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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Mar 20, 1909

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The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. &.
>innrr«irYeTrirrrrrioa-*irOT
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
123£Government St.        ijTclephonc 83
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Vol. VI.   No
/!
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
%
A Mine
Of Wealth.
When the Victoria Times
is dealing with politics it
does not invariably afford
satisfaction to the Conservative party.   This may be due to lack of appreciation, or possibly to the fact that in
the eyes of Mr. Templeman's journal, the
Conservative leaders, whether Provincial
or Federal, are the very incarnation of all
that is wicked.   Very few Conservatives
would fall down and worship the picture
which the Times paints as the true portrait of the Hon. Bichard McBride, or
Attorney General Bowser;  and they may
be pardoned for cherishing the belief that
the artiest either has a perverted imagination or is not possessed of the actual facts.
But when the Times Avrites on a subject
upon which it has accurate knowledge it
is always interesting, and is entitled to
that consideration which fair minded men
extend to a journal which seeks the truth,
and having found it is anxious to proclaim
it, even from the house tops.   In a recent
issue the Times undertook to discuss the
subject  of  ' Newspapers  as  Sources  of
Wealth."   No paper is better qualified to
enlighten the public on this subject, and
the dictum of the editor to the effect that
"A Yukon gold mine is a poor thing compared with a newspaper, as a money making proposition" will be accepted without
demur.   The Times quotes the illustrious
examples of Sir Alfred Harmsworth and
Mr. James Gordon Bennett but with characteristic modesty refrains from mention-
fi ing the local plutocrat, whose association
i/with the Times must have made him a
I r modern Croesus.    Probably it was the
editor's "comprehensive sense of proportion" which prevented him from coupling
the triumvirate;" but he might well have
gone on to relate how both the eminent
newspaper proprietors named managed to
erect magnificent blocks on the leading
thoroughfares of their respective cities in
which to house their enterprises.   It would
perhaps be probing a little too deeply into
the secrets of the editorial sanctum to endeavor to unearth the reasons why a party
organ is ''a money making proposition" or
in Western phraseology a "milch cow." In
any event it is gratifying to know that the
editor of the Times is able to differentiate
with such authority upon the newspaper as
a "gold mine" and the newspaper as a
"gold brick."    The concluding paragraph
treats of "Frenzied Finance" and ' Curb
Brokers," but frenzy is not confined to
financiers, and others than brokers sometimes require ''a curb."
Will Not
Down.
Anything that Mr. Edward
Musgrave writes is entitled
to respectful consideration.
His status in the community, his interests, and his sound judgment
render his contributions to the discussion
of public questions invaluable. But at
times even Jove nods, and in his latest
utterance on the Waterworks Settlement
Mr. Musgrave has allowed his anxiety to
do justice to the Esquimalt Company to
overbalance his usually accurate survey of
the facts. He roundly declares that the
price assured to the Company by the settlement is inadequate. In this his opinion
is not shared by such prominent citizens
as Mr. D. Ker and Mr. C. H. Todd, who
have been most intimately associated with
th/), various negotiations between the City
a'nd the Company. The price assured—
$940,000, and possibly a round $1,000,000
—is $250,000 more than the city has
hitherto been willing to give and it is not
yet certain that the ratepayers will vote
for expropriation on these terms. The
/ Company gets all its invested capital, six
per cent, interest, and a bonus of twenty
per cent, for nursing their investment for
twenty-six years. Mr. Musgrave's objection is that the basis of valuation is wrong;
it should be 'present value." Under ordinary circumstances this contention would
be correct, but in the present case it is
where Jove nods, for Mr. Musgrave ignores the fact that in the opinion of three
most eminent counsel the city has the right
of appropriation under the Act of 1873,
and if so the basis of valuation finally
incorporated in the Bill is the only fair
one. As to Mr. Musgrave's criticism of
the Government, he overlooks two facts,
that no one has a greater interest in, or is
more impressed by the importance of protecting vested interests than the responsible
heads of the Government, indeed a very
general complaint is that they are biassed
in that direction. The other point is that
no Government seeking to retain the confidence of the country could allow 40,000
people to be held up for an adequate water
supply any longer, and few persons will
find fault with a settlement which stilled
even a political Opposition.
The first Dingley Tariff
The American Bin fell like a bomb shell
Tariff. on the industrial world out
side of the United States.
It came at a time when English mills were
running over-time to  furnish ■ manufactured goods to  the   United  States.    Its
avowed intent was to put a stop to this,
or at any rate to reduce the importation
of such goods to a minimum.   That was,
several   generations   ago.     The   Dingley
Tariff had the desired effect, and whilst it
could not shut out British manufactures
it vastly reduced their importation and
forced them into other markets.   By dint
of developing the great natural resources
of their country, at a rate unparalleled in
the history of the world, the United States
has forged to the front, and with its eighty
millions of people today occupies the position of the greatest manufacturing nation
in the world.   The riches of the mine, the
soil and the forest have rendered this easy,
and one of the most marked characteristics
of the era of progress has been the establishment of a high rate of wages.   Generally speaking, American workmen have
taken a larger percentage of the value of
the article produced than any other industrial community.    While the golden,
age progressed the people were oblivious
of the fact that the cost of living was at a
par with the rate of earning, and that the
direct effect of a high protective tariff has
been to raise the cost of every commodity
which they had to purchase, and to enrich
a small minority of their fellow workmen
beyond tlie dreams of avarice.   The climax
w'as reached when the billion dollar steel
trust was formed and the anti-climax little
more than a year ago when public confidence in the stability of American enterprises was rudely shaken and people began
once more to hoard their dollars in a stocking.   Today the gigantic industrial enterprises of the States are face to face with
the greatest problem of the times,  and
needless to say any economic problem presented to capital is of .equal interest and
importance to labor.   The demands for a
reduction in wages have been made on
every hand either by refusal or by concessions which are scouted as inadequate.
Does labor realise the gigantic project now
under way to effect by indirect means what
capital is unable to effect directly 'I   Does
labor realise that the great industrial concerns of the world constitute a huge solidarity?    That in order to enforce their
demands the iron and steel manufacturers
of the States have combined with those of
England, France, Germany and Belgium
so as to apportion the markets of the world
that instead of manufacturing the full re
quirements of the American market in the
States the mills will be running hajf timo,
or quarter time, and by a judicious lowering of the tariff the combine, now universal, will manufacture in Europe and
export to the States ? At any rate that is
the scheme, and it is not easy to see what
remedy labor will find. The situation is
one of the greatest gravity, and only furnishes an added illustration to show how
keen is the fight between the manipulators
of thc great trusts and the leaders of the
labor unions. This is the true inwardness
of the "pour parlers" which have been interchanged between Europe and the States
during the last twelve months. The
struggle will be Titanic, the issue Epochal.
The Public
Service Act.
The Colonist made an unfortunate slip when it declared that while the Public Service Act is a useful
measure "it is not of any very general
public interest," it is no more happy Avhen
it suggests that the Superannuation Bill
"involves so many different views that it
might well be left until it has been more
carefully thought out." The fact obviously unknown to the Colonist is that the
Public Service Act directly affects the income and therefore the livelihood of at
least three thousand persons in the City of
Victoria and nine thousand in the Province. As to the Superannuation Bill it
has probably been more carefully thought
out by the Provincial Secretary than by
any other Minister in Canada since he has
been the first to lay such a measure upon
the table and it is not at all unlikely that
he will enjoy the distinction of being the
first Minister to bring about actual legislation upon a subject of very great and
general public interest.
Water
Gruel.
The   name of   Joseph   T.
Clark no longer figures at
the head of the Publisher's
Announcement in Toronto
Saturday Night, and needless to say the
spirit of Joseph T. Clark no longer animates the front page of the most influential
and independent paper in the Dominion.
Toronto Saturday Night has been an unqualified success and lias attained an enviable position among Canadian journals
mainly through the genius of its founder,
Mr. Edward Shepherd, and the sanity of
his  successor,   Mr.   Clark.     The   latter,
whilst not quite the equal of his predecessor in style, being less ejigramatic and incisive, was at least his equal in breadth of
view   and  reasonableness  of  conclusion.
Just why lie has stepped down and out is
not known to The Week although he undoubtedly must have had good reasons for
abandoning a position which hardly any
other man in Canada could have filled with
such distinction after Mr. Shepherd had
set the standard.    If the current issue is
to be regarded as a criterion of the work
of the new editor then indeed has Saturday Night fallen upon evil times.     The
articles on the front page to which tens of
thousands of Canadian readers have been
accustomed to turn weekly for guidance,
are not only devoid of style and disti?iction
but lack appreciation of vital issues, and
unfortunately are characterised by a freedom in phraseology which has hitherto
been a stranger to the columns of Saturday  Night.     Perhaps,  however,   in  the
minds of most people a still stronger objection will be found in the fact tliat the
viewpoint of the paper lias been moved
lutely no reason why the recommendation
of the annual meeting should not be acted
upon and meetings held at which topics of
importance might be discussed  so that
interest in the Club could be kept alive.
round, and it no longer looks out with a
clear eye into the ravelled problems of the
day, and no longer sounds a clear note on
subjects in which the public is interested.
Notice the last issue, the first article is an
unreasoning attack upon the Lord's Day
Alliance because "a goodly number of the
citizens of London, St. Thomas and Yarmouth ask for Sunday street cars but so
far have received very little encouragement from Sir James Whitney."   We are
told that the old puritanical Sabbath has
run its course, that the prevention of the
operation of Sunday cars is class legislation, and the very old chestnut is once
more made to do service which tells us
that the man of means owns or hires a
horse, but "the poor devil who has neither
horse nor auto has to sit on the step or in
the stuffy boarding house and suck his
thumb for want of a better occupation."
With a singular lack of appreciation of
non sequitur the editor goes on to re-hash
the threadbare argument that "it is not
mens' souls that require looking after so
strenuously but their bodies," and finally
asks whether "a majority of the citizens of
Toronto would favor turning back to the
old regime when there were no Sunday
cars."    This new editor was probably in
pinafores at the time or he would remember that the vote in favour of Sunday cars
in Toronto was carried by a small majority, and that majority composed of members of the churches who, although they
had moved into the suburbs, wished to
continue attending tlieir old places of worship.    Had it not been for their support
Sunday cars would have been defeated, so
after all there is little fairness and no
logic in the attitude of the editor of Saturday Night.    The same characteristics
mark his handling of other questions, and
with the single exception of the one already dealt with not one of the subjects
rises above the importance of parish politics.    It is impossible to lay down the
paper without a sigh of regret, but lest it
should be considered that this criticism
is unfair it is only necessary to mention
that one of the articles is a defence of the
marriage of Chinamen and white women,.
and finally that the slip-shod style in which.
tlie whole editorial is written may be well
illustrated by the following sentence takes
verbatim from the Chinese article,  "In
fact many a poor degraded woman has
been picked up from  the gutter  by the
Chinese to be afterwards offered honorable
marriage and in the end made self respecting women," (sic).
