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Week Sep 9, 1911

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 Everitt Motor
I         Car
\Hanover-Trotter Motor
1              Co.
lowroom, 931 View St.   Phone 2346
A British Columbia Newspaper and Review,
Pnbllshed at Victoria. B. 6.
Hall & Walker
Agents
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St. Telephone 83
OL. IX.    No. 36
Ninth Year
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
Ninth Year
One Dollar Per Annum
IOT THEIR BOLT— On Thursday
[evening the  Liberals  held  a public
[ meeting in the Institute Hall, of which
/ictoria Times declares that it was the
lest ancl most successful political meet-
Iver held in Victoria.   The Times may
be excused for arriving at this con-
J>n, especially as it reports that "there
la contagious spirit of optimism in the
|nd the enthusiasm fairly bubbled over
nes."   The Week will not quarrel with
Times in its use of terms, nor in its
llarly critical  method of grading the
rers.   Mr. F. T. Congdon is said to
given "a magnificent address."   Mr.
|>leman made "a telling speech," while
VI. B. Jackson only "talked" on Re-
bity.    Dr.  Lewis  Hall occupied the
land expressed his pleasure at attend-
nother meeting "to show that we are
tour of our old war-horse whose locks
grown white in the service of his
[ry and his party."
Mr. M. B. Jackson
Jackson spoke   first  and  as might
Ibeen expected opened by emphasising
landonment of Reciprocity by the Con-
live party, but naturally had nothing
of its abandonment by Sir Wilfrid
er in a number of speeches both at
nperial Conference and on the floor
House at Ottawa, speeches which
Ibeen freely quoted during the cam-
land with which everyone is familiar.
Jr did Mr. Jackson explain why, hav-
Irmally ancl officially abandoned Reci-
Sir Wilfrid Laurier had been led
it up at the present time.   Of course
impossible for the speaker to travel
his journey without announcing that
a Free Trader.   This has been the
_y position of all the Liberal speak-
So have addressed Victoria audiences
the campaign, although they have
to  recognise how such a position
Ins their argument unless they are pre-
jto come out flat-footed ancl declare
|ree Trade   as an   issue.     This, of
they cannot do.
A Natural Error
j Jackson fell into the common error
ling that "the Reciprocity Agreement
led only for the free exchange of na-
broducts, and as two-thirds of the
1 of Canada were engaged in agricul-
Jursuits compared with one-third of
bple in the United States we ought
Jre to get the better of the arrange-
Mr. Jackson forgot for the mo-
Jhat such articles as brass bars ancl
lolled iron, crucible steel and wire
Irclly be called natural products, and
ly are on the free list, Also that on
Juced tariff list are many items which
product of manufacturing indus-
|uch as graving blocks, bells, cutlery,
agricultural implements, portable
and boilers, plumbing fixtures,
Ivehicles and iron ore. Mr. Jackson
jrgot to make a little calculation,
j he might have made mentally, to
that two-thirds of the population of
It would be about five millions, while
lrd of the population of the United
| would be not less than thirty mil-
jso that his argument based on the
[ages of those engaged in agricultural
|s cuts the other way.
Theory v. Experience
a pity that Mr. Jackson did not
Inent his study of Adam Smith, John
}t Mill and Henry George by a refer-
practical experience in connection
|ie relation of wages to the cost of
It is all very well to talk of econ-
Irinciples, ancl all very well to enun-
jconomic axioms, but speakers like
lickson should remember that econ-
rinciplcs ought to be considered not
In an axiomatic form but in their
|i to, and their bearing upon, each
Viewed in this light, Mr. Jackson
has yet mu.ch to learn about the effect of
the cost of living upon wages. It may well
be that "there are many intelligent Labour
leaders who know more about the economics of Labour than some political demagogues," whose knowledge is confined to
a theoretical acquaintance with writers on
economic subjects. But Mr. Jackson
should cultivate the acquaintance of these
intelligent Labour leaders, and he would
then learn, what The J^eek has repeatedly
stated, that in all negotiations between employers and employees where the rate of
wages is in question, the cost of living becomes a potent factor in the settlement of
disputes.
Cost of Living and Wages
Will Mr. Jackson direct his attention to
the remarkable decision of Lord Rosebery
as long ago as 1893 ?   At that time he was
true, that if Reciprocity increased the cost
of living it must inevitably increase wages.
Mr. Templeman
Mr. Templeman devoted his talk mainly
to the labour question ancl the relaxation
of the Immigration Act by the Dominion
Government. What he said is indeed difficult to understand because it was directly
opposed to the known facts. For instance,
he said that "no change in the immigration
laws could affect the Alien Labour Law"
and that "the Alien Labour Law was as
effective as ever." The electors of Victoria are not disposed to split hairs over
a matter of this kind. The simple fact
is that the Government issued a circular
which allowed alien labourers to come in
by the hundred. They could not have come
if the circular had not been issued, ancl
they did come in because the Dominion
THE   ALIEN   FOOTPRINT
Which was discovered on Vancouver Island in 1911, and greatly agitated Robinson Crusoe Templeman
appointed arbitrator in a dispute which had
occasioned the biggest strike among coal
miners in Great Britain, when nearly all
the mines were lying idle for six months.
Lord Rosebery in settling the dispute laid
down the principle that the cost of living
had risen in England so much that for the
first time it became necessary to establish
a "minimum" below which wages could not
go, whatever the selling price of coal might
be. That principle was incorporated into
what may be called the economic axioms of
the British Labour market, ancl regardless
of supply ancl demand still remains, and is
likely always to remain. It is a recognition
of the principle that man must live ancl not
starve, and that in the most depressed times
the rate of, wage must be high enough to
at least insure him a living in violation of
the abstract theory of supply and demand.
The application of this important incident
to the present case is that, if as Mr. Jackson and other- Liberal speakers contend,
Reciprocity will reduce the cost of living
then it is equally certain that Reciprocity
will reduce wages.   The converse is equally
Government had been asked by the railway companies to allow them to come in
on modified terms. That is all there is
about it.
Tweedledum and Tweedledee
It matters not whether Mr. Templeman
juggles with the phrase "Immigration Law"
ancl "Alien Labour Law" or not. The men
came; the Government allowed them to
come, and at the same time there were hundreds of Canadians in and around Victoria
and Vancouver looking for work. One of
the first results of this invasion of alien
labour was the posting of notices offering
employment at reduced rates. The situation requires no comment; it speaks for
itself. Then for once Mr. Templeman allowed his imagination to run away with
him. In following the lead of the Victoria Times and denouncing the Chicago
Democrat he said that it was a fly-sheet got
up by an emissary of the Conservative
party of Canada to have its fake story
copied. The letter of Mr. Furlong, the
editor, published in the Colonist a few days
ago, certainly places Mr. Templeman and
the Times in a bad light.   The balance of
the time was taken up by Mr. Congdon.
Mr. Congdon
Mr. Congdon is an able speaker, but
whatever the Times may think of his performance on Wednesday, The Week ventures to think that he failed to sustain his
reputation. One has only to condense his
statements to realise this. He too announced himself as a Free Trader, and
quoted W. T. Stead to the effect that Canada had a great opportunity for Peace.
Just what connection there is between Mr.
Stead, Peace, and the Reciprocity Agreement is not apparent, but everyone knows
where Mr. Stead stands on the subject of
Peace, and everybody knows just what his
opinion is worth on any subject whicii
gives scope for the play of his Little England tendencies. There is not space to
cover the whole of Mr. Congdon's address,
but it is full of statements which will jar
on the majority of Canadians ancl which
greatly minimised the effect of his arguments on the Reciprocity pact.
Anti-British
For instance, he said that "Canadians
would not send their money to Great Britain to provide naval defence." Mr. Congdon thought that "a Siwash from the backwoods could put up a better argument for
loyalty than a number of London barristers
whom he had met." In arguing that all
the industries of Canada would be benefited by Reciprocity Mr. Congdon made no
reference to the unanswerable argument of
his opponents that under the Reciprocity
pact Canada must suffer through having her
raw material transported across the Line
ancl manufactured by American labour, in
American cities, instead of on our own soil.
A Free-Trader
But when all is said and clone Mr. Cong-
dan had to fall back on the catechism of
the Free Trader, and by doing so clearly
demonstrated that the only argument in
favour of Reciprocity is the Free Trade
argument. He said: "A truly free people
has the right to buy where they will and
to sell where they wish. That is Free
Trade ancl that must be the ultimate destiny of any great country. There may be
some necessity at the present time for retaining a moderate tariff, but the tendency
must be to pare it down." Here is the
gist of the whole question. Free Trade
may be thc ultimate aim, but even Mr.
Congdon admits that meanwhile a tariff is
necessary, and surely he would admit that
a Reciprocity pact such as is now proposed,
containing in its schedules not only natural products but many manufactured
articles, is something very different from
a "paring down." It is here that the inherent weakness of the Liberal case becomes apparent. It is a case which would
be logically consistent if Free Trade were
now the platform of the Liberal party. As
it is, the admissions of their chief speakers
only tend to show that without Free Trade,
which they admit is presently impossible,
it loses its raison d'etre.
THE CAMPAIGN—The feature of
week in the local campaign has
been the decision of the Courts in
the matter of the prosecution of Grant,
Smith & Co. under the Alien Labour Act,
when they were convicted ancl lined. The
effect of this is to prove that the circular
issued by the Dominion Government relaxing certain clauses of the Immigration Act
enabled alien labourers to come into Canada
in violation of the principle of the Acl.
The decision of the Courts practically says
that even in face of the circular it was
illegal for Grant, Smith & Co., through
their agents in Seattle, to enter into contracts for the importation nf labourers.
The interesting feature of the case is that
the circular in question was issued in cbft-
(Coritinued on Page 2$) THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
ll
1 '
!
i
'
. II
It seems to me that 11.45 is a very
early hour in the night for the city
to turn out the cluster lamps which
illuminate some of our principal
streets near the centre of the town.
On Tuesday night I was waiting disconsolately on the corner of Douglas and Fort streets for the last car,
which didn't come after all as I had
missed it, when to my surprise I
found myself plunged into the comparative obscurity afforded by the arc
lamps ancl the street signs. It is
reasonable enough to turn the cluster
lights out, say, an hour after midnight, but I should have thought that
some consideration might be shown
for those unfortunates who miss the
car and have to walk. Especially is
this consideration necessary at the
present time, when the streets in general are in such a dangerous state.
* *   *
The second number of "What's On
In Victoria" is to hand and fully
maintains the standard set by its predecessor. This is really a most convenient little hand-book and is full
of all those little bits of every day
information which everyone is supposed to have, but which few people
can supply at a moment's notice.
How many of my readers can tell
without hesitation what time the Seattle boat arrives, and when cars
leave the centre of the city? Not
many I am sure, and it is to supply
this sort of information as well as to
advertise the coming events of the
month that the London Publishing-
Company has come to the rescue with
their pamphlet. I personally have always managed to muddle along up to
the present without ever knowing
anything at all about times and hours,
but now that I have once seen a copy
of "What's Ou In Victoria" I like
to keep one on my desk all the time.
* *   *
The congestion on Broad street
grows worse and worse. If my readers are beginning to get tired of my
frequent references to the nuisance
which David Spencer, Ltd. perpetrates
every day in the week except Sundays I am sorry, but I intend
to continue "pegging away." The
constant dropping of water, we are
told, will wear away the hardest
stone, and 1 have found in the past
that after I have conducted a long
campaign either for or against something, good results have obtained. I
don't know how long the civic authorities are willing to allow the big
departmental store people to use the
sidewalks as a storage place to the
great inconvenience of the public, but
I do know that I am going to emulate the dropping water for some
little time yet. It is a crying disgrace
that a public thoroughfare right in
thc heart of the business section of
the city should be given over to the
abuse of a large firm. Such a state
of affairs would not be tolerated for
a moment in any other city which I
have ever visited, and it would not
be tolerated in Victoria if complainants, whose name is Legion, would
"get together" and compel the Mayor
ancl Council to do their duty and
show a little more of the iron hand
ancl less of the velvet glove. I don't
blame Spencer's a bit. On the contrary, I rather admire their nerve. I
should do the same under the circumstances if I had the chance, but
I do blame the authorities who allow
the interests of the public to be set
at naught in favour of the usurpations
of a big firm.
* *   *
It is rather late in the clay to give
a warning to visitors to the Agricultural Show who patronise Shanks'
mare, but if I had taken a walk out
in that direction myself before last
Saturday I would certainly have cautioned all such to beware of the sidewalk in the vicinity of the Willows.
It is a bad one, and I was somewhat
surprised to hear my companion remark that it was much better than it
had been. Presumably some kind of
repair has been effected, but I am of
opinion that it was in such a state
before that "kill or cure" was the
only prescription for it and the halfway measures adopted would seem to
be a waste both of time ancl money.
* *    *
I don't often refer to books in my
column; in fact I do not believe that
I have ever clone so, leaving all literary disquisitions to my esteemed
friend and colleague "Bohemian."
But this week I want to encroach on
his preserves and say how much I enjoyed reading "The Silent Places" by
Stewart Edward White, the author of
"The Blazed Trail." To my mind
this later book far excels the former
both in interest and in the descriptive
portions of the story. It deals with
the devotion to duty of two servants
of the Hudson's Bay Company in the
old days and of their stern chase after
a "bad Indian." It is absorbingly interesting throughout and I am infinitely obliged to the Standard Stationery Co. for recommending me to read
it.   Go thou and do likewise.
* *   *
A gentleman in town who is a regular reader of The Week,, stopped
me on the street the other day and
enquired whether I was the gifted
individual who was responsible for
the "Lounger." At least, though he
didn't put it quite so nicely, I feel
sure that is what he meant. On my
replying in the affirmative he asked
me whether I thought that a public
convenience was a suitable place
whereon to hang the Union Jack.
Naturally to this interrogation 1
shook my head, whereupon he surprised me by stating that the flag is
suspended above such an establishment on Beacon Hill. I have not
been out to the Park to see this extraordinary state of affairs with my
own eyes, but I have not the slightest
doubt as to its truth. They say that
loyalty breaks out in all sorts of
funny places, but I think this is the
limit.
* *   *
I confess that I am looking forward with a certain amount of excitement ancl a great deal of curiosity to
the "Do It In Victoria" carnival
which is to take place next week in
the city. In spite of the fact that
Coronation Day proved that Victorians can enter into the spirit of a
carnival ancl prove themselves every
bit as capable of enjoying it as the
peoples of the Mediterranean, I cannot imagine them working themselves
up into the proper frame of mind
without some external impetus such
as the Coronation afforded. I do not
doubt for a moment but that the carnival will be a success, but I am interested in seeing how that is to be
attained. The idea is a good one ancl
seems to be based on much the same
lines as that which prompted the
"All-British" weeks which were so
successful in many cities in the Old
Country. In any event I sincerely
trust that the proceedings will pass
off without a hitch and that the promoters will feel that they have not
expended a vast amount of energy
and fore-thought without obtaining
desired results.
Of the shorter works of Miss Marie
Corelli one of the best known is
"The Autobiography of a Slander."
In it she traces the growth and consequences of one idol ancl malicious
remark and her book contains a very
striking moral. Just for fun a Victorian worked backwards on a rumour whicii was flying round town
on Tuesday last to see if it was possible to find out where it started.
As you may remember there was a
very general report that we were on
the eve of a war with Germany and
it was freely stated that the latter
had refused the French terms with
regard to the Moroccan impasse. It
appears that at one of the city hotels
was staying a British officer, but
whether or not he was on the active
list I am not certain. He received a
cablegram and immediately made
preparations for a hurried departure.
This was sufficient. The tale first
was that he had received a communication from the War Office; thence
it was an easy step to assume that all
officers had received wires recalling
them immediately. Obviously such
proceedings could only augur war,
and if there was to be war of course
it would be with Germany. The reasons were to hand ancl there was our
little rumour freely circulating round
town and causing a great deal of
very unnecesasry excitement. What
great results from little causes spring!
Perhaps the most surprising result
was (so I am informed by a member) betting at the Union Club of
even money on war!!
*   *   *
One of the principal landmarks on
Government Street is the large clock
hanging outside Mr. Redfern's jewelry store which serves as a regulator
for most people's watches as their
owners come into town from the
wharf. It was with something of a
shock therefore that at the beginning
of the week I observed that this
clock had stopped at 3.30 ancl my
surprise was greater when I noticed
that it registered the same time next
morning. It was not till I happened
to be passing the Sayward Block
later on that I realized what had
taken place, viz, that the clock had
been stopped on purpose preparatory
to being moved. For Mr. Redfern is
leaving the store which he has occupied on Government Street for 49
years and on Tuesday next will open
up in the Sayward Block where he
has thrown two stores into one. The
new premises will make "Redfern's"
the largest jewelry establishment in
the city and are now in process of
being fitted up in the most extensive
manner. When a firm has been in
business at the old stand for close on
half a century the moving of its business premises becomes a matter of
general interest. Mr. Redfern will
take with him the good wishes of the
entire community ancl especially those
of the
Ofri
trct^-ft*.
AN ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Victoria,  B.C., Sept.  7,  1911.
The Editor of The Week:
Sir,—I wish to thank The Week
for the beautiful watch and chain
which I received as a prize in the
Ladies' Contest. I also take this opportunity of thanking the many kind
friends who by their efforts helped
me win such a beautiful prize.
I remain, yours very sincerely,
MAUDE E. OWENS.
A  MERE FAD
Magistrate—"You're a professional burglar,   aren't   you?"
Prisoner at the Bar—"No, yer worship. I
ain't makin' no business o' stealin', yer
worship. I'm a decayed gentleman, yer
worship, an' I jest took it up as a fad."
A   CHANCE   FOR   HIM
"We don't pay for poems," said an editor
to a would-be contributor,
"I supposed as much, judging from what
you print; but I thought you might want
to   improve  your   style."
A   NOVEL   ENTERTAINMENT
Sammy came  home  from  an  afternoon  at
the   Natural  History   Museum.
"Where have you been?" said his grandpa, who saw that he was in uncommonly
good   spirits.
"Oh, we've had a splendid time. We've
been to a dead circus!"
RUBBING IT IN
A young gentleman with a very plain face
was rather annoyed because his view of the
stage was obstructed by the liat of a pretty
girl who was sitting in front of him in the
gallery.
Wishing to get a glimpse of the performance, he plucked up courage and, in a nervous voice,  exclaimed:
"See here, miss, I want to look as well as
you."
"Oh, do yer?" she replied, in a rich Cockney accent, as she turned around and looked
at him square in the eye. "Then you'd better  run  home and  change  yer  face."
What "Good Scotch"
Has Done
"Whusky an' parridge are the makin' o' a man.   Bruce
an* Wallace won a' their battles o' them.   Burns built his
poetry o'   them.    They   are   the   secret of   Scotland's
greatness."
Purest and best matured of all Scotch Whiskies is
Bonnie Scotland's favorite, known as Johnnie Walker's
Kilmarnock. It is absolutely pure and mellowed by age
—the standard of highest excellence. That's why every
first-class club, hotel, bar and restaurant in B. C. stocks
"Johnnie Walker." Your dealer can supply you for home
use.   Insist upon getting Kilmarnock Scotch.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents
Cor. Fort & Wharf Sts,, Victoria. Water St., Vancouver,
and Nelson, B. C.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Royal Househo|
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisl
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Deald
<Uhe
SONGHEE GRIU
Is the calk of the town.    Music 6.30 to 8.30 p.\
and 10.30 to 12 midnight.    Courteous Waiters
Bright Lights & the best food, prepared
by the best Chef, and Oh ! well
what's the use?   Go see for
yourself at
The Hotel Westholmi
Everybody Knows Where It Is
If You Want Somethi
Ready Prepared and Want it in a Hurry Just Vis^
Our Delicatessen Department
Sausage Rolls, dozen   	
Meat Pies, each 	
Roast Veal, lb	
Boiled Ham, lb	
Corned Beef, lb	
Cooked Tongue, lb	
Roast Pork, lb	
Brawn, lb	
Veal Loaf, lb	
Roast Chicken, each, $i.oo to 	
Roast Mutton, lb	
Dill Pickles, dozen	
Sweet Mixed Pickles, pint 	
Sour Mixed Pickles, pint 	
Sweet  Gherkins, pint   	
Queen Olives, pint 	
Cakes and Pastry of All Kinds
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Lt\
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store|
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
Headqul
for FirstX
*__.    ' ^ r 7 Nursery\
>*$* 3BT^    bothFf\
**       ^f» * Ornami
A few more Responsible Aj
wanted, resident Fruitgrowe
Horticulturists preferred.
Layritz Nurseries
Carey Road Victoria THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
d
The Havoc
not know why the programme
to  inform  the  patrons of  the
ria Theatre on Thursday night
the  very  excellent   play  called
Havoc" was by H. S. Sheldon,
inly  the author had  no reason
ashamed  of   his   work,  which
dmirable in conception and with
r two exceptions equally admir-
n execution.    The only fault  1
find is that a play written up-
ch intelligent and serious lines
have descended in several in-
s to the use of "dime novel" ex-
ts;   such  as  the  leaving  of  a
end on a table; the placing of
and hat on a chair; thc mis-
several occasions of a revolver,
the most important act of all
aving of a hand-bag on an of-
esk by the heroine.    All these
are  hoary  with   tradition  and
rather    too    much    of melo-
This,  however,  is  the   only
m which can be offered in con-
n  with  a  play  which  was  en-
satisfactory and  which turned
ibles    on   what    is  called   the
n philosophy of marriage in a
lecisive and refreshing manner,
the old story of the triangle,
he injured husband taking his
;e  in  a  novel  and  improbable
Instead   of    shooting   his
over, as he at first intended,
ided to overlook the offence on
on   that   his   wife   obtained   a
:, married her lover and allow-
three of them to live in the
house    on    an    amicable  and
y footing.    No more effective
is could have been devised, for
ittle more than a year of this
nee the wife declared with ob-
ruth that it was "hell."    The
|t of the audience was enchain-
so much by the development
whole plot as by curiosity to
|>w  this    phase    of  the  story
work out.   In the very capable
of Mr. Miller and his company
[ced out admirably and the solu-
improbable,  appeared plaus-
he last act Jmund the disen-
wife    working    as a steno-
in the office of her first hus-
hile her worthless lover was
r    away    on     a     European
to escape from the clutches
aw.    The play is remarkable
respect.   There are only three
|ers, with the exception of an
it at the office who figures in
d act, and it is rare indeed
ee people have been able to
eir    audience   throughout   a
|)lay.   Possibly the honours go
ry    Miller    who    played  the
cl    husband—Richard     Craig.
:  work  of  Francis  Byrne  as
essert, the lover, was almost,
, equal to it.   Miss Laura
rews was on the whole very
tory as the wife.   My opinion
the play is worthy of an all-
st and that in  such hands it
prove to be one of the most
tory and popular of drawing-
ramas of modern times.
Five  Minutes from Broadway
ge Cohan's so-called musical
has outlived its usefulness as
entertainer.  Like the dresses
[adies who figured in the pro-
at  the  Victoria  Theatre  on
feday night it is worn thread-
|The    company    acted    like a
amateur    aggregation    and
was out of the question be-
Ithey   had   no   singing  voices.
|her,  the    production    was  a
disappointment   and   the   only
possible conclusion is that the management would be well advised to
"cut it out."
The Juvenile Bostonians
On Monday and Tuesday nights
the Juvenile Bostonians played at the
Victoria Theatre. Though by no
means on a par with the Pollard
company, the Bostonians provided
some excellent entertainment and
two of their number in particular,
viz., Doris Canfield and Rose Henry,
shone conspicuously in the parts assigned them. As a musical outfit the
company was not a great success, the
voices throughout being mediocre
and the numbers selected unattractive, but the general effect of the
plays produced was pleasing and the
youth of the best actors together
with the fact that all thc performers
were of the fair sex was something
of a novelty.
The Princess Theatre
Well suited to the general holiday
spirit which animates Victoria during
Fair week is the play, "Ole Oleson,"
running at the Princess Theatre in
the A.O.U.W. Hall on Yates street.
Very marked has been the success
which has attended the production of
this piece and the Williams Stock
Company have placed themselves on
a higher level than ever in the eyes
of their numerous patrons.
Next week's offering will be the 4-
act comedy-drama, "Roanoke. The
scene is set in the South and the play
itself is very picturesque as is the
scenery. The play calls for strong
acting and will bring out the dramatic
quality of the whole company. Miss
Pinkie Mullally has an especially
strong part as has also Mr. Van
Dyke, in fact every member of the
company will be called upon to do
his or her best. "Roanoke" is well
written and has a good comedy vein
running through it, in which Miss
Ora Wolf as Aunt Dinah will appear.
The scenery and stage effects as is
usual with this company, will be all
that can be desired.
The Empress Theatre
There are many who will be glad
to see Herr Nagel back again at the
old stand in the Empress Theatre this
week and to hear that he is likely
to remain at the piano for some time,
as he is certainly the right man in
the right place. A grand novelty this
week has been thc Mexican miran-
da, a weird looking instrument which
combines all kinds of musical effects
and is played by the four Solis
brothers. Another big item has been
the act by Professor Kluting's performing animals, rabbits, pigeons,
dogs and cats all performing together
in amity. Harry Mayo is a monologist with a good fund of stories and
a fine bass voice. "A Lead Year
Leap" is the title of a sufficiently
amusing playlet acted by Hutchison
& Thurlow, whilst Bijou Russell
winds up an excellent bill with the
ever popular sand dance.
The Majestic Theatre
As announced last week the piece
de resistance this week at the Majestic has been the story of Enoch Arden
as told by the Vitagraph people on
the screen. The presentation proved
to be an enormous success. As has
been remarked before, whenever
Manager Christie thinks it worth
while to give a long reading notice
of a coming attraction, that attraction is sure to be well worth seeing.
The Crystal Theatre
An added interest attends a visit to
the Crystal Theatre in that the purchase of three tickets entitles the
buyer to a coupon on which he may
make a guess at the majority of thc
winning candidate in the coming election, the lucky person who comes
nearest to the correct answer being
the recipient of $50. This may be a
bait to some people, but as a matter
of fact regular patrons  of the  Cry
stal need no bait to persuade them
to continue "coming." There has
been the usual run of good pictures
this week, perhaps, "The Changing
of Silas Mamer," being the most noticeable.
Romano's Theatre
The firm responsible for the production of David and Goliath, which
was a feature picture at Romano's on
Monday and Tuesday, has fallen into
the same mistake as all the illustrators for Sunday School books, in
that David is represented as little
more than a small boy, whereas we
know that Saul, who stood a head
and shoulders above the rest of the
people, offered to lend him his armour. However, the discrepancy is
such a common one, and most people
have become so accustomed to regard
David as an infant prodigy that it
really does not matter, and the fact
remains that the picture as a whole
was good.
Miss Jeanne Russell
In introducing a short season of
stock production at the Victoria
theatre, beginning Tuesday, September 12, the management takes pleasure in calling to the attention of his
patrons the most successful of all
Pacific Coast stars, Miss Jeanne
Russell, who has just finished a long
season with "Cousin Kate," and will
be seen next week with The Mack-
Leone Co. in such high class productions as "The Little Minister,"
"The American Girl," "The Thief,"
"The Man from Home," "Polly Primrose," "Charley's Aunt," "The Girl of
the Golden West," and "Sunday."
With the Mack-Leone Company,
Miss Russel lis surrounded by a
most capable cast, including sixteen
artists of recognized ability and reputation. The company will produce
the choicest plays of an extensive repertoire during their short stay here,
each splendidly mounted and elaborately staged and costumed. The
opening play will be on Tuesday
night, September 12, "The American
Girl," by J. Grattan Donnelly. Both
the play and the author are too well
known to need any introduction, and
with Miss Jeanne Russell at its head
the Mack-Leone Co. should score a
decided hit in "The American Girl."
With the company will be seen a
number of first class vaudeville acts
of exceptional merit. The management has placed the prices of admission at bargain rates, and assures patrons of a theatrical treat, September
12 to 16, inclusive.
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
Watch Jor Constant Improvements™ Appointments and Service.
*3ir._-___x* ____%
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S^PS
Si
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ri
■:->■_.■ *"■
Majestic
Theatre
Change of Programme Three
Times a Week, Monday,
Wednesday  and
Friday
High Class
MOTION
PICTURES
Shown for the first time
in Victoria
We Cater to Ladies and
Children'
jtmpress
WEEK SEPTEMBER 11
MRS. JULES LEVY AND FAMILY
In a Melodious Musical Melange
RICE AND CANDY
Two   German   Comedians   Mutilating
the English Language
MILLER AN DMACK
Steppers Who Excel
IDA BARR
The   Premier   Hit   of   the   London
Music  Halls  in   Catchy  Songs
WESTON AND LYNCH
Presenting
"The Fainting Girl"
THE EMPRESSCOPE
HERR NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA
The Kardomah
Tea & Coffee Store
L. Overton, Prop.
1107 Fort Street Phone 2645
Oh Ladies, in thy hours of ease
Drink only of Kardomah Teas,
Whose qualities are unsurpassed
And keep their flavour unto the last.
