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Week Mar 12, 1910

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 QfVVVV_~_TS_-1t
Let us show you the new
Pocket Edition
Gillette Safety Razor
TERRY CASH CHEMIST
. S.E. coiner Fort an 1 Douglas „j
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The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. e.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANV* COAL
1232 Government St. Telephone 83
Vol. VII.   No. 6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
One Dollar Per Annum
MISTAKEN KINDNESS
The AVeek does not often differ from
the decisions of the  Police Magistrate,
who has established an enviable record for
fair dealing, and enlightened administration of tlie law.   But his action in reference to the boys who were found guilty
of stealing from Hibben's store is certainly open to criticism.   Everyone would expect Mr. .Tay to err, if at all, on the side
of mercy, but no one would expect him
to strain mercy until it ceased to be a
virtue.   Yet that is what he has done in
the case under consideration.    It is possible1 to admit that there are boys and
boys', criminals and criminals, and, that
different criminals should be treated differently; on this ground it may have been
justifiable, if the boys were really sons of
"respectable" parents, who were in a position to guarantee healthy environment and
closer1 supervision in the future, to refrain
from branding them as convicts and herding them with habitual criminals.    But
there is a wide gulf between this reasonable concession and dismissing the boys
with a caution.    Such action is not fair
to other prisoners.   It is not only "respectable"  parents who  object  to  publicity;
many people in a humbler walk of life
suffer just as keenly when their relatives
figure in the annals of the police court;
but this is ono of the penalties which even
"respectable" parents should be compelled
to pay for neglecting their duties, and allowing their boys to associate with vicious
companions.    The interests of justice demand that the names of all persons arraigned in the ■ police court, and proved or
confessed   guilty,   should   be   punished.
There should be no making fish of one
and flesh of another.   In England no such
invidious distinction is ever made.   Further,* the boys under consideration should
at least have received a sound thrashing,
as a punishment for their offence;  they
could not have escaped it in England, and
it is this sparing!of the rod which, on
this continent, spoils so many children.
The Week maintains that in this case the
law has not been vindicated, and j that
while leniency may have;been justifiable it
has been carried too far, and that with the
best intentions the police magistrate has
placed a premium on juvenile crime, as
hereafter it will be very difficult to resist
a plea which has proved so successful, and
which, not for the first time, has created
in uneasy feeling in the community, especially when it is observed that juvenile
i_r'me is on the increase.
THE MUCK RAKE AGAIN
One day this week the Victoria Times
[returned once more to its muck-raking
iropensities. It fished up a lost document
'rom the gutter, ancl although the docu-
nent was private property, and bore the
tames of two respected citizens, members
if one of the oldest established legal
irms, it published the document as if it
vere public property, and then tried to
lake political capital out of it. This inci-
lent establishes a new record for gutter-
piping, even on the part of the Times,
and one would like to think that it is the
only newspaper published in Canada which
would stoop to such a despicable act. It
is one of those atrocities which re-acts on
the perpetrator, and whicli for purblind-
ness can only be compared with the performance of Mr. A. IT. B. MacGowan in
his dastardly attack on Mr. Justice Clement. It is difficult to resist the conclusion that the comet's tail has been waving
with unusual ferocity in certain quarters
during the past week.
"strumental in carrying a vote of £20,000,
"given unanimously out of the Public
"Treasury, in order to show that Canada
'made common cause with England and
"with France in the Crimean war."
THE OTTAWA VAUDEVILLE
Punch has a splendid cartoon in the
latest issue to hand, depicting John Bull
as a sailor, wearing his traditional jolly
broad grin, witli a little added emphasis
of amusement, while he reads the Press
reports of the so-called Naval Debate at
Ottawa.   It is a simple drawing, and all
thc   expression   is  in  the   sailor's  face,
which plainly shows that he regards the
whole proceedings as farcical.    This attitude of amused toleration undoubtedly reflects English public opinion, although it
will not be received very graciously by
Canadians.   But what else can be expected
when the leaders of the Government are
making it perfectly clear that there is no
sincerity in the movement, and that they
are prepared to "hedge" at every sign of
opposition   from   their   disaffected   followers.   The Week has never taken stock
in Sir AVilfrid Laurier's professions of
loyalty,    and    never    had    less    faith
with Mm in this regard than at the present time.   What he is most afraid of is
not that he may fail to carry his present
proposals, but that the movement in favour
of something more substantial may gain
ground.   It is pitiful to see a man of his
position gee-ing and haw-ing on an Imperial question as he has done recently.
His conduct confirms the opinion of those
who have always considered him an opportunist.   It is as easy to prove this charge
as to state it.    Sir AVilfrid in his first
speech on the Navy Bill said: "It does not
follow that because England should be at
war, we should be at war."   And lest there
should be any misunderstanding as to his
position, he went on to add:    "For myself, I do not hesitate to say that if the
Crimean AVar were to be undertaken by
England under similar circumstances, I
would hesitate very much, before I would
give my consent that we should take part
in such war."   In this connection it may
be interesting to quote an extract from a
speech delivered by Sir J. A. Macdonald
in 1885 which serves to illustrate the difference between the two parties.   Sir John
said: "AVho can look back to the time
"when the Crimean AVar broke out and
"not remember with pride how Canada
"rose as one man to stand by the Mother
"Country and by France, when the French
' Tricolor and the Union Jack were joined
"together fighting the battles of liberty
"against absolutism on the shores of the
"Crimea ?   There was a rush of Canadians
"to go to the battlefield, and I had the
"great pleasure, as a member of the Government of Sir Allan MacNab, to be in-
BRITISH POLITICS
It is hardly worth while, in view of the
■Unreliable Press despatches being circulated, to make any comment on them with
reference to British politics. There is,
however, one point, with cannot be too
strongly emphasized, and that is the gross
misrepresentation involved in the repeated
statement that the King is using his influence in the present crisis. ,,This first
took shape in a declaration that Mr. Asquith would not assume the reins of office
unless he received assurance that the King
would create a sufficient number of Liberal
peers to ensure the submission of the Conservative majority in the House of Lords.
It is only necessary to state such a proposition in order to realise its impossibility. The latest despatch is even more
grotesque; it is that "under pressure from
the King, Mr. Balfour will be led to form
a ministry." As if it were possible, with
Mr. Asquith, installed as Prime Minister,
for the,King, even to discuss the possibility of replacing him. It is difficult to
decide whether such reports are due more
to ignorance or malice. It is, however,
surprising that respectable newspapers continue to print the despatches, whilst pointing'out in their editorial columns how un-
Miable and mis-lefl'ding they are.
THE NEW CITY OFFICIALS
AVhen the wondering ratepayers of \7ic-
toria read in the morning Press that at
the .previous evening's meeting of the
Council, ,a new City Solicitor, and a new
City Engineer had actually been selected,
they gasped with astonishment. It seemed
altogether too good to be true; such decision! Such promptitude! Their lively
satisfaction was, however, like many other
goocl things, doomed*.to a .short life, for
Mr. Mayor, following, his usual custom,
resolved that what had been done quickly
could not have been done well, and called
for a re-consideration of the Appointments.
AVhich is another way of saying that somebody had been pulling the strings. The
matter was re-opened at the next Council
meeting, and, in spite of the Mayor's protest, the original selection of Mr. Speak-
man was confirmed. So far, so good. The
A\Teek knows something of Mr. Speakman,
ancl while he is not the biggest man in
Canada, he is a goocl man, and big enough
for the job. As to the City Solicitor, there
is no reason to suppose that second
thoughts would be best, ancl the little legal
difficulty su^ested could easily be overcome, even if it involved his living here
for six months without undertaking such
legal duties as would clash with the
statutes. He could at least act in an advisory capacity. If the Council has secured the best man who applied, it would
bo well advised to stick to him.
thoroughly deserve the hearty vote of
thanks accorded them on their return; a
vote which is endorsed by The AA^eek. It
was particularly pleasing to hear of the
newly aroused interest taken in their mission by the Hon. AVilliam Templeman,
Senator Bostock, Senator Riley and Mr.
Ralph Smith. In reading their eulogium,
however, it occurs to the casual reader to
wonder what has become of Mr. Barnard,
who, as the sitting member for Victoria,
albeit not an occupant of the Government
benches, might naturally have been expected to take some interest in tlie work
of the delegation. But the name of Mr.
Barnard does not figure ui the very flattering report handed in; and the only conclusion which it is possible to draw is that
on this Occasion he failed to catch the
Speaker's "eye.   *    ' r      ''"
NOT QUITE CLEAR
A few months ago the Board of' Trade
unanimously passed a strongly worded resolution calling upon the Dominion Government to make an immediate and substantial contribution to Imperial naval dp-
fence. Indeed, the Victoria Board bf
Trade was one of the first commercial
organizations in the Dominion to prefer
this request, and to urge upon the Government the performance of a very obvious
duty. According to the local press a resolution was passed at the monthly meeting
of the Board on Thursday, endorsing the
policy of the Dominion Government on the
naval question. It would be interesting to
know how the two resolutions can be
squared, since the policies they represent
are diametrically opposed, and Mr. Bordefi
ancl his followers are today fighting for
the very principle which the Board of
Trade enunciated some months ago, and
which the Dominion Government has persistently refused to recognise.
THE TRIP TO OTTAWA
The President of the Board of Trade
and Mr. J. IT. Kingham have just returned
from a successful trip to Ottawa, where
tliey have been representing the wishes of
the Board with respect to local improvements, and other matters of interest ancl
importance to Vancouver Island.     They
A PRINCE OF INDUSTRY
At one time or another most of the
cities in a new country experience the
privilege of "entertaining an angel unawares," and thus .more than ,one, big m<an
has come ancl gone,without his passing being noted. On Wednesday evening a fine,
burly man, easily the' biggest and most
impressive who has visited Victoria of late,
might have been seen sitting ln a privileged corner on the floor of the House.
