summoned to all meetings of the
Committee of Imperial Defence is a highly
satisfactory solution of a constitutional problem, as it does not complicate the question of representation, and will undoubtedly be acted upon in the case of all the Over-
Seas Dominions, but The Week would point
out that this very proviso determines the
character of the proposed contribution, and
once more makes it perfectly clear that it
can in no sense be regarded, as a "gift,"
and that all the precautions which could
have been taken in hedging round a permanent naval policy vvith safeguards have
been exacted before a dollar is parted vvith.
Quit You Like Men
The announcement of Mr. Borden does
not write "Finis" to a single chapter in the
programme of the Navy League or any
other patriotic organization whicii is looking for Canada to assume her rightful position, pnd to discharge her full obligations
in the matter of Imperial Naval Defence.
While it is clear that the League has failed
to secure its first request for an "unconditional" contribution, it need not despair of
securing its second, the establishment of a
Fleet Unit on the Pacilic Coast, and to that
end it should bend all its energies, undeterred alike by the hostile criticisms of
those who think it. ultra-British and the
blandishments of those who would lull it
into a sense of false security. To Canadians as to his own countrymen Lord
Roberts' appeal becomes a command:
"Awake! quit you like men."
William Blakkmork. r 2
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
- The opening years of the Twentieth Century will be memorable for
many things, but perhaps the interest
which has of late years been taken
in hospital work will have the most
lasting effect. The closing days of
Queen Victoria's reign, the ail-too
brief sovereignty of Edward VII. and
the early years of His Majesty
George V. have shown that this feature of public life has appealed with
special force to the Royal Family,
and as is usual when Royalty leads
the way the rest of the world has
heard the call. Victoria, the name
city of the Great Queen, is now in
the throes of a Hospital Question
and it is up to the citizens of our
capital to say whether they are going to fall in line with the examples
which have been set over the whole
Empire, or whether they desire to
muddle along with a hospital which
is antiquated in design and restricted
in accommodation.
* *   *
That a new hospital is needed nobody will deny. Probably there is
not one person in Victoria who will
not appear enthusiastic in his desire
to see erected an institution worthy
of the city. One might therefore be
pardoned for supposing that, such being the case, nothing more need be
said on the matter; but the person
who so optimistically regards the
situation knows little of the curse of
the city in which he lives. And that
curse is "apathy." On the 12th of
this month a By-law will be presented to the ratepayers, asking permission to raise the sum of $200,000.
This will be added to the sum of
$100,000 which has been subscribed
by the merchants, and the Provincial
Government will then be approached
to supplement the total amount. Before the petition for this By-law was
presented to the Council it was necessary to secure signatures representing $9,000,000 worth of property; as
a matter of fact signatures representing $17,000,000 were obtained. It is
obvious, therefore, that there is a very
widespread desire throughout the
community that a Hospital By-law
should be passed. And the By-law
will be passed, provided only that
the curse above mentioned does not
get in its wicked work.
* *   *
And the way in which the curse
works is as follows: Every man,
woman or child, though in this case
it doesn't so much matter about the
child, who lives in Victoria, has been
in the habit of leaving as much as
possible for others to do. When i
measure of this 'nature is before the
public, people forget that a certain
percentage pf the .votes cast must be
obtained in order to make the Bylaw pass. They allow anything to
stand in the way of their attending
the polling booths, and each property
owner relies on his or her neighbour
to carry the thing through. And the
result has always been—failure, rank,
dismal failure. The cranks and the
minority who are opposed to a Bylaw are always in evidence; they organize -they make a point of beating
up voters who will turn it down; they
know full well that those in favour of
it will be over-confident, and so it
is that they usually win the day. If
everyone who is a property-owner
and who really thinks that Victoria
needs a new hospital were to register his or her vote on December 12th
in favour of passing the By-law, its
success would be guaranteed from
the start. But will they do so? Past
experience has shown that they are
too apathetic. Let us hope that this
time they will come forward in their
numbers and insist on its passage by
an overwhelming majority.
* *   *
My remarks concerning the lighting of streets and policemen in last
week's issue have resulted in my being asked to say a few words with
re-•••_; to that portion  of Superior
street which lies between Menzies
and Government. Superior street always has been rather unfortunate. It
suffers from its name. Like some men
and women I know it is labelled with
a high-sounding title which it has
never been able to live up to. I once
knew a boy whose Christian name
was "Heavens"; and another who
went through life boasting the baptismal appeallation of "Celestial."
Poor fellows, the handicap was too
much for them and they turned out
the biggest little "rips" imaginable.
It is somewhat the same with Superior street. It 'had a good name,
and apparently the City Council who
first named it and all the succeeding
Councils since, thought that they had
done enough for it and that with a
distinguished title like that it ought
to be able to look after itself. It was
for that reason, I suppose, that until quite lately it was the worst paved
road in the city, it was for that reason, presumably, that for many
months the sidewalks were kept piled
dep with excavated mud, and for the
same reason at the present day it
runs in gloomy splendour at night,
glad to hide its dishonoured head in
darkness. But I believe that the
Council now in office lately had a
feeling of remorse for the way in
which this street has been treated in
the past, for a lamp-post has been
erected at t'he blackest spot in the
stretch referred to above. Yes, the
lamp-post is there. But what avails
it? A post can give no light, and at
the time of writing it rears its lengthy
form towards the sky, an added menace to the wayfarer and another
monument to that spirit which looks
so well after the streets infernal at
the expense of those we use in this
world. I hope that when the illuminating spasm takes hold of the authorities and we see the blaze of light
which is to adorn the "Gateway,"
some kind official will send a boy up
with a lamp to hang on this lonely
post, so that the householders on Superior street may enjoy a share of
the brilliance w'hich is to be meted
out to their more fortunate neighbours. ,
*   *   *
There are few virtues which are
more worthy of commendation, when
practised in the abstract, than economy. It is true that when we are personally affected by it, we are apt to
give it another name and speak disdainfully of it as "meanness." What
is economical in ourselves, when put
in effect for our own benefit, becomes
mean in another person. I myself am
a devotee of economy. I like to see
it practised on all sides. I always
make one piece of bread do for both
butter and jam and I hate seeing
sugar go to waste in the sugar basin.
But what becomes me, does not so
well become an august body, especially when that body is representative
not only of a great city, but also of
the Majesty of the Law. It is for
this reason, therefore, that I regret
to see that the Patrol Waggon is being used as an Express Waggon. The
other day this modern "Black Maria"
drove up in state to a store on Douglas street and backed up to the door.
Two detectives emerged and an eager
crowd of bystanders collected, prepared to see Justice triumphant and
Vice overpowered. But what a disappointment was in store! Talk
about the mountains labouring to
bring forth a mouse! They are not
in it with two detectives, real, live,
flesh-and-blood detectives chasing a
coffee urn. I am told that the same
thing happened quite recently also on
Government street. If it were not impossible for anything so majestic as
the Law to be brought into disrepute,
I should feel inclined to say that such
action was liable to make it look
ridiculous. I won't say it, however,
because, for all I know, such a statement might be construed as contempt of coutt.
I try hard to cultivate the saving
grace:,of charity. I do not mean the;
oharitjr which we.'associate with the
giving pf alms, but the charity which
is akin tp love, which tries to see the
good in our friends and enemies and
which resolutely refuses to believe
evil. I think that on the whole I am
charitable, but occasionally my real
feelings swell upward and, like Job, I
curse my day. I am sorry to say
that in most instances when this happens the real offender is a dainty
damsel. I have never seen her; she
is never quite the same girl. Sometimes she has black hair, sometimes
brown, and again it changes to peroxide. Her eyes are as variable as her
hair; as for her figure, I despair pf
being able to describe it. In only one
thing is she consistent; she always
bears the same name, and that is
"Central." I am aware that I have
written quite lately on this subject,
but I am mindful of the truth taught
by the dropping of water, and I hope
in time that I shall be able to wear
away the obdurate heart of "Central"
who keeps us all waiting until she
wakes up. Being a girl, she labours
under the impression that a conversation over the 'phone must of necessity last five minutes at least, and
that is why, when at last you 'have
been connected with the number you
desire, you are left there. I pften
think that "Central" and I might well
change names, she so religiously lives
up to the title of
cfa
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Season 1911-1913
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Dec. 27—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 9—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Jan. 17—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Jan. 31—Westminster vs. Victoria.
Feb. 11—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Feb. at—Westminster vs. Victoria.
March 4—Vancouver vs. Victoria.
Matches start at 8.30 p.m.
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Canadian Representative, 3 Front St. E,, Toronto
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The Hartmann Concert
Once more conclusive proof has
been given that Victorians have no
claim to be considered patrons of instrumental music. They will flock to
hear great singers, but will not sit
through a whole evening of violin or
piano playing. On Monday night
Arthur Hartmann, who easily stands
in the front rank of violinists the
world over, gave a recital in Victoria.
Assembled in the Victoria theatre to
greet him were about 125 persons, including those who were in the gallery.
It is pitiful to have to chronicle suc'h
a fiasco, but it is the truth and I am
inclined to think that the sooner im-
pressarios realize that Victoria is not
the place where first class instrumentalists are appreciated, the fewer disappointments they will have to face
in the future. It is gratifying, however,
to be able to record that the few who
were present were enthusiastic in
• t'heir applause and made up in some
measure by the volume of their sound
'for the emptiness of the auditorium.
( Arthur Hartmann has now visited
,'Victoria three* times, and on each oc-
| caston of his appearance at the theatre be has shown himself to be a
master of his art.* He combines to an
extraordinary degree brilliancy of
execution with depth of feeling. His
well selected programme gave him
the • opportunity of displaying these
qualities at their best. The "Symphonic Espagnole" and the "Allegro
de Concert e Cadenza" revealed the
hand of the master, whilst the exquisite "Menuetto" ("Danse des Au-
vergnats") of the parly eighteenth
century and his own composition,
"Cradle Song," showed the soul of
the true artist.
Mr. Hartmann was accompanied by
Mr. William Reddick, a pianist of
merit. His work as accompanist was
marked by that sympathy which is the
true test of this most difficult art,
whilst as a solist he earned a well-
deserved encore by his rendering of
Schumann's "Papillons."
"The Typhoon"
On Tuesday night last Walker
Whitesides with his company appeared at the Victoria theatre in "The
Typhoon," which is said to have
achieved enormous success in Europe. The play, which is from the pen
of an Hungarian playwright, Meny-
hert Lengel, deals with the life of
Japanese emissaries in European
capitals, and is intended to portray
the menace of the "Yellow Peril."
Seen in "The Typhoon" Mr. White-
sides at once demonstarted not -only
the remarkable force of the play, but
also the enormous strides in dramatic
art which he 'himself has made since
his last appearance in Victoria. In the
role of "Tokeramo," the Japanese in
Berlin with a special work to do for
his country, he exhibited to the full
the heroic spirit of patriotism and
fatalism which characterizes the subjects of the Mikado. In voice, manner and general make-up he achieved
a triumph and was well supported by
the men of his company, who, one
and all, successfully submerged their
Caucasian attributes beneath the disguises of the Mongolian. Mr. J. Jordan, as "Joshikawa," the leader of
the Japanese colony, in particular
sustained the illusion to a marked
degree. In absolute keeping with the
make-up of the' actors was the setting of the stage. Though the scenery
throughout the three acts was the
same, it never palled. On one occasion it was changed from a modern
library to an Oriental hall, but this;
was contrived by the actors themselves and the effect was unique. The
one weak spot, in the whole production was to be found in the acting
of Miss Florence Fisher. Voice and
manner were both against'her, neither
did she look the part of "Illona Ker-
tier," the young lady of. Berlin of
whom the Japanese agent was enamoured. Her companion,    Miss Shaw,
was far more at home in the comparatively small role of "Tira Hempel."
Mr. Hubert White had an unnatural
and difficult character to depict and
as "Ernest Lindner," the jilted German lover, who found consolation in
"Takeramo's" cognac, he figured well.
"The Typhoon" will certainly rank
as one of the most successful dramas
produced this season at the Victoria
theatre. It is a play with something
more than a plot; it is powerful
enough to make people think, and of
not many modern plays can this be
said.
Lambardi Opera Company
At the time of writing the Lambardi Opera Company has only given
one of its four performances at the
Victoria Theatre, but that one was so
super-excellent in every respect that
if.it is to be regarded as a criterion
of the others, it certainly entitled the
management and the Company to unqualified praise. Puccini's masterpiece, "Madame Butterfly," is not new
to Victoria, and theatre-goers have
not yet forgotten the splendid performance given here rather more than
lent work throughout the opera. She
has a fine contralto voice and in the
"Trio" with Nico-letti and Aramini
rose to great heights. Such an all-
round company with really brilliant
operatic stars should appeal to every
music lover in Victoria. Every
vacant seat, and there were a few,
was a blot on our musical reputation.
Princess Theatre
"Baby Mine" at the Princess theatre this week is making a great hit.
It is one big continuous laugh. Miss
Margaret Doyle was warmly welcomed to the Williams' forces.
Next week will be staged "What
Every Woman Knows," Barrie's
widely read book, which was dramatized for Maud Adams and of wheih
she made a great success. It is a
beautiful play, well worthy of the
great author.   The   part of Maggie
Paul Armstrong, the Playwright, and His Star, Holbrook Blinn, who will be
seen in "A Romance of the Underworld," Victoria Theatre,
Wednesday, December nth
a year ago, when, owing to the indisposition of the star billed, Madame
Ferrabini substituted. Her singing
was brilliant and the opinion then
formed of her has been justified by
her promotion to the chief soprano
roles in the Montreal Grand Opera
Company. The performance, however, of Madame Matini on Thursday night was so. superior to that of
Madame Ferrabini as to eclipse it altogether. Rarely, if ever, has a more
pure, liquid and brilliant soprano
voice been heard in opera in Victoria.