Phone, or when passing call in and take 1 lb. of our Tea or Coffee
home.    You  will be satisfied.    The goods are  of  the best.
Phone Orders Promptly Attended To
FLAVOURED   TO   TASTE
"It's the insects," complained the amateur gardener. ''They destroy all my radishes, and try as I may I can't exterminate
them."
"Best remedy I know," said the friend,
"is to lay salt between thc rows, Never
been  known  to fail."
"Well," said thc friends when next they
met, "and did you try the salt on those
insects?"
"Yes," replied the other, "and the nexl
morning the little beggars were pulling up
the radishes, dipping them in thc salt and
eating them by the score."
"LAND   REGISTRY   ACT"
In  tbe  Matter of an  Application  for a  fresh
Certificate of Title to that part of Lot 4
of Section 2$, Spring Ridge, Victoria City,
Map   74,1,   of  wbicb   William   Moore  and
Ernest W. Whittington are the registered
owners.
NOTICK is  hereby  given  of my  intention
at tbe expiration of one month from the first
publication hereof tn issue a fresh Certificate
of   Title   in   lieu   of   the   Certificate   of   Title
issued   to   William    Moore   and    Ernest   W.
Whittington on thc 25th  of April,   1002, and
numbered 7704 C, wbicb lias been lost.
Haled at I,and Registry Oflice, Victoria,
British Columbia, this 30th day of August,
1911.
S. Y. WOOTTON',
Registrar General of Titles,
sept. 2 sept. 2.1
Princess
Theatre
A. O. U.W.Hall
Yates St.
Week of Sept. I ith
Williams Stock
Co. presenting
The Great Comedy
Drama
"Roanoke
»
Prices 10, 20 and 30 cts.
Seat Sale opens on Monday at
11a. m., Box Office.   Seats may
also be booked at Messrs. Dean
& Hiscocks, Druggists, cor.
Yates & Broad Sts.
Victoria Theatre
S—NIGHTS-s
Beginning
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 12
MACK-LEONE CO.
with
MISS JEANNE RUSSELL
And an excellent Cast of 16 People
The most Successful Stock Co. on the
Pacific Coast, introducing "Thc American Girl," "The Man frnm Home,"
"The  Little  Minister, with
HIGH   CLASS  ORPHEUM
VAUDEVILLE
Special  Prices—25c, 35c, 50c
Seat Sale Monday THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
in I
The Week
A   Provincial   Newspaper   and   Revi?w
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
Company, Limited
Published  at   1208   Government   St.,
Victoria, B. C,  Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
PUBLISHERS'   ANNOUNCEMENT
Have you read the story of "A
Munificent Gift"? Do so, for it is
well worth your time. The story is
replete with humour and incidents
connected with the necessary detail
attendant upon the building of, and
the proper equipment of, a modern
home for Victoria's "latest newly-
weds," and we desire to take this opportunity of thanking the many well
known business firms of Victoria,
whose progressive business methods
and ilberality contributed so largely
to the story's success .
Incidentally, there is a cash prize
of Twenty Dollars connected with
your reading of the story, which is
offered for the "most artistic" correct answer submitted to The Week,
in re the solution of the unique and
apparently "not-to-be-solved" puzzle
it contains—but read the story, for it
is really the most interesting and
unique write-up we have ever seen in
Victoria. You will be well repaid
for your trouble.
Sir James Douglas
K. C. o.
Written Specially for the Week
by Gilbert Malcolm Sproat
Sir James Douglas, K.C.B., Gov
ernor of Vancouver Island (1851
1863), and of British Columbia (1858
1863), and, (waiting arrival of his
successor, Seymour and Kennedy)
until March-April,  1864.
Born 1803.       Died 1877.
No! though willing to offer a few
notes, I cannot tell your readers anything definite about the family history of James Douglas. The tentative biographies, so far, help little,
being almost as indefinite on that
point as those of Shakespeare (not
the Postmatser, but the other man).
Third and youngest son of a supposed Clydesdale Scot, who, emigrating to British Guiana, had a family
there—educated with his brothers in
Lanark and, perhaps, Chester, the
three youths, in 1819, when James was
16, going to North America in the
service of the North-West Fur Company; that is about all we are told
of his early years. The brothers returned to Scotland soon but James
remained.
This obscureness would matter little in an ordinary case, but Douglas,
be it remembered, is one of our own
historic treasures, as well for what
he was as for what he did. The
stories of "father," "mother" and
"school master," informative as these
are, in any case, are specially desirable in relation to any estimate of
men above the average. I once made
a futile effort to supply the above
deficiencies.
Eight and thirty years ago, in connection with a proposal to write
something for the Home Land folk,
about the North Pacific Coast, theii
lately become "Canadian," the Hudson's Bay Company gave me the run
of all its archives, (back of a certain
date), in the head office in London.
This unusual privilege, however,
proved nugatory, owing to my failure
to obtain needed, illuminative further information from the company's
North American officers, active and
retired. The Scotch-Indian "suspicion," habitual in the "Service,"
could not be overcome. Sir James,
I remember, wrote that, the details
of a fur-trader's career could have
no general interest, and, that his own
official action as a company, ancl as
a Crown officer, was in the records.
The family history he did not refer
to, possibly thinking it of no outside
importance. Nevertheless, to us, now,
the family and educational history of
Douglas is important in any estimate of the man. Was he Scottish,
entirely, on both sides of the house?
What sort of school, or schools,
were his; what subjects were taught,
and what respective degrees of proficiency did he attain? Was he well-
grounded, ancl in what subjects, before leaving Scotland, or, was he,
really, self-educated, afterwards? He
was goocl at figures, soon after joining the company, but a poor penman; a kindly medical officer, Dr.
Burney, helped him, ancl other lads,
successfully, in that art. Did he get
his facility in French, and his good
personal manner—as relatives of my
own did,—from impoverished French
noblemen associated temporarily,
with some Scotch schools, iu Napoleonic times, or, were these later acquisitions? And, lastly, would he ever
have been the Douglas the world
knows, without his many years' intimate association with his patron, and
his pattern, the accomplished Dr.
John McLaughlin, head of the Western Department of the Hudson's Bay
Company, for over 20 years?
It does not do for a biographer to
go too much by what a man's close
"contemporaries" say. The greater
qualities of one who is daily before
our eyes, in the ordinary affairs of
life, tend to lose their distinctiveness, as we become familiar with the
common materials that form the
basis, and, largely, the body, of human character. Moreover, the unaf-
fectedness, going with real excellence,
may cause an undervaluation by critics who, perhaps, find themselves
keener, comparatively, on some small
points of conduct or worldly wisdom
Said a schoolfellow, and colleger,
of Thomas Carlyle    to    my father:
"What's a' this, in the papers,
aboot Tam Caerlyle?" "Tam, aye,
was a suniph." (dull, unpractical person).*
ii
Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By "The Gadfly")
ff
That the Empress Hotel management   has   added   safety  pins  to   its
menu.
* *   *
That  they  are    served    singly  at
night ancl in bunches in the morning.
•4=   *   *
That bachelors' buttons would be
more serviceable for many purposes.
* *   *
That if the races at the Fair were
swift, the management was slow; especially on Thursday, when there
was an interval of nearly an hour
between the third ancl fourth races.
* *   *
That the Horse Show got a much
better write-up than it deserved, seeing that no provision whatever was
made for the "press."
That the programmes were a delusion and a snare, as in many instances not half the entries were
printed.
* *   *
That the names of horses omitted
from the programme had to be represented in the newspaper report by
dashes.
* *   *
That there is lots of room for improvement in the method of handling
the sale of boxes.
* **:       #
That on Wednesday night one box
was  sold  three  times  over.
**■**■#
That Government officials have
their feelings as well as ordinary mortals, and the statement that they are
"no  d cl    good"    comes    with  a
shock even from the honeyed lips of
an eminent agriculturist.
That the Mayor of Victoria set an
excellent example in a democratic
age when he bicycled out to the Fall
?air.
*   *   *
That there was plenty of betting
even if it was not in "evidence."
That people got very tired of the
trotting races,  especially when  they
ran to six heats.
* *   *
That the running races were much
more popular.
* *   *
That the election of Dr. Tolmie to
the Presidency of the Agricultural Society is the best move the Society
has ever made.
* *   #
That Dr. Tolmie is as popular as
he deserves to be ancl no more can
be said.
That it is long odds against the new
President being in any way responsible for flying the Stars and Stripes
over the Grand Stand.
* #      H-
That there could have been no
more effective  object  lesson against
Reciprocity.
* *   *
That that is perhaps why the American flag was hoisted.
* *   *
That the Pacific North-West Library Association paid a thoroughly
merited compliment to Mr. E. 0. S.
Scholefield by electing him President
for the ensuing year.
* *   *
That there is no more popular
Government official, and no more industrious ancl competent public servant. .
* *   *
That Secretary McGaffey has assembled the nucleus of a splendid
Provincial Exhibit.
* *   *
That among its decorations will be
found two exquisite paintings by
Miss Mason, which attracted the attention of all connoisseurs.
* *   *
That the Dominion Rating & Mercantile Agency has taken its medicine without a "kick."
* *   *
That if the Franco-German war
scare had materialized Victoria would
have been denuded of her "chefs,"
and the premises of the "Deutsche
Verein" would have been "to let"—
IF.
* *   *
That Duncan Ross' campaign philli
pics are much more effective at long
range.
* *   *
That like many other small men he
can talk very large—at a distance.
* *   *
That the information published by
The Week some time ago to the
effect that the Liberal leaders had
resolved on a "dirty" campaign in
Victoria is being verified by every
issue of the Times.
* *   *
That there is more than a suspicion that the Liberal leader knew
what he was talking about when he
said that "elections are not won by
prayers."
* *   *
That on the occasion of the Conservative meeting at Oak Bay the
beautiful grounds of Mr. Rattenbury
were illuminated by Chinese lanterns.
* *   *
That the Times has overlooked a
splendid opportunity to work in an
Oriental argument.
That the difference between the
Immigration Act and the Alien Labour Act, so far as the actual results
on Vancouver Island are concerned,
is precisely the same as the difference  between   "Tweedledum"  and
"Tweedledee."
* *   *
That the imported aliens who were
allowed to come in without the $25
in cash will not go out empty handed if they can annex a few more fare
boxes.
* *   *
That only an archivist can appraise
the value of archives.
* *   *
That the judges say the Peach hat
must go, but that the "peaches" will
remain.
* *    *
That the lemon is no longer a popular fruit among C. P. R. captains, especially when it has a string attached.
Arbitration, International Peace and
Annexation
U
In October, 1898 the German Emperor visited the Holy Land; history
does not tell us whether the Czar
having heard of his intentions came
and stole fhe cloak of peace whicii
the Kaiser may have intended to don
after his dip in Jordan, but it looked
rather like it. The Czar scrambled
into the pulpit first and so it came
about that in 1899 the Hague Conference found itself discussing the
question of the reduction of armaments in spite of the fact that the
elements, at the Great International
Peace Demonstration in Hyde Park
(attended by delegates from nineteen
countries) had had thrown cold water
on the very idea on the 26th July,
1896, by checking proceedings by
means of a thunder storm. When we
try to defeat the elements we take
on a big thing. Peace is peace and
war is war; many have handled each
with consummate skill but only by
thoroughly recognizing the thorough
antagonism which must ever exist between the two; all attempts to forge
a connecting link between the two
in the shape of arbitration have invariably ended in failure, usually in
something worse. It is sufficient here
to accept the principle that war is a
terrible thing ancl the sooner waged
and finished the better. It brings
about death and frequently complete
understanding and peace; whereas arbitration, even if it puts off the evil
day, produces mutilation, barbarity,
anarchy, civil war, and ruin at last.
However much the Czar may have
enjoyed his fun as an Apostle of
Peace or impressed his audience, he
had to pay dearly for his amusement, since a very short time after he
found himself at war with Japan,
closely followed by internal dissensions, ending in granting his people a
constitution.
Just when he and his people were
getting thoroughly tired of war and
the Mikado and his people of the
same frame of mind, each party accepted the invitation of Mr. Roosevelt to step into the country of Stars
and Stripes and discuss the mere details of the inevitable peace which
was already a foregone conclusion.
Mr. Roosevelt may have led the
straying horse of peace back to the
stable, but no credit is clue to him
for catching that horse; it was the
horse that allowed itself to be caught
after his free gallop, ancl had the
stable door been left open the prodigal would have returned just as
soon of his own free will, possibly
earlier.
Whatever credit may be due to the
then United States president for his
timely rendering of "I've something
sweet to tell you," there was not
much original in his secret and what
there was contained nothing of the
element of arbitration in the sense in
which it is now taken up by his, at
one time, pupil, now successor in office. Mr. Taft wants to influence the
animal, full of health and energy,
only waiting for a chance to free
himself for an exhilarating gallop,
from indulging in a spin in the fine
fresh air which encourages every inducement for working off superfluous
energy and promoting a healthy circulation!
Peace Conferences and Arbitration Discussions in theory may bring
together assemblies of men of law
at the expense of their countries, and
those men may become noted for a
time for their eloquence ancl the attractive utterances they get reproduced in print about economy to nations in reductions of armaments, but
past records only go to show up the
utter sham of the whole idea of arbitration being able to stave off the
proper understandings whicii the
more practical trials of strength alone
can bring about. Such meetings only
bring lucrative employment to a few
individuals and waste of time very
often to industrial populations when
business slackens during times of
doubt and uncertainty.—Fallacy No.
1.
We can now briefly sum up Fallacy   No.   2.   Annexation,   based   on
on)
trade   agreements   such   as   Rec
city, another pet scheme haling
across the border.
We learnt at school how the A
gines of the Balearic Islands co
ered themselves masters of Spaii:
cause, when they slung stones (v
went out of sight) towards the
land,  none were  hurled  back
sponse;  their  interpretation  of
retaliation  being that the  peop
Spain were afraid to hit them
This may seem a laughable vie
take, but it has a parallel in the
nexation    question    between   Ci
and the United States.    Does
seem more likely that as trade
nections  gradually  improve  be
the  two countries  better and
ties  will  draw  the peoples  toj
ancl stronger will become the f<
of uniting under    the    old um
rather than  separation from th
Mother Country?
The sounder form of goveri
will decide the main issue and
more than probable we shall sc
return of the prodigal and a
welcome he will get!
DO IT IN VICTORIA CARN
WEEK PROGRAMME
At a meeting of the "Do It I
toria"   carnival   committee   hell
night  at  six    o'clock    the  arj
ments  for  the  carnival  in  the|
ness  district  of Victoria were
pleted  and  revised.
The programme as it now al
under the authority of the m|
ment reads as follows:
Monday, Sept. 11—Finishinl
decorating of the streets and [
of stores. Every citizen sho|
his part.
Tuesday, Sept. 12—Receptl
the various committees at S«
Grill and Empress Hotel.
Wednesday,   Sept.   13—Kar|
Kara will  arrive and appear
streets.
Thursday, Sept. 14 — Van]
day. Evening at 8 o'clock, Kil
Queen of the carnival in ela
floats. Various free entertaij
on the streets.
Friday,  Sept.   15—Seattle,
Bellingham and Everett Day.
mobile parade, starting at coij
Belleville    street    and    Govei
street.
Saturday, Sept. 16—Victorl
Merchants and manufacturer!
street parade, 3 p.m.
TO  YOU
(By Margaret O'Grady
Why do I dream of you to-night?      ,
Is it the dim scent of a lonely rq
Or   wistful   gleam   of   hushed   and]
stars? I
Perhaps some vagrant melody, wB
From wizard strings, while memory 1
A heart  too deeply seared with I
pain. ■
Once more I see the light in your ,1
And faintly feel your trembling ll
Oh, tender piteous dream that nevel
My fighting soul with recollectiol
As haunting breaths of breeze througf
_,   si*?h' I
Sobbing like wounded love, whicli
blurs
That  other  deathless  night,   that  id
bye.
When  Love  is  done,  you  said,
forget,
Remembrance is but madness, sweet 4
Why do 1 dream of you to-nightl
FOR  PRIVATE CIRCULATI|
Although a poet's powers I
Possess in high degree,
A verse of mine in vulgar print
Vou'Il never live to see.
I write not for the common hel
I'll have you understand;      I
My readers, few in number, are J
The wisest in the land.
For none but Editors their eyes]
Upon my verses set: f
They read them—and return thenl
"With thanks and great regra
—Walwynne Niq
BOOK NOTES
Attention is called to thd
lowing books now in stoq
the   Standard   Stationery
store on Government stree|
"Robert   Kimberley,"
H. Searman. McLeod &
$1.50.
"The Jew's House," F«j
Hume. Ward, Lock & |
$1.50.
"The Fire Opal," R<|
Fraser.   McLeod & Allen. I THE WE^K,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
McLaughlin-Buick   Pleasure    Cars,     Palmer   &
Singer   Pleasure   Cars,   Randolph   Delivery
Trucks,  Rapid  Delivery Trucks.
"Rapid" 2 Tun Truck, Model IQI2
We  have  thc hest Repair Shop  in town and the largest  stock of
Repair   Parts,   Remy and Splitdorf  Magneto  parts, Goodyear
Tires in all sizes in stock.
Western Motor & Supply Co., Ltd.
1410 Broad Street       Telephone 695
Victoria, B. C.
WHITE
Gasoline Truck
None Better
WHITE
Garage
Cars of Quality
White Pleasure and Commercial
Cars
1218 Wharf St. Phone 2908
Ask tor Demonstration
Thos. Plimley
Store, 730 Yates St. Garage, 727 Johnson St.
New "Belsize" Delivery Van
Delivery Vans, all styles;   Gramm Trucks, Russell, Silent Knight,
Overland,   Hupmobiles,   Brush,   Belsize   and
Daimler Automobiles.
HITE
| WHITE POLICE PATROLS
ARE   ECONOMICAL
I The following quotation from an
rticle which appeared in The
■lacon Telegraph of March gth,
■■lis how a White Police Patrol is
living money for the taxpayers of
"aeon, Ga.:
"The cost of the auto wagon was
2,600.00. If the average for the
list live months is kept up, the
Iving to the city in sixteen
lonths will pay for it, and over,
lhe wagon went on duty on tlie
lh of October. The cost of oper-
lion for the month ending No-
Imber 6th was $17.40; December,
11.80; January, $17.95; Febru-
ly, $i8.j8; March, $i2.fo; total
lerage for the five months, $78.9,1.
Verage   per   month,   $15.78.     'I. e
s
limber   of   police   calls   responded
'___  the  five  months was   1,197;
J/erage   of   239   calls   per   month.
lhe  number  of  hospital  calls  was
1)6;   average  per  month, ,39-   The
(umber   of   miles   run   was   2,656;
lycrage  per  month,   531-    The old
ck maria, drawn by two horses,
■■quired  the  services of  four men,
$75.00 each, making $300.00 for
_n,    and     allowing    $30.00    per
■onth    for    feed    of    horses,   and
lo.oo for repairs and harness and
loeing, makes up a total of $340.00
Ir  month,   or  $4,080.00  per  year.
lie auto patrol  requires only two
Jn at $75.00 each, making $150.00
Id   operating   expenses   of  $15.78,
"total   of    $165.78,   or   $1,980.36
year.    Tbe  saving  to the city
lone year  is  $2,090.64._   Thus in
Iteeii   months   the   saving   alone
111  pay  the  cost  of  the  wagon."
hite Garage
"Cars of Quality"
Vhite Pleasure and Commercial
Cars
Is WHARF  ST.        Phcne 2908
SPEED WELL
Model 11 F, Seven Passenger, 50 Horse Power, Special Touring Car
Victoria Motor Company
Sole Agents for Vancouver Island for Speedwell Pleasure Cars
and Speedwell Trucks
Garage and Salesroom, 926 Johnson St., Victoria, B. C.
Telephone 2861
Delivery Car
The experience of Marshall Field
& Company of Chicago points a
moral that will guide or at least
encourage investigation. Marshall
Field & Company have always
known what each and every operation in their establishment costs
and what relation the cost of each
division of their business hore toward the whole. They have for
years maintained a cost system at
their stable and they knew the cos*,
of delivering each parcel each mil'
so when they began "a try out"
with a few motors they had a
basis for comparison.
"It is worthy of note that tlieir
experiment with a few motor
wagons led them to install main*.
It has been thu same wilh other
concerns where the cost has been
known—tlu* motor Delivery Car
has stayed."
White Garage
Cars of Quality
White Pleasure and Commercial Cars.
1218 Wharf Street
Phone 2908
Everitt 30
"The Aristocrat" 110 in Wheel Base, 30 H. P. $1750
Hanover-Trotter Motor Co.
Distributors
Garage and Salesroom, 931 View Street
Telephone 2346
WHITE
A White "Six" for
1912
Ask For Demonstration
Relieving tbat there was a de-
rand unfilled for an American ear
nf practically unlimited power and
speed—built according to the best
engineering practice; a car that
would bc economical to maintain
and easy to operate—the WHITE
Company has built for ___2 a six-
cylinder "sixty" whicii has all of
tbe features which havc individualized thc WHITE Gasoline
Car since its appearance.
White Garage
Cars of Quality
"White   Pleasure  and   Commercial Cars"
1218 WHARF STREET
Phone 2908
The Place to
Buy Your Furniture
Office Desks and Chairs
a Specialty
Our Prices are Right.
The New] Furniture Store
£734 Pandora Street, between
I       Douglas & Blanchard
I Phone  L2649 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
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The Everitt Car
Made Entirely in Canada
On the first of January, ign, the
Tudhopes of Orillia decided to manufacture in their own plant a motor
car which could be sold ancl guaranteed the same as their buggies whicii
they had manufactured for fifty-six
years. The great point with the Tudhope people was to get a car, or
rather to get a design of a car, which
could be guaranteed fully and absolutely in every detail, and in this
they have succeeded. The end of
their search resulted in their securing for Canada the full manufacturing rights of the "Everitt" car which
for the past season has led in sales
and service of all cars sold or manufactured in Canada.
We know we are, in mechanical
features, a step beyond cars in the
same field of competition, and in order to reap full advantage of this
superiority of design the Tudhope
people saw the necessity of having
an equipment which is adapted to the
manufacture   of   the   pre duct.   The
ters they invited twelve of the best
informed automobile dealers in the
country to participate in a convention for the criticism of the "Everitt."
The result was most flattering to
their design, not a single mechanical
point was subjected to even a suggestion. The general appearance was
developed into a more cosmopolitan
outline for the sake of the trade.
Consequently the " Everitt" was
launched after a refinement which
no other car has ever had the good
fortune  to  experience.
What these "auto critics" desire in
their experienced choice of car are
points which we state as descriptive
of the "Everitt."
Simplicity is the keynote of the
mechanism. Things which could not
be done away with have been combined. This combining has been carried out to the extent that every
function which is necessary to the
working of a gasoline engine is developed with 150 less parts than re-
The Canadian "Everitt" and its regular equipment of extra tire, etc.,
costs exactly the same price the
"Everitt" and the same equipment
cost in the United States.
A two years' guarantee is given on
the "Everitt" covering all defects in
material or workmanship—12 times
the length of the guarantee given on
the average car.
The "Everitt" is handled on Vancouver Island by Messrs. Hanover,
Trotter Co., 931 View street, Victoria, who will be glad to demonstrate the car at any time to intending purchasers.
NO QUARTER GRANTED
This story, which is told of a Scottish
highlander woh served in the French war,
illustrates either the bloodthirstiness or the
unique ideas of humour of the Scotchman:
This highlander had overtaken a fleeing
Frenchman and was about to striek him
down when, falling on his knees, the Frenchman cried:
"Quarter I    Quarter 1"
"I'll no' ha' time to quarter ye," the Scot
answered.   "I'll just cut ye in twa."
HE WAS NO CHICKEN
Two little girls, one the daughter of a
minister, and the other a daughter of a
bishop, were one day extolling the capabilities   of   their   respective   families,   and   the
HANA
The Best of All
No one would willingly buy an indifferer]
painting when for practically the same prid
^ a real masterpiece could be secured. Neithd
would anyone, if he or she knew it, buy I
shoe of indifferent style and incapable d
comfort when they could just as well own
HANAN—a   real   masterpiece.
It is to you, who do not know it, we aij
speaking.   HANAN   Shoes   need   simply
introduction—that's     all.      All     styles,
shapes.
H. B. Hammoni
Shoe Company
Broadwalk Scuffers for Children
Sole  Agents:
Hanan & Son, Wichert & Gardine|
N. Y. N. Y.
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street
RIGHT ON HIS JOB
The late Lord Young, of the Scottish
bench, was responsible for enlivening many
a dull case. One of the best remarks that
ever fell from his lips was the reply to a
counsel who urged on behalf of a plaintiff
of somewhat bibulous appearance.
"My client, my lord, is a most remarkable
man, and holds a very responsible position;
he is manager of some water works."
After a long look the judge answered:
"Yes, he looks like a man who could be
trusted with any amount of water."
'I
capital of the company was sufficient
to enable them to make the widest
choice. The first step was the erection of modern manufacturing buildings, large enough to contain machinery for the building of 2,500 cars
a year. Next, these buildings were
filled with specially built machines
to make the parts of the "Everitt."
Perhaps you don't realize what a
brand new factory means to you.
Machinery has to be specially built
to make parts of any automobile model. This machinery is surprisingly
expensive. Naturally, manufacturers
hesitate about improving any part of
their models, because a change, however small, means the change of costly machinery—the throwing of an
expensive machine into the discard,
ancl replacing it with a still more
expensive one.
This is why old established automobile factories often cannot see
their way to making improvements
in their cars which would lessen the
original cost to those who buy them,
lessen the cost of operation, and make
the cars better in many ways. So,
you see, the manufacturer's stock of
machinery is a big clement in blocking improvements, both for himself
and for you.
But the Tudhope Motor Co. made
a clean, new start, without this handicap of old stock. They were not
loaded down with a bolt or a screw
that had to be used, because they
hated to throw it away. They made
their plant and their machinery to fit
the model they wanted.
This company entered the automobile manufacturing field to make a
car of the type which represents the
demands of men who know from
their own personal experience those
points which are real virtues in an
automobile. To aid them in securing
the broadest opinion  on those mat-
quired in the engine of our nearest
competitor. This lessening of the
number of required parts enables us
to absolutely use the same quality of
material and workmanship that goes
into the highest priced cars.
Another feature of a car which is
all meaning to the artist is Reliability. Reliability and control are sisters for a machine that is not easy
to control, is unreliable. Not only
must a car take you where you want
to go and bring you back, but on
the road it must be sure in cases of
emergency. The motor will carry
you along up hill or clown, but when
a street car conies suddenly around
the corner or the unexpected happens—the situation demands that
you stop short—then you rely on
your control apparatus. The "Everitt"
has straight brake rods operating two
sets of brakes. The car is under control at all times.
While one of the greatest comforts
with the driver is security from accident through "reliability," to those
riding in the tonneau behind, nothing contributes so much to the enjoyment of automobiling as ease of
riding. The desirable points are secured in the "Everitt" through several sources.
Aside from mechanical features, the
general appearance brings more
friends to the car and to its owner
than any point. It is natural that
all desire to be seen riding in a car
of fine finish ancl good lines. This
same proud spirit is back of the construction of the "Everitt." The reputation in the automobile industry
of the manufacturers' demands that
at whatever price we may build a
car, it must bc able to compare side
by side wilh automobiles of whatever
price. In whicii case you will recognize what a high-class, graceful creation is the "Everitt."
minister's little daughter said: "We have a
hen that lays an egg every day." "That's
nothing," responded the bishop's little
daughter, "my father lays a cornerstone every
week."
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing upon the lands on Cracroft Island,
formerly held under Timber License i\o.
31882, now expired, by reason of the notice
published in the British Columbia Gazette
of December 27th, 1907, is cancelled and the
said lands will be open to location by preemption only after midnight on Thursday,
November  30th,   1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
August  30th,   1911.
sept. 2 11   ov. 25
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over Lots 31, 32 and 33, North Division of Salt Spring Island, by reason of
the notice published 111 the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, such
land having; been held under Timber Licence
No. 14891, which has expired, is cancelled
and the said land will be open to location
by pre-emption only after midnight on Thursday,  December 7th,   1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
September 2nd, 1911.
sept. 9 dec. 9
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an auction
sale of lots belonging to the Crown in the
Townsite of Quesnel will be held on Monday, the 16th day of October next, at Quesnel.