Half-an-Tiour sufficed for him to note the
proceedings, make the acquaintance of the
Premier, the Speaker ancl a few other
prominent members, ancl then to go as
quietly and unostentatiously as he had
come. Thc gentleman was Mr. Graham
Fraser, father of the iron and steel industry of Canada; the founder, and for
thirty years the managing director, of the
Nova Scotia Steel Co. The man to whom
in its most troublous times the Dominion
Steel Company turned for guidance, and
who now at a mature age has retired from
active business and spends most of his
time in travelling. Mr. Fraser may, without exaggeration, be pronounced the highest authority on iron ancl steel in the
Dominion. He is intimately associated
with Messrs. Mackenzie & Mann; his son
being the manager of their important iron
mining and smelting works near Port
Arthur. Mr. Fraser has large interests in
the lumbering industry of British Columbia, ancl is represented in .Vancouver by
his son, Mr. Russell Fraser. There is
some reason to hope that Mr. Fraser may
be induced to interest himself in the iron
ore deposits of Vancouver Island, and
their exploitation. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910 ,
The Week is the Best Advertising Medium in
British Columbia, Exchanges with Every Paper in
the Province, and with a good many in the
Dominion.   The Week circulates to Paid
Subscribers in the following places:
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
ESQUIMALT
ALDERMERE
ARMSTRONG
ALBERNI
ASHCROFT
ARROWHEAD
BEAVER POINT
SALT SPRING ISLAND
BEATON
BANFF,  Alta.
CAMP McKINNEY
CRANBROOK
COWICHAN STATION
COWICHAN  LAKE
CAMBORNE
CHEMAINUS
CROFTON
PETERBOROUGH, Ont.
MONTREAL, Que.
CARIBOO, B.C.
CLAYOQUOT, B.C.
SECHART, B.C.
WINNIPEG, Man.
CARSON, B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
COLQUITZ, B.C.
CHILLIWACK, B.C.
OTTAWA, ONT.
150-MILE HOUSE, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
METCHOSIN, B.C.
TULAMUN CITY, B.C.
MILNES LANDING
MILNES' LAND'G, B.C.
HOSMER, B.C.
PRESTON, Ont.
TOD INLET, B.C.
WILMER, B.C.
SASKATOON, Sask.
PORT SIMPSON, B.C.
COUTLEE, B.C.
FOUR-MILE HOUSE,
V.I., B.C.
KERRISDALE, B.C.
GLACIER, B.C.
LOWER NICOLA, B.C.
BRANDON, Man.
DAWSON, Y.T.
MT. SICKER, B.C.
REGINA, Sask.
HAMILTON, Ont.
COMAPLIX
CALGARY, Alta.
CUMBERLAND
DUNCANS
ENDERBY
EHOLT
GRANITE CREEK
GRAND FORKS
GOLDEN
GREENWOOD
GANGES HARBOUR
Salt Spring Island
GALIANO ISLAND
HEDLEY
HAGANS   .
HAZELTON
KELOWNA
KEATINQS
KEREMEOS
COWICHAN BAY, B.C.
EDMONTON, Alta.
QUESNEL FORKS, B.C.
FIFE, B.C.
EHOLT, B.C.
HALCYON, B.C.
BULLION, B.C.
COMOX, B.C.
AGASSIZ, B.C.
PRINCE ALBERT, Sask.
ATLIN, B.C.
QUEEN CHARLOTTE
ISLANDS, B.C.
QUATSINO, B.C.
ROCK CREEK, B.C.
GATEWAY, B.C.
PENDER ISLAND, B.C.
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
NAHUM, B.C.
NORTHPORT ,B.C.
GABRIOLA  ISL.,  B.C.
TULFORD  HARBOUR,
B.C.
SAVANOS, B.C.
CORFIELD, B.C.
FRENCH CREEK, B.C.
SLOCAN JCT., B.C.
COBBLE HILL, B.C.
KISPIOX VALLEY, B.C.
FERGUSON, B.C.
CRESTON, B.C.
PEACHLAND, B.C.
HALIFAX, N.S.
BELLA COOLA, B.C.
TORONTO, Ont.
KAMLOOPS
KITSALAS
KASLO
LORNE CREEK
MIDWAY
MAYNE ISLAND
MARYSVILLE
MOYIE
NICOLA
NICOLA LAKE
NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO
NELSON
NEW DENVER
NORTH SAANICH
ARLINGTON P.O.
NEW ALBERNI
NEW  WESTMINSTER
PENTICTON
LADYSMITH, B.C.
DELTA, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
NANTON, Alta.
BEAUMONT, B.C.
SOOKE, B.C.
MISSION CITY, B.C.
KITLUMGAR, B.C.
OKANAGAN, B.C.
STETTLER, Alta.
EPWORTH, B.C.
SODA CREEK, B.C.
KENORA, Ont.
MITLAKATLA, B.C.
HARRISON HOT
SPRINGS, B.C.
HORNBY ISLAND, B.C.
LYTTON, B.C.
BANFIELD, B.C.
CLINTON, B.C.
SHAWNIGAN LAKE,
B.C.
PARRY SOUND, Ont.
ST. JOHN'S, P.Q.
ALMONTE, Ont.
WESTHOLME, B.C.
EBURNE, B.C.
GOLDSTREAM, B.C.
SARDIS, B.C.
SANDON, B.C.
MINSKUISH, B.C.
FOREMAN, Alta.
GABRIOLA ISL., B.C.
WHITEMORSE, Y.T.
MONTE CREEK, B.C.
PHOENIX
PRINCEON
PORT ESSINGTON
PRINCE RUPERT
PARKSVILLE
ROCK CREEK
REVELSTOKE
ROSSLAND
SLUGGETT
SLOCAN CITY
SIDNEY
STEWART CITY
TURGOOSE
TRAIL
VERNON
WARDNER
YMIR
PIER ISLAND, B.C.
WHITEWATER, B.C.
WILLIAM HEAD, B.C.
SOMENOS, B.C.
MOUNT TOLMIE, B.C.
COBOURG SIDING, B.C
NORTHSIDNEY, B.C.
FIELD, B.C.
PINE ISLAND, B.C.
SILVERTON, B.C.
SEATTLE, Wash.
STRAITS SETTLEM'TS
BALLARD, Wash.
CHICAKO, ILL.
PORTLAND, Ore.
LODI, Cal.
GRANGEVILLE, Idaho.
TACOMA, Wash.
SPOKANE, Wash.
SANTA CRUZ, Cal.
DULUTH, Minn.
SAN ANGEL, Mex.
STEPHEN, Minn.
NEW YORK, N.Y.
CHICAPOO FALLS,
Mass.
LONDON, Eng.
BIRMINGHAM, Eng.
BROXBURNE,
Herts., Eng.
BRIDGEWORTH,
Salop, Eng.
CAMBRIDGE, Eng.
GLASTONBURY, Eng. *
j    At The Street   \
\ Corner i
p By THB LOUNdER &
I^^/hA**^**^/)])
By a strange coincidence my remarks of last week on the subject
of the local pool-rooms being made
use of by young boys, where the atmosphere with which they were surrounded was such as to corrupt their
young morals, was fully borne out by
thc reports in the Times of March 4
and thc Colonist of March 5. Each
paper reported the fact that the unfortunate lads who had been charged
with breaking into T. N. Hibben's
had laid thc blame on the poolrooms. It is, perhaps, scarcely necessary for mc to point out that by the
time the Times appeared on Friday
evening, my column, which is always
printed on the inside sheet, was already on thc presses, or, at any rate,
set up. I had received the information on which I based my remarks
after I had written my previous
week's column. On Thursday night
last I took a stroll around these
same pool-rooms just to sec for myself what was going on. It not be-
ng Saturday night there was no very
great evidence of this pernicious
practice obtaining, save in one room,
and there I saw at least six, and I
am putting the number as low as possible, so as to be on the safe side,
youngsters of less than seventeen
years of age. Again, I place the maximum age as high as possible for the
same reason. I can affirm that I saw
them smoking cigarettes; I only stayed a few minutes, but I certainly
heard them invoke the Saviour's
name, in that manner which is so
peculiar to this land, and I also heard
various expressions which as a rule
are only associated with the lips of
those who have arrived at manhood's
age and have forgotten how to control their tongues.
I pose as no saint, but my worst
enemies can hardly accuse me of being a persistent user of filthy or blasphemous language. Still less can
they say that I have ever done so in
front of young boys. I take my stand
as a man who has been through the
mill and probably knows more about
it than the pious person who has
never been near it. And I give it
as my firm conviction that there is
nothing more dangerous for a growing
hoy than to be constantly thrown into society where he cannot fail to
hear bad language, and, hearing, cannot fail to incorporate it into his own
style of speech.
Men are too careless in the Western country with regard to their language when children are around. I
have heard men, men who would be
styled respectable, use   language    in
the street, where they could be overheard, which has disgusted even me.
Is it any wonder that the youngsters
pick it up? I don't blame the "kids"
in the slightest. Man is an imitative
creature, and never more so than in
the early stages of his growth. It is
dfficult to find a means of preventing
the youth of the city from picking
up expressions on thc street, but it
is at least opssible to make some
kind of a rule which will prevent him
from learning his billiards in places
where he is bound to become acquainted with every kind of foul utterance.
Few people will blame a man for
swearing when someone steps on his
pet corn, or when some unexpected
catastrophe overtakes him, or even
when one of those little annoyances
which are so often more upsetting
to the temper than a real misfortune,
comes into his daily life. But the
man who will embody an oath, a foul
word, or a blasphemy in his everyday conservation, ceases to deserve
the title of gerjtleman, even if he ever
had the right to bear it. And I am
one of those people who believe in
what are known as "Nature's gentlemen," that is to say, no matter from
what parentage a man may be descended, if he be a blackguard he is
no gentleman. No; the latter is one
who is gentle; gentle to women, children and dumb animals. And most
people now-a-days, I am glad to say,
hold this view.
Good Skates      Good Instructors      Good Music     Good Time
SKATING
Morning    10.00 to 12.00
Afternoon     2.00 to 4.30
Evening    7.45 to 10.00
LADIES   FREE  AT  ALL  SESSIONS
Assembly Rink
Fort St.
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
c4 Machine That Has No Equal
The Underwood Typewriter
Sold by Baxter & Johnson
809 Government Street       ....       Qffice Supplies
What can be more enjoyable than a glass
of sparkling Burgundy or genuine imported,
high grade, Claret? If you want the best
ask for SCHMIDT'S.
"RADIGER & JANION
1318 Wharf Street
'British Columbia Agents        .•&
One Spoonful of
"DIXI" TEA
Goes farther than two of any other brand, It is famous through
the whole of Western Canada for its rich flavour and fine bouquet.
Noted   as   the   most   economical   Tea   money   can   purchase.
DIXI TEA, per pound $1.00, 50c and 35c
or
THREE POUNDS FOR ONE DOLLAR
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Independent Grocers and Wine Merchants
Tels.: 50, 51, 52 and 1590 1317 Government Street
I am just going to quote a few
words from the Colonist of the Sth
inst. They were spoken in the course
of the trial above referred to, and I
am indeed glad that they were reported. The father of one of the
boys "hoped that the city would do
something to put a stop to the practice (viz., boys being allowed to frequent pool-rooms). Thc Court made
a note of the point, and it is likely
that an effort will be made to have a
by-law passed regulating the affairs
of pool-rooms in such a manner as to
exclude young lads."