Every note from the highest to the
lowest proved a delight and the histrionic skill and dramatic force of
this incomparable Italian lady were
in every sense equal to her voice.
Her dendition of the part of Madame
Butterfly will stand out as an ideal
performance, which may possibly be
duplicated in the future, but will never
be surpassed. The other parts were
all well sustained, the rich baritone
voice of Nicoletti being heard to
great advantage in the part of the
American Consul. The tenor, Aramini, Was a voice of wide range and
great power; on the whole he sang
exceedingly well, the only fault being
an occasional tendency to raspiness.
Madame Zizolfi, as Suzuki, the maid,
distinguished herself and received a
full share of applause for her excel-
Wylie will be played by Miss Page,
giving her a good opportunity to
display her wonderful versatility.
Miss Doyle will have a splendid
chance as the young and beautiful
Lady Sybil. Mr. Belasco should make
a good David Wylie. Mr. Williams as
Mr. Venable, and the remainder of
the cast are well fitted to the different parts. The ladies of the company
will display several pretty costumes,
and all of the stage settings are specially painted.
"What Every Woman Knows"
will run all week, Wednesday and
Saturday matinee.
The Empress Theatre
The acrobatic turn contributed by
the Seven Picchianis is far and away
the best of its kind that has ever been
shown at the local vaudeville house.
The performers are simply wonderful.
They work largely by means of
springboards and the effects they contrive to get from tllis simple contrivance are nothing short of phenomenal.
If there were no other turn at all in
this week's bill, the Picchianis would
,be worth far more than the price of
[admission, Gaylord & Heron are two
amusing black-face comedians who
differ from the majority in that they
are bf the female persuasion. Their
act is in two parts and both are equally entertaining. Miss Gertrude Gebest
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The. Largest Best -Furnished and Most Comfortable Vaudeville and
Picture Theatre in the City.
Two Acts of Vaudeville, changing Mondays and Thursdays.   Four
Reels of First Run Pictures, changing Monday, Wednesday.
and  Friday.   The   Best  Music—three-piece
Orchestra—in the City.
The biggest Fan on the Coast, removing 37,600 cubic feet of air every
five minutes, insuring you fresh and cool air.
Hours: Pictures from 1.30 to 5.30 and 6.30 to 11.00.
Vaudeville, 3.00 to 4.00 and 7.00 to 11.00.
Victoria Theatre
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7
Lambardi Pacific
Coast Company
Matinee   ■   ■   "LA BOHEME"
50c to $1.50
Evening   -   -   -   -   "SALOME"
Soc to $2.50
is a lady monologist and a success as
such, whilst Milt Arnsman is in the
same line, only he is a mere man. It
is unusual for a vaudeville bill to offer
an audience the opportunity of judging between the sexes on common
ground. In this case both are good.
The Three Lorettas open the performance with a musical act interspersed with comedy.
. The Crystal Theatre
Capacity houses have become a regular feature of every evening performance at the Broad street house now-a-
days.* Rarely has an innovation been
attended with such instantaneous success as the inauguration of two vaudeville turns given between, the pictures
has attracted. The Crystal theatre is
the largest moving-picture house in
the city, and* in the old davs the fact
that it was not always crowded did
not mean that it was doing less business than its.competitors. The present
day fact, however, that it is always
full up to the last seat, does mean
that it is doing the biggest business
in Victoria. And the shows are well
worth the attendance, the attractions
shown this week being no exception
to the rule.
The Majestic Theatre
A realistic drama of the terror
which brooded over the Netherlands
during the sixteenth century, when
they constituted part of the personal
property of the Spanish crown, was
revealed at the Majestic theatre this
week, and under the title of "The
Revolt of the Peasants" held the
house enthralled. A little good comedy was needed to counterbalance
this film, and it was well provided,
the champion Vitagraph comedian,
John Bunny, being featured.
Romano Theatre
"The Mail Clerk's Temptation"
proved an exciting film and one with
a good moral attached, and was one
of the big reels seen this week, but
last Saturday and Friday, too late
for mention in The Week, a really
magnificent representation was given
of the story of Undine. Tllis was a
splendid Tannhauser production and
gave immense pleasure.
Holbrook Blinn in "A Romance of
the Underworld."
Holbrook Blinn, star of Paul Armstrong's new play, "A Romance of
the Underworld," which conies to the
Victoria theatre on Wednesday, December 11, recently expressed him-
isclf very lucidly on the question of
characterization.
"No man is what hc portrays on
the stage," said Mr. Blinn. "Shakespeare says: 'One man, in his time,
plays many parts,' and we might
easily take this saying unto ourselves,
jwe actors, and gain credit for getting
inside a part and turning it inside
out for the view of .(he public. One
can no 'more be the rough diamond
off fhe stage'and yctjpoliray it cVery
night than one can forget himself,"-if
(Continued dft-Page110)
Princess Theatre
F.ra.rljA.O.U.W.HaU
Cor. Yates & Blanchard Sts.
WEEK   COMMENCING   MONDAY
DECEMBER 9
The Williams Stock Co.
Will Present
"What Every Woman Knows"
Prices ioc, aoc and 30c
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday
ioc and aoc
Curtain, 8,311 p.m.
Reserved  Seats  on  sale  at   Dean
Matineei, 3.45
le at  Dean  &
Hiscock'i, cor.  Broad and Yates Sti.
impress
WEEK DECEMBER 9
Three Times Daily—3.00 p.m.,
7.30 p.m., 9.00 p.m.
POULINE FLETCHER & CO.
In an Up-to-Date Comedy Playlet
"The Girl With a Taking Way"
There's a Laugh in Every Line"
VIRGINIA GRANT
My Lady Dainty in Pretty Songs
A Natty Duo
DE VERE & LEWIS
Presenting a Refined Musical Offering
The Unctuous Comedian
DON CARNEY
Original  Monologue and Syncopated
Pianologue
The Clever Canine Comedians
JACOBS' DOGS
TWILIGHT PICTURES
Victoria Theatre
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 11
Doors open 7.30. Curtain 8.30
The Distinguished Star
HOLBROOK BLINN
And Company of Fifty, in
"A Romance of the Underworld"
(By Paul Armstrong)
Author of "Alias Jimmy Valentine,"
"The Deep Purple," and
"Salomy Jane."
Direct from Three Months in Chicago
Prices $1.50, $1.00, 75c and 50c.
Mail Orders now received.
Seats on Sale, Monday, December Qth
Victoria Theatre
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
December 13th and 14th
John  Cort  Offers  His   Big  Musical
Success, from Daly's Theatre,
New York
The
Rose ol Panama
A Viennese Opera, with
CHAPINE
The Charming French Prima Donna
Company of 70     Orchestra of 20
Prices, 50c to $2.00
Mail Orders no\y received THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
The Week
A Provincial Newspaper and Review
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at  1208  Qovernment  St.,
Victoria, B.C., Canada
WILLIAM BLAKEMORE, Editor
The Age of
Specialization
By Bohemian
Of the many delightful books contributed to the world by the late Mr.
Samuel L. Clemens, better known to
thousands of readers as "Mark
Twain," one of the most popular was
entitled "A Yankee at the Court of
King Arthur." In this romance, as
the majority of fiction lovers know,
an American of parts found himself
suddenly carried back many centuries into the days when Arthur and
his knights of the Round Table held
sway in England under the auspices
of Merlin. The hapless stranger was
first consigned to a dungeon with
every prospect of being burnt alive
in the near future, when a good memory and a knowledge of electricity,
gunpowder and similar useful subjects enabled him to turn the tables
and out-Merlin Merlin.
It is not at all wonderful that 'he
should Have been able to do this.
There are certainly hundreds of men
in Victoria today who, if they became
the victims of a like strange occurrence, could do just as well for themselves as did the hero of "Mark
Twain's" imagination. What is far
more wonderful is the fact that there
are equally certainly thousands of
men in Victoria today who would be
as helpless at Merlin's feet as he was
before the exponent of the new wizardry.
I do not think that any reader will
dispute this statement of mine. It is
true that now-a-days we are all familiar with the use of electricity. We
use it to light our homes and our
streets; we use it to carry our messages; we use it to drive our machinery; we use it to cook our food, to
iron our clothes, to ease our limbs
and, if the latest reports are to be
believed, we are going to use it to
aid our digestions and possibly to
take the place of food itself. To employ a colloquial expression, which,
like so many of its kind, conveys a
meaning more directly than many a
flowered phrase, electricity "cuts no
ice" with us in the Twentieth Century. That familiarity has not yet actually bred contempt is only due to
the fact that we have sufficiently
numerous evidences of its devastating power to leave its management to
those who know how to control it.
And that is the whole case in a nutshell. We ourselves know nothing
about it and are entirely dependent
for its use on a class of men who
call themselves electricians. We can
turn a switch, but if anything goes
wrong we are helpless to repair the
damage.
This is an age of specialists. We
see the fact staring us in the face
every day of our lives. Even if our
daily experience did not teach us this,
we could read it for ourselves in the
advertising columns of every magazine. The Correspondence Schools,
which flourish so mightily on this
continent, are never tired of urging
upon the readers of their advertisements the fact that in the present age
if a man wishes to make his mark
in the world he must specialize. To
be successful it is necessary to have
one subject at the finger tips; about
one thing a man must know more
than anyone else in his neighborhood. We are taught to make ourselves "facile princeps" in one art or
in one branch of a trade or profession and let others attend to the outlying details. And this is probably
why "Mark Twain" took care to
make sure that the Yankee at King
Arthur's court had more than a smat
tering of the first principles of electricity.
In the history of the world there
probably never was a time when the
adage "Jack of all trades, master of
none" was more scrupulously insisted
upon. Ask any man who has "hunted
a job." Ask any employer who interviews applicants. Both will tell the
same story, that the man who in reply to the question "What can you
do?" answers "Anything," is the man
who never fills a billet. It is the most
hopeless answer in this world, and
yet it is still the most common. The
seeker after work who makes this reply is almost always a man who
could more correctly and truthfully
answer "Nothing." It is far better
for a man to be a competent bottle-
washer than have a smattering of
various trades of which he knows
none of the underlying principles.
Even unskilled labour now-a-days
requires a man of experience. There
is much to learn about the scientific
way in w'hich to handle a pick and
shovel so as to get tbe maximum of
work with the minimum of exhaustion.
To my mind it is rather a humiliating confession for our highly advanced civilization to have to make, but
I think that it is true that ninety-
nine per cent, of our population
would be far worse off in the circumstances in which "Mark Twain's"
Yankee found himself than our ancestors of a few generations ago. In
fact, I would go further and say that
the more remote the generation the
more likely its representative would
be to 'hold his own amongst a primitive people; at least, he would be less
likely to incur the opprobrious
epithet of "liar."
It may not be pleasant for us to
contemplate our individual helplessness, but I am inclined to think that
it is rather good for us. There is a
general tendency abroad to consider
•that we are most certainly "the people"; that never before has such a
civilization been seen as that of the
Twentieth Century; that we are
giants before whom 01. ancestors
shrivel as pigmy dwarfs. And yet,
take us separately, one by one, and
we are very children. Just consider
one more little instance.
The average boy receives a watch
about the time that 'he is ten years
old. From that age until his death,
w'hich, to adopt David's reckoning,
may be expected in fifty years, that
individual is never without a watch,
except at such times as it may be un-
derging repairs at the jeweller's or
keeping the wolf from the door at
the pawnbroker's. Yet, from the time
that the boy of ten receives the watch
till the old man of sixty bequeathes
it to his heir, he 'has never learnt how
to make one or how to repair it when
it fails to keep time. And mark this,
when any man or woman who is not
in the profession, that is to say who
is not one of the specialists whom
we employ to look after our timepieces, is able to take a watch to
pieces or repair one, he is looked
upon as quite an extraordinary person of brilliant attainments.
So it is with everything. Our battleships are machines w'herein are stationed men each one of whom is a
specialist in his own department. Our
factories are honeycombs within
each cell of which resides a specialist. Our business houses employ specialists to buy, others to sell and
others still to tell the public what
they can procure. If a man is a successful lawyer he is sure to specialize in some branch of law and we
know that it is natural ambition of
every doctor to become a specialist
with an international reputation for
some particular form of operation.
Thus it will be to the end. So long
as we live in a progressive age where
time is money and money is everything, so long shall we continue to
specialize, until at length the lmiit
is reached and perhaps, who knows,
we shall all begin again. Remember
what is said of the ancient Egyptians
that they knew more three thousand
years ago than we know today—and
where are the Egyptians?
What are Germany's
Aims?
Written specially for The Week by
J. Arthur Hill
Three main forces may be detected,
controlling Germany's policy. The
future of the civilized world depends
largely on which of these forces shall
prove strongest.
First, the war party which desires
war for its own sake and because it
is the quickest way to promotion, in
the Army and Navy. When we remember that the forces of the Empire
number on a war footing nearly 4,-
000,000 men, we realize the great
strength of this party.
Second, the civilian and trading
party, which comprises the bulk of
the population, and which does not
want war, because it would upset
trade, increase taxation, and bring
death into countless homes.