All lots will bc offered subject to an upset
price which will be announced at the sale;
The ternis of payment which will be one'-
quarter cash at thc sale and the balance in
three equal annual instalments with interest
at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum.
Plans of the Townsite may be seen at
the Land Office, Victoria, and at the office of
the   Government   Agent,   Quesnel.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
September sth, iqii.
sept. 9 oct. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve
existing over the foreshore abutting on
the East Coast of Vancouver Island
from the head of Saanich Inlet to the
50th parallel of nortli latitude, as well
as the reserve of the coal under the sea
fronting the said foreshore, notice of
which bearing date January sth, 1910, was
published in the British Columbia Gazette
on January 6th, 1910, is cancelled, except iri so far as the said reserve
refatcs to the foreshore in front of Nelson
and Newcastle Districts and to the coal
under  the  sea  fronting  such foreshore.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
August 30th,  1911.
sept. 2 dec. 2
Movin
Sale
We are obliged to move
have taken a store in the S_\
ward Block.
For the next three wek
we will allow 20 per\
cent discount off all
cash purchases
This is only the second si
we have held in forty-n|
years—is it not worth attetf
ing?
Redfern c_# Soi
Oldest Diamond and JeweleA
House in Western Ganada\
1009 Gov't St.
Clean, White,|
Sound Teetl
Are of the utmost importaj
to your health as well as yl
appearance.    The daily use|
Bowes' Antiseptic
Tooth Paste
keeps the teeth in perfect
dition.    Being alkaline it
tralizes    acid    secretions—I
vents decay and removes dis
oration.   It promotes sweetij
of breath or leaves a refresff
and   agreeable   taste    in
mouth.
25c per Tube.   Sold here
Cyrus H. Bow|
Chemist
1228 Government StreiJ
Tels. 425 and 450
Roy's   Art   Glass   Works   and
848  Yates   St.,  Victoria,   B.C
Albert F. R03
Over   thirty   years'   experience
Art  Glass
LEADED  LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer of Steel-Cored
for   Churches,   Schools,   Public   Bl
ings and private Dwellings.    PlainP
Fancy  Glass  Sold.   Sashes  Glazeq
Contract.    Estimates   free.    Pho:
COAST LAND DISTRICT |
District of, Range 2
TAKE  notice  that   I,   William   Br|
Vancouver,   occupation  Sign  Painter,
to apply ior permission to purchase
lowing   described   lands:—Commencin!
post   planted   about   1   mile   souther]
the mouth of lower Glacier creek, sal
runs into Homalko River about 9 mill
its  mouth,   thence   north   80   chains;[
west  80   chains;   thence   south   40   en
river;   thence  meandering  the  river  if
of commencement, containing 400 acn]
or less.
Dated August   uth,   1911.
WILLIAM  BROWN.
Morton S. Jones,
aug. 26 THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
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PARDON US
But we MUST tell you about the Tudhope Line for 1912. YOU have seen these aristocratic cars running EVERY
DAY. You know the blue car with the white diamond on the radiator? That is the Tudhope EVERITT, the only car
manufactured ABSOLUTELY in Canada and sold without any duty added on. We would like to show you this
EVERITT' "36" because we believe that we have the Canadian car for Canadian conditions and Canadian people. We
absolutely and fully guarantee this car from date of purchase, and we want you to ask anyone who drives one of these
EVERITTS how he likes it.
This is the new EVERITT "36". Completely equipped with nickle trimmings throughout, Gray & Davis lighting
system, large wheels, Continental demountable rims, double drop frame, Bosch dual ignition which permits starting from the
seat, Bosch spark plugs, unit cast long stroke 36 H.P. four-cylinder motor, self-oiling, simple and accessible in every part,
safety transmission gears, five-passenger body, hand buffed leather upholstering, nickle windshield, extra Continental demountable rim, extra tire with tire cover, tire holders and inner tube, dragon horn, nickled robe and foot rails, 60-mile nickled
speedometer, tool box on running board, shock absorbers on the rear, mohair top with side curtains ancl slip dust cover, with
the Tudhope special equipment and the two-year iron-clad guarantee of Tudhope service for owner's protection. Car sold
complete as above with no extras to buy and delivered at your front door for $1,750.00.
We do not want you to feel obligated in any way in coming to see the EVERITT. We just want to get acquainted
and try to show you the stupendous value of this one goocl car amongst all the other good cars. Our belief is that all cars
are good cars, but our Canadian manufacture allows us to give more value and a better guarantee for the money, and all we
ask is that you let us try and show you.
Handled Exclusively by
The Hanover-Trotter Co.
931 View St., Victoria   Phone 2346       Garage, Auto Repairing, Auto Supplies, Marine Motors.
Some very desirable Island territory open.   Apply at once.   The EVERITT Six "50"
announcement next week.
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\rrespondence
I Week accepts no responsibility for
Iws expressed by its correspondents.
Jinicationi will be inserted whether
by  the   real   name  of  the  writer
Inom de plume, but the writer's
pnd address must be given to the
as an evidence of bona fides.   In no
lill it be divulged without consent.
FRUIT LANDS
Victoria, Aug. 31, 1911.
Jditor of The Week;
Ibout an hour ago I receiv-
pamphlets  from Ottawa en-
lespectively  "Reciprocity with
Iited  States," and  "The  Bar-
Iself."    I  have only had  time
Ice for a moment at the first
lied  document, but that  short
fas   sufficient   to   impress   me
le poverty of argument in the
|r  the    heading    "Fruit  Land
it is claimed that land values
districts (Fruit Land) have
Ily increased    since    the pro-
Reciprocity agreement was in-
|d,   and   the   Reciprocity   pro-
credited  with  the  increase.
I information that proves con-
to   me   that,   on   the   con-
|iat  Reciprocity  has  operated
as a deterrent to people into take up fruit lands.  Some
lis   of   persons   made   applica-
Ir fruit lands in this province
\& a deposit towards the pttr-
But    what    happened?    As
the Reciprocity Pact became
|issue every one of the appli-
a man cancelled his applica-
|d forfeited his deposit, giving
leason   for   his   so   doing—the
Tjcity  proposal  and  the  possi-
If its coming into force.    An-
Itrgument  put  forward  in  the
let was in connection with the
1 industry.    It was stated that
the long voyage from Seattle to the
fishing banks ancl back again would
give B. C. fishermen a supreme advantage over American fishermen.
Now this appears to me the most dishonest ancl the most childish statement of all. The Americans have already secured a firm hold of the
Eastern markets, and as for the few
miles' difference in the transportation, the powerful company that at
present controls this market would
have no difficulty whatever in retaining and even extending it.
And again, as to agricultural produce—our own Government has paid
and is still paying thousands of dollars to American agricultural experts
to lecture to our farmers on the proper growing and handling of fruit—
on the raising of poultry and on
farming methods generally. How
think you are our farmers going to
compete with a community whose
members have been for years past-
masters in these arts and from whom
we are but now learning the alphabet. Without the shadow of a doubt
we should be swamped.
Once more, the American business
man is perhaps the most astute in the
world, barring perhaps the Chinese,
and I was told just the other clay by
a friend who had been sojourning in
the States for the past few months
that, go where you will—in hotel,
coffee room or bar, railway carirage
or electric car—there is a unanimous
and unprecedented chuckling over
this Reciprocity Pact, and what it
will mean to America. This alone
would decide me. The American
above all nationalities craves the biggest share in every deal, ancl you can
trust them for knowing when they
have got it. I think it a great misfortune that this question has been
made a political issue in Canada, for
I feel perfectly sure that as an economic change it would act disastrously to our country generally and throw
back the hands of the clock at least
20  years.
PATRIOT.
UNDER WHICH FLAG
Victoria, B.C., Aug. 31, iqii.
To the Editor of The Week:
Sir,—I was rather surprised this
afternoon, while on Douglas street,
to be accused by Col. Currie of being bought by the Conservative
party  to  oppose   Reciprocity.
I may say to Col. Currie, or any
of his party, that I have never been
bought or taken pay from any man
alive in Canada, or any part of the
British Empire, and it makes me feel
proud to think it is the only defence
they have to offer upon my stand
with respect of thc trading of the
Union Jack for the Spangled Banner.
The outset of the whole pact, if we
stand pat, will be, that we will annex
U. S. A., as she is; the only part
of the world that has borrowed our
language outside of the Empire ancl
it is a natural coincidence for her
to come back under the flag of the
most just laws of the globe, the
British Imperial Justice.
As for my being bought, I always
thought a Briton had his own mind
and thoughts to choose from ancl
not allow others to lead him, unless
he thought it to better the community at large, ancl if Col. Currie will
bring the person or persons with
proof I will submit to the accusation.
It is certainly very poor policy on
the part of Col. Currie to try and
throw disrespect on his opponents
to say they had bought a poor individual like myself, because I have
always considered myself like the
rest of the Liberal party, a lightweight in B. C, and since I have
been working with the Esquimalt
wing of the Liberal party, Col. Currie must not think I am like other
Canadians, where politics are concerned, to whom a dollar looks as
large as thc  moon.
Respectfully yours,
FRANK P. SLAVIX.
DISRESPECT
Victoria, Aug. 31, 1911.
Editor of The Week;
Sir,—The writer is an interested
reader of your paper, The Week. You
ought to be a "daily." Anyhow, I
admire the way—fearless ancl just—
in which you handle civic matters
which demand the attention of the
City Fathers towards a betterment,
and criticize their wilful  neglect.
You take up—but keep it up—the
matter of Spencer's "squatting" on
the people's property. Besides being
most unsightly, isn't it disgustingly
annoying? Kick them off. Make them
obey the law. Or is there no law to
cover?
Today another incident occurred on
the main street which to say the
least, was "rotten" heathenism. At
3.15 this afternoon a funeral cortege
passed up Fort street from Government street, and it happened that a
street car (didn't get number) was
bound clown Fort going north along
Government to Yates street. The
motorman deliberately cut through
the procession and Officer No. 15
(erected there by the city to "automatically" direct traffic), allowed this
to be done. This breach of the law,
to say nothing of disrespect, is a
punishable offence in the more crowded thoroughfares of other- cities. In
this "woolly West" how is it? Have
wc no time to be "brotherly," courteous, etc., and respectful? With
your wide influence, could you have
Police Officer No. 15 put right or
quote the law governing, in your
columns. Wishing you continued success,
I am, etc.,
"OBSERVER."
A TOURIST RESORT
In order to cater for the sportsmen
who will soon be out in large numbers, the proprietor of the Central
Hotel, Quiet Cove, Quatsino Sound,
has put his house in order ancl will
be prepared    to    accommodate large
numbers of hunters ancl tourists. Mr.
Gus Moerman has been at Quiet
Cove for some years now, and his
hotel is at present undergoing extensive alterations. By thc first of October all the new work will be completed and the hotel will be fitted with
35 rooms and up-to-date sanitary arrangements.
WHAT IS THE COST?
The answer to this question is that
the cost of a Canadian Government
Annuity depends upon four things:
ist, the age of the applicant; 2nd, the
amount of annuity required; 3rd, the
age at which the annuity is to commence; anel, 4th, the plan on which
the purchase is made. Tables whicli
answer these questions have been
published by the Department and
may be had on application. Annuities are payable for life, but for a
small additional payment may be
guaranteed for a number of years
certain, not exceeding twenty, so
that should death occur before the
guaranteed period expires the annuity
would be continued for the remainder
of the twenty years to the- annuitant's
legal representatives. Hy the latter
plan the return of a specific sum is
assured. Any other details of this
important annuity plan may be had
on application to the Superintendent
of Canadian Government Annuities,
Ottawa.    Postage free.
MISPLACED ADVICE
One Sunday morning, Mr. Moody, the revivalist, entered a Chicago drug store distributing  tracts.
At thc back of thc store sat an elderly
and distinguished citizen reading a morning
newspaper,
Mr. Moody approached tlie gentleman and
threw one nf the temperance tracts on thc
paper   before   him. *
The old gentleman glanced at the tract,
and then, looking benlngantly at Moody,
asked:
"Are  you  a  reformed   drunkard?"
"No, sir, I am nol!" cried Moody, drawing back,  indignantly.
"Then   why   in   li don't   you   reform?"
quietly   asked  the  old  gentleman. THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,   1911
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Model 27, 1912 McLaughlin-Buick
We invite comparison with other makes of cars in every
one of these details. We especially invite such comparison
from experienced motorists. The appearance of our cars
would commend them to the tyro. We firmly believe the
design and construction will as strongly commend them to
the expert. Investigate its record in the hands of users
throughout the country.
Power and speed are both inevitable results of correct
design, good material and careful workmanship. Given
these three factors, all cars are certain to give satisfactory
service. When light weight is added to unimpaired strength,
greater relative power and speed is obtained. Perfect car-
buretion, ignition and oiling give maximum engine efficiency.
Possession of speed as well as power therefore argues possession of the other virtues.
Model 27, Torpedo, 1912 McLaughlin-Buick
There is no satisfaction of motoring keener than that
of seeing one's car overhauling another of reputed high
spead on a steep ascent. The ability to press the accelerator
and pick up immediately at the crucial point of a hard climb
means a thrill of pride in possession that is distinctly worth
while.
Hill climbing is of course a direct expression of power,
but, it is more than potential power. It is power most advantageously applied. It is developed power delivered at
the rear wheels with the least loss of efficiency, it is the j
largest percentage of power delivered in relation to the total
weight lifted.    All  are  mighty  important considerations, i
Western Motor & Supply Co., Ltd.
Telephone 695
Sole Agents for Vancouver Island
1410 Broad St.
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The Palmer-Singer Car, with the Western
Motor & Supply Co.
Limited
Consistent with Palmer & Singer
policy—to offer as wide a range of
selection as possible—two new models have been added to the line of
cars whicii we have previously offered to the motoring public. The
IQU line will include a high powered
four-cylinder car as well as our high
powered six, giving the advocates of
both four- and six-cylinder motors,
the advantage of high power in either
class. The same choice is afforded
those who favour smaller cars of
lesser power by the addition of a six-
cylinder, forty horse-power car to the
thirty horse-power, four-cylinder
model which has won signal favour
in the last two years. In variety of
bodies thc same extensive choice is
offered, for, beside the usual touring
and closed body types, we can provide any special body that has met
with popular approval as well as several innovations of distinctly pleasing
lines. With the equipment of a new
factory at Long Island City, at our
very doors, wc propose to cxercis*.*
the same searching oversight over the
manufacture and testing of our product which has been responsible for
its excellence in the past and to add
those personal refining touches which
are only possible when every detail
passes before the most interested,
critical  eye.
We owe our success in the past to
the fact that we began the manufacture of automobiles after the experimental stage of motor evolution had
been passed. An extended experience
in marketing cars and a long experience in driving them had taught us
thoroughly what the motoring public
desired. An intelligent judgment enabled us to select those features of
mechanical practice which were
sound and to employ them in our lirst
cars unhampered by any investment
of capital in following mistaken
methods, untrammeled hy prejudices
whicii grow out of long experiment.
Our lirst cars had all those features
whicii all motorists today agree are
correct in design and successful in
practice, artd our subsequent models
have followed these lines with only
the refining changes which time
makes in the application of all mechanical principles. Our cars today
offer more successful features than
any other cars in the market of whatever make. These features are common to all our models—which differ
only in size, power and equipment,
but in neither mechanical arrangement nor material.
We therefore appeal to the experienced motoring public, confident that
in comparison of specification we
gain an immense advantage, which,
when coupled with the record of successful use in the hands of owners,
cannot  fail  to  command  approval,
It is needless on these pages for
us to attempt to exploit the superiority of the six-cylinder motor over
the four. Every motor car owner
or prospective owner, if left to his
judgment, would undoubtedly choose
the six-cylinder type. But there has
been one obstacle which has prevented the man of moderate means
from securing a six in preference to
a four.   That obstacle has been price.
That the six-cylinder has come to
stay is a self-evident fact. By
glancing over the specifications of
the high-grade car manufacturers you
will note that nearly all of them have
at last come around to the six-cylinder idea. We are among the
pioneer builders of sixes, there being
only one other manufacturer of six-
cylinder cars older than the Palmer-
Singer Manufacturing Company. In
1Q07 we evolved our lirst six. Tin-
car met with immediate success, owing to thc fact that we had been
experimenting on sixes for two years
previous to marketing our product.
Several other manufacturers were
quick to fall in ilne, realizing that
the public would be quick to grasp
the situation and would not bc content vvith cars of the four-cylinder
type. The majority, however, still
adhered to the old type of motor until the demand of custom made them
at last change; all this time wc had
been producing and building six-cylinder cars, gaining in experience and
knowledge, until today we are in a
position to bring out a model which
represents thc acme of motor-car
construction.
The Western Motor and Supply
Co., Ltd.. on 1410 Broad Street, are
sole agents for Palmer-Singer Cars
for Vancouver Island.
VY
.iiiz
AlexandraCafe tZ°?
COURTNEY STREET, TWO BLOCKS EAST OF POSTOFFl
OPEN EVERY DAY AND SUNDAYS Phone 2|
Good   Service,   Moderate  Charges,   Dainty  Meals,   Quiet  Situa|
Table D'Hote or A La Carte
Breakfast 8 to io a.m.;  Luncheon ]2 to 2.30 p.m.;  Dinner 6 to 8
Afternoon Tea Strawberries and Cream Ice Cream J
Special Dinners Catered For      Contracts Taken fo.  EntertainmJ
Hot Weather Mortality
Xo fewer than 548 children under
the age of two years died from summer diseases in London in one week
last month. In the three preceding
weeks the mortality  from the same
cause had    been    56,    1:
and 318.
Forty-nine of last week's deaths were
in Stepney, 41 in Poplar, 40 in. Islington, and  36 in   I'ethual  Green.
Sir Redvers Buller
The memorial to General Si
vers Buller will be unveiled b)l
Marshal Lord Grenfell in Winl
Cathedral on Saturday, Octol
The monument takes the fon|
recumbent life-size figure in
by Mr. Bertram MeKennal,
and the pedestal bears the legcfc
great  leader.     Beloved by hi THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
IRESS OF WORK ON LANDS OF S. ALBERTA LAND CO.
lery good idea of the vastness of the Southern Alberta Irriga-
leme is given in an article in the "Engineering Record, report-
Jress of the work.   The project is to provide water to irrigate
per cent, of a tract of land 500,000 acres in extent.   This
|oth sides of the Bow River, west of Medicine Hat, and north
Dtith Saskatchewan River.   The project involves the construc-
!00 miles of canals, a 360,000 acre ft. reservoir, 47 miles
source of supply, and about 45 miles from the land to be
J and a 2-mile siphon under 2 ft. head.   The work is already
le, and part of the land will be watered next season.
lthe land to be reclaimed lies upon a plateau well elevated
le river, which flows on a low gradient through a deep and
lively narrow valley, the diversion of water presented many
obstacles.   The wide walls of the valley are high and rather
[d in many places are cut by deep and precipitous drainage
To avoid a high bank five iniles below the intake, the canal
pverted to a deep cut leading from the river to the channel
eral drainage valley.   Between this point and the storage
there are the two deep and important crossings of East and
Irowhead Creeks.
j source of the supply is the Bow River, which heads in the
Coldwater Lakes at the head of the Bow Pass.   The main
I features of the project are the intake, the deep cut emerging
river valley, the crossings of the two Arrowhead Creeks,
iGregor, and the inverted siphon crossing the Bow River.
lEast Arrowwood crossing consists of two wood stave pipes
in diameter.   The two ends are practically identical rein-
bncrete structures.   The West Arrowwood Creek crossing is
ead wooden flume supported on pile trestles having a maxi-
rfit of 45 ft.   The velocity of this flume will be about 6.4 ft.
Id.
Inecessary works to convert Snake Valley, as it was locally
Ito a storage reservoir, renamed Lake McGregor, consisted
In embankments at either end, having lengths of 3,600 and
J and heights of 48 and 46 ft. respectively. These dams are
|le across the top, and rise to an elevation 10 ft. above high-
e, which is 30 ft. above the outlet level,
loutlet works consist of a reinforced concrete gate tower, an
[vert through the dam, and buttressed wing walls leading to
the above structures. The two gate outlets are located at
end of the outlet culvert, and are provided with two 5 by
Ice gates, built by the Ransomes-Rapier Company, of London.
lit tive miles away from the lake outlet the side walls of the
Iw River are encountered, ancl from here on the canal will
pteep slopes for about eight miles. This canal, up to where
Hust west of the company's tract, will have a capacity of
ft., and a bottom width varying from 30 to 40 ft., dependent
ladients clue to the slopes of the country. The 85 miles of
Iween Lake McGregor ancl the Bow River siphon contain
Iforced concrete drops ancl one plume 4,600 ft. long.
120,000 out of the 300,000 acres of irrigable land in the
-re located on the east side of the Bow River. For full
lnt this will require 800 sec. ft. of water, which is to be
Iross the river in a wood stave 8 ft. in diameter, supported
le'
lam, intake structure, and embankment across the island have
Jtleted at a cost of about £30,000.   The 46-mile canal, in-
f00,000 cubic yards of excavation, ancl the dams at the north
ends of Lake McGregor, containing 300,000 and 130,000
|ls of material respectively, have been finished.   Four hun-
of horses are now at work on the first 14 iniles of outlet
lg the banks of the Little Bow River, where the cuts run up
The line from the Little Bow River to the Bow River
lovered with men and teams.
I CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY'S EARNINGS
the meeting of the Directors of the Canadian Pacific Rail-
Inonth was not productive of news in the direction of
(dividends, new capital stock issues or action of a similar
Iwhicli the market "bulls" have been predicting for a consid-
3, a definite statement regarding the earnings was made after
post essential items concerning the earnings for the fiscal
1 June 30th are that after payment of all dividends, nearly
is carried forward as a surplus from railway and steam-
ligs, besides which there is the sum of $6,500,000 special in-
i land sales ancl other assets, making a net surplus of
carried forward, or over $1,500,000 per month,
et earnings for the first time exceeded $100,000,000.
s year's report appeared an item "Special income from
land sales ancl from extraneous assets not included in the
§502,205." No corresponding item appears in the report for
nded June 30th, 1910, but a list given in the report whicii
n to correspond thereto amounted to a total of $2,426,477.
was accordingly used in the above table although the large
I the corresponding figures for last year would require more
i than  appears on  the  surface.   The net result is  the
|em after all.   After paying all dividends and making allow-
epreciation and various special charges the surplus carried
$18,475,447, or $4,578,832 more than the previous year
licrease, as compared with the previous year of 33 per cent.
s a splendid showing, more especially in view of the fact
Residence  Phone  F1693
Business Phone 1804
W.D'O.Rochiort
Architect
Plans and Specifications on
Application
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
_*he
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dom
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors'  Instruments and
Drawing   Office   Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
1218 Langley Street, Victoria, B. C.
fWflOTH;
THE BESTOFEYMTHING
INTfiEMRTOFTMTY
135RoomsWithBath-505ahpl£|?oohs
You  Can  Keep Posted on all   Developments
in  the  Peace   River,  the   Cariboo  and
Fort George
Country, Reading Our
FREE Monthly
B. C_ Bulletin of
Information
which gives all the news impartially, clipped
from the leading dailies, weeklies, and magazines; articles bearing on British Columbia,
covering Farm Lands, Fruit, Lumbering,
Mining, Fishing, New Railways; laso synopsis of Land, Lumber, Mining, Immigration
and other laws.
WE   ARE   JOINT   OWNERS   AND
SOLE AGENTS OF THE
FORT  GEORGE  TOWNSITE
at the junction of noo miles of navigable waterways, the strategic point for
the building of the second largest city of
British Columbia, having more varied and
important  natural   advantages   than   Spokane.
Seven railroads building and  projected.
One hundred million dollars (estimated)
will be spent in next fivc years in railroad
building   radiating   from   Fort   George.
Millions of agricultural acres waiting for
farmers.
Coal, timber lands, water power and rich
gold mining country all tributary to Fori
George.
Write us today. We dou't ask you to
buy; just get posted—then do what you
think is wise.
Natural Resources
Securities Co._
Ltd.
S93   BOWER   BLDj.,   VANCOUVER,   B.C.
643   FORT   ST.,   VICTORIA,   B.C.
Clover Hill
All Good High Lots--The
best buy in the City for a
Home.   Prices, $500 to $900
Terms: io per cent Cash and IO per cent Quarterly
Green & Burdick Bros.
Phone 1518
Cor. Broughton & Langley St.
CanadianOrientalLand Investment
Company, Limited
(To be Incorporated under the "Companies Act of British Columbia, 1910,"
with Amending Acts)
CAPITAL    -    -    -    $100,000.00
Divided into 10,000 Shares of $10.00 each.
DIRECTORS
CHARLES PASEDAG ALLAN, ESQ-,
Messrs. C. P. Allan & Co., Green Building, Victoria, B.C.
JAMES HERRICK McGREGOR, ESQ.,
Messrs.  Gore &  McGregor,   1218  Langley  Street,  VictoHa,  B.C.
REGINALD NOTON HINCKS, ESQ.,
Savoy Mansions, Victoria, B.C.
BIGGERSTAFF WILSON, ESQ.,
B. Wilson Company, Ltd., Herald Street, Victoria, B.C.
BANKERS     -     -      BANK OF BRITISH  NORTH AMERICA
SOLICITORS     -     Messrs. EBERTS & TAYLOR, 1114 Langley St., Victoiia, B.C.
AUDITOR     -     W. CURTIS SAMPSON, C.A., Langley St., Victoria, B.C.
GENERAL MANAGERS  -  -  C. P. ALLAN & CO.,
HEAD OFFICE    -     -     GREEN BUILDING, VICTORIA, B.C.
Date of this Prospectus—July 25, 1911.    Copies of the Prospectus together with
share-application forms may be obtained from the Bankers, the Bank ot British North
America, or from the General Managers, Messrs. C. P. ALLAN ■__ CO., 31 Green Blk.
We desire to announce that we have opened offices in Rooms
304 and 305 Bailey Building, Handling, Seattle, Wash., handling
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Cotton, strictly on a Commission Basis,
in the various markets of the world. Mr. Carl L. Miller, who has
long been connected with important brokerage firms in the west,
will be in charge.
We are members of the Chicago Board of Trade. Our
Eastern correspondents are S. B. Chapin & Co.. and Logan &
Bryan, of Chicago and New York, members of all Exchanges.
Private leased wire connections enable quick dispatch in handling
all business intrusted to us for execution.
Having carried on a successful brokerage business in Victoria,
B.C., for the past 10 years, we refer you to any bank, firm or
individual of that city as to our standing and integrity.
Respectfully,
F. W. STEVENSON & CO.
Frank  W.  Stevenson
Walter   H.   Murphey
Seattle, March 6, 1911.
Royal Bank Chambers
Vidoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Architect
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
Give Your
Typist Good
Stationery
and She'll Give
You Better
Work
Baxter & Johnson Co.
Umiliil
721 Yates St,            Phone 730 10
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,   SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
II   !
I
i
that last year's crop was considerably smaller than was at first hoped,
and also in view of the fact that many of the American railroads
showed a considerable shrinkage in earnings as compared with the
previous year. After paying all charges and dividends and after making allowance for depreciation, etc., the company has been able to carry
forward a surplus, over and above all charges, of one and a half
million. dollars per month. The fact that the Western crop this
season is fully 75 per cent, greater than a year ago will exercise its
influence on the earnings of the company for the current year ancl the
company will be able to show still greater earnings than those mentioned above. 	
HUDSON'S BAY STORES STOCK
At a recent annual meeting of the Hudson's Bay Company in
London. Richard Burbidge, director of retail stores, was asked to make
a statement in regard to the company's stores, many shareholders
expressing disappointment at the smallness of the dividend by reason
of £400,000 being held back to be invested in sites for stores.
Mr. Burbidge made it clear that the company intends to pursue a
very vigorous policy in connection with its stores department. In the
course of his reply he said:
Ever New Stock
"I feel it a great privilege to be called upon to say anything in
connection with the trading department of the Hudson's Bay Company.
When I went to Canada first, two or three years ago, to be followed up
by another visit last year, I was anything but pleased with what I saw
as far as the company's sale-shops in that country were concerned,
having regard to the style of business I was accustomed to at home.
I quite understood that it was impossible to bring them up to the same
high pitch that we have in our premises in London and the other
different trading communities here. But what I felt sure was that
there was a goocl deal of stock there which it was unnecessary to carry
in a country like Canada. It might have been good value at one time,
but it was out of date, ancl it was necessary that the stock should be
realized before we put in a fresh ancl ever-new stock which would be
the means of drawing customers to the stores.
Must Spend Money
"The slaughter was brought about at the commencement of the last
financial year. But it was not all done even then. There will be
some this year, and we must ask you to bear with us until we get that
on a solid foundation, ancl if there is anything to be realized it is in
the best interests of you, as shareholders, ancl of ourselves, as directors, that it should be done with as little delay ancl loss as possible.