I do not imagine that there will be
the slightest difficulty in passing such
a by-law, provided that the public,
and especally those who are parents,
urge their desire for some such measure. Since writing the above I have
played two games of billiards in the
city. In one house, "The Canada,"
there was nothing to which anybody
could object. All the players were
adults. In the other, and I won't
specify names as yet, the opposite
was the case. There wcre three boys
whose voices had not yet broken, and
that means that they were under
thirteen at any rate, because boys
mature early here. Thete wcre at
least half-a-dozen  more    who    were
not more than sixteen.   They were '
smoking   pipes   and   cigarettes,   and j
though they were not swearing and
blaspheming quite as badly as I had
been led to expect, still, they did pretty well on that line.
It is a puzzle to me why the proprietors of these pool-rooms care to |
harbor such riff-raff.  Their own trade I
is endangered thereby.
I suppose it is only fair to say that I
on  the walls  of the  pool-room  ofi
which I am writing there were notices j
"No     Boisterous     Language     Permitted."    Excellent maxim; but thel
rather     paunchy     gentleman     who
was responsible for the good observ-1
ance of the rule seemed to be somewhat "easy" in his interpretation of|
the word "boisterous."
*   *   *
My attention has been drawn to a]
rather curious anomaly at present]
prevailing in British Columbia ini
general, and in Victoria in particular,!
and that is with regard to the status!
of the architects of the Province.!
Lawyers, doctors, dentists are all!
protected by law; no man is allowed!
to practise these professions unlessf
he has satisfied a board of examiner*
of his professonal ability. But th«|
(Continued on Page 6) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
Dr. and Mrs. Herman Robertson
left town on Monday evening's boat
en route for Europe, where they will
spend six months travelling.
Miss Turner, of this city, is visiting
friends in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. E. A. Marshall went over to
Vancouver on Tuesday evening's boat.
Mr. and Mrs. McPhee, from Los
Angeles, are recent arrivals in the
city.
* *   *
Mrs. C. F. Hoskings, 1602 Dallas
Road, was hostess one evening last
week at a very charming party given
in honor of Mr. C. C. Smith, who
shortly leaves for Alberta. The evening was spent in dancing and other
amusements. Those invited were:
Mr. and Mrs. A. Green, Mr. R. Green,
Mr. and Mrs. W. Cooper, Mr. and
Mrs. W. Clegg, Mr. and Mrs. F. Ross,
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Cox, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Smth, Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Henley,
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Henley, Mr, and
Mrs. Shouldice, Mr. and Mrs. J. Eccles, Mr. and Mrs. Wescott, Miss
Ruby Smith, Miss Bossencle, Miss B.
Clegg, Miss I. Clegg, Miss F. Baird,
Mrs. H. Hoskings, and the Messrs.
^'Andrews, D. Smith, Homewood,
W. Eccles, T. Smith, Prior, Bossencle,
V. Hitchcock, F. Hoskings, W. H.
Smith, J. Cox, Cadman and W.
Chappie.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Girdwood, from
Cowichan  Lake, are spending a few
days in Victoria.
* *   *
Bishop Perrin was a visitor to Vancouver during the week.
* *   *
Miss Richards crossed over to Vancouver last week.
Mr. John Hopp, from Cariboo, is
in Victoria on a business trip.
Mr. E. A. Jacobs, who has been
spending the last week in Nelson on
business, returned to Victoria during
the week.
* *   *
The marriage of Miss Eva Holmes,
formerly of hts city, to Mr. E. A. C.
Studd, will take place on the 28th of
this month in London, Ont.
* *   *
Miss Abbott, from Seattle, is in
town visiting friends.
Mrs. Keith Wilson, from Saanich, is
in town, staying with her relatives.
* *   *
Mr. Maurice Bowcroft, of this city,
is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lamb
of Cowichan Station.
Mr. and Mrs. George Blackwell,
from Kirkella, Manitoba, are visiting
relatives in Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. H. Croft spent a few days of
last week in Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Armstrong, of
Vancouver, are making a short stay
in the city.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Langley have
returned from a pleasant holiday trip
spent in Southern California.
* *   *
Mr. J. C. Pendry went over to Vancouver on Tuesday evening's boat.
* *   *
Mr. A. Purvis spent a few days of
the week visiting in Vancouver.
* *   *
The Companions of the Forest intend to hold a dance on March 17th
at Foresters' Hall, on Broad street.
*     *     *
The engagement has been announc
ed recently in Ottawa of Miss Claudia
Bate, second daughter of Colonel ancl
Mrs. Allan Bate, to Mr. Frederick
Peters, C.E., son of Colonel and Mrs.
Peters, of Victoria.
* *     *
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Morris are
spending the week-end in Vancouver
visiting friends.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy, who has
been staying with Miss Newcombe,
Dallas Road, returned to her home at
Chemainus last Saturday afternoon.
* *   *
Mr. D. Spencer, jr., who has been
away on busness, returned to the city
last Monday evening.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Watson, from Ladysmith, are enjoying a brief holiday in
the city.
•*.    *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Max Purvis, from
New Westminster, are guests at the
Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. Seegan and Miss Seegan, from
Seattle, spent a few days n Victoria
last week visiting friends.
* *   *
On March 17th Miss Dorothy Day
will be hostess at a "miscellaneous
shower," to be given in honor of her
friend, Miss Ethel Brown, whose mar-
rage to Mr. Clement Cornwall is to
take place shortly.
* *   *
A Vancouver engagement which has
been recently announcel is that of
Miss Elesie H. Lindsay, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. R. Lindsay, to
Mr. Trevor Gordon Rant, of the same
city.
* *   *
Mr. J. Mason, of this city, left during the week for Prince Rupert.
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell McCallum
and famly have taken up their residence in their new home at Foul Bay.
* *   *
Mrs. Richard McBride will be at
home to her friends on Monday afternoon.
* *     *
Mrs. Herbert Carmichael was hostess last Wednesday and Friday afternoons at two smart brdge parties held
at the Alexandra Club.
* *     *
Mr. Robin Dunsmuir, who has been
out of town for some time, returned
to Victoria during the week.
* *     *
A tea was held last Monday afternoon at the Alexandra Club. The tearoom was very prettily decorated with
carnations and greenery. Mrs. Richard McBride and Mrs. Henry Croft
received the guests.
* *     *
The bridge club met at Mrs. W. S.
Gore's,  Burdette  avenue,  during the
week.
* *     *
Mr. W. H. Willis, from Winnipeg,
was a visitor to Victoria this week.
The Canadian Magazine
The Canadian Magazine for March
contains two valuable articles on
transportation. The first is entitled
"The Welland Canal," and deals with
the history of this important waterway
and its relation to the waterborne
commerce of Canada. The other is
by Ernest Cawcroft, and is entitled
"The Fight for Commercial Supremacy. It gives an account of the new
Erie canal, and tells what its building
will mean in the fight for commercial
supremacy. The fact that $101,000 is
being spent on this canal by the State
of New York should be sufficient to
induce Canadians to seriously consider the situation. There is also a very
pcturcsque description by a Canadian
NEW BAGS
For Easter
Of course every lady must
have a new Satchel to match
or harmonize properly with her
new Easter Suit. We have just
received a remarkably smart
consignment of the most
charming and exclusive ideas
exploited in almost every conceivable leather.
Prices $3.00 to $25.00
Your inspection cordially invited. Remember we are always
glad to have you call and look
around even if you do not desire to purchase.
W. H. WILKERSON
The Jeweler
915 Government Street
Tel 1606
.lib
tfflia THFATPF
M
-V>-*- —^  US-SEES. MANJCtr
Monday, March 14
Mort H. Singer's Biggest Musical
Success
Stubborn Cinderella
with
HOMER B. MASON
COMPANY OF SEVENTY
A Riot of Fun and Melody
Prices—-50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Seat sale now open.
lady, Mrs. Fred. A. Hodgson, of bullfighting in Mexico, and Mr. Harold
Sands contributes a fascinating account of the Silver King mine at Nelson, British Columbia. All of these
articles are well illustrated. Short
stories are contributed by Verna
Sheard, W. E. Elliott, H. Adolph
Gerard, W. Lacey Amy and James
Lawler. Mr. Amy's contribution,
which is entitled "The Picture Puzzle"
is strong evidence against the statement that there is in Canadian writers
no sense of humor. Good verse is
given by Professor George Herbert
Clarke, Doctor Arthur Wentworth
Eaton, J. Edgar Middleton, Alan
Sullivan, May Austin Low and Eric
Brown.
Orator—I believe that the great
body of American people are gentlemen.
Voice in the Rear—You're wrong.
The last census shows that over half
of them are ladies.
Mrs. Subbubs—I guess I'll have to
give a big dinner.
Mr. Subbubs—What for?
Mrs. Subbubs—It's the only excuse
I can think of to borrow back those
fine dishes I loaned to Mrs. Naybor.
Interesting
Instructive
ROMAN©
THEATRE
A visit to our amusement house will prove that we have the best
in Moving Pictures and Illustrated Songs.
Daily from 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., and 7 until 11 p.m.
Saturday performances commence at 1 p.m. sharp.
Complete change every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
ADMISSION—Ten Cents; Children at Matinee, Five Cents.
ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE.
A PLACE OF ATTRACTION FOR THE
YOUNG AND OLD IS
THEATRE
The strides made in the improvement of Moving Pictures are
nothing more than marvellous.
They are not only interesting to ldok at but instructive and
impressive and oftentimes portray a lesson worth learning.
Complete  change of programme  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays
and Fridays.
Continuous performance: 2.00 to .30—7.00 to 10.30 p.m.
Children's Matinees: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday—Five Cents,
Admission - Ten Cents
rWJEJTIC
THEATRE
Yates Street, Just Below Government
where you can see the latest and best Motion Pictures
money and skill can produce. Illustrated songs. Continuous performance daily from 2 to 5.30—7 to 11.
Admission—10 cents;   Children to Matinee, 5 cents.
