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BC Historical Newspapers

Week May 4, 1907

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Kingsford Smith & Co. 3
Stock and General 3
AUCTIONEERS 9
Commission and Real Estate Agents.    3
860 Granville, Vancouver.   °)
ijL JUUUUUJUL1UUIJU.SU AUJUUU .O
The Week
21 British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. -8.
^rsYinnrryinrvTnri-*jTroiinrp
Stewart Williams     jj K.C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
3 :UJUUJUJUUUU^iUU4UUUUUfc
iVol. IV.    No. 14
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
The Coal
Situation.
In deference to thc request   of   an   influential
coal operator The Week
defers the publication of
the first series of articles on the coal situation until next issue, by which time it is
hoped that  an amicable and permanent
■settlement of the present differences will
be made.    .Meanwhile the following facts
should be carefully noted and duly con-
jsidercd by the public.    That immediately
ton his arrival at Fernie Minister .Gushing
lof the Alberta Legislature promised and.
.obtained   a   confirmation   by   wire from
Premier Rutherford that next session an
eight hours bank to bank bill would be
.passed.    That the operators unreservedly
withdrew their demands for a ten per cent,
reduction of wages and conceded a ten per
cent, advance.    These were tiie only two
important issues at stake.    If they had
been conceded when demanded there would
•have been no strike.    They were conceded
as soon as the Government representatives
put in an appearance and intimated that
thc provisions of Mr. Lemieux' Act would
be enforced.    President Lindsay of the
Operative Association stated on Wednesday tliat the operators had accepted every
offer made by tlie District Miners' Board.
The public will naturally ask, why were
not these identical offers accepted a month
jago?    President Sherman, tlio miners' re-
Ipresentative, stated Yesterday to the Associated Press tliat if the ill-advised notice,
Iwhich the operators put out a fortnight
lago, demanding a ten per cent, reduction,
Iliad not been posted there would have been
Ino cessation of work.    Whatever the re-
Isult of th<! referendum, whieh is not to
■hand at the moment of going to press, it
lis perfectly clear that the unreasonable atti-
Itude of the operators which they promptly
■abandoned as soon as an official investiga-
Ition became imminent, is answerable for
■the regrettable condition of affairs which
[lias deprived Southern British Columbia
of a fuel supply, and has seriously interfered with our most important industries.
|ft will be a matter for general regret now
hat such reliable representatives of the
loveniment as Sir William Mulock and
|Mi-. Mackenzie King are at Fernie, if the
opportunity is not taken to make a thorough investigation of all matters pertaining to the present industrial conflict, and
j,ho disposition of the coal produced in
lEast Kootenay.    If this is done it will
pe found that nearly fifty per cent, of the
Jtotal output is being exported at a time
jwhen the smelters of British Columbia are
lying idle, or are threatened with suspen-
Ision for lack of fuel, and the personal com-
lfort,   and  even  the  lives  of  thousands
of   settlers   on   thc   prairies   are   being
■Jeopardised.
Everyone knows that this
The Business is Canada's growing tyne,
"hitlook. and everyone knows that
a young country, like a
(toy or girl, may grow too fast and outrun
its strength. This may not be the case
(villi Canada, but there are not wanting
Ijgns that 11 little healthy restraint may
jiave to be exercised especially in Hie realm
[if speculation. To say this is not to
found a pessimistic, but a warning note,
is not to abandon the optimistic heights
Bipon whicli a period of unparalled pros-
jperily has permitted the country to dwell,
fit is to cast an observant glance from those
dizzy heights, and to note intelligently thc
signs of the times. The future of Canada is assured. Its boundless resources
arc barely touched and nothing can permanently retard such a development as
history docs not record. But there will
bo temporary lulls in this onward march,
and the keen observer predicts tliat one is
about due. There has been too much trading on paper. The banks in their laudable
anxiety to expedite the opening up of half
a continent have been lavish, and in some
cases extravagant in the assistance they
rendered, not only to legitimate business
enterprises, but to pure speculation. A
stringency in the money market six months
ago placed the lirst hand-writing on the
wall. Later still disturbances in high
financial circles in London and Berlin accentuated the situation. Quite recent
occurrences in New York, culminating in
lhe retirement of the largest brokerage
firm on the continent, and possiblv in the
world, has added the finishing touch.
There is nothing so sensitive as the money
market, and already the fiat has gone forth
through banking circles that the strings
are to be drawn tighter, and roundly
speaking that during the next year or two
it will be the business of bank managers,
rather to reduce than increase " collateral."
The effect has been instantaneous. In Winnipeg, in Vancouver and even in Victoria
there is a perceptible lull in real estate and
speculative transactions. Within thc last
week in all these cities tliere have been
numerous surrenders of options at the instigation of the banks, which were not prepared to continue financing. In consequence many advertising and printing arrangements havo been cancelled and it is
probable that the coining summer will see
thc number of real estate agents in Western cities reduced by fifty per cent. After
this judicious weeding out tliere will come
a healthy re-action, and this line of business will proceed upon sounder, because
on more conservative lines. Of all booms
a land boom is most susceptible of extravagant expansion, and there is no doubt
that in Vancouver especially real estate
values have been pushed to too high a
figure. A salutary check is not to be regretted. It, will furnish an opportunity
for consolidating legitimate business, and
for snuffing out the mere speculator, who
has been doing business on hot air and
paper options.
The Weekly
Half-Holiday.
riio retail store employes
in Victoria are negotiating for a weekly half-
holiday. As a matter of
fact there is a movement all over the continent in the direction of shortening thc
hours and improving the conditions of this
ill-paid and arduous class of labour. The
Crescent, one of the largest dry-goods
stores iu Spokane, now closes its doors at
six o'clock every evening, Saturday included. Consideration for the employes
of the Conipuny is lhe reason giveu for
the change. This is as it should be and is
11 circumstance highly creditable to lhe
Company. The Week has nothing to say
as to the best arrangement which can be
made between lhe Victoria stores and their
employes, but that some concessions will
have to be made. There is no doubt that
public opinion, fully alive to the trend of
events, favours it, and that the public will
be quite willing to regulate their shopping
so that a desirable result may be obtained.
The Week has one suggestion to make,
which is that experience in other Western
towns is not in favour of a Wednesday
half-holiday. A break in the middle of
the week is more inconvenient than one
at the end, especially to country customers.
The reasonable attitude adopted by both
parties, and the general considerateness
shown by the employes of the Capital city
leave little room for doubt that a perfectly
satisfactory settlement will be reached.
On more than one occas-
Not Too Loyal. i0n recently a contemporary has held up New
Brunswick as a model for British Columbia. In one respect at any rate the
former can sit at the feet of the latter and
learn wisdom, and that is 011 the score of
loyalty. This seems rather singular when
one remembers the proximity of New
Brunswick to the land which has been invested with unfading interest as the chosen
habitat of the United Empire Loyalists;
still the -fact remains. At the St. George's
Society banquet, held in St. John's, President Stude said he had asked the School
Board lo fly the British flag over the school
buildings, and to celebrate the occasion by
also devoting five minutes to patriotic subjects in the schools. The Board declined
on the ground that they would have to do
the same for the other societies if they did
it for one, a declaration which naturally
evoked loud hisses. Perhaps after this
we may bc spared the infliction of so frequent a reference to the virtues of New
Brunswick, and in any cA-cnt we shall be
able to understand why journalists who
have graduated in that benighted province
talk patriotism so much, and practise it.
so little.
When Sir Wilfrid Lau-
Laurier a ner paid his first visit tc
Bureaucrat. England   he   earned   the
sobriquet of " The Silver-
tongued Orator." During his present,
visit hc docs not appear to be enhancing
his popularity; indeed he has struck a
vein, which is arousing distinct antagonism on the part of a section of the London
Press. The Evening Post slates him
severely for his attitude on the question
of tho Imperial Council, and the Colonial
Office secretariat, and notes his strange defection from the pause of the Imperial
Alliance. Richard Webb, au eminent
journalistic authority, declares that it
seems almost incredible that Laurier
should have ranged himself on thc side of
lhe old bureaucracy against the self-respecting ambition of Colonial Nationalism,
lie gave utterance to the following striking phrase in condemning the Canadian
Premier: " Shall it be said of him that
he stood silent, if he did not, actually lend
a hand, while the bureaucracy strangled in
its cradle the Imperial offspring of Canadian Nationalism." All of Avhich goes
lo show that Sir Wilfrid is more in his
element on the platform than in the (.'01111-
eil Chamber, and that on the present important occasion he sadly misses the sound
advice and guidance of Mr. Fielding.
It is one thing to advo-
Exuberance of cute thc operation of the
Verbosity. Sunday  Observance  Act
in P>. (? it is entirely
another lo defend lhe ill-judged and ex-
travagant utterances of all its supporters.
The former The Week has consistently and
conscientiously done, which entitles it to
denounce lhe sensational utterance of Dr.
Sipprell, Presidenl of Columbia College,
at the Metropolitan Methodist Church last
Sunday. Dr. Sipprell charged the Attorney-General of this Province with opening
the door to the destruction of our Christian Sabbath, and then with a burst of
higli-falutin, happily rare on this side of
the line, he declared that  ' sueh men are
[riving the sword of gross materialism
into the heart of our national life, and
stifling the convictions that are among the
grandest ami noblest man can know." It
is only a few weeks since one of the most
eminent of English Temperance advocates
declared that the cause he had at heart
had been hindered more by the intolerance and illiberality of its friends, than
by the hostility of its foes. Dr. Sipprell
is endeavouring to bring about the same
condition of affairs with respect to Sunday  Observance.    A  few   more  sermons
'.elivered in a like spirit will effectually
prevent the procuring of any remedy for
tlie present veto in this Province, and those
who from conscientious motives believe
that the Act should not apply here could
desire nothing more favourable to their
contention than the assistance of Dr. Sipprell. Moderate men sometimes wonder
why society is so invidious iu its distinctions as to muzzle dogs only.
There is a lady of blessed
Mixing memory   who   immortal-
The Metaphors.     is,.,l herself by habitually
" mixing the metaphors.'.'
[Ier lineal descendant is editing a Koo-
.tenay paper, which tells its readers that
Premier McBride has gone to England in
search of the Golden Fleece, at a cost to
the Province of $10,000; but it declares
that the saddest pari of thc whole business
is that when the Argonaut reaches London, he is liable to get lost in the throng
and never be heard from again. Truly
a little knowledge is a dangerous thing,
especially when it is classical.
The Week offers no arjol-
Wanted, a 0gy for copying this title
Leader. horn an article published
in The Colonist. There
is still a large balance due to Thc AVeck
011 this score. The excuse must bc that
the occasion is not without importance,
nor the admission of The Colonist without
significance. The occasion is the very
commendable effort now being made to
bring about the establishment of car-
building shops in A'ictoria. The significance is that neither the journalist who
firs! mooted the subject, nor the financial
magnate who devised a scheme for raising
ihe necessary funds is prepared to assume
ihe responsibility of continuing to lead
1 lie movement. However, as a strong committee of business men lias been entrusted
wilh lhe task of investigation and suggestion, il is not unlikely ihat at the adjourned public meeting lo lie held on the
1-llh inst., some interesting information
may be available. The Week is heartily
in accord with thc proposal, and believes
that it is a feasible one. The principal
lilliculty is in procuring and arranging
available data in such a form as will ap-*
peal lo capitalists who will have to be
relied upon for carrying out the scheme.
Bonusing, except as a temporary expedient
is a poor foundation upon whicli to build
a permanent structure. The Dominion
Goyernmenf has within the last ten years
paid upwards of $7,000,000 hy way of
bonus to the iron and steel industries, wilh
results which cannot be regarded as satisfactory. A bonus is like a crutch, or
a go-cart : useful and in some cases neees-
(Continued mi Page Four) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907.
At The Street   t)
Corner
}
By THE LOUNQEK
I was glad to see that the British
Government had actually completed
some more of the clasps due to the
soldiers who served in the Boer War.
I say that I am glad, because if there
is a virtue which I admire, it is "Punctuality," and it seems to me little
short of marvellous that clasps which
were due in 1902 should actually be
readyas son as 1907.
Punctuality is one of the few virtues, perhaps the only one which I
possess. It is hard to find either man
or woman gifted with it. I believe
that the stock examples of punctual
people were the old-fashioned Red Indians, and to my mind it seems a pity
that they have been stamped out, as
they might have given modern civilization a few "pointers" on the subject of this all-important characteristic. They were always on time, neither before, nor behind.
Many people believe that they show
their punctuality by arriving at the
rendez-vous before the time appointed; in this they are entirely wrong.
It is just as unpunctual to be ahead
of time as it is to be behind. It is
all on the same principle as a watch;
a time-piece which is perpetually
gaining is just as useless as one that
is forever losing.
Now, you know very well, that I
never point to an abuse unless I can
either give a specific for its cure, or
point out the reason for its existence.
I will do the latter in the case of
"Unpunctuality." The reason why so
many people are unpunctual in keeping their appointments is because they
are certain that the other party will
also be unpunctual. For instance, if
Jones asks Smith to meet him at the
corner of Fort and Government
Streets (not necessarily inside the
Brown Jug) at a quarter-past three,
the probabilities are that Smith will
dally over his lunch, spend a few
minutes with a friend, remember that
he has left something at home and
finally solace his conscience with the
thought that Jones is sure to be at
least half an hour late. Jones, meantime, is doing the same thing and
imagines that Smith will be at least
an hour late. Now, fiow can this sort
of thing lead to punctuality; and yet,
readers, you must admit to yourselves that this is not an untrue portrait of what usually occurs. The
most punctual people I have ever met
have been childreji, and myself. Most
men are unpunctual; all women are
unpunctual, partly, I imagine, because they have initial difficulties at
home with their hats. Men and women of the present age, please mend
your ways and do be punctual. Remember that punctuality is the thief
of Time.
I am seriously thinking of turning
Socialist, even Anarchist (I hope the
Chief of Police will not get after mc
for this statement), not because I
object to work myself, or to seeing
others work, but from a feeling of
philanthropy towards those whose
private incomes preclude them from
the pleasures of work. To me it is
pitiful that so many men and women
should never know the blessings
which attend an active life; that so
many should have to spend their energies in charity (which energies, by
the way, are very rarely appreciated);
that so many should never know the
bliss which comes upon one who has
the satisfaction of having done a good
day's work. Needless to say, I am
not speaking from experience, but
from hearsay, but I understand that
hard work is the best paregoric (I believe that's the right word) for all the
ills and ailments of mankind. Personally I intend to start taking this
particular medicine when I get ill,
and not before, but I should not recommend this course to my readers,
because I think it is extremely immoral.
Now there is a subject which I take
up with a little trepidation, because it
touches that class of life, of which the
least said the better. However, I
havc always made a practice of saying
what I think, and of writing it, too;
when I have the chance. I think that
my readers will bear me out, at any
rate as to my justification in so writing, and that most of them will bear
me out in my facts. The Temperance
people are seeking to diminish the
number of licensed houses; this may
be a very excellent plan, and I, for
one, have no grudge against it. But,
why may I ask, do these very excellent Temperance people take note
only of those houses which pay a
fixed licence every year; whose owners are good citizens of the city; who
may be trusted to see, as a rule, that
their customers are sober both before
and after serving them; who pay a
heavy tax for the privilege of serving
their customers with alcoholic liquors;
who are necessary members of society, and who are for the most part
excellent persons in themselves.
I would beg to remind the Temperance agitators that there are in this
city, as, I believe, in every other city
in Canada, certain houses of ill repute.
The authorities recognize the necessity for the existence of these houses,
and although they may not be acknowledged officially, yet, practically,
their continuance is assured. Under
these circumstances it will be admitted that the sale of alcoholic liquor
on their premises cannot be prevented. Such being the case is it not fair
to urge upon the reformers the justice
of imposing a license tax upon the
owners of this class of houses where
liquor is sold illlicitly, before proceeding to raise thc existing tax upon
legitimate traders? A measure of this
kind could not fail to meet with general approval. It would be a source
of revenue, and would be no unfair
hardship to those who are accustomed
to quadruple the prices on all drinks.
I respectfully submit this suggestion
to the Mayor and his co-reformers.
I am inclined to believe that civilisation is a huge mistake. I am not
the first person to evolve this theory,
but as I have never yet made mention
of it myself, I feel that I am justified in airing my views on the subject. What do we find is the result
of civilisation? The degradation of
the previously uncivilised. First come
the missionaries and then the gin
trader. How much happier were
most of the savage tribes before they
were civilised. Consider the noble
brave of thc Red Indian type to whom
I have already referred. What is he
now? What was he before the advent
of "The Civilisers"?
But I am really thinking more of
myself in connection with this subject. I usually do think of myself
first; it pays. Owing to an excess of
civilisation we have what they call
"The Penny Postage." The question
arises as to whether this is a blessing
or a curse. I think it to be the latter,
because when it is so cheap to send a
letter you are supposed to write frequently to your friends and relations.
Now, letter writing is not a blessing.
There are, or at least there were people who really enjoy writing letters,
but the vast majority of us hate letter-writing. Unfortunately, however,
owing to the fact that a letter only
costs two cents, we are expected to
correspond at regular intervals with
all sorts of folk whom we should prefer never to see again. If, on the other hand, it cost four bits to send a
letter, other people would not expect
you to write to them more than once
a year. That the Imperial Government should repeal this Act, which
is, as I believe, attributed to a Mr.
Henniker Heaton, is the sincere wish
of
C&1
trtctcs&r.
[Obviously Lounger, with all his
store of learning, never heard of Rossland Hill.—Ed.l
Two of a Kind.
The professional humorist was having his shoes shined.
"And is your father bootblack,
too?" he asked the boy.
"No, sir," replied tht bootblack;
"my father is a farmer."
"Ah!" said the professional mumor-
SALE OF LOTS
IN THE FINEST SUBDIVISION YET
PUT ON THE MARKET
Bounded by Cook St., Dallas Road, Moss St.
Buy one or more lots for your home while prices are low.
BRITISH AMERICAN TRDST CO., Limited
COR. BROAD and VIEW STS.
1
TEL. 319
Lezve Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprieto,
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke   ar
Current rates.   Anthracite coal Tor sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
THEATREGOERS!!
The Victoria Theatre season
is just becoming ripe. Remember that extra hands on at the
Carlton Lounge
The old Vernon. Opp. Theatre.
Strictly First Class.
Theatre Call Bell.
STENOGRAPHY
L. McLEOD GOULD
Has opened a Stenographic Office
at 35 Yates Street, Victoria, B. C
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 11$ cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
THOMAS CATTEBALL
Builder and General Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring,
Ofllce, Bank, Store and Saloon Fittings
Pile Driving, Wharves and Dock Sheds
constructed and repaired.
TICTOBIA.
ist, reaching for his note-book; "he
believes in making hay while the (sun)
son shines."
It was at a charity dinner that a
careless waiter spilt a plate of coup
over one of the clergymen present.
What—he commenced. Then remembering himself, he turned to his
neighbor and asked: "Will some
layman kindly say a few words appropriate to the occasion?
THE SPINNEB.
A beggar blind, she sat upon a stone
Within thc market-place.
Amid the surging crowd she spun, alone,
A smile upon her face;
One paused  and  spake  to  her  in wondering  tone:
"Why do you smile?" he said.
"The  people  jostle  and  the  winds  are
cold;
Thy hopeless eyes are blind;
Thy garments are too meager far, and
old,
To fend thee from the wind;
Thou  hast no silver in  thy purse,  nor
gold,
But beggest for thy bread."
"I am not cold," she said; "my heart is
warm,
I do not feel the blast."
"But barken to the raging of the storm!
The sun is overcast!"
"I sit and spin," she said, "secure from
barm,
And think upon the Light.
"I do not see the squalor and the sin,"
She said, "that flaunt so near;
Instead,   my   brooding   gaze   Is   turned
within,
And  music soft I hear—
The voices of the stars—and spin and
spin
A garment strangely bright,
A cloth of gold to wrap my soul within
When it is night."
—Cella Myrover  Robinson.
TRIPLETS
GILBEY'S INVALID PORT
" Known in London as the Doctor's Friend."
Per Bottle, $1.25.
GILBEY'S SPEY-ROYAL SCOTCH
"As supplied to His Majesty King Edward the VII."
Per Bottle, $1.25.
GILBEY'S STRATHMILL SCOTCH
" The Greatest Good to the Greatest Number."
Per Bottle, $1.00.
DIXI H.ROSS & CO.
Cash Grocers     ;:     ::     ::     111 Government Street.
SPECIALTY.
Sauer-Kraut, 3 lbs. for  25c
Frankfurt Sausages, per lb 15c
We Want Mines
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding us particulars
stick to facts.
r We will send our expert anywhere.
j: A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO-
r GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
>o       Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
^SLSULSUUSJUULULXSUJJUULXUJU
The Man With a GUNN Is Satisfied
Gunn Sectional Bookcases are the best made, for reasons which
we will be pleased to show you if you will call upon us.
YOU   DONT   GET    DONE    WHEN    YOU    BUY    A    GUNN
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Metropolitan Building, &£&£&
(Books
Swear BY
Not AT
©ur
Gas Stoves
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4   1907
Floor
Coverings
In floor coverings we
are this year showing
greater quantities and a
better range of patterns
and values than ever before. Our second floor
is replete with a magnificent stock. These lines
are shown under most
favorable conditions. Many
large windows on three
sides make this a daylight floor.
Full Range of
Carpets
Hundreds of
Rugs
Special Display of
Chinese and
Japanese Matting
(test in Linoleums
and Oilcloths
STERLING SILVER
For a Wedding or Birthday Gift there are few things which are more acceptable than a piece of solid silver.
Sterling Silver is practically everlasting and a gift in this material will be appreciated for many moons.
In our Silverware department we have a very large showing of real choice pieces of Sterling,
just been augmented by a large shipment from one of the foremost makers of this class of goods.
This stock has
The design and finish of these new pieces is most pleasing and you will be surprised and delighted at the beauty
and skill displayed in the manufacture. Like our patrons we are satisfied with nothing but the best. Superiority
of quality, and designing that shows the highest achieve ments of the silversmith's craft.
We have priced these low, and if you will but come and see the line you will be surprised at the fairness of
the prices.
SUGAR SPOONS, at each, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00 and $2.50
BUTTER KNIVES, at each $2.50 and $3.00
BON BON TONGS, each    $1.75
SUGAR TONGS, at each $3.00 and   $3.50
SUGAR SIFTERS, at each $3.00 and  $3.25
CREAM LADLES, at each $2,00, $3.00 and .$3.25
SALT SPOONS, at each  50c
SALTS AND PEPPERS, at per pair, $1.50 and..$2.50
BABY SPOONS, at each $1.75 and $2.00
MATCH SAFES, at each $3,00, $3.50 and  $4.00
VASES, at each $1.00, $2.00 and  $3.00
COFFEE SPOONS, at per dozen $8.00 and ....$10.00
TEA SPOONS, at per dozen  $16.00
TABLE SPOONS, at per dozen   $40.00
TABLE FORKS, at per dozen    $40.00
BUTTER DISHES, at each  $8.00
CHILD'S CUPS, at each $6.00 and  $7.50
Special Values in Lace Curtains
There is now ready for your inspection today a very choice line of SWISS IRISH POINT CURTAINS. This
is a direct importation from St. Gall, Switzerland, a place made famous by the high quality of its curtain
productions.
This shipment includes some handsome lines which must be seen to be properly appreciated. We cannot here
describe their loveliness and show you* what exceptionally good values they really are.   We want to see them.
Luckily they have arrived at an opportune time. House-cleaning is now in full swing in many Victoria homes
and here is something that you surely need.
These were ordered last fall before the general advance in cost of these lines and these prices represent a
considerable saving over present real worth.   Prices per pair range—
$7.00, $7.50, $8.00, $9.00, $10.00, $12.00, $12.50 and $30.00.
Seasonable
Furniture
We are prepared to
meet the demand in seasonable lines of furniture. We have large
and complete stocks of
the many lines now in
season. We can supply
your every want. You
will save both time and
money by coming here
for   the   following   lines:
Lawn
Furniture
Porch
Furniture
Camp
Furniture
Go-Carts
Refrigerators
Ice Cream
Freezers
VICTORIA, HOME OF
THE FAMOUS
"OSTERMOOR"
MATTRESS.
Write for Catalogue and Samples.
We have a most interesting book on Homefurnishlng which we shall be pleased to send to anyone who thinks it
worth a post card. It is a book of useful suggestions on this important business of "Home Making," and should be
In the hands of all those contemplating the purchase of any furnishings for the home.   Write for it—now.
We send samples of draperies, curtain materials, mattings, carpets, linoleums, etc., etc., to interested people.
Our stock in these lines ls the largest in Western Canada; and out-of-town customers are invited to write us.
VICTORIA, HOME OF
" OLD HICKORY "
SUMMER
FURNITURE.
(Notes on
Provincial News
The Vancouver World quotes Chief
if Police Chisholm as asking the following pertinent question in connection with the case of one Neil Taylor, an escaped lunatic from the hospital for the insane at New Westminster:   "Shall a man be allowed to
■lie on the street just because there
[s not a fund to provide for medical
Jttendance?"    One would think that
In the largest city in the West, and
|n this Canada of ours such a ques-
lion would never have to be asked,
ind yet the fact is that for following
[he promptings of common humanity
Jnd procuring a hack to convey the
infortunate man to a place of safety
he chief will probably have to pay
ack hire and doctor's fee out of his
wn pocket. After this no person will
ie so foolish as to be taken ill in the
itreet, and hardly, if he can help it,
n Vancouver. It might be thought
hat the provision of a fund for such
|in obviously necessary and humane
mrpose would be one of the first im-
mlses of an enlightened community.
a name on the map. One by one it
has lost all its notable citizens: Billy
Ross has gone to Fernie; J. A. Harvey and the veteran editor, A. B.
Grace, to Cranbrook; the McVittie
brothers, so prominently identified
with the pioneer days of the district,
are wandering over the face of the
earth locating mineral and timber properties and running survey lines; Dave
Griffiths on Wild Horse Creek, and
the respected Indian agent are the
only ones who hold the fort. Meanwhile Cranbrook is forging ahead,
thanks to the development of a splendid lumbering industry. It has a population of 3,000 and possesses every
adjunct of advanced civilization, except a good opera house, and it is
about to acquire that at a cost of
$12,000.   Here's to Cranbrook.
East Kootenay. Mr. Randall is in the
prime of life and will make a capable
and efficient officer.
We hear a great deal these days
ibout Cranbrook, which is easily one
if the most prosperous of western
■ities, as it is also one of the most
peautifully situated. At its birth, ten
.ears ago, the general prediction wa3
(hat it would simply be a divisional
—joint, and long and bitter was the
Struggle between the rival settlements
)f Cranbrook and Fort Steele even
or this honour. The property owners of the latter place over-reached
[hemselves by making exorbitant de-
utnds upon the railway company,
..ith the result that they were side-
racked, and until the Kootenay Central is built Fort Steele will remain
[vhat it has been for eight years, just
Just what the coal mining industry
means to Vancouver Island and the
West Coast, and just what its enormous possibilities are may be gleaned
from the fact that the Wellington
Colliery Company of Cumberland has
just closed a contract to ship 20,000
tons of sack coal to Nome. It is understood that a much larger contract
could have been secured if it had
been possible to supply the coal.
■vi
The modest member for Fernie is
not getting very much for himself,
not even a port-foho, although he has
well earned it, and it is sure to come
in time; but he is not unmindful
of his friends and has been successful
in securing a valuable appointment for
R. C. S. Randall, who has just been
gazetted mining recorder for the Cariboo Division, Registrar of the Mining
Court of Cariboo and Collector of
revenue tax for the Barkerville Assessment District. Mr. Randall has
been a resident of Fernie for about
eight years; he is a son-in-law of
Col. Herchmer and for some time has
held a position as game warden for
Nanaimo is getting excited about
railway development and the opening
up of the country between the Coal
Capital and Alberni. The latest pronouncement of Vice-President Whyte
settles the question as to the route
which railway construction will take.
The Week is in a position to supplement the general statement with
the following facts: The main line
of railway from Wellington to Union
Bay will pass through Nanoose and
Parksville. It will not touch Cameron Lake as was expected, but will
debouch to the north over a pass
near Beaver Lake, the elevation being 1,200 feet. After crossing the
range it will swing round to the east
and head straight for Union Bay. A
branch line of some seven miles will
be built to Alberni. Nanoose will be
a divisional point and the right of
way has been moved onto the large
flat nearer the beach in order that
there may be plenty of room for a
yard. The work of construction will
commence this year. The mileage, including the branch to Alberni, will
approximate to eighty miles and the
whole is expected to be completed
within two years.
ly known in Chilliwack as "Arthur,"
has for some two years past been
Chief Engineer for the Kettle River
Valley Railway Co. with headquarters
at Grand Forks, and at this point
Mr. and Mrs. Henderson will reside,
having already taken up their abode
at the Hotel Yale of that city.
An event of much interest to Chilli-
wackers, because of the popularity of
the contracting parties, transpired on
Saturday, March 30th, at "Hawthorne
Lodge," the magnificent home of Mr.
John McClary, London, Ontario, the
bride's uncle, when R. A. Henderson, C.E., son of J. C. Henderson of
this place, and Miss M. D. Pavey,
daughter of Edwin Pavey of St.
Thomas, Ont., and sister to Mrs. M.
H. Nelems and Miss E. Pavey of this
place, were united in the bonds of
matrimony.
Mr. Henderson, better and popular-
Kaslo is waking up, or at any rate
The Kootenain is putting up a pretty
good case of make-believe. The Week
prefers to believe that the former
is the fact, and with three such veteran "boosters" as G. O. Buchanan,
R. L. Retallack and John Keen, to
say nothing of an ex-commissioner,
an ex-deputy commissioner and J. A.
Alexander, it would be strange if it
were not so. Then one must not forget the genial and inimitable Col.
Stone and the one and only naturalist, W. J. Cockle. These men of parts
and versatility would make the name
and fame of a greater city than Kaslo. If they can only restore the activity and splendour of thc early and
middle nineties, when Kaslo had the
temerity to dispute with Nelson for
the supremacy, they will havc
achieved something noble. Thc most
tangible approach yet recorded to
this ideal is to be found in a short
item published in the last issue of
Thc Kootenain, as follows:
"There is not an idle man in Kaslo and every horse and mule around
town has been pressed into service.
This is Kaslo's growing time."