At the annual meeting of
The Canadian The Canadian Club a reso-
Club- lutioii    was    unanimously
passed requesting tlie incoming committee to arrange for more frequent meetings, either with or without the
usual luncheon. This was a month ago
and no move seems to have been made in
tlie matter. The Week is fully aware of
the difficulty of securing men of note, especially at this time of the year. It also is
mindful of the fact that an attempt was
made to secure Dr. Wilfred Grenfell, the
famous Labrador missionary. It is to be
greatly regretted that this truly eminent
man did not visit Victoria, the more so as
he delivered two lectures in Seattle; but
the fact of the matter is that he came
West for the express purpose of raising
funds to cary on his philanthropic work
and iu this respect undoubtedly found a.
richer field in the Sound City. All the
same it is a pity that the Canadian Club
seems to have fallen into a moriband condition. Little or nothing has been done for
nearly six months, and if the difficulty of
serving luncheons is so great there is abso- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1908
CHARITY.
"Alas!  for the rarity
Of Christian Charity
Under the Sun."
Were truer words than these eve.
written? Of all the many virtues,
charity, Christian charity shall we say,
is surely the most necessary both for
our own general happiness, in everyday life, and for the happiness of
those dependent on us, and around
us.
Yet how few, how very few, possess this great virtue; to begin with,
the majority of us don't realize what
charity really means, or not in the
true sense of the word. We think
that "almsgiving" sums up the whole
matter. How virtuous and charitable
we feel if we give something away
(preferably something we don't want
ourselves) to one who is in a poorer
or humbler station of life to what
we are, quite overlooking the fact that
in all probability the manner of giving and the spirit of giving has quite
detracted from the original virtue.
No, "almsgiving" does not by any
means constitute the whole of charity; it has too wide a meaning to be
summed up in one word. The truly
charitable person must possess many
other qualities besides that of liberality to the poor; he must be charitable in thought and speech, as well
as action, most certainly in speech.
The tongue is an unruly member,
and we must learn to bridle it if we
would be really charitable. We must
be more chary with those thoughtless
little hints and iiniendas which are so
easily spoken,—those uncharitable
little snubs and speeches, how many
bitter feelings, and heart-burnings
might be avoided if they were only
left unsaid. Without wishing to sermonize those beautiful words of St.
Paul in his Epistle to the Corinthians
might well be quoted: "Charity suf-
fereth long and is kind; charity en-
vieth not; charity vaunteth not itself;
is not puffed up . . . Rejoiceth in
the truth. . . . Charity never fail-
eth. . . And now abidcth faith,
hope, charity, these three; but the
greatest of these is charity."
KATHLEEN ASHTON.
He Was Sure.
The Old Lady—Have you got all
my trunks in, porter?
The Porter—Yes'm.
The Old Lady—Are you quite sure
I've left nothing behind?
The Porter—Not a copper, mum.
People in search of truth never find
it. Truth is found not by chasing
after it, but by attracting it to you.
Do your work, live your life, do the
duties that lie nearest and truth will
find you out and come and make her
home with you.
About this subject of Foreign Missionaries, 1 read thc following yesterday in a  Book:
"Woe unto ye Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites, for yc compass sea
and land to make one proselyte; and
when hc is made, yc make him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.
A thcosophist writes ine that hc is
in receipt of a message from a ma-
hatina which says that in his next incarnation, Theodore Roosevelt will be
a washerwoman, thc mother of eleven
children, and have a periodic boozc-
lighter for a husband.
Intellectual Compromise is proof of
Mediocrity.
Theology is passed along by the law
of parental entail. When a child loses
faith in his parents, hc loses faith
in their God. The break in the family tie precedes the break in religion.
The persistency of the Jew in religious matters is owing in great measure to his filial piety. "Honor thy
father and thty mother," is an injunction quite as binding on the Jew as,
"Thou shalt love thc Lord thy God
with all thy heart,"
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District.
RADIGER & JANION,
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, after use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz. $2.70
TEASPOONS  " 3-15
DESSERTSPOONS..  " 4-95
TABLESPOONS   " S-85
DESSERT FORKS   " 4-95
TABLE FORKS   " 5-85
DESSERT  KNIVES     " 4-95
TABLE KNIVES     " 5-4<>
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchaite ana Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted  stock  in  British  Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
There is an Affinity that shapes our
ends, rough hew them how we will.
No. 372.
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF   AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
Companies' Act, 1897.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Michigan-Pacific Lumber Company" has
this day been registered as an -Extra-
Provincial Company under the "Companies' Act, 1897," to carry out or
effect all or any of the objects of tne
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate at the City of Grand Rapids,
Kent County, State of Michigan, U.S.A.
The amount of the capital of tne
Company ls One Million Five Hundred
Thousand Dollars, divided into One Hundred and Fifty Thousand shares of Ten
Dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province ls situate at No. 1114
Langley Street, Victoria, and William
John Taylor, Barrister-at-law, whose
address is No. 1114 Langley Street, Victoria, B.C., Is the attorney 'for the
Company.
The time of the existence of the
Company is Thirty years from the 25th
of January, A.D. 1909.
Given  under  my  hand  and  Seal   or
Offlce at Victoria,  Province of British
Columbia, this first day of March, one
thousand  nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has   been   established   and   registered
are:—Buying,    selling,    manufacturing,
and dealing in forest products,
mch 6
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Land Registry Offlce, New Westminster.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Land Registry Offlce, New
Westminster," will be received by the
Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Friday, the 12th of March next, for
the erection and completion of a Land
Registry Offlce at New Westminster,
B. C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque, or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank In Canada, made payable to the Hon. tne
Minister of Public Works, or by cash,
in the sum of five per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which sum will
be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called
upon to do so, or fail to complete tne
work contracted for.
The cheques, certificates or deposit,
or cash, of unsuccessful tenderers will
be returned to them after the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed ln the envelope
furnished.
F.  C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 22nd February, 1909,
mch 6
To Satisfy Epicurean Tastes
IMPORTED FRENCH PRUNES, per lb 25c
SMYRNA FIGS, per lb 25c
SMYRNA FIGS, per bottle 50c and 35c
SMYRNA FIGS STUFFED, per bottle  50c
STUFFED DATES, per bottle  50c
GLACE FRUITS, per box  25c and 50c
ROASTED CHESTNUTS in SYRUP, per bottle  $1.00 ■
ALMONDS AND TABLE RAISINS, per bottle   75c
PISTACHIO NUTS, per bottle  25c
ROSE LEAVES, per bottle   25c
MUFFINS, per dozen   40c
CRUMPETS, per dozen   20c
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS.
1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
VICTORIA FUEL COMPANY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
I     Damp Rooms Cause Rheumatism     }
And other ills that human |j
flesh is heir to. These 1
spring days a good &
Gas
Radiator
In parlor or "den" may
save you many a large
doctor's bill. Call here
and see our special values
in gas radiators, heaters,
stoves and cooking ranges.
I
S
I Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS, CASH REGISTERS,
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—ask ua.
treet
w.*M___t&*l*M_&i_+MMA*MM_*MM
Somethinq New
cadburvs chocolate
FLAKES
JUST THE THING FOR YOUR CARD PARTY.
Our New Chocolates from noted English and Canadian firms
are unequalled for quality and flavor, a variety of fillings that
will be sure to meet your approval.
(Slay's
619 Fort St. Phone 101
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I THE WEEK  SATURDAY MARCH 20, 1909
Social and        %
Personal. *
Mrs. Charles V. Spratt leaves next
I week for Southern California where
she will pay several visits.
*   *   *
Mrs. C. E. Pooley, Fernhill, Esqui-
Imalt,   entertained   a   few   friends   at
bridge on Wednesday and Thursday
evenings.
*   *   #
Mrs. Stretfield of Saanich spent a
ay days in town during the week.
« *     *     *
^ iCliss   Purse  is  the  guest  of  Mrs.
|3clater, Pemberton Road.
* *   *
Mr. Stanley Johnson of Vancouver
■/as staying with relatives in Victoria
this week.
* w   w
Mrs.   Franklin   Parry,   Miss  Duns-
Imuir and Miss Muriel Dunsmuir, Miss
M. Little went over to Seattle during
the week to do some shopping.
*   *   *
Miss Cordelia Grylls is giving a
farewell concert on Wednesday evening, 24th, in the Alexandra Club
rooms. Miss Grylls will be accompanied by Mrs. H. Robertson and
Miss I-I. Harris. Others who are contributing towards the programme are
Mrs. D. E. Cambell, Mrs. A. Humber,
Miss Fitzgibbon, Miss Helen Peters
(pupils of Miss Grylls), Miss Mc-
Creary and Mrs. Leeder.
* *   *
Canon Beanlands left last week for
I Toronto.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Bradley-Dyne of
I Saanich paid a short visit to town
j early in the week.
* *   *
The engagement has been recently
I announced   of   Miss   Marie   Gibson,
Esquimalt, to Mr. Turner, Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Banington-Foote of Thetis
Island,  came  in  by  Monday's  train.
* *   *
Mrs. Carew Gibson who was oper-
1 ated on for an appendicitis during the
I week, is making satisfactory progress
I in St. Joseph's.
* *   *
Mr. Sherwood Gillespie of Seattle
was a guest at the Empress last week.
Mr. Maurice Berkeley came over
; from Seattle for a few days this week.
* *   *
Mrs. Arthur Robertson of Pem-
Iberton Road, was among the numer-
f.ous bridge hostesses last week. The
house was very prettily decorated
with daffodils and smilax. The first
prize, two dainty brass baskets, was
won by Mrs. Fred. Jones. The second
prize, a carved stool, by Mrs. Tye.
* *   *
Captain and Mrs. Parry entertained
at a smart dinner at the Empress last
week the following: Colonel and Mrs.