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
PANTAGES
THEATRE
Week of March 12
In a Magnificent Scenic
Production of
THE
RAJAH
The Funniest Musical Comedy
in Years
SEE THE EGYPTIAN AND
GERMAN BALLETS
A Whirlwind of Fun, Mirth and
Singing
20—PEOPLE—20
THE
New Grand
Week of March 12
"The Laughing Favorites"
FOSTER AND FOSTER
Mirth—Melody—Song
4-TOSSING LAVELLES-4
Famous   Family   of   European
Acrobats
"The Girl with thc Contagious
Smile"
HELEN  CARMEN
Presenting a Repertoire of
Unequalled Melodies
EDWIN  WINCHESTER
Musical Monologist
THOS. J. PRICE
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
!
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208   Government St.,   Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
Common Phrases
BY BOHEMIAN
Two weeks ago I wrote an article
under the above heading, in which I
made reference to the fable of the
old woman driving her pig to market.
I said that this nursery rhyme was
derived from some old prophecy
which I had forgotten, and asked
some reader to be kind enough to
send mc a copy. A correspondent has
been good enough to comply with my
request, and has pointed out that the
good old children's favourite, "The
House that Jack Built," is also a
lineal descendant of the same. I re-,
produce the original, (together wa^b;
the interpretation, asTI thinjj that'it
may be of interest to readeriS.
The original is presumed "'■■■to be a
hymn in "Seper Haggadah,*'1 fol. 23.
The historical interpretation, which
Is rendered below, was first given by
P. N. Leberecht at Leipsic in 1731
and is printed in the "Christian Reformer," vol. XVII, p. 28. The original is in the Chaldee language. It
is inserted in the Hebrew Passover
Service Book and concludes the service for the first two nights of the
Passover.   The poem is as follows:—
I
"A kid,  a  kid my father bought
For two pieces of money;
A kid, a kid.
II
"Then came the cat and ate the kid,
That   my   father   bought   for   two
pieces  of  money.
A kid, a kid.
Ill
"Then came a dog, and bit the cat
That  ate  the  kid,   that  my   father
bought for two pieces of money.
A kid, a kid.
IV
"Then came the staff and beat the dog
That bit the cat that ate the kid
my father bought
For two pieces of money.
A kid, a kid.
V
"Then came the fire and burned the
staff,
That beat the dog that bit the cat,
that ate the kid,
That   my   father   bought   for   two
pieces of money.
A kid, a kid.
VI
"Then came the water and quenched
the  fire,  that  burnpd  the  staff,:
That beat the dog, that bit the cat,
that ate the kid,
That   my   father   bought   for   two
pieces of money.
A kid, a kid.
VII
"Then  came  the  ox and  drank  the
water, that quenched the fire,
That ate thc kid, my father bought
for two pieces of money.
A kid, a kid.
VIII
"Then came thc butcher that slew the
ox, that drank thc water,
That quenched the fire, that burned
the staff, that beat thc dog,
That bit the cat, that ate thc kid, my
father bought for two pieces of
money.
A kid, a kid.
IX
"Then came the Angel of Death that
killed thc butcher, that slew the
ox,
That drank the water, that quenched
the  fire,  that  burned  the  staff,
that beat the dog,
That bit the cat, that ate thc kid, my
father bought for two pieces of
money.
A kid, a kid.
X
"Then came the Holy One, Blessed
be He, and killed thc Angel of
Death, that killed the butcher,
that slew the ox, that drank the
water, that quenched the fire, that
burned the staff, that beat the
dog, that bit the cat, that ate the
kid, my father bought for two
pieces of money.
A kid, a kid."
The following is the interpretation:
No. 1.—The kid, which is one of thc
pure animals, denotes the Hebrews;
the father by whom it is purchased
is Jehovah, who represents himself as
sustaining this relation to the Hebrew nation. The two pieces of
money signify Moses and Aaron,
through whose mediation the Hebrews were brought out of Egypt.
No. 2.—The cat denotes thc Assyrians by whom the ten tribes were
carried into capitivity. No. 3,—The
dog is symbolical of the Babylonians. No. 4.—The staff signifies the
Persians. No. 5.—The fire indicates
the Grecian Empire under Alexander
the Great. No. 6.—The water betokens thc Romans, or the fourth of
the monarchies to whose dominion
the Jews were subjected. No. 7.—
The ox is the ^symbol of the Sar
acens who subdued Palestine and
brought it underwthe Caliphate. Nd.
.8.—The butcher who killed the ox
denotes the Crusaders, by whom the
Holy Land was "Wrested from the
Saracens. No. 9.—The Angel of
Death signifies the Turkish Power
by which the land of Palestine was
taken from the Franks, and to which
it is still subject. No. 10.—The commencement of the tenth stanza is designed to show that God will take
vengeance on the Turks, immediately
after whose overthrow the Jews are
to be restored to their own land, and
live under the government of their
long-expected   Messiah.
The above was copied from a book
of Old Nursery Rhymes, Tales and
Jingles by W. Gannon, published by
Hurst & Co., New York.
This sort of thing possesses a great
deal of interest for me and I cannot
help feeling that there are many readers who will appreciate it. Doubtless
there are many who will be bored by
it, and to them I would say that it
doesn't happen very often.
There are thousands of men and
women who are always being puzzled
as to the correct way of spelling "bylaw." There seems to be a prevalent
doubt as to whether it should be
spelt with or without an "e." Of
course, there is no "e." The termination "by" as found in such words
as "Whitby" or "Grimsby" signifies
"town," being the old Saxon word.
Whitby was the white town, and
Grimsby was the town of Grim, some
mythical hero of antiquity. Therefore, a by-law is merely a law appertaining to a town. The "e" in
such expressions as "good-bye" is, due
to the fact that the modern term, is
condensed from the original "God be
with ye."
In this same connection it is curious to note how people who would
never soil their lips with an oath will
make use of expressions which are
simply and solely corruptions of blasphemies. For instance, the common
expression "Gee Whiz" is nothing
more nor less than a corruption of
"Jesus Wept." "Zounds," which is
somewhat out of date just now, stands
for "God's Wourids." But this is a
style of white-washing which by no
means commends itself to
The B. C. Exhibit at Vienna
A splendid collection of heads, antlers, and other game trophies has just
left the Provincial Museum for Vienna, where it will show what British
Columbia can produce in this line at
the first International Shooting and
Field Sports Exhibition to be held
during the coming summer, in the
Austrian capital. This exhibit will be
under the charge of Mr. Warburton
Pike, than whom no fitter man could
possibly be founl for the position.
Not only is Mr. Pike a great hunter
and traveller but hc has the skill and
ability to place his experiences on record and his books arc standard
works on thc subjects of which they
treat, as  thc  world,  or at  any  rate
that part of it which takes an interest
in such matters has found out. What
Mr. Pike says can be absolutely relied on, which is more than can be
said of most hunting records.
The collection consists of over
sixty specimens of heads, antlers,
skins, and in one or two cases of
stuffed animals themselves, and it is
safe to say that it will excite great
interest, as it contains one or two
specimens that have never yet been
seen in Europe, one of which is a
Kermodes white bear, that curious
small member of the bear family
which has been found in those little
known regions in which the Yukon,
thc Stikine, and thc Peace River take
their sources. There are also one or
two record heads, notably a specimen
of a Stones Sheep (Ovis Stonei) of
whicli the measurements are thirty-
four and one-half inches wide, thirty-
six and one-half inches round the
curve, and fourteen and one-half inches round the base. There are also
two mule deer heads, one belonging
to Mr. Hull of Kamloops and another
that hails from the Okanagan, both
being remarkable for size and symmetry. There are specimens of all
the different kinds of mountain sheep
with which the province abounds, including the giants from the Rooky
Mountains, and others from the Similkameen, and trie Chilcotin country,
as well as specimens of Ovis Dallii,
Ovis Stonei and Ovis Fannini. Every
individual part of the collection is a
genuine British Columbia specimen
and includes none of those larger
heads which can be obtained in Alaska and which are often palmed off as
local ones. But in Vienna those specimens will be submitted to the examination of critical experts who
would at once detect any fraud of
such a kind.
In addition to fur, feathers and
scales have not been overlooked, and
there are three kinds of grouse and
two of ptarmigan and in London the
fine collection of fish now on exhibition at the offices of Mr. Turner,
the Agent-General, will be picked up
and taken to Vienna.
The result of this display cannot
but'be of great advantage to British
Columbia. At Vienna it will be seen
not only by British sportsmen, but
also by that large and increasing
number of continental nimrods of
whom numbers will avail themselves
of the opportunities the province presents. Wild animals are becoming
rare in many parts of the world and
with the exception of British Columbia most of the countries where they
are found are in the tropics and are
not only unhealthy but inaccessible
except at much cost of time and
money, while Victoria is only at the
most, fourteen days from London and
the hunting grounds of the province
can easily be reached in another week.
At the Victoria theatre on Monday,
March 14.
New Grand Theatre
Mirth, melody and song, by the
laughing favourites, Foster and Fos
ter, who have made the continent
ring with laughter from end to end
are coming to the New Grand on
Monday and will lead the new bill
all the week. They will present the
entertaining oddity, The Volunteer
Pianist, which gives them the opportunity to introduce all kinds of music
into the act. The duo contains one
singer with a strong baritone voice
and his renditions are delightful.
Billed as "The Girl with the Contagious Smile," Helen Carmen, will
be another delightful feature of the
bill next week. She will present a
repertoire of unequalled melodies.
Her title has been won by her pleasing manner and her ability to impart
her brightness to the audience.
The four Tossing Lavelles from
far off Europe are a famous family of
acrobats who could only be induced to
come to this country at an enormous
figure. Sullivan and ■'. Considine secured them for one tour including
Victoria in the path mapped out for
them from New York. This act wi'lj
hold the audience spell-bound and^bc
specially acceptable to athletic Viic-.
toria. ■ 4  ■ '■"'■"
Edwin Winchester, the musical
monologist, is going to offer Something entirely in an original class.
His musical act has been featured in
theffiig theatres of the south and is
looked on as a big drawing card for
all cities. Thomas J. Price will sing
another song next week and the usual
moving pictures are billed too.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth Casheir
Williams, of San Juan, married woman,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Lot 204; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement; containing 320 acres,  more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ELIZABETH CASHIER WILLIAMS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Percy
Simpson, of Victoria, gentleman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 20 chains
east of L. Alexander's post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 20 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated  January  24th,  1910.
HARRY  PERCY SIMPSON,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that William Mostyn
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the ofllowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Samuel Thrasher's;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenoe
west 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated January  24th,  1910.
WILLIAM MOSTYN THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
■      District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Beard, ol
Victoria, gthtleman, intends to apply
for permiss|im. to purchase the following describea lands :--Commencing at a
post plante^.-,at north-east corner of
Lot 24*8; theriije nopth 30 chains; thence
east 50 chains; thence south 30 chains;
thence west 60 chains to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres,
more dr less. ■'.:• •*■■   -
Dated January 2.4th, 1910.