I feel sure that the trading of the Hudson's Bay Company in future
has its high-water mark to attain to.
"I have not the slightest doubt, providing you are prepared to find
the capital ancl to carry on the business that the trading of the shops
will be as profitable as any other portions of the business. It requires
time and patience, ancl we must have the money to do it with. I will
add that I have nothing to do with the big carry-forward other than
as one of your directors, but I quite concur that it is the right thing to
do for the future of the company."
Grand Trunk Pacific
Investors
The construction of the new transcontinental railway—the Grand Trunk
Pacific—is to-day opening up new towns that in the very near future will be
large and important cities. Just as the advent of the pioneer transcontinental
line—The Canadian Pacific*—opened and built up divisional points such as
Brandon, Regina, Calgary, Lethbridge, etc., so will the new line of the Grand
Trunk make large divisional points of the towns we now otter for sale.
We have secured the agency from the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY CO. for the towns mentioned below and the shrewd investors who can
recognize the many advantages for investment in these towns at the prices of
today, will share in the large profits that will accrue as a result of their rapid
development. No other investment is so safe and profitable, and if you want
to get your portion of the wealth Western Canada's development is creating,
take advantage of this opportunity now before it is too late.
Prices of lots in all of these divisional points are $75, ?ioo, $150, $200, $250
and $300 on easy monthly payments, no interest and no taxes till 1912, with a
5 per cent, discount for cash.
MELVILLE—The first Saskatchewan divisional point on the G. T. P. and
the largest new town on the line between Winnipeg and Edmonton. Located
in a rich agricultural district, an important railroad and distributing centre.
Melville bids fair to become one of the important cities of Western Canada.
WATROUS—The mecca of the health seeker, situate near the shores of
the famous Little Manitou Lake, and in the centre of one of the finest farming
sections of Saskatchewan.
BIGGAR—The opportunity of opportunities, located in the heart of a
wonderfully rich and fertile agricultural district, and with railway facilities that
guarantee a future, being not only one of the most important Grand Trunk
Pacific divisional points on the main line between Winnipeg and Edmonton, but
is the junction of the branch lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific to Battleford
and Calgary, which will be hurried to completion at an early date. The C. P. R.
runs through Biggar, and all C. P. R. trains stop there.
TOFIELD—The terminus of the branch line from Calgary, situate near the
shores of the Beaver Lake. The discovery of natural gas and of clay, and having
at its door several square miles underlaid with lignite coal, promise the development at Tofield of important manufacturing industries.
EDSON—The last prairie divisional point on main line of Grand Trunk
Pacific, and the gateway to the Peace River Country. Rich in natural resources,
Edson lots fulfill every requirement for safe and profitable investment.
REMEMBER THE PRICES, $75.00 to $300.00, and terms of one-tenth cash
and balance in nine equal monthly payments—no interest.
Pemberton & Son
Exclusive Agents for Victoria and Vancouver
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
F. KROEGEI
ARTISTIC  UPHOLS'
" Windowphanie"
Ma.-es Stained  Glass out of Ph
Has Removed to 721 Courtney
Opposite Alexandra Club Tele
NOTICE TO  CONTRACT!
A YEAR'S MINING
An increase of 7.3 per cent, in the mineral production of Canada
over the previous year is shown in the annual report of the mines
branch of the department of mines just issued.
The total value of the production was $91,831,411, as compared
with a value of $85,557,101 in the year before. The production of
metals shows an increase of $2,382,474; structural materials and clay
products, $5,193,394, and other non-metallic products decrease of
$1,001,533.
The metal mining industries of Ontario were particularly active,
there being a very important increase in the production of nickel and
copper at Sudbury and in the silver production of the Cobalt district.
Attention is drawn to the fact that not only is a very large portion of
Canada's mineral production exported, but that, on the other hand, the
refined or semi-refined products of a similar class are re-imported for
domestic consumption. Ontario again leads the provinces with 40 per
cent, of the whole mineral production.
Alterations   an   dRepairs—Upper
Extension  Schools
SCALED TENDERS .superscrl
der for Alterations and Repairsf
and Lower Extension Schools,''
ceived by the Honourable the
Public Works up to 12 o'clock no
nesday, the 13th day of Septembc
the erection ancl completion of
works required in alterations ancl
the Upper and Lower Extensia
in the Newcastle Electoral Distriq
Plans, specifications, contract,
of tender may be seen on and aff
day of August, 1911, at the off
Government Agent, Nanaimo, B.f
der Michie, Esq., Secretary of Scl
Extension, B.C.; and the Deil
Public Works, Parliament Buil|
toria.
Each   tender  must be accompal
accepted   bank   cheque   or   certifi*
posit on a chartered bank of  Cq
payable   to   the   Honourable   the
Public   Works,   for   the   sum   of l.
shall  be  forfeited  if  the  party  t(|
cline   to    enter    into   contract
upon to do so, or if he fail to
work  contracted   for,     The   cheql
tilicates  of  deposit   of  unsuccessfl
will be returned to them upon t|
of the contract.
Tenders    will    not    be    considl
made out on the forms, supplied,
the actual  signature of the tenclel
closed  in thc envelopes  furnishea
The lowest   or  any   tender   nol|
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITll
Public Works|
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., August 25th,  ig|
sept. 2
SAYWARD LAND DIS'll
TAKE NOTICE that Haroldf
ter of Hazelmere, B.C., occupatl
intends to apply for permission [
the following described lands:—L
at a post planted at thc southwtl
Lot 501, Sayward District, Prov-T
ish Columbia, thence north 35 ell
west 60 chains; thenee south"
tiience -cast 60 cliains to point
ment, and containing 1G0 acres t|
Dated   August   21st,   iqii.
HAROLD WARE
sept. 2
Some of the Things That Make Lifd
Worth Living
The Electric Water Heater       The Electric Toaster       The Electric Disc Stove
The Electric Iron       The Electric Tea Kettle       The Electric Coffee Percolater
The Electric Chafing Dish      The Electric Warming Pad      The Electric Range
The Electric Curling Iron The Electric Air Heater
These Appliances are in Many Victoria Homes
Are they in Yours?
B. C. Electric Railway Co., Limite
P. O. Box 1580
Light and Power Department
Telephone 160(; THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
11
A MUNIFICENT GIFT
A  Novel  Method of Starting Housekeeping that will be Interesting to   Every   Reader
Isl
HW     Written Expressly for the Week by J. T. Weart    [n]
!
n  the   morning   of  Wednesday,
;ust   i6th,  there  appeared  in  the
jonto Globe the following notice:
(vlARRIED—On   the   14th   inst.,
Nellie Schofield and Mr.  Chas.
Churchill, at   the   First    Baptist
,rch, by the Rev. A. E. Watson."
etter to Henry Schofield of Vic-
amiouncing   the   event,    soon
|tght  a  reply,  for  Nellie  was,  as
e Henry declared, the only one
|for him to take care of. He wrote
effusively of his delight at her
ling and proposed that if Charlie
Nellie were to locate at Victoria
grow   up  with   the   country   he
d bestow upon them such a gift
ould enable them to have a nice
i and  live  comfortably the  rest
eir days.
his," wrote Henry, "will be my
ing gift to you. I don't know
ling better for you to do, for
>ria is growing fast and is the
suitable place for a young cou-
|o start in life that I know of."
[out ten days subsequently a
,1-worn party arrived at Victoria,
y, although 60 years of age, was
and at the dock to greet the
e, and as he shook hands with
of them at once his face once
showed the gleam of youth and
et were as spry as he gallantly
Jed the party to the Empress
tanding near.
ell," said Uncle Henry, as hav-
ntered the bus they rode over
hotel. "1 hope you young
enjoyed your trip West. Didn't
nd it a little tiresome?"
[should say not," replied Nellie,
er enjoyed a trip more in my
We had lovely weather all the
put and the scenery along and
gh the Rockies was the most
ful I have, ever seen. It was
\f grand."
glad you had such a nice trip,"
Henry,   "though   1   guess   you
.glad to get here.    Well, here's
ptel, where you youngsters will
home for a while."
s is the Empress Hotel," said
"where   I   have   engaged   a
ame bridal suite for you, over-
g the  harbour and  mountains,
s the only lirst class hotel Vic-
has.    You'll he made comfort-
know."
ed out with travel, the little com-
0011 broke up after dinner at the
ss, and retired  for thc   night,
morning, after the usual greet-
ad   been   given   and   breakfast
11 of, Uncle Henry in his ori-
|nanner,   said,   "Well,   folks, 1
that  wc  had  hest  be  looking
|r grounds to build your house
we'll just phone down to the
Garage  and  have  them   send
one  of their swell  machines."
hey  seated  themselves in  one
White" Gasoline cars a half
'ater   and   went   whizzing   out
treet,  Nellie remarked:  "Well,
isn't this a most exhilarating
'\nd such a beautiful machine,
low smooth it runs.    Do they
ny of them here?"
te  a  number," replied   Henry,
White   Garage  is   one   of   our
rogrcsisve firms, and since they
need    selling    their    gasoline
re they have sold quite a few
11, as, in my opinion, they have
t machine on thc market, one
have found by experience: gets
st out of order, and a prettier,
;isily running car I don't know
is without question  thc  most
r car on the market, and being
11 30-, 40- and 60-horse-power,
te that the manufacturers  can
supply  the  demand  for.    As
11  readily see,  it is noiseless,
s  and  smokeless, and  its  ex*
implicity permits even  a  no-
run it.   Then it is so very light
and will run from 20 to 28
11 one gallon of gasoline, whicii
pears to my pocketbook.    It's
did hill climber, too, even on
ar, and it has one thing I like,
.n't have to be tinkering with
he time, for like my Howard
it's   made  right  in   the   first
1 want you to meet Mr. J. S.
.ve, the manager, when we get
or they have the largest  and
uipped garage in the city, that
ssible at all times, with  good
)r   rent  or  sale  and  when   it
fto auto sundries or to do your
[ig you  can't ask for  a  thing
ey do not know how to do—
it right.   That's the best part
It was    certainly   a big motor
hey had  there," said  Charlie,
think I ever saw a liner one."
know    it,"    replied    the old
man. "They make a splendid truck
in a half, one and a half, three and
five tons' capacity and you can realize
how good it is when I tell you that
in a recent competitive test, they
won, competing against 16 other
makes, and the next clay, sold seven
trucks.   That's going some."
"If you are fond of conundrums,
Nellie," said Uncle, as they drove
along, "here is one Mr. Blakemore
was telling me the other day, and he
says The Week will give $20 in currency to the person who sends in
the most artistic correct answer by
Thursday,  September  14th.
"Well, what is it?" laughingly inquired Nellie. "You have me interested."
"Here it is," replied, Henry, pulling out a sheet oi paper:
"A single f am, a twin I am never;
A triplet I am, though my parts you
can sever;
Search   well   for  me  here,  but  bear
this in mind,
The more you discover, the less you
will find."
"Gee!    That's  a  good  one,"   said
Charlie, as   he   studied   the   puzzle.
"What's the answer?"
"The answer," replied Henry, "Mr.
Blakemore tells me, IS PRINTED
IN THE FOUR LINES, but you
study it out for a while, or I'll tell
you exactly what it is before you go
home and see if you can catch it.
Watch for it for I am liable to spring-
it on you any old time."
In answer to a question —as
to where they wanted to go,
Uncle Henry replied, "Just drive
out around the city, Billie. We want
to look at a bit of Mother Earth. It's
the basis of home, Charlie." It was
the first time the young couple had
seen such a beautiful harbor with
mountains for a background, and the
trip was made all the more enjoyable
hy Uncle Henry pointing out the various places of interest en route.
After driving around for a while
Uncle Harry exclaimed: "What!
Think after looking at the numerous
places that double corner on Oliver
street, Shoal Bay Park, in the Oak
Bay district, would be the most desirable to live on? All right. That
was a pretty place, wasn't it? Facing
Shoal Bay beach—one of the prettiest
beaches around Victoria, with Oliver
street running from Oak Bay to the
sea, I liked the appearance of it very
much, and as the drains and water
pipes are being laid now, electricity
already there, and an up-to-date sewage system' to be laid shortlv, it
means your home can have every
modern improvement. I see that the
cement sidewalks and boulevards
have already been petitioned for, and
with the Oak Bay car service to
shortly be extended along Central
avenue, which runs through Shoal
Bay Park, it means your home will
rapidly increase in value in the near
future. It's a good investment, for
the soil is richly fertile and for the
price asked is a bargain. Tf you want
to see about terms, 1 see by the sign
we must go hack and sec Monk &
Monteith, 639 Fort street, who run
one of the leading real estate offices
here and who are always looking for
new settlers. They are a wide-awake,
up-to-date and thoroughly responsible
firm. 1 bought a ranch of them some
time ago that will prove to be one of
thc best investments 1 ever made. I
have known the firm for some years
and they have been renting my houses
and placing loans for me ever since
they started here, and 1 have always
found them honest and upright in all
their dealings and fair to both the
borrower and lender."
"Poultry, fruit and bees make a
nice combination for a small farmer,"
remarked uncle, "whicii reminds me
of another good conundrum, Nellie,
Mr. Monk handed me the other nay.
Why is a beehive like a bad potato?"
" 'Give it up,' laughed Nellie.
" 'I haven't been able to think of
anything but those pretty Calgary
girls I saw at Calgary as we came
through,'   said  Charlie.
"'Nice thing for a young married
man to say," laughed uncle, 'but you
get busy with some brain food and
think it over. Or, maybe, I'll tell you
after while.    You remind me."
"Now," said Uncle, "we have settled the real estate question, I want
you to have a good, big modern
house, and T don't care a rap if it
breaks the bank, so we'll go up and
meet Mr. H. T. Whitehead, manager
for E. Stanley Mitton, our new linn
of architects, with offices in the
Board of Trade Building. Even with
money we've got to have a firm who
thoroughly understands the art of
drafting, building, etc. He is one of
the best structural engineer and
architect's in Victoria and Vancouver
and has put up some mighty fine
buildings. He is considered one of
the finest architects in this part of
the province and his services are constantly in demand. I have watched
his work with interest, for he gives
his clients reliable estimates as to
what a building or home would cost,
thereby insuring his clients against
loss; in fact, he superintends a
building just as though he were building it for himself. He prepared the
plans and superintended the erection
of the beautiful home of H. G. S.
Heisterman at Belmont, and Mrs.
Heisterman on St. Charles street,
and prettier homes you never saw
anywhere. Many of the buildings
and private residences on Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, are the
result of his work, besides which he
has designed homes for prominent
people in Calgary, Nanaimo, Nelson,
Kamloops; in fact, all over British
Columbia, and, honestly, more work
than I could tell you about in an
hour. I tell you, Nellie, you'll find
Mr. Whitehead all right. Well,
here we are."
After meeting Mr. Whitehead and
looking over the numerous plans,
they decided on a house of the bungalow style, Nellie adding the usual
request for lots of closet room, and
gave him the contract for the work.
"There is one thing I like about
our    architect's    plans,"    remarked
The reading of
this story is worth
$20.00 to you
Uncle, as they left, "and that is
Mr. Whitehead always gives special
attention to the plumbing, giving
special directions for all clean-outs
and sanitary safeguards. To my
mind, tliat is one of the most important features of a modern home."
"Mr. Whitehead often gets off a
good one," said uncle, as they went
down stairs, "and he was telling me
the other day about an Irishman who
had bought out a livery stable and
had a sign painted representing himself astride a jackass, which he placed
over the entrance of thc stable.
"One day he noticed his friend Pat
looking at the sign, and he asked him
how he liked his picture.
"Pat, after a moment's thought, replied: 'That's a fine picture of you
Casey, but who is that on your
back?"
"Now, for the worst part of housebuilding, and that is to lind a good
contractor," said Charlie, as having
bid Mr. Whitehead good-day, they
once more entered their auto anil
went driving out Yates street.
"Pshaw!" said Uncle Henry, "that
is, perhaps, the easiest part ot the
whole deal. We'll just run over and
see The Thomas Catterall Co., Ltd.,
921 Fort street, our best contractors
and builders. They've done a lot of
work for me, and 1 don't think there
is a more conscientious firm of contractors in the city. They put up
the handsome residence for E. E.
Blackwood, corner Rockland and Linden avenues, 'Burleith,' the former residence of Hon. James Dunsmuir on
Craigflower Road, the former residence of A. E. Todd on St. Charles
street, and the handsome residence of
Hon. James Dunsmuir at Hatley
Park. Do you remember my calling
your attention to the present Victoria
High school and the beautiful home
of John Arbuthnot on Rockland
avenue, this morning? Well, they
built those also. They arc now just
completing a beautiful store building
for Gault Bros., 731-733-735 Yates
street, to bc occupied by 'Gordon's
Limited,' when completed, and honestly, they havc done more work than
I can think of. They have erected
a lot of houses in Victoria, and what?
Able to take care of our work? Well,
I should say so! That will be an
easy matter for them to put our
house up, even if it is to bc a beauty.
But you will always lind 'I'he Catterall Co. gives just the same careful attention to small work, and their
facilities lor taking charge of big
contracts are of the best."
"Wasn't   he  really jolly!"  laughed
Nellie, as having met Mr. Catterall
and arranged with him, they once
more started on their way.
"Nice fellow, Mr. Catterall is," answered uncle, "and during the twenty-
seven years he has lived here he has
made many friends. 1 like him very
much."
"Mr. Catterall was telling me a funny story the other day," said uncle,
as they left, "about an Irish contractor, living at Chicago, who, being pretty well fixed, sent on to Ireland for his brother Patrick. When
Pat arrived in New York his brother
was there to meet him, and after fixing Pat up with new clothes, a good
dinner and attending a vaudeville performance, they boarded the night
train for Chicago. Thinking it would
be easier on Pat if he gave him the
lower berth of the Pullman, Mike
took the upper one, and after getting
under the covers he thought of Pat,
and leaning over the edge of the
berth, asked:
" 'And how are yez makin' out
down there, Pat?'
" 'Oi'm makin' out al' right,' answered Pat, 'only Oi'm havin' one
heel of a time thryin' to git into this
hammock.'"
"Let me think," exclaimed Uncle
Henry, as they waited for Billie to
crank up. "The next thing to look
after is lumber to put into the hutise
How would you like to go through
a really big lumber mill and see how
our big sticks are cut up, Nellie?"
"That would be just splendid!" exclaimed she, for 1 have never been
through a big mill."
"All right! We'll do it and order
our lumber at the same time. Get
some speed on this buzz wagon, Billie, and take us out to the Canadian
Puget Sound Lumber Company, Ltd.,
2120 Store street.
Arriving at the offices of the null,
Uncle introduced the young fo'.ks to
Mr. Delbert Hankin, manager of the
lumber department, who personally
conducted them through the immense
plant. It was interesting to \vat*.-.h
both Nellie's and Charlie's look of
amazement as they saw how easily
the big log turners deftly placed the
immense logs in proper position on
the carirage running before tite big
endless saws.
"What an immense amount of
lumber they cut here," remarked
Charlie, shouting into Uncle's ear, as
the dogs took hold of the four-footer
and shunted it over for another run
into the screaming saws.
"You know it," replied Henry, "but
wait till we get out of here. This
machinery is too noisy to talk eas-
ily."
"What a big mill this is!" exclaimed Nellie,
"I should say it is," assented Henry, "it's the largest and most up-to-
date mill on Vancouver Island, operating besides their immense lumber
mill, a modern sash and door factory
where you can get everything needed
for a home, for they take pleasure
and pride in showing visitors through,
as they did us, and explaining how
trees 1000 years old are logs one day
and lumber delivered to you the next,
till kiln dried, manufactured and sandpapered, ready for use, all in twenty-
four hours.
"Then they have the largest and
best box factory in British Columbia,
making all kinds of boxes and berry
crates, which they ship all over the
country and world."
"It must take quite some timber,
to keep a big mill like this going all
tlie  time,"  said  Charlie.
"They have a very large timber
acreage here on Vancouver Island,"
said Uncle, "that amounts to about
55.000 acres, or about four billion feet
of timber."
"You mean four millions, don't
you?" quizzed Charlie.
"Xo! I don't," hc replied, "1 mean
four billion and if you're any good
at mathematics, you know it takes
just one thousand million to make a
billion and they have four billions.
Get  that?"
"But Uncle," interrupted Nellie, "is
all this lumber used locally?"
"Well, hardly," he replied. "They
do an immense export business, shipping it in cargoes of a million feet
and oftimes more, to Australia, south
Africa, China and Europe. You see
it is not only the largest but the oldest mill here, starting up in 1858, or
when I was but a boy Jeven years
old. Then they havc very accurate
'estimate men': men that can give you
the correct cost of a building the size
of a  cottage  up to a modem   build
ing, and stick by their figures."
"Mr. Hankin was telling me the
other day," laughed Uncle, as they
rode up Government street, "about a
well known local divine who was
preaching one Sunday morning on
the subject of 'The Great and Small
Things of Creation.' To illustrate
his thought that nothing was either
too vast or too tiny to be of interest
to God, he proceeded in these words:
" 'The Creator of this immense universe created also the most infinitesimal atom of it. The Architect of
these vast mountains fashioned also
the tiniest thread of gold running
through them. The God who made
me made a daisy.'"
"Seeing we have clinched the lumber contract," said Henry, "the next
thing to look after is the electricity
for the house, and we want a good
linn to do it."
"Billie, take us over to Hawkins
& Hayward, 728 Yates street. 1 hey
do some line electrical work," said
he.
"You can readily see," continued
Henry, after introducing the young
folks to Mr. Hayward and Mr. Hawkins, "that there's nothing in the electrical line you can't get here. Are
they busy now? Well, I guess ves!
They're always busy."
"They put in the beautiful electrical
fixtures and wiring for the H. B.
Hammond Shoe Co., in the Pemberton Block, the re-wiring of the Parliament Buildings, wiring and equipment for all the recent city schools,
and one of the best things electrical
I ever saw, was their beautiful electrical decoration of the Parliament
Buildings at the time Premier Sir
Wilfrid Laurier visited here. Many
of the best private homes of the city
owe their lighting effects to Hawkins
& Hayward, for they only do first
class * work.
"There is nothing in the electrical
line they don't do, from wiring a
room, according to the underwriters'
rules, up to installing a complete electrical plant, and when they do our
wiring 1 know it'll be done right."
"Mr. Hayward was telling me the
other day," laughed Uncle, "about a
Reverend Moses Jackson, who was
holding services in a small country
church, and at the conclusion loaned
his hat to a member, as was the custom, to pass around for contributions.
The brother canvassed the congregation thoroughly, but the hat was returned empty to its owner.
"'Bre'r' Jackson looked into it,
turned it upside down and shook it
vigorously, but not a copper was
forthcoming,    lie sniffed audibly:
"'Bredern,' he said, 'I sho' is glad
dat 1  got ma hat back again.'"
"The next thing to look after," said
Uncle, as they left Mr. Hayward, "is
cement for your foundations and as
we naturally want the best article
that money can buy, we'll run over to
tiie office of Evans, Coleman and
Evans, Ltd., (113 Pandora street, and
order it."
After meeting Mr. II. J. Crowe, the
manager, and they had ordered their
cement, lime and plaster for the
house. Uncle Henry also helped them
to select two mantle fireplaces from
their many styles on display.
"How about brick for lhe two
chimneys?"   inquired   Nellie.
"Of course!" replied Uncle, "I almost forgot them, didn't I? There is
no one in Victoria carries a better
line of brick, than Evans, Coleman
and Evans, for lhey carry bricks of
all kinds,—pressed, enamelled, and
lin—for all purposes. In fact, you
cannot name an article of heavy material that enters into thc building
of a house, they don't carry."
"Their name seems mighty familiar," remarked Charlie. "Seems to
me, that was the name 1 saw on so
many wharfs, as we came over on the
boat yesterday—'Evans, Coleman and
Evans'."
"Your eyesight is still pretty good,
son," remarked Henry, dryly. "They
have only been here since Februar-.
but if there is any part of the waterfront they don't occupy, it's because
they cannot use it in their business.
You see, he continued, they are the
largest firm of their kind on the Pacific Coast, for besides handling
building materials of all kinds, they
are the largest dealers in structural
steel we have."
"I guess we've got to buy our wall
papers and paints now." said Uncle
Henry, "and as we want tlie best
article money can buy, we'll just go
down and  see The  Melrose  Co., 618
(Continued on Next Page) 12
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
A Munificent Gift
Continued from Preceeding Page
II i
ii
Fort street. They are the best
handlers of paints and wall paper in
Victoria."
After introducing the voting folks
to Mr. C. B. Deaville, the manager,
they spent a few moments admiring
the beautiful art papering displayed.
"While we are here we will order
what we want in the line of wall papers," remarked Uncle Henry. "You'll
lind here thc largest stock and most
exclusive designs in the city to select from. Mr. Deaville will help you
in making your selection, Nellie."
"There's a whole lot of satisfaction," remarked uncle to Charlie, "in
having a competent decorator to do
the work for you. The Melrose Co.
do the work for the very best families in Victoria, employing nothing
but the very best skilled labor, and
when it comes to a thorough understanding and appreciation of the harmonious combination of colours and
the grouping of effects, I don't know
their equal. Then again, they do a
very large business in plate and sheet
glass and some of their designs in
leaded art glass are the most beautiful and original to be found in the
city, and in selecting your paints,
Charlie, get 'Pyramid Paints' for they
wear  like  iron."
"That was certainly an immense
stock they had there," remarked Nellie, as they left.
"Indeed it was," assented Henry.
"They have to keep an immense
stock, for they do an enormous business, not only in selling wall papers
and paints, but in decorative work of
all kinds."
"Now that we have the house
planned for and the painting contract given," said Charlie, upon leaving Melrose's, "I guess the next
thing will be to look after the plumbing.    Where shall we go?"
"The leading plumbers of Victoria
are Hayward & Dodds, 927 Fort
street, and they are cracker-jacks,
too," said uncle. "We'll just run
down there for a moment, and I'll
introduce you. You'll find them very
agreeable gentlemen."
"I don't pretend to know everything," continued Uncle, after introducing thc young folks to Mr. T.
Hayward and Mr. A. Dods, "but
when I want plumbing and heating
done I want a firm which bears a
wide reputation for honest work,
who charges for the exact articles
and time consumed, and doing business along these lines is what keeps
Hayward & Dods a pretty busy firm.
"They are the men we want if we
can get them, but their time is always contracted so far ahead we will
have to see. They put in the plumbing and beating for the Mt. Edward
Apartments on Vancouver street, the
October .Mansions on Fort street, the
home of Duncan Ross, on Rockland
avenue, and Richard Hall, and H.
Bowen, and better work you never
saw. They also did the plumbing
and heating for the home of Hon.
Mr. Justice Galliher on St. Charles
street, and are now working on the
B. C. Telephone building and the
Quadra Apartments, and from experience I know that when they finish
our plumbing we will have a warm
bouse and fixtures that will be ornamental to any home.
"They are the sole agents for the
Peck-Williamson Under-feed Furnace,
one of the best known for the saving
of fuel and the amount of heat they
give. Then they make a specialty of
porcelain-lined bath tubs and up-to-
date lavatories, with sanitary plumbing, and their prices are so reasonable
that nobody ever kicks about their
treatment. They do work all over
Vancouver Island besides having a
branch at Nanaimo for they are a
mighty nice firm to deal with.
"Mr. Hayward was telling me a
funny story other day," laughed Uncle, "about an old farmer in Vermont, who was driving an insurance
agent from town to one of his neighbors. As they passed the old farmer's place, just lately purchased, noticing the unusually rocky condition
of the ground, the agent asked him
what he was going to raise. The old
man replied 'lobsters.'
"'Have you any statistics on them?'
the  agent  inquired.
"'Figures, you mean? Wall, no, I
hain't!' the old man answered, 'but
thc fellow who advised  me to grow
'em, said they lived on almost nothin'| it is durable, absolutely proof against
and when they were six months old i leakage, and lasts for lifetime, therc-
and  able  to  climb trees,  they were j by eliminating any repair expense."
worth    four-bits   apiece,   and   that's      "But is sewer pipeing all they make
jood enuf for me,'" he added compla-  here?" inquired Nellie.
no    means!"    replied
"Selecting furniture and pretty draperies, replied that wise young person promptly.
"That's right!" laughingly replied
the old man, "and here is where we
get wonderfully busy."
"There is a new furniture store
here at 734-736 Pandora street," said
he, where you can get fitted out nicely and at a reasonable price. Let's
run down there and see them."
On entering the store Nellie was
soon busy selecting some solid oak
furniture for her dining and living
room, a handsome brass finished bed
and bedroom suite, a 'Restmore'
mattress, a chiffonier, a china closet,
couch and a tufted leather chair for
'hubby.'