His Honour Judge Forin of Nelson may not be thc most brilliant
man in the world, but he has a will
of his own, is a hard-working, conscientious officer and like an illustrious dignitary of the Supreme Court
is sedulously intent upon maintaining
the dignity of his office. This is as
it should be, "for who would fardels
bear when he might their quietus
make with a bare injunction?"    The
injunction referred to was laid upon
no less a person than Mr. J. A. Macdonald of Rossland, the leader of the
Opposition in the Provincial Assembly. The mild-mannered but somewhat
dour Scotchman some three months
ago trod upon the tail of the coat
worn by the judicial Irishman, and as
the latter was prohibited by the etiquette of the profession from resorting to the use of a shillelagh, he
laid an injunction upon the bellicose
Scot, preventing him from appearing
in thc august presence until hc had
purged his offence by offering a most
humble apology and bowing his face
to the floor three times, looking towards Nelson. The eminent counsel
vainly imagined that thc Statute of
Limitations with respect to such injunctions operated after three months,
but was both shocked and surprised
to find on turning up in the court
last week that the Irish judge had by
no means accepted that interpretation
of the law, and still insisted on his
"pound of flesh." For once thc coldblooded Scot waxed Irish hot, and
strange to say the effect worked inversely in the case of thc Irish judge,
who became increasingly cold, until
he reached the verge of stonyheartedness. The sequel was the complete
discomfiture of the unrepentant and
rebellious counsel, who is now conferring with Joe Martin as to the
best means of circumventing the injunction. Meanwhile the County
Court practice of Mr. J. A. Macdonald, K. C, leader of the Opposition,
and erstwhile political bed-fellow of
W. W. B. Mclnnis, ex-M. P., and ex-
commissioncr  is   suspended.
The Usual Verdict.
Judge—"What is the verdict of the
jury.'
Foreman of the Jury—"Your honor,
thc jury arc all of one mind—temporarily insane!" THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4 1907.
Ube Week
IS THE  ONLY  PROVINCIAL REVIEW
It circulates in every town and district in British Colum=
bia as well as through a large section of the Northwest
Provinces.
IT IS INDEPENDENT, FEARLESS, VIRILE
It accepts no questionable or patent medicine advertising
YOU CAN AFFORD TO SUBSCRIBE FOR IT
EDITORIAL COMHENT.
(Continued from Page One)
sary in early life, but to be abandoned at the earliest possible moment. Unless an industry becomes
self-supporting' it cannot be permanent. The Week is aware that
bonuses have become sueh a recognized institution in the New
World tliat they are invariably
used by promoters as a lever to induce capital to invest. Even this
may be an advantage, but it is of
far greater importance to be able
to demonstrate that one has
the natural resources, the economical point of assembly and the
market. If this can be shown
there is sufficient capital available
to start car-shops in or near Victoria, and the committee should
direct its attention to this work.
Indeed this is preliminary to approaching the Government with
any application for assistance.
The question of iron smelting has
been mentioned in this connection, but it is an entirely different
subject and is not at all essential
to thc establishment of car-building shops. The two subjects
should be investigated separately,
and if the conclusions are favourable their relations will ultimately
be demonstrated.
The Diplomacy of Women.
The dependency of women makes
for diplomacy. From their earliest
clays it is a necessity to their well-
being. The hoy-child is born with
the hereditary conviction of his superiority, which is fostered more often
than not by his upbringing.
What he takes by right and by force
the girl-child gains hy subtlety. As a
method of moving her world, it is
realized almost iu the cradle, and as
easily adopted as a duckling takes to
water, being thc survival of an instinct whose origin lies hidden in thc
darkest ages of antiquity.
The tactics of grown-up children
are merely those of the nursery somewhat elaborated. Thc field of operations is wider, and the desired objects
more complex and difficult of acquisition.
The accepted theory that women
are less honest than men arises from
their conversancy with diplomatic
ways for arriving at their ends. Thc
dividing line between these ways and
dishonesty is a narrow one, and
women seem less able to recognize
when they cross thc Rubicon. They
justify their means by their end, and
the male mind is apter to adopt thc
reverse method. Still, the world
would be but a poor place to live in
if it were not for the diplomacy of
women, working, as it docs, for peace,
which is well-nigh the most desirable
thing in life.
The average woman is always more
or less at thc mercy of her male belongings; of her father or brothers,
of her husband or sons. If she is
what is fallaciously termed an inde
pendent woman, she is at one end of
the scale at the mercy of her employers, and at the other end of her
dependents. It seems almost unnecessary to add that servants of every
class demand more and more the
skilled dealing of a Machiavelli if any
satisfaction is to be got out of them.
The household of the domestic diplomat is the only one that runs on
wheels nowadays.
The greatest philosopher of economics has truly said, "The nature of
women is an eminently artificial
thing, the result of forced repression
in some directions, unnatural stimulation in others"; and has further explained, "It is only a man here and
there who has any tolerable knowledge of the character even of the women of his own family. ... of
their actually existing thoughts and
feelings."
In thc nature of every woman there
is something of the Sphinx, and a
man may live his life through in unconscious ignorance of the enigma
beside him. In their home life men
are essentially creatures of habit and
tradition. Tt is only outside their
home that they find conventionality
amusing, and if they marry out of
their special sphere of conventions,
disaster is almost invariably the result unless thc woman is clever
enough to save the situation diplomatically.
Almost all the celebrated women
havc gained their fame by diplomatic
means. The famous women of Jewish
history were all subtle in their methods—Rebecca, Jael and Herodias, to
name but a few of them.   What born
diplomatists, too, were Catherine of
Siena, the great saint, and Catherine
de Medici, the great sinner! The list
of them down the ages is unending.
The royal road to fame as well as
to peace would seem for women to be
marked by the sign-posts of diplomacy.
The many friends of Miss Alma V.
Clarke of Vietoria and Kamloops will
be pleased to learn of the excellent
progress she is making in her musical
studies under Dr. F. H, Torrington of
Toronto. Miss Clarke was a pupil of
Mis Smtih of Victoria and last fall,
accompanied by her mother, went
east. Her first piano recital was given
at thc Toronto College of Music a
wek ago today. The young musician
was assisted by Miss Nina Coad and
Miss Deborah Caldwell. The programme was as follows:
(a) Rachmaninoff..Prelude in C sharp
minor.
(b' Prudent Le -Reve  d'Ariel
(c) Verdi-Liszt    "Rigoletto"
Ganz Vocal
"[ Seek for Thee in Every Flower."
Nina Coad.
(a) Chopin    Berceuse
(b) Gottschalk "II Trovatore"
(a) Trotere   Vocal
"A Rose in Heaven."
(b) Roeckel   "Primroses"
Deborah Caldwell.
Liszt   Rhapsodies No. 12
Whishaw. .Vainka's Song Vocal
Nina Coad.
Chopin Grande Polonaise, Op. 22
Orchestral accompaniment on second
piano, Dr. Torrington.
■PATRONIZE THE=
Football Match
AT OAK BAY THIS AFTERNOON, IN AID OF THE FUNDS
OF THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE
Gentlemen's
Summer Hose
Just the right weight for summer wear, but durable withal
—not made to sell only, but
made to wear well and look well
all the time.
IN LISLE THREAD
Black, tan grey and fancy
colors, extra strong at heels
and toes, per pair, 50c and 75c.
FINE GAUGE CASHMERE
In plain blacks, tans and a
galaxy of fancy colors; not loud
colors that only a bounder
would wear, but just those
shades which bespeak the well-
bred. We have a splendid assortment, at per pair, 25c, 50c
and 75c.
SILK HOSE
Absolute  perfection   for   summer   wear in black and colors,
at 75c, $1 and  $1.50
Sea & Gowen's
The Gentlemen's Store
64 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.
Every Man's Librarj
A new scries of books being pul
lished by J. M. Dent & Co. of Lol
don, a firm noted for the excellenj
of its printing and binding.
There will be a thousand titles
the series, over three hundred ncj
ready, comprising the very cream
English literature and translatiol
from the Classics. It will inclul
many copyrights not to bc had othtl
wise in a popular form.
Thc print is large and clear.    T|
thin   India   paper   makes   the   boc
convenient to hold.   The binding ;
in Maroon Limp Leather and partic
larly   neat,  gilt   tops.
We have made a heavy contra
with thc publishers and place t(
price at
65 cents per volume
THOMSON
STATIONERY O
325 Hastings St. Vancouver, Bj
WEEK 6TH  MAY,  1907
The New Gram
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    Proprietor!
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON. ,
THE  PARISIAN   GRAND
OPERA DUO
M.   Conty,  Tenor.   M.  Gerart,  1
M. Conty, M. Gerart,]
Tenor. Baritoil
HARRY W. BABB AND CO.|
Comedy Sketch
" The Sheriff of Laramie "
Harry W. Babb, E. Loring Kel|
and Miss Mazie Oliver.
The Ways ot Many People
EDWARD A. LESLIE
The Entertaining Entertainer |
BURTON AND VASS
Singing and Talking Comcdian|
PINKIE MULLALLY
Soubrette
GEO. F. KEANE
Song Illustrator
" Some One Thinks of Someond
NEW MOVING PICTURES!
Thc most popular film of late ye;|
for either old or young,
The " Teddy " Bears
Prof. M. Nagel's Orchestra
"Polonaise   Militaire,"  by  Chop|
arranged by M, Nagel,
Upside Down.
"Help!   ilelp!" cried an   ltalian|
borer mar the mud-flats of thc
lem River.
"Wha?.- thc matter there?" canl
voice from thc construction shanll
"Quick; Bringa da shoy'l! Brl
do peck! Givanii's stuck in da 111]
"How far in?"
"Up  to his  knees'."
"Oh, let him walk out."
"No, no! He no canna walkll
wronga end up!"—Everybody's M|
zinc. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4, 1907
VS10JX  B. 8. COMPANY OP 8. 0.
LIMITED.
This   Company   Is   not   supported  by
H Government subsidies, but by the good
1*' will  and   patronage  of    the travelling
public and shippers.
i Steamers leave Company's Wharf,
. Vancouver, for Prince Bupert, Port Eis-
IVlngton, Portland Canal, Alert Bay and
f Cannery Porta, on 1st, 10th and 20th of
! each month, and leave Vietoria on day
before, by new steel
i Steamer "CAMOSUN,"
,' the only  steamer  on  this  route built
•with   steel   water-tight   compartments
i and  double bottom,  insuring  safety  of
J passengers in case of collision or wreck.
f     Van   Anda,   Lund,   Heriot   Bay,   Hos-
kyn Inlet, Surge Narrows, Granite Point,
Elk Bay, Hardwiek Island, Bear Itiver,
l* Salmon River, Port Harvey and all log-
I glng camps, every Morula/ at $ p. m.
1      Van Anda, Lund, Lewis Channel, Shod
Bay,  Port  Neville,  Port Harvey,  Chatham Channel, Tribune Channel, Broughton Island, every Friday at 6 p. m.
Gibson's,     Pender     Harbor,     Nelson
Island, Marble Bay, Blubber Bay, Lund,
I Manson's, Whaletown, Read Island, Bute
I Inlet, every Monday at 11 a. m.
Gibson's, Wellcome Pass, Pender Har-
j bor, Agammemnon Channel, Hotham
| Sound, Vancouver Bay, Deserted Bay,
^Deserted Bay, every Friday at 9 a. m.
\, Sechelt, Buccaneer Bay, Nelson Island,
f'l'Granlte Island, Scotch Fir Point, Van
:"Anda, Blubber Bay, Marble Bay, every
(Saturday noon.
li    For  berths   and   passages,  apply  at
|| Company's Offices—
CABBALL STBEET, VANCOUVEB,
ana G3 Wharf Street, Vietoria.
SKEENA RIVER
STEAMBOAT
SERVICE
Steamer "Northwest" for Hazleton
jjind all points on the Skeena  River
Kivill leave Port Essington about May
J'jioth and thereafter regularly during
lie season of 1907.
For passenger and freight rates ap-
Iply at the office of
THE NEW BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMERCIAL CO., LTD.,
Room 14 Jones Building,
■R07 Hastings St. VANCOUVER
THIS SPACE IS
RESERVED FOR
Connell,
Young &
Mitchell
SOLE   AGENTS   FOR   MUTUAL REAL ESTATE CO.
Capital Stock $150,000.00
WANT
5   Modern   Houses  with  good
|   grounds,  also  10 A.   1   Building    sites    or    cheap    inside
acreage*    We are buying, not
f   selling.
64 DOUGLAS STREET
Phone 35a.
VICTORIA.
I Sell
[The Earth
IA. 0. P. Francis
REAL ESTATE BROKER
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER. B. C.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE
WE WILL SELL
925 Arlington  (Slocan)    06A
1000 Alberta Coal & Coke 31
1500 International Coal 62
2000 Rambler Cariboo    35
3000 Diamond Vale   26
WE WILL BUY
500 Western Oil Cons 1.65
1000 Rossland Giant  02^2
2000  Belcher    38
We sell calls on all Curb stocks.
Many prefer to deal in stocks in this
way. If you are interested write us
for information.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment
Brokers.
Drawer 1083. Mellon, B. C.
R.   S.    DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
44 Fort Street .... VICTORIA.
WANTED
TIMBER
LANDS
I have connections with Eastern
capitalists wanting timber lands, saw
mills and logging outfits. I would
like to meet cruisers or others having
these properties for sale.
E. R. CHANDLER
Room 8, Jones Building,
407 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B. C.
YOU  LOOK  FOR  TROUBLE
If you obtain a Fltearm of doubtful qunlilj
The experienced Hunter's and
Marksman's Ideal
is a reliable, unerring STEVENS
FIND OUT WHY
by .hooting our popular
RIFLES-SHOTGUNS
PISTOLS
Ask your local Hardware
or Sporting Goods Merchant for the STEVENS.
If you cannot obtain, ire
ship direct, express pre-
pnid, upon receipt of Catalog Trice.
Send 4 cents in stamps for 140 Page
Illustrated Catalog, including circulars of latest additions to oiir line.
Contains points on shooting, ammunition, the proper care of a firearm,
etc., etc. Our attractive Ten Color
LiMio'rraphed I la neer mailed any-
tvherofnr f.x cents In stnmps.	
J. STEVENS ARMS Ss TOOL CO.
P. O. Box 4007
Chlcopee Falls,  Mass.,   U. S. A.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co, Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ol ipeclally selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
ROW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the salest and best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.   There will be a
60 PER CENT. INCREASE
IN YALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you liow to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hold)
REAL ESTATE
SPECIAL  BABOAXNS
95,000—City lot 629.120 feet, on Doug-
las et.
$5,000—Cottage and lot, 60x120; No. 181
Fort st.
$1,350—Fine residential lot near Douglaa st., $500 cash, balance ln two
years at 6 per cent.
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots,
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E- ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
t
B.    KUBB1T
46 Fort Btzett
P. O. Box 77 Phone 1279
VICTORIA
W.B.Smith
Wnttrta&tr
35 YATE5 5
PHONE.     892
POULTBY KEEPING FATS.
Readers of our magazine, because lt
teaches the bqst methods of handling
fowls for profit. Tells how to get eggs
In winter, and raise chicks in summer.
Shows house-plans, handy appliances,
etc., as woll as illustrating and describing the different breeds. Every Issue
worth the price of a year's subscription.
We will send it one year and Include a
large book on poultry for GOc. Sample
freo. Poultry Advocate, Petrolea, Ontario.
NELSON, B. C—Improved and
unimproved City Property
handled on commission. F. B. Lys,
Real Estate and General Agent, West
Baker St., Nelson, B. C
P
rt I CrIX 1 3   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay Lake and West Arm.
Lake and Biver frontage. We
have large and small tracts of
good land and prices to suit all.
Also several partly Improved
ranches. Full particulars willingly given.
I
♦  H. E. CR0AS0AILE &  CO.
| Nelson, B.C.
BOND SIGN  CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
Seeds, Trees,
Plants
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard
or conservatory. Acclimated stock.
Oldest established nursery on the Mainland.
NO Seedless Apples
HO Pitless Plums
HO Cobless Corn
Just old, reliable, approved varieties at |
reasonable prices. We do not even sup- '
ply any kings or presidents—Just the I
common British Columbian Is good !
enough for our trade.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps, Spraying Material, Greenhouse Plants, Cut
Flowers.
Wo do business on our own grounds
—have no rent to pay, and and are prepared to meet all competition.
Let me price your list before you
place  your  order.    Catalogue  FREE.
KI.EEHBT
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver.
OWNERS
OF  COAST  AND  ISLAND  TIMBER   DESIROUS   OF   SELLING
SHOULD CONSULT
Haywood Bros,
& Company
Realty, Mining and Timber Brokers,
45* Seymour St. VANCOUVER.
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates and
designs lurnisheri.
Lulu Island
Land
30 acres—18 cleared, 5 in strawberries, all fenced; $210.00 per
acre; half cash.
160 acres, Lulu Island—Nearly all
under cultivation; 6 roomed
house, barn and outbuildings;
$190.00 per acre, one-third cash.
Central Park, 5 acres—2 cleared;
good 5 roomed house; good
stable and hen house; $3,100.00,
$1,000 cash.
180 acres—Alluvial soil; house;
barn; 20 cleared; small fruits;
orchard.   Price, $6,000; half cash.
247 acres—Rich soil, 200 acres cultivated, which produces 3 to 4
tons hay per acre, 250 fruit trees
bearing; 2 houses; 3 large barns;
2 silos. This is one of the best
paying propositions in the Fraser
Valley. Price, $20,000; on easy
terms.
York & Mitchell
606 Hastings St.   VANCOUVER.
BARGAINS
-IN-
Fruit
Lands
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
ARROW LAKES
Now is the time to buy. We have
large and small tracts of good land
and prices to suit all.
Some snaps in Coast property.
Kincaid & Anderson
Real Estate, Insurance and Financial
Agents
Firit Street   ::   ::   Revelstoke, B. C.
Timber Wanted.
We have urgent demands for timber, especially in large bodies, both on
the coast and in the interior. Full
reports and maps wanted!
MONTANA   BROKERAGE   CO.,
336 Cambie St., Vancouver.
_ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4) 1907.
utton's Seeds
Sutton's Late Green Marrow Pea.
Sutton's Walcheren Cauliflower.
Tie FINEST in the World
A Title that is not a mere stretch of
imagination built on vain words, but won
in open competition with the whole world
in every part of the world. This marvellous record has been maintained unbroken
for the past 85 years.
WHY?
For over one hundred years " SUTTON
& SONS" have been growing, trying, testing, acquiring and discarding seeds from
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arrived at the world's standard of present
perfection with the result that flowers
grown from "SUTTON'S SEEDS" are
larger and more perfect; vegetables are
liner and more choice; root and other farm
crops are over thirty per cent, more profitable. We are proud to handle these world-
renowned seeds
BECAUSE
Nothing is too good for this glorious Western land of ours. British Columbia demands and deserves thc finest seeds in the
world, AND SHE GETS THEM EVERY
TIME YOU
Sow Sutton's Seeds
From thc Sole Agents
The Brackman-Kerr
Milling Company, ud.
125 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
36 Hastings St., Vancouver, B.C.
And at New Westminster and Nelson, B. C.
Sutton's Parsnip.
Sutton's Imperial Cabbage.
Notes on
Provincial News
The latest news from the Slocan
mining camp bears out all that has
been predicted for several years past
; as to the splendid prospects of the
Rambler. Mr. Zwieky bids fair to
reap for himself and his colleagues a
richer harvest than was expected. In
the new workings between the
seventh and ninth level a vein of rich
ore nine feet in width is being developed, and this is only one of several similar veins which have been
cut by the tunnelling and upraise
operations. It would not be surprising if the Rambler ultimately turned
out to be one of thc richest mines
in the Province.
pert attention. A new company has
just been formed to start a large tobacco farm on the Mission ranch and
adjoining lands. Mr. H. Rothenberg
is the managing director, and T. W.
Stirling and P. M. Carruthers joint
promoters. A capital of $5,000,000 is
spoken of, but probably not more
than a fifth of this will be required.
The climate is ideal for the purpose
of tobacco raising, and if the product be properly cured and kept in
stock long enough to mature there is
no reason why success should not
attend thc effort. The Okanagan is
a far better district in which to grow
tobacco than any portion of the Province of Quebec, where the industry
is conducted on a large scale.
ing returned from a visit to the Old
Country.
Jim Grier has purchased the Greenwood Ledge from Colonel Lowry. Jim
is well known throughout Southeast
Kootenay, having passed through
Cranbrook several times by hand. Although born in Bruce county, Ontario,
where agricultural journalism flourishes, Jim is no hayseed thought
moulder, lie is an able editor and
a good printer. The colonel intends
making a tour of the cent belt lecturing on "The difficulties of making
a four flush win."—The Prospector.
it has consistently supported him ever
since it was known that the late member would not seek re-election; it is
anxious to see its high expectations
of Mr. Scholield's ability and fair-
mindedness justified, and therefore
hopes he will yet see his way to support the petition of practically the
whole of Nelson for Chief Jarvis' appointment.
surprised. Somebody's boys are thei
and we ask whither is the tendenc
and ultimate results of these nigl
ramblings and such doing?
Maple syrup made in Kamloops
would be somewhat of a surprise to
thc average easterner who in all probability has never seen a hard maple
tree in this province. That the tree
grows and thrives here is known but
it is likely that it remained for Alex
McArtlnir of McArthur & Harper, to
make the first test of thc quality of
thc sap from thc local grown hard
maple. From a tree in his garden
he took the sap, boiled it in approved
sugar-making fashion and the result
was as good as the product of any
crack Quebec "sugar bush." It is
up to someone now to advocate the
manufacture of maple sugar as an industry for the interior of British
Columbia.
Tobacco growing at Kelowna is not
a new enterprise, having been established there more than ten years ago,
when F. J. Watson, who sunsequcnt-
ly removed to Fernie, where he has
made a fortune in the real estate business, acted as secretary. Thc enterprise, however, bas not been uniformly successful. The cause for this is
not far to seek, and may be stated
as insufficient capital and lack of ex-
Thc Hedley Gazette draws attention
to the fact that very little progress
is being made with the construction
of the V. V. & E. railway. After
thc lapse of two years less than
fifty miles has been actually completed. In 1897 M. J. Haney built
150 miles of the Crow's Nest Railway
iu a year through a far more difficult country and at a greater distance
from the base of supplies. Recently
the surveyors who havc been at work
since last summer received orders to
disband, and they have left the country. No one would expect to get any
information as to the intentions of the
company from thc astute but sphinxlike J. J. Hill, and it would probably
be just as futile to apply to his political sponsors at Ottawa, "the solid
seven." In view, however, of the
positive declaration that the line
would bc constructed through to Cloverdale within two years it Avottld appear that thc Province is entitled to
some explanation. The talk of commencing at thc western end and building east appears to have just as much
foundation in the case of the V. V.
& E. as in the case of the G. T. P.
J. G. Thynne, of Otter Valley, arrived in Nicola on Friday last, hav-
Jim Schofield of Trail is a good
fellow and will make a splendid M.
P. P. Measured by the yard-stick of
the average constituent he has already
demonstrated the latter by securing
for his division an appropriation of
nearly $28,000 in addition to a good
share of the special appropriation for
bridges. This is more than double
the amount secured by thc Ymir Riding in the past. The Week would,
however, respectfully request Mr.
Schofield not to become a graduate
for the Hogocracy. A man who has
done as well as hc bas during the
first session and secured an appropriation which other less fortunate
members think is pretty nearly equal
to the earth, should be above casting
envious eyes at Naboth's little vineyard, which being translated into
modern journalese means that he
should be satisfied with the patronage of Ymir Riding and not seek
that of Nelson also. The wardenship
of Nelson gaol belongs on all grounds
to Chief Jarvis, that is if high personal character, competency, fitness
and long and honourable service
count for anything. Mr. Dcvitt of
Trail has no particular claims on the
party and certainly none on Nelson.
Hc is well provided for as local land
agent of the C. P. R. The Week was
the first to suggest thc nomination of
Mr. Schofield for the Ymir district;
.*, .'" /     '
A. E. Planta, the popular Mayor of
Nanaimo, finds his real estate business increasing so rapidly that he is
unable to handle it alone, and has
therefore secured thc assistance of
Mr. Herbert Skinner, who has had
many years' experience in this line of
business. Mr. Planta is branching
out in the districts which will be traversed by the new railway to Union
Bay, and is already dealing with a
large acreage.
The small boy seems to be attracting more than his share of attention
just now. This is especially true in
B. C. where he rapidly promises to
furnish a problem insoluble alike by
parent, teacher and police. The Week
has recently quoted extracts upon this
vexed subject from the Nelson News,
the Fernie Free Press, the Revelstoke Herald and other Provincial
papers. The mildest term which some
of these were willing to apply to the
peccadilloes of a troublesome youth
was "hooliganism." The Cowichan
Leader in its latest issue touches the
subject somewhat picturesquely, as
witness thc following paragraph:
"Oh, where is my wandering boy
tonight?" Take a look down the
street about 10 or 11 o'clock. Notice the signs being torn down, boxes
overturned, stones hurled through
windows of vacant houses, shutters
pried open. Who are these types of
unmitigated nuisances? "What-" you
exclaim, "my boy there?" We do
not say so, but since he is not at
home, suppose you look and ascertain, and it is possible you may bc
The Moyie Leader is near enouf
to the centre of disturbance to ke(
in touch with every move in this ir
portant matter. In its latest issue
places itself in line with every pap
published in the interior except or
by registering its opinion as to wl
is the real nigger in the fence.
The Week is supposed to be more
less biased in this matter, it refrai
from further comment, but gives t
editorial opinion of the Moyie Lead
verbatim:
"It is said the Fernie miners ft
that if they could pass up Lindsey,
settlement would be reached in a fi
hours. The operators, it is said, f<
the same way. Then Lindsey shot
be asked to step aside and alloAv t
settlement of the difficulty to procd
without delay."
Under Her Bed.
Mrs. Hicks was telling some lad;
about the burglar scare in her hot
the night before.
"Yes," she said, "I heard a no
and got up, and there from under t
bed I saw a man's legs sticking ou
"Mercy!" exclaimed a woman. "T
burglar's  legs?"
"No, my dear; my husband's le
He had heard the noise, too."
(With   Apologies   to   Tennyson.)
Break,   break,   break,
At the hands of my maids, ah me!
And 'tis well that I do not utter
Tiie thoughts that rage inwardly.
Oh! well for the sixpenny plaque
That  it  hangs  untouched  on  the w
Oh!   well   for  the  vase  that  one  bi
at Bazaars,
That never is known to fall!
While the "Lowestoft" bowls go "ban
And the "Wedgewood" ware Is crash
And 'tis O for the touch of the "Cro
Derby" cups
And  the sight of the  "Sevres"  they
smashed!
Break, break,  break,
At the hands of my maids, ah me!
But the little there's left of the ch
I  love
Shall be kept under lock and key.
—Pall Mall Magazim THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907
Notes on
'•Provincial News
The Week has on many occasions
j| endeavoured to direct the attention of
the authorities to the reckless and
criminal destruction of game birds by
conscienceless bipeds who call themselves sports.   A contemporary calls
j, attention to a matter which appears
to have been grossly neglected in
words which are none too strong for
I the occasion:
"Thc annual  slaughter of breeding
game  birds has  been going on for
I some time. The provincial police will
do nothing to put a stop to this diabolical work. It is not in their line
of business. The government has not
the time to waste in making provision for the enforcement of the game
laws,   consequently   thc   way   of  thc
I poacher is comparatively smooth."
Canadian Metals Company with caution and discretion. After a thorough
investigation and a scientific test of
some hundreds of samples of ore,
taken from the Bluebell mine, he has
advised the company to erect a two-
hundred ton mill. His advice has been
accepted and construction work on
the new mill will start next week, lt
will take a long time to pull this
company into shape, but if it can be
done Mr. Fowler is the man to do it.
All he needs is time and a free hand;
it is certain that he will insist on
both.
That the Vancouver World can bc
iboth strong and sane on occasions is
^proved by its excellent articles of the
vlast few weeks on the coal strike, but
tthat its penchant is still the ultra-sen-
fsational is well illustrated by the yel-
jlow streaks which, like bars sinister,
Bdisfigure its shield. Its latest is dated
r'Victoria, April 29," and tells of " A
[shackled girl rescued from flames. A
(female denizen of Chinese cell spirited
laway to another prison." The story
lis graphically described in a lurid
[-paragraph which tells that out from
I'the smoke and flames which rolled
litlong the narrow hall, staggered a
([Chinaman. Limply lying in his arms
twas a burden, the weight of which
tmade him stumble at the foot of the
Ifistair. For a moment the folds of the
l^ilkcn hanging, torn with hasty hand
Ijfrom some inner doorway, were toss-
|*,ed aside, revealing the painted, doll-
1,'like face, of a young Chinese woman.
JiThe startled spectators had hardly
■'grasped the fact that her limbs were
[heavily loaded with shackles, when
ifher rescuer again gathered her within
(ihis arms and dashed down a narrow
(■alley. Since that moment the most
Icareful search on the part of the Vic-
Ktoria police has failed to rival the
[slightest trace of thc woman.
I The facts are that the limp burden
Iwas a very much alive and struggling
lone, that it was not a woman at all
i.but a boy who had been locked in
Ihis room for misbehaviour, and was
[being rescued by his father. The facts
Eire well known to thc police; there
Bias been no difficulty in connection
■with the matter and the supposed
■connection of the ladies of Victoria
■with the incident is pure imagination.
R. M. Macdonald of Nelson is a
popular barrister, who has often conducted the Crown cases at Nelson
Assizes, and a year ago acted as dep-
uty-attorney-general in Victoria during the absence of Mr. Wilson and
Mr. McLean. Mr. Macdonald, however, is not less conspicuous in another department than in law, for he
is the conductor and manager of the
Nelson Choral Society, which is one
of the best musical aggregations in
tlie Province. Last week a splendid
concert was given by this society, in
which three choruses from Wagner,
The Flying Dutchman and Lohengrin were given, followed by Stem-
dale Bennett's May Queen. The Nelson press was enthusiastic and de
clared that only one criticism could
be offered, viz., that Nelson did not
get enough of the choral society. It
divides its praise between Mr. Macdonald for his painstaking work and
efficient conducting, and Mr. H. S
Bodmer, the accompanist, who is one
of the most brilliant pianists and one
of the soundest musicians in the west.