ROBERT) .BEARD,
feb 26 Jtlltyf* Williams, Agent.
Canadian Pacific Oil
Mr. E. P. Howard, one of the directors of the Canadian Pacific Oil
Company, who was in charge of the
office in Victoria passed through the
city in the early part of the week
on his way east after a four weeks'
visit to the company's holdings in
California. Mr. Howard was enthusiastic as regards the future of the
company, and confidently expects a
big gusher by June. A ten-thousand
gallon gusher has lately been tapped
within one mile and a quarter of the
company's property. The rotary drill
has been doing good work and the
company are now down about 1,600
feet. The whole amount of stock
for sale in Victoria was easily disposed of some weeks sooner than
had been anticipated, and those who
were fortunate enough to get in on
the ground floor are assured of a substantial return for their money.
MUSIC
AND  THE   STAGE
A Stubborn Cinderella
The first act of "A Stubborn Cinderella," the latest musical comedy
success of Messrs. Hough, Adams
and Howard, authors of "The Time,
the Place and the Girl," "The Goddess of Liberty," and other successes,
is laid on the campus of the University of Columbus, at the unveiling of
of a statue. The second act depicts
a realistic railway wreck and the third
an orange Fete at Del Coronado
Beach, California. The plot of the
piece is interesting and unusual and
concerns the daughter of a Scottish
Earl who has never spoken to a
stranger. She is among the guests
at the unveiling of the statue of Columbus and meets Mac, the leader of
the college, with whom she falls in
love at first sight. She, however, is
engaged to Grand Duke Boris, so
Colonel Hunt, her body-guard, interrupts the affair with Mac. The young
couple meet next at an orange Fete
in Dot Coronado Beach, California,
where Lady Leslie is to see for the
first time her affianced husband,
Grand Duke Boris. It is here that
she becomes obstinate and chooses
Mac.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE, that I, William Buck-
land, intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 6, Graham Island, being the southeast corner of land applied for; them*c
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February  25th,  1910.
WILLIAM  BUCKLAND.    /
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles Cleveland intends to apply for a license to
prospect for coal on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Section 26, Township 6, Graham Island, being the southwest corner of land applied for; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
CHARLES CLEVELAND,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Arrow Park School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for School Building, Arrow
Park,' will be received by the Honou.-
able the Minister of Public Works up
to and including the 31st day of March,
1910, for the erection and completion of
of a large one-room frame school-building in the Ymir Electoral District,     *,_
Plans, specifications, contract, ana
forms of tender may be seen on and'
after the 7th day of March, 1910, at
the office of the Government Agent at
Nelson; the office of the Government
Agent at Revelstoke; the ofllce of the
Secretary of the School Board, J. N.
Pennock, Arrow Park, and at the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of;
Canada, made payable to the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works, for a
sum equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C.  GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., March 2nd, 1910.
mch 5
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that I, Bert Wheeler,
intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
BE/RT WHEELER,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that George Wheeler,
intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 16, Township 6, Graham Island, being the northwest corner of land applied for; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 25th, 1910.
GEORGE WHEELER,
mch 12 John Demers, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
School, Tappen Siding.
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for School, Tappen Siding," will be re-
29thceived by the Hdnourable the Mittis-
,ter of Public Works up to and including
'the 29th day' of March, 1910, for the
erection and completion of a largef_one-,
room frame school-building in the Kamloops Electoral District.
Plans, Specifications, Contract and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the Sth day of March, 1910, at the
office of the Secretary of the School
Board, J. A. Carlin, Kault, B.C., and at
the Department of Public Works, Victoria,
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for
a sum equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the xecution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 6th March, 1910.
mch 12
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander Keay
of Everett, Wash., occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to
prospect for coal on the following described  lands: ,__,_.
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of Masset Inlet, Graham
Island and about four miles S.E. of
Delkatla; post marked "A.K.S. S.W. Corner"; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Date of staking Sept. 23, 1909.
ALEXANDER  KEAY,
oct 23 F.  H.  Millard. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
Spring Carpet Styles
NOW ON DISPLAY
The pretty new Spring styles in our new
carpets and rugs make the matter of choos=
ing easy. We have something suitable for
any room and any furnishings and some=
thing that will please you in the matter of
price. These offerings mirror the newest
ideas of the leading fashion centres, and
are manufactured by the foremost makers
in the world.
We guarantee every carpet or rug we sell
-assure you absolute satisfaction. Our
carpet prices compare favorably with prices
quoted on carpets of inferior quality==they
are lower when you consider the service
they give. Come in and see ours before
you invest a cent in carpets or rugs.
Rich, New Curtain Materials for Spring Decorating
*
FURNISHERS OF
CHURCHES
SCHOOLS
BOATS
SINCE 1862
AT VIOTORIA, B.O.
Complete Home Furnishers
Victoria, B.C.
FURNISHERS OF
HOMES
HOTELS
CLUBS
SINCE 1862
AT VICTORIA, B.O.
THE PARTNERS
By Gilbert Hudson
For nearly five minutes Cratchard
|had not spoken a word.
He stood with his back to the fire,
flcu
gazing into the invisible world of his
own thoughts. His features, strong,
(shrewd, yet plausibly candid, wore
the kind of patient half-smile habitual
to them—the face of a lawyer—every
Inch of it. '.
The other man was a small, sandy-
naired  person, with  a weak mouth
lind furtive eyes.    He did not like to
fcmile.    He wished Cratchard would
fcontinue the sentence he had begun
live minutes ago.   Yes, five minutes
exactly, now.    He had kept his eyes
|)ii  the  old-fashioned   moon face  of
Ihe office clock as well as on his part-
tier's, and could not have told you
Vhich  of the two faces looked the
nore  inscrutible.    At  last  he  could
\_r it no longer.
"You were about to remark, my
lear Cratchard,    that    if   the worst
|omes to the worst "
"Why, then," said Cratchard, start-
Jig suddenly out of his reverie, "I
liust look after Number One, that's
ll."
] The half-smile broke into a little
tickling laugh, and the dreaminess
linished from the deep-set eyes, as
"ley encountered Mr. Pelican's watery
lit suspcious orbs, with a penetrat-
lg stare. Pelican fidgeted.
I"I don't understand you," he said,
fandidly, Cratchard, I—I somehow,
In't quite like your manner this af-
rnoon. I hope nothing's e—er—
jiiss? I hope I—er—haven't offend-
you in any way. I should be
rry if anything came between us af
ter so many years of partnership.
We have always got on so well together, you know." ..(j't-i
"And we shall do so, still," said
Cratchard, "if only you continue to
behave as you have done hitherto,
and take my advice on every point.
jljf not "
' "Well—well; I am quite prepared to
adopt our usual method in this case,
provided of course •"
The little man paused.
"Speak out," said Cratchard.
"You seem more than ordinarily suspicious to-day, Pelican."
"I can't help it, Cratchard. You
strike me as being—er—a little—er—
altered. That look in your eyes, these
relapses into silent musing, have
puzzled me. You tell me you have
something important to disclose. You
compel—I mean ask me—to swear
participation and secrecy. After no
little hesitation I consent; and then
you talk of the worst coming to the
worst, and looking after Number One.
ft all sounds so—well—er—fishy.
Really, I'm scarcely ashamed to confess, you alarm me."
"I am glad to hear it," said Cratchard. "As long as you're afraid of mc
I shall have nothing to fear from
you."
"That's true," admitted Pelican,
with a feeble smirk. "Why should
you?"
"Then it only remains for me to
tell you everything. Yes; I think I
know you well enough to risk it."
This with a resumption of the smile,
varied by a cat-like grimncss at the
comers of the mouth.
"Risk!" answered Pelican. "That's
an unpleasant word."
"What!" cried Catchard, almost
threatenngly. "You flinch—you go
back on your word?"
"Oh, no, Cratchard; no. The word
slipped out unintentionally. You may
rely on me. You know, you always
have. I've never failed you yet, and
I'm not likely to begin at this time
of day."
"I should be sorry for you if you
did," muttered Cratchard. "Now, are
you ready?"
"Quite ready, Cratchard."
"Just see if the door's' shut tight."
Pelican rose and went to the door.
"It's all right," he said.
"Well then—stay!—the speaking-
tube. One can hear sounds through
it quite well downstairs; and sometimes the clerks carelessly leave the
whistle out. That duster—cover up
the mouth wth that."
The office was an old-fashioned one,
and in the corner of thc room facing
Cratchard, and behind Pelican, some
three feet of an ancient speaking-tube
protruded from the wall like a dead
snake. The obedient Pelican muffled
the mouth of the tube with the folded
duster. As he was not over deft with
his fingers, this occupied him a few
minutes, with his back to Cratchard.
When he turned, Cratchard had
changed his position. He was now
standing at the desk. In front of him
was a small but heavily-made antique
box, bound with brass and iron.
"What on earth's that?" whispered
Pelcan, his countenance shining with
a weird, feverish light of expectant
wonder.
"Ready?" said Cratcliard calmly.
Pelican nodded.
"Honor bright!"
Pelican nodded again.
Cratchard drew a small key from
his waistcoat pockcit, inserted it, gave
it two    or    three    turns, released a
couple of metal clasps, and then threw
back the lid. There was a flash and
a glitter of precious stones. A flash
and a glitter, too, of something else
in Cratchard's right hand—a revolver.
"Betray me," hissed Cratchard, "and
I'll shoot you like a dog!"
Pelican reeled and nearly fell.
"Great heavens!" he gasped, "the
Carlshaven diamonds!"
"Quite so," said Cratchard, softly,
"what else? Pull yourself together
and don't be a fool. Look here; the
reward of secrecy"—he pointed to the
diamonds wth the revolver—"the reward of treachery"—he flourished thfr
weapon airily.   "Which is it to be?"
"Secrecy, secrecy," stammered Pelican.   "Secrecy, of course.'
"Then sit down and hear what I
have to say. Perhaps you'd better take
a glass of water, it will steady you."
A carafe and tumbler stood on an
empty bookshelf behind Pelican.
Promptly following his partner's advice he reached for it in a curious
sidling manner, never quite taking his
eyes off the other, poured himself out
a glass with trembling fingers, and
drank it hastily.
"Ah, you arc a brilliant man," he
murmured, as he sank again into his
chair. "How on earth did you find
them? Why, nobody has set eyes on
them since they came into the old
Duchess's possession. She had a
mania for keepng them hidden."
