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Week Mar 14, 1908

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 ■7__T__*__T{__Tnnr_~_~rrr_Ti
\ Klngsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
EP  ■■.-.. iagjon and Real Estate Agenta.    „
suviUe, ".Vancouver, jj
EJUUUUULiJLaJUlAJUUUUUj
Victoria Edition
The Week
fl British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. G.
nrwrmrgg
R.CJaaim   a(
AUCTIONEERS
o  Stewart WillluM
1    WILLIAMS & JANION
i   « .
• REAL ESTATE AGE-ITS
0   f i PORT ST. VICTORIA, R. C.
^»aa8«88»t.»ig,»i,nim_____i_u^
Vol. V.   No. 7
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908
Onb Dollar Per Annum
The* Case
In a Nutshell.
It is rather unfortunate for
a  clear  understanding  of
the matters at issue that thc
case of the City against tho
Esquimalt   Waterworks    Company   and
against the B. C. Electric Railway should
have been raised at the same time, and
dealt  with  by   the   same   tribunal*—the
Private Bills Committee.   This could not
be avoided since the City had to frame its
bill as a Municipal measure embracing all
points upon which it sought Legislation.
The result has been to foster the impression that both Corporations are in the same
boat while as a matter of fact they have
nothing in common.    The City applied
for power to expropriate a certain piece
of property situate at Goldstream for the
purpose of acquiring a water supply.    On
this question Mr. McPhillips, the chairman of the Committee, exercised his undoubted legal right to vote twice, once as
an ordinary member of the Committee and
then as chairman to give a casting vote.
If Mr. McPhillips had not voted at all the
Committee would by a majority of one
have acceded to the request of the City and
would have passed the clause as it was
drafted, but by a deciding vote he ruled
in favour of the Waterworks Company
ancl threw out the clause.   It is only fair
to Mr. McPhillips to state that he has not
had any legal connection with that Company, but on the other hand has been fighting them for years as the legal adviser of
the B. C. Electric Railway.   However imprudent it may have been, and on this
point The Week is as firmly convinced as
ever for Mr. McPhillips to sit on this
Committee while the City Bill was before
it the suggestion of natural bias could
have no application to the case of the Esquimalt Waterworks Company.   With respect to the B. C. Electric Railway Mr.
McPhillips is and has been for many years
their legal adviser and is in receipt of a
retainer, therefore at no time can he be
I fairly said to be "indifferent" to their in-
! terests.   The application of the City with
respect to this Company was for authority
to utilize any water power they might
acquire for the generation of light and
heat and so practically to enter into competition with the Company.   The opposition of the latter to this proposal was not
based upon any specific protection in their
charter, which indeed gives them none, but
upon the broad ground that it would be
unfair for the City to enter into competition with a private enterprise.   The B. C.
E. R. has about $1,500,000 invested in
Victoria;   the whole of this money has
been raised in London; it has yielded but
a modest return.    There is no allegation
that its charges are excessive or that it is
not well managed and mindful of the public interest.    If it could be attacked on
any of these grounds it would certainly
have no case as against the application of
j the City, but it is easy to see that there
is a wide difference between competition
with   another  industrial  enterprise   and
competition with the City.    The latter
would be' an unequal contest and the contention of the Company is that if such
powers as the City sought are to be granted
they should only be exercised on condition
that the interests of the B. C. E. R. are
bought out at a fair valuation.   In other
words, they ask that the recognition of
"vested interest," which is one of the first
EDITORIAL
principles of English Law, should not be
denied them. When this matter was before thc Committee Mr. McPhillips did
not vote at all, although he took consid-
able part in the discussion. As the
matter now stands the City lost its opportunity of securing whatever Legislation
the House might have been willing to
grant if the Bill had gone before it, and
negotiation is the order of the day. With
respect to the two points at issue The
AVeek has never shifted its ground; it
believes and has always believed that the
only satisfactory and permanent solution
of the Water problem is to acquire the
property of the Esquimalt AVatenvorks
Company. It has reason to believe that
if negotiations were reopened through the
right medium far better terms could be
made than have yet been offered by the
Company, and such terms as would not
be considered unreasonable by the ratepayers. With reference to the B. C. Electric Railway The AA7eek believes that the
argument of that Company is a sound one,
and that it would not be right for a public
Corporation like the City to enter into
competition with a vested interest, against
which no complaint is made, upon terms
which would be unequal and therefore
unfair.
About two months ago The
Getting At AVeek made serious charges
The Facts.       against the management of
the Canadian Mexican Pacific Steamship Company.   These charges
wore so serious and so specific that to
ignore them was impossible if they could
be denied.   The Steamship Company chose
the former course.   Last week tlie Editor
received a communication from an important official in Mexico complaining of the
attack, and declaring that, in some respects
at any rate, it was inaccurate.    In order
to do full justice to the Company The
AVeek prints this letter with the exception
of one paragraph which constitutes a libel
on certain gentlemen who were erroneously suspected of having furnished the information upon which our editorial was
based.   With respect to Mr. Donly's letter
it is only necessary to say that The AVeek
unreservedly accepts his version of the
mutiny on the Lonsdale, since he was present, and his information is at first hand.
Witli his opinion as to the relations existing' between the Captain and his subordinates it is impossible to agree because
The AVeek has definite information to the
contrary, whicli thc sequel shows to have
been reliable.    This, however, does not
reflect upon Mr. Donly's opinion because
it is hardly likely that hc would be allowed to witness such conduct as is complained of.    In defence of The AA'eek's
comments it is only necessary to say that
a weekly review is justified in assuming
the correctness of a cable despatch which
appears in the Daily Press if it contains
no inherent improbability.    The mutiny
on the Lonsdale was cabled' all over the
world ancl was widely commented upon,
as it was in line with what The Week had
been led to expect there was no hesitation
in assuming its correctness.    The public
will scarcely derive much comfort from
the circumstance that out of a total of
forty only eleven mutinied, the hard fact
of the mutiny remains.    At this point
The Week would have been content to let
the matter drop but for something whicli
occurred  about ten days  ago.    On  tlie
arrival of the Georgia from her last trip
two of the Mates and the Purser were
peremptorily discharged, and within a
week the other two mates were "let out."
The reason for the former dismissals was
that on the previous return of the Georgia
to Victoria a written protest against the
seaworthiness of the vessel was lodged
with the Inspector; this was commented
on by The AAreek at the time. The method
of these dismissals may be only a detail
but as a straAV shows which way the wind
blows so it is in small matters that men
and corporations show their real character.
These officers Avere relieved, at any rate
so far as the Purser was concerned, by a
note handed to his successor without explanation or intervention of the Company.
In order that the public may understand
exactly how this precious steamship line
is managed and what risks are taken by
people who entrust their lives to its care
there will be found in our columns a detailed statement by an ex-officer of the
ship endorsed in every detail by three
other ex-officers. It far more than justifies everything The AAreek has said, and
should not only act as a warning to the
public but should ensure complete reorganization of the management and the removal of the incompetents who have
brought it into such disrepute. Perhaps
the strongest justification for the criticism
of The AVeek is to be found in the fact
that the General Manager, Captain T. H.
Worsnop, lias been recalled to England.
Meanwhile Mr. Charles Gear of Victoria
is managing the Company's affairs and
under his experienced and competent control it may reasonably be expected that
great changes will be made.
Paternal
Solicitude.
The Editor of the A'ictoria
Times has a pretty wit, also
a lively fancy, and withal a
tender strain of human sympathy.    One can hardly conceive of these
admirable qualities in conjunction with
the drudgery of political journalism.   To
a nature so constituted the duties of such
a position must be both uncongenial and
painful, and the life of such a man must
be a perpetual struggle between the fierce
vindictive spirit which urges him to flay
his political opponents and the gentle generous impulse to spare them.    As a natural consequence the victory is not always
on one side;   sometimes the demon ancl
sometimes the angel triumphs. On Thursday evening last it was the turn of the
angel.    Rarely has so touching and pathetic a tribute been paid to political antagonists as that which graced the editorial
columns of the Times under the heading
" .Ingratitude."   With this as a title, and
a poetical quotation as a text, the Times
proceeded to chant, or should it be to wail,
a dirge over the inhuman treatment supposed to have been meted out to Captain
Wolley and Mr. J. L. Beckwith by the
Conservative party.    So pained was the
local organ of Liberalism at the base ingratitude shown towards men who have
served the party conspicuously for many
years that it is hardly a figure of speech
to say that the editorial eye was dimmed
with tears as the editorial mind pondered
this latest illustration of "man's inhumanity to man."   Far be it from The AVeek
to suggest that this painful exhibition of
emotion   bore   any   resemblance   to   the
mythological story of Saurian lachrymos-
ity with which all are familiar, yet such
occurences are so rare in political life that
it would be an interesting occupation to
probe the mystery ancl focus the X-rays
of scientific investigation upon a heart of
such abnormality. In the absence of the
necessary appliances much is naturally
left to speculation and one wonders
whether this newly begotten sympathy for
Captain Wolley and Mr. Beckwith may
not be due to the fact that they were unsuccessful, albeit gallant, standard bearers.
One might speculate further whether the
expression of sympathy was not prompted
by the same generous impulse which has
led the Times to boost Mr. A. E. Mc-'
Phillips for a portfolio, and whether the
dearest wish of the editorial heart would
not b_> gratified if Mr. McPhillips had to
face his Island constituency on an early
date. It would be ungenerous to question
too deeply the motives which inspired so
rare an outburst of editorial emotion. Far
from condemning the author the public
will gratefully recognize so striking an
evidence of repentance for the long string
of vituperation which, when the demon
has been in the ascendent, has been so conspicuous a feature of the Times editorials.
There will be a general hope that the angel
will have as long an innings as his predecessor. It would be idle to speculate as
to the feelings of Captain AVolley and Mr.
Beckwith when they found a champion iu
such an unexpected quarter. It will be
amusing to watch the developments of this
newly awakened sympathy if either of
these gentlemen should be a candidate at
the Federal Election—a much greater possibility than the Arictoria Times wots of.
Enforce
The Law.
Proverbially he is an unskilful tactitian who gives
the    enemy    occasion    to
blaspheme.    This may be
putting the matter of the non-enforcement
of the law upon the lowest ground, although the argument will not lack point
in Canada,    On the other hand no good
citizen is willing to submit without protest to the ignoring of the laws of his
country.   Throughout the Dominion, but
more noticeably  than  anywhere else in
British  Columbia,   there  is conspicuous
laxity in the enforcement of certain laws
which are not perhaps very intimately
associated with the interests of life or personal property.    These matters have recently been under discussion in the Daily
Press and it will do no harm to emphasize
what has been very properly pointed out.
There is a widespread demand for the
better observance of the law governing the
protection of game.    Both shooting and
fishing are indulged in all the year round
without let or hindrance.    _N'ot that the
game wardens wink at this open defiance
of the law but that apparently they do
not cover the ground.    This is especially
the case so far as fishing is concerned.
Every day during the last week baskets
of salt and fresh water fish have been
brought into A'ictoria, and travellers who
come from the West Coast as well as from
the interior of the  Island tell of deer
shooting expeditions ancl the slaughter of
game for purely sporting purposes.   This
subject has been harped on so long by
those who are anxious to preserve tlie game
of Vancouver Island that it apparently
excites no interest.   All the same the present condition of affairs  is 1111 outrage
which calls for prompt ancl drastic treatment.   The remedy lies in strict enforcement of the law.    If there are not sufficient game wardens to ensure this their
numbers   should   be   increased;    if   thc
trouble   lies   elsewhere   the   Government
should turn their attention that way.
_ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
I want to plead guilty to an unpardonable sin, not by any means the
unpardonable sin, but one of minor
degree, which, after all is said and
done, may be classed with the venalities. For the third time I have misquoted a popular phrase much in evidence at this season of the year, and
that in spite of the fact that on each
occasion the editor has jumped on me.
The result is that I have made a mental resolve never to use it again, for
fear I might get kicked. Needless to
say, the phrase as I should have quoted it runs, "Fresh woods and pastures
new." I weakly used the colloquial
corruption and made it "Fresh fields
and pastures new," which, as well as
being verbally incorrect is obvioush
tautological and nonsensical.
There is only one reason why I do
not more seriously regret the slip. It
has brought letters of protest from all
parts of the Province; and the editor
who must share the blame, through
lack of vigilance, tells me that he has
been held up on the street by irate
literateurs. All this is very gratifying; it shows how widely the Lounger
column is read, how jealous its readers are for the reputation of its author, and what, after all, is of far
greater consequence, how many men
there are in the Province who are not
altogether absorbed in the pursuit of
the nimble dollar.
I hope it will not be thought that I
get free drinks, or free lunches, still
less free dinners, at the Empress Hotel. I beg to assure my readers that
such is not the case; my only excuse
for mentioning that splendid hostelry
so often is that I am anxious to see it
fill a public want, and realize all the
expectations which have been indulged in by its heartiest well-wishers. For this reason, I desire to point
out that the catering is far below th-:
standard of a hotel so exquisitely furnished and equipped. The only satisfactory item is the wine list, and as
an old country connoisseur in wines, I
must say they have been well selected,
the Rhine wines in particular being
exceptional for any but a private cellar. The meals are not as good as
can be obtained for less money at
three or four hotels and restaurants
in the city. To start first with the
afternoon tea, the flavour of the tea is
not what Victorians have been accustomed to. I do not know the brand,
and it may not be cheap, but it is certainly nasty; the cake is invariably
stale, and the toast is not fresh. Afternoon tea is either dainty and a
success, or it is an utter failure; there
is no middle course with this function.
In such a lovely room, and with all
accessories of luxurious society, a
"punk" tea is an anomaly for which
there is no excuse.
The dinner is worse. It lacks variety, and runs far too much on the
lines usually followed by a Chinese
cook, although I do not know, and :t
may not be a fact, that such is cm-
ployed. I dined there the other
night. With the single exception of
the potatoes, we had no fresh vegetables, but several varieties of canned
vegetables which my soul abhors
Canned Boston beans and canned
string beans, as an accompaniment to
roast lamb and roast turkey, cannot
be considered quite up to date. Then
everything was smothered in sauces
or gravies, to which, also, many persons object. In a $1.25 table d'hote
one would naturally expect a cours
of sweets. The only one on the
menu was the one which is sacred to
every two-bit eating house from the
Atlantic to the Pacific—apple pie
and that was so sweet that to me it
tasted like molasses. Most amazing
of all, there was no fruit. Now, these
may be sordid details, and the management may resent my criticism, but
I am araid I am case-hardened, and
I shall not let up as long as the Empress, which may reasonably be expected   to   set   a   decent   standard,
charges more than an ordinary hotel
or restaurant and gives a far inferior
meal.
The above is respectfully submitted to the consideration of the management, which can rely upon the
fact that it expresses what nine people out of ten who have patronized
the Empress are saying.
I have just had a chat with a lady
friend of mine who is in society, in
fact, she goes everywhere and knows
everybody. The subject of our con-
ersation was the attitude of society
towards the season of Lent. She made
the remark that naturally things were
very dull in the town, "that of course
there were no dances and the only
thing that goes on is Bridge." This
led to a discussion on the ethics of
Lenten observance, and neither of us
was able to throw even a glimmer of
light upon the principle which governs society in this connection. 1
do not want to be uncharitable, but 1
am convinced that the whole attitude
of society towards Lent is farcical.
The Church, and by that I mean practically every church, bans the dance
and its members accept the edict, but
Bridge goes on day and night for
small and large stakes, in scores of
instances absorbing nearly every min
ute of what should be one's leisure
breaking in upon social and domestic
duty, shouldering out of the way
numerous obligations, and in short
establishing itself as little less than
a mania.
I have no ambition to become ;
miniature Father Vaughan, least of all
to preach because it is Lent. Personally, I'dance, play Bridge, and go to
the theatre in Lent, but I claim to do
all in moderation. It is not any one
of these things which I am condemning, but the lack of consistency. But
then, who would expect consistency
from society? And what is consist
ency, anyway? And, once again, was
the old priest right who declared that
"the only abstinence of any value was.
that which really involved self-denial,"
and "the test of self-denial is a man's
willingness to deny himself that
which he most likes"?
On this basis there would be no
Bridge in Lent.
I was talking to a Manitoban who
has recently come to live in Victoria,
about the "hold-ups" which have varied the monotony of life during the
last few weeks. He tooK a novel and
somewhat refreshing view of the situation. Said he: "Barring the loss
of life, it is the best thing that ever
happened to Victoria; instead of
frightening people away, it will be »
first-class drawing card. Why, I know
half-a-dozen families from the prairies
who intended to settle here, but after
sampling it for a few months, found
it so dull that they went back. In my
opinion, it is deadly dull, and anything which stirs things up is a blessing in disguise. The hold-up game
stamps Victoria with the Western
spirit, and as soon as people on the
outside begin to realize that, instead
of being, as your stupid Tourist Association boasts—a little bit of England
on the Pacific—it is really a Western
town, people will not be afraid of
coining to live here." This original
reflection, taken in connection with
the Colonist editorial of Thursday
last on the subject of social exclusiveness in Victoria, is both suggestive
and illuminating. Things have certainly come to a pretty pass when a
sober-minded citizen finds it so dull
that a 'hold-up" is an entertainment.
I have had my say on social exclusiveness, and am glad to see that it
is bearing fruit. The Colonist, at its
usual three-monthly interval, is waking up and making the subject its
own—of course without acknowledgement. I trust, however, none the less
effectively, for, whether the Colonisl
knows it or not, it is a live issue, and
the explanation is not that ladies from
the prairies know so little of good
manners that they do not return first
calls, but that many ladies in Victoria
delay their first call so long that it is
an intrusion, if not a rudeness, to call
at all. There is no excuse for calling
upon a lady the first time a year aftei
her arrival; if she has a spark of womanhood, she will not return such a
call. I know several cases on a par
with this; in fact, as I said before, I
will not discuss the subject further
but every week brings complaints tc
this office from men who bitterly resent the treatment their wives have
received in this connection.
ofa
Not Fatal.