Third, t'he politicians of the ''World-
Politics" party, who, noting the increase of population, foresee that emigration—already large—will become
more and more imperative, and that
it is undesirable for these emigrants
to become absorbed in another nation,
as in the United States, w'hich contains twelve million German-born people; consequently that it is desirable
for Germany to acquire territory in
some other part of the world. To this
party, so far as can be seen, belongs
the Emperor himself; hence his strenuous naval-armament policy.
As to these three forces, it is to be
hoped that the first will be resisted
by the good sense of the nation at
large and by the responsible men in
the Reichstag; that the second will
increase in strength, helped by clear
perception of the unprofitableness of
war—so forcibly argued by Mr. Norman Angell—even for the victor; and
that the third may be rendered innocuous by allowing it reasonably
free play.
This latter point will become the
crux of the situation. At the present
moment, many Germans seem to think
that the British Empire blocks the
way to colonial expansion. It is not
so. It is even the other way round.
Britain would like Germany to have
colonies at a distance, for this would
relieve the situation in the North Sea
by necessarily drawing off German
warships for the defence of the foreign possessions. Britain's shipbuilding programme could then be curtailed without danger, and the British
taxpayer would be thankful. Broadly
speaking, then, Britain would welcome
and not obstruct Germany's colonial
expansion.
But, coming to practical details,
where can this expansion occur?
In the first place, Britain certainly
will not cede any of her Dominions
except under compulsion. ^Canada
will not become German until after
an expensive and bloody war, which
would leave Germany too weak to
hold what she had gained; for Britain
would fight to a finish, and would
(even if beaten) leave her enemy so
enfeebled that France would be able
to step in and seize back the longed-
for Alsace and Lorraine, and the
United States would annex Canada,
thus leaving Germany mauled, depleted and weaker than before. German
politicians—the far-seeing ones—are
aware of all this, and they know that
they can hope for no help except perhaps from Austria, and this would be
off-set by Italy and Russia, who are
always ready for an opportunity to
bite off some of Austria's possessions.
It is unthinkable, therefore, that Germany will fight for possession of our
colonies, unless the war-party prevails over the cooler and wiser heads.
Where, then, must the Teuton turn?
There are three places. If the
stream of Germany's surplus population can be turned into these three
quarters, war will be avoided for a
generation, and perhaps for ever—for,
in twenty or thirty years, public opinion will have become educated up to
the insistence on arbitration for all
disputes—and the advance of civilization will be accelerated.
First, the filling up of Germany's
own waste places. There are vast
tracts of land in Mecklenburg-
Schwerin, Silesia, Swabia and even in
Prussia, which are not populated anywhere near the limit of their power to
support. At the same time it is undeniable that Germany's .sixty-five
million inhabitants will soon expand
to.a number too large to be comfortably housed in the 211,000 square
miles of territory—only about twice
the area of the United Kingdom.
Second, German Africa. The Witu-
land Protectorate covers 520,000
square miles; Damaraland and Great
Namaqualand, 230,000, and other protectorates in Africa 415,000. Some of
this land is malarial and tropical, but
with the extermination of mosquitoes
and tsetze, the clearing of bush, and
the extension of irrigation, a large
proportion of it will become habitable
and even healthy for white men. And
a good deal of it is so already, like
the hill portion of our own British
East Africa. (A friend of mine is a
missionary at Sagalla, and finds climate agreeable and soil fertile—the
latter to such a degree that the natives are encouraged in laziness, the
rich soil growing all the wheat and
vegetables they require, almost without labour.)
Third, South America. It is a very
commonly held opinion in Europe,
that Germany wishes to obtain territory south of Panama. It may be so.
And it seems clear that some such
colonization would be all to the good,
in the interests of civilization. Patagonia, Peru, Chile and some of the
smaller Republics—all these are practically waste places, more or less incompetently governed, and consequently failing to inspire sufficient
confidence to attract money for the
development of their enormous natural resources. With a stable Germanic government, railways would be
built, the countries opened up to trade,
cereals cultivated, s'heep bred—as now
in the Argentine. The chief difficulty
is that perhaps the Monroe Doctrine
may still be insisted on without qualification; and indeed the United States
would naturally object to a great
Power gaining a foothold very near
her own borders. But the danger may
be exaggerated. So long as the States
are on terms of friendship with Britain or France, she would have no need
to fear a German colony which, after
all, would only be comparatively
small. And certainly such a colony
would increase American trade.
On the whole, then, in the interests
of world-progress, Germany's aims at
legitimate expansion ought not to be
resisted or thwarted. Such expansion,
in the proper direction, will bring
more good than ill; and if it is checked—through exaggerated timidity regarding its "dangerousness"—the result may be an outburst of war which
will put back the clock of progress for
a generation, and will devastate the
civilization of Europe. It is better to
open a safety-valve than to have a
blow-up.
Interesting Items About
Forestry
The chief forester of the Province
announced recently the earnest desire
of the Forest Branch in Victoria to
assist those who require information
on any phase of the forest industry.
Russia began a forest policy in 1615
and had forest reserves in 1687. She
posseses today the greatest store of
timber in the world.
One forest in France pays over 20
million dollars annually, Such a thing
as a fire is, of course, unknown.
There is a town in Europe whose
citizens receive a dividend over and
above the municipal expenses. Wise
use of the surrounding forest has
made it a permanent and growing
revenue-producer.
France has spent over 40 million
dollars in an endeavor to prevent the
erosion of the soil from mountains
whose slopes have been denuded of
timber through forest fires.
The forest industry had a value to
British Columbia in 1911 of $28,000,-
000—almost equivalent to the value
of the foodstuffs produced and imported.
H. R. MacMillan, chief forester of
the Province, has established a bureau
of information in the Forest Branch,
Victoria, from which statistics, etc.,
regarding the forest and the forest
industries may be had.
Imperial Naval
Defence
What British   Columbians   Thought
On the Subject of the Navy
in 1901.
[For the following interesting report which appeared in The Colonist
of October 2nd, 1901, The Week is
indebted to Capt. John T. Walbran.]
A committee of the British Columbia branch of the Navy League yesterday waited on Sir Wilfrid Laurier,
Premier of Canada, at the Mount
Baker hotel, and presented him with
the resolution passed by the executive of the league last month. Mr. Justice Martin stated the case, and Capt.
Barkley, Joseph Pierson and G. T.
Devereaux also spoke.
Sir Wilfrid promised to submit the
proposition to his colleagues and asked that the league send him any information they may 'have as to what
Australia has done. He recognized
that with the growth of Canada her
responsibilities increased, but reminded the committee that the present j
matter of chief importance was that |
of transportation.
The resolution submitted was asl
follows, it having been passed at a]
meeting of the executive of the Brit-f
ish Columbia branch of the Navy|
League on September 4th.:
"Whereas  in the opinion    of thel
British Columbia branch of the Navyl
League, the time has come when Can-|
ada, the first of the colonial   dependencies of the Empire, should realize *
her obligation to bear a just proportion of the cost of the scheme of Im-
peiral naval defence;
"Be it therefore resolved, that a
special committee of this league be
appointed to wait upon the Right
Honourable t'he Prime Minister of
Canada on his arrival in Victoria, and
request him to lay the matter before
the members of the Government and
engage, if possible, their favourable
consideration of the same;
"And that the same committee
wait upon the Provincial Government
and, if deemed advisable, present a
petition to the Provincial Legislature
praying for t'heir co-operation in this
matter, of such importance to a maritime province, which already enjoys
the immense benefits of having a
naval establishment within its boundaries;
"And be it further resolved, that a
copy of this resolution be forwarded
to the premiers of all the provinces
in Canada."
Those present were: Vice-presidents the Hon. Mr. Justice Martin,
the Hon. Mr. Justice Tyrwhitt-Drake,
the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop
of Columbia, Capt. E. Barkley, R.N.,
Capt. J. Devereaux; committee, Roland Stuart, S. A. Roberts, R.N., Joseph Pierson, J.P., C. H. Lugrin,
Capt. J. G. Cox, Capt. C. Boyds, Richard Hall, M.P.P., C. S. Baxter, Capt.
J. Gaudin (as guest), G. A. Kirk, R.
N., Capt. J. T. Walbran, A. B. Fraser,
F. L. Neale, G.T., Hon. Secretary G.
T. Devereaux.
HE KNEW
The prosecuting witness testified that the
defendant knocked him senseless, and then
kicked him in the head and face for several
minutes.
"If he knocked you senseless," asked the
magistrate, "how do you know that he kicked
you after you were down?"
The witness reflected.
"I know it," he replied, '"cause that's what
I'd 'a' done to him if I'd got him down—
so there 1"
A Pimlico woman, studying a neighbour's
new furs from the window, fell out. In following the fashions, let us not go too far.
BOOK NOTES
At the Victoria Book and Stationery Co., 1004 Government
St., Victoria, B.C.:
"The Street of the Flute
Player," by H. DeVere Stacpoole.
"The Lost World," by Conan
Doyle.   $1.50.
"Smoke Bellew," by Jack
London.   $1.50. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
BUILDING PERMITS
I
November 21 to December 3
November 27—
' Turner & Perry—Wilman St.—Dwelling $ 2,000
November 28—
Thos. Heaslip—Graham St.—Dwelling  3,500
N. H. Cashfield—Fernwood St.—Dwelling  3,000
B. J. H. Boulton—Ida St.—Dwelling  3,800
King Mfg. Co.—Ellis St.—Office  250
Steele & Fortous—Vining St.—Dwelling  3,500
G. H. P. Caxton—Stannard St.—Dwelling  2,000
Merchants Bank—Douglas St.—Temp. Floor  300
L. Dawson—Myrtle St.—Dwelling   1,500
November 29—
F. & John Eulers—Edgeware Road—Dwelling  3,000
E. H. Battle—Hiland Drive—Dwelling   5,000
H. Bickerdike—Queen's Avenue—Dwelling  3,800
December 2—
Coast Investment Co.—Fairfield Road—Dwelling  3,000
Duncan Ross—Rockland Ave.—Garage   692
Victoria School Board—Cecilia and Olive Sts.—School.... 50,000
Victoria School Board—Victor, Lionel, Adelaide.. School.. 50,000
December 3—
H. Warburton—Graham St.—Dwelling  2,000
P. Burns & Co.—Fernwood St.—Alterations  600
F. H. Ware—Clover St.—Dwelling  2,500
FUEL OIL ON THE PACIFIC COAST
The use of fuel oil on the British Columbia Coast has many
advantages over the use of coal. The quantity required to perform the
same service is less both in weight and the space occupied, with a
proportionate decrease in fuel bills. On the larger boats, the reduction
in firemen and trimmers by its use has been as high as 67 per cent., with
the consequent lowering in pay-roll and the cost of subsistence. Such
expenses as renewing of grate-bars, stoke-hold floor plates, slice-bars,
rakes, etc., are done away with.
Owing to the uniform temperature of the fires, boiler repairs have
disappeared. With the use of fuel oil there is no constant opening of
furnace doors for firing up, no cleaning of fires, with the consequent
inrush of cold air, and the resulting lowering of temperature, which
has a serious effect on joints and rivets because of contraction. The
experience on one of the large boats running out of Vancouver in this
respect is that one boiler in a battery of six was constantly under repair
when coal was in use. Since oil has been in use there have been no
repairs necessary.
Because of the absence of smoke, cinders and coal dust, oil-burning
ships are not only cleaner, but the supplies required for scrubbing and
painting are much less. There are no dirty bilges and no corrosion to
the bottom boiler plates as a result of absence of ashes.
In point of efficiency the advantages are quite as marked. The
calorific values of oil far exceeds that of coal, after deducting the
percentage of moisture and ash from coal, the latter from experience
being found to run as high as 20 to 25 per cent. The average run of
coal will be found to represent 7,000 to 9,500 B.T.U., whereas oil will
give as high as 18,500 B.T.U. Owing to incomplete combustion when
firing with coal the stack temperatures are very high; with oil, combustion is practically complete, and stack temperatures of 400 degrees
to 450 degrees are obtainable. In the case of one large coast steamer
the reduction in stack temperature was 950 degrees; the temperature
with coal being 1,400 degrees, with oil 450 degrees.
With fuel oil there is perfect control of the fire. When the
engines are stopped fires may be completely extinguished, if desired, in
the course of a minute. There is no lost time in filling the coal bunkers.
The oil tanks can be filled in several hours, fuel enough being taken on
to last in some cases twice as long as when using coal.
The efficiency of the plant, and, to a large extent the economy to
be obtained, depends on the system of burners adopted. As is well
known, there are three methods of atomizing fuel oil employed, viz.,
by air, by steam, or by mechanical process. The' first entails considerable initial expense for compressors, etc., and the cost of operation.
The second, while not so costly to install, uses a large amount of live
steam, which is unreclaimed, and a consequent drain on the fresh
water supply. In addition, the roaring of the burners is disagreeable
and a nuisance. The third, or mechanical system, consists of heating
the oil to a high temperature and putting it under pressure, from which,
when escaping at the burner, it bursts into a vapor and readily ignites.
' A large number of vessels, also a number of stationary plants,
have been equipped with the mechanical system. Its adoption as
being the cheapest to operate and most efficient, was only after careful
consideration of the various systems. It is practically noiseless, and
consists of a pump, heater and burner. In practice, two pumps and
two heaters are fitted, so that in case of a breakdown or overflow
there will always be one pump and one heater in reserve. The burners
are very sirnp^'asip,d,esigr(, and,a.re arranged for .changing, or cleaning.