"Yes; but I wormed the clue to
their whereabouts out of her yesterday, before she turned up her toes,
while you wcre busy downstairs with
the port. A nice job I had to get
them away undetected. That's why
I took a cab and came away first
alone."
"Clever—clever! I could never have
done it," sighed Pelican enviously.
"And now I conic to thnk of it, she
didn't give any directions where to
find them, even in her will."
"The will," said Cratchard, with emphatic slowness, "does not mention
them at all."
Pelican looked stupefied.
"You have the will in the tin box
there, at your elbow; see for yourself."
"But I could swear she left theni
to her niece, her only living relative."
"Open the will and sec."
Pelcain unfolded the: document and
glanced it through. Amazement deepened into horror; he started from his
chair.
"Why, man!" hc cried, hoarsely,
•'.tllis is not tlifc' will at all! This is
% forgery—a piiljiable forgery!"
"Be quiet, you fool," growled
Cratchard, covering him with thc revolver. Pelican quickly subsided.
Cratchard stole softly to the door and
locked it. Then he came back and resumed:
"Of course it's a forgery. But what
of that? No one but you would be
likely to detect it. No one has ever
set eyes on thc will but ourselves and
thc two witnesses, and they were ignorant old servants. I came here last
night after you'd gone home, and sat
up till four this morning over the
task. Don't make an ass of yourself, Pelican. You ought to bc grateful to me for doing all thc dirty work,
and giving you a share of thc profits
for nothing."
"But  the  real   will—the  original?"
"Non est," said Cratchard, laconically. "Took it home and burnt it.
Now, bc wise in time, Pelican, and a
third of these diamonds shall bc
yours. Think what that means; retirement—luxury—leisure. No more
office drudgery—no more fusty hooks
and law courts—no more daily toiling and moilng for a mere competency in a miserable country town.
Pah! How I hate it! Mow I have
abhorred it from my youth up!   Curse
(Continued on Pago 8) 1
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
BREAKFAST IN A
JIFFY
Don't know just how long a "jiffy" is, but if you cook with one of our splendid, time-saving Gas Eanges, you
can get a hasty breakfast almost while you are thinking about it. No trouble to start, like a coal fire, no smoke or
soot—no heating discomforts. Economical, too, because it costs only just while you are using it. One turn of the gas
tap and the expense ends.    Cheaper and cleaner than coal or wood.
Quick and clean cooking, perfect heating and general comfort are assured with the conveniences of a Gas Range.
We have them in all the desirable sizes, well and strongly made, handsomely designed and all ready for quick adjustment in any room. Although high in quality and of the very latest and most up-to-date models our prices are extremely
reasonable.
You can either pay cash or purchase upon the easy payment plan. We cordially invite you to visit our showroom.    It is a pleasure to us to demonstrate the safety, simplicity and economy of gas for cooking purposes.
The Victoria Gas Co-
limited
Corner Fort and Langley Streets     -     Victoria, B. C.
At the Street Corner
By THE LOUNGER
(Continued from Page 2)
architect, who, in common with other
professional men, has spent time and
money in equipping himself for the
proper fulfilment of his duties, has no
such protection. There are many instances to hand, and, as said above,
more particularly in Victoria, where
the contractor makes his own plans
and specifications, and throws them
in as a bonus to an intending client.
One can hardly blame the contractor; business is business all the world
over, and if the maintenance of a
draughtsman to utilize the experience
of years, pays, why, naturally, the
practice obtains. One can hardly
blame the pubic, if the latter be satisfied with the plans prepared. But I
think that one may justly blame the
system under which such a state of
things exists. People come to Victoria and see all the new buildings in
progress. "What a fine business the
architects must be doing," they say.
Whereas, as a matter of fact, thc majority of the architects in Victoria
have not enough work to keep them
busy. It is all in the hands of the
contractors. I am not speaking
from mere casual hearsay; the matter was mentoned to mc, and I made
a few enquiries and found that these
things are so. And it doesn't seem
quite right.
*   *   *
Has anyone noticed the total lack
of consideration shown by thc public, and especially by women, at the
post-office weket where stamps arc
for sale? Time and again I have
gone there in a hurry and havc had
to wait while some stout female (the
inconsiderate female is always stout)
holds up the right-of-way while she
licks and affixes the stamps which she
has purchased. The idea that other
people are waiting, and that she
might just as well move away a little
to do this work never seems to oc
cur to her, I use the feminine pronoun, because, in every case, the offender is of that gender. Men have
a far higher opinion of the value of
time, and are, for the most part, infinitely more considerate of the needs
and wants of their fellow-men. I
can well imagine the shrieks of expostulation which this last remark
will produce. I shall have Florence
Nightingale and the whole of the
Red Cross Brigade thrown at my
head, and I will admit that women
are capable of greater heroism than
men for the benefit of suffering humanity when it comes to the big
things of this world; but, in the little
ones, methinks that they lag somewhat far behind.
♦     *     *
T.-B.
Died
Let
March io,
1910
P.
Him R. I
* * *
What is a "backyard" boy? Kip-
lng has introduced us to the "Brushwood Boy." Of our own experience
we know thc schoolboy, the lazy boy,
thc bad boy, the good boy, and even
the haut-boy; but it remains for an
Oxford man, resident in Victoria, to
discover with the help of the advertising pages of the Colonist, this new
species, the "backyard" boy. When
I first saw that an educated man was
advertising for "backyard" boys, I
concluded that it was merely a misprint for "backward," but the same
expression has occurred over and over
again since then; so Victoria can now
take rank amongst other cities which
have fathered discoverers, inventors
and other famous men. If this should
meet the eye of the advertiser referred to, I trust that he will  com
municate to The Lounger the physiological peculiarities of the "backyard"
boy so that a wondering world may
be no longer left in ignorance regard-
ng this latest phenomenon.
The Civil Sabbath and Lord's Day
Legislation
Ofa
Miss Ascum—Is Freddy Fathedd
working for a living?
Miss Trillion—Oh, my, yes. Thc
poor boy has been trying for six
months to gain papa's consent.
Her Suitor—I wish to marry your
daughter, sir.
Her Father (sternly)—My daughter
sir, will continue under the parental
roof.
Her Suitor—Well, sir, the parental
roof looks good to me.
\    The Canadian Publishing Associa-
i tion has issued the first number of
I The Dominion Sentinel, while it an-
| nounces that "it is not published in
1 the interest of any class whatsoever,"
j yet every signed article is the product
I of a Seventh Day Adventist preacher
■ or leader, and all its 48 pages are devoted to earnest explanations and exposition of the views of that body
concerning   Lord's   Day   legislation.
Many  times   have   we   obtained  the
publications of Seventh Day Advent-
ists, and, whether books, pamphlets,
periodicals or leaflets, they were without exception declared to be published
by   some   association   the   name   of
which  would never suggest  the  society in whose interest the  publication  was  issued.    Very  clearly  this
Journal is issued in the interest of
the people who are opposed to all
legislation in regard to the Lord's.
Day.
Again and again in its 48 pages th<
writers declare that Lord's Day legis
lation in general, and the Lord's Da;
Act of Canada, in particular, is religi
ous legislation. It is said to be ai
effort to "enforce the ten command'
ments by law," "a purpose t'
bring about a strict (religious) ob
servance of thc Lord's Day, by law,|
a law "enacted under the plea to ber
efit man, often used to oppress him'
etc, etc. Yet, in the whole 48 page
there is not named one section, sui
section or clause of the Lord's Dai
Act that proves the charge that it
religious, or that in any way sui'
stantiates the specious charges
these Seventh Day Adventist write)
The fact is that thc Lord's Day A I
nowhere seeks to enforce religion. 11
single purpose is to preserve the cr THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1910
right of citizens throughout tha Dominion to that day as their weekly-
day of rest. When the Act was before the Canadian Parliaments in 1906
for enactment, an effort was made by
Seventh Day Adventists and other
Saturday Sabbath keepers to secure an
amendment which was of a purely religious character. In fact, the only
effort to secure religious legislation
in connection with the Lord's Day
Act was promulgated by the Saturday
Sabbath keepers.
Much emphasis is gven in this
"Sentinel" to the right of liberty of
conscience, and to worship as each
person chooses. On the front page,
and in several other places, Queen
Victoria's well known words are
quoted and enforced: "Firmly relying on the truth of Christianity. . .
we declare it to be our royal will
and pleasure that none be in any way
favored, none molested, or disquieted
by reason of their religious faith or
observances." This right and liberty
to worship in peace is guaranteed
throughout the empire by Act of Parliament. In this Dominion, R.S.C.,
1906, Cap. 146, sec. 198 to 201, safeguard the civil right of every citizen
to the practice in quietness and without interference of any religious rite
1 or ceremony, according to the conscience of that citizen. This legis-
I lation, dealing directly with religious
worship, is accepted, acted upon, and
by implication highly commended in
I every article in this paper.
This  writer,  however,    most    frequently insists   that  the   Sabbath  is
I only,  always  and  singly a  religious
■ institution; and that at no time, nor
lunder any circumstances is the Sab-
Ibath civil in its character.    Yet, the
ISabbath has always been civil as well
las    religious.   The   same    command
Iwhicli  says "Remember the Sabbath
Iday to keep it holy" also commands
Ithat the day shall be a day of rest,
■when neither "thou, nor thy wife, nor
IthjV, son,  nor thy daughter, nor thy
(manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor
]thy  cattle, nor the  stranger that  is
vithin thy gate" shall do any work.
jit is truly civil as well as religious.   A
Sabbath law is a six-day law, kindred
ito  an  eght-hour law,  the  first  projecting the weekly rest after six days
af labor, and the other protecting the
(daily rest after eight hours of labor.
[In both cases "the liberty of rest for
each, demands the law of rest for all."
The civil character of Sunday laws
Js well stated by the Supreme Court
of New York in a recent case.
"As a civil institution it (the Sab-
Ibath) is older than the government.
■The framers of the first constitution
■found it in existence; they recognized
pt in their acts. The stability of government, the welfare of the subject,
and the interests of society have made
It necessary that the day of rest observed by the people of a nation be
(uniform, and that its observance
fehould be to some extent compulsory,
liot by way of enforcing the conscience of those upon whom the law
operates, but by way of protecting
(those who desire and are entitled to
(the day.