Prior, Mr. and Mrs. Kirk, Mrs. Edwards, Mr. Justice Martin, Mrs. Martin, Colonel and Mrs. Jones, Mrs. J.
W. Laing, Mr. and Mrs. F. Barnard,
Mr. Maurice Hills. Bridge was indulged in after dinner.
6   *   *
Miss Cordelia Grylls leaves shortly
for England.
* *   *
Captain Rothwell was a visitor in
town during the past week.
w   *   *
Judge and Mrs. Lampson were passengers on Monday's outgoing train
to Sydney.
* *   *
Mr. D. R. Ker went over to Vancouver on a business trip on Monday
last.
* *   *
Mrs. Beauchamp Tye has been the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Stanly Johnson in Vancouver, for the past couple
of weeks.
* *   *
Miss Morris of Duncans was a
guest at   the   Empress   during   the
week.
* *   *
Mrs. Parry and the Misses Dunsmuir sail next week for the Orient.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Flumerfelt,
who have been touring California,
have returned home.
* *   *
Mrs. Neuroulos was the guest _ of
Miss Bulwer, Esquimalt Road, during
the week.
* *   *
Mr. D. W. Higgins (Vancouver)
was a guest at the Balmoral during
a  short visit this  week.
* *   *
Mrs. Herchmer is visiting again in
the city.
* *   *
_/Ur. T. R. Cayzer of Galiano Island
was in town this week.
* *   *
Mrs. Frank of Tacoma was in Vic-
' toria for a short visit.
* *   *
Thc Bridge Club met and the
pretty residence of Mrs. C. M. Roberts, Burdette avenue, on Tuesday
last. The floral decorations were
composed of pale pink and white tulips.   Miss Hickey, Miss Gaudin and
Miss Johnson ably assisted the hostess in looking after the welfare of
her guests. The pretty prize, a set
of silver candle shades, mounted on
pink, was won by Miss McClure.
Those present were: Mrs. Spratt,
Mrs. Griffith, Mrs. Matson, Miss McClure, Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. Love,
Mrs. Blackwood, Miss S. Blackwood,
Miss Newcombe, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs.
T. James, Mrs. Piggott, Mrs. Rismuller, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Brett, Mrs.
Savage.
Whom Love Hath Left Behind.
Across the dewy grass they came,
And she was wet and still;
They laid a cloth upon her face
When resting on the hill;
For they could not bear to see her
eyes,
Which made their blood run chill.
Oh, bright ancl fair the water's face
When Love is young and kind;
But, a sullen look, and black it wears
When Love hath proved unkind;
Ancl a soft, sweet bed it makes for
some
Whom Love hath left behind.
—Louise   C.    Glasgow,    in   The
Canadian Magazine for March.
Victoria Golf Club.
Members of the Victoria Golf Club
who were present at the dinner given
at the Union Club on Saturday evening last to the Seattle team are
unanimous in their appreciation of
the table decorations which were prepared at very short notice by Major
Beale (secretary of the Union Club),
and Mrs. Beale.
The colour scheme of the flowers
was entirely red, white and green, conformable to the customary flags and
turf of golf links.
Down the middle of a table set for
fifty was a baize imitation of the
"fair green" of St. Andrew's or some
other "weel kenned course," lumpy
with bunkers of real sand, dotted
with tees and flagged putting greens,
and populated with tweed-clad club-
bearing brownies, driving, putting and
foozling in various styles.
The centre piece represented the
mythical Colonel Bogey in white
whiskers, doing the 19th hole (2,000
yards) in one tremendous combination drive and putt, assisted by a
cherub-checked caddie whose duty it
was to blow the hesitating ball over
the lip of the hole.
The menu cards were mounted on
miniature putting greens alternately
carrying a red and white hole flag
with a tiny cleek conchant and a dew
drop Haskell at rest.
Little Union Jacks and American
flags embracing each other over the
oysters gave a friendly international
touch to the spread—and so lifelike
was the appearance of suppressed
emotion in one doll lady's attitude
as she topped her drive, that a visitor
burst into poetry and quoted Keats:
"No syllable she uttered, woe betide!
But  to  her  heart,  her  heart  was
voluble,
Paining  with  eloquence  her  balmy
side
As though a tongueless nightingale
shold swell
Her throat in vain, and die, heart
stifled in her dell!
"Why are you so vexed, Irma?" "I
am so exasperated! I attended the
meeting of the Social Equality League
and the parlor maid presided and had
the audacity to call me to order three
times!"
Important Information.
With the twenty-second of February looming up in the middle distance,
the young teacher thought she saw
a good chance to inculcate patriotism
111 her young charges.
"Now what little boy can tell me
anything about George Washington?"
she asked sweetly. Then selecting the
boy attached to the hand which seemed to be waving thc most frantically,
she  said,  "you may  tell,  Willie."
"Please, mum, we git a holiday on
his birthday."
Criticism.
"So you do not approve of my style
of speechmaking?" said the youthful
statesman.
"No," answered Senator Sorghum;
"your speeches are not short enough
to bc epigrammatic nor long enough
to be depended on for time-killing
in an emergency."
Make Some
Money on
the Side
CYPHERS
INCUBATORS AND
BROODERS
Will enable you to do this without trouble. Call and see us or
write.
WATSON &
McGregor
647 Johnson St.
if
if
Leave Your
:e Checks at
if
if
if
if
8
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
*f
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if
if     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
The Pacific
Transfer
Co.
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
A. E, KENT, Proprieter
Phase 249.
Oriental Cream
OB KIOIGAZ-. BBAOTSnn
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
Smoke Dudleigh's
Famous Blend
THE PEER OF ALL
MIXTURES.
Do not be put off with any
other.
To be had only at
Ini Navy   Richardson
Cigar Store.      "IVHHI UOUII
Phone 346
"Unfermented, but full of Alcohol." This is the heading of an
interesting article, published a few days ago in a Vancouver paper.
It deals with the recent government analysis and shows how
tee-totalers have drank intoxicants for years without knowing it.
This is not a fairy story, but cold facts gleaned from the last
bulletin of the laboratory of the inland revenue department,
showing the immense quantity of alcohol and health-dangering
ingredients found in so-called "unfermented" wines, soft drinks
and tonic wines, labelled "Unfermented Grape Juice for Sacramental and Medical Use," etc., "This Wine is Produced from Pure
Grape Juice Only," "Warranted Free from Alcohol," etc., etc. The
examination proved that a large number of samples were found to
contain from 12 to 25 per cent of alcohol.
W. J. Lemp's Eeer contains but four per cent of alcohol, no
preservatives, no unwholesome ingredients,* pure water, the best
hops and malt procurable, is brewed in the honest, old, slow way
and properly aged before being placed upon the market.
We leave it to the intelligence of people to judge which is
preferable, these deceptive wines and soft drinks favored by prohibitionists or wholesome beer drank by the discerning. Pither
and Leiser, corner Fort and Wharf streets, Victoria.
1__l__l__<.-- *__'__■■■- '■*_•__'_- '__'_   ■_  '__'_  *_*_'_ _'_'_l.-'_____"  '__'_*'__'__'__,__'__'' •*  t__t'  l______.l__J___l___'_.t_l_l___l
p)keakfast
Lunches
Afternoon
Teas
Dinners.
Smoking Rao.n.
Tea Room.
We grow cur own produce.       Parties catered to and tables reserved.
Cosy Corner Cafe and Tea Rooms
616 Fort Street.
fesi^r',^:$H^^S!$:$^;-r:-;:eK:-
PHONE
:--iTH:-rae«si6ise^$!$i$!SKi$!sea
&a»i*:.*w*a^^
EMPRESS THEATRE
C.jr. Gavernment and Johnson Sts.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES   AND ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
COMPLETE  CHANGE   OF  PROGRAM    EACH    MONDAY
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE.       a to 5.30. and 7 to 10:30 p.m.
Admission—10 cents.
Children's Matinee Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—5 cents. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 20, 1909
The Week
With the exception of the Fairmount t0 have a good time.   This produces
Hotel and one stone block near the features not found in any other town,
A Provincial ReWew a^nd Magazine, pub-  Bank of California down town every and far too much in evidence here. It
"THF WFFK" PI IRI KHIMfi buildiug succumbed t0 the flames- The accounts for the rapidity with which a
rnMDiWV  I IMITCn           area consumed would be aPProximate- new  China  town  has been built up
wUfllFAIN Y, LliVll 1 _\).          ly   two    miles   square.    Today   the when an decent minded people hoped
Nbliikad at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER f der * g[adually takin/ P°SSeS,r * had P"ished for ever'   li accou"ts
  of the desolate area, and every day for the conspicuous audacity of vice,
ll# ^Ifrwf^ti^'vJ!.^?^ Rr   carry'»g the attack nearer and nearer and the easy toi;rance 0f the auth-
626     Hastings Street.. .Vancouver, a.i_.  .....        ,-, t*	
 to Van Ness Avenue.   To a stranger orjties, who wink at glaring  abuses
W. BLAKEMORE. .Manager and Editor there is no evidence of lire within a because of the money which they cir-
___^_. ______ _____________________                         mile of the waterfront, and the stores, ___\ate,
Ff Atl-CISCO                               0fficeS' h0tds and bl°CkS Whi0h haVC There are features in San Francisco
p,                .                   been run up, literally in a day, pre- today  which   wiu   not  iong  survive)
HOI   rfanClSCan  se»t the variety and irregularity of an and by the time that a complete a
old  city.    The  notable  exception   is city   has   ariscn   froffl   the   rui,ls   0f
Nob Hill, once occupied by the Palatial   residences  of  the   millionaires
but now deserted.    It is a splendid
By W. BLAKEMORE.
three years ago, unless I am greatly
mistaken it will be beautiful, and
purified.