"Now comes the question of floor
covering," remarked Uncle Henry.
What would you like, Nellie, rugs or
carpets?"
"Why uncle," replied Nellie, "I
think pretty rugs for the parlor, an
axminster rug for the dining-room,
and matting for the bedroom would
be nice, don't you?"
"Fine ideas!" replied Henry. "We'll
also get some bookcases and some
Gault's linoleum for the kitchen, for
I know from experience it wears like
iron."
"Wasn't Mr. Butler courteous,
though," remarked Charlie on leaving.
"You're right, he is," replied Henry, "for courtesy always pays in this
old world. He has a nice stock,
though he is awfully crowded for
room, but he lias 'good furniture for
less' down to a science and he is doing a big business."
"Uncle Henry," said Nellie, as they
left Butler's, "there are so many pretty views here whicii would make
pretty postcards, that I would like to
have a camera. What do you know
about it?"
"Easiest thing in the world to settle
tllat question," said he. "We'll run
down to Shaw' Bros., 1004 Government street, and you can pick out a
fine one.   They carry a fine stock."
Meeting Mr. Shaw, it took only a
moment for Nellie to select one of
their handsome "Carbine" cameras,
with anistagmat lenses and a full supply of "Wellington" photo films and
developing paper, "for," said she, "I
think the"best part of amateur photography is in the developing, and I
am going to learn how."
At Uncle's suggestion Charlie selected an "Expo-Watch" camera, capable of taking twenty-five film pictures on one roll. "They are about
the handiest thing I ever saw," said
he.
"That was certainly some stock,"
said Charlie, as they left.
"I should say it was," answered
Henry. "It is really the largest stock
of photo supplies in the Province.
Then they do splendid developing for
amateurs, giving a twenty-four hour
service, but the best part of buying
a camera and things to go with it
from Shaw Bros., is the fact, that
they want you to feel at perfect liberty to always come to them for practical experience and advice. That's
the way I like to see a firm do business."
"Your asking so many questions
about your camera, Nellie," said
uncle, as they left, "reminds me of
an old lady Mr. Shaw recently told
me of, who while a passenger on a
train once, asked the conductor:—
" 'What are the passengers looking
out of the window for?'
" 'We ran over a cat, madam,' said
the conductor.
"'Was the cat on the track?' she
next asked.
" 'Oh, no, ma'am,' assured the conductor. 'The locomotive chased her
up  an  alley.' "
"The next thing to look after," remarked Uncle, as they left Shaw
Bros., "is to attend to thc proper
nipeing for the sewage, so buzz along
Billie and take us over to the B. C.
Pottery Co., Ltd., corner Broad and
Pandora streets."
"I may be old fashioned," remarked Uncle, after introducing Charlie
and Nellie to their general manager
and secretary, "but I believe in having every sanitary arrangement possible in a home, and to my mind, vitrified salt glazed sewer pipeing connected with the plumbing is the best
sanitary precaution one can make, for
cently.
"Say, that's a good one,' laughed
Charlie, "but wait till I see Mr. Hayward again. I have one about an
old lady at San Diego taking a 200-
pound sea bass for a sardine. .
think he'll like it."
"What is the most interesting part
of going to housekeeping Nellie?" inquired uncle, as they left, after arranging for plumbing.
'By no means!" replied Henry.
They make everything in the line of
sanitary pipe fittings, all sizes of agricultural drain pipes, chimney pines
and flue lining, chimney tops, fire
brick and lire clay, and while we are
here, we nifght as well order what we
will need in chimney tops, flue lining
and lire brick for your two fireplaces,
and we'll tell Mr. Mitton to mention
them in his specifications."
"Is there much demand for this
material?" inquired Charlie, as they
rode away, after bidding B. C. P. Co.
good-day.
"When I tell you, that at their factory, over on the E. & N. tracks, they
make over a mile and a half of pipeing every working day," repiled Henry*. "I guess you can get an idea of
how much pottery they sell in a
year's time.
"They ship all over the British province, and as far east as Edmonton.
In fact, their pottery is used wherever the best is demanded."
"Do you know, Uncle Henry," said
Charlie, "I caught one peach of a
cold the other night on the Pullman, coming from Calgary, and I can
feel it all through nie. What's good
for it?"
"We'll just run up to the Victoria
Turkish Baths, 821 Fort street, and
show you how to get rid of that cold
in a hurry," replied Henry. "They
have a mighty nice establishment."
Arriving at the Turkish Baths and
meeting Mr. A. E. Parnwell, the
manager, they were courteously
shown through the establishment.
"My, what an intense heat that
room had," remarked Nellie, as the
door of the hot room closed behind
them, where they had lingered for
just the fraction of a minute.
"You know it's hot," replied Henry. "They keep the temperature
there around a 160 degrees which is
hot enough for anybody. I've had a
bath here many a time and know
from experience just how it feels. So
go ahead, Mr. Parnwell, ' give this
young man a full course and we'll
call for him in about an hour."
"Now," said Uncle Henry, "before
we go any further, Nellie, I am going to buy a few things for yourself,
so come with me and I'll take you
into Finch & Finch, 719 Yates street,
who are without doubt the leading
establishment of the city.
Upon entering the store the manager personally showed them around
among the different departments that
are of such interest to ladies of taste
and breeding. Nellie was almost
dumbfounded by the many beautiful
lines she found there that was so suggestive of Regent street, London, and
the Louvre, Paris, but finally bought
a beautiful tailored suit, upon whicii
there were but slight alterations to
be made; a swell opera cloak, two
of their beautiful new silk underskirts,
a half dozen fancy waists, several
pairs of Perrin's kid gloves, two of
their beautiful silk kimonas, a motor
coat, a waterproof, some Kayser silk-
hosiery and many dainty little things
in lingerie that appeal so irresistibly
to every woman. While doing her
shopping Nellie was heard to exclaim:
" 'Haven't Finch & Finch a beautiful store for a city the size of Victoria!"
"You're right they have," replied
uncle, "and that is why I brought you
in here. They always keep so well
posted on the latest style and their
fitting rooms are so tastily and comfortably arranged. They have the exclusive trade of the city."
"Gracious me! Look at my new
husband!" exclaimed Nellie, as they
entered the Turkish Baths again. "I
never knew my hubby was so good
looking," she exclaimed, her eyes
sparkling with admiration of Charlie's
heightened colour and clean expression from his medicated bath.
"That bath was a peach," said
Charlie, as he climbed into the auto,
"and I feel as clean as a kitten."
"How's the cold?" inquired Henry.
"Feels better already," replied he.
"And it ought to, for he certainly
gave he a bakin' for fair."
"Turkish baths are certainly an infallible cure for colds or for eliminating poisons from the system," said
Henry. "But then the sweating process lie gave you is merely nature's
method of flushing and cleansing the
pores of the poison and effete matter
which gathers there and interferes
with the skin's function of elimination. I like those baths and I also
like Mr. Parnwell's Medicated Steam
Baths, whicii he gives. Then the
massage they give you for muscle
trouble and for sore joints—well, to
my mind there is nothing like it, and
witb the accommodations they have
there, you're only obliged to stay
there for about an hour, to avoid
taking cold. They keep open day
and night and are the best weekly
baths one can take. They have a
splendid patronage."
"ff there is one thing I am fond
of more than another," said Henry,
"it is a glass of good wine with my
dinner, so if you like, we'll run down
and I'll show you a wholesale liquor
house that would be an honor to any
city."
Entering the beautiful offices of
Pither & Leiser, after Uncle Hefiry
had introduced thc young folks, they
were shown through the immense establishment, which more than interested them by the magnitude of the
stock  carried.
What an immense stock they carry!" exclaimed Nellie, as they stood
watching the big trucks go whirling
oast, loaded with wines and liquors.
"Is there anything in the liquor line
they don't carry?"
"I don't think you can name it,
little girl," replied Henry, "for this
is not the oldest but the largest
wholesale liquor house in Canada, being founded in 1858, and, it is a matter of pride with them, that they have
built their business and reputation on
three excellent mottos-—'purity,' 'quality' and values'."
"But what liquors were you thinking of ordering for the house?" inquired practical Charlie.
"Well," answered Henry, "I was
thinking that first of all, we would
order a case of 'Kilmarnock Extra
Special' whiskey, for I don't wish
you young folks to keep house without the very best whiskey on hand
in case of sickness. Then next comes
not only mine, but the universal favorite—G. H. Mumm's Extra Dry
Champagne, that is acknowledged the
peer of all champagnes—we want a
couple of cases of that; and for a
mineral water, you cannot order anything purer than 'White Rock.' Then
I am also very fond of 'G. Preller &
Co.'s Sauterne' and 'Deinhard & Co.'s'
Rhine wine—we will need about three
cases of each. I think that will be
enough for a while unless you children brought a Toronto thirst with
you."
"That was certainly a wonderful
liquor house," said Charlie, as they
rode away," but is it all sold locally?"
"By no means," answered Uncle.
"As I said before, Pither & Leiser
are the largest wholesale liquor house
in entire Canada, and besides their
immense business throughout British
Columbia, they export immense
quantities to Alberta, the Yukon,
Montana, Washington, Oregon and
even as far south as San Francisco.
They do an enormous business."
"Well," said uncle, "after all this
running around we have forgotten to
buy any hardware."
"I'm glad you folks woke up,"
laughed Charlie, "for I was wondering how Nellie was* going to cook."
"Easy to settle that point," replied
uncle. "We'll drive around to the
Drake Hardware Co., 1418 Douglas
street, our best,, dealers in hardware
and supplies, and you can pick out
anything you want. They carry a
tremendous stock."
Nellie was soon deeply interested
in her purchases, buying a -Gurney-
Oxford range, which are the greatest
coal savers on earth; some imported
"Elite" enamel graniteware, cooking
utensils, some fine "Westholme "I. X.
L." table cutlery, a "Pastime" washing machine, a "Fairy Oak" coal
heater, and a complete array of accessories.
At uncle's suggestion they also
purchased a brass fender, a brass coal
hod and a pair of andirons for the
fireplace, "for they help make a room
look so comfy," he explained.
"It's a pleasure to buy at a store
like that!" exclaimed Nellie, as they
drove away again, "they were so
courteous."
"They're noted for that," senten-
tiously remarked uncle. "Their stock-
is always new, their prices are right,
and what you buy of the Drake Hardware Company you can depend upon,
for it's a store where quality predominates."
"Speaking of eating," said uncle,
Mr. Drake told me the other day, a
funny incident about .1 well known
business man here, who had just finished eating a sumptuous dinner. As
he turned to leave the waiter touched
his arm and in an insinuating manner
said: "Haven't you—er—forgotten
something, sir?"
"Why, yes, so I have," replied the
gentleman. "Thank you for the reminder."
Lifting a olate he pocketed the coin
which had lain under it, and stalked
out past the crestfallen waiter.
"Served him right," said Charlie.
"Uncle Henry," said Nellie, as they
left Mr. Drake, "what about that
watch vou promised me when I got
married?"
"Well, tjirlie," be retorted, "I believe I did promise vou something
like that. I see by The Week that
Redfern & Sons. 1009 Government
street, sell very fine watches, so we'll
run over there. Thev have a beautiful store witb a stock that will surprise you, and T know you can get
just what you like."
"T am the proudest jrirl in Victoria, owning a fine watch like that,"
she exclaimed, after being waited up*
on. 'Thank you, Uncle Henry, so
much'."
"Don't mention it, my dear," he retried. "You found your uncle kept
his word, didn't you? And now T am
going to make you both another present—a chest of solid 'Windsor' silverware that will last you a life
time."
"Oh, isn't that perfectly lovely!"
she exclaimed, as they stood admiring one of the many chests of sterling silver that were on display.
"I never saw such silverware before."
"Having chosen her silver, Nellie
was induced to buy several prettv
souvenir spoons of new design to
send back to her friends in Toronto
and Uncle insisted upon buying bet-
several choice pieces of Canadian cut
p-lass from the well assorted stock
that was on display. She fairly went
info ecstacies over the assortment of
bric-a-brac, jewelry of all kinds, umbrellas and ebony articles  shown.
"Haven't they a wonderful coll
tion  of  diamonds  though?"  she
quired, as they rode away.
"For quality, it is one of the b
stocks to be found in Victoria," s
he, "for Redfern & Sons make t
a   special  feature  of  their  busim
Being   the   oldest   jewelry   firm
Western Canada, having been in
business for 49 years, they comm
an  excellent trade with their  st<
and ideas of what people of ref
ment like to use.    They move r
week,  September  12th, to their 1
location,    1211    and    1213    Doui
street,     Sayward     Building,    wl
they will have the largest and fi
appointed jewelry store in Victt
We'll   go   and   see   their   new   s
when they get settled in it, for t
business   is   run   on   three   splet
business  ideas—'we  keep  what
want,'   'quality,'  and  'good  value!
and  that  will  win  success  for  J
body, anywhere, anytime.    Now I
go have luncheon."
"Mr. Redfern was telling me a f
'mother-in-law' joke the other nij
said uncle, "about a Black Hand
ciety, who wrote a man a letter
nianding that he put one thou
dollars in a barrel on the corne
X and Z streets at nine o'clocl
Friday night, or they would blo\
the beautiful home of his
mother. Instead of the money
man put a note in the barrel: 'I*
ing doing in the money line, bu
proposition you suggest inte
me.' "
"Uncle Henry," said Charlie,
they had luncheon, "I always lil
smoke after dinner.    Where cat
get a good cigar?"
"Just  up  the  street  at  the
and  Navy  Cigar  Store," repliet
"Let's walk up there and I'll
duce  you to  Mr.  Percy Richar
or   'Dudleigh,'   as   he   is   gen<
known  by.    You'll  find  him a
clever gentleman.   I've given up
other brands and now smoke no
but   his   'Marquesas'   cigars.
Havana cigars you never smoket
made  in  all  sizes.    Yes,  thank
Dudleigh, I'll just take a couple
boxes of 'Marquesas,' for I am
ly out of my last box.
"Another thine you will like
this store, Charlie; there isn't a
in the city where you will find
line of smokers' articles and tol
If it's made of tobacco, you'll
here."
Uncle at this point took C
and showed him the immense
room, where thousands of^ the
finest cigars were kept in p
condition.
"Wasn't that a stock for your
exclaimed Charlie, as^ bidding
leigh good-day, they joined Nt
"It has to be," replied Uncb
besides running one of the_ 1
cigar stores of the city, sellin;
wholesale and retail, they are
quarters for all sporting infort
and their patronage is enormc
like to trade there."
"Dudleigh told me a good 01
other  night,"  said   Henry,   "ab
little newsboy who with a eig
in his mouth entered a notion!
here and asked for a match.
"'We only sell matches," sa|
storekeeper.
" 'How much are they?" ask|
future citizen.
" 'Penny a box,' was the ans\|
" 'Gimmie a box,' said the
"He took one match, lit thel
ette, and handed the box bac
the counter, saying "Here, take
put it on de shelf, and when ai
sport  comes  and  asks  for  a
give him one on me."'"
"There is one important th
want to attend to tllis aftei
said uncle, as they joined Nelli
we want a good firm to do it.
"What is it?" queried Nellie
have nie interested."
"If you spring any more stl
on me," laughed Charlie, "I
ing to quit, for this has been
the most strenuous day I ha\
put in."
"Not  a bit of it," replied
"You've overlooked that little
of vours. So come on and yo
look  real  pleasant,  for  I  am
to  have your photos taken.
Buff Cyco photos made by tl'
son studio, 626 Yates street.^
the thing, as I want you chil
always   have   something   to
vou of your first month of 1
life."
Arriving at the studio and r
Air. Gibson, after the usual co
lations had been extended aw
was arranging her hair in tf
dressing room, Uncle continue
ing to Charlie.    "You can sa
you  please,  but  wliet^ it  co
artistic photography, this studi
equal of any in the northwest
at    those    photos!      They
breathe, they're so realistic, at
that nosing natural?   Mr. Gihs
seif is an expert on rc-touchi
that means    a whole    lot,
comes to artistic photography
as you can readily see, they
direct ray of light—a new sy
lighting—so that a beautiful:
is   assured   and   each   nortrait
art   study  in   itself.    Now  y
Nell get busv."
"Now, Nellie," said Henrv, '
started off, "here is where T at'
(Continued on Next Pag THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
13
A Munificent Gift
Continued from Preceeding Page
test your taste and judgment."
Don't you think it's pretty good?"
ghed Charlie.   "Look at whom she
;cted for a husband!"
Did  she  do  it in the  dark?"  in-
red the old man, laughing at Char-
s    tell-tale    colour,   while    Nellie
led with laughter at uncle's inno-
t thrust at the way in which Char-
had proposed to her.   "You're all
it, son, but we want some pretty
:ures  for that  nest of yours  and
11 go down to Joseph Sommer, The
Gallery ,1012 Government street,
get 'em, for they have the finest
in town."
rriving at The Art Gallery Nellie
quite a while in making her se-
ions, for as she aptly remarked,
re   were   more   pretty   pictures
e  than  she had seen in her life
ire,"    but    finally    bought    some
itiful subjects in water colours, a
en or so of hand-coloured photo-
Hires, many little dainty subjects
ature prints, some exclusive etch-
and several clever novelty pic-
that   "were    just   the    cutest
gs she ever saw."
t  Uncle's    suggestion    they also
based some brass craft and sev-
clever subjects in Art Statues and
ery ware, "for they help so much
aking a home look dainty," said
ly! I could have stayed there all
noon," said Nellie, as they rode
r, "they had so many pretty
?s there to look at."
ndeed they have," answered Hen-
and that is why I took vou
They have, without a doubt,
best line in the citv of art sub-
that are absolutely exclusive."
e had a dandy line of moldings,"
rupted  Charlie.
should say yes," replied Henry,
you did a wise act, Nellie, in al-
lg Mr. Sommer to use his own
in mounting your pictures for
for there isn't a man in Victoria
displays b.etter taste in choos-
ippropriate moldings than Mr.
ner does. He does a big busi-
for there is no one in town
carries a finer or more artistic
of moldings, and his stock of
"s materials is complete with
thing."
r. Sommer told me a funny story
ther day," said Henry, "about a
man here, who, said to a Jew-
iend: 'When I was in Paris last
1 I had an opportunity to buy
a Murillo or a Rembrandt. I
took the Rembrandt, and I
I did not make a mistake.'
ell, as far as that goes,' said
'any of them French machines
_tty goocl hill climbers.'"
lildren," said Uncle Henry, as
rode down Government street,
1 going to have your health in-
for in case of illness it would
in mighty handy."
riving at the offices of the
h Protection Society of Canada,
ed, in the Pemberton Block,
introduced the young folks to
G. Taylor, the manager, who
ously explained the objects and
:s of the Society,
other words," said Charlie, as
aylor finished speaking, "as I
tand it, instead of waiting unlet down and out from a spell
;ncss and havc to draw on my
account for goodness knows
jng, all I have to do is to pay
ranee fee of one dollar and ten
> per year, for full and com-
medical attendance, provided I
e sick."
it's    it,    precisely,"    answered
"and   a   deal   like  that  looks
enough for me to join any old
Now if  you  and  Nellie  have
:ertificates and Mr. Taylor has
noney, let's be moving."
iat a fine thing that seems to
emarked Nellie, as they waited
Hie  to    crank    up.    "Sickness
sometimes   necessary,   doesn't
so  bad,  when  you know your
■ill be all paid for you."
lould say not, answered Henry.
especially in a company, where
it physicians in Victoria are on
taff and even free hospital ser-
given you, and by having free
ation with their physicians at
es, you can often prevent sick-
ut in the advent that you don't,
ciety looks after you to your
satisfaction."
we  can't go to housekeep-
itiiout   something  to  eat,"  re-
Charlie.     "Where   do   you
we   can   get  the  best  deal  in
ies and get them fresh?"
just   ride   around   to   Vic-
up-to-date grocery, The West
rocery Co., Ltd., 1002 Govem-
■treet, and I'll introduce you,"
uncle, "and as they run one
busiest stores in the city they
ling goods fast enough to keep
ling fresh on their shelves."
they reached the store there
up-to-dateness about  it that
ed Nellie's attention, and after
ul looked about and contracted
for their goods they decided that
Uncle Henry was right again, for they
found a complete line of imported
delicatessen goods, a fine line of fresh
fruits and vegetables, the Huntley &
Palmer's biscuit, a full line of the famous Crosse & Blackwell's sauces,
pickles, oil, jams and preserves; Mof-
fett's best Hungarian Flour, Voonia
Garden Tea, Swift's Ham and Bacon,
St. Ivel's Potted Meats, and a complete line of liquors, including King
George 4th Scotch Whiskey, Dupont's White Wines and Clarets and
Budweiser Lager Beer, and everything else good to eat, which, Uncle
Henry said, "were better and sold
cheaper than at any store in the city."
"They are such pleasant people to
do business with," remarked Charlie.
"Yes," replied uncle, "they are a
firm whose word is good, and I notice that their customers always stay
by them. They have, to my mind, the
best and most attractive grocery in
the city, it always seems so nice and
clean.    I like to trade here."
"Mr. Lee was telling me," said
Uncle, as they left, "about a little
patron of theirs, who has a great
deal of trouble pronouncing some
of the words she met with. 'Vinegar' had given her the most trouble,
and she was duly grieved to know
that the store was being entertained
by her efforts in this direction.
"She came one day to the store
with the vinegar-jug, to get it filled,
but with no intention of amusing the
people who were gathered there. So
she handed the jug to the clerk with:
" 'Smell the mouth of it and give
me a quart.'"
Leaving Mr. Lee, the old uncle, in
keeping with his generous nature, insisted on taking Nellie and Charlie
into Miss Hadfield's millinery, 749
Fort street, and have Nellie pick out
one of her becoming newest hats.
Nellie was quite a while in making
her selection, as she was rather bewildered by the great display of poke
bonnets, in all the latest shades, close
fitting turbans with clown crowns, in
all designs and the very latest effects
in exclusive millinery and suit hats
she found there.
Nellie found Miss Iiadfield a very
charming lady to deal with.
"Why, in Toronto," she declared,
"they have no such millinery store as
this one. If you don't object, Miss
hadfield, I am going to drop in here
often when I'm lonesome."
Nellie was assured of a welcome at
any time, and leaving her two hats
for  some  extra  trimming, withdrew.
"Well," said Nellie, "I certainly
know where to buy my hats in the
future, and she treated me so pleasantly, too. I like the appearance of
her salesroom so much."
"You're right there," said uncle,
Hadfield is recognized here as Victoria's exclusive milliner, for before
coming here she was head designer
at Regent street's, London's most exclusive millinery and her excellent aptitude for knowing what style of millinery a lady looks best in and her
originality in building exclusive millinery to order is winning for her
many admiring patrons, among the
most exclusive families of the city.
Her opening fall display took place
yesterday, Wednesday the sixth, and
her rooms were crowded with Victoria's elite."
"Miss Hadfield was telling me recently," said Uncle, as they drove on,
"about a little girl three years old
who was sent upstairs and told to sit
on a certain chair that was in the
corner of her room, as a punishment
for something she had done but a
few  minutes  before.
"Soon the silence was broken by
the little one's question: 'Mother,
may I come down now?'
"'No, you sit right where you are.'
"'All right, 'cause I'm sittin' on
your best hat.'"
"Children," said Uncle Henry, as
they rode down Yates street, "what
do you think of having a little farm,
that would not only become a first
rate investment, but a money-making
proposition in case anything should
happen to Charlie's earning capacity?"
"I know what that means," exclaimed Nellie, delightedly. "That
means fresh eggs, fresh milk and tender chicken when you want it. How
I would love a home like that," said
she.
"The reason I spoke," replied Henry, "I know of a real charming little
spot not far from the city, which is
an ideal place of its kind, and which
Pemberton and Son have for sale.
We'll run over there and see them
about it."
Arriving at Pemberand & Son's office, in the new Pemberton Block,
and after introducing thc young folks,
Uncle gave instructions to have papers drawn up, deeding to Nellie the
farm he had in mind, comprising ten
and a half acres near Cordova Bay.
"That's the best work we have done
today," said he, as they entered the
auto and drove out Fort street. "Few
people in the East realize," continued
he, "what splendid opportunities
await them out in this wonderful
British Columbia, aud the place we
just bought, is one of the prettiest
little farms around here. With
seven acres under cultivation, one
hundred assorted fruit trees and everything you can think of in the way
of smal lfruits, and four big chicken
runs, already stocked, it means
revenue from the start. Then it has a
nice eight-room house, with barn and
stable, so you see it is already equipped for work,"
"How near is it to the water, Uncle
Henry?" inquired Nellie. "You know
I love the water."
"It's just about a mile from Cordova Bay," replied he, "where land
is selling for $1,200 per 40-foot water
front lot, and being only a mile from
Royal Oak Station, on the Victoria
& Sidney Railroad, makes it only six
miles from Victoria, and, it also being but a mile from the new Saanich
Electric Railway, it means that your
property will rapidly become valuable
in the near future."
"It was a good buy for eighty-four
hundred dollars, I think, for now you
have something that means real independence to you, for in case something should happen, and you can
never tell, always remember, that
even with hard times, people have to
eat, ancl the man who is in a position
to supply the market with good fruit,
pure milk and fresh eggs and poultry,
always has a shade the best of the
other fellow."
"Nellie," remarked Uncle Henry, as
they left Pemberton & Son, "the next
thing to look after is good flour.
Your Aunt Jennie used to declare
that 'Prairie Pride' flour, made by the
Medicine Hat Milling Co., and
handled here by the Brackman-Ker
Milling Co., was the best she ever
used, and as you will want to know
where to buy hay, grain and feed
for your ranch, we'll just drive over
there and I'll show you a firm that
does the largest hay, grain, cereal,
flour and feed business in British
Columbia."
"Cereals was something I wanted
to ask you about," said Nellie, as
they were being conducted through
the establishment. "Both Charlie
and I are very fond of cereal for
breakfast.    Can we get some here?"
"There's hardly a grocer in the
Province who doesn't handle the products of the 'B.-K. Co.'," replied he.
"They have the largest cereal mill in
B.C., making the well known B. & K.
brand of 'Cream of Oats' and 'Canadian Wheat Flakes' that are widely
noted for their delectable and appetizing flavour. You can _ get them
everywhere, for besides being put up
in packages, they also retail in seven-
pound bags for family use."
"But how about poultry feed and
supplies?" interrupted Charlie. "You
know I am one of those chicken
cranks that believe in feeding hens
plenty of appetizing foods with beef
scraps."
"You cannot name an article that
a hen uses, that the 'B.-K. Co.' do
not keep," replied Henry earnestly.
"Their line is unusually complete,
even to stock foods and remedies.
In fact, there is not a food that
horses, cattle, pigs, or poultry use,
that you cannot get here, and that is
why I brought you around, for it
won't take you long to find out that
the 'B. & K.' trademark, in red, that
goes on every package and bag thev
sell, stands for quality and value,
first, last and all the time. Then
their prices are reasonable also, for
owing their own boats and buying in
car-load lots, they are able to give
you—their customer—advantage of
every possible discount they can
command. I've dealt with them for
years."
"Charlie, clear," exclaimed Nellie,
as they left, "I'm thoroughly ashamed
of that horrid suit you are wearing.
Where can wc get some nice wearing apparel, uncle?"
"Why, we'll go up the street to the
fastest growing clothing store in Victoria," said he. "J. N. Harvey, Ltd.,
614 Yates street, carries the swellest
line of clothing and fashionable haberdashery in town, and you ought
to trade there."
Arriving at Harvey's beautiful
store, "at the sign of the Arrow," and
meeting Mr. Price, the manager,
Charlie humoured Nellie by allowing
her to select two handsome business
suits, a Hawes hat for dressy wear, a
soft felt for everyday and a Tress
cap for windy days, some shirts, including two beautiful wool taffeta
shirts, several suits of Woolscy
underwear, a pair of Dent's gloves,
a half dozen of their latest imported neckwear and a fully supply
of fancy hosiery.
"When anybody tells you this is
the clothing house of the city you
can readily believe them," said Henry. "Besides, you needn't bc afraid
of being over-charged here for goods,
for Mr. Harvey, who bought out the
old established business of B. Williams & Co., is a man of modern
business methods and ideas, and his
best idea is to sell strictly for cash.
By so doing, he is able to buy for
cash, and running in conjunction with
this Victoria store, another large establishment in  Vancouver  their tre
mendous cash purchasing power enables them to sell at a much closer
margin of profit than most stores.
Then their clothing is purchased from
the best makers in the world, and
selling as they do, under their own
personal guarantee, if anything
should go wrong with any garment
purchased, if the customer will call
at the store, they will rectify the
trouble at once. They really carry
the largest and best line of clothing
in town, for their styles are always
the latest and when people in Victoria find where they can get a dollar's worth for a dollar, it don't take
'em long to decide that Harvey's is
the best firm to buy from."