On reading the following paragraph one might be excused for supposing that it is an item translated
from some Armenian or Persian jour
nal. As a matter of fact is it clipped
from the Nelson Daily News, which
will confer a great benefit on a curious
public by offering some explanation
The only one suggested in thc office
of The Week is that it is a cuneiform
inscription from some exhumed
Egyptian cylinder:
"There will be a meeting of the
Oriental Order of Humility and Perfection tomorrow night in order to
meet the grand mogul from Vancouver. The Hyastite and the Rossland
tetrach will necessarily attend.
The  editor  of  a   Provincial   Daily
charges the  Rev. W.  M.  Rochester,
|western secretary of the L. D. A.,
vith impertinence.   This will only be
surprise to those who do, or do not
snow the editor.
There is a movement on in Nelson
[0 extend the city limits so as to include the suburb of Fairview. This
(natter has been under consideration
for some years, but is now being
lorced to the front by the rapid
Ijrowth of the capital of the Kooten-
lys. There should be no opposition
To what can only be regarded as a
progressive movement. It will involve a little extra taxation and will
■insure more than a little extra pro-
lection. Every property owner in
Fairview including Mr. Jiscovicz, who
liarefully considers the situation, will
Tealize that the accruing benefits will
lar outweigh the disadvantages.
A contemporary bemoans thc fact
that we shall soon be enveloped in
clouds of dust, and that no efficient
remedy for the nuisance has yet been
suggested. As the complaint hails
from East Kootenay The Week en
dorses the project mooted of using
petroleum instead of water for sprinkling; it is known to be much more
effective and as there is an abundant
supply in the Flathead district there
will be no difficulty in adopting the
system ■ which promises to be both
effective and economical.
About 800 men are now working
in Extension mines, Ladysmith. It
is a sight worth seeing as the miners
train pulls up to the depot, and hundreds of sturdy men and boys race
each other along the platform and
street homewards. As a travelling
man observed to another last evening,
you don't often see such a lot of well
put up able bodied men get off a
train, as the men now passing. It
is not strange that the little city has
a champion football team.—Nanaimo
Herald.
The Similkameen Star indifferently
londucted for some years under the
Inalign influence and constant interference of A. E. Howse has been purchased by B. S. Kennedy, who is at
Isast a newspaper man and who will
le more intent upon advertising the
Jistrict, and attracting the attention
If the outside world to the Similka-
lieen than in fomenting party strike
Ind indulging in personal bickerings,
lhe Week congratulates Mr. Kennedy
[h having acquired a paper which was
lnce influential and may be made a
lower in what will yet be one of the
|chest  valleys  in  British   Columbia.
S. S. Fowler, M. E., of Nelson, is
landling the various properties of the
Mrs. D. M. Crowley, of Rossland,
will visit her daughter, Miss Winnie
Crowley, at Kansas City, where the
latter is now singing with thc Boston Ideal Opera Company. At the
conclusion of the Kansas City engagement Miss Crowley will sever
her connection with the company and
proceed to New York, where she will
take vocal lessons under some competent teacher.
The Chambers of Ker Heart.
The doors are shut; and none may deign
to guess
Of those mysterious rooms they cannot
share—
Herself not doeming of their spaciousness
Till   Love,  unbidden,  finds  an  entrance
tliere.
—Eugene C. Dolson.
Coats, Suits
and Waists
CAMPBELL'S
Everything
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BEWITCHING BLOUSES
The most beautiful assortment of dainty blouse wear that
has ever been displayed in
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designs. Many are most elaborately trimmed with fine lace
and exquisite embroidery,
whilst others gain effect from
their handsome simplicity. All
sizes; short, long and three-
quarter sleeves. ALL are extremely moderate in price
90c, $1.00, $1.25,
$1.50, $1.75 and
up to $9.00
Anqus Campbell & So.
MAIL ORDERS
PROMPTLY
ATTENDED TO
THE LADIES' STORE
Promis Block, Government Street, Victoria.
SOLE AGENTS
FOR
LA VEDA
CORSETS.
Motto for a Cemetery.
A merchant who had amassed a
large fortune made many gifts to his
native town, one of which was a tract
of land, to be used as a cemetery.
One day he took his gardener to thc
proposed cemetery to plan out walks
and drives through the grounds. As
they were passing out under the arched entrance, that had just been completed, the donor of the land said to
his gardener:
"Now, Pat, I can't think of anything
to make this cemetery complete except a motto on this gateway. But
I would like to have something that
we don't sec everywhere. Can't you
suggest something suitable?"
Pat scratched his head for a moment, and then said:
"How would this do, sir: 'We
have come to stay?'"
Bridal Lore.
A January bride will be a prudent
housekeeper and very good tempered.
A February bride will bc a humane
and affectionate wife and tender
mother.
A March bride will be a frivolous
chatterbox, somewhat given to quarreling.
An April bride will be inconstant,
not very intelligent, but  fairly good
joking.
A May bride will be handsome,
amiable, and likely to be happy.
A June bride will be impetuous and
generous.
A July bride will be handsome and
smart, but a trifle quick tempered.
A September bride will be discreet,
iffable, and much liked.
An October bride will be pretty,
coquettish, loving, but jealous.
A November bride will be liberal,
ind, but of a wild disposition.
A December bride will bc well proportioned, fond of novelty, entertain-
ig, but extravagant.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
What Restrained Him.
A stranger in a small town wanted
thc advice of a lawyer and as hc was
hunting for one one day he came
upon a sign which read, "A. Swindle,
Attorney at Law."
He entered thc office and after rc-
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH & CO.
Factory and Head Office -
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Office
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS -I CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader   -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
cciving the necessary advice said that
thc lawyer was a fine man, buehe
wanted to know why hc made his
name sound so ridiculous and why-
he did not put his name in full.
"1 would," replied the lawyer,
laughing, "if my first name were nol
Adam."
The Worm's-Eye View.
Consistent ignoring of thc duties
and responsibilities of Empire may be
Little Englandism,I prefer to think it
ignorance, an ignorance which is not
peculiar to the Labour Party, but to
a class of politicians brought up in a
narrow clique, knowing next to nothing of his country and its place in the
world. It is the worm's-eye view of
things.—Planet.
REWARD $250
The Royal Vancouver Yacht Club will
pay the above reward for such information as will lead to the arrest
and conviction of thc person or any
of tht persons who broke into certain
yachts lying at thc Club anchorage at
Vancouver, between thc 14th and 19th
days of April, 1907, and stole therefrom stores, blankets, furnishings, fittings,  etc.
Full particulars of the articles stolen
can be furnished by the undersigned,
to whom all communications should
bc addressed.
C. O. JULIAN,
Hon.  Scc'y  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht
Club, 344 Granville Street,
VANCOUVER. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, MAY 4  1907.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
88%   Government Street. .Victoria, B.C.
Rm. 14, McKinnon Blk. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Banzai.
By BOHEMIAN.
Every Englishman was brought up
on roast beef, plum pudding and
" Hurrah." The exercise of shouting
tlie latter expanded his lungs and
otherwise strengthened his diaphragm
to lit him more fully for doing his
duty with respect to the former. It
is said that no other nation in the
world can cheer like the English and
I verily believe it. An expert in
cacophony might be able to explain
this, and would possibly attribute it
not only to the voice production but
to the relation of the two inflections
which are requisite to the full expression of the word. Many a time have
I listened to a vast concourse of people, on some. occasions as many as
100,000 cheering a victorious football
team. Again on Hampstead Heath or
Cannock Chase I have heard from
50,000 to 60,000 people cheer Mr. Gladstone, when they had been raised to
a pitch of the highest excitement by
one of that magnificent orator's harangues. Possibly the loudest cheering I ever heard was when the great
Liberal chieftain delivered his historic
impeachment of Turkey in connection
with the Bulgarian atrocities. The
cheering lasted at least fifteen minutes
and I thought it would never cease.
Even when the crowd began to melt
away the excited multitude would
turn again to give yet another cheer.
On all these occasions one was struck
with the whole-heartcdness and absolute abandon of the cheerers. The
second syllable seems to mount higher
and higher with that rising inflection
of which it admits, and which gives
the impression of being limitless.
I have attended many political meetings in Canada and have also been
present at important functions which
aroused the keenest interest on the
part of those present, but I have yet
to hear the old English "Hurrah," as
I heard it at home. There is more
restraint, more conventionality and
an apparent unwillingness to let oneself go, which 1 cannot help thinking is largely due to self-consciousness, for Canadians do not feel less
keenly than Old Countrymen, but any
habitue of the theatre, the concert
room or the political meeting will at
once admit that the visible and audible demonstration is very different,
and I venture to think, less natural.
For instance, from Nova Scotia to
British Columbia it is the invariable
custom for a Canadian audience to
applaud almost every item on a concert programme, regardless of its
merits, but the applause dies instantly
the performer re-appears, and with a
suddenness that must produce something approaching a chill. Why is
this? Is it that the applause lacks
sincerity and is not so much a mark
of appreciation as a means to an end?
Or is it the invariable unwillingness
of a Canadian audience to give way
to demonstration cf any kind? Similarly applause in public meetings is
rare and never prolonged, however
important the occasion, or notable thc
utterance.
It is not strictly in line with the
title of my sketch, but at this point
I am led to ask another question,
which at any rate bears directly on
the subject of tlie outward and visible sign of an inward emotional disturbance. Why do Canadian audiences, especially thc female portion,
begin to titter and half-hystcrically to
laugh at the most pathetic incidents
in a play? It cannot bc, and it is
not, on account of any lack of intelligence to appreciate the true meaning of the situation, and I can only
conclude that it is an hysterical cloak
for the feelings aroused which would
more naturally give vent in tears. It
is not a commendable substitute, being unnatural it is necessarily inartis-
t:"; it grates harshly on the sensibilities of those who believe in the
true expression of emotion, and by
its very perversity it irritates.
I have a theory that profound feeling can only be aroused in public by
profound incidents. The occasion
must be great; the personality of the
actor must be imposing, or there must
be some historic association which appeals to the depths of one' nature. I
shall never forget the Jubilee of '97,
when millions of people cheered the
Royal procession. The noise, the enthusiasm were indescribable, but neither shall I forget that when the little, shrunken, black-robed figure of
our beloved Queen appeared the
cheering subsided into a low-toned,
sympathetic note of veneration, and
quick as a flash tears began to roll
down the cheeks of myriads of lookers-on. Why was this? There was
no lull in thc magnificence of the procession with its gorgeous trappings.
There was no break in thc endless
line of gorgeously clad military personages, who constituted the most
picturesque feature of the pageant.
For them and for the occasion, the
cheers; but for the insignificant little
mother, the tears. It was all a matter
of expression, and so I conclude, as
I have been forced to conclude on
many occasions that personality and
the association of ideas are greater
than the momentary achievement,
which appeals to the populace from
the lip of the orator, the actor or the
singer. Personality is the greatest
equation, and can suggest and arouse
the profoundest sentiments. It is to
this sentiment that the memory of
our hero appeals. It explains why
thirty-four years after his death loving hands lay wreaths of flowers upon the tomb of Charles Dickens in
the Poets' Corner. It explains why
dusky sons of Africa still visit Westminster Abbey to drop a tear upon
the slate slab, which covers the remains of David Livingstone. The
"Hurrah" for these men is loud and
insistent, but it manifests itself in
silence.
Happy are the people whose privilege it is to acclaim the living hero.
What would the world not give to recall the men whose work it failed
to recognize while they were here.
Today we are placing laurel wreaths
upon their tombs and statues, instead
of on their brows. Can the imagination grasp the kind of welcome which
would bc given, and the cheer which
would reverberate throughout the civilized world if Abraham Lincoln
were to pass through the streets of
our cities today? It is many years
since England's great warrior heroes,
Nelson and Wellington, were laid at
rest. Their greatness was acclaimed
by many a loud hurrah. So in our
own day there are thousands who
were privileged to witness the tremendous outbursts of enthusiasm with
which Bismark, Moltke and Prince
Frederick Charles were received on
their return from the Franco-German
war.
In thc status of the Powers engaged and the historic associations
recalled by the swift decisive struggle, with its dramatic finale, the
Franco-German war is the greatest
since the Crimea. I doubt, however,
if in far-reaching effect and in the
mark made upon the future, development of civilization, it ranks in importance with the Russo-Japanese
war. It is too soon yet even to contemplate its results, but it is not too
soon to realize that the issues are
momentous and that in years to come
it will be no mean honour for the
present generation of Victorians to be
able to tell their children and grandchildren that on the first of May, 1907,
they greeted General Kuroki, one of
the most brilliant officers of the victorious Japanese army with a loud
" Banzai."
artist of such distinction, and so I
believe would Victoria, if it only
knew that in our midst is a collection
of oils, the work of Mrs. Beanlands.
well worthy of finding a permanent
resting-place in one of our public
buildings. I was attracted by a brief
notice in the evening paper to the
office of Messrs. Matson & Coles,
where one of Mrs. Beanlands' pictures is being exhibited. It is entitled " Georgia Straits " as seen from
Mosquito Island, and has just been
sold to an English connoisseur, who
is taking it home with him.
Thc canvas is large and the picture
one quite familiar to residents of Vancouver Island. In the foreground is
a large fruit tree in full blossom, near
the shore. Then the Straits of
Georgia stretch out to the far distance
studded with rocks and wooded islets.
In the background Mt. Baker rears
its snow-covered summit into the
clouds, and the Olympic Range completes the perspective. Several passers-by looking at the picture expressed disappointment, but when I
suggested that they step back and
view it from a distance of twelve or
fifteen feet they found their objections disappear. It is a fine painting; colour and drawing are good;
if anything it is lacking is atmosphere.
Still it is a work of which any artist
might be proud, and is especially valuable as a typical representation of
Pacific scenery. By the kind permission of Mrs. Beanlands The Week
will publish a photograph in next
issue.
It is, however, in portrait painting
that Mrs. Beanlands excels. In her
studio are several really fine figure
pictures, and in her dining-room one
of exceptional merit, a life-size painting of a celebrated Parisian character, a disreputable old habitue of the
studios in the Latin Quartier, known
to every artist who has visited Paris
during the last thirty years, and commonly spoken of as "L'ami Veraline.
This picture was accepted by the
Paris Salon, and as a character study
is intensely interesting, with its dark
shadows, Rembrandt face, sunken
eyes, gnarled hands and an indescribable air, half defiant and half insouciant. The few minutes I was able
to spend in Mrs. Beanlands' stt dio
convinced me that here are art treasures, little suspected by the people
of Victoria, of which I hope to write
in fuller detail on another occasion.
In any event I think it is a pity that
the public should not have the opportunity of seeing the collection, and
I venture to throw out the suggestion that one of our charitable institutions might do worse than endeavour to arrange for an exhibition.
The Best In the World
That is why wc sell "THE CONKLIN " and why we wish you to
buy one from us, because you will be satisfied and a well satisfied
customer is what we always strive for. The prices of "CONKLIN"
self-filling pens are extremely reasonable; everybody can afford to
own a " CONKLIN."
The difference in prices in these three grades is caused
by the size of pen and weight of nib; in all other
respects they are identical.
Silver Filigree " Conklin " Pens $7.00, $8.00 and $9.00
Heavy Gold Filled " Conklin " Pens, very handsome $15.00
Gold Band " Conklin " Pens at  $4.50 and $6.00
MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
47-49 Government Street, Victor!*, 8. C.
^^H^TT^
*yt*w
How wo wish and wait for dinner,
So says saint and so says sinner.
When the dinner has heen good,
And the diner seeks solitude,
How his appetite grows faint,
So says sinner, so says saint.
E. A. B,
New Denver, B. C„ March 18, 1907.
Art.
That a prophet is not without
honour save in his own country
is well illustrated in the case
of a Victoria artist, who has had
live works accepted and hung by the
Royal Academy, anil several by the
Paris Salon, and yet of whose fame
only a small circle of friends seems
to havc heard. One would think that
any city would be proud to claim an
A Location Notice.
Below is given what is claimed to
be a bona fide copy of a location notice posted on a claim near Cornucopia, Ore. It claims about everything between heaven and the other
place and is the prize notice until
something can be shown to beat it:
We the undersigned men of worth,
Just to show that we're on the turf,
Do hereby locate for ourselves alone,
Fifteen   hundred   feet   radius  around
this stone;
Together   with   mineral   and   water
rights;
All placer lands and townsites,
All veins and ledges within our line
Of brass and gold and other mines.
We claim all coal and oil as well
From the top of the sagebrush down
to hell;
All the air and sunshine, too,
Up to where the sky shines blue.
The name of the claim is Wilson and
Green,
No. 400 and group  16.
There may be much better things
than money, but it takes money to
buy them.
xti »n«Miir»**»iiiiiHi
Your Grocer Sells
Stands for
CROSSE k
A name which stands for absolute,
perfection and purity in JAMS.
MARMALADES and  PICKLES
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THE    PARTICULAR
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HAS HIS CLOTHES
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PEDEN
DO YOU?
Peden's
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Tailoring     Parlors
FORT STREET
VICTORIA
I
and as a reminder of your needs
I beg to call your attention to
my  line in
BUBBERBY'S   Veldt   Coats   and
Balder Hats;
KHAKI     Biding     and     Walking
Breeches and
FOB'S Puttees.
WBITE ME.
E. CHAPMAN
Davis Chambers.
615   HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST.
VANCOUVEB.
British Columbia Agent
For
B.  ATKINSON'S   BOTAL   IRISH
POPLIN TIES.
When at dinner in St. Louis one
day, Thackeray heard one waiter say
to another, "Do you know who that
is?" "No," was thc answer. "That's
the celebrated Thacker." "What's he
done?" "Blessed if I know," was the
reply.
nMawEBsa
we solicit the business of Manufacturer!
Engineers and others who realize the ndvisabi:
ity of having their Patent business transacts
by Experts. Preliminary advice free, charge
moderate, ^ur Inventor's Adviser sent upon re
micst. Marlon & Marion, Reg'd., New York I.if
Bltlg, Montreal: and Washington, D.C. U.S.A. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4, 1.J07
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following    described  land    situated off
ment,   containing   100   acres,   more   <
less.
ANDREW OLSON, Locator.
Mar.23 J. E. BATEMAiN, Agent.
»"™*: « « is ism «&* ?m»os^°^ &$$%& * --^»
NOTICE is hereby given tli.u, 00 days
chain:
of beginning*.
April 20.
J. N. BRITTEN, Locator.
Apl. 20
of what is now known as Jap Inlet: of commencement, containing 160 aeres
Commencing  at   a  post   marked  Roy   more or olss.
MaeGowan's N. W.  corner;  thence east   Mar. 2
ANNIE COPELAND.
following aescr.ue u mm »-» after dat j lntend to apply to the Hon.
shore of Skee na.Hive i, abo it 0£ ya os ch f Coramlasioner 0f j ands and AVorks
up mouth of creek abo it one and one- permisslon t0 purchase the  follow-
half miles from Hot hpiings up Sktc.ua i in Rupert District:
River
Commencing at a post inarked "J. G.
J"' thenoe East 40 chains; thence
North 40 chains; thenee East 120 chains;
thence South 40 chains; thence West SO
ing tract of land In Kup
Commencing at a post marked W. J. J.
on the west sido of an island lying-
northwest from Lot (i, Rupert District;
and thence following the .shore of the
Island to the point of commencement,
chains; thence South 40 chains;  mence  all of said Island, about 200 acres.
NOTICE is hereby given that CO days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley; Commencing at a post
planted at the S. AV. corner of E. J.
Coyle's purchase claim, marked G. H.
M.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 ohains north; thence 40
SO chains; thence south 40 chains;
thenee west to beach, containing 320
acres, more or less.
ROY MACGOWAN.
Per AV. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 5, 1!J07. Apl. 6
AVest SO chains; thence North 40 chains
to place of beginning.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
Located Feb. 27, 190',
Meh. 30.
\V.  J.  JONE.S.
.vest; tnence 4U cnains norm; liiuhco c n„rmissicm * t0
■hains east; thence 40 chains south, to S^Sibed land
lost  of commencement,  containing  100   jj^um Valley:'
May 4
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 clays
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Combbmissioncr of Lands and
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to out and carry
away timber from the following described lands, in Barclay District:-
NOTICE is hereby given that, 00 days
after date, I intend to apply lo the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lands situated about two
miles south of what is known as Jap
Inlet on the north end of Porch or
Island:
Commencing at a post marked A. McKay's   S.   W.   corner;   tiience   south   40
po:
acres more or less.
Located   13th  December,   1900.
G.  H. MILLER,  Locatoi*.
P. AV. BOHLER, Agent.
Dateu 20th February, 1907.       Mar.lG
NOTICE is hereby given tliat, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chler Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following land: Commencing at a post planted
on the right bank of the Skeena River,
 .         --   ;--- ..   .      '   about one mile east of mouth of Zym-
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days   „olitz   River,   marked   "E.   O.'s   Initial
after date I intend to apply to the Chier   ijQatn,   thenee  north   CO  chains;  thence
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks roi   east 40 ul]ains; thence south 80 chains;
purchase   tho   foi owing   *jlence east 20 chains; thence south 15
situated in the Kitsum-   cha|Ils  nl0,-e or less, to bank of Skeena
-Commencing at a post  chains;  thence west  8(1  chains;   thenci
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for
permission to purchase the following-
described land, situated in the Kitsumkalum Valley: Commencing at a post
"   AV.   Corner  of  L.  S.
kalum Valley: Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of AV.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked L. t>.
F.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thence 40 ehalus north; thenee 40
chains east; thonce 40 chains south to
post of commencement, containing ico
acres more or loss.
Located   13th   December,   1900.
L. S. FERGUSON, Loeator.
F. AV. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907.       Mar.16
River; thence along river bank southwesterly to point of commencement,
containing 100 aeres, more or less.
E.   OLSON,   Locator.
Mar.23 J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
aftor  date,   I  Intend  to  make  application    to    the   Chief    Commissioner    of
Lands   and   Works   for   the   following
described lands:    Commencing at Peter
Painswith N. AV. shore of Harret's Harbour,  Moresby Island,  Queen  Charlotte*
NOTICE is hereby given that 00 days   island;  thence S. 80 chains; thence E.
■iftei* date we  intend  to apply  to the  20 chains; thence N. SO chains; thonce
 *■■'•-   W. 20 chains to place of beginning, containing 160 acres, more or less.
lixed at the N.E. corner of Claim No. 1;
thence AV. SO chains; thenee N. SO
ohains; thence E. SO chains; tiience S.
SO chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 3.—Commencing at a post
lixed at the N.E. corner of claim No. 2;
thence AV. 00 chains; thence N. 100
chains; thenoe E. 20 chains; thence (3.
100 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 4.—Commencin,
Located   13th  December,   1900.
E. J. COYLE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated February 20th, 1907.       Mar.16
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
from date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to out and carry
away timber from the following do-
scribed  lands  on Thurlow  Island,  Say-	
ward District: NOTICE Is hereby given that CO days
From a stake about 25 chains west nfter date I intend to apipy to the Chief
from S. E. corner of Lot 113; thence Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for
at a post west along southern boundary of said permission to purchase the following
fixed at the S. E. corner of Claim No. 3; lot, and beyond, 00 chains; Ihence soulh described land, situated in tlie Kitsum-
thence Nl SO chains; thence E. SO chains; 100 chains; thence east CO chains; thence kalum Valloy: Commencing at a post
thence S SO chains; thenee W. SO chains north 100 chains to tlie point of com- planted at the N. E. comer of G. H.
to point of commeneement. mencement, containing C40 acros,  more  Miller's  purchase  claim,  inarked  E.   S,
Clyaim No. 5.—Commencing at a post
fixed at the S.  E. corner of Claim No.
Ciiiof Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for permission to purchase the following lands in the Nechaco Valloy, Coa3t
District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the South West corner of Section 32,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey,
thonce north SO chains; thence east 40
chains; thence soutli 80 ohains; thence
west 4 0 chains to place of beginning,
being the wost half of said section 32.
CHARLES F. MAXWELL, JR.
September 20, 1900. Mar.lG
A.   BENCH LEY.
L. T. WATSON, Agent.
Staked 9th March, 1907. Mar.23
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
tlio following described lands, situated
near Works Channel, in Skeena District; Commencing at a post on T. H.
Watson's East boundary and marked
"G. J. C.'s AVest corner," thence north
20 chains, along T. H. AVatson's claim;
thence East 40 chains; thence South 20
chains; thence AA'est 40 chains, to point
of commencement, containing 80 aeres,
4; thenee N. SO chains; tbence E. SO
ohains; thence S. 80 chains; thence AV. SO
chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 0.—Commencing at a post
fixed at the S. E. corner of Claim No. 5;
thence N. SO chains; thence 10. SO chains;
thence S. SO chains; thence VV. SO chains
to point of cammencement.
Claim No.   7.—Commencing at a.post
or less.
A.  PRICHARD.
Thurlow, B. C, March 16, 1907.   Apl.20
F.'s S. E. Corner, running 40 chains
west; thonce 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thence 40 chains south to
point of commencement, containing 100
acros, more or less.
Located 13th December, 1900.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following* described lands:
;ommenoi„B  iu a „i»*.  ., Comm^oing at a post_plant^ at the
flvoa nt nm q  if  corner of Claim No  6'  N. AV. corner of the B. C. T. & 1. Co. s
thence EL SO chains; thSnSe S. 80 chains;  Lot No, 23; thence following linert. No,
thence AV. SO chains; thence N. SO chains
t0^m'°No?^Sfenotng at a post  •Col'lowinrb^^ described land, shunt,,! in the Kitsuni-
flxed at the S. W-corner of Claim No. 7; '
thonoe S. 100 chains; thence E. 00
chains; thence N. 100 chains; thence AV.
00 chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 9.—Commencing at a post
dxed at the S. E. corner of Claim No. 7;
thence E. SO chains; tiience N. SO chains
E.  S.  IRONSIDE.  Locator.
F. AV.  BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907. Mar.lG
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
, ,„ „, t.  ,„...    after date I intend to apply to the Chief
"3 south to Lot 21; thenee west follow-   Commissioner of Lands and AA'orks for
ing line of Lot 21 to Charles Bay; thence   permission   to   purchase   the   following-
 ,ch back to point of com-  described land, s
mencement;   Sayward   District,   Lower   kalum  Valley:    Commencing at a post
Thurlow Island planted   at   the  N.  E.   corner  of E.  J.
JOHN A. CAMERON.      Coyle's  purchase  claim,  marked  D.  M.
April 10  1907 Apl. 20   M.'s   S.   E.   Corner,   running   40   chains
__; west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east; thonce 40 chains south, to
post of commencement, containing 160
acres, more or less.
Located 13th December, 1906.
D. M. MOORE, Locator.
F. AV. BOHLER, Agent.
Dated 20th February, 1907.       Mar.lG
2. Commencing at the south east corner of Section 31, Township 12, Range 6,
Poudrier Survey; thenco north SO chains;
tiience west SO chains;  thence south SO   wi	
chains; tiience oast SO chains; to place   more or les3
of beginning, being said section 31. G,  j,  CAMPBELL,  Locator.
AVM.  LANE.      March 9 T. H. WATSON, Agent.
September 20, 1906. Mar.lG ,., , . .
 7„    4,  -n-,0t ™r       NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
3. Commencing at the South East cor-   fmm   datC|   j   |ntend   to  apply  to   the
ner of Section 31, Township 1, Rangei 4,   Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
  after date, I intend to apply lo the Hon.
thonce AV. SO chains; thence S. SO chains  Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
to point of commencement. for a special license to cut and carry
Claim No. 10.—Commencing at a post  away   timber   from   tho   following   de-
flxed at the S. E. corner of Claim No. !);  scribed lands, situate on Lyell Island:
thence E. SO chains; thence N. SO chains;      Commencing at a post marked "north-
thence AAr. SO chains; tiience S. 80 chains  west  corner,"   placed  at  the  northeast
to point nf commencement. corner of Claim .No. 5 of M. J. G. AVhite;
Claim No. 11.—Commencing at a post running soutli 80 chains; thence west
fixed at the N.E. corner of Clnim No. 10; so chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
thence N. SO chains; thenco AV. SO chains
Poudrier Survey; thence north SO cluiins;
thence west SO chains; south SO chains;
thence east SO chains to place of beginning, being said section 31.
,  N.  A. WALLINGER.
August 5, 1900. Mar.16
4. Commencing at the South AVest corner of Section 32, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey.; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thenco south SO
chains; thence wost SO chains to place
of beginning, being said section 32.
THOS. STARBIRD.
August 5, 190G. Mar.lG
5. Commencing at the North East corner of Section 30, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence west 80 chains;
thence south  SO chains;  thonce east SO
for permission to purchase 160 acres of
land on Skeena Coast District, B.C.:
Commencing at a post marked J. Mc-
Gown, S. E. Corner, on west bank of
Skeena River, one-half mile above R.
Lowry's pre-emption; thenee west 40
chains; thenee north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence following the
meandering of the Skeena to point of
commencement, containing 160 aeres,
more or less.
J. McGOWN.
December 24th, 190G. Mar.23
NOTICE is hereby givon that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
a twenty-one yenr lease of tho following lands in the Coast District:
Commencing nt the Nortli East angle
chains; thence north SO chains to place  of   Section   24,   Township   1,   Range   4
thence AV. SO chains; thence S. SO chains;
thence E. SO chains to point of commencement.
Claim No. 12.—-Commencing at a post
fixed at the N.AAr. corner of Clnim No.
11; thence S. SO chains; thence AAr. SO
chains; thence N. SO chains; thence E.
SO chains to point of commencement.
NOTICE  is  hereby  given  that  sixty
  davs  after  date,  I  intend   to  apply  to
east SO chains to the place of beginning,   the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
of beginning, being said section 30
L. BIRKETT.
August 5, 190G. Mar.lG
Dated April 2, 1907.
H. G. ANDERSON.
Apl. 20 C. G. Anderson, Agent.
Claim No. 13.—Comemncing at a post  away   timber   from   tlie   following   de*
fixed at the N.W. corner of Clnim No. 4;  scribed lands:
thence N. SO chains; tiience E. SO chains
thence S. 80 chains; thence W. SO chains
to point of commencement.
Claim No. 14.—Commencing at a post
fixed at the S.E. corner of Claim No. 13;
tbence N. GO chains; tiience E. 100
chains; thenco S. CO chains; thence AV.
100 chains to point of commencement.