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors'  Instruments and
Drawing   Office   Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
214 Central Bldg., View Street
Phone 1534        Victoria, B. C.
Fire Insurance, Employers'
Liability & Contractors'
Bonds Written
See us about Real Estate
Investments
Green & Burdick Bros.
Limited
Cor. Broughton and Langley Streets
Telephone 4169                               Telephone 4170
The
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .     Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
Royal Bank Chambers
Vuftoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Architect
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
The Rent Makes Payments
on this Positive House
Snap
We can deliver for only $500 cash, a practically new, modern, 5
roomed cottage, modern in every way; with cement floor in basement,
furnace pipes, fireplace, built-in bookcases, etc.    The lot is within
half a block of the Oak Bay Car Line.    Garage built six months
ago.   There are several fine Oak trees on the property.   The owner
has a client who will take lease for six months at $35.00 per month.
The payments are only $35.00 per month.
Will you let us show you this at once
Price $4500
With $500 cash and $35 per month
PEMBERTON & SON
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Contains 252,800,000 acres of rich (arm
and  fruit lands,  timtrr,  mineral and
coal lands.   Railroads now building will
open up to settlers and investors.   We
specialize on British Columbia Investments and can tell you about opportunities to GET  IN  AT THE  BEGINNING in town lots, townsite subdivisions or farm, timber, mineral, coal
lands and water powers, wholesale or
retail.    Your name and address on a
postcard    will    bring    you    valuable
information FREE1
WRITE OR CALL
Natural Resources
Security Co., Ltd
Paid-up Capital $250,000
Joint   Owners  and  Sole  Agents   Fort
George Townsite
619  Bower Building, Vancouver, B.C.
may t8                                         aug 17
A. W. Bridgman
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Agent
Conveyancer and Notary. Public
Established 1858
AtTPVit Commercial  Union  Assurance  Co.,   Ltd.
Sigew of Londoni England
Canada Accident Insurance Company
Imperial Underwriters' Corporation
Northern  Counties  Investment  Trust,   Limited
of Bradford, England.
1007 Government Street                      Victoria, B. C.
Removal Notice
On or about November Wth
The Palace of Sweets
will be located in
their new store
at
747 FORT STREET
Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward                            Reginald Hayward                            F. Caselton
President                                         Sec'y-Treas.                                 Manager
The B. C. Funeral Co.
(Sucpcssors to Charles Hayward)
Late of 1016 Government Street, have removed to their new building,
734 Broughton Street, above Douglas.
Phones aajs,  ™3«-  «»37.  "38,                                                          Established 1867
•
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application   Phone X2308
P. O. Box 449 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
A burner can be taken out and changed in five seconds, and has various
sized tips, which can be used as required, for increasing or diminishing
the consumption.
With regard to the supply of fuel oil on the British Columbia
coast, there are no present indications of failure. It was reported
about the beginning of the year that there was in storage in California
alone a quantity sufficient to take care of the world's consumption for
seven months. The California and Texas oil fields are by no means
exhausted; new wells are constantly being sunk and from indications
in Alaska, Alberta and South America other fields will be developed.
Notwithstanding, therefore, the immense increase in consumption, the
supply promises to be adequate. Two large companies now have
storage tanks in Vancouver, and one of these companies will shortly
have a storage tank in Victoria. These companies are each prepared
to make term contracts for the supply of oil fuel in large quantities.
FOXES AS INVESTMENTS
If the present fashion for investment in fox farming continues, the
prospectuses of fox ranching companies will shortly become a common
affair. Papers were signed recently for the purchase of the Dalton
Ranch at Tignish to a syndicate of English and Canadian capitalists.
Letters patent are being applied for under the style of the Charles
Dalton Black Fox Company. Mr. Dalton will take stock to the value
of $100,000 in the new company, and is to remain as managing director
for at least one year. One of the conditions of the sale is the guarantee
of a crop of not less than fifty young foxes next spring, and for each
one short of that number Mr. Dalton will forfeit the sum of $5,000.
Another syndicate is applying for incorporation as the New Brunswick
Tuplin Irving Black Foxes, Limited, with a capital of $100,000.
A Charlottetown paper reported that within a few days a gentleman from Port Elgin, N.B., bought five pairs of foxes from Tignish
and Alberton parties, paying for them fifty thousand dollars; a gentleman from Moncton bought four pairs, also from parties in Tignish and
Alberton, at the same price, ten thousand dollars a pair; a gentleman
from St. John bought two pairs in the same locality at the same price
and wanted two more pairs, but could not get them.
A first-class fox is evidently a good investment, even at $5,000.
An authentic record is reported of a single female black for which in
seven years produced forty-five descendants which lived and were sold.
These at the prices ruling to-day would be worth $225,000, a liberal
return in seven years for an investment of $10,000 for a pair.
Legislation may be introduced in the Quebec Provincial House
with the object of protecting those engaged in raising or breeding
foxes and other fur-bearing animals kept in captivity. This legislation
will be based on a similar Act recently passed by the government of
New Brunswick, and will specially apply to the breeding of black or
silver foxes.
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE NOTICE that  I, Archibald  Paterson, of Vancouver,  B.C.,  occupation  Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing at  a post  planted about  two miles
west from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains; east
80 chains;  to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
ARCHIBALD PATERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, John Friers, of Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Baker,   intends   to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about 5 miles distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S. .W.
corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
JOHN FRIERS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Albert Boyce, of Nanaimo, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends to
apply for permission t^ purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about six miles in a westerly direction
irom the western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east. 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
ALBERT BOYCE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas Bone of Luton,
England, occupation Postmaster, intends to
apply for permission to purchase, the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile east from the
north-western extremity of Sigutla Lake,
marked S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains,
east 40 chains', south 80 chains, west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
THOMAS BONE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Alfred Hills, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one mile west and one mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. W. corner, thence north 80
chains, east* 80 chains, south 8b chains, west
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
ALFRED HILLS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Hubert Lee Harris,  of
Bella Coola,  B.C., occupation prospector, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the following  described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted  about  three miles distant
and  in  a   north-westerly   direction   from   the
north-western    extremity    of    Sigutla    Lake,
marked  South-west   Corner,  thence  north  80
chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west
80  chains  to  point   of  commencement,  containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
HUBERT LEE HARRIS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov.9 Jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Manley E. Marsh, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation Mason, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about two miles distant and in
a  westerly   direction   from   the   Western   extremity of Kwalcho Lake, marked N. W. Corner, thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 25th August, 1912.
MANLEY E. MARSH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that Charley  Don,  of  Vancouver, B.C., occupation Labourer, intends to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase. the   following   described   lands:—Comemncing   at   a
post planted about 7 miles in a westerly direction from the western extremity of Kwalcho
Lake, marked N. E. Corner, thence south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east
80  chains,   to  point  of  commencement,  containing 640  acres,  more or less.
Dated 27th August, 1912.
CHARLEY  DON,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov.9 Jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Charlotte Gadsden,
of  Bella  Coola,   B.C.,  occupation  Housewife,
intends to apply  for permission  to purchase
the  following  described   lands:—Commencing
at a post planted one mile distant and in  a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked S.
W.  corner,  thence  north  80  chains,  east. 80
chains,   south  80  chains,   tfest  80  chains   to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
ANNIE CHARLOTTE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Robert   Boyce,   of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Rancher, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about 6. miles distant and in a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern   extremity   of   Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S.   W.  Corner,  thence north 80 chains,  east
80  chains,   south   80   chains,  west  80  chains
to   point   of   commencement,   containing   640
acres,* more or less.
Dated 21st August,  1912.
ROBERT BOYCE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, George  Brinkley, of
Vancouver,   B.C.,  occupation   Bricklayer,  intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following   described  lands:—Commencing
at  a post planted  at  the western  extremity
of Nahlouza   Lake,    marked    N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80  chains,  east  80  chains  to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
GEORGE BRINKLEY,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   Robert   Beveridge,   of
Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation   Miner,   intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   at   the   western   extremity   of
Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner, thence
north   80  chains,   west   80  chains,   south   80
chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
ROBERT BEVERIDGE,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Edward   Smith,   of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E.  Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th October, 1912.
EDWARD SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Dodds, of Vancouver,  B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission  to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 8 miles in a westerly direction
from the western extremity of Kwalcho Lake,
marked N. E. corner, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 40 chains, east 80 chains
to   point of commencement,   containing   320
acres, more or less.
Dated 27th August, 1912.
FREDERICK DODDS,
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 11
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Robert J. Baxter, of
Vancouver,  B.  C, occupation Gentleman, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the   following  described   lands:—Commencing
at  a post  planted  two  miles west  from  the
western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked
N.   E.  corner,  thence  south 80 chains,  west
80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  13th  October,  1912.
ROBERT 1. BAXTER.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
j an. 4
LIQUOR ACT,  1910
(Section 42.)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the first
day of December next, application will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for renewal of the hotel licence to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known as the
Parsons Bridge Hotel, situate at Parsons
Bridge, Esquimalt District, in the Province of
British Columbia.
Dated this 25th day of October, 1912.
RICHARD PRICE, Applicant,
nov. 2 nov. 30
Have YOU Thought of It?
Have you thought that one of
the best Christmas Presents
you could make a lady who has
not got one would be an—
ELECTRIC IRON
B. C. Electric Railway Company, Ltd.
Light and Power Department Telephone 1609 THE. WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7,. 1912
Mount Pleasant Subdivision
Shawnigan Lake
O
kHIS Subdivision is situated on the west side of this beautiful
lake and within a few feet of the C. N. R. Line. This line
will no doubt be completed in a few months, with a good and
efficient service, which means that these lots will double in value.
Each lot is 55 x 132, making
a splendid large lot. A week
or two at this resort means
a renewal of health and
strength. The price of each
lot is within the reach of
every person, being only
$125 each, with a small cash
payment of $25, and the
balance only $5 per month.
Any lots.left after January
lst will be increased in price
to $150 per lot.
These lots are covered with
beautiful shade trees and
command a lovely view of
the Lake, where excellent
boating, fishing and hunting
can be enjoyed.
Any lots left after January
lst will be increased in price
to $150 per lot.
BEAUTIFUL SHAWNIGAN
LAKE
One of the most Beautiful Summer Resorts in the whole of Canada. Heretofore prices demanded for property there has kept
back the pleasure seekers from enjoying this splendid stretch of clear mountain fresh water. The Canadian Northern Railway
Company have now definitely decided on the route to be taken to the Lake and are at the present time surveying and grading
a tract along the west side of this well known Summer Resort, which will run within ten yards of our subdivision. Great
developments are taking place, so that we considered it only fair to the public to place our subdivision on the market at prices
and terms to suit every person. People from all parts of Canada stayed at the Lake this summer, taxing the hotels to their
utmost, making it necessary for some of the people to hire a tent to camp in the hotel grounds. Among the many attractions are
Regattas, which attract hundreds of people from all over the country. There are also several dances given at the beautiful
Strathcona Hotel, to which many people go from the city, returning next morning by an early train. The subdivision is situated
almost opposite the Strathcona Hotel with road allowances of 66 feet through each block of lo'ts.
PRICES ONLY
$125
PER LOT
You cannot do better than secure a Lot before the Spring
See us at once
W. GROW & COMPANY
Real Estate Brokers. • Financial Agents
732 YATES STREET Phone 975        P. O. Box 1109 VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
THE CHRISTMAS FRUIT
MAGAZINE
The 1912 Christmas number of The
Fruit Magazine, Scientific Farmer
and Canadian Citizen, is a handsome
and valuable production just tp hand.
In additipn tp the beautiful colored
cover, there is a splendid three-colour
Frontispiece of the Jonathan Apple,
The editorial wprk is strong and
crisp, covering such subjects as "Re-
flectipn," pn present day conditions;
"Soldier Farmers," the "B.C.F.G. As-
spciatipn," "Winnipeg Parks" and
"Census and Statistics."
Other impprtant articles are "The
Use pf Fertilizers," "B. C. Fruit
Packing Schpols," "The Voice of the
Crpaker," "The Dream of a Fruit
Grower," "San Jose Scale and Mush-
ropm Rppt Rot" and the usual monthly features of interest.
A large number of fine halftones
of Winnipeg Parks is a special feature of the illustrated sectipns and
there are splendid pprtraits pf Admiral Lprd Nelson and Admiral Lord
Collingwood. The poetical selections
are numerous and well chosen.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to and including 23rd day of December, 1912,
for the construction of two 55-foot and four
36-foot motor launches.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen at the offices of the
Government Agents at Vancouver and New
Westminster, and the Department of Public
Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
In the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dec. 2:
LIQUOR ACT, 19-1.0,	
(Section 19)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the 12th
day of December next, application will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by wholesale in and upon the
premises known as Radiger & Janion, Ltd.,
situate at Victoria, B. C, upon the lands described as 1318 Wharf Street.
Dated this 12th day of November, 1912.
RADIGER & JANION,
nov. 16
Applicant,
dec. 7
SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for Public
Building, Greenwood, B.C.," will be received
at this office until 4.00 P.M., on Monday, December 9, 1912, for the construction of a
Public Building at Greenwood, B.C.
Plans, specification and form of contract
be seen and forms of tender obtained at the
office of Mr. Wm. Henderson, Resident Architect, Victoria, B.C., at the Post Office, Greenwood, B.C., and at this Department.
Persons tendering are notified that tenders
will not be considered unless made' on the
printed forms supplied, and signed with their
actual signatures, stating their occupations
and places of residence of each member of the
firm must be given.