England   and   Scotland   delivering   a
series of lectures on his travels and
Sporting Comment
The    meeting    of    the    Victoria
Lacrosse   Club  which  was  held last
It was my first visit to San Francisco  and  was  a  revelation.    Forty  eminence  in the centre  of the city,
years ago an old man named Henry capped by the Fairmount Hotel, from
Vincent was travelling up and down  the roof of which one gets a bird's
eye view which covers the entire city
and looks far into the surrounding
experiences. He was always billed country. Since the fire the magnates
as "Henry Vincent, the Orator," and have wisely crossed the bay to Oak
in many respects filled the bill, but land and Berkley, where the effect of Monday augurs well for a good sea-
he was gifted with that "fatal fluency" the earthquake was not felt; and as son> that is> if the same energy that
which was so marked a characteristic Nob Hill is too high for stores 't was shown at tile meeting is in evi-
of Arthur Mursell, and which prevent- will probably be given over to Hotels dellce on the iieid The 0fficers wh0
ed both from attaining front rank. Thp and apartment houses. , were elected for the forthcoming sea-
effect of one of Vincent's orations At the present moment San Fran- son are all well known to Victorians,
was similar to that of a meteor which cisco is hardly a pleasant city to live and they deserve the undivided sup-
dazzles, disappears, and leaves you in in; the air is full of dust; the streets port of the sporting fraternity of the
Cimmerian darkness. arc lined with bricks and mortar; piles  city.   1 do not mean that the other
I well remember that one of Vin* of stone and lumber; the hammer sports must not be attended to, but
cent's most brilliant orations dealt ringing on steel structures, and teams when it comes to a lacrosse match
with a visit to America more than are rushing building material in every everybody turn out. There is at pre-
half a century ago, and wound up with direction, sent in the city the makings of a first
a glowing panegyric on San Francisco But take a ride to the suburbs and class team, and if the players get out
and the Golden Gate. As I had my you wjjj be more t[ian repayed for and practice as they should both New
first glimpse of the great Western your journey though you travel all Westminster and Vancouver will have
City and its surroundings my mind in- round the world tQ pass through the to go some to beat the locals. Regu-
stantly reverted to St. George's Hall, Qglden Gate. 1 cannot find words lar practices will commence about the
Wolverhampton, where in the sixties to express the magnificence of the end of the present month and the
I heard Vincent's glowing description view from the Qjg Heights. The players will be in good condition
San Francisco is a great city; it is Golden Gate is well named; it is three when they open the season. The de-
great in size, in spirit, and instinct miles w;de and commands the en- cision to leave the matter of pro-
with throbbing, palpitating life. It trance to the Inland Waters of the fessionalism vs amateurism to the an-
has an atmosphere all its own, and Bay Its soijtary sentinel is a light- nual meeting of the B.C.A.L.A. is, I
different from that of any other city house 150 feet high. From the Cliff think, a very wise one, but it would
I have visited. All places where men Heights, 500 feet high, on the city do no harm to give the. delegates
and women congregate are thronged. si(]C) 01]e looks acrQSS tQ ,Mount Ta_ some idea of what is wanted.
There are no vacant seats in the thea- malpaiS; to the summit of which a The latest joke in the sporting
tres, the churches or the halls. The tram ra;iway wjnds jts way. West- world is the challenge that has been
population is as active and restless as ward stretches a long range of low issued by Jas. J. Corbett to Jeffries,
a colony of ants. Tramcars, automo- lying mountajnSj iapped at their base Johnson or any person who cares to
biles, hacks, stream along in endless  by the waters of the Pacific. fight-   Jeffries and Johnson have been
procession. On Washington Street ]t js the first week in _fi.drch_ but getting off some good one during the
twenty-five motor cycles passed me t|)e sun shines and the sky jg b)ue A past coupie of months, but that of
inside of five minutes. Everyone is in few mi)es sout|. of Th(, cjiff thou_ Corbett's caps the climax, but still
a hurry and the people live every sandg of young peop,e ar(, bathjng jn Jas. J. was always known as a good
minute of the time. the sea> and a littie further on Sun- advertising agei
Every street car is crowded, and day afternoon fifty thousand people The Victoria United football team
this not only at special hours of the listen to the strains of the City Band will not journey to Nanaimo today to
day but practically all the time.   The  jn Golden Gate Park. meet  the  players  of  that  city  in  a
better class people patronise the cars There is nothing like this park on regular scheduled match. This action
to a very limited extent, for them it the American continent. It covers 'las been taken, owing to the reports
is the auto o rthe hack. While I many mjies. ;s iajd out scientifically that were in circulation, to the effect
found considerable kindness I noticed |las gardens, lakes, pergolas, fountains that Nanaimo was under quarantine,
but little courtesy. Not once did 1 and an the most attractive features The locals are anxious to play, but
see a man relinquish his' seat in favor 0f the Parisian Parks. Every kind of to make sure thc officials of Nanaimo
of a lady, and both on the streets reCreation is indulged in, and every were written to, and while the town
and in the departmental stores the kjnd 0f game. 1 counted twenty ten- is not quarantined, the authorities
women folk were jostled the same as „jg courtSj all free to the public, and would not allow the game to be play-
the men. more are being added.   But perhaps  ed   making  it  unnecessary   for   the
There was a note of optimism the most striking feature of the park locals to make the trip at the present
everywhere; you could not find a man is its fine oiled roadway for motors; time.
in the city who did not express the many miles in length, winding all The Painter Cup, presented by J.
belief that it would be greater than round the park, smooth, hard and -E- Painter for football competition
ever and so it will, for it is this same dustless it makes motoring a luxury, among the city schools has been won
indomitable spirit and note of op- It seemed to me that all the motors for the first time by South Park,
timism which in the short space of in the West had gathered here, and Although the South Park boys won.
three years has built a new, and in out of curiosity I sat near the hot they had no snap, as their total score
many respects magnificent, city on houses from half past three to four for the series was only four goals,,
the debris of earthquake and fire, o'clock in order to count the number while ,all that was scored against
Since the Spring of 1906, when San of cars passing-it totalled up 335 in them was one. This shows good
Francisco was in ashes, and the Am- the half hour. playing °n the  part of the young-
crican press was almost a unit in de- I have spoken of the band, and it sters. Ihe outlook for cricket for the
daring that its glory had departed and should be spoken of; there were thirty coming season is very bright. With
that its sun would be eclipsed by Port- performers; the selections were high Victoria, Albions and Garrison in the
land and Seattle; building permits ag- class, the rendering splendid, and in field and a possibility of Cedar Hill,
gregating $207,000,000 have been the vast space in front of the stone Esquimalt, Victoria West and the
granted and two-thirds of the burnt arch, where the players are massed, Empress Club all looking for games,
area has been reoccupied. Within provision is made for seating 20,000 there is sure to be something doing,
two years from date there will be no people. The music was listened to, Walking is now becoming popular
trace of an earthquake and fire which and thoroughly appreciated. I in- and every week sees several members
completely demolished all the busi- quired of one of the patrolmen as to from the local clubs taking a stroll
ness section of a great city. the financial arrangements made for extending from five to ten miles. This
Many  stories  have  been  told  of the band.   He told me that originally is good exercise.   Let the good work
that dire event;  I tried to get at the the city footed the bill but that since continue,
truth.   The earthquake was far more the fire, well-to-do private citizens de-
serious than the press tried to make frayed the cost.   This is a specimen
out.   The local papers minimised the of the public spirit which has made,
earthquake and   magnified   the fire, and as long as it lasts will continue
UMPIRE.
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
1016 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C.
Ohas. Hayward, Pres.
R. Hayward, Sec.
P, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867
I
I
I
Telephones—48,   594,   igos,   305,   or   404.
I
1
GOODS AND SAMPLES SENT FREE
BY MAIL
Silk Dresses Made to Order to Meet
the Latest Tailoring.
So Hop & Co., 639 Fort Street |
*_ *
PHONE 1884.
639 FORT STREET.
Pongee Silk
In purchasing Pongee Silk it will be to your advantage to visit
onr premises. We have a line of the finest quality in the fallowings widths:—
34 inches wide 50c per yard.
34 inches wide 60c and 65c per yard.
EXTRA HEAVY QUALITY.
34 inches wide $1.00 per yard.
26 inches wide 40c per yard.
We are correct in stating that we carry the nest make of grass
;t    linen at—
ii
34 inches wide.  Regular price $i.oo, now goes for 80c.
I   ORIENTAL IMPORTING COMPANY   |
if    510 Cormorant Street ... Phone iaai.    8
if _
8i8S888m88«»»»*S-8«^^
I VICTORIA THEATRE I
THB VICTORIA MUSICAL SOCIETY
[ will present:—
j MARIE HALL Violinist
i LENIE BASCHE  Pianist
\ HAROLD BEALEY Baritone
j    on Tuesday, March 23rd. Prices—75c, $1.00, $1.50,  $3.00.
I Box Office opens Monday. March 22nd.  Mail orders, if accom-
•     panied by remittance, will be dealt with immediately after season
\mtimi_mm.mmmmm
and  nothing is  too  good for Vic
torians.
buyers will appreciate a firm which contraot when called upon to do so,
eives them the best tliat is to be had, or « he fall to complete the contraot.
gives mem _u- "vav ,,_■,•**■ Cheques   of   unsuccessful   tenderers
will be returned upon signing of contract.
The Department ls not bound to accept the lowest or any tender.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 12th March, 1909.
mch 27
PUBLIC SCHOOL DESKS.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tenders
for School Desks," will be received by
The Kingdom Saved.
When   Barry   Sullivan,   the   Irish
New Citizens.
Victoria is well supplied with firms
The Tu"tlTis7not that" the "fire "spread to make, San Francisco a city of dealing in Gents' furnishings and yet
from one or two starting points at note, there is room for the latest comers
the foot of Market Street, but that Much might be said about the because they have everything up to
in twenty different places the earth- darker side of the picture. This great date and are enterprising. Messrs,
ouake caused buildings to fall and Californian capital is the dumping Fitzpatrick & O'Connell have opened
fire to break out. The whole of ground for all the successful gold a very attractive store opposite the
Chinatown and the whole of the busi- miners and prospectors on the con- post office and are already connected
ness section from the waterfront to tinent; the men who make a "big with a large circle of customers,
Van Ness   Avenue   was   wiped   out. strike" and head straight for 'Frisco which   goes  to  show  that  Victoria
?9S»nM2&l& MW. tragediaun' waj 'h*in* Richard HI-
following school desks ready for ship- one night, and actor came to the
ment  to places  to be hereafter deslg-  ..        „.   , i,nrQP|    u„ u..
nated to the order of the Department at lmes, A norse, a noise! My king-
Vancouver or Victoria, B.C., on or be-  d0m for a liorsel" some merry wag
in the pit called out:
"And wouldn't a jackass do as well
for you?"
"Sure," answered Sullivan, turning*
like a flash at the sound of the voice.
"Come around to the stage door at
once I"
fore the 14th May next:—
Single Desks
Size No. 5
Size No. 3
Size No. 2
.400
.300
Single Rears,
Size No. 5
Size No. 3
Size No. 2
. 40
.100
.100
The name of the desk and maker to
be mentioned in tenders.