Shot through the heart was the youth,
But there were no tears of sorrow;
He lived to tell the tale, because
The wound was made by  Cupid's
arrow. —Chicago News.
His Failing.
"What an exasperating old cuss
Hewligus is in the matter of borrowing money!"
"Why, I thought he was well fixed.
I didn't suppose he ever had occasion
to borrow any."
"Great Scott! he doesn't. What I
mean is that it's exasperating to get
turned down every time you try to
borrow from him."—Chicago Tribune.
ARE YOU
COUGHING
YET????
It is unwise to let a Cough run
on, for frequent coughing naturally increases the irritation in
the bronchial passages. If you
are wondering what to , take,
suppose you try
BOWES'
BRONCHIAL BALSAM
It has relieved others and will
relieve you. We do not say it
will cure your cough in one
night, but a few days' use will
cure a long-standing hoarseness,
croup or bronchial cough. Recommended in all throat and
lung troubles, asthma, whooping cough, etc. Per bottle, 50c
only, at this store.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
rt*^^^^^***!
-Vb~*A
Rain
Coat
Weather
The Mas, who own. on. of our
awful Bain Coati, ha. no fear'
a. to what th. weather may he,
for If lt rain, he 1. protested—
if It ihlnei h. ha. a modiihly
modeled garment that play* th.
rele of a iwaffffer Light Weight
Overcoat.
BAIW   OB    SHINE
HE'S    WEM.    ATTIBED.
$10.00 to $25.00.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
1301   Qovernment   St.,    Victoria.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE «»3- VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE
THE REPUTATION OF
BEST
; James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
>    Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
\    The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
RADIGER & JANION, Sole AgraU for B.C.
)bej
:oria. J
*N3
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
Plows, Harrows, Seed Drills,
Etc.
Bain Wagons and Carts.
Brantford Carriages, Buggies,
Phaetons, Buckboards,
Spring Wagons and
Carts.
Petaluma Incubators.
Melotte Cream Separators.
e. g. prior & ee..
LTD.
LTT.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
5a Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manaeer.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming,
Aa experienced certificated staff available at atl times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
Investigate the
..
Cushman" flarine flotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
You can always      — -      —^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jVl#    D»     than othera-
eigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908
I Notes on
Provincial News
Conditions at Nanaimo.
There has been quite a little contest
between the powers that be on thc
subject of the unemployed at Nanaimo. Admittedly, some three or four
hundred miners have been thrown out
of work because stocks of coal in San
Francisco, are large. The Socialist
member more than a month ago urged
the Government to start public works
The municipal authorities, presumably on the supposition that relief
works would be a bad advertisement
tried to minimize the situation. They
got the ear of the Government, and
the order was cancelled. This led t(
great dissastifaction among the men,
who were not willing to starve in
order to save the reputation of Nanaimo. The denouement has been, what
everyone expected, a due recognition
by the Government that public work?
were necessary, and the starting of
three or four hundred men to build
roads. This should have been dont
in the first instance.
week. In view of this, it is not a little amusing to notice how that reputable organ struggles to minimize the
effect of his speech. It harks back to
the landslide of 1896, and then takes a
leap to the recent turnover in New
Brunswick, which it declares has had
a coalition for nearly thirty years.
Most people, including the leading
Liberal organs, freely concede a Conservative victory. "But," says the
News, "even if it be a Conservative
victory, it is of no importance; just
as the Conservative forces of British
Columbia counted as nothing in the
last provincial election, and could not
prevent the return of several Liberal
candidates." Just what the logic of
this comparison is, The Week fails to
see. A marvellous editorial, with an
eye only on the virtues of the Liberal
party at Ottawa, winds up with an appeal "ad captandum," to down the
"rubber" policy of Borden and the
"weak" men who flank him, as well
as the "jelly men" who cried in their
defeat of 1896, "Too much Tupper."
This method of disposing of an antagonist of the calibre of Sir Hibbert
Tupper, at least possesses the charm
of novelty.
Noblesse Oblige.
The Mayor of Cumberland has
never heard of the motto, "Noblessi
Oblige." At a recent meeting of the
Council he fell foul of the city clerk
in a manner happily rare in the annals
of public service. The press has very
properly condemned his conduct. It
might do worse than turn him over tt
the schoolmaster for a lesson in manners.
Socialist Candidate.
The Nelson News gives an interesting account of a meeting recently hel<
in the capital of the Kootenays, when
W. Davidson, of Sandon, made his
bow as Socialist candidate for the
Federal Parliament.. Mr. Davidson
was member for Spokane in the Local
Legislature until he was defeated by
the veteran, W. Hunter, at the last
provincial election. Mr. Davidson
must know that his chances of elec-
I tion are about one in a thousand, but
he will infuse a little excitement into
the contest, and will rob the Liberal
candidate of several hundred votes.
This is what the Socialists call educating the constituencies, and as long as
the workingmen are willing to pay for
the game, no doubt they can get it.
Coming Events.
It seems pretty certain that W. G.
Galliher will be the Liberal standard-
bearer for Kootenay in the next Federal election. It is not by any means
so certain who will represent the
Conservatives, but popular opinion is
about divided between the claims of J.
A. Harvey, of Cranbrook, and W. A.
McDonald, of Nelson. Either would
make an admirable candidate, and
would give "Big Bill" a hard run. The
selection should be made at once; the
sooner the man is in the field the
better.
Struck Bedrock.
Just as we go to press, Manager
MacKay of the Cambrian informs the
Leader that he has struck bedrock
with the shaft which he is sinking.
The shaft is 99 feet and is in 60 feet
of water and 39 feet of aluvial deposit.
Mr. MacKay is to be congratulated
for his energy and perseverance in
carrying this project to a successful
conclusion.—Moyie Leader.
Major rant to his heart's content.
And the Major ranted accordingly
"They scream," he went oh, "at
their friends, their lovers, their husbands. Bless you! Even scandal i;
shouted now."
"From the house-tops sometimes,''
put in the Other Man, with a quiet
smile.
"Ah, you may laugh," grunted th<
Major, "but it's the truth. The Eng
lishwoman used to be noted for he.
beautiful contralto tones in my young
days; but, now, ugh! she shrieks like
any suffragette on a Cabinet Minister's doorstep."
The Other Man was silent.
He was thinking of a little sixteenth
century parsonage hidden away
among the apple-blossoms in a faraway Devonshire hamlet, where someone lived who knew nothing of suffragettes or the strenuous life; or
for the matter of that, of the motor
voice either, and suddenly the longing
to be there grew so strong that even
the delights of the club paled into insignificance.
He jumped up as suddenly and
pulled out his watch; he had just
time to catch that train!
The Major's voice trailed after him
as he went: "The motor voice, I call
it," he was still asserting, triumphantly, delighted with his new-fount
phrase.
"But it's true, I'm afraid," sighed
the Other Man; and he sank back
comfortably on the cushions of the
"taxi" as two smart women passed
him, both discoursing at the very top
of their voices, the one of her winnings at bridge, the other of the beauties and super-canine intelligence of
her pet chow. And then all at once
as the taxi whirred its way down St
James' Street, he smiled contertedly
as he thought how very different
someone was. A. P. V.
Unsatisfactory.
Hyker—Troubled with indigestion,
eh? You should drink a cup of hot
water every morning.
Pyker—I do; but they call it coffee
at my boarding-house. — Chicago
News.
Free Text Books.
From every part of the Province a
note of satisfaction is heard at the
action of the Goevrnment in granting
free text books for the public schools
What this means will be realized
when it is remembered that in the
schools of British Columbia there are
32,000 scholars, and an estimate of $2
each per annum would be low for thc
cost of school books. The distribu
tion will commence at once, the first
book distributed being the reader
The provincial press, both Conservative and Liberal, is a unit in approving the action of the Government.
Back to the Land.
The editor of the Slocan Mining
Review wearies of pen-pushing, and
yearns for a bout of digging. In the
latest issue of his paper he pathetically asks: "Who'll buy? We will trade
the whole Review paraphernalia for a
$3,000 ranch on Slocan Lake." Don't
all speak at once. The Review editor
is not the only mortal who is weary
of handing out high-grade maxims to
an unappreciative public, and yearns
to get back to the land.
A Melancholy Romance.
Sad were the waves when he wooed
her;
Sad was her first batch of bread;
Sad were his thoughts on the morning
Sad irons she threw at his head.
—Lippincott's.
Kept Count.
Myrtle—What's the score?
Ethel—Eight to four.
Myrtle—You must be mistaken. I'm
sure I haven't seen more than three
men carried off the field.—Judge.
Well-Earned Promotion.
Ten years ago, and for ten years
before that, Mr. G. J. Bury was private secretary to Sir William Van
Home. Of the many able men wht
had filled that honourable position
none was more efficient or more cour
teous than Mr. Bury. In '97 he came
West; in '99 he was District Superintendent in Kootenay, with headquarters at Cranbrook; in 1902 he had
charge of the Long District on the
I prairies; in 1906 he was called to Winnipeg, to act as assistant to Mr. William Whyte; in 1908 he is appointed
General Manager of Western lines,
with head office at Winnipeg. This
puts him in direct succession for one
of the highest official positions in thc
gift of the company, and as he is yet
a young man there is no knowing
how far he may go. It is not impossible or indeed improbable that he
may go all the way. At any rate,
here's wishing him luck.
An Oasis.
The Fernie Free Press declares that
the Coal City is "an oasis in the Sahara of a dull West." It proceeds to
prove its contention by pointing to the
coal companies' pay roll of $185,000,
and the fact that there are few building lots left for sale in the city. It
declares that in the near future •_ will
be necessary to extend the boundaries.
It looks as if Fernie is just coming to
its own, and nothing is more gratifying than to notice that the old-timers
are reaping the reward of their confidence.
"THE MOTOR VOICE."
Sir Hibbert's Effort.
Even through the partizan spectacles of the New Westminster Daily
News, it is easy to see that Sir
Charles Hibbert Tupper had a great
reception in St. George's   Hall   last
"I hate the motor voice," said the
Major, sunning himself at the club
fire in approved fashion.
"The motor oice?" queried the
Other Man, in astonished accents.
"The motor oice," reiterated the
Major. "Came in with the motor and
the strenuous life, and—and all the
rest of it.
"Hang it, sir, there isn't one woman
in a million who knows how to talk
at all nowadays. They all shout, or
scream," he added, as an afterthought.
The Other Man, just home on leave
after a five years' sojourn in India
was silent. The joy of being "home"
was for the moment so great that it
dwarfed everything else. This wat
England, London, Clubland. What
did anything else matter?   He let the
How Adam Was Punished.
A prominent pastor tels this story
"I visited a cetrain school one day
where Bible instruction was part of
the daily course, and in order to test
the children's knowledge, asked some
questions. One class of little girls
looked particularly bright, and I
asked the tallest one: 'What sin did
Adam commit?'
" 'He ate forbidden fruit'
"'Right.   Who tempted Adam?'
" 'Eve.'
" 'Not really Eve, but the serpent.
And how was Adam punished?'
"The little girl hesitated and looked confused. Behind her sat a little
eight-year-old, who raised her hand
and said: 'Please, pastor, I know.'
"'Well, tell us. How was Adam
punished?'
'"He had to marry Eve.'"—Harper's Weekly.
Timely Death.
Pat—Begorra, 'tis luck for Dennis
that he died when he did.
Mike—An' why?
Pat—Because, bejabbers, the liv'ry-
men's raised the price of hacks yesterday.—Circle Magazine.
Cold Be Trusted.
"Trust her? You surely don't think
she could keep your secret?"
"Well, I've trusted her with other
things, and she kept them."—Pick-
Me-Up.
Rhine
WINES
We carry a full stock of "the
good Rhine Wines," both pints
and quarts. The following is
a partial list:
Laubenheim
Nierstein
Stein wein
Zeltinger
Hocheim Vintage, 1893
Liebfraumilch Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Moselle
Rudesheim Vintage, 1900
Berncastler Doctor
Johannisberg Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Hock
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
AU kind* of Building Materiel,
LUMBER
SBSH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victorin
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
TO HOME SEEKERS.
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by txcellent road. About 20
acres fenced, 10 acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft.
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale, $2,000, terms
to suit.   Box 162, Victoria.
^Stheatr
TUESDAY, MABCR X7TH
THE  XXBXE LA SHELVE 00
Presents
The Virginian
Dramatized by Owen Wister and Kirke
La Shelle, with
V.  S.  HABT
AS THE VIRGINIAN.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Saturday,
March 14th.
Prices:—50c, 75c, $1.00 and 91.50.
Mall orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
Y. IKI. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
VICTORIA
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Kasld»tlal aad D ly School ior Boyu
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent 011 Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Mscdonald, M.A., LL.D-
Principal
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according to size. Write for seed and tree
catalog.
JAY -ft CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. a
BEDDING
PLANTS
Ckeap Prices.   Get onr price lilt.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
THOMAS CATTERALL
Builder and General Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring, Office, Bank, Store and Saloon
Fittings.
Pile  Driving,  Wharves and  Dock
Shed constructed and repaired.
VICTORIA.
_________________ THB WBEK, SATURDAY MARCH 14, 1908
Incorporated 1905
Capital, $600,000.00|
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00|
Subscribed
Capital,     1550,000
Reserve .  . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907  .   .   $130,000!
3. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IB CLOSING UF ESTATES
•Ither as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forma furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TBUST CO.,
limited.
338 Basting1 Street, Weat,
Vancouver, B. O.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
♦THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83H Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
The Magic
Touch.
On my way to the editorial sanctum the other day, I overtook a lady
whom in the far distance I had mistaken for an Indian squaw; and mind
you, this does not involve any disparagement of the personal attractions and charm of the lady in question. My mistake arose from the fact
that she was carrying a huge bundle
wrapped in a multi-coloured shawl.
In reply to a question, she said that
she was on tramp to return numerous
articles which had been lent to her
when her house was burnt out last
week. Then she added the remark
which set me thinking and furnishes
the peg on which to hang this week's
column: "I had no idea until trouble
overtook me that I had so many
friends, and that there was so much
kindness in the world."
The Magic Touch is that of adversity or sorrow. It is the fashion to
rail at the world, to speak of it as
heartless or indifferent, to imagine
that people do not care, and that
outside the ties of consanguinity there
is no active sympathy. Of course this
is all wrong; in a general way, the
error of such a conclusion is demonstrated by every philanthropic institution, by every hospital, asylum, orphanage and refuge But public institutions do not appeal so much to the
individual as to the mass. It is possible to contemplate thc charity and
humanness exhibited in the foundation of a hospital without realizing
the personal element in the case.
But tliere is an experience which
draws people closer together, which
breaks down barriers and justifies the
dictum that "one touch of nature
makes the whole world kin." It is
through the gateway of suffering or
sorrow that human sympathy flows.
The experience of this lady, and her
optimistic remark, has set me thinking. It is so easy to be pessimistic
so easy to think that people do not
care, so easy to live with the set conviction that they are absorbed in their
own affairs and unmindful of their
fellows. Occasion explodes this theory, it teaches that while under ordinary circumstances these generalizations may be true, they are discredited
in emergency, and that is the point
I want to make.
There is an old adage with which
we are all familiar, "Mind your own
business. It is an excellent working
rule, and in the sense in which it is
ordinarily used is worthy of endorsation. We all resent prying curiosity,
and most men feel that the lifting of
the veil which covers their private
and domestic affairs should be left to
their own hand. The circumstances
under which advice or aid should be
proffered unsought are about equally
rare. Mankind, in the mass, has absorbed the philosophy of this truth,
and is inclined to be governed by it.
There are circumstances under which
the claims of common humanity impel
a right-thinking man to offer aid
when he knows, for instance, that
people are suffering in silence, and
that a pride, which can hardly be
called improper, will keep them silent
to the death; but such cases are the
exception.
As a matter of fact, the majority of
people, whatever their peculiarities oi
idiosyncracies, are only too glad to
render assistance to their fellows who
are in distress. It is a natural impulse, and one which has not been
overlaid by the veneer of civilization.
The community would ostracise any
man who close dhis heart to an appeal for help at such a moment. Experience shows that people vie with
each other to see how much they can
do and, within their means, how much
they can give to those who momentarily stand in need.
This impulse of kindliness is not
confined to any class; indeed, at such
times people of all sorts and conditions come forward with their contribution of material or personal aid
Nothing creates a more immediate
and dire necessity than a fire. In a
few minutes a family may be deprived
of everything they possess in the
world; in a moment of panic they
may despair, but in a few hours they
will find that all their pressing necessities have been provided for by the
generosity of their neighbours; in
many instances, kind-hearted people
to whom they have never spoken.
This has been so in Victoria time and
again, it was conspicuously the case
on the occasion of the big fire last
summer; within the experience of the
writer, it has been the case in every
part of Canada. In England, while
the same spirit prevails, it does not
manifest itself in quite the same way,
because there are so many more public institutions which share the duty
of dealing with emergencies and there
is so much more organized provision.
In Canada, the spirit is much more
manifest, and the fact is at once attributed to the solid, deep-rooted generosity of the people and to the quick
recognition of the fact that personal
effort must take the place of public
aid if it is to be effective.
Nothing is more striking than the
ineffectiveness of organized effort in
Canada. Our public bodies have nc
resource. If you apply to a mayor or
a chief of police, you will find that in
nine cases out of ten they are powerless to help, except along stereotyped
lines, which are ill-adapted to emergency conditions. In fact, an emergency is just the one thing with which
Canada has not been trained to cope.