"The Chrstian Sabbath as one of
lhe institution of religion may be protected from desecration by such laws
lis the Legislature, in their wisdom
Inay deem necessary to secure to the
lommunity the privilege of undisturbed worship, and to the day itself that
|)Utward respect and observance which
nay be deemed essential to the peace
|md good order of society, and to
Jircserve religion and its ordinances
from open reviling and contempt, and
ihis not as a duty to God, but as a
|luty to society and the State."
It is necessary that the purpose of
lhe Lord's Day Act and the aim of
lhe Lord's Day Alliance be clearly understood by the people. Hence the
(tatements of The Sentinel should be
lorrectcd, and the object of its publication distinctly made known.
Riter—Did you see that little story
}f mine in today's paper?
Critick—Yes.
Riter—Don't you think the general
let-up and style of it was characterise?   Wasn't it like me?
Crittick—No, I wouldn't say it was
Ike you; it didn't have a very big
lead.
Satisfaction
We guarantee quality and satisfaction with every purchase of
Groceries.
Phone orders carefully attended to.
A.  POOL
623 Yates St. Phone 448
Watson's Old Stand
There's
Nothing half
So Sweet
In Life as
Love and
Dudleigh's
Mixture
1 andN™/   Richardson 1
K  Cigar Store.     "IVIIH1 UOWII  "g
i Phone 346
NOTICE
"Public Inquiries Act"
NOTICB is hereby given that, pursuant to the above-named Act, Robert
S. Lennie, of the City of Nelson, Barri ster-at-Law; Day Hort MacDowall, of
the City of Victoria; and A. B. Erskine, of the City of Vancouver, have,
by order of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, been appointed
a Commission to inquire generally into
the business of Fire Insurance as carried on in the Province of British Columbia, including the placing of insurance by persons in British Columbia
with companies or associations in the
United States and other jurisdictions,
and to report in writing upon the results of the said investigation, and
especially as to the advisability and
best methods of Government supervision of the operations and financial
standing of all companies or associations carrying out the business of Fire
Insurance in this Province.
And as to compelling them to obtain
licences from the Province authorising
the transaction of said business:
And to furnish adequate security to
British Columbia policy-holders that all
valid claims they may have against
said companies or associations will be
promptly paid:
And notice is hereby given that sittings of the said Commission, for the
purpose of making inquiry into matters
aforesaid, will be held at the following
points on the dates set opposite, viz.:—
Victoria March   3rd, 1910
Vancouver March   9th, 1910
Nelson March 16th, 1910
Special sittings may be fixed by the
Commissioners upon sufficient requests
from other sections of the Province.
And notice is also hereby given that
all interested parties may obtain from
any of the Commissioners subphoenas
for the attendance of witnesses 8t any
sittings of tho Commission.
Provincial Secretary's Oflice,
Victoria, B.C., 23rd February, 1910.
feb 26
BLUE PRINTS
Any Length in One Piece
Six Cents per foot
TIMBER AND LAND
MAPS
DRAUGHTING
Electric Blue Print &
Map Co*
1218 Langley St. - Victoria, KC
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Douglas,
of Victoria, gentleman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 42 chains west from
the north-east corner of lot 117, T. L.
36,048; thence north 70 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 70 chains;
thence west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 140 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
SAMUEL   DOUGLAS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that S. J. Mllllkin,
of Midland, Ont., merchant, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 30 chains
south of Sec. 31, Tp. 12, at the northeast corner of S. Thrasher's claim;
thence north 30 chains to the south line
of Sec. 31, Tp. 12; east 80 chains; south
30 chains, west  80 chains.
Dated February 4th,  1910.
SAMUEL JOHN MILLIKIN.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
Cold Storage
Vancouver Island
Cold Storage and
Ice Company
VICTORIA, B.C.
Goods received at all hours.
Expert attention given.
Consignments solicited
Phone 2282    P.O. Box 875
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that James Walker,
of Victoria, mechanic, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 64 chains north and
40 chains east of the north-east corner
of lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 24 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 24 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement and
containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated February  4th,  1910.
JAMES WALKER,
feb 26 J* W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that F. E. Randall, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
shore on the east line of T. L. 36,167;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres, moro
or less. 	
Dated February 4th, 1910.
F.  E.   RANDALL,
feb 26 J- W. Williams, Agent.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve, notice of which was given ln
the Gazette of the 28th October, 1909,
reserving all foreshore abutting on the
East Coast of Vancouver Island, and
extending from the head of Saanich Inlet to the 52nd parallel of north latitude,
and all coal underlying the said foreshore, as well as the coal under the
sea fronting the said foreshore and
extending out therefrom a distance of
one mile, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., January 6th, 1910.
jan 8
RENFREW  LAND DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE    that    John   Weaver
Bridgman, of Victoria, broker,  intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing;
at a post planted beside H. P. Simpson's;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 10
chains; thence south 50 chains; thencel
east 30 chains; thence south 30 chains; |
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement,   and   containing   170   acres,
more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
ARTHUR JOHN WEAVER BRIDGMAN
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Armstrong, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation,
Master Mariner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted in the
vicinity of Green Point, Thurlow Island,
Cardero Channel, at a post situate about
sixty chains in a south-easterly direction from said Green Point, and marked
"R.A.N.E."; thence 40 chains south;
thence 20 chains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence 20 chains east to the point
of commencement.
Dated  February  Sth,  1910.
ROBERT ARMSTRONG,
feb 19 Per Chas. McHardy, Agent
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRIST
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Frances J.
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask., married woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner of J. W. Williams';
thence east 60 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west 60 chains; thence
north 20 chains to place of commencement and containing 120 acres, more or
Dated January 26th, 1910.
FRANCES   J.   THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four chains west
of the north-west corner of Lot 248;
thence north SO chains; thence east 20
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 20 chains to place of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
Dated January 24th,  1910.
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
LAND REGISTRY ACT
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate    Certlflcate    of   Title   to
Lots 7, 13, 27, 35, 36, 46, 61, 62, 63,
67, 68, 69, 91, 92, 93, 105, West half
of Lot 8 and West half of Lot 14
of Suburban Lots 37 and 45, Esquimau District.
NOTICE  Is hereby  given  that  it  is
my  Intention  at  the  expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to said lands, iss-ed to
Mary  Elizabeth  Nicholson  on   tho   2nd
day  of December,   1890,  and numbered
10805A.
Land  Registry  Ofllce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the llth day of February, 1910.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
feb 19 Registrar-General of Titles
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph William
Williams, of San Juan, rancher, Intends
to apply for permission to purchaso
the following described Iands:—CommencinK at a post planted on the Telegraph Trail about 8 chains south of the
south-east corner of lot 117, T. L. 36,-
048; thence south 8 chains to the north
line of T. L. 4.1,560; thence east 15
chains to the north-east corner of T. L.
■13,560; thence south 60 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 70 chains;
thence west 55 chains to place of commencement and containing 292 ncres,
more or less.
Dated January 26th, 1910.
JOSEPH WILLIAM WILLIAM?,
feb 26
The Taylor Mill Co.
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Bowes'
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young. Per bottle, soc at this
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CHEMIST
1228 Qovernment Street
Near Yates
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Annie A. Beard,
of Victoria, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east cornor of the
south-west quarter of Sec. 32, Tp. 12,
Renfrew District; thence south 30
chains; thence west 10 chains to S. J.
Mllllkea's claim; thence north 30 chains;
thence east 10 chains to place of commencement, and containing 30 acres,
more or less.
Dated February ith, 1910.
ANNIE A. BEARD,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Leigh H. Mllli-
ken, of Vancouver, clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-east corner
of S. Thrasher's claim; thence north
30 chains to the south line of Sec. 31,
Tp. 12; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 10 chains; thence east 40
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 210 acres, more or less.
Dated February 4th,  1910.
LEIGH H.  MILLIKEN,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Ernest
Thrasher, of Mosten, Sask. farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains east and about 61 chains nortli
of the north-west oorner of Lot 252,
Renfrew District; thence south 24
chains; thence enst 80 chains; thence
north 24 chains; thence west 80 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 192 acres, more or less.
Dated  Februnry 4th,  1910.
HARVEY ERNEST THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ia, 1910
THE PARTNERS
(Continued from Page 5)
your offices, say I! Curse your routine! Give me freedom—freedom and
enjoyment! And these will purchase
it. Look at them, Pelican—gloat over
them. Doesn't your mouth water?
Don't your fingers itch?"
The little man exhibited every sign
of greed and covetuousness. Then,
with an awkward affectation of pious
reproach, he said;
"Oh, Cratchard, Cratchard! I always thought you an honest man—the
very soul of integrity."
' ■ "And so I have been, generally
speaking, until now. Never had an
opportunity, before, of being otherwise,' on a scale worth risking a hard-
earned regular income for. I flatter
ter myself I haven't managed things
badly, for a beginner. Well, Pelican,
you seem quite fascinated with the
beauties. Come, now, which will you
have for a start? There's a generous offer for you. As you've come
around sensibly, after all, I'll give
you the first choice—only it mustn't
be thc tiara; that's my especial
fancy."  '  :
Pelican gazed intently.
"Oh, np," he said deprecatingly. "1
shouldn't think of asking for tha-ft.
That's the lion's share, and due to
you, who, as you rightly obsen-Jfs,
have done all the dirty work. Somf
of the smaller things would suit me
better—rings and such like. They
would be—ahem!—easier to dispose of
without—er—By the by, Cratchard,
the box looks very shallow inside.
Why, surely, isn't that a false bottom? Depend upon it, there's other
jewellery underneath."
Cratchard laughed.
"Pelican, you're a genius compared
with me. What a blind fool I have
been not to notice that! A false bottom? To be sure there is. Here are
two small tongues of leather to lift
out this upper tray—so! And here
underneath is a second lid with a little
trap-door in it. What purpose can
•that serve, I wonder? Here again,
these buttons on each side, when
pressed, will probably release some
spring or catch. I'll try."
. He stooped over the box, manipulating inside it. He did not notice
that Pelican had turned ashy white
as he watch him with compressed
lips and straining eyes.
Suddenly there was a metallic click
and a rattling, whirring sound, and
simultaneously an unearthly yell from
Cratchard.
Pelican yelled too, and began to
dance about like a madman.*
"Saved!" he cried—"saved:" He
darted forward and snatched up the
revolver, which Cratchard had laid
aside when he began to examine the
box. "Now, Cratchard, up with your
hands!"
Cratchard replied with a kind of
snarling groan and swore terribly.
Stamping and writhing he stood, his
face distorted with mingled rage and
pain, his hands inextricably fixed inside the box.