' Each tender must be accompanied by an
accepted cheque on a chartered bank, payable
to the order of the Honourable the Minister
of Public Works, equal to ten per cent (10
p.c.) of the amount of the tender, which will
be forfeited if the person tendering decline to
enter into a contract when called upon to do
so, or fail to complete the work contracted
for. If the tender be not accepted the cheque
will be returned.
The   Department   does   not  bind  itself   to
accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, November 18, 1912.
Newspapers will not be paid for this advertisement  if they  insert  it  without  authority
from the Department.—29965.
nov. 30 dec. 7
VICTORIA (RENFREW) LAND
DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Hanna Mary Green,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinste*., intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted on the  north boundary of the
Carmanah I. R., about 15 chains east of the
N. W. corner of the Carmanah I, R.; thence
north 80 chains; thence east'80 chains; thence
south 80 chains;   thence west 80 chains  to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or leBS.
Dated November 5th, 101a
HANNA MARY GREEN.
Harold W. Duckitt, Agent,
nov. 30 jan. 25
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Motor Launches
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Motor Launches," will be received by
the Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to 12 o'clock noon of Monday, 23rd day of
December, 1912, for the construction of two
25-foot motor  launches.
Intending bidders will give full description
of the hull, engine, etc.
Delivery: One launch at Arrowhead; the
other at Nelson.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
.accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent of the amount
of the tender, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to
complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed by the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
Forms of tender can be obtained from the
Government Agents at Vancouver, New Westminster, Revelstoke, and Nelson, and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 29th November, 1912.
dec. 7 dec. 21
VICTORIA (RENFREW), KAND
DISTRICT .
TAKE NOTICE that Caroline Hemington
Muir, of Victoria, B. C, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the east
boundary of Lot 50, Renfrew District, about
20 chains north of the S. E* corner of the
said Lot 50; thence east 80 chains; thence
.north 20 chains, more or less, to the south
boundary of T. L. 1728; thence west along the
south boundaries of T L.'s .1728 and 1727
to the east boundary of said Lot 50, a distance
of 80 chains, more or less; thence south 20
chains to point of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
Dated November 6th,  1912.  _
CAROLINE HEMINGTON MUIR.
.__  , HK0\lW-P»9k'.t_.M^ ..
hdv.36' )an.2i
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In the Matter of an application for a fresh
Certificate of Title to Lot 1874, Victoria
Town (now City).
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication hereof to issue a fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to Edward Truran on the 8th
day of September,  1863, and numbered 1345,
which has been lost.
Dated  at  Land  Registry   Office,   Victoria,
British Columbia, this 13th day of November,
'9'2' S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
nov. 16 dec. 14
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Order-
in-Council, approved August 17th, 1895, reserving and . setting apart for the sole use
of Her Majesty's Government for military
and naval purposes that portion of the Sand
Spit at the Lagoon, Esquimalt, which is the
property of the Province, is rescinded; and
that the lands described in the aforesaid
Order-in-Council are reserved for Government
purposes.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
29th October, 1912.
nov. 2 feb. 2
LIQUOR ACT,  1910
(Section 19)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the 7th
day of December next, application will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by wholesale in and upon the premises known as Turner-Beeton & Co., Ltd.,
situate at Victoria, upon the lands described
as  1232  Wharf Street.
Dated this 7th day of November,  1912.
TURNER, BEETON & CO.
Applicant,
dec. 7
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In the Matter  of  an Application  for  fresh
Certificates of  Indefeasible  Title to  Lot
1596, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication hereof to issue fresh
Certificates of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Indefeasible Title as to an undivided half
issued to Robert Edwin Jackson on the 5th
day of March, 1867, and numbered 3456, and
of the Certificate of Indefeasible Title as to
an undivided half issued to said Robert Edwin
Jackson on the 18th day of July, 1904, and
numbered 10205C, both of which have been
lost
Dated at Land Registry Office, Victoria,
British Columbia, this 4th day of November,
m2' S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles,
nov. 9 dec. 7
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion, in
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the
Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories
and in a portion of the Province of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years at an annual rental of $1
an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will be
leased to one applicant.
Applications for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or Sub
Agent of the district in which the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal sub-divisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the
tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by
a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable
coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If
the coal mining rights are not being operated, such returns should be furnished at
least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted
to purchase whatever available surface rights
may - be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the rate of $10.00 an acre.
For full information application should be
made to the Secretary of the Department of
the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or
Sub-Agent of Dominion  Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.   B.—Unauthorized   publication   of   this
advertisement will not be paid for.
sept. 21
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In  the  Matter   of   an   application   for   fresh
Certificate of Title to Lot 306, Victoria
City.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication  hereof to issue a  fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to Adelina Phelps on the 13th
day of October,  1885, and numbered 6610A,
which has been lost.
Dated at  Land  Registry   Office,   Victoria,
British Columbia, this 6th day of November,
I9'2' S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles,
nov. 9 dec. 7
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Mark Smith, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north shore of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. W. Corner, thence north
80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains,
west 80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 12th August. 1912.
MARK SMITH.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Edith Bone, of Luton,
England, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile east and two
miles north from the north-western extremity
of Sigutla Lake, marked S. W. Corner, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement,  containing  640  acres,  more  or  less.
Dated 20th August,  1912.
EDITH BONE.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Annie Peterson, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about three miles distant and in  a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of   Kwalcho   Lake,   marked   N.   E.   Corner,
thence south 40 chains, west 80 chains, north
40 chains, east 80  chains, to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated '25th August, 1912.
ANNIE PETERSON.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
ov.9 jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Margaret Harris, of Bella
Coola, B.C., occupation Housewife, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
-lanted   at   the   north-western   extremity   of
iigutla Lake, marked S. W.  Corner, thence
north   80   chains,   east   80   chains,   south   80
chains, west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or leas.
Dated 20th August,  1912.      '
V MARGARET HARRIS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan.4
COMPANIES' ACT '       •'
.TAKE NOTICE that the Grand Trunk Pacific Land Company, an extra Provincial Company, registered under the laws of the. Prp-
vince of British Columbia, whose registered
office is situate at 918 Government Street, in
the City of Victoria, B.C., intends on the 17th
day of December, 1912, to apply.to the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies 'for' the change
of the name of the said Company to "Canadian Land and Securities Corporation, Ltd."
Dated  at  Victoria,   B.C.,   this  8th  day   of
November, 1912.
BODWELL & LAWSON,
•xjmec. >•-'-- SpiicvtqrsJof.,tly; Cpmpany...,
nov. 16 '    Sec. 14'
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, Ralph Sweet, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Carpenter, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  four  miles  distant  and  in  a
north-westerly    direction    from    the    northwestern  extremity   of   Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S.  W.  Corner,  tnence north 80  chains,  east
80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point   of  commencement,   containing   640
acres, more or less.
Dated 21st August, 1912.
RALPH SWEET.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that George E. Hartshorn,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Logger, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one mile west and one mile
north from the western extremity of Nahlouza
Lake, marked S. E., Corner, thence north 80
chains, west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east
80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 13th October,  1912.
GEORGE E. HARTSHORN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 jan. 4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that I, William A, Walton, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply tor permission to purchase the following  described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted about one mile distant and  in
a westerly direction from the western extremity of Nahlouza Lake, marked S. E. Corner,
thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains, soutii
80 chains,  east 80  chains to point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more   or
less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
WILLIAM A. WALTON.
Percx Gadsden, Agent,
nov. 9 Jan.4
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District, of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Percy Gadsden, of Bella
Coola, B.C, occupation Farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles distant and in a
north-westerly direction from the northwesterly extremity of Sigutla Lake, marked
S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains, east
80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
PERCY  GADSDEN,
nov. 9 jan. 4
WATER NOTICE
I, Samuel McCullough of Royal Oak, South
Saanich, in the Province of British Columbia,
"give notice that on the i8tb day of December,
1912, I intend to apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Victoria, for a licence
■to take and use four cubic feet of water per
second from springs on Section 87, Block 1,
Lot 8, on Section 86, Block 2, Lot 20, on
Section 86, Block 3, Lot 4, all of Range I
East, Lake District, Province of British Columbia, Plan No. 1373, and to form a reservoir
for storage' from said springs on that portion
of Lot II, lying within Section 86, Block 2,
Range I East, aforesaid.
* The water is to be taken from said reservoir and is to be used on Section 87, Block I,
Lot 4, Lake District aforesaid, for domestic
purposes and also to irrigate land in the
above mentioned Sections 86 and 87.
Dated and posted this 16th day of November,  1912	
SAMUEL McCULLOUGH.
*' - ■*■'*..-.*■*. '*-•:■-*• .  **•■-.'■••: *..-.■*.   -v.*  :?-, -.:-.-••*..■•■ *.•■•* ,-.
nov. 23 dec. 14
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
NOTICB is hereby given that the Reserve
existing over the lands included within Special
Timber Licences Nos. 39318 and 39319, situated on the North Thompson River in the
Kamloops Division of Yale District, by reason of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on December 27th, 1907, is
cancelled and that the said lands will be open
for entry by pre-emption on Thursday, December 19th, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
■oth September, 1912.
sept. 14 dec. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
covering the parcel of land formerly held
under Timber Licence No. 40026, situated on
the Columbia River in the vicinity of Arrow
Park, by reason of the notice published in the
British Columbia Gazette on the 27th December, 1907, is cancelled; and that the vacant
lands formerly covered by the before mentioned licence will be open to pre-emption
only on and after the 28th day of December,
1912.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
24th September, 1912.
sept. 28 dec. 28
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over the lands included in Special
Timber Licence No. 14830, situated on Upper
Rendezvous Island, Sayward District, by reason of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazetter on the 27th of December, 1907,
is cancelled, and that the said lands will be
open for entry by pre-emption on January
15th, 1913, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
25th September, 1912.
oct. 5 jan. 4
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
IN the Matter of an application for a fresh
Certificate of Title to  Lots  Nos.   182A,
182G and 1204, Victoria City.    Also part
of Section XIX, Esquimalt District, British Columbia.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention
at the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication  hereof to issue a fresh
Certificate of Title in lieu of the Certificate
of Title issued to Donald Fraser on the 6th
daj; of December, 1872 and numbered 698A,
which has been lost.
Dated  at  Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
British Columbia, this 28th day of June, 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles.
nov. 16 dec, 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon Crown lands in the Kootenay
District, formerly held under Special Timber
Licences numbered 4481, 5255, 5256, 5832,
8534, 9081, 9082, 10259, 10260, 10261, 10262,
10499, 10500, 11249, 11347, 13824, 16727, 21907,
22661, 23116, 24432, 26737, 26926, 28182, 28183.
28184, 30358. 3i'8o, 31184, 31185, 31201, 31208,
31212, 31213, 31308, 3U30, 31481, 32022, 32654,
32655, 32711, 33406, 334H. 33449, 33459, 3346o,
34221, 34273, 34310, 34311, 34386, 35631, 36502,
36553, 36554, 3758o, 37993, 37994, 39011, 39202,
39359, 40406, 41078, 41344, 41426 and 43176,
by reason of the notice published in the British
Columbia Gazette on December 27th, 1907, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
lands for sale at public auction.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B, C,
ioth October,  1912.
oct. 19 Jan. 18
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Thomas J. Williams, of
Vancouver, B.C., occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile distant and in a
westerly direction from the western extremity
of Nahlouza Lake, marked N. E. Corner,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains, north
80 chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated 13th October, 1912.
THOMAS J. WILLIAMS.
Percy Gadsden, Agent,
nov.9 Jan.4
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of North Saanich
TAKE NOTICE that* The British Columbia
Jlectric Railway Company, Ltd., of London,
JOngland, occupation Railway Company, intends to applyl for permission to lease the
follpwing described foreshore :*r-Commencing
at *a post planted at Union Bay, at the southwest cofner of Section .Thirteen (13), Range
One (1) West, North Saanich District; thence
west (ast.) Twenty-eight hundred (2800) feet:
thence north (ast.) two thousand six hundred
and forty (2640) feet; thence east (ast.) One
thousand six hundred and twenty (1620) feet,
more or less to high water mark, and thence
in a southerly direction along high water
mark to the point of commencement, comprising one hundred and, thirty-seven (137)
acres, more or less.
THE   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   ELECTRIC
RAILWAY CO., LTD.,
Arthur O. Noakes, Agent.
September. 14th, 19J2.
oct.  12
' At.'. 7
VANCOUVER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3   '
TAKE notice that  I, Hannah Jane Gadsden, of Luton, England, occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for  permission to
purchase   the   following   described   lands:—
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   about   one
mile east and one mile north from the northwestern   extremity   of  Sigutla   Lake,   marked
S. W. Corner, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains,  south  80 chains, west 80 cnains, to
point of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 20th August, 1912.
HANNAH JANE GADSDEN.
Percy Gadsden, Agent.
nov. 9
jan. 4
SEALED TENDERS will be received by
the Minister of Lands not later than noon
on the 3rd day of March, 1913, for the purchase of Licence No. X9 to cut 45,300,000 feet
of timber and 4,000 cedar poles standing on
Lot 671, Malaspina Strait, New Westminster
District.
Particulars of Chief Forester, Victoria, B. C.
nov. 30 mar. 1
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on Lot 10, Group I, Kootenay District, by reason of a notice bearing date
March 26th, 1888, and published in the B. C.