We lack funds, initiative, and machinery. There is plenty of all these for
political purposes, but none, or next
to none, for charitable. This is a
great defect in our social polity, and
one which happily is neutralized by
the splendid spontaneous action of
the private individual.
As we live in a country of great
natural resources and of great potential riches, I am not sure that I would
have it otherwise. The spur to individual effort furnished by the existing
condition of affairs keeps alive in the
community the impulse to kindly
deeds. It is in reality but a phase of
a very broad question, none other
than that which lies at the root of
Socialism. Mr. Balfour has finely
said that as long as the world lasts the
highest enterprises and the noblest
deeds will spring from individual effort and personal initiative; and that
the substitution of a system of communal for individual responsibility
would extinguish the noblest impulses
of the race.
I think this sublime truth has one
of its aptest and most impressive
illustrations in the subject which I
have been discussing. In an age of
pessimism, in which, however, tin
clouds are already beginning to break
I find justification for the supremest
optimism in the unchanged hearts of
my fellow-men.
The Canadian Magazine.
Mr. Cy Warman, the well-known
author and journalist, writing on
"Prince Rupert" in the Canadian
Magazine, says:
"Prince Rupert is new and attractive. It is to be a model city in every
sense of the word. It guards what is
said to be the finest natural harbour
on the coast, if not in the world. It
is the terminal town of a transcontin-
tal railway which bids fair to surpass
anything ever yet attempted in the
way of railway construction on this
continent, crossing from ocean to
ocean wtihotu a single mile of mountain grade or grade that can by any
stretch of imagination be considered
au obstacle to the -conomici operation of the road. Prince Kupert is
also at the end of the long portage on
the shortest route around the world.
Any scheme which has for its ulti
mate object the swift circling of the
sphere must reckon Prince Rupert on
its right-of-way. The mineral wealth
of all that vast mountain region, the
forest products of Northern British
Columbia, as well as the food products of the Prairie Provinces and thr
fur of the far north—that is to say
all the export wealth of this resourceful Dominion originating north and
west of the South Saskatchewan
bound for the Orient by the Occidental route—will funnel down and pass
out by way of Prince Rupert."
Embarrassing Then.
"We'd have been robbed last night,"
said Miss Pechis, "if it hadn't been
for that bulldog papa bought the
other day."
"You don't say!" exclaimed young
Sparker.
"Yes, indeed; a bulldog is certainly
a good thing to have around."
"Well—er—yes, except around one's
coattails."—Philadelphia Press.
A Welsh View.
The incumbent of an old and historic church in Wales, who had been
showing a party of Americans around,
asked them to visit his parochial
school, of which he was very proud, in
the fond hope of a liberal donation.
After a recitation or two he invited
them to question the scholars, and
one of the party accepted the invitation.
"Little boy," said he to a rosy-faced
lad, "can you tell me who George
Washington was?"
"Iss, surr," was the smiling reply.
"He was a 'Merican Gen'ral."
"Quite right. And can you tell me
what George Washington was remarkable for?"
"Iss, surr. 'Ee was remarkable 'cos
'e was a 'Merican an' told the trewth."
The rest was silence—and it was
not followed by a donation.—Cassell's
Journal.
A Significant Title.
"Someone has written a play entitled 'The Girl Who Has Everything.' "
"Well?"
"Wonder  what  it's  about?"
"Sounds like it might be about the
hired girl and her numerous ailments."—Kansas City Journal.
A Scheme.
"I guess," said Mrs. Subbubs, "I'll
have to give a big dinner."
"What for?" asked her husband.
"It's the only excuse I can think of
to borrow back those fine plates I
loaned to Mrs. Naybor."—Philadelphia Press.
A Lost Art.
A Richmond housekeeper had occasion many times to employ a certain odd character of the town known
as Anne Cecelia Cromwell.
Why
Carry
An
Expensive
Watch?
when out shooting or fishing? Why risk its being knocked about
in the bush or seriously hurt by severe wetting? Campers and
fishermen should see our excellent lines of
Reliable Timekeepers at Low Prices.
We can recommend, because we have personally tested our
watches, at
$i.oo, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $2.75,
$3.00, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 and $6.50
Nurses' Watches a specialty. The up-to-date, correct kind, with
sweep second hand.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home I
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
"Old Black Joe", with their
touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can hea?
these cherished songs on the Victor, or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie","In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that:   These instruments bring right into your home beauri-
1 sacred selections; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars;
comic song-hits and minstrel humor; perfect dance music ; classic
mphonies—entertainment of every sort for every mood and every
occasion; and all to be heard at its best on the Victtr tr Berliner
-o-phone.
Any Vulot or Berliner dealer will gladly play
Victor Records for you.  Call and ask to bear
them, and get him to tell you about the
easy-payment plan. Write us far catalogue
—use the coupon.
S$ *\    H» Bw,lMr *■*)!■
\\%\    cww.ienidi.m
\\\       ■«■«•  608
The old woman had not been seen
in the vicinity of the house for a
long time until recently, when the
lady of the house said to her:
"Good morning, Aunt Cecelia. Why
aren't you washing nowadays?"
"It's dis way, Miss Annie," replied
Aunt Cecelia, indulgently. "I's been
out o' wuhk so long dat now, when
I could wuhk, I find I's done lost
mah tas'e fo' it."
"Yes," rejoined the demoralizer
"but it's one of the games of chanct
that clergymen do not try to discourage."—Philadelphia Inquirer.
Encouraged by the Clergy.
"Marriage," remarked the moraliz-
er, "is a lottery."
Thaw has taken to checkers as 1
means of making the time pass pleasantly. A man of checkered career, lit
should be proficient at the game.
The New York Times says that thc
way some men dress indicates that
their tailors don't know the difference between a fit and a convulsion. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
^©■■oo-oooooooooooooooooo-ooo-ooo^^
^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^^ >0-*»00000000'0<H>0000000<>0'00
ADD ATTRACTIVENESS
TO YOUR HOME BY USING THESE MATERIALS.
For as low as 20c per yard, we can offer you the very newest art designs in
Cretonnes. Don't confuse these art creations with the ordinary designed efforts,
because they are entirely different and much superior. These Cretonnes come from
the world's best maker;, who employ high-salaried artists and designers, and who
exert every possible effort to market each season the newest and nicest designs of the
year. Even with all this extra goodness the prices are, if anything, lower than before,
and certainly low enough to make their use more popular. For curtains, drapes, loose
covers, etc., etc., these Cretonnes and Chintzes are particularly adapted, and in the
great choice of designs and color combinations you will experience no difficulty in
finding something that will suit you and harmonize perfectly with the other furnishings.
In your plans for this Spring's cleaning changes, include some of these—at least, see
them on our Second Floor.
British Cretonne—A specially nice line
in a variety of pretty tapestry and
floral effects.    Splendid value at the
price marked, per yard 20c
British Chintz—Artistic designs on jas-
par ground. This style is suitable
for long curtains, 48 inches wide and
sold at, per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and conventional designs, that are bright and
cheerful, we show a splendid range.
Priced at, per yard, 35c, 30c and 25c
British Chintz—A fine range of pretty
and attractive designs in Green and
Yellow, Rose and Green, Pink and
Green, with blue ribbon.   Per yd. 40c
British Chintz—A very pretty and serviceable Chintz with artistic designs,
in various colorings on a jarper
ground, has a softening influence on
the whole effect. It makes the less
liable to soil, yet does not detract
from the daintiness. Price, per
yard  40c
A SPECIAL DISPLAY
Elaborate as have been our former showings of Lace Curtains this Spring's
offerings easily surpass every former attempt of ours. We have never before shown
such a large and complete assortment—positively the largest and best stock of Lace
Curtains in the West. This is "Curtain Time," and this should be YOUR store these
days. Come in and ask to be shown the new lace curtains and we promise you won't
be disappointed nor regret the few minutes spent in looking. We also promise you
curtain values not surpassed by any other store. Tremendous Cash purchases make
possible satisfyingly low prices.   SHOWN ON SECOND FLOOR.
Nottingham Lace Curtains—In these
curtains we have just unpacked more
than 60 new designs, and these with
our former splendid showing makes
an assortment of this style of curtain
that isn't equalled elsewhere. We
can promise you values that cannot
be duplicated, and in this range of
prices you will find something that
will surely suit you. Prices range
from, per pair, $14 down to  75c
Novelty Braided Curtains—This is a .
"new thing" in Curtains, and a style
we think you'll like very much. The
designs are uncommonly dainty and
pleasing. We have them in Arab and
White, and offer you a very special
value at, per pair  $5.00
Swiss Lace Curtains—In the Swiss line
we have just opened more than 50
new patterns in White, Champagne,
Ivory and Ecru shades. This excellent curtain is shown in a great
choice of designs and at a great price
variety. We have them at, per pair,
$30, down to  $3.50
Ariston Lace Curtains—This is a very
dainty curtain and the new styles
just unpacked are indeed pleasing.
A special weave makes a very strong
curtain, and you'll find this style an
excellent wearer. The Ecru and two-
tone effects are very pleasing. Price,
per pair, $6 down to $4.00
GET A STEP LADDER.
Don't run the risk of shattered
bones — "long suffering" remembrances of your Spring Cleaning—
through using chairs, boxes and improvised scaffolding, when safe, convenient, time and labor-saving step-
ladders may be purchased so reasonably low-priced as ours are.
These ladders are made of good
hardwood, screwed and bolter firlmy
and securely together. They are
specially constructed, with a view to
rigidity when extended and compactness when closed and not in use.
They are exceptionally strong and
steady—features you should look for
in stepladders. We stock a complete
range of sizes, and offer you a choice
ranging in size from five to twelve
feet at forty cents a foot. With step-
ladders priced so reasonably fair, why
take any chances with the chairs and
boxes?
A Splendid Showing of Centre Tables
In dainty Centre Tables we are at present offering a very complete range of styles at prices
that will surely appeal to the saving sense of the thrifty keeper-of-the-home. We stock a splendid variety in both Golden Quartered Oak and Mahogany and are listing here a few prices to
give you an idea of the moderate way in which we have marked these. We have them at
lower prices and higher also, giving you a choice of prices unequalled elsewhere.
Centre Table—An excellent low-
priced table in Golden Oak.
Top is square and measures
24x24 inches, polished to a
high finish; shelf underneath.
Shaped legs. Price, each
only    $3.50
Centre Table—Another Golden Oak style. This table
has round top, 24 inches in
diameter, polished. Shelf
beneath. A very neat style
and one that will please lovers of the plain. Price $5.50
style in either Quartered Go
Centre Table—We have this
style in either Quartered
Golden Oak or Empire Mahogany, and in either wood it
is a very stylish table. The
top is a polished round one,
24 inches in diameter. Price
is   $6.50
Centre Table—An oval shaped
style in Empire Mahogany.
Top is 18x28 inches. Has a
shaped shelf and shaped legs.
This is a very attractive
table and is splendid value
at the price, each $7.50
Centre Table—Made of selected Quartered Oak, finished
Golden. The top of this
table is square and measures
24x24 inches, and is highly
polished. Legs are plain
shaped.   Price, each ..$10.00
Centre Table—A dainty round
top style, in Golden Oak
Top measures 28 inches in
diameter and is highly polished. This is one of our
most handsome centre table
styles.    Price only ...$12.00
TRY A CHINA CABINET
A dainty and attractive China Cabinet makes a decided improvement in
the furnishings of any dining-room
—and it is useful, too. Don't hide
your collection of china bits, but let
them see light on the shelves of a
stylish  Cabinet.
The Third Floor Showroom is replete with a choice assortment of
these Furniture pieces. We offer you
a wide choice as to design, style of
finish and price, and we think we
have something to please most anyone. We have some new styles in
China Cabinets in Golden Oak and
in Early English Oak that are delightful. The assortment of Mahogany Parlor Cabinets contains some
very choice designs. Detailed descriptions would be of very little value
here—it's necessary to see the pieces
to appreciate their worth.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
Joooooooooooogooooooo^^
Sporting
Comment.
A Challenge.
The mechanical department of T.
R. Cusack's printing oflice hereby
challenge thc same department of the
Victoria Printing Company to a bowling match, to be played on or before
Saturday, March 21st, four men to a
side.
Owing to the fact that the first All-
Island vs All-Mainland football match
was played at Vancouver it is hard
to determine exactly how the Islanders lost but judging from the press
reports and from the observant ones
of those who witnessed the match it
is learned that the Islanders certainly had the better of the game in
fact a second goal was scored but a
foul had been called before the goal
was scored and it was not allowed.
From those who witnessed the game
it is learned that the majority of the
Islanders played a brilliant game
while others failed to make good and
in most cases those who did not compare with their team mates were
those whose selection I did not agree
with. This was certainly the case
on the part of Harley who played out
and although he did not leave the field
he weakened both the half-back division and the forward line as one
of the latter was compelled to drop
back in order to assist him. This is
not as it should be and for the next
game the selection committee should
be very careful of their decision. On
the forward line there was some signs
of favoritism and too much individual work and had there been more
open play the result might have been
different. On the half-back division
although Dufty and Johnson played
a hard game they were rather slow
for the fast forwards of the Mainland, but in spite of this Dufty played a much better game than McKinley would have done. In the back
division Hewitt was too impetuous
and was rather inclined to pl_<y forward than full back and it is to this
cause that the Mainlanders can attribute their lone score. It was on
the occasion of one of his journeys
down the field that he allowed the
opposing forwards to get in behind
him and when his partner went across
to stop the rush the ball was sent
flying across the wing with the result that an open shot was given on
the goal with the result that a tally
was registered. Although the Islanders failed to win the team this year
made a much better showing than
that of last season, which went down
to defeat, and after the showing of
last Saturday it will be almost impossible to make many changes in
the lineup, for the next match. Or
course there are players on the Island
at present who were not here when
the first match was played and their
presence might make a difference, but
it is safe to say that after Saturday's
game there will not be more than
two or three alterations at the most.
Many of the spectators claim that
the Islanders fared the worst at the
hands of the referee, but to the credit
of thc players it can be said that
there has yet to be a kick registered.
It is true that they lost a goal through
the action of the Mainland full back
who took the chance of a penalty kick
rather than a goal and also that they
were given a free kick in the penalty
area instead of a penalty kick, but to
these there were no protests made,
all being satisfied to win the game
on their merits rather than on a mere
technicality.
The   time  for  entering  teams   for
the People's Shield competition closes
in about ten days and as yet no entry
has been made from this city. The
committee which has been appointed
to govern the competition has suggested that only the winning teams
and runners up on th elsland ancl
Mainland should be allowed to compete but according to the rules any
team in Canada has the right to take
part and it is certainly up to some of
the local teams to enter. If some
arrangements could be arrived at
whereby one team could be entered
from this city to be selected from
all three clubs now taking part in
the league a combination could be secured that would make any other club
go some to win. I hope that those
in charge will make some effort to
bring about some such arrangement.
While on this subject I have to urge
the Island representatives to stand
out for more than two games. Ten
teams have already signified their intention of competing, which will necessarily mean nine games and with
two on the Island would give seven
to the Mainland. The Mainlanders
evidently forget where the championship of British Columbia rests at present and are rather inclined to overlook the Island. Their attention
should be firmly drawn to this matter
and it might be possible to teach
them that fair play is the making of
all sport.
taking part in the match, five with
Nanaimo and six with Ladysmith, the
majority of these players being registered only a few hours more than
required by the constitutions. This
according to the rules of the Island
Association, but whichever team
wins the championship will find itself
up against a hard proposition as none
of these recent importations will be
allowed to represent the Island clubs.
It is not too early to take steps to
bring this matter to a head at the
annual meeting and unless the practice is stopped it will have a serious
effect on football in British Columbia.
I am pleased to learn that arrangements have been completed between
the owners of the Oak Bay Park and
the Victoria Baseball Club whereby
the latter will occupy the grounds
this season. This means that Victoria
will bc represented by a ball team
that can worthily be called a Victoria
team and which will be able to compete with the best semi-professional
teams on the Coast. I hope that the
sport will receive the encouragement
that it deserves and the prmooters can
always count on any assistance that
can be rendered by The Week.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that 1, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for tho purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east UO chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
E. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissionei' of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
ut the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, SO feet
north of tho creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
00 chains; thence*eust 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place )4f
commencement. ,
Dated February  24th,  1908. R0
M. J. G. WHITE. V/
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agg"'
tit
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTftlQT
District of Coast, Range 1. '
TAKE NOTICE that I, the iHKM-r-
signed. intend to apply to the Hon.* Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Worlcs'Tor
the purchuse of the following described
lauds:—Commencing at a post planted
ono milo west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains;; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 6nalns;
thence south 60 chains back id p_i_:e
of commencement. ,_   ,
Dated February 22nd_,_1908.    '»>'   t0
March 14
C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
4________iai
The most important match in the
Tsland League series will be played
this afternoon at Ladysmith when the
Nanaimo team will endeavour to wrest
the championship from the present
holders. The game will be a very
hard one and further interest will be
given it by the recent acquisition,
to both teams. On the line-up for
Saturday it is expected that no less
than  eleven  cx-Mainlanders  will  be
The basketball match between thc
Bays and the Y.M.C.A. resulted in
a win for thc former by the narrow
margin of one point. Thc game was
fast from start to finish and there is
little to choose between the two
teams. The match attracted a large
attendance but it cannot bc said that
it was the largest crowd that ever
attended a game as a few years ago
as much gate money was taken iu
at thc Drill Hall at ten cents a head
as was done at the Assembly Hall on
thc occasion of this match at twenty-
five cents a head.