No tender will be entertained unless
accompanied by an accepted cheque on
The Difference.
Many a young man starting out to
a'charVered bank of Canada, payable to COnquer the world considers himself
the   undersigned,  or  by  cash,   In   the \ ...
amount of one hundred and fifty dollars an Alexander when  he  is in reality
($160), which will be  forfeited if the h f . A]
party  tendering decline  to  enter  into DUt a smart Aiec- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1909
NEW AWNINGS
FOR YOUR STORE OR HOME.
The season for awnings is almost
here—don't you need a new one or
the old one "fixed up"?
Come in and let us give you an
estimate on awnings for your home
or store.
We put into our awnings the
same extra touch of quality that,
characterizes our furniture and other
lines, and it pays.
If you want good awnings come
here.   Estimates gladly furnished.
CHIFFONIERES.
We want to show you the wonderful line of Chiffonieres we show at
the popular price of $35.00.
In this price we show some really
handsome designs, and have in our
showrooms today ten different designs at this price.
These come in Golden Oak and
Mahogany. The finish is especially
fine and the workmanship throughout the very best.
The values are certainly better
than ordinary. Come in and let us
show you what we can offer you
at $35.00.
Others at $18 to $125.
Save 15 Per gent.
on Carpet Squares
New Axminster Squares Priced at Saving Prices
We have good news for you from the Carpet Department, news of an opportunity to save 15
per cent on the purchase of that new carpet square you are going to buy for this Spring. We made
our order for Templeton Parquet Axminster Squares so large that we obtained a special discount and
we are enabled to offer you these at prices fifteen per cent lower than we have been able to offer
same before. These are the finest seamless Axminster Squares. They come in handsome floral and
Oriental designs and colorings, and a broad choice is shown. They have a beautiflu, deep, close pile
and are execllent wearers.   Pleased to show these.
Size 6x9 feet  $25.00
Size 7-6 x 9 feet  $30.00
Size 9x 10 ft. 6 in $40.00
Size 12x9 feet  $42.00
Size 13-6x10 ft. 6 in $55.00
Size 12x10 ft. 6 in $50.00
A WHITNEY COLLAPSIBLE GO-
CART FOR $10.45.
Complete with Hood.
NICKEL PLATED SOAP BOXES AT 50c.
If you ever travel, here is a useful article—a Soap Box. Even
if you don't, it's useful. This is a neat box of nice design,
nickel-plated.    It  is  excellent value at, each   50c
LARGE, FINE QUALITY CHAMOIS 75c
There are dozens of uses for the Chamois Skin, and just as
many reasons why you should use one. From the washing of
windows to the polishing of silver, you can use them to advantage. We have a fine line of large, fine quality chamois, which
we have marked at the fair price of, each 75c
FISH CARVERS IN LINED CASE, $5.00.
Fish Carvers in a plush-lined case and marked at the right
price. These are of very attractive design, of good quality and
are excellent value.   A serviceable article. Price is, per set $5.00
CLEAN CARPETS.
IF   YOU   LET   US   DO   THE
WORK FOR YOU.
Let us clean and repair your
old carpets this Spring. Our carpet cleaning machine thoroughly
removes all dust and without
the  least injury to  the  carpet.
Our carpet workmen are prepared to alter and repair the old
carpet and in a position to do
this work promptly.
Telephone the Carpet Department—Phone 146.
An Alteration Sale of Odd Bits in China
Workmen have started with important alterations in the China Store—we are making some
changes here, making a better store. The changes are going to upset things in this department for
a time, and the problem is "what are we going to do with the new Spring China?" We must make
room, so all the odd pieces are going to be offered at little prices to clear and to make room. Come
in today and tomorrow, for there'll be lots of real good bargains in china bits.
Just a Sample Value.
Here is sample value from our
stock of Go-Carts, just a representative style chosen from a very complete stock.
This is a collapsible cart, with
hood. The device is the simplest and
best made. The cart when in use is
rigid and strong. Folds instantly
and  easily.
Upholstered in brown or green Boston Leather. Gear is all steel, four
10-in. rubber-tired wheels. Fine enamel finish.
Remember this is a "Whitney" cart
—a guarantee that it is the very best
made.
Priced at $11.00, which, with our 5
per cent, discount, makes this splendid value at  $10.45
Other "WHITNEY" Carriages from
$3.75 to $40.
FREE!    FREEI
This is a beautiful book of more
than 300 pages. Everything is beautifully illustrated, carefully described
and priced. This makes shopping by
mail through the medium of our Mail
Order Department a simple and satisfactory matter.
SEND FOR IT NOW.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West Try furni-
ture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
At The Street   a)
Corner
i
By THE LOUNQBK
ier i
The seventeenth of Ireland is a
great day whereon the Sons of Erin
and their descendants are wont to
celebrate in true Irish fashion. It is
only on such occasions that one
learns how many Irishmen there are
around, and by the same token how
Irish they can be.
The Junior Member for Victoria
did the honors at the banquet on
Wednesday night in the unavoidable
absence of the Premier, who is a
veritable "broth of a boy" and has
undoubtedly kissed the Blarney Stone
as often as any of his compatriots.
Mr. Thomson was supported by a
goodly array of orators and trenchermen, which brings me to a point
upon which it is the special privilege
of Lounger to say something. I refer to the difficulty experienced in
Victoria in arranging for any decent
service on the occasion of a public
banquet or feast of any kind.
The Canadian Club has practically
abandoned its functions because of
the difficulty bf serving a luncheon,
and this after trying at least four
hotels. The function at the Dallas
Hotel on Wednesday night was anything but creditable to the management and the caterers. The banquet
was announced for 8.30, late enough
in all conscience. It was 9.25 before
the hungry crowd, many of whom
had eaten nothing since mid-day
lunch, were ushered into the dining
room, and  nearly   10 o'clock  before
they began to eat. If this is the best
Victoria can do the sooner such functions are given up the better. The
difficulty is that there is no restaurant
big enough to deal with 150 to 200
guests at a sitting, and no hotel able
or willing to do so at the time when
men want to feed, because it interferes with their guests.
Is Victoria too small to support a
large restaurant? What is the use
of advertising the city and exploiting
its advantages if there is no provision
for hospitably entertaining a large
convention or gathering of any kind?
Surely this is one of the most notable
deficiencies of the City, and one which
should be remedied.
1 always understood that there was
to be a restaurant or grill room at
the Empress Hotel. I believe the
room is there but for reasons best
known to themselves the management
prefer to use the space for storing
lumber. If the anticipations of those
who profess to know are realized, and
the Alaska-Yukon Exposition brings
tens of thousands of visitors to Victoria this year, the deficiency to which
I have directed attention will be seriously felt.
The war still wages as to the choice
of material for paving James Bay
causeway. At least it wages in thc
press, for the City Fathers have turned down the recommendation of the
Streets Committee and propose to use
vitrified brick. There are three objections to this course, two of which
are conceded by all parties, and one
of which is disputed. The disputed
point is as to the durability and suitability of vitrified brick. Personally
I am opposed to it as being costly,
noisy, unsightly, and liable to grind
under heavy traffic. Still with the experience of Portland and Seattle to
guide  them  the  visiting  deputation
were no doubt justified in recommending this material for paving certain
streets.
On the other hand no one can deny
that it will be July or August before
James Bay causeway will be completed if vitrified bricks are used, and
further it will make a patchwork job.
In view of the importance of making
the city look as presentable as possible before the rush of visitors comes
in, I should have thought that the
Council would have been prepared to
waive all other objections and use
wood blocks for the present; if this
were done the sidewalks and road
could be completed by the end of
April, not a day too soon. If properly laid the pavement would bc
good for at least six years, and under
existing circumstances that is surely
long enough to counteract any other
disadvantages.
I am glad to see that the Council is
beginning to move again in the direction of demolishing unsightly and
dangerous buildings. A year ago the
good work ceased but a revival seems
imminent. The several buildings already mentioned should be removed
without a moment's delay, but there
are others which have apparently escaped the vigilance of the Building
Inspector and I intend next week to
submit a list of them. Meanwhile I
would especially direct attention to
the old house on the Fairfield Road
near to Moss Street which should
not be inhabited in its present condition by any human being. I do not
wish to cast any reflection upon the
people living there, the blame rests
with the owners or their agent. If
the tenants are paying any rent a
portion of it should be applied to remedying conditions which are a disgrace to civilisation; if no rent is being paid the tenants should be com
pelled at least to repair windows and
doors, and to remove other evidences
of dilapidation.
Congratulations to the public on the
impending opening of the new tramline to Ross Bay. It will be a great
boon to several hundred people who
up to now have had to trudge in all
weathers over bad roads to do their
shopping and mailing. It now only
rests with thc telephone company to
complete the public service to this
section by erecting the poles which
have been lying on the road side for
some weeks past. When I last wrote
on this subject they were still growing in the woods, lt did not take
long to cut and deliver them, but they
seem very reluctant to assume a perpendicular position once more verb-
sap—especially in the Spring time.
Nordau declares that this is a degenerate age, and yet Nordau never
found himself in Victoria on the occasion of the arrival of a champion
pugilist, colored at that, and his white
"Better half." Just what lower grade
of humanity Nordau struck to make
him a confirmed pessimist I do not
know but the fulsome attention lavished upon Johnson was enough to
make such real heroes of the ring as
Tom Sayers and Allen turn in their
graves. I must confess to being utterly unable to understand on what
principle space is allotted in some of
the daily papers. The Victoria dailies
handled the subject pretty well; they
gave Johnson quite sufficient publicity,
without being extravagant, and they
wisely threw a mantle over some of
the less creditable incidents of the
voyage, but the Vancouver and
Seattle papers acted as if there never
had been a real champion before, as
if he were a model not only of courage and skill, but of conduct, and as if
he was all the more  interesting be
cause of his colour. As a matter of
fact the whole thing is simply an
extravagant illustration of hero worship. The sporting writers pander to
the lowest possible taste in exploiting the career of such men as Johnson, whose title to fame rests upon
the fact that he scored a victory on
points over a man thirty pounds
lighter than himself. It will be time
enough to appraise the pugilistic
merits of Johnson when he has met
and defeated a lirst class fighter of
his own weight, and even then it is
doubtful whether he will be entitled
to the attention which he is now
receiving.