Calm No. 15.—Comemncing at a post
ft*," ■ . -. the S.E. comer of Claim No. 14;
thei. i' "I. SO cluiins; thence E. SO chains;
thee f-i. SO chains; thenco AV. SO chains
to point of commencement
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to tlie Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works   	
for a special  license to  cut  and  carry   east corner;  thence north 40 chains  to
 ■-"•---    *-    Frank's southeast corner; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains to John
and AVorks for permission to purchase
the following described land, situated in
Range 5, Skeena River District, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at      .
corner, marked "R. Braun"; thence run
ning west SO chains to Turner's south-
I'oudrier Survey, thence south four
miles, thence west six miles; thenco
north four miles; thonce east six miles
to place of beginning.
L.  ENGEN.
August 6, 1906. Mar.16
G. Commencing at tlie Nortli West corner of Section 29. Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north SO      NU-rllJJ,-. ls nereby given tun
„„,-„„-   chains; thence west SO chains  to place   a(ter l]ate , *ntoml t0        ,    (0
x post planted on" the southeast  of beginning, being said section 29. 	
•    -  HOWARD   H.   PORTER.
August 5, 1906. Mar.lG
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of timber limit No.
S71S, marked J. N. Britten's northeast
corner; thenee south 120 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains; tiience north SO
chains; thence east 40 chains to place
of beginning.
No. 2. Commencing at the southeast
corner of No. 1; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south SO
chains; thence west
7. Commencing at the North East corner of section 28, Township 1, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence wost SO chains
son's  southeast  corner;  thence  east  49	
chains; thence south SO chains to point   thence south SO chains; thence east SO
of commencement, containing 480 acres,
more or less.
Located September 1st, 190G.
R. BRAUN.
NOTTCE is hereby given tliat 60 days
ter date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lauds and Works for
a twenty-one year lease of the following hinds in tlie Coast District:
Commencing at the North Enst angle
of Section 3G, Township 2, Range 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south four
miles; thence west six miles; thence
north four miles; thonce east six miles
chains; tiience north SO chains to place  to place_qf beginning,
of beginning, being said section 28.
C.  J.  MANSFIELD.
August C, 190G. Mar.16
NOTICE  is  hereby given  that,  sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
,   . ,        Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
chains to place   -t,y0rks,  for  permission   to  purchase an
Claim No. 10.—Commencing at a post  of beginning. Island, situated in Saanich Inlet, oppo-
flxed at the S.E. corner of Claim No. 15:      No. 3.   Commencing at a post planted   site Tunnel on E. k N. R. E.
thence N. SO chains; Ihence E. SO chains;   at the northwest corner of No. 2; thence      Dated February 27th, 1907.
thence S. SO chains; thenee AV. SO chains  north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
to point of commencement. thonce south SO chains; thence west SO
Staked April 17th, 1907. chains to place of beginning.
May 4, CHARLES HARDY. No. 4.   Commencing at a post planted
' .   at the southeast corner of No. 3; thence
NOTICE is hereby given that. 30 days  north SO chains; thence east 80 chajns;
8. Commencing at the North AVest corner of Section 27, Township 1, Kango 4,
Poudrier Survey; thence south SO chnins;
thence east SO chains; thenco north 80
chains; thenco wost SO chains, to place
of beginning, being said section 27.
L. AV. PATMORE.
August  6,  1906. Mar. 10
Mar. 2
ROBERT   J.   PORTER,
Locator.
**,,,, i. ■*,..-. ,..*,.....,  ...... .-•     ■  -, - . , .en   after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon. thence south 80 chains; thence west su CIl|ef Commissioner of Lands and Works
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Water  chains to place of beginning. ,  ,   for permission to purchase the follow-
for a special licence to cut and carry No. 5. Commencing at a post planted Ing descl.ibed land, situated In Skeena
awav timber from the following de- at the southwest corner of No. 4; thence district: Commencing at a post on left
scribed lands, situate on the left bank east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains, bank of gkeena River about. 4 miles
of the Skeena River, about forty chains, thence west SO chains; thence north SO from Port Essington, marked "J. C.'s
more or less, inland, and about one mile,  chains to place of beginning. Ni Wi Cor."; thence S. 20 chains; thenco
more or less, below the Indian Village n0. G. Commencing at the southwest E. 20 chains; thence N. 20 chains to
of Old Kltzequekla, Skeena District, corner of No. 6; thence east 80 chains; bank of Skeena River; thence westerly
British Columbia:— thence south SO chains; thenee west SO   along tho bank to point of commence-
Clalm No. 1A.—Commencing at a post  chains; thence north 80 chains to place   ment, containing 40 acres, more or less,
marked "J. A. H„ N. E„" and placed on  0f beginning.
the left bank  of a small  creek which      N(J   7>   Commencing at a post planted
flows into the Skeena River about  one  a(. t])e sol,theast corner of No. 6; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west SO
chains to place of beginning.
No. 8.   Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of No. 7; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thenco south SO chains; thence west SO
chains to place of beginning.
_ No. 9.  Commencing at a post planted
NOTICE Is hereby given that, GO days at the northwest corner of No. S; thenee
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief north SO chains to south line of Claim
, Commissioner of Lands and Works for No. 7 known as the Dunbar Claim;
.permission to purchase the following thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
described land at the north end of Por- chains; thence west SO chains tp place
eher Island, about one and a half miles of beginning,
tsouth of what Is known as Jap Inlet: No. 10.  Commencing at a post planted   j*,jar. o
Commencing at a post marked Lillian   at ti,0 southeast corner of No. 8; thence   	
, Imhoff's N. W. corner; thenco south 40   east ;*o chains; tiience south 80 chains;
fehalns;  thence  west  40  chains;   thence   thence west SO chains; tiience north SO
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
— Chief Commissioner of Lands and AA'orks
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days   for permission  to purchase  the follow-
      - ■          ing described land, situated on the head
of the Bulkly River: Commencing at
a post marked R. B„ N. W. corner,
thenco running west GO chains; thence
south GO chains; thence east CO chains;
thenco north GO chnins to point of com
mencement,   and   containing   4S0   acres,
more or less.
AV. N. CLARK, Locator.
Bulkly Valley, July 3rd, 190G.     Mar.lG
j! mile,   more   or  less,   below   Old   Kltzequekla;     thence    astronomically    south
, eighty    chains;    tiience    astronomically
west  eighty  chains;   tiience  astronomi-
tcally  north   eighty  chains;   and   thence
ll astronomically    east    eighty  chains  to
■ point of commencement, and containing
I 040 acres. J. A. HICKEY.
'    March 20th, 1907. May 4.
JOHN CUNNINGHAM.
Port Essington, B. C„ Dec. 10, 1906.
Jan. 19.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commlsslone rof Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, adjoining Lot 640,
Skeena District:
Commonclng at a post marked "A.
C.'s N. W. Corner"; thenco east 40
chains along south bouhdayr of E.
Flewln's claim; thence south 40 chains;
thonce west 40 chains; thence north 40
chains, along east boundary of Lot. G4G
to point of commencement, containing
100 acres,  more or less.
ANNIE COPELAND.
LTA533 NOTICES.
NOTICE is hereby given that CO days
aftor date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for a twenty-one year lease of tho following lands in  the Coast District:
Commencing at a post planted at tlle   north to shore 100 chali
Nci
North AVest angle of section 81, Town- then*
ship 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey, hon t
thence east six miles; thence south four
miles; thence west two miles, tiience
north one mile; thonco wost two miles;
thonco norih one mile; thence west four
miles;, thence nortli three miles to
place of beginning. ,
FRED ENGEN.
August 10, 190G. Mar.16
FREDERICK G.  SPARLING.
August G, 190G. Mar.lG
NOTICE Is hereby given that GO days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for
a twenty-one year lease of the following lands in  the Coast District:
Commencing at the South East angle
of Lot 25, Township 13, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence nortli live miles;
thonce wost six miles; tbence south flve
miles; thence east six miles to place
of beginning.
J. I.UND.
September 15, 1906. Mar.16
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date 1 intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AA'orks for permission to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on Pitt Island
off Granville Channel.
No. 1.—Commencing at a post, marked
J. Q. J.'s Norih AVest corner, about 2 1-2
miles wost of Lowe Inlet, tbence soutli
10 chains; thence east ICO chains;
thence north 10 chains; thenco west 1G0
chains to place of beginning on shore.
No.2.—Commencing at a post marked
.1. G. J.'s mi the North West shore about
one-half mile cast of Clue Nugget on
Granville Channel; thence running soutli
CO chains; thence east 40 chalus; thonce
more or less;
thing shore in a westerly direc-
plaee of beginning,
.—Commencing at n post marked
NOTICE is hereby given that CO clays
after date I intend lo apply to lhe Chief ajll)IV
Commissioner of Lands  and   Works  for c-rtr11 r•
a twenty-ono years lease of the follow- tt
Nug
thei
easl   80 elm
to shore mop
so   chains   I
place
No.
J.   (1.
Kxug
lbout  ono  milo  west  of  Clue
of Granville Channel;
nlng soutb  ,scl chains;  thence
tbenco north so chains
less, theuce nlong shore
Ins   In   n   westerly   direction   to
f beginning.
Commencing at a post marked
,1.   aboul    half   milo   east   of
il  Inlet  off Granville, channel on
tnorth 40 chains; thence east to point of
commencement,   containing   160   acres,
Ijmore or less.
C. W. SAREL.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March S, 1907. Apl. 6
dialns to place of beginning.
No.' 11. Commonclng at a post planted
at the southeast corner of No. 8; thence
oast 80 chains; thence south SO chains;
tiience west SO chains; thenee north SO
chains to place of beginning.
No. 12. Commencing at the southeast
corner of No. 11; thence north SO chains;
thence oast SO chains; tbence south SO
chains;  thence west SO  chains  to place
Inlet:
Commencing at a post marked Lillian   Place of beginning.
Imhoff's N. AV. cornor; thence south 20       _ ,„,,,„
chains;   thence  oast   SO   chains;   thenco       September 15th, 190
MTCKLEBI'RC.
6. Mar.lG
..   NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
latter date, I Intend to apply to the Hon. °2a-WLjnXr
■Chief Commlss oner of Lands and AVorks oi DCginnint.
Wor^permission to purchase the follow-      No. 13.  Commencing at a post planted
Sng described  land on  Porcher  Island, at  tho  northwest    corner    of No   12,
■siumtld about six miles in an easterly thence north SO chains; the .ice east SO
Ifllrectlon from Refuge Bay: chains;  thence  south  80 chains;  thence
I.   Commencing at a post marked W. D. west SO chains to place of beginning.
I'Newlon's N. W. corner; tbence running      j^o, 14.  Commencing at a post planted
north 20 chains; tiience west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
100 acres, more or less.
LILLIAN IMI-IOFF.
EUGENE WACKER, Agent.
March S, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE Is hereliy given that 00 days
arter date. 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for permission to purchase the following land, situated In the Kitsumkalum
Valloy, commencing at a post planted
at tlio S, AA"". corner of AV. Bruce purchase  claim,   marked   T.   D.   P.'s  N.  E
wouth 80 chains; thenee east 40 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, con-
Itaining 320 acres, more or less.
W. D. NEAVLON, Loeator.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March 13, 1907. Meh. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
■after  date,  I   Intend  to  apply  to  the
3hlef Commissioner of Lands and AVprks
Ifor permission to purchase the following land: Commencing at a post
Jplanted on the bank of the Zymgotltz
•River, about one mile and a quarter
■from Skeena River and marked A.
lO's S W. Cor. Post"| thence east 80
liliains along the line of Beatrice Bate-
Inan's application; thence north 20
Ichains; thence west 80 chains; thence
bouth 20 chains to point of commence-
at the northwest corner of Claim No. 6
known as the Dunbar Claim; thenco
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 100 chains along tho east
line of Claim No. 11999; thence east 40
chains to place of beginning.
No. 15. Commencing at a post planted
in the corner of Claims No. G and 7,
known as 'he Dunbar Claims; thence
north 80 ch  'ns; east SO chains; thenco
NOTICE is hereby given tbat, GO days   corner, running west 40 chains; tiience
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief   south 40 chains;  thence east 40 chains
Commissionei* of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, situated on Porcher Island, about two miles south of Jap Inlet.*
Commencing at a post marked William
Johnson's N. AV. corner post; thence
running 120 chains south; thence 40
chains east; thence 120 chains north:
thence 40 chains west to point of com-
thence   north   40   chains,   to   point   of
eommeneement,    containing    100   acres,
more or less.
I.ocatecl 2.3rd January, 1907.
T. D. PECKARD, Locator.
F. VV. BOHLER, Agent.
Feb. 23.
south  SO nh: ins; thence west SO chains   mencement,  containing  -ISO acres,  more
follow-  to placo of beginning.
No. IG. Commencing at a post planted
at tlie northwest corner of No. 15;
Ihence north SO chains; tiience cast SO
chains; thonce soutb SO chains; thence
west SO chains to place of beginning.
No. 17, Commencing at tho northwest
corner of Claim No. 5, known as the
IDT -on iuiuio jo our is*-*0 9lH Suon)
suiuqa 08
or less.
March S, 1907.
WILLIAM   JOHNSON.
A. McKAY, Agenl.
Apl. G
NOTICE is hereby given that GO days
from date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissionei- of Lands and  AA'orks for
permission to purchase tM following do-  eust  10 clmins; 11
scribed  land, adjoining Lot G4G, Skeena   then
NOTICE is hereby given tliat, GO days
District:
Commencing   at
a   post,   marked   "A.
nfter date, I intend'to apply to tlie Chief  C.'s N. AV. Corner"; thence east 40 chains
„.,.,   ,„   .„,,,   ,..,. ,,   .;,.,,,„   Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for   along   south   boundary   of  1.   Flewln s
Soou'eoSS", imrsio riquna  permission   to   purchase   the   following  claim;  thenco south  40  chains;  thonce
it north west eorner: tbence SO
nth; thence SO chains east;
chains north moro or less to
hence 80 chains along shore In a
llreotlon to place of beginning.
Commencing at a post marked
boul . miles west of Kxugeal
Hranvlllo Channel on shore at
nrth west corner; thence soutli 40
inlns; tiience east I GO chains; tbence
north In chains to shore moro or less;
thenee westerly nlong shore to place of
beginning' 160 chains.
No. 0. -Commencing at a post marked
,1. ii. J.'s about three-quarters of a mile
wost of Raker's inlet on Granville Channel at the north west corner; tiience
soulh 10 chains; tbence east 1G0 chains;
thence north to shore 4 0 chains more or
less; tin e along shore 1 (10 chains more
or less In plnee of beginning.
•        JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
May 4.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt sixty
days after dale T intend tn applv to the
Honourable Chief Commissioner of
Lauds ami Works for permission to purchase (be following doserlbed land situated on west side of Pitt Islaud locally known as l.ofiv Island, Skeena
River district,
Commencing al a posi marked "P, B.
W. South West corner" and iidloinlng
M, O. J." N. AV. corner'*' post thence
North SO chains;
to shore iu chains; more
or less; thence along shore lu a southerly direction to place of beginning 0011-
Inlning :!20 acres more or less.
May .| F, 13. WARREN. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, for permission to
lease the following described lands, situated on Camelia Inlet, about 20 miles
southeast from mouth Skeena River:
Commencing on shore of Camelia Inlet on west side of Salt Lagoon Falls,
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains', thence east to shore 40 chains
more or less; thence along shore to
place of beginning.
Apl 27 ■    JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, on Deans Chanel, Coast
District:—
No. 1.—Commencing from the S. K.
corner post on the west side of Deans
Channel and about one-half mile north
of Labouchlre Channel at a small bay
called Nuskoe Bay, thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains, to post
of commencement, containing 0*10 acres.
Staked 30th March, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 2.*—Commencing from the S. W.
oorner of B. C. D. C. L. 220, at Om
Klam Creek on the north side of Deans
Channel; thonce north 40 chains, following line of B. C. D. C. L. 220; thenco
east 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west SO chains; thenee south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; to shore
line of Om Klom Inlet; thence following shore line to post of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Staked 30th March, 11107.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 3.—Situated on the west side of
Deans Channel, commencing from the
S. E. corner post on the N. W. shore of
Deans Channel and about one-quarter
mile north of Anulcom River, and about
9 miles south of L. 15, Deans Channel;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains, to Deans
Channel shore line; thence following
shore line to post of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Staked 3rd April, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 4.—Commencing from the west
boundary and the middle of W. J.
Vaughan's Claim No. 3, on the south
side of Amilcom River (Deans Channel); thence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO chains to post of commeneement, containing 640 acres.
Staked 3rd April, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 5.—Commencing from the S. E.
corner and adjoining claim No. 4 on the
west side; thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south SO
chains, to post of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked 3rd April, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
•No. 6.—Situated about 2 miles south
of the Klmsquit Indian reserve on the
east side of Deans Channel, commencing from the N. AV. corner; thence E.
160 chains; thence south 40 chains to
shore line; thence following shore to
post of commencement, containing 640
acres.
Staked 3rd April. 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 7.—Situated on the east side of
Deans Channel and opposite of Amilcom River; thenee east 160 chains;
thence north to shore line 40 chains;
thence following shore line to post of
commencement, containing CIO acres.
Staked 4th April, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. S.—Situated on the south side of
Deans Channel and commencing from
tho N. W. corner post and back of survey line of B. C. D, C. L. 233 on Nomas
Creek; thenee east SO chains; thence
south SO chains; thenee west 80 chains:
thence north to post of commencement
80 chains; containing 640 acres.
Staked 4th April,  1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, .'.gent.
No. 9.—-Commencing from the W. J.
Vauphan Claim No. S, from N. E. corner on the east side of Nomas Creek;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; to post of commencement, containing 640 acres.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 10.—Situated on the west side
of Deans Channel and about one-half
mile north of Labouchlre Channel, and
adjoining W. J. Vaughan's claim No. 1
on Nlskoll Bay, the east boundary;
thence north 100 chains; thence east 40
chains to boundary line of 13. C. D. C.
L. 203; thence south to shore line;
thence following shore line to post of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
commencing from  S. W. corner.
Staked  5th April,  1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 11.—Situated on the south side
of Deans Channel and about one-hall'
mile west of entrance tn Cascade In-
lot, commencing from N, E. eorner post
of B. C. D. C. L. 220, north side of King
Island; thence south 40 chains; theuce
east 120 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains to shore line; thence following
shore line to post of commencement,
containing CIO aeres.
Staked Sth April, 1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 12.—Situated on the north side of
Deans Channel nnd about opposite of
B, C. D. C. L. 226 and about 2 miles
west of entrance to Cascade Inlet;
ihcnoe west 40 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 40 chains; thenee
north SO chains; thenee east 40 chains;
thonce south 40 ohains to shore line of
Deans Channel; thence following shore
line to post of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked   Sth   April,   1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 13.—Situated on the north side
of Deans Channel and about one-quarter
mile from the entrance to Cascade Inlet, on the east side, commencing from
tlio S. W. corner; thence north 40 chains:
thence east ICO chains; thence soulh 40
cbalns to shore line; then following
shore line to post of commencement,
containing  C40  acres.
Staked  8th  April.  1907.
W. J. VAUGHAN
B. F. JACOBSEN, Agent.
No. 14.—Situated on the south side
of Deans Channel, about 2i/ miles east
of Cascade Inlet, thence commencing
from the N. W. corner post on north
shoro of King Island and opposite of W.
J Vaughan's east boundary of claim
No 13; thenee soutli 40 chains; thenco
east 120 chains; thence north SO chnins
to shore line; thonce following shore
line to post of commeneement, containing C40 acres.
Staked 8th April, 1907.
W. .1. VAUGHAN      s
Apl 27 B.  F.  JACOBSEN,  Agent.
Claim No.  2A.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty-
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands, situate on the left bank of the Skeena
River, about forty (40) chains (more
or less) Inland, and about one mile
(more or less) below the Indian Village of Old Kitzequekla, Skeena District,   British   Columbia:
Commencing at a post marked J. A.
H., N. W. and placed on the left bank
of a small creek which (lows into the
Skeena River, about one mile (more or
less) below the village of Old Kitzequekla, and joining J. A. H.'s No. IA.
claim at the northeast corner, thence
astronomically south eighty (80) chains;
thence astronomically east eighty (SO)
chains; thence astronomically north
eighty (80) chains; and thence astronomically west eighty (SO) chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres.
J.  A.   HICKEY.
March 20th,  1907.         Apl 27
Claim No. 1.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and AVorks fora special license to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on the
right bank of the Skeena River about
one and one-half (li/) miles (more
or less) inland, and In a westerly direction from Hazelton, Skeena District,
British Columbia.
Commencing at a post marked J. A.
H., S. E. and placed on the right bank
of a small creek which flows into Shu-
goon-oms Creek, about one and one-
half miles (more or less) from the
mouth, thence astronomically north
eighty (SO) chains; thence astronomically west eighty (80) chains; thence astronomically south eighty (SO) chains,
and thence astronomically east eigthy
(SO) chains, to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres.
J.   A.   HICKEY.
March Sth, 1907. Apl 27
Claim No. 2.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and AA'orks for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands in Skeena
District, in the Province of British Columbia, situate on the right bank of the
Skeena River, about two and one-half
(2i/) miles more or less inland and being in a westerly direction from Hazelton.
Commencing at a post marked J. A. H.
N. E. and placed at the south west corner of J. A. Hickey's No. 1 Claim, thence
astronomically south SO chains; thence
astronomically west eighty chains;
thence astronomically north eighty
chains; and thence astronomically east
eighty chains to point of commencement
and containing G40 acres.
J.  A. HICKEY.
March 11th, 1907. Apl. 27
Claim No. 3.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and AVorks for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands in Skeena District, in the Province of British Columbia, situate on the right bank of the
Skeena River, about two and one-half
miles more or less Inland, and being in
a westerly direction from Hazelton.
Commencing at a post marked J. A.
H. S. E., placed at the southwest corner of J. A. Hickey's No. 1 Claim; thence
astronomically north eighty chains;
thenee astronomically west eighty
chains; thence astronomically south
eighty chains; and thence astronomically east eighty chains, to point of commencement and containing 640 aeres.
J. A. HICKEY.
March   11th,  1907.        Apl 27
Claim No. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 Intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands in Skeena
District, In the Province of British Columbia, situate on the right side of the
Skeena River, about one mile (more or
less) inland and being in a westerly
direction from Hazelton.
Commencing at a post marked J. A.
H, S. E., and placed at the northeast
corner of J. A. H.'s No. 1 Claim; thence
astronomically north eighty (80) chains;
thence astronomically west forty (40)
chains; thence astronomically south
forty (40) chains; and astronomically
east one hundred and twenty (120)
chains to point of commencement, containing  610  acres.
J.  A.  HICKEY.
March Sth, 1907. Apl 27
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
curry away timber from the following
described lands ill Nootka District, commencing at post marked J. S. S., S. E.
corner; west 40 chains; north 40 chains;
wost SO chains; north 40 chains; east
120 chains; south SO chains, to the point
of commencement.
J. S.  SHOPLAND.
April  22nd. Apl 27
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Nootka District, commencing nt post marked J. S, S., N. E.
corner, west 80 chains; north 40 chains;
west 40 chains; south SO chains; east
120 chains; north 40 chains to the point
of commencement,
J.  S.  SHOPLAND.
April  22nd.  Apl 27
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
aftor date, I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north end of Sechelt Peninsula on the
point of Agamemnon Channel, New
Westminster District, thenco SO chains
smith; SO chains east; SO chains north;
thence along shore to point of commencement.
AV. E. GREEN,
j. McConville, Agent.
Staked April ICth, 1907. Apl 27
NOTICE Is hcrcby~givcn that, CO days
afier date, 1 Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following tract of land In Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked A. J.
F., S. E. corner, about one mile south
of the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thenco north SO chains*,
thence west 80 chains', thenco south 80
chains; thenco east to point of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Located Feb. 26, 1907.
Meh. 30. A. J. FIRES.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated on
Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G.
M. Davis' N. W. Corner"; thence east SO
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence 40 chains north
to  point of commencement.
Staked January 10th, 1907.
G. M. DAVIS,
Mar. 30       Per E. A. Hudson, Loeator.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ing tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked J. L.
L„ S. E. corner, near the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; tiience west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located Feb. 26, 1907.
Meh. 30. J.   L.   LEESON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:—
No. 1.—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of a small lake, about two
miles east of the head of Great Central
Lake; thence north 80 chains; thence
oast SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing at a. post planted
at the southeast corner of No. 1; thence
north 80 chains; thenee east SO chains;
thense south 80 chains; thence west
along shore line to point of commencement.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of No. 2; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 4.—Commencing at a post planted
40 chains west of No. 3; thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north SO chains
to point of commencement.
No. 5.—Commencing at a post planted
40 chains west of the head of the lake;
thence east 160 chains along shore line;
thence south 40 chains; thenee west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6.—Commencing at a post planted
40 chains west of southeast corner of
No. 4; thenee east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north SO chains to point of commencement.
Located this 2Sth day of March, 1907.
J. A. DRINKWATER.
Alberni. B. C. April 0
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we intend to apply to tho
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks. for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in the Cariboo
District:—
Limit A.—Commencing at a post
planted about four miles N. E. of the
E. end of Mahood Lake; thence AV. 80
chains, S. 80 chains, E. SO chains, N.
SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit B.—Commencing at a post
planted at tho N. AV. corner of Limit
A; AV. 80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. SO
chains, N. 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit C.—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains W. of the N. E| corner of Limit B; N. SO chains, AV. SO
chains, S. SO chains, E. SO chains to
place of commencement.
Limit D.—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains W. of the N. E. corner of Limit C; N. SO chains, AV. SO
chains, S. SO chains, E. SO chains, to
place of commencement.
Limit E.*—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. cornor of limit D;
N. SO chains, AV. 80 chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit F.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of limit E.;
N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit G.—Commencing . at a post
planted at the N. E. oorner of limit F.;
N. SO chains, W. 80 chains, S. SO chains,
E. 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit H,—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of limit G.;
N. SO chains, AV. 80 chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit I.—Commencing at a post
plar.ted at the N. E. corner of Limit
IL; N, SO chains, W. 80 chains, S. SO
chains, E. 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit J.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit I.;
N. 80 chains, S. SO chains; E. SO chains,
to place of commencement'.
Limit K.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit
J.; N. 80 chains, AV. 80 chains, S. SO
chains, E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit L.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. AV. corner of Limit
F.; N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. 80
chains, E. 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit M.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit L;
N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. 80 chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit N.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. Corner of Limit
M; N. SO chains, W, SO chains, S. SO
chains, E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit O.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit
N; N. SO chains, AV. SO chains, S. SO
chains, E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit P.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit O;
N. SO chains, AAr. SO chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit Q.—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. W. corner of Limit L;
N. 80 chains, W. 80 chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit R.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit Q;
N. SO chains, W. SO chains. S. SO chains,
E, 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit S.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. cornor of Limit R;
N. SO chains, W. 80 chains; S. 80 chains,
E. 80 chains to placo of commencement.
Limit T.—Commencing at a post
planted nt the N. E. corner of Limit S;
N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. 80 chains,
E. 80 chains to place of commencement.
Limit U.*—Commencing at a post
Planted at the N. E. corner of Limit
T; N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. SO
chnins, E. SO chains, to place of commencement.
Limit Ar.—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains E. of the N. E. corner
of limit H; N. SO chains, AV\ SO chains,
S. SO chains, E. 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
Limit W.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of limit V;
N. SO chains, W. SO chains, S. 80 chains,
E. SO chains to place of commencement.
Limit X.—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner of Limit W;
N 80 chains, W. SO chains, S. SO chains,
E. SO chains, to place of commencement.
Staked March 20th, 1907.
Dated April 11th, 1907.
DANIEL McKAY,
chas. a, Mcdonald,
April 20 Locators.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land on Porcher island, about
three miles in an easterly direction from
Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post inarked S. A. (..
Finch's N. E. corner post, running SO
chains south; thence 20 chains west;
thenee SO chains north; thence 20 chains
east to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
S. A. G. FINCH.
Per AV. W. Clarke, Locator.
March 11, 1907. Mar.30
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 00 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land on Porcher Island,
situated about four miles in an easterly
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Miss
Jennie Johnson's N. W. corner post;
thence running east 80 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence north 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 1C0 aeres, more
or less.
MISS JENNIE JOHNSON, Loeator.
-».      a. ,„   ,„„„     A* McKAY, Agent.
March 12, 1907. Mch. 30
NO 1 ICE is hereby given that, GO davs
nl1.6 * £ate' I,intend t0 aPP'y t0 the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land on Porcher Island,
situated ono mile south of Refuge Bay*
Commencing at a post marked Kay
McKay's N. AV. corner; thence east 40
chains; thenee north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence following beach
to point of commencement, containing
100 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  J.   HIBBARD.
w     i   i-i   in.,,     A- McKAY, Agent.
March 11, 1907. Meh. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land on Porchcer Island, situated about six miles in an easterly
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Mrs.
S. A\r. Mosby's S. AV. corner post; thence
running east SO chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or loss.
MRS. S. AV. MOSBY, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March 12, 1907. Mcli. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for permission to purchase the following
described land on Porcher Island, situated about four miles in an easterly
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Miss
Jennie Johnson's N. W. corner; thence
running east SO chains; thonce north 20
chains; thenco west SO chains; thence
south 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 aeres, more or le3s.
MAUDE S. McKAY, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March 12, 1907. Mch. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 00 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land on Porcher Island, situated about six miles in an easterly
direction from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Delia
Young's N. W. corner post; thence running SO chains east; thence 20 chains
south; thence SO chains west; thence 20
chains north to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
DELLA YOUNG, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March 12, 1907. Mch. 30
NOTICE Is hereby given that, CO days
after date, 1. intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land on Porcher Island,
situated about six miles ln an easterly
diroctlon from Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Mrs.
S. W. Mosby's S. W. corner post; thence
running east 80 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west SO chains; tiience
north 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
MARGARET McLEOD, Locator.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March  12, 1907. Mch. 30
NOTICE Is hereby given that, CO days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and AVorks for
permission to purchase the following
described land on Porcher Island, situated about one mile south of Refuge
Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Kay
McKay's N. AV. corner post; thence east
SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thonce wost SO chains, to beach; thence
following beach to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
KAY McKAY.
A. McKAY, Agent.
March 1.1, 1907. Mch. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and AVorks
for permission to purchase the following tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked G. S.
AV., N. E. corner, about ono mile south
of the northwest corner of Lot 3, Rupert District; thence west 80 chains;
thonce south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains: and thonce north to point of
commencement, containing 640 acros.
Located Feb. 26, 1907.
Mch. 30. G. S. WRIGHT.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following tract of land:
Commencing at a post marked J. W.