UMPIRE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAN^JiSfljpKi'r
District of Coast, Range. 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I. I th«d uHai*-
signed, Intend to apply to tlie ttpm CMpf
Commissioner of Lands anrt Works' Tor
the purchase of the following r(d«ts(ttr-*iW-l
lands:—Commencing at a post plantod
on the wost shore of ba*y";inSfTOv'6f
Jesso   Isla.nd,   one   quarter^^lge
^^___ __________■-- chttlqmotlioirfo
east 60 chains; thence south..60 chalng
north of Jesso Islnnd, run       ..
chains; thence north 60 chaiqmotihoirio
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chair
back to tho place of 001™^^^*^!."'
Dated February 22nd, 1908. " rn„.,rf
H. G. ANDERSON. •"",J^
March 14 C. G. JohnstonoeAerirtt.
 In mrl
Lawyer (examining juror)—EWyflti
understand the difference b'etWSftl
character and reputation? '"'
Juror—Reputation is the naiWe
your neighbours give you; charactdr
is the one they take from you.—Judge. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
*t_ir&r'A_,ot_*i<Atn_tr{_ A ■XmAr^TtlflTnUT
* Ilusic and      J
I   The Drama.*
^ipi'i'if^Pif^pifififii'i1
On Wednesday evening, Paul Gilmore was seen at the Victoria Theatre in an up-to-date comedy, "The
Wheel of Love," by George V. Ho-
bart. The best that can be said both
of Gilmore and the play is that they
served to pass the time. The actor
has probably never been seen to less
advantage, and certainly never in so
poor a play; it may be up-to-date, according to the American standard,
which seems to aim at the horse
laugh, but it was strangely devoid of
beauty, interest or art. Moreover,
Gilmore is rapidly degenerately into
a self-conscious matinee puppet.
From the moment the curtain rose,
until the end of the play, he was not
once natural, but stilted, stagey, and
melodramatic to a degree. When an
actor cannot deliver a curtain speech
with any nearer approach to naturalness than Gilmore exhibited, it is
time to stop taking curtain calls. A
few years ago I thought he had in
him the makings of a decent actor;
on Wednesday I felt, and the opinion was shared by many to whom I
spoke, that he had sunk to the level
of a mere puppet. He has ability and
experience, but badly wants taking
in hand by a candid friend. On Wednesday he played to a large house,
and at least pleased the  gallery.
Bispham helped to make 'Danny Dee-
ver" popular by his dramatic rendition, and this little popular classic has
sold to the drum-beat of twenty thousand copies.
The New Grand.
Manager Jamieson's programme at
the New Grand this week is in several
respects an exceptionally good one.
Young Buffalo, the sensational
marksman, certainly lives up to his
reputation, and is about as skilful as
any performer of the kind I have
seen. Vera O'Neill's College Boys
give a very good musical singing and
dancing specialty. Senor De Domin-
icis is a cornetist of exceptional ability; the other turns are quite up to
the average, although I cannot claim
to have that special gift which enables one to appreciate the comedy
sketch, "The Bowery Bud," but it
seemed to suit the audience, and I
suppose that is sufficient. Large
houses are the order of the day—and
night.
Next week's bill will be headed by
Gardner and Maddern, in a comedy
sketch entitled "Too Many Darlings,"
and will also include Katherine Nugent, last in Victoria with "The College Widow" company, in an entertaining act, which includes some admirable imitations of various vaudeville celebrities, and a pretty little
child's song in a very juvenile way;
the Regal Trio, composed of Messrs.
Murphy, Andrews and Parker, singers and comedians; Paul M. Bell and
Rena Washburn, in "The Johnnie and
the Chorus Girl" (Miss Washburn is
a Mohawk Indian and will sing in
her native tongue); the Grace Tempest Trio, with James Dunn and Stanley Warner, introducing singing
dancing and specialties; Leonard and
Ward, character change comedians;
Thos. J. Price, singing the illustrated
song, "A Little Cosy Flat," and new
moving pictures, entitled "The Bargeman's Child" and "The Rolling Bed."
Walter Damrosch.
Walter Damrosch, whose coining to
the Victoria Theatre before the end
of the season, with the New York
Symphony Orchestra, is awaited with
interest, has had such a busy life
as conductor, organizer and lecturer,
that his talent for composition has
not been used as much as his friends
would have liked. His really great
works are an American opera on
Hawthorne's "Scarlet Letter," which
hc composed and produced successfully, and a beautiful Manila "Te
Dcum," which he wrote in honour of
Dewey's victory. And who hasn't
heard of "Danny Deever," not so
broad in scope, but fairly "great"
nevertheless? Damrosch liked Kipling's poem. He wisely waited until
he was in the proper mood, and then
caught the atmosphere to perfection.
The Virginian.
"The Virginian," as dramatized by
Owen Wister and Kirke La Shelle,
from Mr. Wister's stirring and widely
read novel of the same name, is to
be the bill on Tuesday, March 17, at
the Victoria Theatre.
The book has been bought by more
than a half million of people, and it
is probable that each of these copies
has been read at least five times. This
is unusual popularity, even in this
day of big selling novels, and it
would be the almost unanimous verdict of this vast host of raeders that
there have been few modern American stories that have more richly merited success than has this realistic
romance of the ranches. It is doubtful if the appearanec of any dramatization since that of "The Prisoner
of Zenda" has been awaited with
more eagerness by local fiction-lovers than is this play made from "The
Virginian," and this fact is only one
indication of the exceptional hold
which this story has taken upon its
readers.
With the evident intent of fixing in
literature for al time that fast-disappearing, if not extinct, and wholly
picturesque type of being, the American cow-puncher, Mr. Wister has
given in "The Virginian" a character
study that seems to have satisfied all
demands of fancy regarding our
Western range rider. The hero,
though born in Virginia, has lived
for years in Wyoming and is in perfect sympathy with the peculiar
manifestations of civilization that obtained in that region during the '70s'
and '8o's, when cattle raising was the
only business, cattle stealing the only
crime and lynching the only evidence
of law and order. Speaking of the
cowboy as a type, the author says:
"He was romantic—whatever he did,
he did with all his might. The bread
that he earned, he earned hard, the
wages that he squandered, were
squandered in a night—'Mowed in,' as
he expressed it. . . . His wild kind
has been among us always, since the
beginning: a young man with his
temptations, a hero without wings."
In the character of the Virginian,
Mr. Wister has given a composite
picture of the cowboy—all the good,
the noble, the brilliant fascination and
daring that might enter into the personality of a right-hearted man in
such wild surroundings. At the same
time the ugly things about him are
told without squeamishness; for this
wild West man swears like a pirate,
smokes, drinks, assists at lynchings,
"kills his man," and at the same time
is as gentle as a lamb and as peace-
loving as a dove.
For a heroine, there is a pretty
pink-and-white little schoolma'am
from Vermont, who has certain strict
puritanical ideas about shooting and
other cowboy practises; but in the
end the Virginian wins her heart, in
spite of his grammatical sins and
others too numerous to mention. This
love story, marked as it is by many
clashes between her puritanical conscience and his Western instincts,
and jeopardized at every turn by
amusing episodes and alarming adventures, forms, of course, the nuder-
current of the plot, and a more absorbing romance has not been unfolded in this country for these many
years.
The virtues of the story have all
been carefully preserved in the transition from book to play, and the immense love of the book's readers for
the hero and the girl of his heart is,
it would seem, almost certain to be
shared by those who see their stage
embodiment.
In a play of atmosphere as "The
Virginian" is, the selection of a cast
is a matter of the most vital import
ance, and thc Kirke La Shelle Company spent many days before it perfected the excellent organization now
playing "The Virginian." W. S. Hart,
who is playing the title role, is said
to be to all intents and purposes the
Virginian himself, except that he is
an actor instead of a cowboy. Frank
Campeau will be in his original role of
Trampas. Many of the principals of
the New York cast will appear during
the engagement here.
MOMUS.
Readvertised from The Week of Oct 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north from the northeast eorner of T.L. 11,892; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 120 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO., LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chatns;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or lesB.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located  January  26,   1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD  NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 aeres,  more or
Located January  25.  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;   640  acres,  more or  less.
Located January  29,   1908.
TTNINGHAM VERB PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted  at the S.W.  eorner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAT,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap.    Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and   wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be  given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert Quaislno Sound.
TAKE NOTICB that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICB that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line Intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point Intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
& PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
NBW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG _ ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the foUowing described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 86, township 6, Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
6, and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTBAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dee. 16th, 1907.
W. N. CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1298, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 aeres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described  lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.B. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
 Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that Marie Philippi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thenoe
north 80 chains; thence east 80 ehains;
thence south 80 ehains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 16th, 1908.
MARIB PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George a Watson,   of   Fort   Steele,   B.C.,   occupation!
Miner, intends to apply for a special |
timber  licence over  the  following  described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about I
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of |
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80*
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1% miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 10 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 mlles
west of Fort St. James on the south
Une of timber licence staked ln my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. IS GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICB that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point Intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north Une of seotion  10.
ENOCH A WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent THE WBEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
Correspondence.
,,rhe Week accepts   no   responsibility
ir the views expressed by its corres-
indents.
ifThe columns of The Week are open
I1 everyone for the free expression of
1 leir opinion on all subjects which do
Ifct involve religious controversy.
■■Communications will be inserted
Ifcether signed by the real name of
l__ writer or a nom de plume, but the
|{„ltar's name and address must be
liven to the editor as an evidence of
|$>na fides. In no case will it be
I'Jvulged without consent.
A REMEDY.
J;'o the Editor of The Week,
ly Dear  Sir,—Much    has   been   said,
J nd   written,   during   the   last   few
l-ionths with reference to the influx
Jf Japanese and Chinese into British
ll
Columbia.
The Natal Act has been passed by
Hie Provincial Legislature, which
urely, when one reads Section 95 of
he British North American Act, was
waste of time, expcept, perhaps, to
raw the attention of the Dominion
[louse to the fact that the time has
rrived when something must be
one to stop the overflowing of Brit-
';h Columbia with these aliens.
Surely, a far surer remedy—and
ne I have never heard discussed—
es within the powers of our Provin-
ial Legislators, i.e., tax the corpora-
ons, companies, and individuals em-
Joying Chinese or Japanese labour,
nd thus get at the root of the evil,
.r if these aliens cannot obtain work
hey will surely cease to come.
I say make it cheaper for those giv-
g employment to hire people of our
if/n race.
Thanking you for allowing me to
ke  up  so  much   of  your  valuable
ace, I remain,
Yours truly,
E. H. H. B.
Hazelton, B.C., Feb. 18, 1908.
" BOBS."
lhe Editor The Week,
I Dear Sir,—In your very interesting
linegyric of Wales and Welshmen,
lnt claim "Bobs" as a Welshman.
Jobs" is not Welsh, never was; he
|>mes from an old Irish family, and
fond is he of his Irish descent that
Is title reads, Earl Roberts of Kan-
|har, Pretoria, and Waterford (Ire-
?d), the latter owing to his family's
lig connection with Waterford.
(Roberts himself was born in India,
lucated in England, and entered the
pngal Artillery.
(Barring the fact that among others,
le City of Cardiff presented its free-
|m to Lord Robert, I doubt if ever
was in Wales.
ICannot you Welshmen name some
Itive-born sons, reared in some of
lur beautiful valleys, or coming un-
Ir the influences of Snowdon and
kder Idris, than poach on other
Itionalities for your really great
pn, simpl ybecause the names have
jpseudo Welsh synonym?
■If the conceit of some of the small
lincipalities were knocked away,
len their men would be truly great,
It what with Scotland's "Burns" and
Jiw Wales' "Bobs," it's time to call
■halt, and admit that no country has
I claim above another; each and all
foduce great men, and you, Mr.
ditor, can rest assured that the
ttion that produces the greatest,
lakes the smallest boast—there is no
ped for it.
Yours truly,
J. F. O'REILLY.
I New Westminster, March 12, 1908.
I P.S.—It is not the hen that cackles
le most that lays the largest egg.
IE TRUTH ABOUT THE CANA-
)IAN-MEXICAN STEAMSHIP
LINE.
The cause   of   the   complaints on
lard   the   Canadian-Mexican-Pacific
lamship Georgia was the neglect to
Ive   remedied   certain   complaints
liich had been reported time   after
|ie to the captain by the officers in
arge of each part of the ship, restively.    Finally, in the beginning
January,   1908,  seeing that  these
iplaints were   to   be   disregarded
tin, the officers of the ship, except-
lf only the captain and the chief en-
lieer, drew up and '..anded in to the
lovincial   Government  inspector,   a
statement of defects, and prayed for
a survey of the ship. This was done
just before the official sailing time of
the ship for Mexico. The inspector,
after two or three hours' delay, came
aboard, but went in the first place, not
to the officers, who had called the
survey, but to the captain's room,
where they discussed the matter with
the master and the general manager.
After much discussion, the officers
were called in, and asked if they were
prepared to take the consequences of
their action should it be proved that
they were in the wrong, to which they
unanimously answered that they were.
The complaints made by the officers
were as follows:
(1) Inability to sound bilges.
(2) Bad order of windlass.
(3) Bad order of steering gear
(hand- and steam-).
(4) Bad order of life-saving appar-
With regard to the first complaint,
it was found there was no sounding
pipe from the maindeck in No. I
hatch, this having been cut off in the
'tween decks, evidently some considerable time ago; in No. 2 hatch, the
pipe was choked for about 10 feet
and had been for a considerable period; No. 4, the pipe was choked for
10 feet.
The windlass was continually
breaking down and giving trouble,
and was entirely unreliable.
The steering gear had broken down
twice in three days; first, in the Narrows, leaving Vancouver, when the
vessel very nearly went ashore; secondly, when leaving New Westminster, when the vessel narrowly escaped from another bad accident.
On the first occasion it took three
hours' work with iron wedges, sledge
hammers and a copious supply of coal
oil to get the hand-gear connected
sufficiently to steer the vessel. At
Manzanillo, again, on the voyage
north, the steam-gear again broke
down; and at Mazatlan, in the same
voyage, the windlass also broke down
One lifeboat and 25 per cent, of the
lifebelts were absolutely useless.
None of the lifeboats had been in the
water, or in fact, off their chocks
since the last survey in July. No fire
or boat drill was ever held since the
vessel has been on the Coast.
The general results of the survey
were as follows: The sounding pipes
were in the condition stated. That
the life-saving apparatus was not li.
good order. With regard to the wind
lass, the surveyor did not see this
worked by steam, neither did he see
the hand-steering gear shipped and
tried, merely taking the master and
chief engineer's word that these were
all right.
Complaints of passengers were rife
as to the discourtesy of the master,
dirty state of the saloon and saloon-
cabins, filthy condition of saloon-
galley, which was also used for the
preparation of the food for the Chinese crew. Complaints had also been
made at times, both by officers and
passengers, of the unwelcome visitations of bedbugs.
The master is a very young man,
on the ship's articles 26 years of age,
and came out to this coast with the
ship as mate under Captain Henderson. On the latter's resignation, on
account of the state of affairs, Captain
Forbes took charge. Since then, matters on board have been getting steadily worse. In the beginning of September, 1907, Mr. A. Bucknell was
second mate. In Mazatlan he was ta
come on anchor-watch at 12, midnight, but had not been called. Captain Forbes came to his room _t
12.15, and confined him for the rest
of the voyage. For the remainder of
the trip, Mr. Stacey, third officer, was
the sole officer who navigated the
ship, nobody checking his calculations. The master has never been in
the habit of taking sights since his
appointment.
Mr. F. McNeill, H.B.M. consul at
Colima, Mex., complained repeatedly
concerning the incivility of the captain, the disgustingly dirty condition
of the culinary department, and of the
fact that there were no lifebelts in
any of the staterooms aft. This also
was the case in the officers' ro'.ms
The lifebelts were stowed in a chest
on the fore bridge, to which access
was hard, and in the forepeak, both
Valuable
Timber Sections
For quick sale, IS licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20,000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre.
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
Are You Going
To Build?
fcitt#, 1 111
*   'aia.-.'JfcJiigr^--
A $2,800 Home.
Plans of this beautiful home
only $30.00. Full set of working
drawings and specification prepaid. Send 5 cents for booklet
on "Homes."
E. STANLEY MITT0N
Architect    ■    VANCOUVER, B.C.
PACIFIC COAST  GROWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.   No Scale.   No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds   that  GROW.
Bee   Supplies,   Spray  Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Westminsted   Road
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
places being at Ihe opposite end of
the ship from the pasesngers.
Mr. W. Musgrave, of Victoria, analyst, also complained of incivility, as
well as numerous other passengers.
The general manager, Captain T. H.
Worsnop, appeared to be at loggerheads with everyone, from Vancouver
to Salina Cruz, owing to his unfortunately aggressive and overbearing
manner. He has since been recalled
to England.
On one occasion, a well-known
merchant of Vancouver sent a consignment of 500 tons of coal for sale
on the Mexican coast. For this consignment no B|L, or way bills, were
handed to the purser, and no attempt
to sell the coal was made, yet there
is an excellent market for coal at any
Mexican port on the west coast. This
500 tons was simply carried round and
brought back.
Since the vessels arrived in the
north this voyage, numerous alterations and repairs have been effected
on all the heads complained of in the
officers' petition.
Improving.
Doctor—Has your husband had any
lucid intervals since I was here last?
"Well, this morning he kept shouting you were an old fool and he tried
to break the medicine bottles."—Life.
WEEK, MARCH 16.
The New Grand
MLLIVAN A CtMIIIH,    Pr.prl.tom.
M*«ag«m.M of IteiT. JAMIIMB.
GARDNER and MADDERN
Comedy act, "Too Many Darlings"
KATHERINE NUGENT
Singing Comedienne
REGAL TRIO
Murphy, ndrews and Parker
Singers  and  Comedians.
PAUL M. RENA
BELL and WASHBURN
Musical    Comedy,    Singing    and
Dancing Sketch.