One night recently 1 lounged into
the Victoria Theatre, at least as far
as I could get in, for it was literally
packed to the doors and all the boxes
except thc upper ones were full. At
lirst I thought there must be a big
attraction from the outside, but 1
found that it was just the ordinary
entertainment provided by Mr. Denham with his wonderful moving pictures and his army of amateurs. [
was accompanied by a man who has
travelled all over the world and h;
declared that it was the best ten-cent
show he had ever seen. Personally
I havc a weakness for moving pictures, if they are good, and Clifford
Denham's arc "the best ever," they
are clear and sharp. In addition the
subjects are well selected and I cannot
help but think that pictures of the
class exhibited at the Victoria theatre
not merely afford entertainment and
amusement but are educators of th?
public taste. In any event if one
wants a cheap laugh and an hour's
fun this show is hard to beat.
In justice to the Empress Theatre
I do not want to leave the impression
on my readers that the Victoria is
(Continued on Page Eight) 1
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1909
It Is a Burning Shame
To waste goocl money in large coal or wood fires when not required for heating purposes.    It is folly to cook the cook on a hot summer's day.    That is the
beauty of a gas range—a turn of the tap and the heat is on or off at will.    A hundred other splendid points, too.    Come in and we will explain the many
merits of gas for cooking and heating purposes.
YOU SHOULD COOK WITH GAS.
Then you woiild be spared all the worry, dirt
and inconvenience attendant on a coal or wood
stove and avoid the awful danger of alcohol or
oil. Gas for cooking is positively unsurpassed.
We have some very fine values just now in our
showroom, Gas Eanges and Gas Stoves that well
illustrate the comfort and economy of gas for
cooking purposes.
YOU SHOULD USE GAS HEAT.
Almost every B. 0. home needs a little heat in
the spring, summer and fall, but why suffer work
and worry of lighting fires when a Gas Radiator
—just a turn of the tap and a match-scratch—
will give all the warmth you need. Fuel economy
lessened, as well as wear on carpets and draperies
lessened and freedom from work soon pay small
expense of gas heating outfit.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
itififififiri?ifi?ifififif
# if
if A Lady's Letter *
if ly 1ASETTE. ^
if if
if wifvififififififififif
Dear Madge:
We hear a good deal now-a-days
about refinement, and how desirable
a possession it is to man or woman,
yet not all of us are striving to attain
it, and a good many are callous on
the subject. But a really refined woman strews the paths of life with
smiles and flowers and blessings. She
commands our universal admiration
and respect. She moves in society
with a calm and courteous gentleness
and grace, and her every act contains
a benediction. The influence of the
refined woman is more felt than seen,
in that her example is all-powerful.
It checks insensibly all manifestations
of boorishness or want of culture, and
makes us behave ourselves whether
we would or no. The little courtesies
that she so freely exhibits do much
to impart pleasure to social life, and
largely mark the distinction between
the civilized man and the savage. As
the oil in the machine bearings annihilates friction and conserves power,
so is social intercourse smoothed and
made pleasant by thc lubricating
power of the politeness that comes
naturally where there is refinement.
In one of the celebrated fables of
Esop, a deity is pictured as traveling
over Greece, and, pitying thc shortsightedness of people, he gave to
each a pair of spectacles; unfortunately, as the sequel showed, each
pair of glasses was a different color,
and consequently no two of the Grecians saw anything alike, no two had
the same impression of any visible
thing. And to this day, very few of
us entertain the same opinion on any
subject, or have the same ideas regarding our wants, experiences, or
feelings,
In few cases would we find more
divergent views and conceptions than
in the abstract idea of rest. What is
rest? Ask a few of your acquaintances and see how widely they will
differ. The most prevalent idea of
rest is to do nothing—to lie in bed,
or swing gently in a hammock, or sit
in a tilted chair with your feet on a
table, to lounge by a river bank and
fish; anything that requires little or
no effort is the popular conception of
rest. But science knows no such thing
as rest. Rest is rust, or decay, or
death, and even decay and death are
modes of motion. Some philosophers
have advanced the theory that the
whole of the universe is pure motion,
and arrested motion is matter and
that until pure motion is arrested or
retarded it is not perceptible to our
senses.
But it is not so much thc scientific
concept of rest that concerns us as
the realization, in our everyday lives,
of the thing, whatever it may be,
which will afford us the enjoyment of
rest. We may dismiss the notion that
absolute quiet and perfect immobility
will give us the rest wc need, for none
but the sick could long endure such
a condition. But rather let us seek
rest and recuperation in a change of
work, or in some exercise in whicli
our whole soul can become interested.
Those who have an absorbing hobby
have already solved the problem of
rest, for no sooner has their daily
business or regular work ceased than
they find relaxation or relief for tired
brain or muscle in thc pursuit of their
beloved hobby. The man who loves
a garden and the joy of caring for it,
has no sooner quit his daily toil ancl
eaten his evening meal than he finds
all thc blessings of rest and recreation
in digging, hoeing, planting or weeding his garden. No matter what the
favorite hobby may be, whether it be
utilitarian like gardening, or fanciful
like collecting postage stamps,
whether it be building a chicken house
or caring for a horse, studying chemistry or astronomy, posing over a
microscope or arranging butterflies,
its pursuit is always beneficial, for it
starts new lines of thought in the
brain or puts new sets of muscles to
work in the body, and the tendency
is always in the direction of good.
ln the high-pressure life we are
leading, more than ever before, it becomes the duty of all of us to thoroughly study the philosophy of rest,
and try to apply the most fitting
forms of rest to our individual needs.
There should be no killing of time in
our leisure hours, for such slaughter
neither contributes to our comfort nor
to the welfare of our fellowmen. But
rather choose some hobby that has
the elements of good in it, and that
will afford both us and our fellows
some help and some enjoyment. There
are many such if we earnestly and
honestly seek them. And having
found the hobby-horse that fits your
particular need, cheerfully mount it
ancl smilingly ride along the road tn
rest and happiness.
BABETTE.
^__V__.__._?.tf._?£f«H-».--".____W--^^^
Travel to be Heavy.
Steamships for sale and charter are
at a premium on the Pacific Coast ancl
the Alaskan transportation lines arc
sending agents into the Great Lake.-;
country and along thc Atlantic to
negotiate for craft to be used this
summer in carrying tourist parties
from Seattle to Alaska.
The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, which opens in Seattle on June
1, is of course attracting hundreds
of thousands to the Northwest ancl
that many of them are going to take
advantage of thc opportunity to see
also Alaska's magnificent glaciers and
other splendid scenic beauties, is made
evident by the fact that excursion reservations on the regular boats of the
lines are already made to the full capacity. No less than a half dozen
other large steamers are either now
on the way to Puget Sound, or shortly will be, and these will handle the
balance of the traffic. As it now
stands, no less than thirty large craft
will be engaged constantly throughout the summer in carrying excursionists back and forth on the six-
day Alaskan Coast trip.
WE EAT
TO
LIVE
Meals, 20c and up.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841.
Empire Hotel and
Restaurant
A Lipsky, Proprietor.
if
J
J
»
i
i
jj  Best Brands of Wines, Liquors J]
and Cigars. gi:
i:
:_     Family Trade Catered To.     $\
i t
■j  MILNE BLOCK, »,
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C. $
if
if
if
VmWmWhW»^WhWh'hWhW#»W»Vh'mWhw!
WHEN YOU
PUT AWAY
YOUR FURS
It is well to pack them away
carefully in airtight bags or
boxes so that the little moth
pests cannot ruin them.
MOTH BAGS 50c up.
Are sold by us for the purpose of holding Fur Coats,
Muffs, etc. We know of nothing better. They are also very
reasonable in price. Come in
and take a look at them.
CMOS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt. St., Near Yates.
VICTORIA, B.C.
f\  Prepare yourself  against  Jack 8
8 Frost. g
§    See BOLDEN    |
^ ~.T . .-	
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
Judge—Why did you strike this
man ?
Prisoner—What would you do,
judge, if you kept a grocery store and
a man came in and asked you if he
could take a moving picture of your
cheese?
Pastry.
Paste jewels he sent—
'Twas aught but good taste,
To try to cement
Their friendship with paste.
if For your  weather strips,  etc., if
\\ 760   Yates   St.   Op.   Dominion $
if Hotel.   Phones: House, A.1125; ii
U Shop, B1828. 8
»$»«»»sa»K::tt^-:8$»_8g8i8»gsg3
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building  Material.      y
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria THE WEEK   SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1908
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that W. Wentworth Bell,
lof  Toronto,   Ont.,   engineer,   intends  to
apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the
foUowing described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 80 chains nortn
west of the north west corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains,  more or  less,   to  lake;  thence
J southerly along lake 40 chains, more or
I, less, to point of commencement.
■    Dated February 16th,  1909.
W.  WENTWORTH  BELL.
[Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Lilias Ross, of Victoria, married woman, Intends to apply
•for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  about  20  chains  north  or  tne
south west corner of Lot 28; thence west
40  chains;    thence    north    40  chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south iu
chains to point of commencement.
.. Dated February 16th, 1909.
> LILIAS ROSS.
Fp.   27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take  notice  that William Fernie,  of
Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply ror
permission  to  purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about  20  chains north  of the
north  west corner of  Lot  26,  Anaham
I Lake;   thence  running  west  80  chains;
,thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
i chains; thence north 40 chains to poini
\ of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
WILLIAM FERNIE.
. Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Edith Rose Scott, of
Vancouver, B.C., spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted about 20 chains north of
the north-west corner of Lot 26, Anaham
' Lake; thence   east   80    chatns; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
,' thence south 40 chains to point of com-
I mencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
EDITH ROSE SCOTT,
feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Susan Mary Baiss, of
Victoria, B.C., married woman, intenas
to apply for permission to purchase tne
following described lands:—Commenolng
at a post planted about 3 miles east of
Salmon river and about 16 miles north
of Anaham Lake; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
SUSAN MARY BAISS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Chartres C. Pemberton, of Victoria, B.C., lawyer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 3 miles east ot
Salmon River and about 14 miles north
of Anaham Lake; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
CHARTRES C. PEMBERTON.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
r! District  of  Coast
f Take notice that Katherine Phylllss
Burrell, of Victoria, marled woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 3
miles east of the Salmon River and
about 15 miles north of Anaham Lake;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
KATHERINE PHYLLISS BURRELL.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that William S. Maher,
of Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the fellow-
ing described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted about 40 chains south of
the south west corner of Lot 28, Anaham Lake; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 20 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 20 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated  February 16th,  1909.