"Seeing the.many different kinds
of trousers on sale in there reminds
me of what Mr. Price told me the
other clay regarding Eli Perkins," remarked Uncle. "He attended a lecture given by Eli, who said:
" 'I was on a train going east one
summer night, when there was a
wreck. The train was derailed, and
all the passengers were more or less
shaken up. Everybody in the sleeping car tried to get out as hurriedly
as possible, and in thc confusion our
clothing got considerably mixed. I
had worn a pair of white duck trousers. I put them on quickly, but I
couldn't leave the car! You see, they
were not men's trousers—'
" 'Here there was general laughter,
and Perkins looked about in a pained
sort of a way and then went on:
'You see, they were boy's trousers.'"
"Uncle," said Charlie, as they left,
"I feel as dry and thirsty as a camel.
Where can we get a glass of good
beer?"
"At the best place in town," replied
the old man. "We'll run out to the
Victoria-Phoenix Brewery and I'll
make you acquainted. We'll take
Nellie with us for I know she would
enjoy it also.
"I don't know what you think,"
continued the old man, after introducing the young folks, "and I don't
pretend to know everything, but I do
know goocl beer when I get it, and
here is where you get the best made
in the province and out of it."
"They make the best known beer
around here, 'Victoria-Phoenix Lager
beer,' and you can judge of its
popularity when I say that they sell
50,000 barrels of Lager beer every
year, for they are one of the largest
breweries in British Columbia."
After they had been conducted
through the plant, and they had
started towards town, Uncle continued, "I guess it was easy for you
to see what makes the Victoria-
Phoenix Lager beer so popular.
Their brewery is noted for its cleanliness and perfect appointments, and
cooling ancl ageing their beers as
they do, in sterilized air, making it,
besides from the very best imported
hops and malt, it is purity itself."
"My! that beer tasted goocl on a
warm day like this," remarked Nellie.
"I thought you would relish it," replied Henry. "That's why we brought
you along. I guess, Nellie, you were
like the little fly," said he.
"How was that?"
"It runs this way:
"Oh me! Oh my! A little fly,
Fell with incautious wing,
Into a glass of Victoria beer.
Then asked, without a sign of fear,
O death! where is thy sting!"
"Say! that is certainly clever," said
Charlie.
"I thought you would like it," replied Henry.
"One moment, Uncle," exclaimed
Charlie, as they left the brewery,
"Nellie and I had a bet coming up on
the boat yesterday from Vancouver
and I lost. Have you a nice candy
store in the city?"
"You know it!" promptly answered uncle. "We'll go clown to the Empress Confectionery, 1325 Government street, the finest candy store in
the citv."
Arriving at the Empress Nellie
easily made her selections from the
tempting varieties displayed before
her, after which they were shown
through the factory ancl were very
much impressed with the different
processes by which the sugared
sweetness was made.
"There is one thing I like about
this candy factory," said uncle. "That
is the absolute cleanliness you will
always find here. Then all their
sugar, flavors, chocolates, ancl other
materials used are the very best that
money can buy, ancl that means a
whole lot."
"What a beautiful ice cream parlor
they have," remarked Nellie, after
leaving, "ancl their line of soft drinks
is far above anything I ever drank
in the east. It was so fresh and
cold."
"The finest in thc city," replied
uncle, "and they do an immense soua
business too."
"The Empress does an immense
candy business," he added, "you can
always get such dainty little lunches
and hot drinks there, and their celebrated Naples Ice Cream and H, h A.
Chocolates are unexcelled. Their
fifty-cent candy is the best made or
sold in Victoria, at that price. Then
they make all their own syrups and
crushed fruits, and their original
ideas in frozen ices and sherbets are
widely known.    I go there often."
"Charlie,"  said  uncle, as  they left
the Empress, "the open season is
now on and as we will want to do
some hunting, we might as well get
our outfit now. So let's wander
around to the Victoria Sporting
Goods Co., in their new location in
the Pemberton Block, and see what
they can do for us."
Charlie's eyes fairly sparkled with
anticipation, as having met Mr. Clarence V. McConnell, the manager, he
handled gun after gun, until finally he
had selected two beauties from their
fine stock.
"That 12-bore Parker will do you
for bird.s" said Uncle, "and that 30-
30 Winchester will do you for game.
Now get your ammunition set aside
and we'll move on."
"I certainly liked the way he has
of treating a customer," remarked
Charlie, as they left. "You have some
pleasant business men here, haven't
you?"
"Indeed we have," said Henry, "I
thought you would like Mr. McCon-
nell's new store, for he has a nice
stock and does a good business. As
you could readily see, it contained a
full line of sporting goods of all descriptions, from their famous "D. and
M.' line of athletic goods down to
their new 'Orb' rubber football, for
which they are the sole agents for
B. C. Teams fitting out for hockey,
football and basketball always go
there to get exactly what they want
and at the right price—that's the best
part of it."
"Mr. McConnell was telling me of a
funny story once," said uncle, as they
rode on, "that happened to an operator here in the local exchange. A
partv called up on the phone one
day and asked what the name was
of a reliable loan office. 'Inquiry,'
who answered the phone, replied,
'A. A. Aaronson.'
" 'Spell it, will you please,' requested the gentleman.
" 'A,' answered the clerk.
" 'Yes.'
" *A.'
" 'Yes.'
" 'A.'
" 'Yes.'
"'A.'
"'Oh! Go to blazes!' replied the
man, as he hung up the receiver in
disgust.   'Think I'm a darn fool!'"
"I had a nice piece of luck," said
Charlie, after leaving Mr. McConnell.
"Broke my glasses coming on the
boat from Vancouver. Do you suppose I shall have to send back there
to have them fixed? They were Toric
lenses, you know!"
"Well, hardly," replied the old
man. "Where do you tliink you are,
anyhow—still in Toronto? We'll just
go and see Mr. A. P. Blyth, 645 Fort
street. He is one of the finest opticians in the province, ancl he will fix
them for you quicker'n old David
Harum could swap horses. He h?s
the very latest ideas in optometry—
in fact, there isn't a combination, of
curvature for the eyes known that he
cannot prescribe for accurately.
"I may be old fashioned," said
Uncle, as, having met Mr. Blyth, and
Charlie bad been waited upon, they
entered the auto and drove on, "but
when it conies to delicate work like
caring for the eyes, I want a man
who has had lots of experience. Mr.
Blyth has had twenty-live years of
valuable experience in the optical
business and his examinations therefore are made with absolute precision. There is no guess work about
it, for I have always contended that
glasses have so much to do with one's
health, comfort ancl happiness, that
you cannot be too careful in selecting your optician. He is one of the
most experienced men we have in
this part of British Columbia, for no
matter what trouble one may have
with eyes, that lenses will correct, Mr.
Blyth can give them quick relief and
lasting satisfatcion. He has also a
modern, well equipped optical factory,
grinding all lenses to order and makes
a specialty of quick, accurate repairs."
"To my mind," mused Uncle, "there
are lots of people in this world who
suffer from headache aud nervous irritability, or, in other words, a loss
of nerve energy, a leakage of nerve
force, who, if they only had their
eyes cared for, would never suffer at
all.   That's a fact."
"Why such a pensive mood?" inquired Henry of Charlie, as they
left  Mr.  Blyth.
"I'm thinking about that confounded 'single' you gave us- this morning,"  answered   he.
"Why! Charlie dear," exclaimed
Nellie, "didn't you catch it? I think
it is " and she whispered a moment to uncle.
"That's right!" he exclaimed, "and
you're a clever little girl to know it.
You go ahead, Charlie, and keep
thinking, but I'll tell it to you before we get home, if you can't make
it.    Honest  Injun!"
"Now winter's coming on, folks,
aud as Nellie will perhaps want to
do some home baking, we'll need coal,
ancl as wc want to get the best article
that money can buy, we'll ride around
to J. Kingham & Co., 1210 Broad
street, and arrange for our coal. You
will find Mr. Kingham a very clever
gentleman. That's where 1 always
bought our coal when your Aunt
Jennie was living.   They do twice the
(Continued on Next Page)
■■ 14
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
A Munificent Gift
Continued from Preceeding Page
business of any other coal firm in the
city, handling the famous New Wellington coal, for which they are the
exclusive Victoria agents. Then their
prices are reasonable, considering the
excellent quality, and as for quantity
—well, I never knew them to be short
on a ton yet."
"My, but that is a busy oflice," said
Nellie as they left. "They must do
a big business."
"You can bank on that, little girl,"
replied Henry, "That New Wellington coal we ordered is the best bituminous coal sold in Victoria, and
its superior quality, in connection
with their proper method of handling
it, has pushed their sales enormously.
Their coal enjoys a good name for
superior quality, for without question,
it is the most economical coal on the
market. You don't have to fight
clinkers, and but a very small percentage of ash, it burns so freely.
They have an immense chunk of it—
one solid piece weighing over 5000
pounds—at the fair which I'll show
you tomorrow. Then they have a
good system of weighing and distribution, and I have never found their
employes anything but courteous and
obliging to customers."
"Mr. Kingham was telling me the
other clay about a boy here in Victoria named Tommy, who had been
invited to dine at a learned professor's house, and his mother was
1 anxious for his    good    behaviour at
,!" ' table.    She  gave  him   elaborate  in
structions. 'Well, Tommy, how did
you get on?' she asked on his return.
'You are quite sure you didn't do
anything impolite?' 'Well, no, ma—
at least nothing to speak of.' The
! mother's curiosity was aroused.   'Ah,
1 , then,   there   was   something   wrong.
Now tell me all ahout it, Tommy.'
" 'Oh, it wasn't much. You see,
I was trying to cut my meat when
it slipped off the plate on the floor.'
"'Oh, my clear boy; whatever did
you do?'
"'I just said sort of carelessly,
"That's always the way with tough
meat," and went on with my dinner.' "
"Well, this has been a pretty
strenuous day," remarked Nellie, as
thev were finishing dinner that evening at the Empress, "but I've had a
most delightful time."
"I thought you might find it a leetle
bit tiresome," laughingly replied
Henry, "so I've sort of reserved a
little treat for you tonight."
"What on earth can it be!" exclaimed the young folks in unison.
"I'm going to take you to the Majestic Theatre tonight," replied the
old man. "They have a fine show, I
heard."
They arrived at the Majestic just
as a film was being finished and during the short intermission Uncle
Henry remarked:
"You can say what you please, but
I like moving pictures like they show
them here. I've been in a good many
similar theatres, but to my mind the
Majestic is the best house of its kind.
Die! you notice how clear that last
1 1,1  ' picture was?    Well, they are all like
that, absolutely flickerless, ancl I certainly admire Mr. Christie's taste in
giving his many patrons pictures that
pleasingly instruct, amuse ancl interest one without the slightest show of
vulgarity and films that are strictly
'first-run. In fact, it's the only Biograph house in Victoria. Now watch
this one, it has a good title."
As they were walking home after
the performance, Nellie remarked:
"Well, I certainly enjoyed that hour.
It was a treat, but is it always crowded like that?"
"You know it," replied Henry, "the
Majestic is a pretty place ancl with
their new up-to-date method of suction ventilation makes it the best
ventilated and coolest theatre during
the summer months in Victoria."
"It must cost something to get up
a film like that biograph 'Enoch Arden'," interrupted Charlie.
"I guess it does," responded the old
man, "but expense is no object when
a goocl film has to be produced. Yes!
Goocl lilms cost money, and it's the
constant search for and the showing
of these goocl films that has made the
Majestic theatre so popular."
Uncle Henry was much surprised
next morning to find the young couple up at a very early hour and looking .much refreshed after a splendid
night's sleep. He was pleased, too, to
find them so enthusiastic regarding
the plans which he laid before them
ancl which greatly concerned their
future. After a hearty breakfast,
during which the day's routine was
discussed ancl planned, the merry trio
stepped lightly into their automobile
and were soon on their way to make
such purchases, as Uncle Henry knew
from long experience, were necessary;
in equipping a home ancl commencing j
1 housekeeping.
As they passed the Standard Steam |
Laundry,  841    View    Street,   Uncle
Henry gave them some pertinent advice, telling them of the necessity of
having their laundry work done by a
firm who thoroughly understood the
business.
"Thc Standard do the finest work
around these parts and launder everything.form a collar to a family wash,"
said he. "Your aunt used to say it
did not pay to do her washing at
home, the laundry did' it so well and
so reasonable."
After meeting Mr. H. R. Savage,
the proprietor, they were shown
through the plant ancl were much interested in the many machines that
were laundering pieces by the thousand.
"My! What a lot of machinery
they have here," remarked Nellie, as
they stood watching one of the new
big Troy mangles iron a nine-quarter
sheet in half the time it takes to tell
about it.
"I should say yes," replied Henry.
"Few people in Victoria realize that
The Standard is the model place you
see it is. They have here all the
very latest machinery, from numbering each piece with their automatic
indelible numbering machine up to
and including the huge conveyor
dryer you see over there by the wall.
Then you can see what a well lighted
room this is to work in and their
employes even have a rest ancl lounging room. No injurious chemicals are
ever used here and they take such
splendid care of linens and ladies'
fine waists, that there is genuine
pleasure in opening a package of
Standard Steam laundry—everything
is there—properly laundried and not
worn out."
"Say, Uncie Henry," said Charlie,
as they rode down View street, "what
about that real estate game you were
going to get me into when I came
out here?"
"That's so!" exclaimed Uncle. "But
you children have kept me so busy
all clay, I forgot about it. I want you
to put on the market and sell a little
tract of land I have near the city
limits and I've already rented you a
couple of dandy offices in the Pemberton Building you were in today."
"Some class to that," replied Charlie. "Are the offices already furnished and the cheque book ready for
me to autograph?"
"Well, hardly!" replied he, "but
while we are here ancl thinking of it,
let's ride around to Baxter & Johnson, 721 Yates street, and you can
pick out your own furniture—it's your
office."
After meeting the firm, and the
usual courtesies had been extended,
they made their selections, which included a sanitary, full-length, quartered oak "Moon" desk, a revolving
chair, several arm chairs for visitors,
an Underwood typewriter ancl cabinet
combined, a "Herring-Hall Marvin,"
Safe, a complete set of the Office
Specialty Co.'s "Y and E" filing systems, a set of Macy Filing Cabinets,
and a full supply of stationery equipment.
"What a stock that was," exclaimed Charlie as they left. "Is there
anything in the line of office supplies they  don't  carry?"
"Not that I know of," replied
Henry. "They are the best office furnishers we have ancl as you could
readily see, they carry a full line,
even to the Burroughs' Adding Machine, as well as a complete line of
loose leaf ledger systems for every
or any line of business. They carry
also, a complete line of stock form
bound books ancl make to order any
special books desired. They are doing a big business for they are well
liked here."
"Mr. Johnson was telling me the
other day," said Uncle, "about a certain young man in our city hall who
never nowadays allows his temper to
get ruffled while at the telephone. A
few clays ago he could not get the
number he desired. 'See here Central, I'll report you,' he  shouted.
" 'You don't know who I am,' was
the  composed  reply.
"'Well, I'll find out, and that
blamed quick, too.'
" T know you, though,' came in
soft, easy tones, 'I've seen your picture. You're at the city hall.' The
young man plunged headlong into the
trap.
" 'You have," he exclaimed, delightedly; 'where, in the newspapers?'
" 'No,' was the merry reply, 'on a
lobster can.'
"Uncle Henry," said Nellie, "I am
going to have my winter gowns made
soon, and before doing so, I want to
find a good corsetiere. Do you happen to know whether or not there
is one to be found in Victoria?"
"Why, yes, we'll call on and I'll introduce you to Miss M. Fleming,
Room 8, 707^4 Yates street, almost
next door," said he. "Your Aunt
Jennie always went to her and was
always well pleased with results, ancl
you can judge for yourself after going there."
"Charlie and I have a little matter
to attend to, so I'll take you up and
introduce you and call for you later."
Nellie, after meeting Miss Fleming,
found it an easy matter to select the
corset which pleased her, for she
found there a very complete line of
the ideal "Spirella Corsets,"—the corset of style, comfort, durability and
health; boned with the ideal, inde-
structable Spirella stay. Nellie's eyes
were quick to note the perfection of
workmanship, quality of material and
flexibility of stays.
She purchased two corsets and insisted upon wearing one of them.
Nellie wore a satisfied smile as she
bade Miss Fleming adieu ancl joined
Uncle ancl Charlie who awaited her
below.
"Nellie," said Uncle, as she entered
the auto, "seeing you are so fond of
music, we'll ride over to the Hicks
& Lovick Piano Co, Ltd, 809 Government street, opposite the post-
office, and I will make you acquainted. They have one of the best stocks
of pianos and instruments in Victoria,
for they are an old and reliable firm.
After meeting Mr. Gideon Hicks,
the manager, ancl the usual courtesies
had been extended, Uncle asked Nellie which she would rather have, a
"Heintzman Co," (made by Ye Okie
Firme), a "Kendler ancl Collins," or
a "Wormworth" piano.
"Well, I have always used a
Heintzman," said Nellie, "but I would
rather you would decide about that."
"Then we will have a Heintzman,"
said Uncle. "In fact it bears
an enviable reputation for 'Ye
Olde Firme," Heintzman & Co, give
tone sweetness, tone quality ancl tone
power to all their pianos, I know it
must be a popular one, for I see quite
a large number of them in the best
homes of the city."
"What a number of pianos they
carry," said Nellie.
"Yes," replied Henry, "they carry
the best stock of musical instruments in Victoria, for they represent
the leading piano manufacturers of
the world."
Nellie fairly went into raptures
over the exquisite music Mr. Gideon
Hicks favored them with from their
genuine Pianola Piano, made by the
Aeolian Co. of New York. "If I
could only play like that," she exclaimed;   "the  technique  is  perfect."
At Uncle's suggestion they also
purchased a Victor Victrola with a
number of Red Seal classical records,
"for, to my mind," he remarked, "it's
the best talking machine made ancl
here you will always find a full and
complete list of records."
"And they had such beautiful pianos
there that seemed s_d reasonable in
priee," remarked Nellie, as they left.
"that is one of the many goocl
features connected with buying at the
Hicks & Lovick Co," replied Henry.
"You can buy there any medium-
priced piano you desire, ancl any time
within a reasonable length of time,
you wish to exchange it for a higher
priced instrument they will allow
you the full value for the one turned
in, in exchange."
"Mr. Lovick was telling me the
other clay," said Uncle, "about a
merchant in Victoria who having a
Swedish clerk, sent him out to do
some  collecting.
"When he .returned from an unsuccessful trip he reported: 'Yim
Greenwood say he will pay when he
sells his hogs. Yim Martin, he will
pay ven he sell him wheat, and Bill
Pack say he vill pay in Yanuary.'
" 'Well,' said the boss, 'that's the
first time Bill even set a date to pay.
Did he really say he would pay in
January?'
" 'Veil, aye tank so,' said the clerk.
'Fie say it bane a dam cold clay ven
you get that money. I tank that
bane in Yanuary.'
"Uncle," said Nellie, "for the past
year I have been very much interested in the cultivation of my voice.
In this I was progressing so well I
am loath to give it up. Do you think
I might lind a good instructor here?"
"Yes, indeed, my dear. I'll take
you up to Mr. Paul Edmonds, our
baritone instructor, whose studio is
at 1122 Government street. You will
like Mr. Edmonds, I know, for there
isn't a man on the coast better qualified to give instruction than  he."
Nellie, upon meeting Mr. Edmonds, soon found that all cause for
regrets had ceased, as she was soon
convinced that Mr. Edmonds possessed all the qualifications of her
former instructor, ancl more, and, after a brief conversation pertaining to
the vital points of voice culture, such
as technique, execution and interpretation, etc, arrangements were made
for Nellie to take two lessons per
week.
"I'm glad that is settled," said Nellie, as they walked down the stairs.
"Mr. Edmonds is a very able instructor," said Uncle, "and his many
years of study with Monsieur Gail-
lard, of the Conservatoire, ancl Mr.
Davey, a pupil of Jean cle Reske, bass
of the Paris Opera, at Paris, and in
London with Mr. Edwin Holland,
Hefr Hugo Heinz ancl Signor Ernesto
Baraldi, enables him to accomplish
excellent results both with beginners
ancl advanced pupils."
"I love to hear Nellie sing while
busy with her household duties," said
Charlie. "Seems as though we had
a 'Melba' in the house."
"Well,   you    give    Nellie    a   few
months to study with Mr. Edmonds,"
replied Henry, "and you'll truly think
you have a Melba at home, for his
concert work at the Queen Hall,
Crystal Palace, and the Gloucester
Festival (1907), together with his
tour with Terrazzini in 1909, proves
that his individual instruction in
French, German and Italian diction is
superior to any you can lind on the
Coast. 1 knew you would like him,
for he numbers his pupils among the
very best families in British Columbia."
"Uncle Henry," said Nellie, as they
left Mr. Edmonds, "I want a facial
massage. Is there anyone in town
who gives it?"
"I should say so," replied Uncle,
"Mrs. C. Kosche, 1105 Douglas street,
is an expert, ancl I know you'll get
satisfaction, so we'll ride up and
leave you for a while, and I guess
Charlie ancl I can find some innocent
amusement while you are in their
skillful  hands."
Entering Mrs. Kosche's store an
hour later, Charlie averred that he
would hardly have recognized Nellie,
if he hadn't left her there, her face
looked so fresh ancl pretty from her
massage.
"She treated me so pleasantly, too,"
remarked Nellie, as they drove on,
"and her prices were so reasonable.
I had a lovely shampoo with her
electric dryer.    It just feels fine.."
"Without question," remarked Uncle, "Mrs. Kosche has the best appointed beauty parlors around here,
ancl I have heard several ladies speak
very highly of her facial massage and
the artistic coiffures she constructs.
Then she manufactures all kinds of
hair goods, weaving a lady's own
combings into switches ancl puffs, and
a lady was telling me the other clay
she never saw such splendid bargains in hair goods. But you see,
Mrs. Kosche is closing out here, having been in business in Victoria some
27 years ancl undoubtedly she. has
some bargains in human hair and
latest imported ornaments that will
never be offered here again."
"Do you know Uncle," said Nellie,
"we've forgotten almost the real necessity of housekeeping?" "What's
that Nellie?" "Why, a sewing machine, of course." "By jove, that's
so," replied Uncle Henry. But hold
on Nellie, there's sewing machines
ancl sewing machines; which kind do
you like best, a Standard or a
Singer?" "Why, the Singer's thc
only machine worth buying, uncle;
do they sell them here in Victoria?"
"Well, I guess yes," replied Henry.
"Just come along with me and I'll introduce you to Mr. D. Fuller, the
Singer's manager here, whose offices
are at 1214 Broad street. I see their
wagon all over town, and I guess
from that they must be sellin' a lot
of 'em." After meeting Mr. Fuller,
who fully explained to Nellie the
workings of their latest 1911 Singer,
that interesting article for the home
was very quickly supplied.
"Rather a pleasant gentleman," remarked Charlie, upon leaving.
"You're right," said uncle. "Mr.
Fuller is well liked around here, and
his genial manner has won him many
friends socially as well as in a business way. He's worked up a nice
business here, for he finds the Singer
is liked by every woman who demands the best."
"There!" exclaimed Nellie, as entering the auto, her hand bag caught
on the door lock and broke its strap.
"It wasn't much, I'll admit, but it
was the only bag 1 had," she continued, disgustedly.
"Never mind, girlie," soothed Uncle. "Don't get mad about it, because it is only a short ride over to
Gauthier's Leather Goods Store, and
we'll get you a beauty."
Entering Gauthier's, 1203 Douglas
street, a few moments later, and
meeting Mr. N. S. Mullett, the manager, Nellie easily made her selections from the beautiful assortment
placed before her.
"This is about as pretty a stock of
leather goods as I have ever seen,"
said Charlie, as he gazed around at
the excellent assortment of hand
grips, trunks and various leather receptacles carried there. "Some beauties here, aren't there?"
"Indeed there is," assented Henry.
"A better line you'll fail to find anywhere. While comparatively a new
firm here, this being a branch store
of their immense wholesale and retail establishment over at Vancouver,
they have a fine stock, at prices that
are an inducement to anyone ancl
watch 'em! They are after the
leather business of this town and are
going to get it!"
"Uncle Henry," said Charlie, as
they rode out Douglas street, "I feel
sort of squeamish today, and think
that a drink of good whiskey would
do me goocl.    Where can we go?"
"Do you know, my son," replied
the old man, "I believe you felt safe
in springing something like that, for
I could go one myself. We'll leave
Nellie for a few minutes at the post
office, and run over to the Cafe, nn
Broad street, and have you meet Mr.
Murphy ancl Mr. Bradley. They keep
the best whiskey in town.
"I don't know what you think about
it," continued Uncle, after introducing Charlie, "and I don't pretend to
know  everything,   but   I  know that
when I do drink I like to get the bl
around here. Yes, thank you, Willi
believe I will take a little more of til
Teachers' Highland Cream, as it cl
tainly hits the right spot. We'll j{
take a bottle of that along with
son, as you never know when|
comes handy."
"Now I feel better," remarlj
Charlie on leaving Mr. Murphy.
"You bet," replied Henry, "a Hi
stimulant  now  and   then  don't  hi
anyone,  and  if you  get real thir|
some time, drop in and try their
ported Wurzburger   beer.     It's
real thing and so is the Merchail
lunch they have there daily."   I l|
to go there  for  it is  patronized I
the best business men in town, vl
daily meet  'down  where  the  Wi|
burger flows.'"
"Well, here we are, and Nellie wj
ing for us."
"Bradely told me of a humor]
incident," said Uncle, "told him bf
New York salesman:
" 'Talking about dry towns,
you ever been in Leavenworth, Kl
sas?' asked the traveler of Mr. BJ
ley. 'No? Well, that's a dry t<|
for you, all right.'
" 'They   can't   sell   liquor   at
there?" asked Mr. Bradley.
" 'Only if you have been bitten!
a  snake,'  said  the  drummer,    "if
have  only  one   snake  in  town,
when I got to it the other day
standing in line for nearly half a J
it was too tired to bite.'"
"Now, what I want to know,"
Charlie, as they rode on, "is who I
we  get  to move  all  the  stuff wi
bought today?"
"Pshaw!" replied Uncle, "thai
perhaps one of the easiest parti
the whole deal. We'll run dowf
the Pacilic Transfer Co, 504-506
street, and arrange with them. 11
do more moving ancl trucking
any other two firms in town, for 1
are the most careful movers we ll
ancl I know from past experil
that our furniture and piano' will
delivered to us in the same cond|
it left the store.
"It's a lot of satisfaction to a
ily desirous of moving to know I
they can confidently leave the e|
deal   to   Mr.   Kent's   company,
moreover,  their charges are morel
satisfactory,  considering the caiT
ness of their work.   They also c|
immense  storage  business,  for .
have really the best warehouse i|
city."
"I am glad wc have that setij
remarked Nellie, as having met)
Kent ancl arranging with him [
entered the auto and rode on,
would hate to think of all ourl
furniture ancl piano being marr<|
careless movers."
"Don't you worry, little girlJ
plied Uncle, "The Pacilic Tra
Company are the best movers!
expert packers we have, for[
make a specialty of moving furil
and pianos, as well as giving the T
care ancl prompt attention to ol
for trunks and other lighter fonl
moving. They have eleven big tl
ing teams, all of them conscieif
workers, and do the transfer buf
of the city."
"Say, Uncle Henry," rem|
Charlie, "I've been using up [
matter for an hour or more try!
figure out that bee puzzle youi
us this morning. Why is a b|
like a bad potato?"
"Why," laughingly replied
man, "a beehive is a beeholdeij
it?    Ancl  a beholder is  a  spel
isn't he?    Ancl isn't a spec-po|
bad potato?"
"That will    cost    you    four I
'Marquesas'  cigars,"  replied  Cl
"for Nellie ancl  I  are too yotf
stand for a joke like that."
"Nevertheless," chuckled till
man, "I consider that a pretty|
joke, ancl it's one on you."
"Good," exclaimed Nellie, chi
her hands.   "Did you get it Ch|
"Get what?" he inquired.
"Why,   that's   the   answer   til
single puzzle Uncle Henry gav|
yesterday morning."
"Well, I'll be darned," he
cd, "ancl to think  I  didn't sec
the first place."
They entered the Empresl
evening too tired and weal
words.
"Well, Nellie, we sure did dc
hustling today, didn't we?" inj
Uncle Henry.
"Indeed, we    did,    Uncle,"
she, "and,  honestly,    I    don'tl
how we are ever going to repal
loving kindness.    It was so gl
you, and we met so many nicl
pie here.    One thing is certain
firmly declared, going up to tl
man and putting her young sofl
around his  neck, "when we g|
house finished, the biggest, be
most comfy room of all is go
be  yours,  for    keeps.      Gt
Uncle,   dear,"   and   kissing  hill
whispered: "How could anyon|
loving you?"