GRACE TEMPEST TRIO
with
James Dunn and Stanley Warner
Singing and Dancing Act
LEONARD and WARD
Character Change Comedians.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"A   Little   Cosy   Flat."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The  Bargeman's  Child"
"The Rolling Bed."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ot house)....l»o
Bvenlngi, Balcony  Mo
Lower Floor tOe
Boxes   Me
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
LADIES        MEDICAL   OBXTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Batbs
VIBRATOR  TBEATKEXT
HB.     BJOBHFELT,     SWEDISH
HABBEtm.
Special  Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1429.
A Victorian
Definition of a Kiss.
One man's definition of a kiss is
"a pleasure smack." It's needless to say this man is a sailor.
Another Victorian's definition
of a pleasure smack is "a glass
of Allsopp's Pale Ale." Everybody enjoys a glass of the
famous Burton-on-Trent XXXX
—the best that's brewed.
On draught at all the leading hotels, bars, clubs and cafes.
If your dealer is unable to
supply you with a keg for home
consumption, kindly 'phone the
importers and distributors.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THB
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal  in  the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA. B.C.
Leavt Your Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 24*.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500 a Year
ee e
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.   Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
2?. $5?   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
_______
■M THE WEBK, SATURDAY MARCH 14, 1908,
* Social and        *
J Personal, t
if *
TTTTTTT'M'TTT'i'
Mr. and Mrs. Hilton left for Alberni during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Gordon Mason, Vancouver, is
visiting relatives in the city.
* *   *
Mrs. Roberts, Kuper Island, is
staying with  Mrs. Stewart  Williams.
* *   *
Dr.   O.   M.   Jones   returned   from
Vancouver last Sunday.
* *   *
Mr. A. T. Goward returned from
thc Mainland hist Monday, where he
had been spending a few days.
* *   *
Mrs. King left during the week for
Salt Spring Island, and is the guest of
her daughter, Mrs. Keith Wilson.
* *   *
Miss Kate Gaudin left for Vancouver last Monday, where she intends
spending a couple of weeks.
Mrs. W. F. Bullen and Mr. Harry
Bullen have left on a pleasure trip, to
be spent in California.
The Misses Humphreys have returned from California, where they
havc been spending the winter.
Mr. and Mrs. Trotter Johnston, of
Duncans, are enjoying a short holiday in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Ross entertained a large number of friends at the Empress last
Saturday afternoon.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy, of Westholme, has been the guest of Mrs.
Stevenson, Burdette avenue, during
the week.
•j-.   *   *
Mrs. Stephen Phipps passed
through Victoria en route to Chemainus, where she is the guest of her
father, Mr. Maitland Dougall.
* *   *
Mrs. Charles Pooley, Esquimalt,
gave a most delightful 'five hundred"
party on Wednesday evening, live
tables. The spacious drawing-room
was very sweet with its masses of
spring flowers and pretty ferns. The
first prizes were carried off by Mrs.
Matson and Mr. Coles. The competitors were: Mrs. Rithet, Mr. and
Mrs. Matthews, Mr. and Mrs. Coles,
Mrs. Matson, Mr. J. Harvey, Mrs. J.
Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. Innes, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Pooley,
Captain Hughes, Mr. J. Musgrave,
Miss T. Monteith, Mr. R. Monteith,
Mr.  H.  Pooley,  Miss  Violet  Pooley
and Mr, C. E. Pooley.
* *   *
The "Five Hundred' Club enjoyed
a very pleasant afternoon last Tuesday, when it met at the residence of
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Churchill. There
was some very exciting and close
play, Mrs. Gibb finally proving herself the fortunate owner of the very
pretty prize. There were five tables
in all, the competitors being: Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Tye, Mrs. Crowe-
Baker, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Herman
Robertson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs.
Gordon, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Savage,
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. McBride, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. C. Todd. The tea-table,
which had a beautiful centrepiece of
pale pink carnations and fern, in a
beautiful silver bowl, was presided
over by thc Misses Monteith, Pooley,
Blackwood, Savage, Newling and
Arbuthnot.
Still Better.
"Did you ever see this one?" inquired the funny man, "You can take
two letters from 'money' and leave
only one.    See how it's  done?"
"Sure," replied the postal clerk,
"and if I wanted to I could take
money from two letters and leave
absolutely nothing."
Envious of the Immune.
Little Henri (at the table to the
visitor—I wish I were like you.
Visitor (flattered) — Why, little
man.
Little Henri—Because no one boxes
your ears when you eat with your
fingers.
Almost An Insult.
"What's the matter, Algy?"
"Why, dash it all, that big girl over
yonder, don't ye know, she asked me
if I had a powder rag with -me!"
Charged To Him.
"Dear," began Mrs. Spender, coo-
ingly, "would you consider opals unlucky?"
"I would," replied her husband
shrewdly, "if I got a bill for some and
had to pay it."
Not His Kind.
Mr. Nodd—I don't think much of
that toy bank you got the children.
Mrs. Nodd—What's the matter
with it?
Mr. Nodd—Why, I worked over it
all the evening and couldn't open it.
Precarious.
"You say you kin teach me to
write?"
"I can."
"So's I kin make a livin' at it?"
"Yes."
"Why don't you make your livin'
that way, mister?"
"My friend, to be candid with you,
I don't care for that kind of a living."
Truth Will Prevail.
A schoolmaster was trying to explain the meaning of the word "conceited."
"Now, boys," he said, "suppose that
I was always boasting of my learning
—that I knew a good deal of Latin
for instance—or I said that I was a
handsome man, what would you say
I was?"
"A liar, sir!" was the ready response.
Henry James is revising his earlier
novels, in the earnest hope of making them less intelligible to the ordinary reader.
NEW WESTMINSTBB LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mlle from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
ehains; thence south 60 chains; thenee
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Bllnklnsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
0. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
Change in Time Table
On Beacon Hill, Spring Ridge, Outer Wharf and Douglas St.
Routes. Commencing Monday, March gth, 1908, a 12-minute service will be given on these routes, as under:
First Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 6 a.m.
First Car leaves Outer Wharf to City 6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 11.35 p.m.
Last Car leaves Outer Wharf to City  11.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale  6.00 a.m.
First Car leaves Cloverdale to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale 11.35 p.m.
Last Car leaves Cloverdale to City n.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Beacon Hill   5-57 a.m.
First Car leaves Beacon Hill to City  6.06 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter
Last Car leaves Government St. to Beacon Hill 11.35 P-nl*
Last Car leaves Beacon Hill to City 11*45 P-m*
First Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge  6.03 a.m.
First Car leaves Spring Ridge to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge 11.35 p.m.
La-t Car leaves Spring Ridge to City 11.45 P-m.
SUNDAYS—Cars give same schedule after 9.00 a.m., but cease
running one hour earlier.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
B. C ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., LIMITED
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHO TO-ENQRA VERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
SIS Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
p
[ill bNl -5   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever
DB. T. FELIX FOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAU'x'IFIEB
Purifies as well as Beautifies the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste it to be sure lt is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET
FOWDEB
For Infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 35 cents, by mail.
OOUBAUD'S FOUDBE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Frioe $1.00, by mall.
FBED T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York City.
AT KENDEBSON BEOS., Distributors.
Vancouver aud Victoria, B.O.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co,
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
"The Post" is the
King of
Fountain Pens.
The best self-filling, self-
cleaning pen manufactured in
the world. It is simple, reliable
and durable — positively non-
leakable. To fill it, you merely
dip the pen in the ink, draw out
the plunger and it is ready for
use.
No up-to-date traveller, tourist, merchant, business man or
business woman can afford to
dispense with the "Post," the
Pen of all Pens for busy people.
Every pen guaranteed.
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHEHIST
Government Street, Victoria
near Yates.
If You Keep Lent You Should Keep These
Relished alike by the Epicurean Saint and the Epicurean Sinner,
therefore good things to have on hand:
Bismarck Herring, per tin  65c
Russian Caviar, per tin 35c and 65c
Toono Fish, per tin  35c
Eels in Jelly, per tin  50c
Machonochie's Smoked Haddocks, per tin  25c
Machonochie's Preserved Bloaters, per tin  25c
C. & B. Herring and Shrimp Sauce, per tin  25c
C. & B. Fresh Mackerel, per tin  25c
Mackerel in Oil, per tin  30c and 40c
Fillets of Herring, per tin  25c
Curled Anchovies, per bottle  35c and 65c
Anchovy Rings in Oil, per tin  25c
Prawns in Aspic, per jar  50c
Spiced Anchovies, per keg   40c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
For a Private
Dinner
or a little supper after the theatre, take your wife or friend to the
POODLE DOG
Our soups, fish, steaks, chops, game, etc., accompanied by a col
bottle, will be appetizers long to be remembered.
old
-WE CATER TO CONNOISSEURS.
-EXPERT PROMPT SERVICE.
The Poodle Dog Hotel
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Has turned my cheerless den into a real 'dulce domum.' Gas is
no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. lyrsrrrrirYYsTSTisToTrifrryo-iTQ
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
iCommission and Real Estate Agents.
860 Granville, Vancouver. 3
|JlJL«_9JUUUUUUUUAAJUJUL'IJUUIAJ
Vancouver Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
SQ mnnrmnnr mnmnr j« 11 _. t_ e
»   Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
j°    WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
■
a
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FO*T ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
Wi-U^AiSUUUlAJUUUJUUUUt
for,. V.    No. 7
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908
One Dollar Per Annum
It is rather unfortunate for
The Case &  clear  understanding  of
. a Nutshell,   the matters at issue that the
case of the City against the
Esquimalt   Waterworks   Company   and
lagainst the B. C. Electric Eailway should
lhave been raised at the same time, and
Idealt   with   by  the   same   tribunal—the
■Private Bills Committee.   This could not
■be avoided since the City had to frame its
■bill as a Municipal measure embracing all
Ipoints upon which it sought Legislation.
iThe result has been to foster the impression that both Corporations are in the same
boat while as a matter of fact they have
lothing in common.    The City applied
for power to expropriate a certain piece
of property situate at Goldstream for the
lnirpose of acquiring a water supply.    On
this question Mr. McPhillips, the chair-
jman of the Committee, exercised his undoubted legal right to vote twice, once as
an ordinary member of the Committee and
(then as chairman to give a casting vote.
If Mr. McPhillips had not voted at all the
Committee would by a majority of one
lave acceded to the request of the City and
vould have passed the clause as it was
Irafted, but by a deciding vote he ruled
tn favour of the Waterworks Company
ind threw out the clause.   It is only fair
Mr. McPhillips to state that he has not
liad any legal connection with that Company, but on the other hand has been fighting them for years as the legal adviser of
pe B. C. Electric Eailway.   However im-
orudent it may have been, and on this
fcoint The Week is as firmly convinced as
fever for Mr. McPhillips to sit on this
Committee while the City Bill was before
It the suggestion of natural bias could
liave no application to the case of the Esquimalt Waterworks Company.   With respect to the B. C. Electric Eailway Mr.
McPhillips is and has been for many years
their legal adviser and is in receipt of a
retainer, therefore at no time can he be
fairly said to be "indifferent" to their interests.   The application of the City with
taspect to this Company was for authority
(to utilize any water power they might
acquire for the generation of light and
|heat and so practically to enter into com-
oetition with the Company.   The opposition of the latter to this proposal was not
Ibased upon any specific protection in their
[charter, which indeed gives them none, but
[upon the broad ground that it would be
lunfair for the City to enter into competition with a private enterprise.   The B. C.
E. has about $1,500,000 invested in
/"ictoria;   the whole of this money has
been raised in London; it has yielded but
modest return.   There is no allegation
that its charges are excessive or that it is
piot well managed and mindful of the pub-
interest.    If it could be attacked on
liny of these grounds it would certainly
lave no case as against the application of
lhe City, but it is easy to see that there
Is a wide difference between competition
jvith  another  industrial  enterprise  and
lompetition with the City.    The latter
■vould be an unequal contest and the contention of the Company is that if such
lowers as the City sought are to be granted
lhey should only be exercised on condition
that the interests of the B. C. E. E. are
Lought out at a fair valuation.   In other
Lords, they ask that the recognition of
'vested interest," which is one of the first
EDITORIAL
principles of English Law, should not bo
denied them. When this matter was before the Committee Mr. McPhillips did
not vote at all, although he took consid-
able part in the discussion. As the
matter now stands the City lost its opportunity of securing whatever Legislation
the House might have been willing to
grant if the Bill had gone before it, and
negotiation is the order of the day. With
respect to the two points at issue The
AVeek has never shifted its ground; it
believes and has always believed that the
only satisfactory and permanent solution
of the Water problem is to acquire the
property of the Esquimalt Waterworks
Company. It has reason to believe that
if negotiations were reopened through the
right medium far better terms could be
made than have yet been offered by the
Company, and such terms as would not
be considered unreasonable by the ratepayers. With reference to the B. C. Electric Eailway The Week believes that the
argument of that Company is a sound one,
and that it would not be right for a public
Corporation like the City to enter into
competition with a vested interest, against
which no complaint is made, upon terms
whicli would be unequal and therefore
unfair.
Getting At
The Facts.
About two months ago The
AVeek made serious charges
against the management of
the Canadian Mexican Pacific Steamship Company.   These charges
were so serious and so specific that to
ignore them was impossible if they could
be denied.   The Steamship Company chose
the former course.   Last week thc Editor
received a communication from an important official in Mexico complaining of the
attack, and declaring that, in some respects
at any rate, it was inaccurate.    In order
to do full justice to the Company The
AA'eek prints this letter with the exception
of one paragraph which constitutes a libel
on certain gentlemen who were erroneously suspected of having furnished the information upon which our editorial was
based.   With respect to Mr. Donly's letter
it is only necessary to say that The AVeek
unreservedly accepts his version of the
mutiny on the Lonsdale, since he was present, and his information is at first hand.
With his opinion as to the relations existing between the Captain and his subordinates it is impossible to agree because
The AVeek has definite information to the
contrary, which the sequel shows to have
been reliable.    This, however, does not
reflect upon Mr. Donly's opinion because
it is hardly likely that he would be allowed to witness such conduct as is complained of.   In defence of The AVeek's
comments it is only necessary to say that
a weekly review is justified in assuming
the correctness of a cable despatch which
appears in the Daily Press if it contains
no inherent improbability.    The mutiny
on the Lonsdale was cabled all over the
world and was widely commented upon,
as it was in line with what The Week had
been led to expect there was no hesitation
in assuming its correctness.    The public
will scarcely derive much comfort from
the circumstance that out of a total of
forty only eleven mutinied, the hard fact
of the mutiny remains.   At this point
The A\7eek would have been content to let
the matter drop but for something whicli
occurred  about ten  days  ago.    On  the
arrival of the Georgia from her last trip
two of the Mates and the Purser were
peremptorily discharged, ancl within a
week the other two mates were "let out,'-
The reason for the former dismissals was
that on the previous return of the Georgia
to Victoria a written protest against the
seaworthiness of the vessel was lodged
with the Inspector; this was commented
on by The AVeek at the time. The method
of these dismissals may be only a detail
but as a straw shows which way the wind
blows so it is in small matters that men
and corporations show tlieir real character.
These officers were relieved, at any rate
so far as the Purser was concerned, by a
note handed to his successor without explanation or intervention of the Company.
In order that the public may understand
exactly how this precious steamship line
is managed and what risks are taken by
people who entrust their lives to its care
there will be found in our columns a detailed statement by an ex-officer of the
ship endorsed in every detail by three
other ex-officers. It far more than justifies everything The AAreek has said, and
should not only act as a warning to the
public but should ensure complete reorganization of the management and the removal of the incompetents who have
brought it into such disrepute. Perhaps
the strongest justification for the criticism
of The AVeek is to be found in the fact
that the General Manager, Captain T. H.
Worsnop, has been recalled to England.
Meanwhile Mr. Charles Gear of Victoria
is managing the Company's affairs and
under his experienced and competent control it may reasonably be expected that
great changes will be made.
Paternal
Solicitude.
The Editor of the ATictoria
Times has a pretty wit, also
a lively fancy, and withal a
tender strain of human sympathy.   One can hardly conceive of these
admirable qualities in conjunction with
the drudgery of political journalism.   To
a nature so constituted the duties of such
a position must be both uncongenial and
painful, and the life of such a man must
be a perpetual struggle between the fierce
vindictive spirit which urges him to flay
his political opponents and the gentle generous impulse to spare them.    As a natural consequence the victory is not always
on one side;   sometimes the demon and
sometimes tlie angel triumphs. On Thursday evening last it was the turn of the
augel.   Barely has so touching and pathetic a tribute been paid to political antagonists as that which graced the editorial
columns of the Times under the heading
"(ingratitude."   With this as a title, and
a poetical quotation as a text, the Times
proceeded to chant, or should it be to wail,
a dirge over the inhuman treatment supposed to have been meted out to Captain
Wolley and Mr. J. L. Beckwith by the
Conservative party.    So pained was the
local organ of Liberalism at the base ingratitude shown towards men who have
served the party conspicuously for many
years that it is hardly a figure of speech
to say that the editorial eye was dimmed
with tears as the editorial mind pondered
this latest illustration of "man's inhumanity to man."   Far be it from The AVeek
to suggest that this painful exhibition of
emotion   bore   any   resemblance  to   the
mythological story of Saurian lachrymos-
ity with which all are familiar, yet such
occurences are so rare in political life that
it would be an interesting occupation to
probe the mystery and focus the X-rays
of scientific investigation upon a heart of
such abnormality. In the absence of the
necessary appliances much is naturally
left to speculation and one wonders
whether this newly begotten sympathy for
Captain AVolley and Mr. Beckwith may
not be due to the fact that they were unsuccessful, albeit gallant, standard bearers.