Gazette under date of March 31st, 1888, is
cancelled for the purpose of offering the said
land for sale at public auction,
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands,
nov. 30 mar. 1
WATER ACT
Notice   of  Application   for   the   Approval   of
Works ,
TAKE notice that the Sidney Water and
Power Company, Limited, will apply to thc
Comptroller of Water Rights for the approval
of the plans of the.works' to be constructed
for the utilization of the -water from a well
orf Section 5, Range 2 E., North Saanich,
which thc applicant is, by Water Licence No.
30, authorized to . take, store, and use for
municipal purposes.
The plans and partic-Jars required by subsection (1) of section 70 of the "Water Act;"
as amended have been filed with the Comptroller of Water Rights at Victoria and with
the Water Recorder at Victoria,  B.C.
Objections to the application may be filed
with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of
December, 1912.
BuRT n. WHITE,
-v,..... ..ii *... cm ,Age>»t.9*t.jth9. ■Applte.ut-
dec. 7' Jan-3 THE WEEK, SATURPAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
Christmas Offerings in Jewelry
Necklets
Watches
Toilet Sets
Leather Handbags
Bracelets
Clocks
Brassware
Leather Cigar Cases
Earrings
Silverware
Ebony
Leather Cigarette Cases
Brooches
Rich Cut Glass
Canes
Leather Pocketbooks
Rings
Parasoles
Fountain Pens
Solid Gold Card Cases
Solid Gold/Cigarette Cases
Soli-d Gold Watch Fobs
Solid Gold Handbags
Solid Gold Mesh Bags
These and Many Other Articles are Shown in
Great Variety at This Store. A Visit from You
will be Appreciated.
THE J. M. WHITNEY CO.
YATES STREET AT BROAD
Shareholders on the Road to Sage Creek Oil Field
The accompanying pictures were taken during the recent visit of
the shareholders to the property of the B. C. Oil Co. on Sage Creek
and illustrate the interest now being taken in this important enterprise
which was fully described in the issue of The Week of November 9th.
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Shareholders Filling Bottles from Big Oil Spring
Proposed Extended Jurisdiction and Power of the
Board of Railroad
Commissioners
The following suggestions and the
principles expressed therein are endorsed by E. J. Fream, secretary of
the United Farmers' Association, and
will be submitted to the Board of
Railway Commissioners at Nelson, B.
C, on December 9th, by A. E. Watts
of Wattsburg, B. C.
i. Notice is given to the Board and
all railway companies in Western
Canada that a petition will be presented to the Board at Nelson for
approval and after that to Parliament, asking for extended powers and
jurisdiction for the Railway Commissioners suggesting that they shall
have power to enforce their orders by
the infliction of fines, and to recompense those who suffer loss by the
injustices perpetrated by railway corporations whether they be their employees or the general public.
2. That measures be taken to restrain railway companies from attracting new settlers until such time
as the companies can satisfactorily
handle the traffic.
3. That the rulings of the Board
shall be final an'd no appeal allowed
without the special permission of the
Premier of Canada.
4. That the Board shall have power
to fully investigate the financial
methods adopted by the manipulators
of railway corporations, with a view
of 'ascertaining how some individuals
became premature millionaires, and
to recommend legislation to moderate
it in the future.
And further, to consider various
complaints of which notices dated
November 5th, nth, 15th and 21st
have been served on the railway companies.
1, The illegal discrimination in the
distribution of cars to shippers and
to adopt measures to prevent the
same.
2. Application for the appointment
of an official or officials with power
to subpoena railway officials and examine them under oath, on the above
subject.
3. That all railway companies operating in Canada shall be compelled
to supply small box cars of from 6
to 10 tons capacity for the convenience of the public, thus striking at
the root of one of the principal
causes of exorbitant prices for the
necessaries of life, and to lessen the
extraordinary difference between the
prices paid by the consumer and the
prices obtained by the producer.
4. To compel railway companies to
restore the public roads destroyed by
them during and after the construction of railways.
5. For advice as to the most effective method to restrain the Government of the Province of British Columbia from paying one million six
'hundred thousand dollars or any
other sum to the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company for the return of
a portion of four million acres of
land granted to the said Company,
the latter never having earned the
grant of land nor any portion thereof.
6. That the Board use its influence
to prevent the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from obtaining from
Parliament a further extension of
time for the completion of the Crows'
Nest Pass Railway.
7. An order to compel the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to restore a steamer landing and buildings
destroyed by them.
8. Whether t'he jurisdiction of the
Board xtends over traffic on inland
waters, that is the Lake and River
service operated by railway companies.
9. An order to compel railway co-
panies to fence their right of ways
through all settled districts, and more
especially those mentioned in notices
served on the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, November 7th.
10. To compel railway companies
to provide proper cattle guards and
crossings, suitable  for   the   purpose
they are intended.
11. To compel railway companies
to more effectively clear their right
of ways of inflamable material for
the prevention of fires and damage to
property.
12. To order the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company to produce witnesses who were shipped to Italy and
whose evidence was necessary and
material in a suit or suits against that
company.
13. That the Board use its influence
in investigating and making known
to the public the amount of watered
stock disposed of by the various railway corporations, and ascertain who
received the proceeds.
14. That in the mountainous regions where cliffs of rock endanger
the lives of the employees of railway
companies and the travelling public,
by falling on the railway track and
wrecking trains, officials shall be appointed by the Board with full power
to examine and to direct the railway
companies to take proper precautions
for the prevention of accidents.
15. I shall call attention to the
fact that the Canadian Pacific Railway Company ignored the order of
the Board and did not fulfil promises of the chief officers of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company made
to me and to the late chairman of
the Board, Mr. Justice Mabee, in the
matter of restoring certain public
roads the company had destroyed,
during and after the construction of
their railway.
16. That the Board order an investigation as to why railway officials
are permitted to persecute persons
who dare to criticise railway corporations.
AN   EXAMPLE
"Oh, Bertie, dear, what is monopoly?" she
cooed softly, looking up tenderly, as she rested in his arms, with her dainty, fair little head
nestled against his coat collar.
,,Wcll," replied Bertie dear, manfully
struggling to bring his mind to cope with
abstrucc subjects, and failing altogether to get
beyond concrete facts, "1 sincerely hope tbat
tbis is."
THE MARCH  OF THE BLACK
MOUNTAIN
What will there be to remember
Of us in the day to be?
Whose faith was a trodden  ember
Ancl even our doubt not free.
Parliaments  built   of  paper
And tbe soft swords of gold
That twist like a waxen taper
In the weak aggressor's bole.
A  hush  around   Hunger   slaying,
A city of serfs unfed,
What shall we leave for a saying
To praise us when we are dead?
But men shall remember the Mountain
That broke its  forest  chains,
And men shall remember the Mountain
When it marches against tbe plains,
And christen their children from it
And season and ship and street.
When the Mountain came to Mahomet
And looked small before his feet,
His head was high as the crescent
Of the moon that seemed his crown,
And on glory of past and present
The light of his eyes looked down.
One hand went out to the morning
Over Brahmin  and  Buddhist slain,
And one to the west in scorning
To point at tbe scars of Spain.
One foot on the bills for warden
By the little Mountain trod,
And   one   was   in   a   garden
And stood on the grave of God.
But men shall remember tbe Mountain
Though it fall down like a tree;
They shall see the sign of the Mountain,
Faith cast into the sea.
Though the crooked swords overcome it
And the Crooked Moon ride free,
When the Mountain comes to Mahomet
It has more' life than  he.
But what will there be to remember
Or what will there be to see—
Though our towns through a long November
Abide to the end and be?
Strength  of slave  and  mechanic
Whose iron is ruled by gold—
.Peace of immortal panic—
Love that is hate grown cold.
Are these a bribe or a warning
That we turn not to the sun,
Nor look on the lands of morning,
Where deeds at last are done?
Where men shall remember the Mountain
When truth forgets the plain
And walk in the ways of the Mountain
That did not fall in vain;
Death and eclipse and comet,
Thunder and  peals that rend
When the Mountain came to Mahomet
li<-cause it was the end.
—G. K. Chesterton.
Do You
Know
The difference it makes 40
have a footwarmer there
when you get between these
cold sheets ? Quite apart from
the comfort of it, there ought
to be at least one in every
home in case of emergency.
Hot Water Rottles of Guaranteed Rubber or Strong
Stoneware at
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Strut
Tels. 425 and 450
Roy's  Act   (Haas   Worka   ana   Itora
915 Pandora St,  Vietoria, B. C.
Albert F. Roy
Oftr  thirty  years'   experience  ia
Art Glass
LEADED LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer ol Steel-Cortd Lead
(or Churches, Schools, Public Bnlld-
ings and private Dwellings. Plain and
Fancy Glass Sold. Saahea Glut! by
Contract   Estimates   (rec    Phone J-M
It op Horn
StATTU
Cms. fitmr, moh
TIUBKIOTEVmTHIIW
INTHEWOriMTr
135toQMS^Tiift^SumfP__aH
If you are Interested in
Victoria Carnival
Week
August 1 to 6, iqi3
Please send names and present addresses of former residents of Victoria to the Secretary of the Victoria Citizens
Committee, P. O. Box 1311.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
IN THE MATTER of an application for
a fresh Certificates of Title to Lots 1602 and
1604, Victoria City.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention at
the expiration of one calendar month from
the first publication hereof to issue fresh Certificates of Title in lieu of the Certificates of
Title issued to Bernard Sigismund Heisterman and James Forman on thc 25th day of
February, 1910, and numbered 22110 C, and
to Wesley N. Mitchell and William Nelson
Mitchell on the 25th day of February, 1011,
and numbered 22547 C, which havc been lost
or destroyed.
Dated   at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
B. C, this 4th day of December, A. D. 1912.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar General of Titles. 10
THE. WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
Mr. R. W. Jones, Seattle, was a
guest in town during the week.
* *   *
Miss Edith Helmcken is the guest
of friends in Kamloops.
* *    i
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Perrin have
been visitors to Victoria from Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and' Mrs. L. Cromwell, from
Vancouver, have been recent guests at
the Empress.
*» - *■   *
: Mr. and Mrs. Guy Rothwell, Duncan, B.C., were guests at the Empress
Hotel for a few days during the week.
* *   *
Miss Betty Spalding, Pender Island,
is the guest of her grandmother, Mrs.
J. McKay, of this city.
* *   *
.  Mr.  F.  Maitland  Dougall,  accompanied by Mr. S. Phipps, are guests
at the Empress Hotel from Cowichan.
' *   *   *
Miss B. Donald, Chemainus, is making a short stay in Victoria, the guest
of Mrs. A. W. Bridgman, Esquimalt
Road.
i *   *   *
Miss N. A. Wylde, of Shawnigan
Lake, is staying at the October Mansions.
* *   *
! Mr. John Orr, of Chilliwack, B.C.,
is a guest in the city and is staying at
{he Dominion Hotel.
* *   *
. Miss Willemar, Comox, B. C, is
making a short stay in Victoria, the
guest of friends.
»   *   *
. Mr. P. Garnett, Cobble Hill, has
been a recent guest in town.
• Mr. D. H., MacDonald, of Vancouver, is among the guests"registered
at the Empress Hotel.
'»   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Alex English, Vancouver, are enjoying a brief visit in,
this city.
* * .*
Miss McBride of New Westminster
is the guest of Sir Richard and Lady
McBride, Gorge Road.
Mr. G. H. Mobray of Vancouver,
was registered at the Empress Hotel
during the week.
* *   *
Mrs.  MacKenzie Cleyland is on a
trip to Southern California.
* *   *
Mrs. L. E. Erb of this city has left
on an extended trip abroad.
* *   *
Mrs. C. C. Worsfold, New Westminster, is visiting her relatives in
Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. J. Miller, inspector of Inland
Revenue,* has gone to Prince Rupert
on official business.
* *   *
Mrs. Beresford Hogg and j Mr.
Colin Hogg spent a few days in town
during the early part of the week.
* *   *
Colonel and Mrs. Wadmore and
family have taken up their residence
on Moss Street.
* *   *
Dr. W. S. Miliie, formerly of Sidney,
Australia, has arrived in town from
San Francisco. He intends making
his home in Victoria for the future.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs.- James Cran of
Quamichan Lake, are the guests of
Bishop Cridge for the Christmas holidays.
* *   *
Miss Lita Martin, who has been
the guest of friends in Victoria, returned during the week to hef home
in Vancouver.
■*   *   *
Colonel and Mrs. Roy and family
have arrived in Victoria. .Col. Roy
will take over the command of Work
Point Barracks, successor to Colonel
Wadmore.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. McCurdy and
children* have returned from* their
country residence, "Malahat," and will
spend the Christmas'holidays in Victoria. *   *   *
Miss Williams, who for some weeks
past has been a guest at the Alexandra Club, left on Monday last for the
South en route for India and England.
* *   *
Mr. J. S. H. Matson and Mr. Henry
Croft are leaving shortly for England,
where they will join Mrs. Croft and
Mrs. Matson, to spend Christmas.
* *   *
Mr. Eric Gordon, who has been out
of town on a survey during the last
seven months, has returned to Victoria.    •
Lieutenant-Engineer Roland M.
Bury and Mrs. Bury, who have been
spending their honeymoon in the
Sound cities, have returned to Victoria and taken up their residence at
Southgate Street.
»   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Burchell of
Thetis Island, left on Sunday last by
the North Coast, Ltd., and the Ley-
land Liner Bohemian, on a* brief visit
to the Old Country.
»   »   *
The Police Ball held last Wednesday evening, under the patronage of
Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Paterson and Sir Richard and Lady McBride, in the main building at the
Fair Grounds, proved to be a huge
success  and a most enjoyable  time
was spent by all present.