AV., S. E. corner, about one mile east of
the southeast corner of Pre-emption No.
2004; thence north SO chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south SO chains,
and thence to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located Feb. 27, 1907.
Mch. 30. J. W. WRAY.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situate on Richardson Inlet, northwest side of Lyell Island:
1. Beginning at a post placed opposite the east end of Dog Island, marked
"northwest corner": running south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence easterly along
the shore to place of beginning.
2. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed at the southwest
corner of Claim No. 1; running south
SO chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence easterly along
the shore to tho place of beginning.
3. Beginning at a post marked "northwest cornel*," placed at the southwest
corner of Claim No. 2; running south
80 chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence easterly along
the shore to the place of beginning.
4. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed at the southwest
cornor of Claim No. 3; running south
SO chains; thenee west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence easterly along
the shore line to the place of beginning.
5. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed at the northeast
corner of Claim No. 1; running south
SO chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chains
to the place of beginning.
6. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed, at the southwest
corner of Claim No. 5; running south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east SO chains
to the place of beginning.
7. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed at the southwest
corner of Claim No. 6; running south
SO chains; thence west SO chains; thenee
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to the place of beginning.
8. Beginning at a post marked "northwest corner," placed at the southwest
corner of Claim No. 7; running south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to the place of beginning.
Dated March 30, 1907.
M. J. G. WHITE.
Apl. 20 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date. I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land situated on Poroher
Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of E. A. Hudson's preemption claim, marked E. A. Hudson's
N. E. corner; thence running south 40
chains; thonce west 40 chains; thenoe
north 40 chains to beach; thence east
along the beach to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
E. A. HUDSON, Loeator.
9th March, 1907. Apl. 20
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days after
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works, Victoria, for permission to purchase the
following described land:
Commencing at a point at the southwest comer of Rev. T. Crosby's preemption and better known as Mission
Point; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to banks of Skeena River; thence following tho banks of Skeena northerly to
point of commencement, and containing
160 aores, more or less.
Dated at Hazelton, 29th March, 1907.
C.  E.   GOODING.
Per W. J. Larkworthy, Agent.
April 13th, 1907.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
nfter date, I intend to apijjy to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from tlie following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post placed on
the. northwest end of Spicer Island, on
tho shore of Schooner Pass, marked
"southwest corner"; running north SO
chains; thence east SO chains; thenco
south SO chains; thence west SO chains
to the placo of beginning.
2. Commencing at a post placed on
the east shore of Spicer Island, marked
"northeast corner"; running west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north along the
shore to the place of beginning.
Dated the ISth March, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post placed on
Lyell Island, at the southwest eorner of
H. G. Anderson's claim, marked "northwest corner"; running south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to the
place of beginning.
4. Commencing at a post placed on
the southwest corner of Claim No. 3,
marked "northwest corner"; running
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence east 80
chains to the place of beginning.
5. Commencing at a post placed at
tho southwest cornor of Claim No. 4,
marked "northwest corner"; running
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thonce north SO chains; thence east 80
chains to the place of beginning.
Dated the 2nd April, 1907.
Apl. 20 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, we intend to make application to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AVorks for a lease of the following
foreshore, viz.:
Commencing at S.  \Ar.  corner of Lot
29,   Range   5,   Coast   District,   at  high-
water mark; thence 200 feet due S. W.
by S.; thence in an easterly direction at
ah equal distance throughout from tho
high-water line to a point due S. E. of
the S. E. corner of said Lot 29; thence
due N. AV. to the shore.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   CANNING   CO.,
LTD.
Findlay, Durham & Brodie, Agents.
B. C. MESS, Manager.
April IS, 1907. Apl.20
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, we Intend to make application to tho Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AVorks for a lease of the following
foreshore, viz.:
Commencing at the S. W. corner of
Lot 15, Block 1, Skeena River (known
as the Aberdeen cannery site), at high-
water mark; thence 200 feet due south;
thenco east at an equal distance
throughout from the high-water line to
a point due south of the S. E. corner of
said Lot, 15, and thence due north to
the shore.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   CANNING   CO.,
LTD.
Findlay, Durham & Brodie, Agents.
B. C. MESS, Manager.
April 18, 1907. Apl. 20 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4, 1907.
l,T|T»|'^HTHTT|Tt^^'!|T't''trTlT ProSramnle   consisted   of   a   one-act
Social and
.    play,_ entitled 'J An Interrupted Pro
posal,"    the    following    ladies    and
fjf gentlemen taking part:    Miss Jessie
ry «4-„l       •!*  Le'Sh> Miss Gladys Rutter, Miss Mil-
rersonal. T ler' Mr-p-Rutter' Mr-Rousen and
»Jf  Mr. Fred. Francis.   This was follow-
lifififirififiiififififir r1 py f amusins ¥$ s™s hj Mr-
i*.****.****.*.**.   q  Pooley; a recitation, Miss Rutter,
VICTOBIA
Rvlrs.   G.   Hartnaglc,  of  Seattle,   is
lying a visit to her mother here.
I *   *   *
{Captain R. W. Martin left for Eng-
jid last week on a visit to his old
lime.
* *   *
Major and Mrs. Williams returned
it week from a short visit to
tittle.
* *   *
'The Little Martyr of Smyrna;
songs by Miss Crocker, Miss Miller
and Mr. Francis. Dancing was indulged in. Bantley's orchestra providing the music.
Among the invited guests were:
Mr. and Mrs. S. Rutter, Miss G. Rutter, Mr. P. Rutter, Mr. and Mrs.
Purdy, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, Miss
Crocker, Mr. Pardy, Mr. and Mrs.
Pell, Miss J. Leigh, Miss Mabel
Leigh, Mr. G. Pooley, Mr. and Mrs.
Dobson, Mrs. Mesher, Mrs. Kirk,
Miss May Kirke, Mr. Austin, Mr. and
llts. A. W. V. Innes of Vancouver Mrs. Cooper, Mr. and Miss Laurie,
She guest of Mrs. Tilton. Heywood Mr. and Mrs. Duncalf, the Misses
enl,e* „    .    .. Duncalf,   Mr.   W.   Duncalf,   Mr.   J.
.    * Crocker, Mrs. Vick, Mrs. Davie, Miss
Irs.  Patrick  Bums  of  Calgary  is  r, Davie, Mr, and Mrs. Colby, Miss
■ytng with her mother, Mrs. Ellis,  Harris, Mrs. and Miss Clayton.
!i-ge Road. *   *   *
j             ..    *   *   * Mrs.   Norton  held  her  " Subscrip-
Hr. and Mrs. J. Hirsch have rented tion"  dance  on  the  evening of the
W. S. Gore s residence on Bur- 26th at the A. 0. U. W. Hall, Yates
*   Avenue.  Street.
The hall was prettily arranged with
Irs.   Oscar  C.  Bass  and  children bunting,    evergreens    and    daffodils.
e gone for the summer months to The supper table, which was arrang-
r house on Shawnigan Lake. ed by Mrs. Shallcross and Miss Nel-
* * * lie Dupont, was done with pale pink
jlrs.   Thos.   Kiddie   left  last   Sun- apple  blossoms,  with   candle   shades
evening to join her husband in of the same tone and long streamers
lley, Prince of Wales Island. and bows of pink satin ribbon.   Miss
* * * Heater and her support were in their
iss Perry, daughter of Col. Perry usual good  form.
he N. W. Mounted Police, is the     Among those present were:    Miss
t of Mrs. Ellis, Gorge Road. Johnstone, white crepe de chine with
* * * pink roses and bouquet of same shade;
fLr.  and  Mrs. W.  P.  Gooch  have  Miss  Bttlwer,  white  liberty satin  of
rned to Victoria and have taken pale pink;  Mrs.  G.  Courtney, pretty
-heir residence at 60 Rae Street.      spangled   gown;   Miss   Page,   white
* * * liberty satin; Miss B. Blakemore,
iss May Ridley, the guest of Mrs. white and pale pink chiffon; Miss
ack,  returned  a  few  weeks  ago,  Blakemore, white silk;   Mrs. F. Pem-
a  trip  through   California  and berton,  black;   Mrs.   Woolley,  black,
cico. with   touches   of   green;   Mrs.   Reed,
* * * pink chiffon; Mrs. Langton, cream
lie Cricket Club dance has been lace robe; Miss B. Gaudin, pale blue;
pponed  and will  be  held  on  the Mrs.  Herchimer,  pink  chiffon;   Miss
of May at the A. 0. U. W. Hall, Hickey, white lace robe over pale blue,
es Street. bouquet  of white  roses;   Miss  Foot,
* * * soft pink chiffon; Miss Reid, black;
fiss H. Wilson left last week for Miss Goddard, black corsage of red
tie, where she has accepted the roses;  Miss   Nash,  white;   Miss  Ar-
tion of assistant book-keeper for buthnot, white;  Miss  Gaudin, white;
ell known firm. Miss Pitts,  black;  Miss  Irving, pale
* * * blue and white; Miss Bryden, white
rs. W. Moore of 206 Pandora satin; Miss Perry, white crepe de
et, left for the East last week chjne; Miss Gillespie, white chiffon;
the  benefit  of  her  health.    Mr. Miss Rant, soft white silk; Miss New-
jjre leaves shortly to join her.        combe, flowered organdy; Miss Wal-
* * * ker, white, with red roses; Miss T.
rs. Everard Fletcher has returned Monteith, white with scarlet poppies;
Ottawa,   where   she   has   been Miss Judith Woolley, pale pink; Miss
iding the winter with her father, p>  Mason, white silk; Miss I. Mason,
Hon.  R. W. Scott, Secretary of reci  si|k;  Miss   Mutter,  white;   Miss
e. Monteith, black point d'sprit; Miss V.
* *   * Mason,   flowered   organdy;   Miss   D.
r. and Mrs. W. C. Ward and Miss Mason, pale blue,
en  Ward  arrived  from   England     Among the gentlemen were:    Col.
week.   They   are   staying   with Herchimer, Messrs. Wright, Le Vein,
j- daughter, Mrs. W. E. Oliver, of Haggarty,    Smith,    Browne,    Prior,
Bay. Foot, Randcll (Fernie), Harvey, Col-
* * * ley; Fisher, Pemberton, Gillespie,
,r. Reginald Bethune of the staff Mason, Gordon. Pitts, McCurdy,
he Imperial Bank of Canada has Moresby, Bridgeman, Gore, Wilby,
lived promotion and left on Thurs- Rociifort,    Nash,    McDougall,    Reid,
morning to take up his new du- Bray,  Mutter,  Bell,
at Arrow Head. *   *   *
* * * Miss Annie Harvey gave a cliarm-
le   Bridge   and   Five   Hundred ing tea at Stonyhurst on Thursday af-
nament held at the Dallas Hotel tcrnoon for   the   purpose of bidding
■id of the Tuberculosis fund last good-bye to her friends prior to de-
proved in  every way to be  a parture to England.   The artistic de-
It success.   Thanks are due to the corations  were   composed   of  spring
rictress of the Dallas Hotel, who flowers and greenery,
generously loaned it for the oc-     Some  of the  invited  guests  were:
|*n.    Thc   donors   of   the   prizes  Mrs. Burton, in a pretty gown of pas-
Mrs. Audain, Mrs. G. Matthews, tel   blue,   with    picture    hat;    Mrs.
T. Gore, Capt. Troup, Mr. D. E.  Spratt, very smart costume  Dresden
hell  and  Mr.  Hibben.   The  foi-  silk; Mrs. Bodw-cll, brown frock, Mrs.
ig ladies were on the managing  Robin Dunsmuir, brown tailor-made;
nittee: Mrs. Audain, Mrs. Troup,  Mrs. Flummerfelt, black over white;
Genge,   Mrs.   T.   Gore,    Mrs.  Mrs.   H.   Pooley.   white   over   pink;
tney,  Mrs.   Matthews.    Thc  tea  Mrs.   Gillespie,   mauve;   Mrs.   King,
was   presided   over   by   Mrs. black; Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Tilton, Mrs.
,1 Dunsmuir and Mrs. H. Pooley  Genge,    grey,    frock;    Miss    Rithet,
|Mrs. Genge in charge of the card black;  Miss   Lampman,   Mrs.  Court-
s.   The committee were delight- ney, Miss Gaudin, black taffeta; Miss
5 find at the close of the after- K?  Gaudin,  Mrs.  D.  Janion.  mauve;
that the profits netted the tidy  Mrs. Savage,    grey;    Mrs.  Berkeley,
of $90. mauve; Mrs.* Savage, grey; Mrs. Ber-
* * * kelcy, mauve; Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs.
st Monday afternoon Mrs. Bean- Arbuthnot, cream; Miss Irving, black;
gave a most enjoyable tea at Mjss Pitts, cream; Miss Work, white;
esidence, Burdette Avenue, to a Mrs. Beaven, Miss Hickey, cream
of her  friends  for  the  purpose  serge;   Miss   Violet   Hickey,   cream;
hibiting a  very  beautiful  land-  Mrs. Todd, black; Mrs. Hickey, black
just finished by the hostess of and violet; Mrs. Baiss, grey; Mrs.
uito   Island,   near   Pier   Island,  Langley,   blue;   Mrs.   B.   Tye,   grey;
Mount Baker making a gor- Mrs. T. Tye, mauve; Mrs. Matson,
background. grey;  Mrs.    Coles,    Mrs.  McCallum,
tea table and reception room black and white;  Miss  Angus,  Miss
arranged with every tone of Crease, Miss Cridge, Mrs. Laundy,
|,v daffodils. Mrs.   R.   Jones,   Mrs.    Rome,   Mrs.
ong the guests were Mrs. Pern- Blaiklock, Mrs. Griffiths, mauve; Mrs.
n, Miss Pemberton, Mr. and x, S. Gore, brown velvet; Miss Ar-
W. C. Ward, Miss Eileen Ward, buckle, cream; Mrs. Ker, cream, Mrs.
Beaven, Mr. McClure, Mrs. Wol- Brett, Mrs. Heisterman, Mrs. Wotten,
|Miss Reid, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Mrs. Worlock, Mrs. T. Pemberton,
lgton, Mrs. Pearse, Mrs. Oliver,  Mrs.  J.   D.   Pemberton,   Mrs.  Dean-
Cridge, Misses Pitts, Lady ];intis, Mrs. Perrin, Mrs. Heyland,
e, Miss Crease, Mrs. Baiss, Mrs. Mrs. Moresby, Miss Moresby, Miss
ley, Mr. and Mrs. Galletly, Mrs.  Moresby,    Miss    Heyland,    Mr.    C.
Johnstone, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Sueur, Miss Williams, Miss Pitts, Mrs.
j, Mrs. Burns, Miss Bryden, Mrs. Raymour, Mrs. Corsan, Mrs. Thomas,
arris, Miss Pachell. Mrs. Prior, Miss Perry, Mrs. B. Wil-
* * * son, Mrs. J. Wilson, Mrs. I*?berts, Mrs.
• Rev St J Payne, assisted by Charles, Miss Tilton, Miss Drake,
jnembers of St. Paul's Musical Mrs. Bough-Allen, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs.
Debating  Society,  gave  a  most Jones, Mrs.  Matthews,  Mrs. S. Wil-
Overalls
UNION  MADE
litful social and dance last week Hams, Miss Lawson, Mrs. Blackwood
Galletly, Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Fleet,
Mrs. Burns, Mrs. Sterling, Mrs. Higgins, Mrs. W. Ker, Mrs. J. Hunter,
Mrs. R. Robertson, Mrs. T. Tye, .Mrs.
Bullen.
Mrs. D. R. Ker gave tea last Wednesday afternoon at her pretty residence. The house was a mass of
beautiful spring flowers and smilax.
The table was also arranged with
daffodils in brass shells and long
trailing pieces of smilax and asparagus fern. Mrs. Ker received her I
guests in a handsome gown of all-
over lace ocer cream taffeta, assisted *
by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Walter
Ker.
Among those present were: Mrs.'
Jones, Mrs. McTavish, Mrs. Hel-j
mecken, Mrs. Heisterman, Miss Heisterman, Mrs. Brett, Mrs. Hollyer,
Mrs. T. Davis, Mrs. Herchimer. Mrs.J
Mrs. Hickey, Misses Hickey, Mrs.
Worlock, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. J. Hunter,
Mrs. G. Hunter, Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs.
Rithet, Mrs. Genge, Mrs. Cecil Roberts, Mrs. Hirsch, Mrs. Rykert, Miss
H. Pooley, Miss R. Robertson, Mrs.
B. Tye, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Coles.
Mrs. Bullen, Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. j
S. Robertson. Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. Arthur Robertson, Misses Mason, Mrs. 1
Kent, Mrs. Munn. Mrs. Beaven, Mrs. |
D. M. Eberts, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs.
Johnstone, Miss Johnstone, Mrs. Gaudin, Misses Gaudin, Mrs. T. Gore.
Miss Arbuckle. Miss Todd, Misses
Pitts, Miss Williams, Miss Bray, Mrs.
Morton, Mrs. Lugrin, Miss Lugrin,
Mrs. Shore, Mrs. Lampman, Mrs.
Blackwood, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. J.
Raymour, Mrs. Corsan, Miss Lanson,
Mrs. Savage, Miss Savage, Mrs. Arbuthnot, Miss Arbuthnot, Mrs. A.
Smith, Mrs. Jay, Miss Jay, Mrs.
Rome, Mrs. Blaiklock. Miss Innes,
Mrs. Spratt, Miss Tatlow. Miss Cambie, Mrs. Hasell, Miss Ard, Mrs. Pun-
nett, Mrs. Jeans, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs.
J. Wilson, Mrs. Millar, Mrs. Bough- P'-'i' ,ay> "ot ■» the -•-•tl' "' the two
Allen, Mrs. Church, Mrs. Holmes, principal characters, but iu the reason
Mrs. R. Janion, Mrs. D. Cambell, Mrs. for t*lejr cle;lth, viz., the feud between
Nelson, Miss I . Work Mrs. Berkeley,    h f    ,„        fl      ,       ,
Miss Leech, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. G. .
Wilson,   Mrs.   Flummerfelt,   Madame   new   light   on   the    picture
Martyn, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Prior.
*    »   *
Ire SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Mult   and  Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
I      Are You Looking for a Location
I Investigate Sunnyside
H No similar  land  proposition in British Columbia can offer the
88     settler  so  many  advantages.
H The SOIL is unequalled  in  productiveness;
!i**j Thc LOCATION is convenient   to   rail,  water  and   highway
transportation.
The SCENIC surroundings are unsurpassed.
The CLIMATE grows crops.
The SITUATION is particularly adapted to fruit growing on
a commercial  scale.
j$ The gentle SLOPE of the land lends itself to economical and
II     thorough irrigation, and lastly—
§ The  WATER  supply  is AMPLE.
H As a residential and fruit growing estate there is nothing in
n British Columbia any better and few as good. Thc lots are going
ffl well now before the sale is fairly started. The future of
|] SUNNYSIDE is assured. If you arc seeking choice lands either
i;'      for residential t>r investment purposes, write
1 J. T.    OBINSON,
i*     Manager B. C. Orchard Lands, Ltd.     . KAMLOOPS, B. C.
| 	
11  the   fact  that  the  tragedy  of  he
secretary, Mrs. Hasell." The audience then signified their appreciation
of Mr. Gowen's address by giving
llim a standing vote of thanks.
s.     lie  also  threw  a I
of   thej
Nurse, whom he considered one of the
most  important  figures   in   the   play. I
What is Fame?
It  has   heen  remarked  in  connection with the recent contest for the
j Chancellorship  of  the  University  of
On   Tuesday   last   The   Alexandra   lhe  lecturer, whose speech occupied  0xf()rd  that   Lor(,   Curzon   took  the
Literary Society held their final meet- about    an    hotir-and-a-half,   has   the^,   hmmn   ()f    t|u,     University;
ing for the season.    The speaker for  happy faculty of combining real rhc- whereas  LoK, Roscbery, addicted to
the evening was the Rev. H. H. Gow- torical   elfect   with   thoughtful criti- horse-racing, left without taking any
en of Seattle.   Bishop Perrin took the  asm, a combination not often found.   degre(,   wh.,u.u.,.     Thc   a,)ovc   story
•hair, and after a few suitable words   At thc conclusion of his speech  Mr.  m,L,(|
needs   completion.      Lord   Rosebery
introduced   the   visitor,   who   was   to I.. McLeod Gould proposed a vote ol *H,cam(,   primc,  Ministcr  ()f  Englandj
speak on Shakespeare's great tragedy, thanks,  during the  course  of which .,,„•  three thm,s    wn|)    thc    De{by
"Romeo and Juliet."   Mr. Gowen, who In* referred to the work of the club Mm.]]   ,,s  Wfi  .^^    Lon,  Canon>
is no stranger to Victoria literateurs, during the past season. "This achieve- these ;lre ma|.ks t|)a(. wj,| take a ,o(.
delivered  an  admirable  address,  but ment," he said, "was dw to thc in- ||f wiping QUti am, , n|.(] Curzon |las
the   point  that  most  impressed    the domitable perseverance and energy of yej. (|) .ic*li(,vc tI]c |east important of
Masonic Hall, Esquimalt.   The  Mrs. A. Robertson, Mrs. Hirsch, Mrs. | writer was that hc laid great stress | the president,  Mrs.  Powell, and  the  them, 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907.
DEEP
COVE
WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO
SPEND YOUR VACATION?
DEEP
COVE
?
In a few brief weeks this question will be uppermost in your mind—and your answer? To assist you in
solving the difficulty—and many there are in the interior who will desire to journey down to the coast
and enjoy the ocean breezes—let us suggest your reading the following extracts from John P. McConnell's
story, "The North Arm of Burrard Inlet," in the Vancouver "Province." It might be a suggestion in the
right direction.
Vancouver as a city of surpassingly
beautiful environs will have a worldwide fame when these great natural
features become known.
Take for instance the North Arm,
only one of a dozen of the beautiful
spots within easy access of the city.
That sheet of water will in a few
years take its place among the show
places of the continent and rank with
the Thousand Islands of the St. Lawrence, the Palisades of the Hudson,
the Niagara Falls and Gorge and the
Grand Canyon of the Colorado as a
natural scenic attraction.
The North Arm has the rocky
islets, t|ie deep shadowed coves, the
boating and canoeing facilities of the
Thousana Islands. There is not one
attractive feature of that famous
island studded sheet of water which
thc North Arm does not possess save
the summer cottages, chalets and hotels, and they are bound to come.
In comparison with the lovely wooded heights of the North Arm with
its Avealth of. color and variety of outline, the Palisades of the Hudson are
insipid and flat.
I have stood upon the cliffs of the
Bay of Fundy and watched its sixty-
foot tide rise and swell, swirling in
cddy'ng foam, lashing the red granite
cliffs of that narrow gulf, and I've
seen the world-famous reversing falls
of the St. John River, I have floated
dreamily upon the mirror-like lakes
in the Laurentian Mountains of Quebec, sailed down the tawny Ottawa,
shot the majestic Lachine rapids of
the St. Lawrence; I have traversed
the length of the Niagara Gorge a
score of times, both at the brink and
down at its water edge where the
fearful rapids toss and roar in their
tumultuous rage, and stood beneath
the mighty cataract itself; I have
wound among the ten thousand
islands of thc Georgian Bay, when the
spell of the harvest moon lit the scene
with a beauty almost unearthly; iu
the highlands of Ontario, the famous
Muskoka district, I have wandered
from lake to lake, I have seen the
pictured rocks of Lake Superior grow
and swell upon the vision; then away
over the broad prairies with their own
peculiar spell for those who can be
content with their eternal monotony,
into the grand old Rockies, through
the Selkirks, down the Fraser Canyon, that most impressive of all the
natural wonders I have seen;. I have
ridden over lonely trails amid the
solemn solitudes of the Hope Mountains surrounded by the handiworks
of a mighty nature; but while all
these places have their own peculiar
charm, their individual interests and
features none of them comprehends
such entrancing variety of interests
or so many distinctive characteristics
of simple beauty, grandeur and thrilling magnificence as may be found
within twenty miles of Vancouver up
the North Arm.
Up the North Arm (and by the
way what a barbarous name that is
to give such a beauty spot) we have
the thousand rocky islets dotting the
water; at the upper end are snow-
covered mountains towering from
3,000 to 5,000 feet, making a canyon
clothed in a hundred tones of eternal
green, floored with the salt tide of
the Pacific Ocean and crowned with
silvery caps of dazzling snow.
While the forests have been logged
out there is scarcely a visible scar of
man's depredations save here and
there a moss grown giant stump, an
abandoned log chute and the trails
which make it easy to visit the beauty
spots and explore the wondrous forests and cliffs.
And over all the beautiful scene,
imparting to it the majesty and grandeur that puts it in the Fraser Can
yon or Niagara Gorge class, tower the
stately mountains, solemn in their
huge bulk and silence. Viewed from
the water they welcome one with a
menace, they beckon and challenge.
You watch the flitting sunlight and
shadow swiftly pass over their vei
dure clothed slopes, upwards and
away," and in you stirs a yearning desire to follow and scale their summits. But those summits—crowned
with dazzling snow or opalescent glaciers, alluring in their beauty, repel-
lant in their icy chill und sinister
hardness, loveliness enshrined in peril
for him who would dare to worship
at her feet. * * *
With some judicious advertising
and the facilities for getting to it
the North Arm is bound to become
one of the greatest attractions this
city possesses. If such a feature were
contiguous to New York, that city
would bc as famous for its scenic
attractions as it now is as the first
city of the continent. Think of the
millions of people who visit Coney
Island by boat and tram—a barren
sandy waste, its single attractive natural feature the sea, then reflect upon the thousands who take a four-
hour monotonous lake sail from Toronto to Lewiston for the sake of a
forty-five-minute, dusty trolley ride
up the Niagara Gorge, the interest
of which may be exhausted in two or
three trips, or the hundreds who leave
Montreal every Saturday afternoon to
ride for three to five hours in hot,
crowded cars to the lakes of the Lau-
rentians, there to spend Sunday amid
a nature not a quarter so beautiful as
the North Arm. Yet here we have
a trip unsurpassed in beauty and accessibility in the world. From the
moment we leave the wharf nature
presents to our enchanted view a panorama of mountain, water, sky and
rocky islet of such variety and charm
that its interest is endless. Every
passing cloud, every new mood of
Nature presents an entirely new picture, an entire change in the scheme
of color. Every fathom the boat
moves presents the scene in a new
way. And what I have written here
is an attempt to describe it as I have
seen it in early'April. What a contrast this sunlit sky, these balmy
breezes to the snow-covered wastes
of the prairies of Ontario and Quebec
as lhey are .it this writing. While
trains are stalled in snow-drifts, while
furnaces are voraciously consuming
coal to keep the inhabitants of brick
and stone walls warm we were comfortably sleeping in the open air,
wrapped in one blanket, not even
taking the trouble to keep the camp
fire burning. * * *
But natural beauty and climate are
not all the North Arm has to offer
to visitors. The hunter and fisherman will find plenty of recreation
there. Myriads of ducks of all kinds
are feeding and mating there now.
On one side of the Arm deer are
plentiful in season. On the other
among the lofty peaks the bighorn
and mountain goat roam. Game
birds, grouse and prairie chickens are
numerous.
In the waters of the Arm in season
salmon are plentiful, and may be taken
with trolls. Indian River is a famous
trout stream, and a good catch may
be depended upon at any time.
One might spend an entire summer
on the North Arm, make a different
trip every day, amuse himself in a
new way seven days in the week, and
yet not exhaust its list of attractions.
The next season he could go all over
it again with renewed delight. Residents of Vancouver may spend every
week-end amid its recesses in every
summer of a lifetime, and find a new
interest in every visit.
DEEP COVE is the new Summer Resort of the North Arm. It is within an hour's run of Vancouve
We are operating the passenger boat "Beaver," for the summer months on regular schedule. At DEE
COVE cottages may be had for rent, or lots can be leased or purchased for summer residences wit
permission to use the pleasure grounds and bathing beach.    If we can further assist you, write m
DEEP
COVE
The North Arm Navigation, Land and Development Co., Ltd.
515 PENDER STREET
E. FRANCIS, Manager
Vancouver, B. C.
DEEP
COVE THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4. 1907.
11
MUSIC AND     I
THE STAGE |
?^*^*^^-^^^9^*^^*?j|?-||»
Music and Stage.
Things have been very quiet at the
ictoria Theatre this week.   True, on
uesday night there was " A Stranger
Town," but he did not take us in
any very great extent because we
lessed what kind of a coon he was,
stayed   at  home.   The   fifty   or
xty people who paid for admission
ere entitled to the commiseration of
ose who stayed at home.   On YVed-
sday night Henry W. Savage "of-
red"   Raymond   Hitchcock   in   " A
mkee   Tourist."   Hitchcock   is   by
me  people  considered  a  star,   but
twinkled   very   feebly   and   in   a
inkee Tourist must be considered a
kmal failure.    He has no voice and
without    thc    most    rudimentary
,owledge of singing.   His colleagues
that he  is a delightful  fellow—
the stage—which  1 can well  be-
,'e.    The support was much better
m thc principal work, and the sing-
of  the   chorus  was  good.    The
itinting was unexceptionable but the
ge  management  left  much  to  be
iired;   the  action being  slow  and
waits long and tedious.   The ad-
■tisement   stated  that  Mr.   Savage
ried   his   own   orchestra.     After
iring  it  I  should hardly  think  it
•essary.     Altogether   my   opinion
:h  is  confirmed by many people
Lh whom I have spoken since Wed-
iday  night,  is   that  when   Victor-
are asked to pay $2 for a show
y have a right to expect something
:ter than Raymond Hitchcock, and
fompany with at least two or three
ging  voices.    It  is  said  that   Mr.
tchcock appeared  in  Victoria  two
irs  ago  in  the  " Yankee   Consul,"
no one seems to remember it.
Capsuloids
n
y
The New Grand.
he show at the above theatre this
ek is rather above the average,
st of al lthe orchestra has been pearly happy in their selection. T.
Curtis & Co., present a clever and
using sketch, in vvlhich Mr. Curtis,
the waiter, convulsed the house
h laughter. I again had occasion
sympathise with Mr. Keane over
song; he made the most of it that
man could possibly do, but both
ds and music were "mawkish" in
extreme. The Burkes followed;
are certainly good. The lady
ts an accompanist in thc worst
sible way; a messenger boy, with
ft for music, appears, and between
in they manage to convey more
to the audience than most cou-
Mr. Burke is .able to do what
jne of the hardest things for a
ical man to perform, viz., to play
of tune when he wants to; he
plays the piano with his feet,
ry A. Brown is a clever cartoon-
of that there is no doubt. But I
ture to suggest that he would do
er if he substituted "patter" for
singing. Scrode & Mulvey are
d dancers. What puzzled me was
they prefer to introduce their
:ing act under the guise of a scene
1 "Babes in Toyland." ) They
lid have done much better to have
ie on and simply danced, because
t certainly arc beautiful dancers,
MOMUS.