"Caught, Cratchard, caught! I'm
the master now. You've domineered
ancl tyrannised over mc. ever since I
went into partnership with you, ten
years ago. This is my revenge. I'm
a weak man, you a strong one; I'm
an honest man, you're a thief and a
forger; I'm a free man, you my prisoner. I knew about the finger-trap
years ago! It's a piece of diabolical
mechanism invented by one of the
Duchess's ancestors. You remember
she had lost two lingers of her right
hand.
I asked her one day how she had
met with the accident, and she told
me in confidence—in strict confidence,
Cratchard. That's why I never told
you. I never trusted you from the
first. I always felt you were an evil
being. But somehow or other you
got the upper hand over me, and have
kept it until now. I've been more like
a clerk to you than a partner; but
now I'm free at last. It is Heaven's
own justice!"
The excitement and mocking
triumph of the little man were
terrible.
Gnashing his teeth,"4 the other
dragged the box from the table and
endeavoured to raise it above his
head. In doing so he swept thc loose
tray of jewels off thc table, and they
scattered on the floor, mingling with
drops of blood from his wounded
hands.
"Stop that," shouted Pelican, "or
I'll shoot you!"
Cratchard paid no heed. With a
superhuman effort he succeeded in
lifting the box above his head. Then
he brought it down with all his
might upon the corner of the marble
mantelpiece. The box remained unbroken—the cruel trap held firm.
Cratchard staggered and fell in a
dead faint.
There was a loud and rapid knocking at the door. Pelican went and
opened it.
"Oh, what is the matter? What in
Heaven's name is the matter?" cried
the head clerk, entering the room.
"Send for the police," said Pelican,
as he dashed a glass of water into
his  prostrate enemy's face.
And shortly afterwards the unhappy partnership of Messrs. Cratchard
and Pelican, Solicitors, was dissolved.
The Navy League
The annual meeting of the Victoria Branch of the Navy League held
in the Theatre on Thursday was as
large and enthusiastic as the one
which attracted such widespread attention last year. It is probable that
no other organization could ensure
so representative a gathering at the
present time, and it is certain that no
subject could arouse so much interest.
The occasion was chiefly noticeable
for one of those forceful and eloquent
addresses which Mr. Clive Phillips
Wolley delivers periodically in support of his pet scheme, and for an
even more forcibble impromptu address from Premier McBride. Indeed, the latter may be regarded as
one of the most important contributions which has been made to the discussion of Imperial defence. Mr.
McBride declared that Ottawa could
not go far enough to satisfy British
Columbians; that to a man they favoured that portion of the Federal
policy which provided for the laying
down of keels to eventuate in a Canadian navy, but that this must of
necessity be a matter of the future
so far as its practical assistance to
the Empire was concerned, and that
what the people wanted was an immediate contribution to the British
treasury, equal to the cost of at least
two or three Dread'.aughts. He further dwelt on the importance of providing dock-yards on the Atlantic and
the Pacific, without which war vessels
would be deprived of much of their
usefulness. The Premier's address
was couched in a serious and suggestive key and gave evidence of a
statesmanlike grasp of what he did
not hesitate to declare was essentially
an  Imperial  crisis.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Percy Walls, of
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the followine described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-west corner of Lot
206; thenee north 60 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence south' 60 chains;
thence east 40 chains to place of commencement, and containing 240 acres,
more or less.
Dated January 25th, 1910.
PERCY WALLS,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Speck, of Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted at the south-east corner
of S. Douglas'; thence, north 70 chains;
thence east 20 chains; thence south 70
chains; thence west 20 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 140
acres, more or less.
Dated  January  26th,  1910.
JOHN WILLIAM  SPECK,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Thrasher,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted besides J. W. Williams'
post; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 35 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 35 chains to place of commencement and containing 280 acres,
more  or  less.
Dated  January 26th,  1910.
ABRAM THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Bernard Ryan, of
Victoria, gentleman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains east and about
64 chains north of the north-west corner of Lot 252, Renfrew District; thence
south 64 chains; thence west 64 chains;
thence north 64 chains; thence east 64
chains to place of commencement, and
containing 409 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  4th,  1910.
BERNARD RYAN,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW  LAND  DISTRICT
District of Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird, Jr.,
of San Juan, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner
of Lot 109; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
T. M.  BAIRD, Jr.,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND   DISTRICT
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel Thrasher,
of Mosten, Sask., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:;—Commencing at
a post planted at the north-west corner of Lot 247, thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of commencement, and containing 320
acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th,  1910.
SAMUEL THRASHER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
RENFREW   LAND  DISTRICT
District uf Victoria
TAKE NOTICE that Lorenzo Alexander, of Victoria, gentleman, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Comment
ing at a post planted 4 chains west of
the north-west corner of lot 248; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 20
chains to place of commencement, anu
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated January 24th, 1910.
LORENZO ALEXANDER,
feb 26 J. W. Williams, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Steer, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted half a
mile east of the southeast corner of lot
397, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; therice east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less.:
JOHN STEER,
feb 26 Mathew Yeoman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, M. L. H. Steer, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect fpr coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mile east of the southeast corner
of lot 397, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing ahout 640
acres more or less.
M. L. H. STEER,
fab 26 Matheiy Yeoman,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mary Giguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal bn the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half ta mile east of the southeast corner of lot 397, being the southeast corner of land applied for; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 ohains,
to the point , of commencement, containing 640 acres wore or less.
MARY GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Auger, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
half a mile east of the northeast corner of lot 435, being the northwest cor-
near of land applied for; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
EMMA AUGER,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Richard Glguere,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one-half mile east of lot 435, the northeast corner of lot 436, being the northeast corner of land applied for; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
RICHARD GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Arcadus Giguere,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
miles east of the northeast corner of
lot 435, being the southwest corner of
land applied for; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
ARCADUS  GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
"*   SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Emma Giguere, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the northeast corner of
lot 435, being the southeast corner of
land applied for; thence nortn 80 cnains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
EMMA GIGUERE,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Mark Strong, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile east of the northeast corner
of lot 437, being the northwest corner
of land applied for; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
MARK STRONG,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter east of the northeast corner of lot 437, being the southwest corner of land applied for; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less. This
land lies east of north end of Kundls
Island.
FRANK DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Rose Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the northeast corner of lot
437, being the northeast corner of land
applied for; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
ROSE  DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Demers, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for permission to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter east of the
northeast corner of lot 437, being the
southeast corner of land applied for;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, to point of commencing,
containing 640 acres more or less. This
land lies 3 miles east of the north end
of Kumdis  Island,  Massett  Inlet.
JOHN  DEMERS,
feb 26 Mathew Yoeman, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, George Wheeler,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 365, thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 qhains; thence east 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
GEORGE  WHEELER,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Bert Pollard, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the
southeast corner of lot 355, thence soutli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
BERT POLLARD,
feb  26 John Demers,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph Boyle, of
Seattle, Wash.,  intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of A. P. No. 26768; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
JOSEPH BOYLE,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Gus. Wlncell, of
Seattle,  Wash.,  intend to apply  for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of A. P., 25768; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
GUS. WINCELL,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, James Mullin, of
Seajtle, Wash., intend to apply for a
lioerise to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the southeast corner of A.
P., 25768; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
JAMES MULLIN, I °
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, JoJhn Quinn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
T. L., 35388; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
JOHN QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Qulnn, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EWARD QUINN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Williams,
of Seattle, Wash., Intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile eost of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EDWARD WILLIAMS,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent,
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Parson, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described  lands:—
Commencing at a post planted one
mile east of the southeast corner of
lot 366, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
EDWARD PARSON,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, James Twait, of
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
JAMES TWAIT,
feb  26 John Demers,  Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Sam Lee, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 35G, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less.
SAM LEE,
feb  26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Minard Bachelor,
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for
a license to prospect for coal on tho
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted foar
miles east of the southeast corner of
lot 355, tiience south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
ot*  loss
MjINARD BACHELOR,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Edward Huff, ef
Seattle Wash., intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal ort the .following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and two miles south of the I
southeast corner of lot 365, thence nprth (
SO chains; thence east 80 Chains; thencel
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,!
to point of commencement, containing]
640 acres more or less.
EDWARD HUFF,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queer. Charlotte
Take notice that I, William Boyle, ofl
Seattle,  Wash.,   intend  to  apply  for  al
license to prospect for coal on the fol-l
lowing described  lands:— I
Commencing at a post planted south-1
east corner of T. L. No. 36388; thenftel
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;!
thence south 80 chains; thence, west 80|
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM BOYLE,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Joseph Cdurtney.l
of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply fori
a license to prospect for coal on the]
following described lands:— I
Commencing at a post planted four I
miles east and two miles south of the]
southeast corner of lot 365, thence south!
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thencel
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,!
to point of commencement, containingj
640 acres more or less.
JAMES COURTNEY,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I. Lloyd Allan, ofl
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for a I
license to prospect for coal on the fol-l
lowing described lands:— I
Commencing at a post planted four!
miles east and two miles south of the]
southeast corner of lot 365, thencel
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;!
thence south 80 chains; thence east SO]
chains, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
LLOYD ALLAN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Frank Morgan, ofl
Seattle, Wash., intend to apply for al
license to prospect for coal on the fol-"
lowing described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted twol
miles east and two miles south of thel
southeast corner of lot 366, thence north|
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence|
south 80 chains; thence west 80 ohains,]
to point of commencement, containing!
640 acres rribre or less.
FRANK MORGAN,
feb 26 JoJhn Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Claws Pearson, ofl
Seattle, Wash.,  intend to apply for a|
license to prospect for coal on the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted twol
miles east and two miles south of thel
southeast corner of lot 355, thence south!
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thencel
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,!
to point of commencement, containing]
640 acres more or less.
CLAWS PEARSON,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, Clarance Bald-|
win, of Seattle, Wash., intend to apply
for a license to prospect for coal on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east and two miles south of tha
southeast corner of lot 365, thence nortn
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thenca
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains]
to point of commencement, containing
640  acres  more or less.
CLARANCE BALDWIN,
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Queen Charlotte
Take notice that I, John Boyle, of Sel
attle, Wash.,  intend to apply for a ill
cense to prospect for coal on  the foil
lowing described lands:— J
Commencing at a post planted at thi
southeast   corner   of  T.   L.   No.   353881
thence north 80 chains; thence west 81
chains', thence south  80  chains;  thenci
east 80 chains, to point of commencer
ment, containing 640 acres more or lesa
JOHN BOYLE, '
feb 26 John Demers, Agent.

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