♦'♦v.*
Mrs. J. Greaves Clapham, late of
Quebec, and now resident at 843 Pemberton Road, announces the engagement of her youngest daughter, Elizabeth Blanche, to the Hon. Edmund
Burke-Roche, of Queenstown, Ireland, youngest son of the late Baron
Burke-Roche, and a brother of the
present peer. The wedding has been
arranged to take place at Christ
Church Cathedral on December 17th.
* *   »
A most enjoyable surprise party
was given Mrs. Devlin, Fort Street,
the other evening, when a number of
young people gathered at her home.
Mrs. Devlin was* assisted in receiving
her guests by her daughters, Miss
Grace and Isabel Monteieth. The
evening was spent in dancing, a
charming programme of music being
supplied by Mrs. Hamilton. Some of
those who attended were: The
Misses Milligan, the Misses Lort, Miss
; Rolston, Mrs. Cullin, Miss E. Gibson,
and the Messrs. Captain Cullin, Booth,
Kelly, Myerstein, Rolston, J. Gibson,
A. Morton, - Mackenzie, McGregor,
Milligan and others. The refreshment table aiid rooms were tastefully
adorned with yellow chrysanthemums
and greenery.
* *   *
Very successful was the bridge
tournament held in the ball-room of
the Alexandra Club on Wednesday
afternoon last, by Mrs. Norman Rant
in aid of the maintenance fund of the
sanitarium at Tranquille, in which the
Anti-Tuberculosis Society is interested. Twenty-five tables were in use
and prizes were awarded to the following: Mrs. Fitz-Herbcrt Bullen,
Mrs. Geo. Matthews, and Mrs. Musgrave. The tea table was very pretty, being arranged with yellow chrysanthemums, and was presided over
by Mrs. Herbert Carmichael, Mrs.
Aithur Gore, Mrs. Cecil Roberts and
the Misses Page.
* *   *
At First Congregational church on
the afternoon of December 4th the
marriage of Wilton Willis Beik to
Marion Adelina Davis, the eldest
daughter of Capt. and Mrs. J- A.
Davis, of this city, was solemnized in
the presence of a large congregat'on.
The bride was attired in a neat traveling suit of navy blue and a large
picture hat of white satin trimmed
with pink moss roses. Her sister,
Katherine, acted as bridesmaid and
looked very charming in a brown velvet gown relieved at the collar and
cuffs by satin of a lighter shade, she
also wore a hat to match. The bridegroom was supported by Mr. J. W.
Jamieson, of Vancouver. At 4.30 the
■happy couple left amid showers of
rice and confetti on their honeymoon
of a three months' .tour through
Southern California, whence they will
return home again to take up their
residence in this city. Among those
present were Rev. Hermon A. Carson,
Capt. and Mrs. J.uA. Davis, Mr. and
Mrs. Finnerty, Mr. J. W. Jamieson,
Miss H. Longland, Miss Evelyn Stuart and RiGhard Davis and many
others. Miss Cochrane presided at the
organ. —-
.   - *   *   *
Mrs. George Gillespie was hostess
recently at her charming home "High-
wood," Moss Street, of a very enjoyable dance. Among the. guests were:
Mr. and Mrs. Hebden Gillespie, Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Wilmot, Mr. and
Mrs. R. G. Monteith, Mr. and Mrs.'C.
Payne, Mr. and Mrs. W. Spalding,
Mr. and Mrs. B. Green, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Cane, Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Hunter,
Mr. Bridgewater, Miss P. Mason,
Miss'G. Cross, Miss Dumbleton, Miss
I. Ross (Vancouver1), Miss Guernsey
(Kamloops), Miss Bridgman, Miss
Donald (Chemainus), Miss Rome,
Miss Marion Pitts,-Miss Gladys Pitts,
Miss Hilda Page, Miss Newcombe,
Miss B. Bodwell, Miss Little, Miss J.
Prior, Miss Betty Spalding (Pender
Island), Miss Dupont, Miss J. Law-
son, Miss Devereaux, Miss Naomi
Holmes, Miss McCallum, Miss Daisy
McDowell, Miss Annie McDowell,
Miss Mara, Miss Dodwell, Miss Willemar (Comox), Miss Monteith and the
Messrs. Jack Cambie, B. Monteith, T.
Ambery, D. Martin, Carewe Martin,
John Arbuckle, T. King, B. Cartwright, C. Wardle, C. Wardle, Wise,
Warton, Patterson, Chalmers, Marshall, Pilkington, Tweedie, R. King,
Edgar Browne, R. Powell, Sidney
Powell, Hudson, Fortier, V. McDowell, J. Dunsmuir, Silver, R. Matthews, Colburn, Thornton, Holmes,
Thwaites, Bruce Irving, Bauphin Irving, Garrett, P. Garnet (Cobble Hill),
Jessop and Tupper.
*   *   *
A very successful sale of work and
tea was held under the auspices of
the Ladies' Aid of the Reformed Epsi-
copal Church in the Sunday School on
Blanchard Street. The numerous
booths were most attractively arranged and presented a gay aspect
with their Christmas decorations.
The following ladies very kindly undertook the management of the different stalls: .
Dolls' Stall—Presided over by Miss
Harris and Miss Margaret Sayward.
Fancy Work—Miss Lawson, assisted by Miss Helmcken.
Fish Pond—Miss Newbury.
Candy Stall—Mrs. Richard Jones,
ably assisted, by Misses Ethel
Helmcken and Denise Harris.
Plain Work—Mrs. Gladstone and
Mrs. John Langley.
The Girl Ramblers also had a very
attractive booth under the guidance of
Miss Gladstone.
Tea was served at small tables
daintily arranged with flowers and
served by Mrs. S. A. Spencer, Miss
Fawcett, Miss Rita McTavish ancl
others.
Gossip from the Stalls
(Continued from Page 3)
he is a gentleman, and become a
tough off.the stage. It takes a man
or woman of wide and varied experience to portray characters, and the'
perfection of the art comes from constant practice, with an eye on each
detail to see that no repetition mars
the result. I am so critical of my own
work that if I catch myself using a
gesture or a trick of a part, previously played, I immediately spend much
time to devise new business or forget the mannerisms of . the prior
characterization. This only applies to
character parts, for the personality
of the man or woman when playing
straight parts, is really part of an actor or actress' assets, though even
in those parts there is something to
typify, something apart from one's
own character to show an audience."
"The Rose of Panama"
The English version of "The Rose
of Panama," a sparkling Viennese
operetta that is indeed a worthy successor to "The Merry Widow," "The
Chocolate Soldier" and other recent
musical successes, will be the attraction at the Victoria theatre on Friday and Saturday, December 13th and
14th, under the management of John
Cort.
Heinrich Berte is responsible for
the score of this most entrancing of
European musical importations, and
those familiar with the works of the
celebrated composer require little
further endorsement as to the merits
of the opera. Prior to its presentation at Daly's theatre, New York,
"The Rose of Panama," under the
title "Kreolenblut," enjoyed long
runs in Berlin, St. Petersburg, Milan
and Vienna. The music is reminiscent
in a way of the works of Oscar
Strauss, Franz Lehar and Leo Fall.
There are more th'aii twenty musical
numbers in the score, which will be
rendered by an augmented orchestra.
The scenes are located in a mythical revolutionary republic in the canal
zone of Central America, * and the
story is woven about the troubles of
Jacinta, whose, inheritance of Spanish
blood' is put forward as justification
Supplies/ar the Xmas Table
No season of the year demands greater care for the preparation of
foods than the Christmas season. It is difficult for us to take greater
pains in the selection of our table supplies than we do every day of
the year but, if possible, we have gone to even greater pains to insure
perfection in everything for the Christmas table. ;
•    A FEW LINES THAT PEOPLE WHO WANT
THE BEST MUST HAVE
C. &-B. Candjed Peels
Golden Sultanas
Panarita Curraiits
Redona Shelled Almonds
C. & B. Food Extracts
Blanched Almonds
Ground Almonds
Almond Paste
Glace Cherries
West India Tamarinds
Damson Cheese
Lemon Cheese
English Gooseberries
Pratt-Low Fruits
Chilli Tomatoes
Cherries in Maraschino
Figs in Syrup
Apple Cider
LET US HAVE YOUR ORDERS EARLY
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
74i» 743 745 FORT STREET
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tel. 2677
Tels. 178,179
Tel. 2678
Raphael Tuck's Cards and Calendars
Finest in the World—Now on Sale at
Victoria Book & Stationery Co., Ltd.
1004 Government Street Telephone 63
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
The TEA KETTLE   n» douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress        Opposite the Victoria Theatre
Xmas Suggestions
We can reduce your Christmas worry to a minimum with our endless
variety of Christmas gifts to choose from: Smoking Jackets,
Lounging Robes, Knitted Vests, Neckwear, Gloves, Neck Scarfs,
Leather Goods, Suit Cases,. Umbrellas, Jaegerwear, Sweater Coats, etc.
STORE OF
F. A. 60WEN, Managing Director
1114 Government Street
We Offer
A   first   class   stock   of
Apples,   Peart,  Cherries,
Prunes, Plums, Peaches,
Apricots and small fruits.
Also Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, decidious and evergreen, Roses, etc.
The very finest quality and best assortment grown in B. C.   Catalogue
free.     Personal   inspection   invited.    Now   is   the   time   to   order.
LAYRITZ NURSERIES
CAREY ROAD, VICTORIA BRANCH AT KELOWNA, B. C.
PHONE M3054
for her otherwise inexplicable actions, and her sweetheart, Marcel
Arranto, a handsome captain of the
guards,-,st»ti*pned*at.,the palace of the
president. For the rest of the story
there is an insurrection which brings
forth may comical situationsiriwhi-oh
the president and the pretender are
the leading characters.
Chapine,      the      delightful    little
French prima donna who won New
York in a single night, will head a
cast composed of sixty-five singers
and comedians of more than ordinary distinction, the majority of whom
appeared during the engagement in
New York last season.
Chorus of Balkan allies:    The Porte is not
the Boss-for-us. :,,.'.
"The Old Nest" is the name of a new
novel. The title gives the cynic a chance to
say  there is nothing in it. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
11
tt
Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
ff
That "sweating" has been introduced into Victoria, but one would
hardly have expected to find it in a
magazine office.
* *   *
That the advertisement which some
enterprising journalist inserted in the
Colonist of Thursday should be
framed, and preserved in the Provincial Archives as a relic of barbarism.
* *   *
That cases such as this are unfortunately exempt from the provisions
of the White Slave Traffic Aot, although they obviously furnish many
of its victims.  .
* *   *
That t'he Policemen's Ball was better patronised than ever before and
was a great success.
* *   *
That the distinguished Patrons and
Patronesses,   and   Victoria   Society
turned out to honour the occasion.
*'- *   *
That the Committee of Management must have felt highly gratified
at the result.
* * ' *
That the address which Fire Chief
Davis delivered at the Real Estate
Lunch on Wednesday, was eminently
practical and made the function worth
while.
* *   *
That Miss Wylie's advice to Canadian women to "make themselves
nuisances" was, to say the least of it,
not very intelligent.
* *   *
That she and her colleagues have
shown that in this respect they are
without compeers.
* *   *
That Victorians are glad to see Mrs.
Dunsmuir residing in their midst
again, and hope that the arrangement
will be permanent.
* *   *
That Walker Whitesides in "The
Typhoon" reminded many an old playgoer present of George Alexander.
* *   *
That he is easily the most promising of the younger actors.
Xmas is
Coming
and the
old troubled
question arises
again, "What
shall I give to
him?" Don't
worry, ask
The
Commonwealth
Home of Hobberlin Clothes
606-608 Yates St.
Tailoring Branch at 720 Yates St.
That judging from recent appearances in Victoria there is just now a
sad dearth, of leading, ladies.
* '*   *' •   -
That it would puzzle a Philadelphia
lawyer to tell why such a splendid
aggregation as the Lambardi Opera
Company could not pack t'he Victoria
Theatre.
* *   *
That their   Grand  Opera  is   "the
genuine article" at popular prices, but
Victorians would rather pay the same
figure to see a noisy American farce,
like "Officer 666."
* *   *
That it is an open secret that Mr.
Borden takes all his cues from a well-
known family journal published in the
West.
* *   *
That the journal in question recognised its own promptings in every line
of Mr. Borden's announcement on the
naval policy.
* *   *
That by and by people will begin
to wonder which is the "voice" and
which the "echo."
* *   *
That England still seems to be a
performer at the European Concert
and to play the first fiddle.
* *   *
That light-weight boxers sometimes
over-value themselves and in consequence get put on the shelf for the
winter.
* *   *
That with Thomas to help them the
Victoria team might win out in the
McKechnie Cup contest at Vancouver.
Without him the result is doubtful. *
* *   #
That if Thomas is to be ruled out,
and there seems to be no alternative,
there   are   others   who    should*   be
looked after.
* *   *
That the Times made a very poor
attempt at guessing the composition
of the Labour and Agricultural Commissions.
* *   *
That both Commissions are composed of practical men who will justify their selection.
* *   *
That t'he number of applicants for
the Fenian Raid pension far exceeds
the total number of Fenians who lived
in Canada at the time.
* *   *
That if the Canadian Government
will only work the pension list for all
it is worth, there will be no difficulty
in getting rid of the surplus.
* *   *
That "Collier's Weekly" is behaving
itself better these days, but the canvassers are having a bad quarter-of-
an-hour.