One might speculate further whether the
expression of sympathy was not prompted
by the same generous impulse which has
led the Times to boost Mr. A. E. McPhillips for a portfolio, and whether the
dearest wish of the editorial heart would
not be gratified if Mr. McPhillips had to
face his Island constituency on an early
date. It would be ungenerous to question
too deeply the motives which inspired so
rare an outburst of editorial emotion. Far
from condemning the author the public
will gratefully recognize so striking an
evidence of repentance for the long string
of vituperation which, when the demon
has been in the ascendent, has been so conspicuous a feature of the Times editorials.
There will be a general hope that the angel
will have as long an innings as his predecessor. It would be idle to speculate as
to the feelings of Captain AVolley and Mr.
Beckwith when they found a champion in
such an unexpected quarter. It will be
amusing to watch the developments of this
newly awakened sympathy if either of
these gentlemen should be a candidate at
the Federal Election—a much greater possibility than the Arictoria Times wots of.
Enforce
The Law.
Proverbially he is an unskilful tactitian who gives
the    enemy    occasion    to
blaspheme.    This may be
putting the matter of the non-enforcement
of the law upon the lowest ground, although the argument will not lack point
in Canada.    On the other hand no good
citizen is willing to submit without protest to the ignoring of the laws of his
country.    Throughout the Dominion, but
more noticeably than anywhere else in
British  Columbia,  there  is conspicuous
laxity in the enforcement of certain laws
which are not perhaps very intimately
associated with the interests of life or personal property.    These matters have recently been under discussion in the Daily
Press and it will do no harm to emphasize
what has been very properly pointed out.
There is a widespread demand for the
better observance of the law governing the
protection of game.    Both shooting and
fishing are indulged in all thc year round
without let or hindrance.    .Not that the
game wardens wink at this open defiance
of thc law but that apparently they do
not cover the ground.    This is especially
the case so far as fishing is concerned.
Every day during the last week baskets
of salt and fresh water fish have been
brought into A'ictoria, and travellers who
come from tlie West Coast as well as from
tlie interior of the Island tell of deer
shooting expeditions and thc slaughter of
game for purely sporting purposes.    This
subject has been harped on so long by
those who are anxious to preserve the game
of Vnncouver Island that it apparently
excites no interest.   All the same tlie present condition of affairs is an outrage
which calls for prompt and drastic treatment.   The remedy lies in strict enforce
ment of the law.    If there are not sufficient game wardens to ensure this their
numbers  should   be   increased;    if  the
trouble  lies  elsewhere   the  Government
should turn their attention that way.
i TTTT?. VRffr    Ci-rnnniv  -kit ad^u
THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 14, 1908
Incorporated 1905,
Capital, $500,000.00
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,     $550,000
Reserve .  . $60,000
Surplus, Jan. 30,
1907   .   .   $130,000
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IN CLOSING UF ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TBUST CO.,
limited.
328 Hasting Street, West,
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83H Qovernment Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street....Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
The Magic
Touch.
On my way to the editorial sanctum the other day, I overtook a lady
whom in the far distance I had mistaken for an Indian squaw; and mind
you, this does not involve any disparagement of the personal attractions and charm of the lady in question. My mistake arose from the fact
that she was carrying a huge bundle
wrapped in a multi-coloured shawl.
In reply to a question, she said that
she was on tramp to return numerous
articles which had been lent to her
when her house was burnt out last
week. Then she added the remark
which set me thinking and furnishes
the peg on which to hang this week's
column: "I had no idea until trouble
overtook me that I had so many
friends, and that there was so much
kindness in the world."
The Magic Touch is that of adversity or sorrow. It is the fashion to
rail at the world, to speak of it as
heartless or indifferent, to imagine
that people do not care, and that
outside the ties of consanguinity there
is no active sympathy. Of course this
is all wrong; in a general way, the
error of such a conclusion is demonstrated by every philanthropic institution, by every hospital, asylum, orphanage and refuge But public institutions do not appeal so much to the
individual as to the mass. It is possible to contemplate the charity and
humanness exhibited in the foundation of a hospital without realizing
the personal element in the case.
But there is an experience which
draws people closer together, which
breaks down barriers and justifies the
dictum that "one touch of nature
makes the whole world kin." It is
through the gateway of suffering or
sorrow that human sympathy flows.
The experience of this lady, and her
optimistic remark, has set me thinking. It is so easy to be pessimistic
so easy to think that people do not
care, so easy to live with the set conviction that they are absorbed in their
own affairs and unmindful of their
fellows. Occasion explodes this theory, it teaches that while under ordinary circumstances these generalizations may be true, they are discredited
in emergency, and that is the point
I want to make.
There is an old adage with which
we are all familiar, "Mind your own
business. It is an excellent working
rule, and in the sense in which it ii
ordinarily used is worthy of endorsation. We all resent prying curiosity.,
and most men feel that the lifting of
the veil which covers their private
and domestic affairs should be left to
their own hand. The circumstances
under which advice or aid should be
proffered unsought are about equally
rare. Mankind, in the mass, has absorbed the philosophy of this truth
and is inclined to be governed by it.
There are circumstances under which
the claims of common humanity impel
a right-thinking man to offer aid
when he knows, for instance, that
people are suffering in silence, and
that a pride, which can hardly be
called improper, will keep them silent
to the death; but such cases are the
exception.
As a matter of fact, the majority of
people, whatever their peculiarities oi
idiosyncracies, are only too glad to
render assistance to their fellows who
are in distress. It is a natural impulse, and one which has not been
overlaid by the veneer of civilization.
The community would ostracise any
man who close dhis heart to an appeal for help at such a moment. Experience shows that people vie with
each other to see how much they can
do and, within their means, how much
they can give to those who momentarily stand in need.
This impulse of kindliness is not
confined to any class; indeed, at such
times people of all sorts and conditions come forward with their contribution of material or personal aid
Nothing creates a more immediate
and dire necessity than a fire. In a
few minutes a family may be deprived
of everything they possess in the
world; in a moment of panic they
may despair, but in a few hours they
will find that all their pressing necessities have been provided for by the
generosity of their neighbours; in
many instances, kind-hearted people
to whom they have never spoken.
This has been so in Victoria time and
again, it was conspicuously the case
on the occasion of the big fire last
summer; within the experience of the
writer, it has been the case in every
part of Canada. In England, while
the same spirit prevails, it does not
manifest itself in quite the same way,
because there are so many more public institutions which share the duty
of dealing with emergencies and there
is so much more organized provision.
In Canada, the spirit is much more
manifest, and the fact is at once attributed to the solid, deep-rooted generosity of the people and to the quick
recognition of the fact that personal
effort must take the place of public
aid if it is to be effective.
Nothing is more striking than the
ineffectiveness of organized effort in
Canada. Our public bodies have nc
resource. If you apply to a mayor or
a chief of police, you will find that in
nine cases out of ten they are powerless to help, except along stereotyped
lines, which are ill-adapted to emergency conditions. In fact, an emergency is just the one thing with which
Canada has not been trained to cope.
We lack funds, initiative, and machinery. There is plenty of all these for
political purposes, but none, or next
to none, for charitable. This is a
great defect in our social polity, and
one which happily is neutralized by
the splendid spontaneous action of
the private individual.
As we live in a country of great
natural resources and of great potential riches, I am not sure that I would
have it otherwise. The spur to individual effort furnished by the existing
condition of affairs keeps alive in the
community the impulse to kindly
deeds. It is in reality but a phase of
a very broad question, none other
than that which lies at the root of
Socialism. Mr. Balfour has finely
said that as long as the world lasts the
highest enterprises and the noblest
deeds will spring from individual effort and personal initiative; and that
the substitution of a system of communal for individual responsibility
would extinguish the noblest impulses
of the race.
I think this sublime truth has one
of its aptest and most impressive
illustrations in the subject which I
have been discussing. In an age of
pessimism, in which, however, thi.
clouds are already beginning to break.
I find justification for the supremest
optimism in the unchanged hearts of
my feliow-men.
The Canadian Magazine.
Mr. Cy Warman, the well-known
author and journalist, writing on
"Prince Rupert" in the Caradian
Magazine, says:
"Prince Rupert is new and attrac
tive. It is to be a model city in every
sense of the word. It guards what is
said to be the finest natural harbour
on the coast, if not in the world. It
is the terminal town of a transcontin-
tal railway which bids fair to surpass
anything ever yet attempted in the
way of railway construction on this
continent, crossing from ocean to
ocean wtihotu a single mile of mountain grade or grade that can by any
stretch of imagination be considered
au obstacle to the ■conomiL»» opera
tion of the road. Prince Kupert is
also at the end of the long portage on
the shortest route around the world.
Any scheme which has for its ulti
mate object the swift circling of thc
sphere must reckon Prince Rupert on
its right-of-way. The mineral wealth
of all that vast mountain region, the
forest products of Northern British
Columbia, as well as the food pro
ducts of the Prairie Provinces and the
fiif of the far north—that is to say
all the export wealth of this resourceful Dominion originating north and
west of the South Saskatchewan;
bound for the Orient by the Occidental route—will funnel down and pass
out by way of Prince Rupert."
Embarrassing Then.
"We'd have been robbed last night,"
said Miss Pechis, "if it hadn't been
for that bulldog papa bought the
other day."
"You don't say!" exclaimed young
Sparker.
"Yes, indeed; a bulldog is certainly
a good thing to have around."
"Well—er—yes, except around one's
coattails."—Philadelphia Press.
A Welsh View.
The incumbent of an old and historic church in Wales, who had been
showing a party of Americans around,
asked them to visit his parochial
school, of which he was very proud, in
the fond hope of a liberal donation.
After a recitation or two he invited
them to question the scholars, and
one of the party accepted the invita*
tion.
"Little boy," said he to a rosy-faced
lad, "can you tell nie who George
Washington was?"
"Iss, surr," was the smiling reply,
"He was a 'Merican Gen'ral."
"Quite right. And can you tell me
what George Washington was re
markable for?"
"Iss, surr. 'Ee was remarkable 'cos
'e was a 'Merican an' told the trewth."
The rest was silence—and it was
not followed by a donation.—Cassell's
journal.
A Significant Title.
"Someone has written a play entitled 'The Girl Who Has Everything.' "
"Well?"
"Wonder what it's about?"
"Sounds like it might be about the
hired girl and her numerous ailments."—Kansas City Journal.
A Scheme.
"I guess," said Mrs. Subbubs, "I'll
have to give a big dinner."
"What for?" asked her husband.
"It's the only excuse I can think of
to borrow back those fine plates I
loaned to Mrs. Naybor."—Philadelphia 'Press.
A Lost Art.
A Richmond housekeeper had occasion many times to employ a certain odd character of the town known
as Anne Cecelia Cromwell.
Why
Carry
An
Expensive
Watch?
when out shooting or fishing? Why risk its being knocked about
in the bush or seriously hurt by severe wetting? Campers and
fishermen should see our excellent lines of
Reliable Timekeepers at Low Prices.
We can recommend, because we have personally tested our
watches, at
$i.oo,  $1.50,  $2.00,  $2.50, $2.75,
$3.00, $4.00, $4.50, $s.do and $6.50
Nurses' Watches a specialty. The up-to-date, correct kind, with
sweep second hand.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Sentimental Ballads
On The
Victor-Berliner
Gram-o-phone
Who doesn't enjoy the dear
old songs of heart and home!
Such melodies as "Home Sweet
Home", "The Old Oaken
Bucket","Auld Lang Syne" and
VWi        "°^      °k Joe"' witk *keif
\ »\P        touching beauty and power!
No matter where you live you can heav
these cherished songs on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone
—sung and played as you never heard them sung and
played before; with famous soloists and the most celebrated
bands and orchestras to bring out their rich harmony and
sentiment in full perfection.
Besides the old-time favorites, you can hear on the
Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phoHe the newest sentimental
ballads—"'Neath the Old Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie", "In
the Evening by the Moonlight, Dear Louise", and all the
other popular successes.
More than that: These instruments bring right into your home beautiful sacred selections ; grand opera numbers by the w rld's greatest stars 5
comic song-hits and minstrel humor; perfect dance music ; classic
symphonies-
ntertainmeht of every sort tor every mood and every
and all to be heard at its best on the VUttr tr Berliner
Gram-o-phone.
_, \   x* *■$ ^
\    \    'y'feUfc'   —use the coupeta.
a\ \ \ \'* *\   THI Btrflwr _rm*itm.
\\\\N<&\_   ***«SBTui
\x \ \ ,\\ \     "ft1?11" 6P9
■ V«_v
Any Vulot or Berliner dealer will g'adly play
Victor Records for you.   Call and ask to hear
them, and get him to tell you about the
easy-payment plan. Write us for catalogue
The old woman had not been seen
in the vicinity of the house for a
long time Until recently, when the
lady of the house said to her:
"Good morning, Aunt Cecelia. Why
aren't you washing nowadays?"
"It's dis way, Miss Annie," replied
Aunt Cecelia, indulgently. "I's been
out o' wuhk so long dat now, when
I could wuhk, I find I's done lost
mah tas'e fo' it."
Encouraged by the Clergy.
"Marriage," remarked the moraliz-
er, "is a lottery."
"Yes," rejoined the demoralizer
"but it's one of the games of chanct
that clergymen do not try to discour*
age."—Philadelphia Inquirer.
Thaw has taken to checkers as ;
means of making the time pass pleasantly. A man of checkered career, ht
should be proficient at the game.
The New York Times says that the
way   some men dress indicates   that
their tailors  don't know   the   differ-]
ence between a fit arid a convulsion. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
Kooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-ooooooooooooo^^
SO*00©00000-CK>*000*00*<_^^
ADD ATTRACTIVENESS IIA SPECIAL DISPLAY
TO YOUR HOME BY USING THESE MATERIALS.
For as low as 20c per yard, we can offer you the very newest art designs in
Cretonnes. Don't confuse these art creations with the ordinary designed efforts,
because they are entirely different and much superior. These Cretonnes come from
the world's best makers, who employ high-salaried artists and designers, and who
exert every possible effort to market each season the newest and nicest designs of the
year. Even with all this extra goodness the prices are, if anything, lower than before,
and certainly low enough to make their use more popular. For curtains, drapes, loose
covers, etc., etc., these Cretonnes and Chintzes are particularly adapted, and in the
great choice of designs and color combinations you will experience no difficulty in
finding something that will suit you and harmonize perfectly with the other furnishings.
In your plans for this Spring's cleaning changes, include some of these—at least, see
them on our Second Floor.
Elaborate as have been our former showings of Lace Curtains this Spring's
offerings easily surpass every former attempt of ours. We have never before shown
such a large and complete assortment—positively the largest and best stock of Lace
Curtains in the West. This is "Curtain Time," and this should be YOUR store these
days. Come in and ask to be shown the new lace curtains and we promise you won't
be disappointed nor regret the few minutes spent in looking. We also promise you
curtain values not surpassed by any other store. Tremendous Cash purchases make
possible satisfyingly low prices.   SHOWN ON SECOND FLOOR.
British Cretonne—A specially nice line
in a variety of pretty tapestry and
floral effects.    Splendid value at the
price marked, per yard 20c
British Chintz—Artistic designs on jas-
par ground. This style is suitable
for long curtains, 48 inches wide and
sold at, per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and conventional designs, that are bright and
cheerful, we show a splendid range.
Priced at, per yard, 35c, 30c and 25c
British Chintz—A fine range of pretty
and attractive designs in Green and
Yellow, Rose and Green, Pink and
Green, with blue ribbon.   Per yd. 40c
British Chintz—A very pretty and serviceable Chintz with artistic designs,
in various colorings on a jarper
ground, has a softening influence on
the whole effect. It makes the less
liable to soil, yet does not detract
from the daintiness. Price, per
yard  40c
Nottingham Lace Curtains—In these
curtains we have just unpacked more
than 60 new designs, and these with
our former splendid showing makes
an assortment of this style of curtain
that isn't equalled elsewhere. We
can promise you values that cannot
be duplicated, and in this range of
prices you will find something that
will surely suit you. Prices range
from, per pair, $14 down to  75c
Novelty Braided Curtains—This is a
"new thing" in Curtains, and a style
we think you'll like very much. The
designs are uncommonly dainty and
pleasing. We have them in Arab and
White, and offer you a very special
value at, per pair  $5.00
Swiss Lace Curtains—In the Swiss line
we have just opened more than 50
new patterns in White, Champagne,
Ivory and Ecru shades. This excellent curtain is shown in a great
choice of designs and at a great price
variety. We have them at, per pair,
$30, down to  $3.50
Ariston Lace Curtains—This is a very
dainty curtain and the new styles
just unpacked are indeed pleasing.
A special weave makes a very strong
curtain, and you'll find this style an
excellent wearer. The Ecru and two-
tone effects are very pleasing. Price,
per pair, $6 down to $4.00
GET A STEP LADDER.
Don't run the risk of shattered
bones — "long suffering" remembrances of your Spring Cleaning—
through using chairs, boxes and improvised scaffolding, when safe, convenient, time and labor-saving step-
ladders may be purchased so reasonably low-priced as ours are.
These ladders are made of good
hardwood, screwed and bolter firlmy
and securely together. They are
specially constructed, with a view to
rigidity when extended and compactness when closed and not in use.
They are exceptionally strong an,d
steady—features you should look for
in stepladders. We stock a complete
range of sizes, and offer you a choice
ranging in size from five to twelve
feet at forty cents a foot. With step-
ladders priced so reasonably fair, why
take any chances with the chairs and
boxes?
A Splendid Showing of Centre Tables
In dainty Centre Tables we are at present offering a very complete range of styles at prices
that will surely appeal to the saving sense of the thrifty keeper-of-the-home. We stock a splendid variety in both Golden Quartered Oak and Mahogany and are listing here a few prices to
give you an idea of the moderate way in which we have marked these. We have them at
lower prices and higher also, giving you a choice of prices unequalled elsewhere.