THE ENGLISH INTERNAL
TREATMENT FOR
FALLING
HAIR
Sth Regiment, C. A.
egimental   Orders  by  Lt.-Col.  J.
Hall,  Commanding.
(Regimental H eadquarters,
Victoria, B. C, May 1.
-Guard of Honour:   The Officer
imanding has pleasure in inform-
all   ranks   that   General   Baron
pki    of    the    Imperial    Japanese
ly, expressed his appreciation of
Guard  of  Honour  furnished  by
Regiment on the occasion of his
nt visit to Victoria.
Discharge:    Thc following mnn
ng been granted his discharge is
c off the strength of the Regi-
: No. 250, Gunr. Wm. Jackson,
2, 1907.
By Order,
iigned)
RIDGWAY-WILSON, Capt.,
Adjutant 5th Regt., C.A.
BOWES'
DRUG STORE
98 Government St. near Yates St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Spring Wants
FOR YOUR FURS—
Moth Balls
Insect Powder
Camphor
DISINFECTANTS
FOR PREMISES-
Sulphur
Carbolic Acid
Chloride of Lime
YOURSELF
AND FAMILY—
Fraser's Blood Purifier.
FRASER'S
Drug Store.
30=32 Government St.
VICTORIA.
IMPORTANT
LAND SALE
Under instructions from the Lands
and Works Department, Victoria, I
will sell on
Tuesday, June 4,1907
—At ir a. m.—
LOT 217, BURNABY
containing 120 acres less the C. P. R.
right-of-way. This property is situate
on  Burrard  Inlet,  and  is  eminently
adapted for millsite, etc., purposes.
—Also—
LOT 206, BURNABY
containing 160 acres. This parcel is
situate immediately to the south of
Lot 217, the Barnet Road running
through  it.
Each parcel will be offered separately.
TERMS:
25 per cent, cash, balance in 1, 2 and
3 years.   Interest at 6 per cent.
For further particulars apply to
JOHN S. RANKIN
AUCTIONEER
514 Pender St., VANCOUVER
John Robertson
& Son's
FAMOUS SCOTCH WHISKEY.
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
J
VICTORIA
WINNIPEG
Trade Mark.
Established 1827.
Branches in Canada
MONTREAL
VANCOUVER
HENRY O. WOOTTEN, General Manager.
Canada and the United States. 41 Commons St., Montreal.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home nl nil theatrical and vaudev Ue
artists while lu the Capital city, alio of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
New and Second Hand Launches for sale.
A. W. LePage
Electrician and
Gasoline Engine Expert
GASOLINE ENGINES AND
SUPPLIES.
General Agents for
The Rochester & Campbell
Engines, the Auto-Sparker Dynamos, the Loomis Float Feed
Carburetors, Spark Plugs, Coils,
Batteries, etc.
667 Granville Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
2 and 4 Cycle.
2% to 100 H. P.
Get our list of Bargains.
THE latest "Piccadilly" Single-Breasted Sack Suit affords a
striking example of the perfection attained in the production of fine ready-to-wear clothing. Having in mind the fact
that this style of garment is that most generally worn by the man
of today, we have devoted special attention to the designing of
our model for the season 1907. We offer it in a wide variety
of fabrics,  colors, and  patterns.
MANUFACTURED BY
H. E. BOND & ee., Ltd.,    -    TORONTO
A Postal card will bring you our Style Book.
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur,
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Klectrie
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners' home.
"DANNY" DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
GREEN & sniTM. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,       •      Proprietor.
fi
*x
Electric Mining Machinery
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Fans     Pumps     Hoists     Blowers
Signal Bells   Miners' Lamps
WRITE FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS.
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
VICTORIA, VANCOUVER,
W29 Government Street. 66 Granville Street.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can bc produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY  OLD  LIQUEUR  SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Worker!
ofthe Kooteuayi.
W. E. HcCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in tlio City.
$1.00 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
Do you want a quiet place to
smoke and read the paper while
waiting for   that appointment?
Try then, my friend
The Wilson Bar
VICTORIA, B. C.
*
Beneath Gordon Hotel Vales Street
French Flower Seeds
Sold at REASONABLE PRICES,
viz.:
6 packages   25c
13 packages   50c
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market.
VICTORIA 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1907.
ifif^if'itifif'ty'fy'fy'ii'-jfr'ty
if ■#
if A Lady's Letter '*
if if
Y By   BABETTE. Y
if ^
Dear Madge:
It is absurd to say we do not like
flattery, for we all are pleased with
it. The manner of its administration
is the real point of prejudice.
The particular form of flattery
against which every one turns a soft
side is personal interest. The man
or woman whom you appear to interest has a strong power to please
you. This is why certain people who
have really very little conversational
ability are listened to with pleasure,
they take a real interest in you. From
this have grown two little tricks of
speech which flatter the hearer into
geniality and the timid into confidence. They are, the beginning of
most sentences with "you" instead of
"I," and the substitution of "Tell me,"
for "say." Instead of saying eternally "I think" or "I went," catch your
tongue, and start with "you think,"
and "you went." The effect is marvellous. The one addressed is interested at once and listens keenly to
learn what another person imagines
his thought to be, or to see how
much is known about his goings and
his comings, and he springs at once
into lively conversation. A day's
trial of this unegotistical trick will
convince anyone of the stupidity of
thrusting the eternal first person singular upon a languid listener.
The familiar but vulgar, "Say," with
which too many introduce a sentence,
is an American contraction of the
English "I say." It calls to mind
the humorous slur of the foreigner
who remarked that even America's
national song begins with it. "Say,
can you see, by the dawn's early
light?" Surely if the timid, the egotist, the charitable and the lazy
would equip themselves with these
two improved phrases conversation
would always be easy and genial. It
was my intention to give you a few
more "ideas" on conversation, but it
has suddenly come tn my mind that
my esteemed colleague Bohemian has
thrashed out the subject some time
back, hence it behooves me to think
of something new.
Has it ever struck you how much
there is in adaptability? The following little episode will perhaps illustrate my meaning more clearly: Some
years ago I was invited to spend a
few days with an old school friend
who had been married but a short
time. I found she had an attractive
and cosy little home and her husband
was a man with a fine taste in books,
pictures and plays. We always spent
the evenings in the snug little little
library, and I told myself that did
these people live in town that snug
it. With some pride a very nice
collection of prints was produced
from a drawer and my friend was
as much interested in them as her
husband. One by one we examined
and discussed them. Then all three
proceeded to hunt out meritorious engravings in old books from the
shelves, and to compare them with
the inferior workmanship in more recent works. This cosy married couple had hobbies that were my very
own. Speaking both at once in their
enthusiasm they told me of a couple
of engravings they hoped to secure
ere the year was out. They were
happy these two. They enjoyed the
daintiest of homes. They admired
each other. Whenever I wanted a
few days rest I called on these friends
and found an increasing pleasure in
each visit. I saw the snug little library grow fat with choice books, and
the walls charmed me with such pictures as one too seldom sees these
days. I never knew a man more
courteous and  attentive to his wife.
A few years later my friend was a
widow and she travelled abroad for
some time where I completely lost
track of her. Then one day I met
her in town looking bright and rosy
and she told me she was married a
second time, and I must come and
visit her again. "Come soon dear,"
she said. "Same old address. I do
so want you to meet John; he's such
a dear!"   I confess I did not special
ly care to meet John, yet I accepted
and went. When I went again into
the little snuggery where my friend's
first husband used to dream among
his books and prints, I was met by
a jolly, round-faced young man who
shook me heartily by the hand. Soon
I found time to take a look around
the room and I noticed that the books
were all gone. The dainty little engravings that had peeked from little
nooks were no longer there. On the
wall opposite where I sat was a large
coloured plate of a hunting scene, red-
mouthed hounds climbing over a
hedge. Stretched' along the wall was
a network in which, at various angles,
were stuck a hundred photographs,
mostly of athletes, lacrosse, football
and tennis players, men in tights,
crouching at the scratch, ready to
sprint. Over the window two canoe
paddles were crossed. The old room
was now the lair of a man of action.
"You must come to the great football game with us," said my friend.
"John takes in all the games; he's a
terrible rooter." " She's just as bad
as I am," replied John. John was
indeed a man of action, played games,
went deer hunting, fished, and held
the record for a mile. And my little
school friend was in the last tournament runner-up in the ladies champion ship at the Golf" Club.
A round-faced happy pair bade me
good-bye at the station and I vow
I have never seen a wife more attentive and suited to her husband
than my little friend was to John.
Well, well! yet, why not, Books are
but books,, and pictures, pictures,
while dreams are made of unsubstantial stuff.
A feature is being made of smart
cloaks with loose sleeves for the coming season. They are to be worn for
motoring as well as for summer evening wraps. A favorite material is
thick tussore silk of the new coarse
make, and a useful colour is that
known as tussore, the natural shade
of the silk. The sleeves are cut in
one with the cloak which is about
three-quarter length. A very pretty
example in coarse, heavy silk of this
kind is furnished with wide bands
over the shoulders, stitched with
brown silk. Above the waist they
almost meet, the lower edge of stitching leaving off and the band falling
into the fullness of the back, from
beneath two medallions of brown
gimp. The upper stitching is continued, hood-shaped. From it strappings of silk are carried towards the
edge; there is no collar; these cloaks
are cut low at thc neck, and under
the straps is a scarf of soft brown
silk, terminating with a long fringed
tassel. These coats arc up-to-date
versions of the burnous once very
fashionable in England, and adapted
from the characteristic drapery of our
friend the Arab. There is a grace
about them and a kindliness to thc
figure that recommends them for all
out-of-door wear in this our transition time of year.
Notes on
Provincial News
The Fraser Advance deals, not unkindly, with Mr. Munroe, for what it
may be excused for denominating "a
change of heart" on the subject of a
Provincial University. The good-
humoured banter is so much to the
point that it is repeated below:
We congratulate Mr. Munro in this
redemption, though tardy, of a longstanding pledge, as well as upon his
support of a measure which means so
much to the future up-building of this
great Province. Nevertheless, Ave cannot but recall that this same gentleman on the night of January 31st
last stood before a Chilliwack audience and ridiculed Mr. Cawley for
placing in his address to the electors
a pledge to do his utmost to aid in
the early establishment of a Provincial .University. Either Mr, Munro
has undergone a change of heart since
election, or he is at his old game of
trimming to suit the breezes. If a
man's conduct is to be read in the
light of his previous history, only one
conclusion would seem possible in the
present instance. However, we will
gently draw the veil of charity over
the scene, and devoutly trust that Mr.
Munro's reformation may steadily go
forward until he shall have approved
and appropriated all the remaining
good things in his opponent's platform.
For the month of March, according
to reports from the East, the Dominion Copper Co., with its two furnaces
in operation, was able to earn in ex-
ces sof $50,000 net. According to
present expectations the company wil!
be able to have its third furnace in
blast by the middle of May, everything
being now on the ground.—Phoenix
Leader.
A pretty home wedding was solemnized at Sandwick on Wednesday,
when Miss Emma, the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. G. G. MacDonald of
Comox, was united in marriage to
Mr. Richard R. Ray of Union Bay.
The Rev. Mr. Menzies performed the
pleasing ceremony.
Owing to the strike of the coal
miners in the Crow's Nest Collieries,
which has caused a shortage in the
supply of coal, the Cranbrook Electric Light Company has been compelled to cut off all lights in the city
at 1 a. m. until a further and sufficient supply of coal is obtained.
Mr. George E. Robinson, vice-principal of the Vancouver High School,
is slated to the position of principal-
ship of that institution, to succeed the
late Mr. J. C. Shaw.
The New Grand.
There is a bill of rather more than
the usual excellence at the above theatre this week. It is seldom that a
house can stand two comedy sketches
in one performance, but those contributed by Nan Engleton & Co. and
Billy Arnold and Gardner were really
worthy of the reception which they
had. The Five Bakers, who were
sadly handicapped at the beginning
of the week by the smallness of the
stage and the loss of one of their
number through illness, were marvels;
I expect they are still. Their cycling
turn beats anything that I havc seen
yet, and I have seen many turns of
this description. Gil Brown is the
best monologuist that has yet visted
Victoria, with one possible exception,
whose name I cannot remember, but
whose face and form are known to
me; Gil. is witty, clever and above all
he speaks so that he can be heard;
that is always rather a fad of mine.
In addition he dances, and he dances
beautifully. It is a long time since I
have enjoyed a show at the New
Grand as much as I did that of Gil.
Brown. Thc permanent features were
up to the average.
The Bulkley Pioneer, which was
recently launched by Mr. John Dorsey, is to be acquired by a joint stock
company, now in process of formation. Considerable capital is being
subscribed by the business interests
of the Northern Interior, and on completion of the company a plant will
be purchased and sent into the Bulk-
ley Valley.
Thc Bulkley Pioneer is also to have
a competitor, as it is announced that
Mr. W. J. McKay, at one time part
owner in the Atlin Claim, has purchased the plant of the defunct Skeen
River News and purposes starting the
Essington Sun at Port Essington.
Everywhere thc hold of wealth upon our public policies has been weakened. The men whose cash practically controlled legislation a year ago
are now hopelessly in discredit. They
do not dare to take a hand in public
affairs. Their support is an injury
to any cause. Thc politicians dodge
them. No man dares to acknowledge
them as political breathren.—The American Magazine.
Thc twentieth century is getting
ready for some readjustment, some
readjustment, some great movement
in the interest of humanity, for some
new rule, some modification of individualism that will permit holding on
to thc benefits it brings, but prevents
the evils that grow up with those
benefits.
You cannot get out of
a proposition that which
it doesn't contain.
Under the magic touch of the
wand, the doves come, not from
the magician's sleeve, but straight
from the
Stetson Hat
Briefly, hat quality, hat beauty, hat finish, hat
style and hat durability, place the Stetson on
the heads of particular men and keeps it there.
Every Stetton Beari the Stetson Name
We carry the Stetson in all styles—Soft and Derby.
B. WILLIAMS & CO.
Are Agents for
Stetson, Christy, Lincoln
and Bennett Hats
Also for
SEMI-READY TAILORING
68-70 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
CONGO
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Send for descriptive catalogue and prices.
LTD.
LTY.
E. G. PRIOR &e©.,
Victoria,   Vancouver,   Kamloops   and   Vernon
Subscribe for The Week THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4, 1907.
13
The Motherland.
A Sensational Budget.
It is on all sides assumed that Mr.
Asquith will not be content with a
humdrum Budget this year, and the
Ministerial Pess have boldly proclaimed in advance that it is to be the
greatest Budget since Sir William
Harcourt's Death Duties Budget of
1894.—Daily Telegraph.
No More Hangins.
There can be no doubt that the
tendency in this country is towards
the abolition of thc death penalty.
And in this respect, as in many others,
notably the tardy attempt to create a
Court of Criminal Appeal, we are following the lead of other European
countries.—Thc Tribune.
Satisfied Britain.
It is to be wished that our neighbours would cease to credit us with
thc contemplation of schemes of conquest. Surely they must admit that
we have possessions enough and to
spare; that wc are satisfied with having become, and wish only to remain,
the greatest Empire the world has
ever seen.—Broad Arrow.
The Age of Unrest.
We are having the gospel of rest
preached to us on every hand; we are
told that we are galloping to destruction at our present rate, and yet we
constantly accelerate thc pace. It is
useless to warn, useless to preach,
useless to struggle against thc tendency of the age. We are possessed
for the time being by the Demon of
Unrest. It bas us in its power.—
Lady's Pictorial.
applicants. The lady mayoress will
give Miss Joyce a family Bible, and
a Cardiff trading company will give
her a sideboard.
Taking No Chances.
One day last summer when the
wind was in its most capricious mood,
and particularly "blowy," a woman at
that mysterious age when her friends
speak of her as "well preserved,"
made a dash around a very gusty corner. Her gown was of the lightest
of summer muslins, and on her head
she wore a marvelous creation of
gauze and flowers. Every vagabond
breeze in tbat vicinity instantly saw
an opportunity to do stunts.
Sooner than it takes to tell, the
summer muslin was describing the
most alarming flights. But its owner,
a hand on either side of her hat, kept
on as stubbornly as though such a
display of open-work hosiery was an
cvery-day affair.
"Madame," cried another woman,
rushing up to her, holding ber own
draperies in a tight embrace, "you are
probably not aware of it, but your
skirts are above your knees."
"I don't care," retorted the other,
never moving a linger from the flower-laden bonnet. "I've had those legs
for forty-eight years and can't lose
them, but I've just bought this hat
and paid eighteen dollars for it, and
I don't mean to let it get away."
A Common Mistake.
The average Englishman has come
to look upon the average American as
a feather-brained idiot who cares only
for money and the ridiculous things
that money can buy or achieve. The
idea that there arc millions of people
in the United States who arc well
bred, modest, and unassuming seems
to bc receding from thc public mind in
this country.—Town and Country
(New York) London correspondent.
The clergyman of a certain parish
in the North of England wanted a
wall built around the churchyard, and
called a meeting for the purpose of
raising funds. He opened the meeting as usual, and then asked any gentleman in the room to make! a suggestion, whereupon a burly farmer jumped up, and said: "It seems like a
waste o' money to me, for this reason—them 'at's inside can't get out,
and them 'at's outside don't want to
get in.   What d'ycr want a wall for "
An Officer in Earnest.
The Duke of Connaught has always
Itaken his profession seriously, and we
■believe wc are justified in saying that
lane of thc lasting regrets of his life
lias been the impediment which his
Iroyal birth has placed iu the way of
Ihis desire for an ample share of active
Iscrvice. There could be no greater
|mistake than to suppose that in the
case of his Royal Highness military
service has been merely a dignified
|md ornamental way of filling up a
oyal leisure.—Englishman, Calcutta.
■V Chinese Solomon.
There lived some time at Nankin
■i Chinese lady and her husband. Thc
latter, being compelled to join the
l\rmy, remained absent so long that
lis wife, thinking him dead, married
ligain. The new couple were enjoying their honeymoon, when all of a
|uddcn the first husband appeared on
Woolwich in Despair.
The incessant discharges ordered by
lhe Government have reduced Wool-
Inch to despair and disaster. The policy of parsimony has been carried out
ruthlessly. Workmen have been
thrown out of employment in masses.
Capable men of good character, who
linve laboured in the national work-
limps for twenty or more years, have
lieen turned adrift as harshly as thc
latest comers.—Daily Express.
THE SCENE.
"Give me back my wife!"
"Never! We are lawfully joined."
The case was taken before a Magistrate, who demanded that the wife
should be left in his custody for a
few days, telling thc parties to come
again after that time to receive judgment.
On the day appointed the two
rivals again appeared before the
Judge, who informed them that as the
woman had died in the interval, one
of them would havc to defray her
funeral expenses. The first husband
flatly refused; the second, on the contrary, said he was prepared to do the
last honours to thc dear departed.
"Very good," said thc Magistrate,
drawing aside a curtain. "Here is
your wife, alive and well; take her, if
she is willing."
The woman did not need telling
twice, but walked off with her second
spouse, invoking blessings on the
head of the Solomon of the Middle
Empire.
HOW TO KNOW AN ANTHEM.
Winner of the Bute Dowry.
The happiest girl in Cardiff to-day
Miss Mary Joyce. She has proved
lhe winner in the annual contest (or
Ihe Bute wedding dowry, which this
fear amounts lo £30 14*-,. Her niar-
Jiage to William Henry Bryant will
■hus be really and truly facilitated.
I'he prospective bride is twenty-live
Ind lhe bridegroom just over Iwenly-
|i.\. Miss Joyce's record of domestic
lervice is excellent. She has been in
Inc situation nine years, and for four-
led! years she has helped to support
ler widowed mother. She has promised to give her mother a place.in her
lew home. Thc Lord Mayor of Car-
liti' had to choose between nineteen
People who know little about a
subject sometimes explain it more
clearly than those who know all about
it. An old sailor had heard in church
an anthem which greatly pleased
him. lie was telling a shipmate who
asked: "I say. Jack,' what's an anthem?"
"What," replied Jack, "do you mean
to say you don't know what a han-
thcm  is?"
"Not mc."
"Well, then. I'll tell yer. If I was
to say to yer, "Ere, Bill, give me that
'andspike,' ihat wouldn't be a han-
them, Hut was I to say, 'Bill-Bill-
Bill-giv-giv-giv-g-'v mc, give me. that-
1 iill. giv me. that hand, giv me that
hand, hand-spike. spike-spike-Bill giv
mc dial ihat handspike hand-spikc-
spike-spike, ah men; Bill giv me thai
handspike-spike, ah men!' that would
be a halnhem."
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and AVorks for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the east shore of the Nit Nat Lake,
west of thu cast line of No. 2, running 80 chains east, thence SO chains
south; thenee SO chains west; thence
SO chains north to point of commencement.
May 4 EDWARD E.  HARDWICK.
NOTICE is hereby given tliat, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
tlie Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following* described lands, situated in
Renfrew  District,   Vancouver   Island:
Claim No. 1.—Commencing at a post
marked Frank Verdier on the southwest oorner of timber limit number
S72G; thence north SO chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 120
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 40 chains,
to   the   point   of   eommeneement.
Staked   April   25th,   1907.
Viotoria,   B.   C,   April    29th,    1007.
CHARLES   F.   GARDINER.
May I Frank Verdier,  Agent.
No. 2 —Comemncing at a post situated
at the S.W. corner of T, L. No. 1, A. L.;
thenco north SO chains, west SO chains,
south SO chains, east SO chains.
No. 3.—Comemncing at a post situated
at the S.W. corner of T. L. No. 2, A.
L.; thence north SO chains, west SO
chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains.
No. 4.—Comemncing at a post situated
at the N.W. corner of T. L. No. 3, A. L.;
thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south SO chains, west SO chains.
No. 6.—Commencing at a post situated
at the S.E. corner of T. L. No. 4, A. L.;
thence north SO chains, east SO chains,
south SO chains, west 80 chains.
No. (i.—Comemncing at a post situated
at the S. E. corner of T L. No. 5, A. L.;
thence north 80 chains, east S chains,
south 80 chains, west SO chains.
No. 7.—Commencing at a post situated
at the N.E. corner of T. L. No. G, A. L.;
thence north SO chains, west 80 chains,
south SO chains, east SO chains.
No. 8 —Commencing at a post situated
at the S. E. corner of T. L. No. 7, A. L.;
thence north SO chains, west SO chains,
south SO chains, east 80 chains
No. !).—Comemncing at a post situated
at the S. W. eorner of T. L No. 8, A. L.;
thence north SO chains, west SO chains,
south SO chains, east SO chains.
No. 10.—Commencing at a post situated at the N. W. corner of T. L. No.
!l, A. L.; thence north SO chains, east SO
chains, south SO chains, west S    chains.
No 11.—Commencing at a post situated at the S. E. corner of T. L. No.
10, A. L.; thence north 80 chains, east SO
chains, south SO chains, west SO chains.
No. 12.—Commencing at a post situated at the S.  E.  corner of T.  L.  No
11, A. I..; thence north SO chains, east SO
chains, south SO chains, west 80 chains.
No. 13.—Commencing at a post situated at the S. E. corner of T. L. No. 12.
A L.; thenee north 80 chains, east SO
chains, south SO chains, west 80 chains.
No. 14.—Commencing at a post situated at the N. E. corner of T. L. No. 13,
A. L.; thence north SO chains, west SO
chains, south SO chains, east 80 chains.
No. IB.—Commencing at a post situated at the S. W corner of T. L. No. 14,
A. L.; thence north SO chains, west SO
chains, south SO chains, east SO chains.
No. 16.—Commencing at a post situated at the S. W. corner of T. L. No. 15,
A. L ; thence north SO chains, west SO
chain's, south SO chains, east SO chains.
No. 17.—Comemncing at a post situated nt the S. AV. eorner of T. L. No. 1(1,
A. L.; thence north SO chains, west SO
chains, south SO chains, east SO chains.
A.  LUCKOVICH.
May I. ROBT. E. McKEIL, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 clays
after date. 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Water
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following desoribed lands, situated in tlie Nootka District:—
1. Commencing at a post situated at
the N. A\r. corner of No. 1 Timber Claim,
R. E. McK., situated on the west shore
of Port Eliza Arm, Esperanza Inlet;
thence west 00 chains; north SO chains;
east 40 chains; south 40 chains; west 40
chains; then south 40 chains.
2. Commencing at a post situated at
tlie N. AV. corner of T. L„ R. E M.cK.,
south shore of Esperanza Inlet; then
west about 20 chains to T. L, 11,909;
then soutli 120 chains; east 100 chains;
then north 00 chains; then west 80
ehnlns; then nnrth  SO chains.
Staked April 20th, 1907.
Mny 4.
May 4. ROBT. E. Mi'KEIL.
NOTICE is herehy given that. 3 dnys
after date, T Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
AVorks for a special license to cut nnd
carry nwny timber from tho following
described lnnds, sltunted In Nootkn District:—
No S.—Commencing nt the S.E. corner
of No. 7 T. L„ R. E. McK.; north-west
cud uf Nootkn; thence south 120 chnins;
thence west so chnins: thence north 10
chnins; thonco east -10 chains; thonce
norih SO chnins; thenco enst 40 chnins.
Xo. !i.—Commencing nt the N.E. corner of No. s T. U, It E. MoIC; thenoe
south so ehnlns. enst so chnins, north SO
chnins. west SO chains.
Xo. li).—Comemncing nt tin* S.E. corner nf Xo. S T. L. R. E. McK.; thence
south (10 chnins, west 100 chains, north
20 chains, east SO chnins, north 40
chnins, enst SO chnins.
Alny  I. ROUT. E. McKEIL.
NOTICE Is herehy given thnt, 30 dnys
after dale, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chiel' Commissioner of Lands nnd Works
for a spocial licence to cut nnd carry
away timber from the following described Inmls situated In the Clayoquot
District:—
No. I.—Comemncing at n pnst situated
one-half mile west of Indian Reserve,
mirth shore of llesqiilnt Harbour, nl the
N.E. corner cf Section 85, surveyed
Inmls; thence north S ehnlns, west' SO
chnins,  south  Nil chnins. enst  SO ehnlns.
UNCALLED.
I Mil  nie clown by Sorrow's door.
••ill !" I cried.    "It Is my right.
Set wide* the portal evermore.
My dnv Is done: now comes the 'night.
Press ma ihe rue; let no drop spill;
For 1 will in nml drink my nil;
('nine Sorrow's voice nnd said mc nay;
"When votaries to this temple draw.
O'er burning plowshares Struggling they,
In dflUbt, in ngony. and owe.
And when such enter here; they Ree   ■
Whnt vou can never know cif. me."
NOTifi'; is hereby given thnt. ::o dnvs
nfter (late. I Intend id apply in tho Hon,
Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nml Water
I'm* a special licence In cut nml carry
away timber from the following described Inmls:
A woman likes io hc taken by
storm; it is thc remains of the savage
in her, as woman is the least civilised
of the Iwo. She would much rather
bc kcpf.'in order than keep her Ipis-
band so, although she always tries
it on until she has found him her
master.
Commencing at a post situated near
Hesquiot Point at tlie south-west eorner of T. L. No. 9, marked "R. E. Mc-
Keil"; thence north about ISO chains;
tiience west to shore line about SO
chains; thence southerly following the
shore line to place of commencement.
Commencing at a post situated near
tlie S. E. corner of Timber Limit numbered 10 on the map; tiience east SO
chains; thence north SO chains; thenee
west SO chains to east boundary of Indian Reserve; thence south to point of
eommeneement.
A   LUCKOVICH
May 4. Robt. il. MeKeil, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Woi*ks
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands in Nootka District, commencing at post marked J. 8. S S. W.,
thence E. 10 chains; thence north 100
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 100, to point of commencement.
May 4 J. S. SHOPLAND.
NOTICB is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry awny timber from the following
described lands in Nootka District, commencing at il post marked J. S. S. S.E.,
north SO chains, west SO chains, SO
chains south, SO chains east to point of
commencement.
May 4 J. S. SHOPLAND.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
AVorks for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from tlie following
described lands, situate in Coast District, Group No. 1, Southgate River:—
No. 1.—Commencing at a post planted
north of Southgate River, near the S.
W. corner of T. L. 11.4S5; thence west
40 chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 120 chains; thence north S
chains to point of commencement.
ALVO V. ALVENSLEBEN,
May 4 C. H. EDMOND, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30
days after date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for special licenses to cut
and carry away timber from the following lands, in Renfrew District:—
No. 1.—Commencing at a post planted about 120 chains east of Carmanah
River, and about three and one-half
miles from its outlet; thence SO chains
north; thence 80 chains west; thenee SO
chains south; thence 80 chains east to
point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing at the same point
as No. 1; thence SO chains south; thence
SO chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence SO chains east to point of commencement.
No. 3.*—Commencing at the same point
as No. 2; thence 80 chains south; thence
80 chains east; thenee 80 chains north;
thence SO chains west to point of commencement.
No. 4.—Commencing at a post at or
near the southwest corner of Lot 1;
thence 80 chains north; thence SO chains
west; thence SO chains south; thence
80 chains east to point of commencement.
No. 5.—Commencing at the same point
as No. 4; tiience 80 chains south; thence
SO chains west; thence SO chains north;
thence SO chains east to point of commencement.
No. 6.—Commencing at a post about
120 chains south of Lot 1; thenee 40
chains north; thence 100 chains west;
thence 40 chains south; thence 100
chains west; thence 40 chains south;
thence 100 chains east to point of commencement.
No. 7.—Commencing at the same point
as Lot 6; tiience 40 chains east; thence
40 chains south; thence 40 chains east;
thenee SO chains north; thence SO chains
west; thence 40 chains south to point of
commencement.
No. S.—Commencing at a post about
40 chains south of the southwest corner of Lot 7; thence SO chains south;
thence SO chains east; thence SO chains
nortli; thence SO chains west to point
of commencement.
No. 9.—Commencing at same point as
Lot S; thence SO chains south; thence SO
chains west; thence SO chains nortli;
thence SO chains east to point of commencement.