WILLIAM  S.  MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that James Stevenson
Baiss, of Victoria, rancher, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near Morrison
trail to Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River) and about 10 miles rrom
forks of said trail and Palmer trail;
thence north 80 chains; tnence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JAMES   STEVENSON   BAISS.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles T. Dupont,
of Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles north of
Fish trap where Palmer trail crosses
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acrea,
more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
■^ CHARLES   THOMAS  DUPONT.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles Poole, of Vic-
triao  laborer, intends to apply for per-
m sion to purchase the following described    lands :-Comencing   at    a   post
I      nlanted  on  the  east  shore of Anaham
I      T7ake  about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
Steins  to  lake;  thence westerly along
T%kl  80  chains   more  or    ess;   thence
northerly along lake 80 chains   more ot
Tess to point of commencement, containing'640 acres, morei oi•less.
Dated February^th^O^^
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
* District of Coast
Take notice that Janet E. Mesher, of
Victoria   married    woman,    intends  to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
forks of Palmer trail and Morrison's
trail to Lewis Creek, and about 100
chains east of small lake lying north or
trail; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JANET E. MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast
Take notice that Isabella Bell, of
Toronto, married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
Fish trap on Palmer trail, and about 40
chains south of small lake near Lewis
Creek; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ISABELLA BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Mary L. Dupont, of
Victoria, married woman, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 1-2 miles soutn
of the Indian ranch on Salmon River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
MARY L.  DUPONT.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Michael Finnerty, of
Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following deacrlbed lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east of Salmon
River and about 7 miles north of Anaham Lake; thence west 40 chains! thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement,  containing  160  acres.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MICHAEL FINNERTY.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles C. Revans,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permission   to  purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 mlles north of Anaham
Lake;  thence  south  80  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated  February 16th,  1909.
CHARLES C. REVANS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Ellen S. Bell, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north east corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELLEN  S.  BELL.
Feb 27 J.-R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that J. Stirling Floyd, or
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south west corner of
Lot 28, S.A.W. script, near Anaham
Lake; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
J.   STIRLING FLOYD.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John V. Clegg, of
Victoria, accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains south ot
the south east corner of Lot 28, S.A.W.
script, near Anaham Lake; thence east
80 chains', thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated  February 15th,  1909.
JOHN V. CLEGG.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take  notice that H. P.  O'Farrell, of
rancher, intends to apply ror
permission   to  purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of Lewis
Creek   (branch of Salmon River)   at a
point   about   13   miles   from   mouth   of
creek;   thence  south  40  chains;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement,  containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated   February  15th,   1909.
HENRY PERCY O'FARRELL.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Marion Maher, ol
Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted near the south bank of
Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River)
and about 12 miles from mouth of creek;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MARION MAHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella McQuillan,
of Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the narrows on
Salmon River, near the foot of Anaham Lake, on west bank of river; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less to
lake; thence northerly along lake to
point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
Isabella Mcquillan.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Joseph D. Virtue, of
Victoria,  accountant,  Intends  to  apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted west of the Salmon River, about
1 1-2 miles from foot of Anaham Lake;
thence south 80 chains', thence east 40
chains, more or less, to river; thence
northerly 80 chains along river; thence
west 40 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
JOSEPH D.  VIRTUE.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take notice that John D. Bell, of Victoria, banker, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains, more or less, to lake; thenct,
80 chains, more or less, south westerly
along lake to point of commencement,
containing 320  acres,  more  or less.
Dated   February   16th,   1909.
JOHN   D.   BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George Edward Wilkerson, of Victoria, gardner, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south east corner of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 20
chains to point of commencement, containing 80 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  15th,   1909.
GEORGE EDWARD WILKERSON.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Jessie Clara Bell, of
Victoria, spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on Palmer trail, about 5 miles
north west of J. Lunos' ranch on Upper
Salmon River and about 1 mile east or
Towdestan Lake; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated February  16th,  1909.
JESSIE   CLARA  BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Frederick Stewart
Burell, of Victoria, accountant, intenas
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the west bank of
Salmon River, about 10 chains north oi
ford on the Bella Coola Ootra Lake trail
and near the foot of Anaham Lake;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains, more or
less, to river; thence northerly along
river to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
FREDERICK STEWART BURRELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"LAND  REGISTRY  ACT.'
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to Lot
31, Range 3, Coast District.
Notice ls hereby given that it ls my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof, to issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to said lands issued to Robert
Morris Thompson on the 15th January,
1903,  and  numbered  8398C.
Land Registry Oflice, Victoria, B.C.,
the 3rd day of February, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
mch. 6 Registrar-General.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the reserve covering the fractional sections
31, 32 and 33, Denman Island, notice
of which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette of October 21st, 1876,
is cancelled.
ROBT. A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1908.
Dec. 17
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 33
VICTORIA, B.C.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what'i
taken   up   and   what'a   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
Y. M. C. A.
40 BROAD STREET.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take  notice  that  David H.  Bale,  or
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permission   to  purchase   the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 mlles south of Indian
house on Salmon River; thence south 80
chains;   thence  east  40   chains;   thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February  15th,  1909.
DAVID  H.   BALE.
Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elsie Bell, of Victoria, married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 1 1-2 miles north
west of the north west corner of Lot
27; thence north 20 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELSIE BELL.
Feb.  27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast
Take  notice   that  Arthur  Davies   intends  to  apply  for permission  to  purchase the  following described  lands:—
Comencing   at  a  post  planted  at  the
south  east  corner  of  Lot  25,  Anaham
Lake;   thence  south   40   chains;   thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains*,
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
ARTHUR  DAVIES.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George C. Mesher, of
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described   lands:—Commencing   at   a   post
planted about 4 miles south of Indian
ranch  on  Salmon  River;  thence  south
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chatns; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
GEORGE C. MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elizabeth M. Coulthard, of Victoria, widow, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 3 1-2 mlles
southerly from Indian ranch on Salmon*
River; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
ELIZABETH M. COULTHARD.
Feb. 27 J.  R. Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast
Take notice that Francis Barton, of
Victoria, merchant, intends to apply tor
permission   to   purchase  the   following,
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1 mile south of Blayney's
pre-emption; thence   south    80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of comencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
FRANCIS BARTON.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent,
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, is cancelled.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 15th October, 1908.
3m
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Arthur S.
Blakemore will within 60 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post on a stump at
the centre of the north shore of Tumbo
Island at high water mark; thence north
one mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
February  llth,  1909.
apl 17 ARTHUR S. BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Clarice
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com-
misloner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence south
one mile; thence east one mile to place
of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 CLARICE BLAKEMORE.
LICENCE    TO    AN    EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that William
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coai under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mlle; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to the
place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 WILLIAM BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Barbara
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows*.—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to the place of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 BARBARA BLAKEMORE.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia,
No. 469.
This is to certify that the "Winnipeg
Oil   Company,   Limited,"   is  authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British  Columbia,  and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company to which tne
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at the City of Winnipeg, in the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided into five hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in tins
Province is situate at the City of Victoria, and Andrew Wright, Financial
Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the company.
Given under my Hand and Seal of
Ofllce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this third day of February,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S). S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To purchase, acquire, hold, and operate oil refineries, plant and machinery
of all kinds; to carry on the business
of buying, leasing, letting and selling
petroleum and oil lands; buying, selling,
producing and manufacturing all kinds
of oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all articles and substances
of which oil is an ingredient; of sink-
ink, boring, making, putting down, and
building oil wells, and all buildings and
erections which may be requisite in connection therewith and of otherwise developing and operating upon petroleum
oil lands; of erecting, leasing, buying,
letting and selling oil refineries together
with all such buildings and works as
may be necessary in connection with the
production and sale of oil products and
all compounds thereof, and all sud-
stances and articles of which oil ls an
ingredient; to manufacture, buy, sell,
and deal in oil producers, machinery,
supplies, and utensils of all kinds; to
carry on the business of storing, tanking and warehousing refined and crude
oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all substances and articles
of which oil is an ingredient and granting warehouse receipts for the same;
to construct, equip and operate pipe
lines and other contrivances or ap-
pliances for the transportation of oil;
the doing of all such other acts ana
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of any of the objects
aforesaid.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE
Solicitors for the said Company,
mch 20
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Tittle to
Part (146 acres) of Section 8, Otter
District.
NOTICE ls hereby given that lt il
my intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to above landa Issued
to Joseph Piaement on the 16th day of
July, 1890, and numbered 10298a.
Land  Registry  Offlce,  Victoria,  B.C..
the lst day of December, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Reglstra-General of Titles.
"LAND   REGISTRY   ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to Lot
30, Subdivision of Sections 3 and 4,
Fairfield Estate (Map 826) Victoria
City.
Notice is hereby given that it ls my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to above land issued to John
Sherburn on the 4th day of August,
190S,   and  numbered   18349 C.
Land Registry O&ce, Victoria, B.C.,
the 19th day of January, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Feb. 27 Registrar-General of Titles.
FERRY, BELLA COOLA RIVER.
SEALED applications for a charter to
operate a ferry over the Bella Coola
river, about 26 miles above the mouth,
will be received by the Honorable the
Minister of Public Works up to and Including the first day of March next.
Applicants must state the kind and
size of vessel lt is proposed to use, tha
method of operating and the tolls
which It ls proposed to levy for the
carriage of passengers, horses, vehicles
and cattle, etc.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.,  7th January, 1909.
jan 30
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve placed upon certain lands ln the
vicinity of Lower Kootenay River, District of Kootenay, notice of which appeared in the British Columbia Gazette
of the 14th of August, 1884, ls cancelled, for the purpose of disposing of
such lands by public auction, and to
permit of giving effect to thc recommendations contained In the report of
Mr. W. F. Teetzel, a commissioner appointed to adjudicate upon the claims of
certain squatters upon the said lands,
but for no other purpose.
ROBERT  A.  RENWICK
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Lands and Works Department.
Victoria, B. C, Gth October, 1908.
jan9. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH ao, 1909,
if&i?ififiii?ifit<fyi?fy<fy
X riusic and      |
X   The Drama. I
ifififipiiiiit^iisiiii^^i^i
Following is the programme of the
final concert of the season to be given
by the Victoria Musical Society on
Tuesday, March 23rd:—
1. Concerte in D major..Tschaikowsky
Allegro Moderate
Canzonetta.