Centre Table—An excellent low-
priced table in Golden Oak.
Top is square and measures
24x24 inches, polished to a
high finish; shelf underneath.
Shaped legs. Price, each
only    $3.50
Centre Table—Another Golden Oak style. This table
has round top, 24 inches in
diameter, polished. Shelf
beneath. A very neat style
and one that will please lovers of the plain. Price $5.50
style in either Quartered Go
Centre Table—We have this
style in either Quartered
Golden Oak or Empire Mahogany, and in either wood it
is a very stylish table. The
top is a polished round one,
24 inches in diameter. Price
is  $6.50
Centre Table—An oval shaped
style in Empire Mahogany.
Top is 18x28 inches. Has a
shaped shelf and shaped legs.
This is a . very attractive
table and is splendid value
at the price, each $7.50
Centre Table—Made of selected Quartered Oak, finished
Golden. The top of this
table is square and measures
24x24 inches, and is highly
polished. Legs are plain
shaped.   Price, each ..$10.00
Centre Table—A dainty round
top style, in Golden Oak
Top measures 28 inches in
diameter and is highly polished. This is one of our
most handsome centre table
styles.    Price only  ...$12.00
TRY A CHINA CABINET
A dainty and attractive China Cabinet makes a decided improvement in
the furnishings of any dining-room
—and it is useful, too. Don't hide
your collection of china bits, but let
them see light on the shelves of a
stylish  Cabinet.
The Third Floor Showroom is replete with a choice assortment of
these Furniture pieces. We offer you
a wide choice as to design, style of
finish and price, and we think we
have something to please most anyone. We have some new styles in
China Cabinets in Golden Oak and
in Early English Oak that are delightful. The assortment of Mahogany Parlor Cabinets contains some
very choice designs. Detailed descriptions would be of very little value
here—it's necessary to see the pieces
to appreciate their worth.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to'
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
Jooooooooooooooooooo^^
Sporting
Comment.
A Challenge.
The' mechanical department of T.
R. Cusack's printing office hereby
challenge the same department of the
Victoria Printing Company to a bowling match, to be played on or before
Saturday, March 21st, four men to a
side.
Owing to the fact that the first All-
Island vs All-Mainland football match
was played at Vancouver it is hard
to determine exactly how the Islanders lost but judging from the press
reports and from the observant ones
of those who witnessed the match it
is learned that the Islanders certainly had the better of the game in
fact a second goal was scored but a
foul had been called before the goal
was scored and it was not allowed.
From those who witnessed the game
it is learned that the majority of the
Islanders played a brilliant game
while others failed to make good and
in most cases those who did not compare with their team mates were
those whose selection I did not agree
with. This was certainly the case
on the part of Harley who played out
and although he did not leave the field
he weakened both the half-back division and the forward line as one
of the latter was compelled to drop
back in order to assist him. This is
not as it should be and for the next
game the selection committee should
be very careful of their decision. On
the forward line there was some signs
of favoritism and too much individual work and had there been more
open play the result might have been
different. On the half-back division
although Dufty and Johnson played
a hard game they were rather slow
for the fast forwards of the Mainland, but in spite of this Dufty played a much better game than McKinley would have done. In the back
division Hewitt was too impetuous
and was rather inclined to pl&y forward than full back and it is to this
cause that the Mainlanders can attribute their lone score. It was on
the occasion of one of his journeys
down the field that he allowed the
opposing forwards to get in behind
him and when his partner went across
to stop the rush the ball was sent
flying across the wing with the result that an open shot was given on
the goal with the result that a tally
was registered. Although the Islanders failed to win the team this year
made a much better showing than
that of last season, which went down
to defeat, and after the showing of
last Saturday it will be almost impossible to make many changes in
the lineup, for the next match. Ot
course there are players on the Island
at present who were not here when
the first match was played and their
presence might make a difference, but
it is safe to say that after Saturday's
game there will not be more than
two or three alterations at the most.
Many of the spectators claim that
the Islanders fared the worst at the
hands of the referee, but to the credit
of the players it can be said that
there has yet to be a kick registered.
It is true that they lost a goal through
the action of the Mainland full back
who took the chance of a penalty kick
rather than a goal and also that they
were given a free kick in the penalty
area instead of a penalty kick, but to
these there were no protests made,
all being satisfied to win the game
on their merits rather than on a mere
technicality.
The  time for entering teams  for
the People's Shield competition closes
in about ten days and as yet no entry
has been made from this city. The
committee which has been appointed
to govern the competition has suggested that only the winning teams
and runners up on th elsland and
Mainland should be allowed to compete but according to the rules any
team in Canada has the right to take
part and it is certainly up to some of
the local teams to enter. If some
arrangements could bc arrived at
whereby one team could be entered
from this city to be selected from
all three clubs now taking part in
the league a combination could be secured that would make any other club
go some to win. I hope that those
in charge will make some effort to
bring about some such arrangement.
While on this subject I have to urge
the Island representatives to stand
out for more than two games. Ten
teams have already signified their intention of competing, which will necessarily mean nine games and with
two on the Island would give seven
to the Mainland. The Mainlanders
evidently forget where the championship of British Columbia rests at present and are rather inclined to overlook the Island. Their attention
should be firmly drawn to this matter
and it might be possible to teach
them that fair play is the making of
all sport.
taking part in the match, five with
Nanaimo and six with Ladysmith, the
majority of these players being registered only a few hours more than
required by the constitutions. This
according to the rules of the Island
Association, but whichever team
wins the championship will find itself
up against a hard proposition as none
of these recent importations will be
allowed to represent the Island clubs.
It is not too early to take steps to
bring this matter to a head at the
annual meeting and unless the practice is stopped it will have a serious
effect on football in British Columbia.
The most important match in the
Island League series will be played
this afternoon at Ladysmith when the
Nanaimo team will endeavour to wresl
thc championship from the present
holders. The game will be a very
hard one and further interest will be
given it by the recent acquisitions
to both teams. On the line-up for
Saturday it is expected that no less
than  eleven   cx-Mainlandcrs  will  be
Different After Marriage.
"Do you ever take your wife a box
of candy or a bunch of violets?
"Nope."
"And why not? Is she not as dear
to you as she was before you married her?"
"Yep; but if I was to send her flowers and candy she'd wonder what
crime I was trying to cover up."
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned. Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post plnnted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south along the. shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated   February  24th,   190S.
March 14 C.  G.  JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1,
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shoro of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from tho entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Bllnklnsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 11108.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that 1, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 50 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated  February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District Of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE thnt I, the undersigned, intend to apply to tho Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
ono mlle west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains;
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thenco north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd,  1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
Lawyer (examining juror)—Do you
understand thc difference between
character and reputation?
Juror—Reputation is the name
your neighbours give you; character
is the one they take from you.—Judge.
1 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 14, 1908,
t|*l>l|| k|a J« ___■_■ BlMlli -*___!___. __________ _________ &^m __________ _____________
$ Social and        $
J Personal, j
_________ ___.!___. ___■■_. __________ ____!___. _■_,_____. _________ •I—^Mg ____■_■ ^J_____L*A« ■_______
Mr. and Mrs. Hilton left for Alberni during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Gordon  Mason, Vancouver, is
visiting relatives in the city.
* *   *
Mrs. Roberts, Kuper Island, is
staying with  Mrs. Stewart Williams.
* *   *
Dr. 0. M. Jones returned from
Vancouver last Sunday.
* *   *
Mr. A. T. Goward returned from
the Mainland last Monday, where he
had been spending a few days.
* *   *
Mrs. King left during the week for
Salt Spring Island, and is the guest of
her daughter, Mrs. Keith Wilson.
* *   *
Miss Kate Gaudin left for Vancouver last Monday, where she intends
spending a couple of weeks.
* *   *
Mrs. W. F. Bullen and Mr. Harry
Bullen have left on a pleasure trip, to
be spent in California.
* *   *
The Misses Humphreys have returned from California, where they
have been spending the winter.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Trotter Johnston, of
Duncans, are enjoying a short holiday in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Ross entertained a large number of friends at the Empress last
Saturday afternoon.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy, of Westholme, has been the guest of Mrs.
Stevenson, Burdette avenue, during
the week.
Mrs. Stephen Phipps passed
through Victoria en route to Chemainus, where she is the guest of her
father, Mr. Maitland Dougall.
* *   *
Mrs. . Charles Pooley, Esquimalt,
gave a most delightful 'five hundred"
party on Wednesday evening, five
tables. The spacious drawing-room
was very sweet with its masses of
spring flowers and pretty ferns. The
first prizes were carried off by Mrs.
Matson and Mr. Coles. The competitors were: Mrs. Rithet, Mr. and
Mrs. Matthews, Mr. and Mrs. Coles,
Mrs. Matson, Mr. J. Harvey, Mrs. J.
Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. Innes, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Pooley,
Captain Hughes, Mr. J. Musgrave,
Miss T, Monteith, Mr. R. Monteith,
Mr. H. Pooley, Miss Violet Pooley
and Mr. C. E. Pooley.
* *   *
The "Five Hundred' Club enjoyed
a very pleasant afternoon last Tuesday, when it met at the residence of
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Churchill. There
was some very exciting and close
play, Mrs. Gibb finally proving herself the fortunate owner of the very
pretty prize. There were five tables
in all, the competitors being: Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Tye, Mrs. Crowe-
Baker, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Herman
Robertson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs.
Gordon, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Gibb,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Savage,
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. McBride, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. C. Todd. The tea-table,
which had a beautiful centrepiece of
pale pink carnations and fern, in a
beautiful silver bowl, was presided
over by the Misses Monteith, Pooley,
Blackwood, Savage, Newling and
Arbuthnot.
Still Better.
"Did you ever see this one?" inquired the funny man, "You can take
two letters from 'money' and leave
only one.   See how it's done?"
"Sure," replied the postal clerk
"and if I wanted to I could take
money from two letters and leave
absolutely nothing."
Envious oi the Immune.
Little Henri (at the table to the
visitor—I wish I were like you.
Visitor (flattered) — Why, little
man.
Little Henri—Because no one boxes
your ears when you eat with your
fingers.
Almost An  Insult.
"What's the matter, Algy?"
"Why, dash it all, that big girl over
yonder, don't ye know, she asked me
if I had a powder rag with me!"
Charged To Him.
"Dear," began Mrs. Spender, coo-
ingly, "would you consider opals unlucky?"
"I would," replied her husband
shrewdly, "if I got a bill for some and
had to pay it."
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENORAVERS
and DESIQNERS
In All Branches
SIS Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
p
lATENTS   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
Not His Kind.
Mr. Nodd—I don't think much of
that toy bank you got the children.
Mrs. Nodd—What's the matter
with it?
Mr. Nodd—Why, I worked over it
all the evening and couldn't open it.
Precarious.
"You say you kin teach me to
write?"
"I can."
"So's I kin make a livin' at it?"
"Yes."
"Why don't you make your livin'
that way, mister?"
"My friend, to be candid with you,
I don't care for that kind of a living.'
Salvage Sale
Ex-Steamer "Vadso"
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION
Duly instructed by the agent for the
underwriters, will  dispose  of by
PUBLIC AUCTION
on Porter's Wharf, on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
at 11 a.m.
the following goods: One American
billiard table and fixtures, one case
of glassware, one ship's boat, nearly
new, strongly built, 14 ft.; one large
condenser, steel shell brass tubes and
plates, one combined steam circulating air pump, 7!4x7J4x7J4; one
castiron propeller, a number of empty oil barrels, two 60-gallon water
casks and stands, for ship's use; one
kit of salmon, one case of lamps 20
sacks of salt, one trunk and contents,
one keg of nails, one bundle of tents
and contents, six tins of fish oil, two
bundles of floaters, several lots of
short link chain, one-half and seven-
eighths inch, one ship's steering gear,
one iron hatch, a lot of miscellaneous
ship's iron work, six ship's ventilators and other goods too numerous to
mention.
STEWART WILLIAMS,
The Auctioneer.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Change in Time Table
On Beacon Hill, Spring Ridge, Outer Wharf and Douglas St.
Routes. Commencing Monday, March 9th, 1908, a 12-minute service will be given on these routes, as under:
First Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 6 a.m.
First Car leaves Outer Wharf to City 6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 11.35 p.m.
Last Car leaves Outer Wharf to City  11.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale  6.00 a.m.
First Car leaves Cloverdale to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale 11.35 P*m.
Last Car leaves Cloverdale to City 11.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St, to Beacon Hill  5.57 a.m.
First Car leaves Beacon Hill to City  6.06 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter
Last Car leaves Government St. to Beacon Hill 11.35 P-m.
Last Car leaves Beacon Hill to City 11.45 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge  6.03 a.m.
First Car leaves Spring Ridge to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge 11.35 P-m.
Last Car leaves Spring Ridge to City 11.45 p.iji.
SUNDAYS—Cars give same schedule after 9.00 a.m., but cease
running one hour earlier.
And every 12 minuU-s thereafter.
B. C ELECTRIC RAILWAY CQ., UNITED
A Skin of Beauty ls a Joy Forever
DB. T. FELIX FOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAUTIFIES
Purifies as well as Beautifies the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and ls so harmless—we taste It to be sure it is pro
perly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
GOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET
POWDER
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price as cents, hy mail.
GOUBAUD'S POUDBE  SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Frloe $1.00, by mail.
FBED T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        New York Glty.
AT HENDERSON BBOS., Distributors.
Vancouver and Victoria, B.O.
If You Keep Lent You Should Keep These
Relished alike by the Epicurean Saint and the Epicurean Sinner,
therefore good things to have on hand:
Bismarck Herring, per tin  65c
Russian Caviar, per tin 35c and 65c
Toono Fish, per tin  35c
Eels in Jelly, per tin  50c
Machonochie's Smoked Haddocks, per tin  .25c
Machonochie's Preserved Bloaters, per tin 25c
C. & B. Herring and Shrimp Sauce, per tin 25c
C. & B. Fresh Mackerel, per tin  25c
Mackerel in Oil, per tin 30c and 40c
Fillets of Herring, per tin 25c
Curled Anchovies, per bottle 35c and 65c
Anchovy Rings in Qil, per tin 25c
Prawns in Aspic, per jar ,.".,', '. 50c
Spiced Anchovies, per keg  40c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
"The Post" is the
King of
Fountain Pens.
The best self-filling, self-
cleaning pen manufactured in
the world. It is simple, reliable
and durable — positively non-
leakable. To fill it, you merely
dip the pen in the ink, draw out
the plunger and it is ready for
use.
No up-to-date traveller, tourist, merchant, business man or
business woman can afford to
dispense with the "Post," the
Pen of all Pens for busy people.
Every pen guaranteed.
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHE/1IST
Government Street, Victoria
near Yates.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOt
(
i
For a Private
Dinner
or a little supper after the theatre, take your wife or frieni! to the
POODLE DOG
Our soups, fish, steaks, chops, game, etc., accompanied by a cold    <
bottle, will be appetizers long to be remembered.
-—WE CATER TO CONNOISSEURS.
 EXPERT PROMPT SERVICE.
The Poodle Dog Hotel
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
00000000<>0<K>00000000000000<K>0000000000<>000000000000<
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Has turned my cheerless den into a real 'duke domum.' Gas is
no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19,20
and 21
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 1908.
■200000000©00<>'dOOO<X><K>0-OCk>©6000--^^
S0000000<><>00000'0000000'0000<>000000000000'000^^
ADD ATTRACTIVENESS
TO YOUR HOME BY USING THESE MATERIALS.
For as low as 20c per yard, we can offer you the very newest art designs in
Cretonnes. Don't confuse these art creations with the ordinary designed efforts,
because they are entirely different and much superior. These Cretonnes come from
the world's best makers, who employ high-salaried artists and designers, and who
exert every possible effort to market each season the newest and nicest designs of the
year. Even with all this extra goodness the prices are, if anything, lower than before,
and certainly low enough to make their use more popular. For curtains, drapes, loose
covers, etc., etc., these Cretonnes and Chintzes are particularly adapted, and in the
great choice of designs and color combinations you will experience no difficulty in
finding something that will suit you and harmonize perfectly with the other furnishings.
In your plans for this Spring's cleaning changes, include some of these—at least, see
them on our Second Floor.
British Cretonne—A specially nice line
in a variety of pretty tapestry and
floral effects.    Splendid value at the
price marked, per yard 20c
British Chintz—Artistic designs on jas-
par ground, This style is suitable
for long curtains, 48 inches wide and
sold at, per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and conventional designs, that are bright and
cheerful, we show a splendid range.
Priced at, per yard, 35c, 30c and 25c
m
British Chintz—A fine range of pretty
and attractive designs in Green and
Yellow, Rose and Green, Pink and
Green, with blue ribbon.   Per yd. 40c
British Chintz—A very pretty and serviceable Chintz with artistic designs,
in various colorings on a jarper
ground, has a softening influence on
the whole effect. It makes the less
liable to soil, yet does not detract
from the daintiness. Price, per
yard   40c
A SPECIAL DISPLAY
Elaborate as have been our former showings of Lace Curtains this Spring's
offerings easily surpass every former attempt of ours. We have never before shown
such a large and complete assortment—positively the largest and best stock of Lace
Curtains in the West. This is "Curtain Time," and this should be YOUR store these
days. Come in and ask to be shown the new lace curtains and we promise $rou won't
be disappointed nor regret the few minutes spent in looking. We also promise you
curtain values not surpassed by any other store. Tremendous Cash purchases make
possible satisfyingly low prices.   SHOWN ON SECOND FLOOR.