No. 10.—Commencing at a post at or
near the southeast corner of Lot 3;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tiience south SO chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 11.—Commencing at the same
point as Lot 10; thence 80 chains south;
thence SO chains east; thence SO chains
north; thence SO chains west to point
of commencement.
No. 12.—Commencing at or near the
southwest corner of Lot 11; thence SO
chains south; thence SO chains east;
thence 80 chains north; thence SO chains
west to point of commencement.
No. 13.—Commencing at a post about
40 chains nortli of the southwest corner of Lot 4 and SO chains west; thence
SO chnins enst; thence SO chains north;
thence SO chains west; tiience SO chains
south to point of commencement,
No. 14.—Commencing at the same
point as Lot 13; thence SO chains nortli;
thenco SO ehnlns wesl; thenee SO chnins
south; tiience SO chuins east to point of
commencement.
No. 16.—Commencing at the same
point as Lot 14; thence SO chains soulh;
thenco sn chains oast; thonce Sn chnins
north; thence 80 chains wost to point
of commencement.
No. 10.—Commencing nt (he snme
point as Lot 15; thence SO chains south;
thenee SO chains west: thence 80 chnins
north; thence 80 chains east to point
of commencement.
No. 21.—Commencing at a post nt or
near the northwest corner of Lot 13;
thence so chains north; thence so chnins
west; thenee SO chains south; thence SO
chnins east to point of commencement.
No. 22.—Commencing at the same
point as Lot 21; thence SO chains east;
Ihence SO chnins north; Ihence SO chnins
west; thence so chains south to polut
of eommeneement.
No, 2:1.—Commencing nl a post nt or
nenr the northwest corner of Lot 22;
thonco so chnins east; thenee SO .hains
north; thenco SO chains west; Ihence SO
chains south tn point of oommoncement,
\V. B. GAUP.AHD,
A. F. GAVIN,
\pl 27 HARNEY WATERS,  Agenl.
NOTICE Is herehy given that, 30 dnvs
from date, 1 Iniend tn apply tn the linn.
Chiel' Commissioner nf Lnnds ami Works
for a speeinl license to cut and carry
nw-.iv timber from lhe following described lnnds nn Thurlow Island. Sayward  Histriet:
From n sink'' abollt 25 chnins wesl
from S. E, corner of Lot 113; Ihence
wesl along southern boundary of said
lot. nnd beyond. 110 ehnlns; thenee soulh
100 chains; thence east 00 chnins; thenee
norih 100 chnins tn the point of commencement, eontnlulng 040 acres, more
or less.
A. PRICIIARD.
Thurlow, B. C„ March 10, 1907.   Aid.20
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to make application to the Honourable the Chief Commissioner of Land sand Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands, situated east side of Howe
Sound, N. W. D.:
No. 1. Commencing at a stake planted
at the S. E. corner of Lot 891; thence
east 80; north 80; west 80; and south
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 2. Commencing at the S. W. corner of No. 1; thence east 80; south 80;
west 80; and north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at the S. E. corner of No. 1; thence east 80; south 80;
west 80; and north 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 4. Commencing at the S. E. corner of No. 1; thence east SO; north 80;
west 80; and south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at the S. E. corner of No. 4; thence east 80; north 80;
west 80; and south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at the S. E. corner of No. 4; thence east SO; south 80;
west 80; and north 80 chains to point
of  commencement.
No. 7. Commencing at the S. E. oorner of No. B; thence east 80; south 80;
west 80; and north 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. S. Commencing at the S. E. corner of No. B; thence east 80; north 80;
west 80; and south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 9. Commencing 40 chains north
of the S. E. corner of No. 7; thence east
SO; north 80; west 80; and south 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10. Commencing at the N. E. corner of No. 1; thence east 80; north 80;
west 80; and south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
JOSEPH DUBOIS.
Staked on 12th April. Apl.20
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands situated in Nootka District:
Post No. 1. Commencing at a post
marked T. L. R. E. McK., and situated
about 31-4 miles S. E. from Ferrer
Point, west shore of Nootka Island;
thence north 100 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains.
Post No. 2. Situated near post No. 1,
T. L. R. E. McK; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains.
Post No. 3. Situated S. E. 1 1-4 miles
from post No. 2, T. L. R. E. McK.;
thence north 100 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
east 40 chains.
Post No. 4. Commencing at a post
situated at the N. AV. eorner of No. 3,
T. L. R. E. McK.; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains.
Post No. B. Commencing at a post
situated at the S. E. corner of No. 4,
T. L. R. E. McK; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains.
Post No. 6. Commencing at a post
situated about 20 chains south of Nelson Bluff, south shore of Neutchltlitz
Inlet, Nootka Island; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thenee east SO chains.
Post No. 7. Commencing at a post
situated at the N. W. cornor of No. 6,
T. L. R. E. McK.; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains.
R. E. McKEIL.
April  16,  1907. Apl.20
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we Intend to make application to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked B. C.
C.  Co.,  S.  E.  post,  placed  on  the  east
side of the Tkzino or Indian River, situate at the head of the Oweekayno Lake,
near   Rivers  Inlet;   thence    SO    chains
north; 40 chains west; 00 chains north;
40  chains  west;  80    chains    south;  40
chains east; 00 chains south; 40 chains
east   to   point   of  commencement,   containing in all 640 acres.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   CANNING   CO.,
LTD.
Findlay, Durham & Brodie, Agents.
B. C. MESS, Manager.
April 17, 1907. Apl.20
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from tho following described lands, situated on Narrow Gut
Inlet, Kyuquot Sound, AVest Coast Vancouver Island:
■ No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
"Roy M. Dawson's N. AAr. cornor post";
thence S. 160 chains; thenee east 40
chains; thenco N. 160 chains; thence
following shore line to point of commencement; containing 640 ncres, more
or less.
No. 2. Commencing nt a post marked
"Roy M* Dawson's N. E. corner post";
thence 100 chains S.; thonce SO chains
AAr.; thenco 60 chnins N.I thence 40
ehnlns E.; thenee *I0 chains N, to place
of ennunenccincnl; containing 010 acres.
No. 3.   Commencing nt a post marked
"Rov m. Dawson's x. AAr. oorner post";
thenco E. so chains; thonce S. so chains;
thenee. AV. SO ehnlns; thence N. SO chains
to placo of commencement; containing
(MO ncres, more or loss.
Xo. i. Commencing al a post mnrked
"Roy M. DaAvson'c X. IS, oorner post";
thonce SO ehnlns S.; thenee 100 chnins
AA-' thenco 10 ehnlns X.; thence 10
chains B.; ihence -io chains x. nnd f,o
chnins tn place of commencement; con-
lnining OK' ncres, more or less.
No. 5. Commonclng nl a post marked
"Roy M, Dawson's X. W. post"; thenee
40 chains S.; tiience 130 chains E.;
thence In south hniindnry of No. 4;
thence w. nml s. ('ollowing s. boundary
of i to 6 to placo of cntninencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
No. 1. Commencing at a post inarked
"Roy M. Dawson's X. AV. post"; thence
so chains S.: thenee 80 chains E.; thenee
Ml   chains   X.   to   shore   line,   following
shnre line in piaVe of commencement;
containing 640 ncres, more or less, nnd
situated cm Fair Harbour, Kyuquot
Sound, on smith shore line.
Xn. 2. Commencing nt a post marked
"It. M, Dawson's X. E. corner pnst";
thence S. 00 chnins; thence 120 chnins
W.i thence X. In shore line; thence E,
following shore line In place Of commencement; containing 040 acres, moro
or  less.
Xn. :;. Commencing nt n pout marked
"Roy M. Dawson's .x. W. post"; thonce
13, 120 ehnlns*. thenco i" Chains x.:
tiience AV. sn chnins; thenee X. to shore
line; thenco following shore line to place
.>r commencement; containing 640 acres.
„ic,l* * less, unci located nn lhe 15th dnv
of Decembor, I 000. ,  „
iti iV M. DAWSON.
.\pi. so       I'm Raj Williams, Locator. M
THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4 1907
DESTINY
The Story of a Belated Love Affair,
from the French of Henri
Chantavoine.
^'^'^^•^■?"^(^^'^'^,^"4?^ * know it; I feel it, and, if I may nor even separation; but Madame de
_a- ^Aj  venture to say so to you, it is be-  Barneville,   who   had   no   child  and
cfo €Llirtifri* ^♦fH*-"V etti cause ••* am not a s'"y, affected girl, nothing which bound her to a homt
TP iJIIUI I &l\Jl jf TP Do you believe, Monsieur Pierre, that devoid of love, esteem, and confidence,
vp T  a rich gir\ since it seems that I am lived more and more with her mother.
ififififififififififififif one, can be very proud or happy to Pierre was aware of this distressing
see herself courted by handsome, use- situation, but as Marthe had said
less young men, fops with open waist- nothing to him about it he pretended
coats, who are only running after her to be ignorant of it. He continued
fortune? Do you not believe that she to visit Madame Le Roy; at her house
would be happier and prouder with he met Madame de Barneville, shook
an honest man of her own choice, a hands with  her, talked with her, as
~ ,       laborious, learned man, an artist, to in former days, of art and of music,
In a little ante-chamber adjoining whom> no doubt) ghe wou,d bHng a and asked her no questions
Madame Thierry's parlor, which was fortunei but who WQU,d ,ove hw wjth_ Suddenly Monsieur de Barneville
already full of guests, Pierre Breton  out that>  and wh(J  jn  retufn  wou]d djed) the victim of an automobile ac.
associate her with his work and his cident, and Marthe, who was just
fame, would make her the friend, the twenty-five years old, found herself
true comrade, that every woman who a widow after three years of married
is not a mere doll wants to be for the life. She and her mother left Paris
man whom she has chosen? I speak without regret, and the two noble wo-
to you seriously, simply anl mourn- men, who had suffered so much, went
fully—you see it quite well. I am together to seclude themselves • in
sure that your friendship will never their house in Brittany, the Thicket,
fail me, and you have, and will al- where in the sweet warmth of their
ways have mine." affection their wounded spirits might
She interrupted herself a moment, find comfort. The Thicket was a de-
as if considering a past which had lightful place, a nest of verdure, full
fled away, or a future which had not of birds, with great chestnut trees a
hundred years  old.   The  sadness  of
Indian Beserve, thence east 55 chains;
thence south 116 chains; thence west
55 chains; thence north 116 chains to
place of beginning.
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
J. G. J.'s, south east corner; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 116 chains;
more or less to shore line; thence easterly and southerly along shore line to
place of beginning.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
May 4
and Marthe Le Roy, seated upon a
sofa, talked together like old friends.
Marthe's eyes were bright, and her
face was animated; Pierre, serious
and a trifle melancholy, listened with
the obstinate expression of a man
who does not want to be convinced.
"And so," said Marthe, "I am to
understand that you don't wish to
marry me?"
"I do not. You understand it very
well; it is impossible.
"But why?"
"You know that also, very well, and yet appeared,
it w useless for me to repeat it." "And noW)» she continued, "let us the mother and her daughter insen-
Stjll,  I  wish  that you would re-  eacn follow our destinies separately, sibly passed away before the peaceful
peat it again, so that I may have the sjnce you wish it to be so_   It seems horizon which they saw from their
honor  of  hearing you  say  it once
more, for the last time."
"Very well, then! You know, Marthe, or rather, Mademoiselle Marthe,
what a respectful and devoted friend-
to me, however, that our two des- terrace, under the soft radiance of a
tinies, like our two souls,  deserved clear,  warm,   friendly  sky,  and  the
something better." beautiful shadows of their trees. Paris,
It was the end of April.   A few where one is soon forgotten, forgot
days after this short conversation be- them almost at once; and they asked
NOTICE is hereby given that 30
days after date I intend to apply to
the Honourable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land situate about
3 miles more or less south east from
Mores Cove oft Granville Channel about
40 chains from shore.
Commencing at S.W. corner; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 60 chains;
thensce east 60 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 100 chains; thence
sotuh 100 chains to place of beginning.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
May 4
time when you were a little child
until now, when you are grown up.
Upon  your  side,  you  have  had  an
ship I  have had for you, from the  tween pierre Breton and Marthe Le  nothing better than to be thus for-
Roy, Madame Le Roy and her daugh- gotten, and to live unknown. Mater started for Brittany, and went to dame Le Roy occupied herself a great
a house which they owned, near deal with charitable work; Marthe
esteem, a sympathy for me, greatly Nantes. Pierre, for his part, went returned to her books or to her music,
to my honor, and for which I thank upon a tour t0 Germany.* Marthe Le and said but little. The two ladies
you. But I cannot, I ought not, to Roy wrote to him {rom time t0 time( lived all alone at the very gates of
aspire to the honor of being your with her mother>s knowledge and con- Nantes, where they rarely went, and
husband, for three reasons; yes, three, sent She wrote him charming iet. each sufficed for the other. Some-
catcgoncal, imperious and unconquer- terSi told hitn of their walks and their timeSi ilowever, in the morning, upon
impressions, inquired about his, and opening the window which looked out
made no reference to her former plans upon the green hill at the foot of
and dreams. Pierre answered her in which flowed the Loire, Marthe look-
the same tone of sincere friendship, ed toward Paris as if she saw again
and sent her photographs or little sou- something or expected some one.
venirs of the cities which he visited. Madame de Barneville had been a
Then Marthe's letters became less widow for six months. It was near
IT"./'!!! 4°'d!L.t.l4:.1" y°" "^  'f *   Sequent, and Pierre, who had expect- the end of September, 1900.   One eve-
'""  *        ""' ed this, did not feel surprised or ag-  ning,  as   Madame  Le   Roy  and  her
grieved. Upon returning to Paris, in daughter were about to seat them-
October, he received one morning this selves at table, they heard their dog
little note from Mademoiselle Le Roy: bark, and the bell sounded. The gardener went to open the gate, and a
My Dear Friend: gentleman entered the sandy court in
front of the house.
I want you to be the first to learn      Th(, liule provincial maid-servant,
able."
"Oh!    Unconquerable?"
"Yes, and not to be refuted; they
are as follows: First, you are too
young."
"I am twenty-two years old."
"And I am thirty-six; so I am four-
know how to count.
"You don't know how to count. A
woman's years have not the same
number of days as a man's, Women
become rational sooner than men do,
and they stay rational longer."
"And then, you are too pretty;
don't deny it, no one will believe you
You have charming eyes, while I wear a great piece of news.   I am engaged,  somewhat frightened, forgot to ask
■        -        *    Since yesterday, to Monsieur Jacques  the vjsitor>s name> and stppidly
hideous spectacles; you have beautiful  golden  hair,  while  mine  begins
NOTICE ls hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works, for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land from a creek entering Skeena Hiver about 6 miles up
river from Hot Springs on the east
shore of Skeena River:
1. Commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J." about 40 chains from tide water
on South West corner; thence 40 chains
North; thence 160 chains East; thence
40 chains South to Creek; thence 160
chains West along Creek to place of
beginning.
2. Commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J." about 3 miles from salt water;
thence 64 chains East; thence 125 chains
South; thence 40 chains West to Creek;
thence along Creek in a Northerly direction to place of beginning.
3. Commencing at a post marked "J.
G. JP." about 3 miles up Creek; thence
West 40 chains; thence South 80 chains;
thence East 40 chains; thence South 80
chains; thence East 40 chains to Creek;
thence along Creek to place of beginning.
4. Commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J." about 5 miles up Creek; thence
East 40 chains; thence South 160 chains;
thence West 40 chains to creek; thence
Northerly along Creek 160 chains to
place of beginning.
5. Commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J." about 5 miles up Creek; thence
West 40 chains; thence South 160
chains; thence East 40 chains to Creek;
thence Northerly along Creek to place
of beginning.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
May 4
R. E. McK.; thence south 80 chains J
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80]
chains.
No. 6.—Commencing at a post situated
at the northwest corner of No 3 T. L.
R. E. McK.; thence west 100 chains
thence following the shore to S. W
ccrner of No. 3 T. L., R. E. McK.; thenci
north 80 chains; containing 640 acres
more or less.
No. 7.—Comemncing at a post situate*
near No. 6 post, T. L., R. E. McK.
thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains
south 80 chains, east 80 chains.
No. 8.—Commencing at a post neai
the shore about 3 1-2 miles east fron
Heshquiot Point; thence east 80 chains
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south 8(
chains.
No. 9.—Commencing at a post situate!
about 31-2 miles east from Hesquio
Point; thence east 160 chains, north 41
chains, west 160 chains, south 40 chains
No. 10.—Commencing at a post situated about one-half mile east from Hes
quiot Point; thence north 80 chains
east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 8(
chains.
No. 11.—Commencing at a post sit
uated at the south-east corner of No. II
T. L., R. E. McKeil; thence north 81
chains; thence east 80 chains, south 8|
chains, west 80 chains.
No. 12.—Commencing at a post sitl
uated at the south-east corner of Nof
11 T. L„ R. E. McK.; thence north 81
chains; thence east 80 chains, south S|
chains, wost 80 chains.
No. 13.—Commencing at a post sit|
uated at the head of Refuge Cove*
thence west 50 chains, south 80 chains!
west 80 chains; thence following thj
shore to point of commencement, conl
taining 640 acres, more or less.
Staked April 18th, 1907.
ROBT. E.  McKEIL.
May 4
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
aid Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands situated about 3
miles from Lowe Unlet in a westerly
direction, lake entering Granville Chan-
nell on Pitt Island.
No. 1 Claim.—Commencing at a post
marked "J. G. J.'s" about 2 miles up
lake from Granville Channel on S.E.
corner; thence north 50 chains; thence
west 126 chains, thence south 60 chains,
thence In an easterly direction along
lake shore to place of beginning.
No. 2 Claim.—Commencing at a post
marked "J. G. J." at the head of lake,
thence west 160 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence East 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains to place of beginning.
No. 3 Claim.—Commencing about half
mile up mreek entering head of lake,
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains to place of beginning.
JOHN GO JOHNSTON.
May 4
to turn grey; you are full of grace ten years younger than you—a hand*
and distinction, and I am neither some enough fellow, rich enough, it
graceful, distinguished, nor even ami- is said, which my Uncle Lucien great-
able." ly appreciated.   He is trying to be-
"Still  you  please  me  just  as  you come a government auditor. The wed-
are." ding will probably be  in the  early
"That will pass away, like the vio- part of next year, and I take pleasure
lets which you wear upon your dress, in inviting you to it.   Believe, I beg
And,   finally,   Mademoiselle   Marthe, of you, in my faithful friendship,
you are too rich tor me.   A great MARTHE.
deal   too   rich.   Your   dear   father's
de Barneville-twenty-six years old- ed the doQr o{ the dining.room where
thc ladies had just seated themselves
at table. They rose, and, in spite of
the shadow, they recognized him at
once by his gait, his manner of bowing and bis spectacles.
"Is it you, Pierre?" said Madame Le
Roy. "How glad I am to see you!
Welcome! You must dine with us."
"Madame," said Pierre in a voice
which trembled a little, and which he
tried to steady, "I am on my way to
and    I    would    not    have
death has made you the heiress of a pierre rcplied at oncej send;ng his Nantes,
great fortune, which grows every day cornpiiments and congratulations. The wished "
ir. the banking-house of your uncle, marrjage took place early in January His voice trembled still more; then,
Monsieur Lucien Le Roy, the finan- and pierre was present at the cere. by an effort of his will, it became clear
cier.   I, myself, have my little office
mony.   The   young   couple   went   to and ringing.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land from Gibson Island,
the nearest to the north end of Pitt
Island of Granville Channel:
Commencing at a post marked "J. G.
J." on the N.W. corner; thence southerly along shore about 40 chains;
thence easterly along shore about 160
chains; thence North across Island about
40 chains; thence Westerly along shore
to place of beginning about 160 chains
to contain 640 acres.
JOHN  G.   JOHNSTON.
May 4
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land situated on the north
end of Pitt Island:
Commencing at a post marked "J. G.
J." on shore close to Indian reserve;
thence South 70 chains; thence West 130
chains; thence North to shore 40 chains;
more or less; thence along shore in an
easterly direction to place of beginning.
JOHN   G.   JOHNSTON.
May 4
us," said Madame  Le Roy.
"Yes, sit down," said Marthe. "You
cannot go away without dining."
And she held out her hand to him.
"I    am    not   very   hungry,"    said
NOTICE Is hereby given that 30 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Honourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land situated on South
East shore of Skeena River, about 6
miles up from Hot Springs on shore.
Commencing at a post marked "J. G.
J." N. W. corner; thence East 60 chains;
thence South 120 chains; thence West
to shore; thence along shore in a northerly direction to place of commencement to contain 640 acres.
JOHN   G.   JOHNSTON.
May 4
in the Louvre, and tbe small amount provcncc t0 spend their honeymoon.     "You can guess why I am here at
of money which .1  earn by writing This  honeymoon  was  brief,  like  so the present time."
for the reviews, or by publishing some many  others    Marthe's uncle,  Mon-     And, very quickly, as if to embolden
books,  learned  and  tiresome,  which  sieur  Luden  Lc  Roy> allowed him. ilimseif:
nobody reads." self to bc drawn into unfortunate com-     "I have the honor to ask for your
"Pardon me, I havc read them." mercjai operations which swallowed daughter's hand."
"That is because you havc time to up his own fortune and that of his Then turning toward Madame de
waste. The little that I have is niece. Madame Le Roy saved from Barneville, very pale, and looking
enough for me, and even more than the wreck one hundred thousand straight into her eyes, he said:
enough; but it would not be enough francs, which henceforth was all that "Marthe, the happiness of my life
for you. So you are too young, too she possessed, together with the beau- depends upon you. Will you consent
pretty, and too rich for me.   You sec tiful estate near Nantes. to become my wife?"
very well that I cannot marry you. Monsieur dc Barneville, whose per- The little maid-servant, who under-
If these three reasons did not force sonal fortune had been very much stood nothing, listened to all this with
me to act as I do, you may be sure exaggerated, and who, moreover, had wide-open eyes, the soup-tureen in
that I would go at once to ask your  debts  at  the  time  of  his  marriage, her hands.
hand from Madame Le Roy, who is could not pardon his wife for this "First of all, be seated and dine with
watching us from the lower end of ruin of his hopes, and this sudden
thc room. And now, Mademoiselle and complete change of the situation.
Marthe, let me leave you, as I have He did not love her well enough to
nothing more to say, and as I am love her poor. Marthe drew away
monopolizing you to thc despair of from a man whom she began to devour partners, who are waiting to spise; she became wholly disgusted pierre
dance with you." with him when she saw, little by little,
"Is this your final decision?" what he really was, cowardly in the (Concluded next week)
"My final decision." presence of trouble,  idle, lazy,  and     N0Tice is hereby given that 30 days
"Listen to me a moment more.    I  incapable of creating by means of his after date I Intend to apply to the Hon-
  ,, , ' ,       .  ourable   the    Chief    Commissioner   of
will not be long.   You arc proud, very own work a situation which he had Lands and Works for permission to cut
proud,   and  you  do   not  understand hoped to gain by his wife's capital. ^lnT7e^bIi Vatfs; Xted^a
that another may be proud as well as She suffered for a long time in  si- sm»" Inlet on Pitt Island, off Granville
...,,, l. ■ . ..    .. ..... Channel,  about  one  mile  west  of  Bar-
yourself.   You  feel  something  more lence; finally, she severed .ill relations ker's Inlet.
than an ordinary friendship for me; with him.   There was neither divorce j^ ** ^ToTh'"^ thSrfc^To'at'The^.ToZfSf No.'
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in the Clayoquot District:—
No. 1.—Commencing at a post situated
about 2 1-4 milets north of the Indian
Reserve on the west shore of Sydney
Inlet; thence south, along the shore, 80
chains; west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
east 80 chains.
No. 2 Commencing at a post situated
near post No. 1, T. L„ R. E. McK.;
thence north along shore 80 chains,
west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east 80
chains.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post situated
at the S. W. corner of No. 1 T. L, R. E.
McK.; thence south 80 chains, west 80
chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains.
No. 4.—Commencing at a post situated
near post No. 3 T. L., R. E. McK.;
thence north 80 chains, west 80 chains,
!-outh 80 chains, east 80 chains.
No. 6.—Commencing at a post situated
4 post, T. L„
NOTICE is hereby given that third
days after date I intend to apply to tlj
Honourable Chief Commissioner
Lands and Works for a special license 1
cut and carry away timber from the fo
lowing described lands situate on Kyi]
quot Sound,  Rupert District:
No. 23.—Beginning at a post plautd
at South West corner of Donahoo loci
tion No. 14, thence 40 chains Easf
thence 120 chains South; thence
chains West; thence 40 chains Nortl
thence 40 chains East; thence 80 chaiij
North to point of commencement.
Located March 17th, 1907.
No. 24.—Beginning at a post plantj
on South boundary line of Location
23, about 30 chains from South Wei
corner; thence 160 chains East; then!
40 chains South; thence 160 chains Wesf
thence 40 chains North to point of coq
mencement.
Located March 18th, 1907.
No. 25.—Beginning at a post plantf
at South East corner of location No.
thence 120 chains East; thence 80 chall
North; thence 40 chains West; then!
40 chains South; thence 80 chains Weal
thence 40 chains South to point of coij
mencement.
Located March 18th, 1907.
No. 26.—Beginning at a post plantl
at North East corner of Donahoo locf
tion No. 4, thence 80 chains Wea
thence 80 chains North; thence 80 chaif
East; thence 80 chains South to point f
commencement.
Located April 11th, 1907.
No. 27.—Beginning at a post plant|
at North East corner of J. Donahoo
cation  No.   5,   thence  West  80  chall)
thence North 80 chains; thence East
chains; thence 80 chains South to pol]
of commencement.
Located April 11th, 1907.
No. 28.—Beginning at a post plant
at head of unnamed bay about 3-8 of!
mile in a south easterly dlrction  frtl
Kaoowinch Indian reservation, Kakshf
tie  Arm,     Kyuquot    Sound,   thence
chains   East;   thence  40   chains   soufl
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chai
south; thence 80 chains west; thence f
chains   north;   thence  40  chains  we|
thence 40 chains north to point of co|
mencement.
Located April 12th, 1907.
No. 29.—Beginning at a post plan!
about 5 chains north from south el
corner timber limited 7699, thence f
chains east; thence 40 chains nor!
thence 40 chains west; thence 80 cha|
north; thence 40 chains west; thence ,
chains south to point of commencema
Located April 13th, 1907.
No. 30.—Beginning at a post planl
on west shore of Kokshittle Arm ab|
2 1-2 miles from head, thence 40 cha
west; thence 160 chains south; the!
40 chains east; thence 160 chains no|
to point of commencement.
Located April 14th, 1907.
No. 31.—Beginning at a post plan
on Kokshittle Arm at North east cor
of timber limit No. 7696, thence about
chains west; to Easky Creek, thence
lowing shore line north and westi
thence following shore line easterly
southerly to point of commencement
Located April 14th, 1907.
No. 32.—Beginning at a post plar
at north west corner of timber limit
7707, thence east 160 chains; thence
chains north; thence 160 chains w
thence 70 chains south to point of c
mencement.
Located April 15th, 1907.
No. 33.—Beginning at a post plar
at head of unnamed bay about 1
miles south east from a point mai
Chat Channel Point; thence 80 chi
south; thence 80 chains west; thenci
chains north; thence 80 chains easl
point of commencement.
Located April 16th, 1907.
No. 34.—Beginning at' a post plai
at South east corner of location No.
thenco   80   chains    south;     thence
chains   west;   thence   80   chains   no|
thence 80 chains east to point of c|
mencement.
Located April 16th, 1907.
J. O. DONAHOO, Locatoi
May 4.
NOTICE is  hereby given  that th|
days after date I intend to apply tol
Honourable  the Chief Commissionei
Lands and Works for a special lie
to cut and carry away timber from
following   described   lands   situate
Salt  Spring Island,  south  of Vesu
Bay.   Commencing at a post plante
the   Nordth-east   corner     of     Lot
thence  south  about  60  chains;   th
west to  shore about 84 chains;  th
north along shore about 60 chains to
north west eorner of lot 31; thence
about 80 chains to point of commt
ment   comprising  Lots   31,   32   and
and containing about 503 acres.
DAVID  S.  TAI
May 4.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30
nfter date I intend to apply to the _
Chief Commissioner of Land and W
for a special license to cut and c
away   timber   from   the   following
scribed lands situate In Nootka So
West    Coast    District of   Vancou*
Island:—Beginning  at  a  post    pla
about 20 chains west from North
corner of timber limit No. 9465, th
20 chains West; thence 40 chains N<
thence 80 chains east; thence 40 cl*
north; thence 40 chains east; thencC
chains south to point of commencen|
containing 640 acres.
J.  O.  DONAHOO,  Locatl
Agent for D. M. Eberl
May 4. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MAY 4, 1907
THIRTY days after date I Intend to
■apply to the Hon. the Commissioner of
ILands and Works for a special license
Ito cut and carry away timber from the
[following described lands:
No. IU. Commencing at a post planted
along side of No. 17, marked D. C. McDonald; running north 80 chains; thence
least 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
Ithence west 80 chains to point of com-
nencement.
No. 20. Commencing at a post planted
(two and one-half miles from the head
bf Anderson Lake; running north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
■south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
Ito point of commencement.
No. 21. Commencing at a post alongside of No. 20; running north 80 chains;
Ithence west 80 chains; thence south 80
Ichains; thence east 80 chains to point
pf commencement.
Located March 26, 11)07.
D.   C.   MCDONALD.
Alberni, B.C. Apl. 6
NOTICB is hereby "given that, 30 days
ifter date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
jiway timber off the following described
land situated in Range 6, Coast Disirlet:
1. Commencing at tho N. E. corner
■>ost of the S. W. Vi of Section 12,
Township 1, and thence running west
kn chains; thence south 80 chains;
■hence east SO chains; and thence north
|0 chains to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at the N. E. corner
lost of the S. W. Vi of Section 7,
J'ownshlp 2A; thence running west 80
lhains; thence south 80 chains; thence
last 80 chains; and thence north 80
lhains to point of commencement.
■ C. G. HARVEY,
I Apl. 6.  Agent.
of Block 1; thence ln a northerly direction 80 chains; thence in a westerly direction 80 chains; thence in a southerly
direction 80 chains; thence in an easterly direction 80 chains to place of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post at the
northwest corner of Block 4 and running in a northerly direction 80 chains;
thence in an easterly direction 80
chains; thence in a southerly direction
80 chains; thence in a westerly direction
80 chains to place of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post about
40 chains south of the northwest corner
of Block 6; running thence in a northerly direction 80 chains; thence in a
westerly direction 80 chains; thence in
a southerly direction 80 chains; thence
ln an easterly direction 80 chains to
place of commencement.