Allegre vivaccissimo.
Miss Marie Hall.
2. (a) Twilight   Way Dverak
(b) Polka    Smetaritt
(c) Dance    Dverak
Miss Lenie Basche.
3. Song—Prologue  to  Pagliacci....
    Leencavalle
Mr. Harold Bealey.
4. Introduction and Rondo Cappric-
cioso  Saiht-Saens
Miss Marie Hall.
5. (a) Nocturne in D flat)	
(b) Ballada in A flat) Chopin
Miss Lenie Basche.
6. Songs—From   three   light   lyrics
by Eric Baring.
(a) Prudence.
(b) Pretty Little Kate.
Mr. Harold Bealey.
7. (a) Meditation    Glazeunow
(b) Monmento musicale  ..Schebert
(c) Berceuse   Cesar Cui
(d) Allegro    Fiocco
Miss Marie Hall.
The "Red Mill."
The "Red Mill" has been the most
pronounced hit that has been made
in musical comedy in the last quarter
of a century. Its engagement here
will be for one night only, Thursday,
March 25, at the Victoria theatre.
The scenes of Charles Dillingham's
production of the musical play, "The
Red Mill," in which those two clever
comedians, Whitehead and McNeil,
take the leading rules, arc laid in
Holland, it is believed that this is
the lirst play ever presented in America devoted exclusively to the portrayal of Dutch character and location. The quaint atmosphere of the
country of dykes, windmills and
wooden shoes is said to have been
capitally caught by the author, Henry
Blossom, and tunefully portrayed by
the composer, Victor Herbert.
Girls.
The Messrs. Shubert's production
of Clyde Fitch's greatest comedy,
"Girls," will be the attraction at the
Victoria Theatre on Friday and Saturday, March 26th and 27th respectively.
"Girls" is a play of the bright and
breezy order which handles the question of independent women so cleverly and in such an amusing vein, that
it is unquestionable the one big comedy hit of recent years. The reception this piece was accorded on the
occasion of its premiere at Daly's
theatre, New York, nearly a year ago
is duplicated everywhere. Nightly immense audiences applaud the high-
minded declarations of the three
bachelor girls, who came to New
York, settle clown in a studio apartment, and determine to carve out
their fortunes without the aid of mere
man.
The Girl Question.
A musical comedy full of incessant
action, brimming over with fun and
laughter, pretty girls, catchy music,
comes to the Victoria Theatre on
Wednesday, March 31st. Its title is
"The Girl Question," and it comes
here with the recommendation of having run 339 times in Chicago and
with the further endorsement of the
fact that it is by the authors of "The
Time, The Place and The Girl."
There is a delightful love story running through the play and its plot is
logical and of sufficient interest to
hold the attention of an audience even
though the songs, dances ancl pretty
girls were eliminated.
The New Grand.
Next week's programme at the New
Grand will include Manuel Romainc,
the famous minstrel and phonograph
singer, assisted by the Foley Boys
ancl Sadie Palmer, who will present
the one-act musical skit, "Down in
Music Row"; Mme. Doherty's troupe
of fifteen snow-white trained poodles;
Ann Crewe & Co., presenting her own
dramatic playlet, "My Lady Raffles";
Joe Flynn, comedian, "The Man Behind the Book"; Thos. J. Price, singing, "You are My Life, My AH"; and
new moving pictures and overture.
THE LOUNGER.
(Continued from Page Five)
the only good moving picture show.
The Empress was the pioneer of this
class of entertainment in the city, and
has kept the thing going with unvarying success. The entertainment provided at this small but popular house
is unexceptional in every way and the
patronage it receives is sufficient evidence that it is appreciated.
A most absurd yarn is the story
that Uncle Sam sent his gold from
San Francisco to Denver so that the
precious metal would be safe in case
of an invasion! More likely to get it
out of the way of the local grafters.
Before and After.
She (complainingly)—Before our
marriage you said my pathway
through life should be strewn with
roses.
He—Yes, darling, but you know
roses have thorns, and I didn't realise
then what thin shoes you women
wear.
Potential.
The country parson was condoling
vvith the bereft widow.
"Alas!" he continued earnestly, "I
cannot tell you how pained I was
to learn that your husband had gone
to heaven. We were bosom friends,
but we shall never meet again."
Handsome and  Useful.
"That's a handsome dog you keep,"
said a wayfaring man to the proprietor of a Highland inn where he was
lately sojourning.
"Aye, aye," was the appreciative reply; "an' he will be a useful dog as
well. I haven't washed a plate since
I got him whatever."
An Even Break.
"What happens when an irresistible
force meets an immovable body?"
"Dey divide de gate money," answered the newest member of the
class. And the professor let it go at
that.
Telling the Truth.
Freshman Debater—Was my argument sound?
Candid Critic—Yes—largely.
TENDERS FOB SNFFLIES.
TENDERS endorsed "Gaol Supplies,"
for the supply of groceries, bread, fish,
beef, clothing, boots and shoes, for trie
said institution. From the first day ot
April, 1909, to the 31st day of March,
1910, will be received by the undersigned up to Thursday, the 25th day
of March, 1909. Samples of groceries,
clothing, boots, etc., can be seen at the
Gaol, Topaz avenue. All supplies to
be delivered at the Gaol as required
without extra charge.
All articles required for use in this
contract to be of provincial manufacture as far as practicable.
Forms of tender will be supplied on
application to the undersigned.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
I. M.  MUTTER,
Warden.
Provincial Gaol, Victoria, B.C., Marcli
4,  1909.
mch 6
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Court  House,  Fernie,   B.C.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Court House, Fernie, B.C.,"
will be received by the Honourable the
Minister of Public Works, at the Department of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.,
up to and including Monday, the 22nd
of March next, for the erection and
completion of a Court House at Fertile,
B. C.
Specifications, conditions of tendering
and contract, may be seen at the offlce
of the Public Works Engineer, Victoria,
B.C., and at the office of the Government
Agent, at Fernie, B.C., on and after
March lst, 1909.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of <i°poslt on a chartered bflpk  in Ca
nada, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, or by
cash, in the sum of five per cent, or
the amount of the tender, which sum
will be forfeited if the party tendering
decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or fail to complete the work contracted for.
The cheques, certificates of deposit, or
cash, of unsuccessful tenderers will be
returned to them after the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, slgneu
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelope
furnished.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
Publio Works Engineer.
Works Department,
Vietoria, B.C.,  25th February, 1909.
mch _
WEEK MARCH 15
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CtMiaiNE,    Proprietors.
Management ef ROBT. JAMIESON.
MANUEL ROMAINE
The Minstrel Singer
Assisted by a Strong Company, in
the  one-act Musical  Skit
"DOWN IN MUSIC ROW."
JOE FLYNN
"The Man Behind the Book."
MME.   DOHERTY'S  TRAINED
POODLES.
Introducing Dude and Dimple, the
Waltzing Dogs.
ANN CREWE & CO
In Her Own Dramatic Playlet
"My Lady Raffles."
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"You Are My Life, My All."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Gallant Guardsman."
"Silhouettes."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Recognized
Superiority
Only one thought can come
to anyone as they study the
names that appear in the newspaper talk, and it is this—that
the
Ye Olde Firme
Heintzman & Co.
Piano
holds a place in the eyes of the
world's greatest artists quite
apart from any other piano—a
place by itself.
A carload of the newest
styles in Ye Olde Firme Pianos
will arrive this week and we invite you to inspect the different
styles.
M. W. WAITT & CO.
LIMITED
Herbert Kent, Manager
1004 Government Street
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Has Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Where hc is prepared to perform
dental operation according to the
latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridgework.
Phone 261. Hours: 9 a.m., 4 p.m.
We Now Offer
For Subscription
the remaining portion of the first issue of
300,000 Preference
Shares
In Block of 100 Shares at
$1.00 Per Share
PAYMENTS:
__l
<p
II
<__
SKI:
____
ll
I
II
__\t
ll
15 per cent, on application;   15 per cent, in 30 days.
Balance 10 per cent per month until fully paid.
This stock is entitled to an annual cumulative dividend of 7
per cent., payable before any dividend is paid on the Ordinary
Stock; after a like amount is paid on the Ordinary Stock and
Preference Shares both stocks thereafter participate equally.
PROFITS.
We are confident uml tne Preferred Stock, which we arc now
offering will eventually pay from 20 to 40 per cent, annual dividends, and that within go days from the opening of the plant the
stock will be selling at a handsome premium. We know thc big
dividends that the Eastern Canadian and American mills are making, and with our vast pulp limits covering almost 100 square miles
on Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island, there is no reason why we
should not be even more successful. We are rushing the work
along and are confident of having the Wood Pulp Plant with a
capacity of 100 tons of Wood Pulp per week in operation by
December 1 of this year. Now is the time to secure a portion of
the best dividend paying stock ever offered for subscription in
Western   Canada.
DIRECTORS:
COL. HENRY APPLETON, Royal Engineer, retired, Director
British Canadian Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
CHARLES J. V. SPRATT, President Victoria Machinery Depot.
Victoria.
DR. LEWIS HALL, Mayor of Victoria, B.C.
CHARLES LUGRIN, Editor "Colonist," Victoria, B.C .
W. K. HOUSTON, Member W. K. Houston & Co., Victoria.
JOSEPH McPHEE, Gen'l Merchant, Cumberland and Courtenay.
F. J. MARSHALL, formerly Asst. Manager National Bk. of India.
FREDERICK APPLETON, Director M. R. Smith & Co.. Ltd.,
GREELY KOLTS, Director and Fiscal Agent British Canadian
Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
Reference and Bankers
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA.
Address all communications for Shares direct to the
Western Canada Wood Pulp
and Paper Co., Ltd.
638 View St., Opp. Driard Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
TUESDAY, MARCH 30
MARRYING MARY
THE BIGGEST HIT OF THE
SEASON.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
Charles Dillingham Presents
THE RED MILL
By Henry Blossom and Victor
Herbert.
Company   of   Sixty—An   Augmented
Orchestra—Large Chorus, and the
FAMOUS DUTCH KIDDIES
Sale opens 10 a.m. Tuesday, March
23rd.
Mail orders accompanied by cheque
or money order will receive their
usual attention.
Prices—soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH   FRUIT  DAILY.
623 Yates St.    -    VICTORIA. B.C.
Houses Built
ON  THE
Instalment
Plan
D. H. BALE
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets

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