Nottingham Lace Curtains—In these
curtains we have just unpacked more
than 60 new designs, and these with
our former splendid .showing makes
an assortment of this style of curtain
that isn't equalled elsewhere. We
can promise you values that cannot
be duplicated, and in this range of
prices you will find something that
will surely suit you. Prices range
from, per pair, $14 down to ....75c
Novelty Braided Curtains—This is a
"hew thing" in Curtains, and a style
we think you'll like very much. The
designs are uncommonly dainty and
pleasing. We have them in Arab and
White, and offer you a very special
value at, per pair  $5.00
[ Swiss Lace Curtains—In the Swiss line
we have just opened more than 50
new patterns in White, Champagne,
Ivory and Ecru shades. This excellent curtain is shown in a great
choice of designs and at a great price •
variety. We have them at, per pair,
$30, down to $3.50
Ariston Lace Curtains—This is a very
dainty curtain and the new styles
just unpacked are indeed pleasing.
A special weave makes a very strong
curtain, and you'll find this style an
excellent wearer. The Ecru and two-
tone effects are very pleasing. Price,
per pair, $6 down to $4.00
GET A STEP LADDER.
Don't run the risk of shattered
bones — "long suffering" remembrances of your Spring Cleaning—
through using chairs, boxes and improvised scaffolding, when safe, convenient, time and labor-saving step-
ladders may be purchased so reasonably low-priced as ours are.
These ladders are made of good
hardwood, screwed and bolter firlmy
and securely together. They are
specially constructed, with a view to
rigidity when extended and compactness when closed and not in use.
They are exceptionally strong and
steady—features you should look for
in stepladders. We stock a complete
range of sizes, and offer you a choice
ranging in size from five to twelve
feet at forty cents a foot. With step-
. ladders priced so reasonably fair, why
take any chances with the chairs and
boxes?
A Splendid Showing of Centre Tables
In dainty Centre Tables we are at present offering a very complete range of styles at prices
that will surely appeal to the saving sense of the thrifty keeper-of-the-home. We stock a splendid variety in both Golden Quartered Oak and Mahogany and are listing here a few prices to
give you an idea of the moderate way in which we have marked these. We have them at
lower prices and higher also, giving you a choice of prices unequalled elsewhere.
Centre Table—An excellent low-
priced table in Golden Oak.
Top is square and measures
24x24 inches, polished to a
high finish; shelf underneath.
Shaped legs. Price, each
only    $3.50
Centre Table—Another Golden Oak style. This table
has round top, 24 inches in
diameter, polished. Shelf
beneath. A very neat style
and one that will please lovers of the plain. Price $5.50
style in either Quartered Go
Centre Table—We have this
style in either Quartered
Golden Oak or Empire Mahogany, and in either wood it
is a very stylish table. The
top is a polished round one,
24 inches in diameter. Price
is  $6.50
Centre Table—An oval shaped
style in Empire Mahogany.
Top is 18x28 inches. Has a
shaped shelf and shaped legs.
This is a very attractive
table and is splendid value
at the price, each $7.50
Centre Table—Made of selected Quartered Oak, finished
Golden. The top of this
table is square and measures
24x24 inches, and is highly
polished. Legs are plain
shaped.    Price, each ..$10.00
Centre Table—A dainty round
top style, in Golden Oak
Top measures 28 inches in
diameter and is highly polished. This is one of our
most handsome centre table
styles.    Price only ...$12.00
TRY A CHINA CABINET
A dainty and attractive China Cabinet makes a decided improvement in
the furnishings of any dining-room
—and it is useful, too. Don't hide
your collection of china bits, but let
them see light on the shelves of a
stylish  Cabinet.
The Third Floor Showroom is replete with a choice assortment of
these Furniture pieces. We offer you
a wide choice as to design, style of
finish and price, and we think we
have something to please most anyone. We have some new styles in
China Cabinets in Golden Oak and
in Early English Oak that are delightful. The assortment of Mahogany Parlor Cabinets contains some
very choice designs. Detailed descriptions would be of very little value
here—it's necessary to see the pieces
to appreciate their worth.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are hot
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
PortOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-'OOOO-OO-O©-^^
52ooooooooooooooo<>ooo<_«o<h>o^^
sporting
Comment.
A Challenge.
The mechanical department of T.
Cusack's printing office hereby
allenge the same department of the
ctoria Printing Company to a bowl-
<_ match, to be played on or before
turday, March 21st, four men to a
e.
Dwing to the fact that the first All-
and vs All-Mainland football match
s played at Vancouver it is hard
determine exactly how the Island-
lost but judging from the press
>orts and from the observant ones
those who witnessed the match it
learned  that  the   Islanders   cer-
nly had the better of the game in
:t a second goal was scored but a
|il had been called before the goal
scored and it was not allowed.
Im those who witnessed the game
Is learned that the majority of the
ltnders   played   a   brilliant   game
lie others failed to make good and
nost cases those who did not com-
with   their   team   mates   Were
e whose selection I did not agree
This  was  certainly  the  case
he part of Harley who played out
although he did not leave the field
weakened both the half-back di-
m and the forward line as one
he latter was compelled to drop
in order to assist him.   This is
as it should be and for the next
: the selection committee should
ery careful of their decision.   On
brward line there was some signs
avoritism and  too much  indivi-
work and had there been more
play the result might have been
rent.   On the half-back division
mgh Dufty and Johnson played
a hard game they were rather slow
for the fast forwards of the Mainland, but in spite of this Dufty played a much better game than McKinley would have done. In the back
division Hewitt was too impetuous
and was rather inclined to play forward than full back and it is to this
cause that the Mainlanders can attribute their lone score. It was on
the occasion of one of his journeys
down the field that he allowed the
opposing forwards to get in behind
him and when his partner went across
to stop the rush the ball was sent
flying across the wing with the result that an open shot was given on
the goal with the result that a tally
was registered. Although the Islanders failed to win the team this year
made a much better showing than
that of last season, which went down
to defeat, and after the showing of
last Saturday it will be almost impossible to make many changes in
the lineup, for the next match. Of
course there are players on the Island
at present who were not here when
the first match was played and their
presence might make a difference, but
it is safe to say that after Saturday's
game there will not be more than
two or three alterations at the most.
Many of the spectators claim that
the Islanders .fared the worst at the
hands of the referee, but to the credit
of the players it can be said that
there has yet to be a kick registered.
It is true that they lost a goal through
the action of the Mainland full back
who took the chance of a penalty kick
rather than a goal and also that they
were given a free kick in the penalty
area instead of a penalty kick, but to
these there were no protests made,
all being satisfied to win the game
on their merits rather than on a mere
technicality.
The time  for entering teams  for
the People's Shield competition closes
in about ten days and as yet no entry
has been made from this city. The
committee which has been appointed
to govern the competition has suggested that only the winning teams
and runners up on th elsland and
Mainland should be allowed to compete but according to the rules any
team in Canada has the right to take
part and it is certainly up to some of
the local teams to enter. If some
arrangements could be arrived at
whereby one team could be entered
from this city to be selected from
ali three clubs now taking part in
the league a combination could be secured that would make any other club
go some to win. I hope that those
in charge will make some effort to
bring about some such arrangement.
While on this subject I have to urge
the Island representatives to stand
out for more than two games. Ten
teams have already signified their intention of competing, which will necessarily mean nine games and with
two on the Island would give seven
to the Mainland. The Mainlanders
evidently forget where the championship of British Columbia rests at present and are rather inclined to overlook the Island. Their attention
should be firmly drawn to this matter
and it might be possible to teach
them that fair play is the making of
all sport.
taking part in the match, five with
Nanaimo and six with Ladysmith, the
majority of these players being registered only a few hours more than
required by the constitutions. This
according to the rules of the Island
Association, but whichever team
wins the championship will find itself
up against a hard proposition as none
of these recent importations will be
allowed to represent the Island clubs.
It is not too early to take steps to
bring this matter to a head at the
annual meeting and unless the practice is stopped it will have a serious
effect on football in British Columbia.
The most important match in the
Island League series will be played
this afternoon at Ladysmith when the
Nanaimo team will endeavour to wrest
the championship from the present
holders. The game will be a very
hard one and further interest will be
given it by thc recent acquisitions
to both teams. On the line-up for
Saturday it is expected that no less
than   eleven  ex-Mainlanders   will   be
Different After Marriage.
"Do you ever take your wife a box
of candy or a bunch of violets?
"Nope."
"And why not? Is she not as deaf
to you as she was before you married her?"
"Yep; but if I was to send her flowers and candy she'd wonder what
crime I was trying to cover up."
NEAV WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, tlie undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works fnr
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commenolng at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay.
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated   February  24th,   190S.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thenefi
east along the shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along tho
shore of Bllnklnsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range i.
TAKE NOTICE that I, tlle undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1U08.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 1*1 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 60 feet
north of the creek running to tho bay;
running west 60 chains; thence nortli
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1808.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
tiie purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chalna;
thenco south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on tho west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; tbence south 60 chains
back to tlie place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
Lawyer (examining juror)—Do you
understand the difference belwccn
character and reputation?
Juror—Reputation is the name
your neighbours give you; character
is the one they take from you.—Judge.
. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 14, 1908,
ijb4r4r<fr?tr4*«lr$4r4tf!ri!tt!r
*
if
if
if
Social and
Personal.
if
if
if
m__\______t____A_____._____________ __________ _____W — _____m_____________ _____W__a __________* _____W____t _____W\_m ______W__t IM
Mr. and Mrs.  Hilton left for Alberni during the week.
*   *   *
Mr. Gordon  Mason, Vancouver, is
visiting relatives in the city.
Still Better.
"Did you ever see this one?" inquired the funny man, "You can take
two letters from 'money' and leave
only one.   See how it's done?"
"Sure," replied the postal clerk,
"and if I wanted to I could take
money from two letters and leave
absolutely nothing."
*   *   *
Mrs.    Roberts,    Kuper    Island,   is
staying with  Mrs. Stewart Williams.
the
Envious of the Immune.
Little  Henri  (at the  table  to
visitor—I wish I were like you.
Visitor    (flattered) — Why,   little
man.
Little Henri—Because no one boxes
your  ears when  you  eat with  your
Mr.  A.  T.  Goward returned from  fingers.
the Mainland last Monday, where he
had been spending a few days.
*   *   *
Dr.   0.   M.   Jones   returned
Vancouver last Sunday.
from
Mrs. King left during the week for
Salt Spring Island, and is the guest of
her daughter, Mrs. Keith Wilson.
* *   *
Miss Kate Gaudin left for Vancouver last Monday, where she intends
spending a couple of weeks.
* *   *
Mrs. W. F. Bullen and Mr. Harry
Bullen have left on a pleasure trip, to iucky?
be spent in California.
* *   *
The Misses Humphreys have returned from California, where they
have been spending the winter.
Almost An Insult.
"What's the matter, Algy?"
"Why, dash it all, that big girl over
yonder, don't ye know, she asked me
if I had a powder rag with me!"
Charged To Him.
'Dear,"  began Mrs.  Spender,  coo-
ingly, "would you consider opals un-
"I would," replied her husband
shrewdly, "if I got a bill for some and
had to pay it."
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
S18 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
p
lATENTS   and Trade Mark
obtained in all countries.
Not His Kind.
Mr. Nodd—I don't think much of
that toy bank you got the children.
Mrs. Nodd—What's the matter
with it?
Mr. Nodd—Why, I worked over it
all the evening and couldn't open it.
Precarious.
"You say you kin teach me to
write?"
"I can."
"So's I kin make a livin' at it?"
"Yes."
"Why don't you make your livin'
that way, mister?"
"My friend, to be candid with you,
I don't care for that kind of a living.'
Mr. and Mrs. Trotter Johnston, of
Duncans, are enjoying a short holiday in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Ross entertained a large number of friends at the Empress last
Saturday afternoon.
* *   *
Miss Barbara Mainguy, of Westholme, has been the guest of Mrs.;
Stevenson,   Burdette   avenue,   during
the week.
* *   *
Mrs. Stephen Phipps passed
through Victoria en route to Chemainus, where she is the guest of her
father, Mr. Maitland Dougall.
* *   *
Mrs. Charles Pooley, Esquimalt,
gave a most delightful 'five hundred"
party on Wednesday evening, five
tables. The spacious drawing-room
was very sweet with its masses of
spring flowers and pretty ferns. The
first prizes were carried off by Mrs.
Matson and Mr. Coles. The competitors wcre: Mrs. Rithet, Mr. and
Mrs. Matthews, Mr. and Mrs. Coles,
Mrs. Matson, Mr. J. Harvey, Mrs. J.
Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. Innes, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Pooley,
Captain Hughes, Mr. J. Musgrave,
Miss T. Monteith, Mr. R. Monteith,
Mr. H. Pooley, Miss Violet Pooley
and Mr. C. E. Pooley.
* *   *
The "Five Hundred' Club enjoyed
a very pleasant afternoon last Tuesday, when it met at thc residence of billiard table and fixtures, one case
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Churchill. There of glassware, one ship's boat, nearly
was some very exciting and close new, strongly built, 14 ft.; one large
play, Mrs. Gibb finally proving her- condenser, steel shell brass tubes and
self the fortunate owner of the very plates, one combined steam circulat-
prctty prize. There were five tables ing air pump, 7'4x7J4x7J4; one
in all, the competitors being: Mrs. castiron propeller, a number of emp-
Matson, Mrs. Tye, Mrs. Crowe- ty oil barrels, two 60-gallon water
Baker, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Herman casks and stands, for ship's use; one
Robertson, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. kit of salmon, one case of lamps 20
Gordon, Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Gibb, sacks of salt, one trunk and contents,
Mrs. Ker, Mrs. C. Roberts, Mrs. Grif- one keg of nails, one bundle of tents
fiths, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Savage, and contents, six tins of fish oil, two
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. McBride, Mrs. bundles of floaters, several lots of
Berkeley, Mrs. Hunter, Mrs. Mat- short link chain, one-half and seven-
thews, Mrs. C. Todd. The tea-table, eighths inch, one ship's steering gear,
which had a beautiful centrepiece of one iron hatch, a lot of miscellaneous
pale pink carnations and fern, in a ship's iron work, six ship's ventila-
beautiful silver bowl, was presided tors and other goods too numerous to
over by the Misses Monteith, Pooley, mention.
Blackwood, Savage, Newling and STEWART WILLIAMS,
Arbuthnot. The Auctioneer.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Salvage Sale
Ex-Steamer "Vadso"
MESSRS. WILLIAMS & JANION
Duly instructed by the agent for the
underwriters, will  dispose of  by
PUBLIC AUCTION
on Porter's Wharf, on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
at 11 a.m.
the following goods:    One American
Change in Time Table
On Beacon Hill, Spring Ridge, Outer Wharf and Douglas St,
Routes. Commencing Monday, March 9th, 1908, a 12-minute service will bc given on these routes, as under:
First Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 6 a.m.
First Car leaves Outer Wharf to City 6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Outer Wharf 11.35 P.m.
Last Car leaves Outer Wharf to City  11.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale  6.00 a.m.
First Car leaves Cloverdale to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Cloverdale 11.35 P-m.
Last Car leaves Cloverdale to City 11.48 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Beacon Hill  5.57 a.m.
First Car leaves Beacon Hill to City  6.06 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter
Last Car leaves Government St. to Beacon Hill 11.35 P-m.
Last Car leaves Beacon 11 ill to City 11.45 p.m.
First Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge  6.03 a.m.
First Car leaves Spring Ridge to City  6.12 a.m.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
Last Car leaves Government St. to Spring Ridge 11.35 P-m.
Last Car leaves Spring Ridge to City 11.45 p.m.
SUNDAYS—Cars give same schedule after 9.00 a.m., but cease
running one hour earlier.
And every 12 minutes thereafter.
B. C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO., LIMITED
A Skin of Beauty ie a Joy Forever
SB. T. FELIX FOOBAOD'B
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER
Purifies as well as Beautifies the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
GOTTBAUD'S OBIENTAL TOILET
FOWDEB
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 35 cents, by mail.
GOUBAUD'S  POUDRE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price $1.00, by mail.
FRED T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Great Jones St.,        Hew York City.
AT HENDERSON BROS., Distributors.
Vancouver and Victoria, B.O.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
"The Post" is the
King of
Fountain Pens.
The best self-filling, self-
cleaning pen manufactured in
the world. It is simple, reliable
and durable — positively non-
leakable. To fill it, you merely
dip the pen in the ink, draw out
the plunger and it is ready for
use.
No up-to-date traveller, tourist, merchant, business man or
business woman can afford to
dispense with the "Post," the
Pen of all Pens for busy people.
Every pen guaranteed.
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHEHIST
Government Street, Victoria
near Yates.
If You Keep Lent You Should Keep These
Relished alike by the Epicurean Saint and the Epicurean Sinner,
therefore good things to have on hand;
Bismarck Herring, per tin  65c
Russian Caviar, per tin 35C and 65c
Toono Fish, per tin  35c
Eels in Jelly, per tin 5°L
Machonochie's Smoked Haddocks, per tin  25c
Machonochie's Preserved Bloaters, per tin  25c
C. & B. Herring and Shrimp Sauce, per tin  25c
C. & B. Fresh Mackerel, per tin  25c
Mackerel in Oil, per tin  30c and 40c
Fillets of Herring, per tin  25c
Curled Anchovies, per bottle 35c and 65c
Anchovy Rings in Oil, per tin  25c
Prawns in Aspic, per jar  50c
Spiced Anchovies, per keg  40c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc
For a Private
Dinner
or a little supper after the theatre, take your wife or friend to the    <
POODLE DOG
Our soups, fish, steaks, chops, game, etc., accompanied by a cold
bottle, will be appetizers long to be remembered.
 WE CATER TO CONNOISSEURS.
 EXPERT PROMPT SERVICE.
The Poodle Dog Hotel
YATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
0000-00*00*00000©000000000000<>0-<_*'0^
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Has turned my cheerless den into a real 'dulce domum.' Gas is
no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B.

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