THE RAT PORTAGE LUMBER CO.
April 2,  1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
Jfter date, I intend to apply to the
■hief Commissioner of Lands and Works
pr permission to purchase the following described land situated in the Kit-
limkalum Valley:
TCommencing at a post planted at the
Jirthwest corner of Wilson's purchase
■aim, marked B. J. B.'s S. W. corner
list; running north 40 chains; thence
|.st 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
lence west 40 chains to point of com-
lencement, containing 160 acres, more
(Located March 11, 1907.
B. J. BAILLIE, Locator.
■Apl. 6. P. W.  BOHLER, Agent.
INOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
Iter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
lief Commissioner of Lands and Works
Ir a special license to cut and carry
pay   timber   from   the   following   de-
Irlbed lands, situated near an inlet of
sea (not named on chart), near
•shop's Cove, Ursula Channel, Range
T, Coast District:
iNo. A. Commencing at a post ap-
loxlmately 20 chains from shore line;
lence 40 chains east; thence 160 chains
■nth; thence 40 chains west; thenc*
|0 chains north to point of starting.
■No. B. Commencing at the N. E. cor-
|r of No. A; thence 40 chains south;
lence 160 chains east; thence 40 chains
Irth; thence 160 chains west to point
^ starting.
Staked March 10, 1907.
GEORGE   ROBINSON.
Per his Agent, C. CARLSON.
Victoria, B. C. April 6, 1907.       Apl. 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land situated on the north
end of Porcher Island, about two miles
south of what is known as Jap Inlet:
Commonclng at a post marked Bert
Snider's N. E. corner; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less,
A. W. SNIDER.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 8, 1907. Apl. 6
scribed lands on Porcher Island:
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
Joseph Griffin's S. B. corner, situate near
the west end of Swan Lake, Porcher
island, the line runs north 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence east 40 chains
to place of commencement;
No. 2. Commencing at a post marked
Joseph Griffin's S. W. corner, situate
adjoining No. 1 post, the line runs north
160 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains; thence west 40
chains to place of commencement.
Meh. 30 B. S. TOPPING.
NOTICB is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land situated on the east side
of what Is known as Jap Inlet on the
north end of Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post marked W. W.
Clarke's N. W. corner; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west to beach, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
,   W. W. CLARKE.
March 5, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land situated on the east side of
what is known as Jap Inlet, on the north
end of Porcher Island:
Commencing at a stake marked George
Snider's N. W. corner; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west to beach, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE SNIDER.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 5, 1907. Apl. 6
..-•IOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
iter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
lief Commissioner of Lands and Works
I* a special license to cut and carry
lay timber from the following de-
1-ibed lands, situated at head of Cove
fct named), commonly called Goat
Irbor, Ursula Channel, Range IV,
>st District:
J-Jo. 1. Commencing at a post at south
le of harbor; thence 80 chains south;
lnce 80 chains west; thence 80 chains
Irth; thence 80 chains east to po.int of
Ining.
Ko. 2. Commencing at a stake north
le of harbor; thence 80 chains east;
lnce 80 chains south; thenco 80 chains
lit; thence 80 chains north to point of
Trtlng.
(To. 3. Commencing at a stake approx-
litely 20 chains south from the N. E.
ner of No. 2; thence 40 chains north;
.nee 160 chains east; thence 40 chains
Ith; thence 160 chains west to point
■starting.
lo. 4. Commencing at a stake approx-
Itely 40 chains south of No. 3 standpoint; thence 160 chains east; thence
fchains south; thence 160 chains west;
hce 40 chains north to point of start-
lo. 5. Commencing at a stake approx-
Itely 20 chains south of S. E. eorner
V 3; thence ^0 chains north; thence
.fchains east; thence 80 chains south;
lice 80 chains west to point of start-
lo. 6. Commencing at a stake S. W.
ler of No. 6; thence 80 chains south;
ice SO chains east; thence 80 chains
lh; thence 80 chains west to point of
■tine.
To. 7. Commencing at a stake approx-
Jtely 80 chains east from No. 6;
Ice 80 chains north; thence 80 chains
It; thence 80 chains south; thence 80
Ins east to point of starting.
If). 8. Commencing at a stake at
Itlng point of No. 7; thence 80 chains
|h; thence 80 chains west; thence
fhalns north; thence 80 chains east
loint of starting.
fc. 9. Commencing at a stake at
Itlng point of No. 7; thence 80 chains
llr thence 80 chains east; thence 80
Ins south; thence 80 chains west to
It of starting. , ,       ,
Tj 10. Commencing at a stake at
ling point of No. 9; thence 80 chains
J- thence 80 chains south; thence 80
lnst west; thence 80 chains north to
It of starting.
Iich containing  640 acres,  more or
lilted March 10, 1907.
GEORGE  ROBINSON.
Per his Agent, C. CARLSON.
Ictoria, B. C, April 6, 1907        Apl. 6
l)TICE is hereby given that, 30 days
1 date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
If Commissioner of Lands and Works
special license to cut and carry
v timber from the following deled lnnds situated in the New West-
|ter district:
. 1. Commencing at a post on the
J side of the Lillooet River, about
■ lies from its mouth and about half
lie from the river; running thence
1 northerly direction 80 chains;
(e in an easterly direction 80
lis* thence ln a southerly direction
■lalns; thence in a westerly direction
lialns to place of commencement.
I 2. Commencing at a post at the
iiwest corner of Block 1; thence ln
Irtherly direction 80 chains; thence
In easterly direction 80 chains;
l*e In a southerly direction 80
lis; thence in a westerly direction 80
Jis to place of commencement.
I 3. Commencing at a post at the
Iiwest corner of Block 2; thence
1 northerly direction 80 chains;
*a In an easterly direction 80
lis; thence In a southerly direction
lalns; thonce ln a westerly direction
lialns to place of commencement.
1 4. Commencing at a post about
lalns south of the northwest corner
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
aftor date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land on the north foreshore of Porcher Island, on the east of
what is known as Jap Inlet:
Commencing at a post marked Robert
Brice's S. W. corner; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west to beach, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT  BRICE.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 6, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land situated on Porcher
Island, at the north end, west of what
is now known as Jap Inlet:
Commencing at a post marked Mur-
dock Macleod's N. W. corner; thence 80
chains west; thence 80 chains north to
beach; thence following beach line to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres, more or less.
A. S. MONRO.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 4, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICB is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we intend to apply to the
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away from the following described lands, situated ln Rupert District, B. C:
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
on a small creek, without a name, about
three miles from its outlet, the mouth
of the creek about live miles northwest
of Hobson Bight, thence 80 chains east;
thence SO chains south; thenee 80 chains
west to point of commeneement.
No. 2. Commencing at same post as
No. 1 (marked S. W. corner); thence 80
chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence SO chains east; thence 80 chains
south to point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at same post as
No. 2; thence SO chains south; thence
SO chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement.
Staked March 11, 1907. Meh. 30
D. T. RUSON.
STEVEN COOK.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works to purchase the following described land, situated on thu norlii »i,i<*
of North Bentinck Arm:
Commencing at the S. W. corner of
Lot 125, Range 3, Coast Ditsrict; thence
20 chains north to base of mountain;
thence 20 chains west; thence 20 chains
south to shore line; thence following
shore line 20 chains east to point of
commeneement; containing In all 40
acres, more or less.
CHAS. TUCKER.
Bella Coola, B. C.
Dated March 14, 1907. Meh. 30
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land situated on the north
end of Porcher Island, west of what is
known as Jap Inlet:
Commencing at a post marked D. S.
Wallhridge's N. W. corner; thence west
60 chains; thenee south 40 chains:
thence east 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 240 acres, more or less.
D.   S.   WALLBRIDGE.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
March 4, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land situated on the north
foreshore of Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post on the beach
marked Eugene Wacker's N. E. corner;
thence 80 chains south; thence 20 chains
east; thence SO chains north; thence by
the heach to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
EUGENE WACKER.
March 4. 1007. Apl. 6
NOTICB is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land situated on the north
foreshore of Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post marked P. R.
McKay's N. E. corner: thenee 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to beach,
following beach to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
P. S. McKAY.
Per A. McKAY,  Locator.
March 4, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTTCE is hereby given that. 60 dnvs
nfter date, T intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land situated on the nnrth
end of Porcher Tsland, about two and a
half miles south of what ls known as
Jan Inlet:
Commencing at a post marked William
Snlder's N. W. corner; thence south 160
chains; thenoe east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
W. C.  SNIDER.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
Maroh 8, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTTCE ls hereby given thnt. 60 dnvs
nfter date. I Intend to apply tn the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following desoribed land on Poroher Tsland.
about one mile east of Refuge Bay:
Commencing at a post marked Mr.
Snider. Senior's N. E. oorner: running
SO ohains west: thenoe SO chains smith:
thonce 80 chnins east: thenoe SO ohains
nnrth to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
W.  H.  SNIDER.  Senior.
Per W. W. CLARKE, Locator.
M^rch 9, 1907. Apl. 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following tract of land in Rupert District:
Commencing at a post marked T. W.,
S. W. corner, at the southeast eorner ot
Lot 11 in Township 31, Rupert District;
thence north 20 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence south to the water and
following the shore line west to point
of commencement; containing about 200
acres.
Dated this 26th day of November, 1906.
THOMAS WILLIAMS.
Meh. 30. Per B. W. LEBSON.
NOTICE is herehy given that. 30 dnys
nfter dnfe, T Intend tn npply tn tho T-Tnn.
Chief Cnmmlsslnner of Lands and Works
fnr a sneolnl license to out nnd oarry
away   timber   from   the  following   de-
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to appiy to the Hoii-
ourable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to out
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situate in Clayoquot District:
No. 1. Commencing at a post situate
about one mile east of a conspicuous
Waterfall about three miles northwest
from Bajo Point, West Coast of Nootka Island, thence west 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 2. Commencing at a post near No.
1 Timber Limit, J. E. Butler, thence
east 160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 160 chains; thence south
40 chains, containing 640 acres more ur
less.
No. 3. Commencing at a post situate
40 chains north of No. 1 Timber Limit,
J. E. Butler; thence west 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 4. Commencing at a post situate
near No. 3 post Timber Limit, J. E.
Butler; thence east 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains, containing 640
acres, more or less.
No. 6. Commencing at a post situate
40 chains north of No. 3 post Timber
Limit, J. E. Butler; thence west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains,
containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 6. Commencing at a post situate
near No. 6 post Timber Limit, J. E.
Butler; thence east 160 chains; thenee
north 40 chains; thence west IHO chains;
thence south 40 chains, containing 640
acres more or less.
No. 7. Commencing at a post situate
40 chains north from post No. 5, Timber Limit, J. E. Butler; thence west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
No. 8. Commencing at a post situate
near No. 7 post. Timber Limit, J. E.
Butler; thence east 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 160 chains;
tl.ence south 40 chains, containing 640
acros more or less.
No. 9. Commencing at a post situate
40 chains north from No. 7 Timber
Limit, J. E. Butler; thence west 160
chains; thence north 40 chains; thenoe
east 160 chains; thenee south 4 0 chains.
No. 10. Commencing at a post situate
near No. S post, Timber Limit, J. E.
Butler; thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains.
JAMES E. BUTLER.
Dated April 6th, 1907. April 6
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to 4he
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
oarry away timber from the following described lands:
Claim No. 1.—Situated on a Lake entering Lowe Inlet on the Northeast end
commencing at a post marked " J. G. J."
about three-quarters of a mile from
falls on same running south 116 (one
hundred and sixteen) chains; thence east
55 (flfty-flve chains; thence north 116
(one hundred and sixteen) chains;
thence west 55 (flfty-flve) chains, to
place of commencement.
Claim No. 2.—Situated about a mile
and a half north of No. Claim on same
Lake, running 40 (forty) chains east;
thence north 160 (one hundred and sixty) chains; thence west 40 (forty)
ohains to shore; thence 160 (one hundred and sixty) chains to place of
commencement.
No. 3 Claim.—Sltunted on a Crock
about three-quarters of a mile north of
N'o. 1 where Creek enters lake about one
mile up Creek and about a quarter nf
a mile from nnrth bank stake marked
"J. G. J."; thence running north 55
(flfty-flve) ohains; thenoe enst 116 (ono
hundred nnd sixteen) ehnlns; thonoo
south 56 (flfty-flve) chains; thence west
116 (one hundred and sixteen) chains to
place of commencement.
Claim No. 4.—Commencing at a post
about one mile east of No. 3 stake on
same Creek marked "J. G. J."; thence
running south 55 (flfty-flve) chains;
thence east 116 (one hundred and slx-
toen);     thence    north     55     (flfty-flve)
chains; thence west 116 (one hundred
and sixteen) chains to place of commencement.
Claim No. 5.—Commencing at a post
marked "J. G. J." on a Creek entering
Creek that No. 3 and 4 are situated on
and the three last claims on Creek that
empties into lake that 1 and 2 are situated on about three-quarters of a mile
up on East bank of Creek; thence running east 53 (fifty-three) chains; thence
south 60 (sixty) chains; thence west 106
(one hundred and six); thence north 60
(sixty) chains; east 53 (fifty-three) to
place of commencement.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
April 13
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on a Lake entering Lowe Inlet Lake on the southwest end, commencing at a post marked "J. G. J." about three-quarters of a
mile up the lake, running north 40
tforty) chains; thence east 80 (eighty)
chains; thence south 40 (forty) chains;
thence east 80 (eighty) chains; thence
soutli 40 (forty) chains to shore; thence
following shore to place of commencement.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
April 13
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of i.ands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: Situated at the head
of Lowe Inlet Lake at the head of Lowe
Inlet, commencing at a post marked "J.
G. J." running west 40 chains (forty);
thence north 160 chains (one hundred
and sixty); thence east 40 chains
(forty); thence south along lake shore
160 chains (one hundred and sixty), to
place of commencement, containing 640
acres (six hundred and forty) more or
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
April 13
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described land, situated about two miles
from Lowe Inlet Cannery on the south
side of Inlet and Lake stake, marked
"J. G. J." and planted close to base of
mountain; thence running 40 (forty)
chains south; thence 40 (forty) chains
west; thence 40 (forty) chains south;
thence 140 (one hundred and forty)
west; thence 40 (forty) north; thence SO
(eighty) east; thence 40 tforty) north;
thenee SO teighty) east, to place of commencement.
JOHN G. JOHNSTON.
April 13
No. 25.—Commencing at the northeast
corner of Location No. 19; thence west
100 chains; thence north 60 chains*
thence east 100 chains to shore; thence
south 60 ohains along shore to point
of commencement.
No. 26.—Commencing at the southwest
corner of the Skidegate Indian Reserve;
thence north 160 chains; thence west
40 chains; thenee south 160 chains to
shore; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
APril 13 W. OLIVER.
lAND  PURCHASE
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
Cassiar District, about 12 miles east of
Hazelton, viz.: Starting from a post
A. E. C, N. E .p,laced at the S. E. corner post of Lot 363 and thence Ash.
South 20 chains; thence Ast. West 20
chains; thence Ast. North 20 chains to
South Boundary of said Lot 363, and
thence Ast. East to point of commencement, and containing 40 acres.
A.  E.  CHARLESON.
February 20, 1907. April 13
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated near
Alberni Canal in Clayoquot District:
No. 32. Commencing at a post planted on the northeast corner of Timber
Limit No. 30, marked D. C. McDonald,
running east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
No. 33. Commencing at a post planted along side of No. 32, running east 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south SO chains
to point of commencement.
No. 28. Commencing at the northeast
corner of No. 29, marked D. C. McDonald, running west 160 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located on the 28th day of March, Alberni, B.  C.
April 13 D. C. McDONALD.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
ftlrl ,,dat0*,x '"'end to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
ror licenses to cut and carry away timber from the following described lands.
situated on the Sechart Peninsula, Clayoquot District.
No. 1. Commencing at a post planted
»' .*■ "?„Jves,t "ne of Timber Llcensi
No. 11,108; thence running west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
oast 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No 2. Commencing at a post planted
on the west line of Claim No. 1; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
SV16.^8* "ne of Timber Limit No.
9.875, thence running 80 chains east;
thence south SO chains; thence west 30
chains; thence north 30 chains; thenee
west about 60 chains to point "of com?
mencement, containing about 640 acres.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Cataract
Lake; thence running south SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west along shore of Lake
to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a post planted
on the northeast shore of Cataract
Lake; thence 60 chains east; thence 80
chains south; thence about 100 chains
west to shore of Lake, thence following
shore of Lake north to point of commencement.
No. 6. Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner of No. 6; thence
running east SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commence-
No. 8. Commencing at a post on Pooler Creek about 2 miles oast of Cataract   Lake;   thence   running  east   160
w£.nSii-,-.th?n?e so.Vtn 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains,
to point of commencement.
Sechart. April 6th. \t&\   BENASp°rni3
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on Copper
Island, Barclay District: ^"fpor
No. 7. Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner of T. L. 10 755
thence south SO chains; thence east to
shore; thence following shore line to
point of commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
AP1"11 -*3 J. W. BENSON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the north bank of
Skeena River and near the mouth of
the Zymaquotltz River, and marked Elof
Olson's Southwest Corner; thence north
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south SO chains, more or less, to bank
of Skeena River to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more or less.
ELOF OLSON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
March 2nd, 1907. April 13
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, we intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on Texada
Island:—
No. 2.—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner of T. L. 10,536;
thence west 60 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
No. 4.—Commencing at a post planted
on shore 110 chains southeast of the
southeast corner of No. 2; thence west
00 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence oast to shore; thence following
shore  to point of commencement.
No. 5.—Commencing at a post planted
nt the southeast corner of No. 4; thenco
west 60 chains; thence south SO chains;
thenco east to shore; thence following
shore to point of commencement.
No. 6.—Commencing at the southeast
corner of No. 5; thenoe 60 chains west;
thenee SO chains south; thence east to
shore; thence along shore to point of
commencement.
No. 7.—Commencing at a post planted
nt the southeast corner of No. 6; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 120 ohains;
thence east 40 chains; thence nortli SO
chains; thence east 40 chains; thonoe
north 40 chains to point of commeneement.
No. 8.—Commencing at the southeast
corner of Lot 26; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 100 chains; thonce enst
to shore; thence along shore to point of
commencement.
No. 18.—Commencing at tho northwest
oorner of No. 5 thence wost SO chains:
thence south SO chnins; thence enst SO
chains; thenoe north SO chnins to point
of commencement.
No. 19.—Commencing nt the northwest
oorner of No. (i; thenoe wost SO chains;
thenoe south SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains to point
of commeneement.
No. 20.—Commencing at the northwest
oorner of No. 7: thenoe wost SO ohains;
thence south SO chains; thonoe east SO
chains; thenoe north SO chains to point
of commencement,
Staked 25th, 20th and 27th February,
1907.
GRADY   &  FULMER.
April 13. 1907. April 13
NOTTCE Is hereby given that, 30 days
nfter date, I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to out and
oarry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group:—
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 daya
after date. I intend to apply to the
Hon Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
Bwclay DlstrlctfUttted °n Nitnat Lake'
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
on  Lake shore opposite centre of west
line of No   2; thence running SO chains
!SSLt„<. sald w,est.,llne of No* •-• "'ence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains west;
thence SO chains north to point of commencement.
a    .1 0.1 BRW,ARD E* HARDWICK.
April 8th, 1907. April 13
THIRTY days after date I intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to cut
and carry away timber from the following described land in Rupert District*
. .?• V, Commencing at a post planted
at the N. W. oorner of Section 36, Township 10, marked J. A. Hinton's N. W
corner; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO chains'
thenoe wost SO chains to point of commeneement.
Located  March  23,  1907
,-t1??' It Commencing at a post planted
at the N. W. corner of Section 31, Township 1, marked J. A. Hinton's N, W
cornre; thonce south 80 chains; thenoe
oast 80 chains; thonce north SO chains*
thence wost SO chains to point of eommeneement.
Located March 25, 1907.
.n.a 3A Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner of Seotion 6, Township 6, marked J. A. Hinton's S. W
cornor; thonoe north SO chains; thenee
east SO ohains; thenco south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Located Maroh 25, 1907.
No. 4. Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner of Section 5, Township 6, marked J. A. Hinton's S. w.
corner: thenoe north SO ohains; thence
enst SO chains; thonce south SO ohains;
thonoe wost SO chains lo point of commencement.
Located March 26, 1907.
Nn. 5. Commencing at a post planted
at Ihe N, W. cornor of Section 32, Township 4, marked J. A. Hinton's N W
corner; tlioncc south SO chains; thence
oast SO chains; thonco north SO chains*
thenco west SO chains to point of commencement.
Located March 26, 1907.
41.?- ",-, Commencing at a post planted
at the S. W. corner of Section S, Township 6, marked ,T. A. Hinton's S. W
corner; thonce north SO chains; thence
oast SO chains; thence south SO chains*
thence cast SO chains to point of commencement.
Located March 27, 1907.
.**.?■ ';. Commencing nt a post planted
at the N. E. corner nf Section 30, Township 4, and marked .1. A. Hinton's N E
corner; thenoe south SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north SO chains'
thence east SO chains to point of commencement.
Located March 28, 1907.
Nn. 8. Commencing at a pnst planted
nt the N. W. corner of Section 29, Township 4, marked J. A. Hinton's N. XV.
corner: thenco south SO chains; thence
cast 80 chains; thonce north SO chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement.
Located March 28, 1907.
"J. A. HINTON."
Per J. A. COATES.
Victoria, B. C, April 9, 1907.       Apl.13 i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MAY 4 1907
BUYING
CHANCES_
For Mail Order
Customers
WHITE WAISTS
Pleated and trimmed with lace down
front    50c
"Our Special" lace-trimmed and embroidered waists, with short or
long sleeves    $1.00
Other special prices arc 75c, 90o,
91.35, $1.50, $1.75, $3.25, $2.50 up to
$3.75.
MILLINERY NEWS.
If vou wish to make a thorough
test of this store, its stocks, its usefulness, and Its price advantages, you
cannot do better nor get clearer Ideas
than hy judging its millinery.
Everything here carries the stamp
of good taste and correct style and
price saving; from $5 to $30 each.
Prices that speak eloquently of the
big money-savings awaiting those
who buy at this store; qualities that
are reliable and up-to-date; goods
that carry the Hill's guarantee to
give satisfaction or money refunded.
Light Tweed Dress Skirts, just arrived; stylishly strapped and
pleated       $3.75
LINEN DBESS SKIRTS
"ived yesterday; on sale today. Note
tlie prices: $3.50, $2.75, $3.75, $4.75,
$5.75, $6.75 and $7.35.
Chas. W. Hills & Co.
940 Granville Street
Mail Orders Receive Prompt
Attention.
VANCOUVER.
\&   The New Vancouver Office of
Allan's Restaurant; Mr. F. J.Furnival,
Dougal House; Mr. J. Bloomfield, At-
antic Cafe, and Mr. Seabourne, of
Messrs. Seabourne & McLaughlin of
the Saddlerock Cafe.
The fight is still on between the
United Carpenters and the Builders'
Exchange. As the Exchange refuses
to recognize the union and insists
upon an open shop the United Car-
\/fl flCOUVGI"     Notft^    penters have refused to recognize the
Builders' Exchange, and has issued an
ultimatum that the men will return to
work at a flat rate of $4.25 a day,
from  the  time they start, with any
contractor who  will  sign  thc agree-
tion of thc kings and queens of dog-  ment  ,,s  an  individual   and  kep the
THE WEEK
—is—
SUITE 3, OLD SAGE BLOCK
536 Hastings Street
Telephone 2201. |>
S:«»»&*^^x*^^
Vancouver has ben the Mecca of
thc dog fancier the past Avcek. The
drill hall has housed as line a collee-
dom ever brought together for exhibit purposes on thc Pacific slope.
Altogether thc bench show, which
closes Saturday evening, will go down
in history as the largest and most important so far held. Trail, Calgary.
Olympia, Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria,
Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Hammond, Mission, New •, estminster and Vancouver all contributed their best.   There
closed shop. In brief, the Carpenters
declare fur "an open shop or nothing." Meanwhile the effect of thc
strike is being felt and a vast amount
of building is closed down.
As an outcome of several conferences between the members of thc
Veterans' Association, the South African Campaigners' Association and the
Legion  of    Frontiersmen    there has
were 265 entries, being just 112 more  , - , ,,    TT .,   , c      .      ~, ,
_      been formed the United Service Club.
entreis than last year. Classified th
entries are as follows: 60 setters, 45
'<>x terriers, 34 pointers, 24 cockers.
22 cullies, 13 Irish terriers and tbe
Boston terriers, Airedales, bull terriers and bull dogs are all well represented,
lu  baseball  circles  the'fan's were
Tbe new club has secured quarters in
the Fairfield Block.
Will H. Kidner, formerly editor of
"Crag and Canyon" of Banff, has been
engaged to manage and edit the
''Bulkley Pioneer." He has arrived
in Vancouver and will shortly proceed
to the Bulkley Valley to set up thc
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
 i
delighted thc first of thc week when plant    Meanwhile the "Bulkley Pio-
the "Canucks" broke the ice, winning neer„ wiu be primcd ;„ Vancouver.
thc first of thc scries from Butte on	
Tuesday, but unfortunately again go- Mephisto's Mistake.
ing down  to  a crushing    defeat on Edward  H.  Callillj  formerly man-
c.coensday.    However,  the manage- ager  of   the   ]ate   Lewis    Moi,rjSOn,
ment bas broken loose from the wage whose  jmpersonation  of "Mephisto,"
stipulation clause and has lines out
for some good ball players to
strengthen the home team.
As a result of tbe formation of the
Restaurant Keepers' Association, mention of which was made in the last
issue, it has been decided to raise thc
in the melodramatic production of
"Faust," tells the following story of
the actor, while the company was
playing in Toronto, several years
ago:
Mr.   Morrison,  it  -will  be  remembered,   was   very   deaf,   and  few   in
WE HAVE THEM NOW
TWO CARLOADS OF
price of meals about 25 per cent. At addition to his manager were able to
yesterday's meeting to complete the converse with him . It Avas during
^organization thc following officers the rccellt Boer war in South Africa,
were elected: President, Mr. A. B. Tilcrc was considerable interest in
Lambert of the Cabin lunch rooms; t)ie campaign about Ladysmith on
vice-president, Mr. A. Hamilton of the account 0f the part taken by a regi-
Mining Exchange; secretary, Mr. D. ment recruited at Toronto. This
McKinnon of Messrs. McKinnon & regiment, together Avith other British
Bancroft, proprietors of the Bismarck troops, was besieged within Lady-
Cafe; executive committee, Mr. W. C. smith, and the suspense of the friends
Holtz,   Rainier  Cafe;   Mr.   C.  Allan,  0f t]ie soldier lads Avas tense.   It was
during a performance that the news
~ *~  of the succor of the besieged arrived
in the Canadian city. The house manager informed Mr. Morrison's manager, who in turn communicated the
news to Mr. Morrison, adding that
the house management desired him
(Mr. Morrison) to announce the good
news before the curtain.
Mr. Morrison acquiesced, stepped
before thc curtain and told the news
of the relief of Ladysmith. Cheers
rent the air and the gentleman in the
red clothes smiled as he waited for
thc tumult to subside. Then hc continued in eloquent terms, adding his
thanks, with that of the people for
the safe delivery of Ladysmith. He
spoke of the painful suspense during
the trying ordeal; hc had sympathy
for those more intimately associated
and finally closed his remarks with
an expression of hope that the trouble
was ended forever and that everybody would join in the rejoicing of
the good luck in thc relief of Ladysmith.
Thc audience clapped and shouted,
in fact the ovation Avas so strenuous
that it almost ended thc performance.
The actor bowed his acknowledgment
and stepped behind thc curtain. He
was evidently troubled about something, however, and sought his manager, to whom hc whispered: "Who
is this Lady Smith anyhow?"
PIANOS
ARRIVED THIS WEEK INCLUDING THE FAMOUS
Chickering & Sons
Gerhard Heintzman
Martin=Orme
Mendelssohn and
Morris
Among these there are many new and attractive designs in
Mahogany and Circassian Walnut of various shades and figures,
which are sure to please  even  the most  fastidious.
We expect another shipment in a few days and to make room
wc are offering these beautiful instruments at GREATLY REDUCED  PRICES,  with  terms to suit.
CALL EARLY TO SPCURE FIRST CHOICE
FLETCHER BROS.
SUPERIOR QUALITY MUSIC HOUSE.
VICTORIA, B. C.
JJ
Let us hope that the forces at work
will so change human nature in thc
upward way as to bring about that
ideal condition when we shall be one
for all and all for one; when thc
message of love will be practiced and
not preached; when no one shall be
master and all will bc servants, and
the cry of distress will no more bc
heard and the law of justice, love and
truth will be tbe law governing men.
ll is he who having thought and putting his thoughts into action brought
results, for weal or woe, and we, being neither a thinker and less an
actor, follow in the beaten paths of
custom.
The
Poodle Dog
Grill,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
•AC TUALl v
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the deli
cacies of the
season.
♦ SMITH & SHAUGhNESSY
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦■»»»» ■»»■»♦
Proprietors.
It Is Vancouver's leading cafe.    Excellent service.    French Chef.
All  seasonable delicacies.    Orchestra  noon,  afternoon  and  evening
THE BISMARK
McKinnon & Bancroft, Proprietors.
Corner Abbott and Hastings Streets.
VANCOUVER.
Models of Inventions!
DESIGNED, BUILT OR. PERFECTED FOR
INVENTORS and PATENTEES
DRAWINGS      AND      BLUEPRINTS
Write for Particulars
VANCOUVER riODEL   HACHINE  AND
TVri P WOWs   980 gR*nv'lle st., Vancouver.
V*I*wL.C     VV \JI\IVo, W. T. WATSON, Proprietor
BUY A KODAK
You will miss a lot of fun if you don't. With any one of my
Kodaks you can take a photograph of anything you see worth
taking.
I handle EASTMAN'S KODAKS, CAMERAS, FILMS,
PLATES,   DEVELOPING and PRINTING OUTFITS,
and all kinds of supplies.
My new stock has just arrived.   Call or write and get a cata-
Dguc and let mc show you how to take and make a picture.
DEVELOPING  AND  PRINTING.
WILL MARSDEN ™,?™^

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