* *   *
That the ladies of Victoria have
nobly done their share in begging
$ioo,oq for the Hospital.
* »   *
That the least the property owners
can do i's to pass the By-law for the
other $200,000.
* *   *
That it will not be the fault of W.
H. Price, the indefatigable organizer,
if they do not.
* *   *
That "insanity seizes upon the
bachelor with greater ease than upon
the Benedict"—and then he changes
his estate.*
* *   *
That the Toronto dailies have nothing on the Victoria dailies, when it
comes to a question of mutual compliments.
* *   *
That the cartoon of "Auntie on the
Dock" was the cleverest which has
ever appeared in a Western Daily.
* *   *
That it is doubtful if those who
are really responsible for the Cumberland miners' strike feel sorry about
it.
* *   *
That the joy-riders still make night
hideous and apparently without let or
hindrance.
*****
That Vancouver Street seems, to be
one of their favourite thoroughfares.
*****
That there are several  clauses  of
t'he   Automobile    Act   which    have
caused  the  usual  amount  of  heartburning.
* *   *
That we shall handle these functions better when we are more accustomed to them.
That the Railway Commission
made short work of the application
for a railway. Station at Coquitlam.
* *   *
That the Chairman was particularly
sarcastic to the real estate aspects of
the application.
* *   *
That on Sunday last the Colonist
appropriated the pith of an expert
article by Mr. J. Arthur Hill from
the columns of The Week without any
acknowledgment.
* *   *..
That, as usual, the. appropriation
appeared in the "editorial" columns of
the Colonist.
* *   *
That Queen Mary and the London
Times have joined forces to resist
"easier divorce."
* *   *
That this constitutes a formidable
partnership which will have to be
counted with.
*****
That unless some members of t'he
Forestry Department turn over a new
leaf, they may have to take to the
woods.
* *   *
That a little knowledge may be a
dangerous thing, but a swelled head is
infinitely worse.
MANY NEW FISH HATCHERIES
The Department of Marine and
Fisheries is pushing vigorously its
work of encouraging fish culture
throughout the country. At the end
of this year the department will have
completed seven additional hatcheries
which will bring the total number in
operation up to fifty-eight. There are
in addition two ponds which might
be ranked as hatcheries. One is a bass
pond established near the Bay of
Quinte. Bass cannot be hatched in
the ordinary mechanical hatchery.
They are nesting fishes and have to
be retained in ponds, where they
hatch out naturally. This fall 5,000
were distributed to the different waters. The other pond is one near St.
John, N. B., for retaining parent salmon, whose eggs are sent to the different hatcheries in the Maritime
provinces for incubation.
Careful Building
As many hatcheries as needed are
being built, care being taken to build
them where they will yield the best
results. Unless a sufficient quantity
of eggs can be collected each season
for the hatchery, its beneficial results are minimized.
Before providing the hatchery the
department must ascertain that it be
able either in the waters in the vicinity of the hatchery or in m..\e remote
waters to find a supply of eggs to fill
the hatchery and thus build up and
develop the fisheries of that apd contiguous localities.
The activities of the department are
chiefly' directed toward the increase
of commercial fishes. * The rearing of
game fish, though important, is not
receiving as much attention as it is
felt that first consideration, must be
given to the fisheries in which men
expect to make their livelihood and
on which the general public rely
more and more for food.
As to Game Fish
However, the federal Departmert
of Fisheries hopes that if no change
takes place in jurisdiction that the different provinces will see fit to take up
the hatching of game fish. It is felt
that in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward
Island and British Columbia, as far
as angling is concerned, conditions
there for game fishing are unexcelled.
FROM   SARAH   GRAND'S   NEW   NOVEL
"You can be as vulgar as you like so long
as you know that you are being vulgar; it
is when you are vulgar without knowing it
that you are socially lost."
"No man survives in the estimation of a
woman who has seen him fight with, his fists.
There is something undignified in the performance which costs him her respect, if not
her liking."—Adman's Orchard, by Sarah
Grand.   Heinemann.    f>s.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of South Saanich
TAKE notice that Henry Puckle, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Fruit Grower, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the southeast corner of Section five; Range six east, South Saanich
District, thence west 10 chains; thence north
ten chains; thence east 10 chains; thence
soutii 10 chains to point of commencement,
containing 40 acres, more or less.
Dated 26th November,  1912.
HENRY PUCKLE.
nov. 30 Jan. 23
After Theatre— SUPPER AT THE
BALMORAL
-CAFE-
ORCHESTRA EVERY
EVENING 6.30 To 12.30
MR. M. NAGEL, MUSICAL DIR.
OPPOSITE THE
OPERA HOUSE
ON DOUGLAS STREET
Just what you need after a hard day's
work—A refreshing cup of
LIPTON'STEA
Goes farthest for the money
Skating Boots at Cost
Men's Black Lightening Hitch Hockey Boot, with skates attached, at $4.65
Women's Tan or Black Lightning Hitch Hockey Boot, with skates attached at...$3.95
Ben's Best Black or Tan Skating Boot, with Goodyear welted sole, at $3.85
Women's Black Skating Boot with Whitetrim stays, at  {a.85
Women's Tan Skating Boot, best quality, at $3.33
Women's Best Black Skating Boot, at  (3.50
Misses Best Black Skating Boot, at  Sa.oo
Youths' Best Black Skating Boot, at $3.35
Men's  Black  Lightning  Hitch  Skating  Boot,  with  tan  outside,  counter  tan
trimmed and with padded ankle support at  f3>35
W. CATHCART £? CO.
Successors to H. B. Hammond Shoe Co.
Pemberton Building
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V. and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor'
&H Dealers'
Farmers'Ex-
change, Ltd.
618 Johnson Street
Phone 3318
Want Fresh, Not Frozen
Turkeys This Christmas f
Fresh killed Island Turkeys will be extremely scarce this season, but
the frozen ones will be very much in evidence. The latter, resembling
in appearance the fresh Turkeys, will deceive many of the unwary.
If you really want fresh Turkey, give us your order today and we
guarantee delivery of what you ask for.
The Union Steamship Company, Ltd. of B. C.
The Boscowitz Steamship Co., Ltd.
COAST SERVICE
Sailings every Wednesday for Campbell River, Hardy Bay, Rivers
Inlet, Ocean Falls, Bella Coola.
Sailings every Saturday for Namu, Bella Bella, Skeena iver,
Prince Rupert, Naas, Granby Bay, Stewart.
Phone 1925.
JOHN BARNSLEY, Agent,
1003 Government Street 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1912
NAVAL DEFENCE
"No policy will be satisfactory to the
people of British Columbia which does
not include a substantial and prompt
contribution and THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A FLEET UNIT ON THE
PACIFIC COAST."
has time and again refused to modify its
attitude at the request of large corporations.
The Week is convinced that the Government has only to be made acquainted with
the wholesale importation of Mongolians to
work in the Cumberland mines to put an
end to a condition of affairs which is illegal,
•and in every sense inimical to the best
I interests of the Province.
STRIKE AT CUMBERLAND —In
view of the fact that the Labour Commission which has just been appointed
by the Provincial Government, will probably investigate the subject bf the miners'
strike as one of its first duties, it would be
improper to comment upon it at any length.
But sufficient has transpired to justify The
Week in saying that the daily Press has
been by no meafrs fair in dealing with the
men's side of the case, and it has lent itself
to an unworthy conspiracy in seeking to
fasten on the miners an incident in which
it is certain that they had no hand, the attempted . destruction of the Trent River
bridge. It is regrettable that all the white
miners at Extension and Cumberland should
have been idle for nearly three months, for
even today there are not a score working
except officials of the Company: It is. even
more regrettable that at Cumberland the
places of British-born miners should have
been filled by Mongolians. This is directly
opposed to the policy of the Provincial Government, which has on every occasion set
its face against Oriental Immigration, and
A DECADE AGO—The Week is indebted to one of its most respected
readers, Capt. J. T. Walbran, for a
newspaper cutting which will be found in
the current issue. It deals with the attitude of British Columbians on the subject
of Imperial Naval Defence more than ten
years ago. At that time Sir Wilfrid
Laurier was visiting Victoria and the Navy
League, headed by Mr. Justice Martin, took
advantage of the .opportunity to wait upon
him and present a petition. That petition
set forth that in the opinion of the Navy
League the time had come when Canada
should assume her proper share in the defence of the Empire, and that it was her
duty to contribute to the Imperial Navy.
The incident will be particularly interesting at the present time; it tends to show
not only how slowly events move, but how
long it has taken to arouse a Canadian Government to action. It also shows that before the present standard-bearers became
'conspicuous for their work in so good a
cause, there were pioneers of the movement
carrying on the good work; and in this,
as in many other cases in the history of the
world, it may be said that "Other men
laboured and ye are entered into the
labours." Additional force is added to the
petition referred to when it is remembered
that the' British naval force which was then
quartered at Esquimalt has long since been
removed, and today we are without even the
protection which existed at the time when
Mr. Justice Martin and his colleagues preferred their request to the Prime Minister
of Canada.
THE HOCKEY SEASON—The
Hockey Season at the Arena opens
with a match between Victoria and
New Westminster on Friday evening, December 13th. THe two strongest teams that
have ever clashed at the Coast will meet on
that date and once more Victoria will be
in the whirl of excitement which hockey
arouses. The papers have kept the public
well posted on the details of the fight between the Messrs. Patrick and the Eastern
magnates, who did their best to kill hockey
at the Coast. Everybody knows that the
local men have emerged from the conflict,
not merely victorious, but triumphant.
There are only two Eastern stars left who
would add anything to the lustre of the
Western constellations, Lalonde and Pitre.
In spite of his brilliance, while the former
may be missed, he can well be spared so far
as the public is concerned. Perhaps it is
not generally known that the Messrs.
Patrick have spent $40,000 in wages alone
to secure the three champion teams which
will play at the Coast this winter, and that
they are paying an increase of nearly
$15,000 in consequence of the opposition
whicii they met with from Mr. Lichtenstein.
There can be no better guarantee of their
determination to give the Coast the best
ice hockey in the world, and their splendid
enterprise deserves a "capacity" sale for
everv match.
cause he is a British subject, British-born
and with British qualifications. This appointment may lead to developments of still
greater importance, for Vancouver Island
is developing at such a rate that the Government may consider that it is necessary
to constitute it a separate division for all
engineering and public work purposes.
There does not appear to be any legitimate
reason why any of its Departments should
be administered from Vancouver or New
Westminster. The officials at both places
have more than enough work in hand to
occupy their full time at home, and if Mr.
Barnard can bring about the suggested
change it will undoubtedly make for
efficiency, economy, discipline ancl harmony.
A LOCAL ENGINEER—The announcement made by Mr. G. H.
Barnard this week of the official appointment of Mr. MacLachlan to the position of Assistant-Engineer residing in Victoria, to have control under Mr. Worsfold
of all Dominion engineering work in the
local Harbour, is extremely gratifying.
The importance of Victoria Harbour fully
justifies the creation of the position, and
there is no reason to doubt that in Mr.
MacLachlan the Government have secured
a thoroughly competent marine engineer
who will not be any the less welcome be-
HOSPITAL BY-LAW—The property owners of Victoria should need no
Urging to turn out in .large numbers
and vote in favour of the City By-law for
providing the sum of $200,000 for the cost
of erecting a new hospital. The Week is
almost tired of saying the Jubilee Hospital
is out of date, inadequate, and in every way
unsuited to the requirements of the present day. It may be true that the city has
no money to throw away, but the city has
the means of raising all the money that is
necessary for hospital work, and there is
not a man-who would be willing, if squarely
faced with the question, to allow the city to
remain under the reproach which at present attaches to it for lack of facilities for
carrying on the most necessary and humane
work which devolves on any community.
The private citizens have responded well to
the appeal of the ladies; the noble work
of the latter deserves every recognition and
their hearts should be made glad by a large
and generous response on the_ part of the
property owners on the 12th inst.
Why Not Make It a Practical Gift ?
The tendency to present useful articles as Christmas Gifts grows stronger
each year. What can you think of that is more useful or more acceptable
than Home Furnishings—something for mother's especial comfort; for
father's den or office; for brother's or sister's own rooms? .To secure
the most desirable articles Early Shopping Is Essential.
Telephone Table and Stool—Stool folds under the table when
not in use. Two colors, Fumed and Early English.
Occupies a space of about one and a half feet square.
Complete $10.00
Combination Cellarette and Oard Table—Leaf of table can be
let down and table set close to wall when not in use.
Finished in Fumed and Early English $16.50
SmokWs Cabinet-^Fiiriied ..:.....     $12.50
Magazine Stand—Finished in Fumed and Early English.
Price , $10.00
Nest Tables of Four—Each table slightly smaller than the
other, consequently, when not in use they can all be set
under the largest table. Early English, fumed and
mahogany finish.   Price $22.50
Solid Mahogany Tea Wagons that will greatly please ladies
who entertain , $50.00
Among the many other unique pieces are Hat and Coat Racks in Fumed and Early English finishes at $4.50 and $6; Telephone
Shelves in Fumed, Early English and Golden finishes at $3.50; Music Cabinets in Mahogany finish and Solid Mahogany at $6.50
and up;  huge assortment of Easy Chairs in all finishes, ranging in price from $9 up, and Sea Grass Chairs at $4.50 up.
VICTORIAS
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS
THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY
WEILER BROS, Limited
VICTORIA'S
POPULAR
HOME
FURNISHERS

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