The  old  man  gazed  after
treating figure as she entered
vator, then, throwing back hisl
ders as though he had discovl
new   world,   murmured:   "Anl
twenty years    younger   toniglj
those kids loving me, if I'm
God bless 'em!" THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,   1911
15
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice tliat Tohn J. Harte, of Vic-
| toria, occupation Clerk, intends to apply for
f>ermission to purchase the following described
ands:—Commencing at a post planted about
five miles south of the south end of Pendosy
Lake; thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty   chains;   thence   west   eighty   chains;
[ thence south eighty chains to point of com-
j mencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated   30th   May,   iqii.
JOHN J. HARTE.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent.
I aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Harry Catterall, of Vic-
I toria, occupation Contractor, intends to apply
■ for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a post plant-
led about three miles soutli of the south end
■of Pendosy Lake; thence east eighty chains;
■ thence south eighty chains; thence west
•eighty chains; thence north eighty chains
Ito point of commencement and containing
1640 acres.
Dated 30th May,  1911.
HARRY CATTERALL.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
■aug. \2 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Albert L. Petty, of
IVictoria, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
lo apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
■post planted on the northwest shore of the
■Narrows between Morice and Pendosy Lake,
Ihence north sixty chains, thence east eighty
Lhains, more or less to the west shore of
■Morice Lake; thence following the west shore
If Morice Lake in a southerly and westerly
llirection eighty chains more or less to point
Id commencement, and containing three hundred acres more or less.
Dated 28th May,  iqii.
ALBERT L. PETTY.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
lug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John  P.  Hicks, of Victoria, occupation  , intends to apply
pr permission to purchase the following de-
Jcribed lands:—Commencing at a post plant-
Id one-half mile south of the south end of
Tendosy Lake; thence east eighty chains;
Ihence south eighty chains; thence west
Ighty chains; thence north eighty chains
■j point of commencement and containing
■40 acres.
Dated 29th  May,  1911
JOHN
P. HICKS.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
I TAKE notice that George Ernest Jubb,
t Victoria, occupation Real Estate Agent,
litends to apply for permission to purchase
le following described lands:—Commencing
J: a post planted on the south-east shore of
It 11 a Hay, Morice Lake; thence south eighty
mains; thence west eighty chains; thence
lirth eighty chains more or less lo the south
link of Atna Bay, Morice Lake; thence fol-
Iwing the south bank of Atna Bay in an
Isterly direction eighty chains more or less
I the point of commencement and contain-
Ig 640 acres more or less.
1 Dated 28th  May,   1911.
GEORGE ERNEST JUBB.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
ig. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  3
■TAKE notice that John G.  Brown, of Vic-
pia, occupation Dominion Architect, intends
J apply for permission to purchase the fol-
Ivirig described lands:—Commencing at a
1st planted about one-half miles south of
1; soulh end of  Pendosy Lake;  thence east
l-hty chains; thence north eighty chains;
Jence west sixty cliains more or less to the
1st bank of Pendosy Lake; thence follow-
lj the' cast bank of Pendosy Lake sixty
lains more or less to a point due north
1   point   of   commencement;    thence    south
Irty  chains  more  or   less   to  point   of  com-
fencement and containing 500 acres more or
JiS.
|Dated 29th May,  1911.
JOHN G.  BROWN.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
lg. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
ll'AKE notice that William C. Browne, of
Itoria, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
1 apply for permission to purchase the foiling described lands:—Commencing at a
Jit planted on thc south shore of Atna Bay,
■trice Lake; thence cast eighty chains;
lnce north eighty chains; thence west sixty
■kins more or less to thc east bank of Atna
m; thence following the east bank of Atna
Tr in a southerly and westerly direction
lity chains more or less to point of com-
licement and containing 400 acres more or
fated   28th   Mav,   ign.
WILLIAM C. BROWNE.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent.
■ oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
J AKE notice that Edwin M. Brown, of
Itoria, occupation Real Instate, intends to
Ily for permission to purchase the foiling described lands:—Lommencing at a
It planted on the south-west side of Pen-
ly Lake; thence soutli eighty chains; thence
1st eighty chains; thence north eighty
■tins more or less to the south-west bauk of
lidosy Lake; thence following the bank of
luiosy Lake in an easterly direction eighty
■tins more or less to point of commence-
lnt and containing 640 acres more or less.
Bated  30th   May,   1911.
EDWIN M. BROWN.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent.
2 oct. 7
VICTORTA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  3
rAKE   notice   that   Alfred   C.   Lovick,   of
Itoria,   occupation   Clerk,   intends  to  apply
permission  lo  purchase  the following de-
ibed lauds:—Commencing at a post plant-
about   one-half   mile   south   of   the   south
of   Pendosy   Lake;   thence   west   eighty
■ins;   thence  north   eighty  chains  more  or
to the south-west bank of Pendosy Lake;
■nee  following  the  bank  of  Pendosy   Lake
easterly and  southerly direction  eighty
|ins more or less to a point due north of
nt  of  commencement,   thence   south   forty
■ins  more  or   less   to   point   of  commence-
lit, and containing 400 acres more or less.
fated 28th  May,   rgit,
ALFRED C. LOVICK.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that James L. Armson, of
Victoria, occupation Retired, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one mile south-east of Atna Bay,
Morice Lake; thence east eighty chains;
thence south eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; thence north eighty chains to point
of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 28th  May,   1911.
JAMES L. ARMSON.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE   notice  that  Albert _ E.   Christie,   of
Victoria, occupation Banker, intends to apply
for permission  to purchase  the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three miles south of the south end
of Pendosy  Lake;  thence east eighty chains;
thence    south    eighty    chains;    thence    west
eighty   chains;    thence   north   eighty   chains
to   point   of   commencement   and   containing
640 acres.
Dated   30th   May,   ion.
ALBERT E. CHRISTIE.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John F. Mason, of Victoria, occupation Merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile south of the south
end of Pendosy Lake; thence west eighty
chains; thence south eighty chains; thence
east eighty chains; thence north eighty chains
to point of commencement and containing
640 acres.
Dated   29th   May,   1911.
JOHN F. MASON.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William T. Williams, of
Victoria, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the south shore of the Narrows
between Morice and Pendosy Lake; thence
south eighty chains; thence east eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains more or less to
the south bank of Atna Bay; thence following the south bank of Atna Bay eighty
chains more or less, in a westerly direction
to the point of commencement and containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated  28th   May,   1911.
WILLIAM T. WILLIAMS.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Peter Shandley, of Victoria, occupation Carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about three miles south of thc south end of
Pendosy Lake; tbence east eighty chains;
thence north eighty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty chains
to point of commencement and containing
640 acres.
Dated 30th May, 1911.
PETER SHANDLEY.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that  H.  Crawford  Coates,  of
Victoria, occupation Architect, intends to apply for permission to  purchase the following
describea lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile south of the south end
of Pendosy Lake; thence east eighty chains:
thence    south    eighty    chains;    thence    west
eighty   chains;    thence   north   eighty   chains
more or less to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres.
Dated 29th May,  1911.
H. CRRAWFORD COATES.
Frank   Mallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that  Fred.  W. Jubb, of Victoria,  occupation   Real   Estate Ageut,  intends
to apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   about   two   miles   south   of   the
south    end    of   Pendosy    Lake;    thence   east
eighty   chains;   thence   north   eighty   chains;
thence    west    eighty    chains;    thence    soutb
eighty   chains;   to   point   of   commencement
and containing 640 acres.
Dated  30th   May,   1911.
FRED. W. JUBB.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE   notice   that   Maurice   M.   Meredith,
of Victoria, occupation Agent, intends to apply for permission  to purchase  the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted ahout  three miles south of the south
end   of   Pendosy   Lake;   thence   east   eighty
chains;   thence   north   eighty   chains;   thence
west    eighty    chains;    thence    south    eighty
chains   to   point   of  commencement  and   containing   640   acres   more   or   less.
Dated   30th   Mav.   iqii.
MAURICE M.  MEREDITH.
Frank   Hallett,   Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
■ District of Coast,  Range  3
I'AKE notice that Clement Goss, of Vic-
pa, occupation Insurance Agent, intends
J apply for permission to purchase the
lowing described lauds:—Commencing at
Ijost planted on the south shore of the
prows between Morice and Pendosy Lake,
■nee south eighty chains; thence west
ly chains, more or less to the enst bank
■Pendosy Lake; thenee following the east
Ik of Pendosy Lake in a northerly and
Iterly direction eighty chains, more or
I. to point of commencement and coil-
ilitlg 300 acres more or less.
|)ated 28th  May,  1911.
CLEMENT   GOSS.
Frank   Mallett,   Agent,
■r  12 Oct. 7
VICTORrA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Parsons, of Vic
toria,  occupation  Clerk,  intends  to npply  for
permission    to    purchase _ the    following    described lauds:—Commencing at  a post planted  about   two   miles  soutb   of  lhe  south  end
of Pendosy Lnke; theuce north eighty chnins;
ihence west eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains;   thence   cast   eighty   chains   to   point
of commencement and containing 640 acres.
Dated   30th   May,   1911.
EDWARD PARSONS.
Frank   Mallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 out. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE  notice   that  Gideon   Hicks,   of  Victoria,  occupation   Merchant,  intends  to  apply
for    permission    to   purchase    the    following
described   lands:—Commencing     at     a     post
planted   on   the   soutb   bank   of   Atna   Bay
Morice   Lake,   thence   south   eighty   chains;
thence   east     eighty     chains;     thence   north
eighty   chains;   thence   west   eighty   chains,
more or less, to point of commencement, and
containing   640   acres   more   or   less.
Dated  28th  Mav,   ign.
GID'EON HICKS.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Arthur Wheeler, Jr., of
Victorin, occupntion Insurance Agent, intends
lo apply for permission to purchase thc
following described lands J—Commencing at
a post planted on the nortli-west shore of
the Narrows between Morice and Pendosy
Lake; thence north sixty chains; thence west
eighty chains; thence south eighty chains
more or less to the north shore of Pendosy
Lake; thence following the north # shore of
Pendosy Lake in an ensterly direction eighty
chnins more or less to point of commencement and containing 600 acres more or less.
Dated  28th   May,   1911.
ARTHUR WHEELER, JR.
Frank   Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
,,_..__ .   w$Hgw mmimb ..___ .    	
VICTORIA LANDDISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Richard W. Coleman,
of Victoria, occupation Real Estate, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about five miles south of the
south end of Pendosy Lake; thence west
eighty chains; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south eighty
chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated  30th   May,   19n.
RICHARD W. COLEMAN.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Winifred Codd, of Victoria, occupation Married Woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one-half mile south of
the south end of Pendosy Lake; thence
east eighty cliains; thence nortli forty chains
more or less to the south bank of Pendosy
Lake; thence following the south bank of
Pendosy Lake in a westerly direction eighty
chains more or less to a point due nortli
of point of commencement; thence soutb
forty chains more or less to the point of
commencement and containing 300 acres more
or less.
Dated 29th May.  1911.
WINIFRED CODD.
Frank  Hallett,  Agent,
aug. 12 o."t. ;
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Selby A.  Codd, of Regina, occupation  Merchant,  intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about   three  miles   south   of  the  south   end
of Pendosy Lake; thence west eighty chains;
thence    north    eighty    chains;    thence    east
eighty chains;  thence south eighty chains to
point  of  commencement  and  containing  640
acres.
Dated  30th  May,   1911.
SELBY A. CODD.
Frank   Hallett, Agent,
aug. 12 oct. 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Roswell  Park,  of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner of Lot
3i8t Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains;  thence west 80 chains; thence north
80   chains;   thence   east   80   chains   to   point
of commencement.
Dated June  7th,   191i.
ROSWELL PARK.
aug 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE  notice  that   Aubrey   Neff,  of  London,   Ontario,   occupation   Doctor,  intends  to
applyt for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted at the south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast   District,   Range   3;   thence   north   80
chains;  thence west 80 chains; thence south
80   chains;   tbence   east   80   chains   to   point
of commencement.
Dated June  7th,   191 v.
AUBREY  NEFF.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Laura Lochner, of London, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  2 miles west of south-west corner of
Lot   318,   Coast   District,    Range   3,   thence
south   80   chains;   thence   west   80   chains:
thence    north_   80    chains;    thence    cast    80
chains,   to  point  of  commencement.
Dated  Tune 7th,   ign.
LAURA   LOCHNER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District   of   Coast,   Range   3
TAKE notice that Betrand La Verne Mc-
Cnulley, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Fireman M.C.R., intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318.
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; tbence east 80 chains: thence north
80 ehains; thence west 80 chains to point
of comemncement.
Dated   Tune  7th,   1911.
BERTRAND LA VERNE McCAULLEV.
aug. 12 oct. ;
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE  notice  that   Roy   Rich,   of  London.
Ontario,   occupation   Office   Clerk,  intends   to
apply for  permission  to  purchase the  following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted  two miles  west  of  south-west corner
of Lot 318,  Coast  District,  Range 3;   thence
north 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains; thence
south  80  chains;   thence  west  80  chains,   to
point  of  commencement.
Dnted   Tune  7th,   1911.
ROY   RICH,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District  of Const.   Range 3
TAKE notice that John Ginge, of London,
Ontario, occupation Traveler, intends to apply
for  permission  to purchase  the  following described lnnds:—Commencing at a post plnnted   two   miles   west   of   south-west   corner   of
Lot   318,   Const   District,   Range   3,   thence
north 80 chnins; thence cast 80 cliains; thenee
south  80  chains;   thence   west   So   chains,   to
point of commencement.
Dated   Tune  -th,   ign,
JOHN   GINGE.
aug. 12 oct, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Charles Garland Bell,
of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement. '
Dated June  7U1,   1911.
CHARLES GARLAND BELL,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Fred. Turner, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted six miles west of southwest corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range
3. thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 7th,  1911.
FRED. TURNER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Morley Clarence Man-
hard, of London, Ontario, occupation Bank
Clerk, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted six miles west
of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north _ 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated Tune 7th, 1911,
MORLEY CLARENCE MANHARD.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Reginald Piers Hardman,
of London, Ontario, occupation _ Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted six miles west of
south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District.
Range 3, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thenc« south 80 cliains:
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  7th,   1911.
REGINALD  PIERS  HARDMAN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Jack H. McRae, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the  following  described  lands:—Commencing
at a post planted six miles west of south-west
corner of  Lot  318,  Coast  District,  Range 3,
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains:
thence   south   80    chains;     thence     west   80
chains,   to  point  of commencement.
Dated  June  7th,   1911.
JACK H.  McRAE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast.  Range  3
TAKE notice that Wilfred Stewart Thur-
tell, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission
to purchase tbe following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; tbence west 80 chains to point of
commencement.
Dated Tune 8th.  ign.
WltFRED STEWART THURTELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE  notice that  Ernal   Bice,  of London.
Ontario,  occupation  Medical  Student,  intends
to apply  for  permission  to  purchase thc  following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   eight  miles   west   of  south-west
corner of  Lot  318,  Coast   District,  Range  3,
tbence south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence    north    80   chains;    thence    west    80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated Tunc Sth,  1911.
ERNAL   BICE,
aug. 12   • oct. 7
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast,   Range 3
TAKE notice that Meredith Dodm? bud-
worth, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south So chnins:
thence cast Sn chains; thence north 80 chains:
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated   Tune  7th,   ign.
MEUEDITII DODGE SUDWORT1T.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORTA  LAND  DISTRICT
District  of Const,   Rnnge 3
TAKE  notice  thnt   John   Thomson   Green,
of London, Ontario, occupation Clerk, intends
to  apply  for permission  to  purchase  thc following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   four   miles   west   of   soulh-wesl
corner   of   Lot   318,    Coast   District,   Range
3,   thence   south   80   chains;   thence   west   80
cluiins:  thence north  80  chains;  thence east
So chains to point of commencement.
Dated   Tune   7M1,    1011.
JOHN THOMSON GREEN,
aug. 12 oet. 7
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District of  Coast,   Range  ,1
TAKE notice that Robert James Tobey, of
London,  Ontario, occupation   Bank  Clerk,  intends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purchase
the   following  described   lands:—Commencing
at  a post  planted  four  miles  west  of  southwest corner of Lot 318, Coast  District, Range
3.   thence   north   80   chains;   tbence   west   80
chnins;   thence  south  So  chains;   thence  east
Sn   chnins,   to   point  of  commencement.
Dated June 7th,  igi 1.
ROBERT JAMES  TOltEY
aug. 1 j
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that John Colbern^ Grass, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupntion Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
thc following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318.
Coast District, Range 3; thenee nortli 80
chains; thence cast 80 chnins; tbence south
80 chains; tbence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated  Tune 9th.   toil
JOHN COLBERN GRASS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Clifford Keillor, of London, Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends to apply for permission to purchase thc
following descrilied lnnds:—Commencing nt a
post   planted   eight   miles   west   of  south-west
corner  of  Lot  318,  Coast   District,  Range  3.
tbence    soulh    Sn    chains;    thence    west    So
cliains;   tbence  north  80  chains:   thence  enst
So chains, to poinl of commencement.
Dated  Tune Sth,   rott.
CLIFFORD   KEILLOR,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORTA  LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Const.  Range  3
TAKE notice that Edgnr Thompson of
St. Thomas, Oninrio, occupntion Lnborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at n post planted four miles west nud two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Const District, Range 3; thence south 8n
chains: thence west 80 chains; thence north
So chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated   Tunc  gth,   iqii.
EDGAR   THOMPSON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Rnnge  3
TAKE   notice   that   Sarah   Titus,   of   St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupntion Spinster, intends
to apply for  permission to purchnse  thc following   described   lnnds:—Commencing   at   a
post   plnnted   nine   miles   west   of   south-west
corner of   Lot  318,  Const   District,  Range  3.
tbence    north    So    chnins;    thence    west    80
chnins:   thence  south  80  chains;   thence  enst
So chains, to point of commencement.
Dnted  June Sth,   ion.
SARAH  TITUS,
aug. 12 oct. ;
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Rnnge  3
TAKE notice that Marion Jane Brycc, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupntion Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west of two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Rnnge 3; thence south 80 chnins:
thence west 80 chains; thence north 8n
chnins; east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dnted   June   8lh,   1911.
MARION JANE  BRYCE.
aug. 1 ? oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Slough Haney, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted nine miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th,  iqii,
th,  1911
JOHN SLOUGH HANEY.
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range j
TAKE notice that George Fleckinstien, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June 8th, 1911.
GEORGE  FLECKINSTIEN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Mary Silverthorn, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and three miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,  ion
aug. 12
MARY   SILVERTHORN.
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Cameron, of St.
Thoams, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
nortli of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th, 1911.
WILLIAM CAMERON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Conley, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted eight miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June 8th,   1911.
JOHN   CONLEY.
aug. 12 , oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice tbat Louisa Clouse, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence enst 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated Tune 8th,  1911.
LOUISA  CLOUSE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range 3
TAKE notice that Sarah Horton, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intentis
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
posl planted six miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north So chains;
tiience enst So chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June Sth, 1911.
SARAH   HORTON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORTA LAND DISTRICT
District of Const, Rnnge 3
TAKE notice that Mabel Styles, of bt.
Thomas, Ontnrio, occupntion Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west nnd two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 ehains;
thence east So chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated Tune Sth,   1911.
MABEL STYLES,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Coast.   Range 3
TAKE notice that Eliza Blackell, of St.
Thomas, Ontnrio, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lnnds:—Commencing at a
post plnnted six milts west and two miles
nnrth of south-west coiner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Rnnge 3; thence south 80 chnins;
thence enst 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
tiience west So chains, to point of commencement.
Dnted   lune Sth,   to 1 1.
ELIZA I3LACKELL.
aug. i~' oct. 7
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Const,   Range  3
TAKE notice that Blanche Louise Clark,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster,
intends lo npply for permission to purchnse
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles west and two
miles north of soulh-west eorner nf Lot 318,
Const District, Range 3. thence north 80
chnins: thence west 80 chains; thence south
So chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated Line oth,  igi 1.
*   BLANCHE  LOUISE  CLARK,
aug. 12 net. 7
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Const.   Rnnge  3
TAKE notice thnt  Elizabeth Hice. of London, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to
apply  for permission  tn purchase  the  following described  lands:—Commencing at  a post
planted nine miles west  of south-west corner
of Lot 318,  Coast   District,   Rnnge 3,  thence
south   80   chnins;    tbence    west    80   chnins;
thence north 80 chnins: thence enst So cluiins,
to point  of commencement,
Dnted Line Sth, igi 1.
ELIZABETH   BICE,
aug. 12 net. 7
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,   Range  3
TAKE notice thai  Roy Washburn, of London. Ontario, occupation Medical Student, intends   to   apply   for   permission   tn   purchase
the  following  described  lands:—Commencing
nt   n   post   planted   eight   miles  west   of   smith-
west corner of Lol 318, Coast Districi, Range
3,   thence   north   Sn   chains;   thence   west   80
ehains:   thenc-  smith   80  chnins;   thenee  enst
So  chains,   in   point   nf  commencement.
Dnted   lune  Sth,   191'.
ROY  WASHBURN,
aug. 1- oct. 7 16
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that tbe reserve
existing over certain lands in Range 5,
Coast District, notice of which bearing date
of July 13th, 1908, and December 17th,
1908, were published in the British Columbia
Gazette in tbe issues of July 16th, 1908, and
December 17th, 1908, respectively, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to lands
surveyed as the east half and north-west
quarter section 8, west half section 8 and
north-east quarter section 9, section 14,
north half and south-east quarter section
15, north half and south-west quarter section
16 and section 17, fractional nort hhalf section 18, sections 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 and 36,
all in township 18, Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A.  RENWICK,
Deputy   Minister   of   Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,   B.C.,  June   16th,   1911.
june 24 sept 21
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over certain lands situated in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
bearing date of December 17th, 1908, was
published in tlie British Columbia Gazette,
in the issue of December 17th, 1908, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to
lands surveyed as tbe north half and southwest quarter section 9, north half section
10, north half and south-east quarter section 11; sections 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,
19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and
30, all in township 19, range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy   Minister   of   Lands. .
Department of  Lands,
Victoria,   B.C.,  June   16th,   1911.
June 24 sept 21
. VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice tbat Neil Darrach, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laundryman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thenee east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; tbence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June  12th,  1911.
NEIL DARRACH.
aug. 12 oct. 7
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing upon Crown lands in Cariboo District, notices of which, bearing date of February 15th, 1910, and May 5th, 1910,_ respectively, were published in tbe British
Columbia Gazette in the issues of February
17th and May 5th, respectively, arc cancelled
in so far as the same relate to tlie lands
surveyed as Lots 2978, 2957, 2936, 4318, 4321,
3876, 3875, 3871, 3872, 3873, 3866, 3842, 3865,
3881, 3864, 3882, 3879, 3878, 3-J39, 3638, W. 'A
2624, 3635,  3-J34,  W. V_   2617,  3-J30,  2636,  W.
y_. 2550, 2635, 2542, 2539, E. y_  2630, 2637A,
255*3, 2637, 2548, 2549, 2540, 2541, 2532, 581,
580, 582, S83, 584, 585, 865, 867, 868, 869,
608, 586, 2526, 2525, 2519, 2520, 2510, 2509,
577, 578, 579, 25l8, 2662, 2664, 2466, 2465,
2640, 2482, 2666, 2488, 2490, 2489, 2665, 2661,
2471, 2469, 2468, 2475, 2476, 2481, 2487, 2491,
N. V_ and S.W. V. 2492, S. <A and N.W. !4
2493, N. y2 and S.L. 54 2480, 2483, 2485,
2496, 2499, 2495, 2502, 2501, 2494, 2229, 2228,
2500, 2504, 2505, 2506, 2216, 2220, 2227, 2218,
2225, 2226, 2221, 2212, 2213, 2404, 2209, 2214,
2391, 2410, 2417, 2420, 2223, 2208, 2215, 2392,
2211, 2412, 2423, 2424, 2108, 2109, 2104, 2103,
2102, 2107, 2106, 2105, 2098, 2100, 4053, 4048,
4047, 4049, 4046, 4050, 4039, 4038, 4041, 4029,
4028, 4030, 4027, 4037- 4036, 4035, 4034, 4031,
4032, 4025, 4026, 2433, 2432, 2431, 2430, 2427,
379°. 379i, 3792, 3789, 3788, 3787, 3786, 3785,
3795, 3794, 3793, 3796, 3809, 3824, 3816, 3815,
3812, 3811, 3810, 2429, 2428, 2423, 2437, 2438,
3784, 3783, 3999, 3992, 399'* 3989, 3988, 3987,
4001, 4000, 756, 757, 1806, 181 iA, 1826, 2912A,
2912, 1837A, 2910, 2908, 2893, 2909, 2175,
2177, 2178, 2741, 2751, 2757, 2758, 2769, 2768,
2770, 2801, 2802, 2806, 2807, 2805, 2804, 2813,
2814, 2815, 2816, 2820, 28.19, 2818, 2817, 2852,
2853, 2854, 2855, 2856, 2857, 2858, 2859, 2184,
2188, and 1566A, Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19
nov. 18
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat the reserve
existing upon Lrown lands in Cariboo District, notice of which bearing date of May
5th, 1910, was published in the British Columbia Gazette of May 5th, 1910, is cancelled
in so far as tbe same relates to tbe lands
surveyed as Lots 888, 892, 893, 894, 895, 1554.
3215, 3216, 3217, 3218, 3219, 3220, 3221, E. Vi
3222, W. Y_ 3223, and 3223A, Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19     . nov. 18
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Provincial Home,  Kamloops,  East  Wing
Addition.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for East Wing Addition, Provincial Home,
Kamloops," will be received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to
12 o'clock noon of Wednesday, the 20th day
of September, 1911, for the erection and completion of an cast wing addition to the Provincial   Home,  Kamloops,   B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may he seen at the offices of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B. C.;
the Government Agents, Kamloops, New
Westminster, and Revelstoke; and at the Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings,  Victoria, B. C.
Intending tenderers can, by applying lo
thc undersigned, obtain one copy of the
drawings and one copy of the specifications for the sum of twenty dollars |$2o).
Each tender must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the Honourable Ibe Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $5,000, which
shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if hc fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be
returned to them upon the execution of the
contract.
The successful tenderer shall furnish a
bond of a guarantee company satisfactory to
the Minister of Public Works, equal to ten
(10) per cent, of the contract amount, for
the due fulfilment of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on tbe forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed  in  thc envelopes  furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J.  E.  GRIFFITH,
Public   Works   Engineer.
Public  Works  Department,
Victoria,  B.C., August  24th,   1911.
aug. 26 sept. 16
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of,  Range  1
TAKE  notice  that   I,   William   Waterslon,
of Vancouver, occupation   Broker,  intends  to
apply   for   permission   to   purchase   the   fol-!
lowing  described   lands:—Commencing  at  a I
post  planted  about   70   chains  westerly   from
northwest  corner  of   L.   530  and   about   one
mile   from   Homalko   River,   thence   north   80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains;   thence  west   80   chains,   lo   point  of.
commencement, containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated  August   nth,   1911.
WILLIAM WATERSTON.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat the reserve
existing upon vacant lands of the Crown in
Lillooet District, notice of which, bearing
date of May 5U1, 1910, was published in the
British Columbia Gazette of May 5th, 1910, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 1387, 1403, 1887, 1888,
1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1895 Lillooet
District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August i6tb, 1911.
aug. 19
nov. 18
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on cavant Crown lands in Range 5,
Coast District, notice of which, bearing date
of May 25th, 1910, was published in the British Columbia Gazette of May 26th, 1910, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 1876, 1878, 1879, 1890,
1891, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1S96, 1897, 1898, 1900,
2507, 2508, 2509, 2510, 2511, and 2512, Range
5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19
nov. 18
RENFREW  (VICTORIA OFFICE)   LAND
DISTRICT
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice tbat I, Wm. Joseph MacDonald, as agent for Mabel Gresley, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
al a post planted on the east side of Nit Nat
Lake in thc Renfrew District, commencing at
the north-west comer post of Lot 391, marked
S. E. post, running westerly 40 chains; thence
northerly 10 chains more or less to lake
shore; thence easterly 40 chains more or less
along lake shore; tbence 10 chains more or
less along shore of bay to point of commencement, comprising 40 acres more or less.
Dated July 251I1,  1911.
MABEL GRESLEY.
Per Win. J. MacDonald, Agent,
aug. 19 oct. 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing by reason of a notice published in
the Britisb Columbia Gazette of the 27th
December, 1907, over a parcel of land situated on Reed Island, known as Lot No. 452,
Sayward District, formerly covered by Timber License No. 36862, which license expired
on the 20th November, 1909, is cancelled,
and the said lands will toe opened to location
by pre-emption only at midnight on Friday,
13th   October,   1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 51I1 July, 1911.
July 15 oct-   7
CANCELLATION OF RESliRVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing upon vacant Crown lands in Range
5, Coast District, and in Cariboo District,
notices of wnich, bearing date of December
17th, 1908, February 15th, lpio, and April
3rd, 1911, were published in the British
Columbia Gazette in the issues of December
17th, 1908, February 17U1, I9UL, and April
6th, 1911, respectively, arc cancelled in so far
as the same relate to the lands surveyed as
Lots 4.037A, 4,037, 4.040A, -1.038, 4,040, and
2,951, all in Range 5, Coast District, and Lots
4,038 A.R., 2,793 A.R., 2,828 K, 4,042 A..,.,
4,045 R, 4,046 A.R., 4.044R, 4,042 R, 4,046 R,
2827 k,   2,826 R,    4,048 R,   4,041 J.   4,043 R,
3,047 R, 4,051 R,  2,783 R,  2,799 R, 4,049 R,
4 053 III 4,052 R, 2,782 R, 2,798 R, 2,780 R,
4,050 R, 4,054, R, 4,0551--._4.056 R, Tf,772 A.R.,
2,797 R, 2,796 R> 4,o6o R, 4,05? R, 4,058 K,
4,057 R, 4,066 R. 2,776 R, 4,061 R, 4,070 A.R.,
4,062 R, 4,063 R, 4,064 R, 4,065 R, 2,773 R,
2,775 R, 4>o7o K, 4,069 X, 4,068 R, 4,067 R,
4,019 R, 2,774 I--*, 4,oi4 R, 4,015 R> 4,oi6 R,
4,017 R, 4,024 R, 4,023 R, 4,022 R, 4,021 R,
2,379, 2,380, 2,381, 2,382, 2,3'1, 2,310, 2,301,
2,300, 2,464, 2,463, 2,462, 2,461, 2,460, 2,459,
2,458, 2,457, 2,451, 2,452, 2,453, 2,454, 2,450,
2,449, 2,448, 2,447, 2,446, 2,445, 2,444, 2,443,
2,442, 2,441, 2,388,: 2,387, 2,386, 2,385, 2,384,
2,383, 2,373, 2,374, 2,375, 2,376, 2,377, 2,378,
2,360, 2,359, 2,306, 2,307, 2,308, 2,309, 2,302,
2,303, 2,304, 2,305, 2,358, 2,357, 2,294, 2,295,
2,296, 2,297, 2,298, 2,288, 2,289, 2,290, 2,291,
2,292, 2,293, 2,356, 2,363, 3,84h 2,367, 2,364,
2,355, 2,281, 2,282, 2,283, 2,284, 2,285, 2,286,
2,275, 2,276, 2,277, 2,278, 2,279, 2,280, 2,354,
2,365, 2,366, 2,840, 3,843, 3,844, 3,339, 2,353,
2,340, 2,339, 2,326, 2,325, 2,312, 2,287, 2,271,
2,272, 2,273, 2,274, 2,267, 2,268, 2,269, 2,283,
2,266, 2,313, 2,324, 2,327, 2,338, 2,341, 2,352,
3,838, 3,845, 3,856, 3,855, 3,846, 3,837, 2,351,
2,342, 2,337, 2,328, 2,323, 2,314, 2,265, 2,259,
2,260, 2,261, 2,262, 2,263, 2,245, 2,246, 2,255,
2,256, 2,257, 2,258, 2,264, 2,315, 2,322, 2,329,
2,336, 2,343, 2,350, 3,836, 3,847, 3,854, 3,857,
3,853, 3,848, 3,835, 2,349, 2,344, 2,330, 2,321,
2,316, 2,317, 2,320, 2,331, 2,3*" *. 2,345, 2,348,
3,834, 3,849, 3,852, 3,883, 3,884, 3,851, 3,850,
3,833, 2,347, 2,.v6, 2,333, 2,332, 2,319, 2,318,
3,869, 3,8S8, 3,859, 4,157, 4,l6o, 4,159, 4,158,
3,860,  3,861, 3,868,  3,867,   3,862,  3,863,  3,880,
3.641, 3,637, 3,667, 3,663, 3,659, 3,655, 3,654,
3,658, 3,662, 3,666, 3,665, 3,661, 3,657, 3,653,
3,652, 3,656, 3,66o, 3,664, 3,633, 3,629, 2,66oA,
2,656, 2,652, 2,648, 2,644, 3,642, 2,651, 2,647,
2,643, 2,639, 3,669, 3,678,   -,677,  1 168, 2,638,
2.642, 2,646, 2,650, 2,244, 2,247, 2,254, 2,253,
2,248, 2,243, 2,242, 2,249, 2,259, 2,237, 2,238,
2,239, 2,241, 2,219, 2,232,  2,231, 2,230, 2,217,
2,221, 2,335, 2,224, 2,720, 2,719, 1,100, 1,101,
1,102,    1,103,   1,076,    I,l6o,    1,163,    1,164,    1,166,
1,167, 1,165, 1,097, 1,110, 1,109, 1,108, 1,107,
I.174A, 1,095, 1,171, 1,162, 1,170, 1,099, 1,424,
1,089, 1,182, 1,178, L176A, i,i7oA, 1,180,
1,181, 1,183, 1.189, h'88, 1,719, and 1,775, all
in Cariboo District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., July 7U1,  1911.
July 15 oct 14
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
reserve existing on certain Crown Lands in
Pender Harbour, New Westminster District,
formerly held under special Timber License
No. 42713, by reason of tbe notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of
the 27th December, 1907, is cancelled, and
tbat the said lands will be open to entry
by pre-emption only on and after midnight
of November 3rd,  1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE  notice that  I,   William J.   Cooper,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   about   one  mile   westerly  from
Homalko River, and at S.W. corner of L. 530,
thence   west   40   chains;   tnence   north   40
chains;  thence east 40 chains; thence south
4o_ chains  to  point   of  commencement,   containing  160 acres, more or less.
Dated August uth, 1911.
WILLIAM J. COOPER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE notice that Anker Berntzen, of Vancouver,   occupation   Shingler,   intends   to  apply for permission to purchase the following
described    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
planted about 1 mile southerly from the mouth
of Upper Glacier creek, said creek runs into
Homalko   River   about    12   miles   from   its
mouth; thence east 80 chains; thence north
80   chains;   thence   west   80   chains;   thence
southt 80  chains to point  of commencement,
containing 640 acres,  more or  less.
Dated  August   1 ith,   ion.
ANKER BERNTZEN.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of,  Range  1
TAKE notice that I, James Grey Bennett,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted  about three-quarters  of  a  mile
westerly   from  the   north-west   corner   of  L.
550 and about one mile from Homalko river,
thence  nortli    40    chains;    thence    west 40
chains;   thence south 40  chains;  thence east
40   chains,   to  point  of  commencement,   containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated August   uth,   1911.
JAMES GREY BENNETT.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 2d oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE    notice    tbat    I,    George    Fredrik
Fraser, of Vancouver, occupation Electrician,
intends lo  apply for permission to purchase
thc   following  described   lands:—Commencing
at   a   post   planted   one   mile   westerly   from
Homalko River, and at S.  W. corner of L.
530, thence west 40 chains; thence south 60
chains;   tbence east 40  chains;  tbence north
80   chains   to  point  of   commencement,   containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated  August   11th,   19u.
GEORGE FREDRIK FRASER-
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range  1
TAKE  notice  that   I,   Arthur  L.   Spencer,
of Vancouver, occupation Electrician, intends
to  apply for permission  to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post   planted   about   one-half   mile   westerly
from  Homalko  River  and  at  the  north-west
corner   of  L-   530,   tbence   west   40   chains;
tbence south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement, containing  160 acres, more or less.
Dated  August   uth,   ton.
ARTHUR L. SPENCER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 1
TAKE notice that I, Michel Zattoni, of
Vancouver, occupation Miner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing al a post
planted about three-quarters of a mile westerly from north-west corner of L. 530 and
about one mile from Homalko River, tbence
east 20 chains; tbence south 80 chains; thence
west 20 chains; thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 160 acres
more or less.
Dated August  uth,  1911.
MICHEL  ZATTONI.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
aug. 26 oct. 21
MALAHAT LAND DISTRICT
District   of   Malahat
TAKE notice that Beaumont Boggs, ofl
Victoria, B.C., occupation Real Estate]
Agent, intends to apply for permission tol
lease the following described lands:—Com-1
mencing at a post planted at high water I
on the Saanich Arm, 75 feet East froml
the South-east corner of Lot 120; thencel
northerly and following the shore line ofl
said Saanich Arm to the South-east cornerl
of Lot uo; 2nd—Commencing at high I
water mark due east 33 feet from the postl
at tbe North-east corner of Lot uo; thencel
northerly and following the coast line to|
tbe North-east corner of Lot 120.
Dated July   ioth,   1911.
BEAUMONT   BOGGS.
July 15 sept9|
RUPERT LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range I
TAKE notice that Robert Swords, of, Vici
toria,   B.C.,  occupation  Manager,   intends  tq
apply   for   permission   to   purchase _ the   fo'
lowing   described   lands:—Commencing   at
post  planted  on  the  north-west  corner  of
small   Island   at   the   north-west   corner   1
Jennis    Bay,    Drury    Inlet,   and   embracing
whole of Island; containing  1 acre, more o|
less.
Dated   May   :8th,   1911.
ROBERT SWORDS.
July : 5 sept(|
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given tbat the reseryj
existing by reason of a notice published
the British Columbia Gazette of the 27
December, 1907, covering a parcel of Ian
situated at St. Vincent Bay, Jervis Inle_
formerly held under Timber License Nl
40624, is cancelled and the said lands wl
be open for location by pre-emption at mi|
night on Friday, October 13th, ion.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands. [
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 5th July, 1911.
July 15 oct I
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is  hereby  given that  all   Pub|
Highways  in   unorganized   Districts,   and
Main Trunk Roads in organized Districts ■
sixty-six   feet   wide,   and   have   a   width
thirty-three  feet   on   each   side  of  the  md
straight  centre   line   of  the  travelled   roadl
THOMAS TAYLOR, I
Minister of Public Works!
Department of  Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., July 7th, 1911.
July  15 oct|
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
*C_]i__j___>
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
MINERAL  ACT
(Form   F.)
Certificate   of   Improvements
NOTICE
Iron Alice, Iron Cross, Iron Hand, and Iron
Belle Mineral Claim,  situate in the Victoria,   B.C.   Mining  Division  of Renfrew
District.   Where located: Bugaboo Creek.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   L.   N.   Anderson,
F.M.C.    No.   54082B,   Agent   for  the   Estate
Sidney   Shore,   F.M.C.    No.   54090B;   Alexander   Lipsky,   F.M.C.   No.   49625B;   Oliver
Smith, F.M.C. No.  , intend, sixty days
from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements,
for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
Section _•;. must be commenced before the
issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 24th day of July, 1911, A.D. 1911.
L. N. ANDERSON.
July 29 sept. 23
VICTORIA -LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Henry Lindop, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to purchase
thc following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two iniles south and ten
miles west of south-west comer of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; tbence south 80
chains; tbence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; tbence cast 80 chains, to poinl of
commencement,
Dated  Tune  12II1,   1911.
HENRY LINDOP.
aug. 12 oct. 7
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing on vacant lands of the Crown, notice
of which was published in the British Columbia Gazette in thc issue of May 5th, 1910,
and bearing date of May 5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 2317, 2318, 2319, 2320,
2321, 2322, 2323, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2329,
2330, 2331, 2332, 2334, 2335, 2336, 2337, 2339,
2341, 2342, 2343, 2347, 2348, 2348A, 2349,
2350, 2358, 2369, 2408, 3113, 3114, 31 is. 3"6,
3117, 3"8, 3"9, 3120, 3121, 3122, 3123, 3124,
3125, 3126, 3127, 3128, 3129, 3130, 3131, 3132,
3133, 3134, 3U5, .1136, 31.17, 3138, 3139, 3140,
3141, 3142, 3242A, 3143, 3M4, 3145, 3146,
3147, 3148, 3148A, 3149, 3150, 3151, 3152,
3153, 3154, 3155, 3156, 3157, 3158, 3159. 3160,
3161, 3162, 3163, 3164, 3165, 3166, 3167, 3168,
3169, 3170, 3171, 3172, 317.1, 3174, 3175, 3176,
3177, 3178, 3179, 3184, 3186, 3187, and 3188,
Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
NOTICE is hereby given that the resell
existing  by  reason  of a  notice  published f
the   British   Columbia   Gazette   of   the
December,   1907,  over  Lots   Nos.   10183
10184,  Group  one,   Kootenay   District, wh
have   Decn   surrendered   uitt   of   Timber
cense  No.  32590,   is cancelled,  and  the  s]
lands will be open to location by pre-empt!
only  at  midnight  on   Friday,   13th   Octobf
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of  Lands]
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., 5II1 July, 1911.
July 15
TAKE NOTICE that I, Archie F. _
nedy, of tbe City of Vancouver, Province!
British Columbia, Waiter, intena to apnlu
the Assistant Commissioner of Lands fol
license to prospect for Coal and Petroll
in the vicinity of Sutherland Bay, Di
Inlet, on and over the following descrl
lands, beginning at a post inarked A. F. I
N. E. Corner; tbence running soutli I
cliains; thence west 80 chains; tiience nl
80 cliains; thence east 80 chains to poin|
commencement.
14th August,  1911.
ARCHIE F. KENNEDY,
James Fulton, Agenl
aug. ig scptf
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves
existing over vacant Crown lands in Ranges 4
and 5, Coast District, notices of which, Bearing dates of May 5th, 1910, and May 25th,
1910, respectively, were published in the
issues of the British Columbia Gazette of
May 5th and May 261I1. 1910, are cancelled
in so far as the same relate to the lands surveyed as Lots 785, 786, 787, 788, 789, 790,
791, 791A, 792, 793, 794, 795, 856, 857, 858,
859, 860, 861, 862, 863, 864, 865, 866, 867,
868, 869, 870, 871, 872, S73, 1158, 1159, "60,
1164, 1165, 1166, 1162, 1163, 1169, 467, 468,
847, 1174, 1176, 1182, 1189, 1191, 1192, 1201A,
1188, 1187, 1190, 782, 783, 781, 784, 780, 31,3,
777A, 70, and 1186, all in Range 4, Coast District; and Lots 2188A, 1020, 1023, 3814, and
3826, all in Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., August 16th, 1911.
aug. 19 nov. 18
TAKE NOTICE that I, Willie S. KennJ
of the City of Vancouver, Province of
ish Columbia, Waiter, intende to apply t<
Assistant Commissioner of Lands for a lice]
to  prospect for   Coal  and   Petroleum  in
vicinity  of Sutherland  Bay,  Drury  Inlet, J
and  over  the  following described  lands,
ginning at a post inarked W. S. K., N._,
Comer;     tbence    running   east   80    chaii
thence   soutli    80    chains;    thence    west I
cliains;   thence   north 80  chains  to  point|
commencement.
14th  August,   1911.
WILLIE S. KENNEDY.
James Fuiton, Agenl
aug. 19 septf
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE   notice   that   I,   Anna   Mettler,
Vancouver,   occupation   Married   Woman, 1
tends   to   apply   for   permission   to   purcll
the   following  described  lands:—Comment!
at  a post planted about one-half mile no|
east of post inarked "295 W.P.S.  N.W.
ner," being blazed south to creek about
half mile,  said  creek running into  Horn!
River about 9 miles from its mouth; tha
north   80   chains;   thence   east   80   dial
thence   south    80   chains;   thence   west J
chains to point of commencement, contain
640 acres, more or less.
Dated August  uth,  1911.
ANNA METTLER. _
Morton S. Jones, Agenl
aug. 26 octj
RENFREW   (VICTORIA OFFICE)   LAl
DISTRICT '
District of Renfrew
TAKE notice that I, William Joseph ll
Donald,   of   Clo-oose,   B.C.,   occupation   1-J
eber, intends to apply for permission to
chase   tbe  following   described   lands:—C
mencing at a post planted on an island onl
cast  side of  Nit   Nat  Lake,  comprising I
acre,  more  or   less,  situated about  one  il
south-east   from   tlie   north-west   comer   _|
of   the   Oyces   Indian   Reserve   on   the
shore of Nit  Nat  Lake.
Dated  28th  July,   1911.
WILLIAM JOSEPH MACDONALD!
aug. 19 oct| r
THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
17
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
|)TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
ye existing upon Crown Lands in Cari-
District, notice of which was published
he British Columbia Gazette of the 15th
bptember, 1877, is cancelled in so far as
fame relates to lands surveyed as Lots
368, 360, 370, and 422, Group 1, Cariboo
ict, and that the lands embraced in said
[will be open for pre-emption entry after
[ight of November third, 1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Is Department,
jlctoria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
|CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
[TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
e existing over Lot no, Rupert Dis-
situated within the boundaries of Tim-
license No._ 40892 known as Lot 212,
jt District, is cancelled for the purpose
|king a sale of the said Lot no, Rupert
pt, to the Canadian North Pacific Fish-
jLimited, such cancellation to take effect
|.' third of November,  1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department,
Jtoria, B.C., 31st July, ign.
|ANCELLATION OF RESERVE
'ICE ,IS  HEREBY  GIVEN  that the
existing on  Crown Lands in Asoyoos
n of Yale  District, formerly embraced
Special   Timber. License   No. .31301,
son   of   the   notice   published   in   tbe
Columbia Gazette of December 27th,
s   cancelled,   and _ that   the   lands   em-
within the said timber license will be
'or   pre-emption    entry   only   on   and
ndnight  on   November  third,   1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
I Department,
oria, B.C., 31st July, 1911.
nov. 4
!VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
EC  notice  that   William  Armstrong,   of
omas,   Ontario,   occupation   Chief   of
intends   to   apply   for   permission   to
e   the   following   described   lands:—
icing at a post planted the following
:d    lands:—Commencing    at    a    post
two miles  south and  ten  miles  west
Ih-wcst corner of Lot 318, Coast Dis-
ange 3, thence south 80 chains; tbence
0 chains; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains, to point of commence-
i June  12th,   iqii.
WILLIAM   ARMSTRONG.
oct. 7
tENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Jordan River
: notice that  I,  Netta  B.  Moore,  of
occupation Married Woman, intends
for permission to purchase  the fol-
Jdescribed   lands:—Commencing   at   a
|mted  sixty  chains  distant  in a west-
gc tion   from   tbe   northeast   corner   of
Renferw    District,    being   Netta   B.
S. E. Corner, thence north 40 chains;
west   34   chains;   thence   south    18.6
thence  east   10  chains;  thence  soutb
ins; thence east 24 chains to place of
:ement   and   containing   one   hundred
I teen and 6-10 acres, more or less.
August   2,   IQII.
NETTA B. MOORE.
By William W. Stonmetz, Agent,
sept. 16
r'LAND REGISTRY ACT"
natter of an Application for a fresh
ificate of Title to that part of Sub-
iion   Lot   4,   of  Section   12,   Beckley
n, Victoria City, Map  160, of whicii
ie Lowe is the registered  owner.
CE is hereby  given of my intention
xpiration of one month from the first
on hereof to issue a fresh Certificate
in   lieu   of   the   Certificate  of   Title
Skene  Lowe  on  the  5th January,
|d numbered 8222 A, which has been
destroyed,
at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
'3 7th day of August, A.D., ign,
S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General of Titles.
sept. 16
I COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of. Range 2
notice that I, Peder Berntzen, of
■r, occupation Shingler, intends to ap-
permission to purchase the follow-
ribed lands:—Commencing at a post
about one-half mile north-east of
ked "295 W.P.S. N.W. corner," be-
ed south to creek about one-half
1 creek running into Homalko River,
miles from its mouth, thence south
s;   thecen   east   80   chains;   thence
Ichains;   thence  west   80   chains  to
commencement, containing 640 acres,
less.
August   nth,   iqii.
PEDER BERNTZEN.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
ICOAST LAND DISTRICT
District of. Range 2
notice  tbat  I,  Samuel  G.   Mettler,
niver,   occupation   Machinist,  intends
for  permission  to  purchase the  fol-
leseribed   lands:—Commencing   at   a
lted   about   one-half   mile   north-east
marked   "295   W.P.S.   N.W.  corner,"
ized   south   to   creek   about   one-half
1 creek running into Homalko River
miles from  its  mouth;  thence  south
s;   thence   west   40   chains;   thence
Ichains;   thence   east   40   chains,   to
commencement, containing 320 acres,
less.
August   nth,   1911.
SAMUEL C.  METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
oct. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Almeda Hart, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Music Teacher,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles west and seven
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; tbence soutb
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  June   nth,   ign.
ALMEDA HART,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Isaac Styles, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and one
mile west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Dated June   nth,   1911.
CHARLES  ISAAC STYLES,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Peter Dickinson, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and one mile
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tbence cast 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June   nth,   ign.
PETER   DICKINSON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coastj Range 3
TAKE notice that David Henry Gooding,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer,
intends tu apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and three
miles wej-t of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  Tune   nth,   1911.
*     DAVID HENRY GOODING,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Margaret Neil Bryce, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and three miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tbence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June  nth,  ign.
MARGARET   NEIL   BRYCE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Christopher
Nickerson, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following describea lands:-—
Commencing at a post planted two miles
south and five miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
Dated   June    1 ith,   1911.
CHARLES CHRISTOPHER NICKERSON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that William Mann, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and five miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June  nth,  iqii.
WILLIAM  MANN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Mungo Donald McCrimmon, of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Law
Student, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles
south and seven miles west of south-west
comer of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3;
thence north So chains; thenee east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June   nth,   ign.
MlJNGO DONALD McCRlMMON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that James Thomas Geddes,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Policeman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles soutb
and seven miles west of southwest corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
Date lune   12th,  igi 1.
JAMES THOMAS GEDDES.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Andrew John Clark, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Conveyancer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
iniles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; tbence north
80 chains; tbence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated  June   12th,   ign.
ANDREW   JOHN   CLARK,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Yin Lee, of St. Thomas,
Ontario,  occupation   Laundryman,   intends  to
apply for permission  to  purchase thc  following described lands:—Commencing at  a post
planted four miles north and two miles west
of south-west  corner of Lot  318,  Coast   District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; theuce north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains,  to point of commencement.
Dated Tune 9th,   ign.
YIN LEE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
COAST LAND DISTRICT
District of, Range 2
TAKE NOTICE .that I, Simon Mettler, of
Vancouver, occupation Hotelman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one-half mile north-cast of post
marked "295 W. P.S. N.W. corner," being
blazed south to creek about one-half mile,
said creek running into Homalko River, about
9 miles from its mouth, tbence north 80
chains; tbence west 40 chains; thenee south
So chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres, more or
less.
Dated  August  nth,   1911.
SIMON METTLER.
Morton S. Jones, Agent.
aug. at. oct. 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles William Thompson, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles west
and two miles north of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
Dated June  oth,   1911.
CHARLES WILLIAM THOMPSON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3 '
TAKE notice that Charles Orom Luton, of
Belmont, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase tbe following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles west and two miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence north 80 chains;
tbence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June gth,   ign.
CHARLES OROM LUTON,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Frederick Sutherland, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles west and two
miles north of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated June 9th,   1911.
FREDERICK SUTHERLAND,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Treadwell, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Insurance
Agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles west and
two miles north of south-west corner of Lot
318, Coast District, Range 3; tbence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point  of  commencement.
Dated June gth, iqii.
CHARLES TREADWELL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that John Theoplulus Ellis,
of Berlin, Ontario, occupation Commercial
Traveler, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and two miles north of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point  of commencement.
Dated Tune gth,  ign.
JOHN   THEOPHILUS   ELLIS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that William Samuel Martin,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Cigar
Dealer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands'.—
Commencing at a post planted four miles north
and two miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains,  to  point  of commencement.
Dated June gth,  iqii.
WILLIAM SAMUEL MARTIN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that George Atkins, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and two miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
tbence cast 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated  Tune 9th,  1911.
GEORGE  ATKINS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Hugh McConachic
Somerville, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Hank Clerk, intends to apply for permission
lo purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four miles
north and three miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence east
So chains,  to point of commencement.
Dated  Tune Qth,  iqii.
HUGH McCONACHIE SOMERVILLE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Isabella McCrimmon, of
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted two miles south and nine
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 31S,
Coast District, Range 3; tbence north 80
cliains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Daled   lune   12th,   ign.
ISABELLA McCRlMMON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that James Clark, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase tbe following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and four miles
west of soulh-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east So chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated June gth,   iqii.
JAMES CLARK,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Robert Allen McCully,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Policeman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted two miles south
and seven miles west of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
north So chains; thence cast So chains;
thence south So ehains; thence west 80
chains,   to  point   of  commencement.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
ROBERT ALLEN McCULLY.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that John Irwin, of London,
Ontario, occupation Book-keeper, intends to
apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands :—Commencing at a
post planted two miles south and nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 31S, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; Ihence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated lune  12th,  iqii.
JOHN  IRWIN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Edward John Webster,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Liveryman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a post planted four miles north
and four miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; tbence east 80 chains,
to  point  of commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   1911.
EDWARD JOHN  WEBSTER,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Daniel Barret, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence soulh 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   iqii.
DANIEL BARRET.
aug, 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Frances Tyrell, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six nines
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east So chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement,
Dated June ioth,  ion
aug. 12
RANCES TYRELL.
oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
' District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Bert Styles, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Laborer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  ioth,  ign.
BERT STYLES,
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Alex. Finlayson, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and six miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth, ion.
ALEX.   FINLAYSON.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Harrison Lynn Martin,
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Traveler, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted four miles north and eight
miles west of south-west corner of Lot 318,
Coast District, Range 3, thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dated   June   ioth,   iqii.
HARRISON LYNN MARTIN,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Patrick Frederick Fagan,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Fanner,
intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted 4 miles north and 8 miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 3'8, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June   ioth,   1911.
PATRICK FREDERICK FAGAN.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that John Hep in stall, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Student, intends
to apply for permission to purchase tbe following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south So chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  ioth,  iqii.
JOHN HEPINSTALL.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Martha Eveland, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission lo purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and eight miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Rawre 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  June   ioth,   1911.
MARTHA EVELAND.
aug. 12 oet, 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Emcrela 1*raser, of bt.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north aud nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3. thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated   lune   ioth,   iqii.
EMERELA FRASER.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
_ TAKE notice that Fanny Mitts, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following descrilied lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and nine miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement
Dated   lune   ioth,   1911.
FANNY MITTS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT
District  of Coj'st,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Ralph Oswald Babbit,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence soutb 80 ehains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
ehains; thence cast 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dated  lune   ioth,   1911.
RALPH OSWALD  BABBIT,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Morris Jackson, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted nine miles west and six miles
nortli of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence soutli 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains; thencetnorth 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June  ioth,  iqii.
MORRIS JACKSON.
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Iridell Kilally Johnston,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted eight miles west
and six miles north of south-west corner
of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point  of commencement
Dated lune 10th. ign.
ItoELL KILALLY JOHNSTON.
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that John ^ White, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains, to point of commencement
Dated Tune 10th, ign.
JOHN WHITE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Josephine Gable, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted six miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated June ioth,  1911.
JOSEPHINE GABLE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Edward Ellwood Mc-
Caulley, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
M.C.R.R. Fireman, intends to apply for permission to purchase thc following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted four
miles west and six miles north of south-west
corner of Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3,
thence south So chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dated  Tune   ioth,   1911.
EDWARD ELLWOOD McCAULLEY.
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that John ^Allen, of St.
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted four miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3, thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chaifis; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement
Dated June  1 ith,   1911.
JOHN ALLEN.
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Charles Edward Kreiger,
of St Thomas, Ontario, occupation M.C.R.R.
Fireman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and six miles north of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chatns;
thence north So chains; thence east 80 chains,
to  point   of  commencement.
Dated  lune   nth,   iqii.
Charles edward kreiger.
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Harry Joseph Elleson
Young, of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation
Reporter, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted two miles west
and six miles north of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north So chains; thence west 80 chains,
to point  of commencement.
Dated  lune   nth,   1911.
HARRY JOSEPH ELLESON YOUNG,
aug. 12 oct 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast,  Range 3
TAKE notice that Mary Mills, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Spinster, intends
to apply for permission to purchase thc following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two miles west and six miles
north of south-west corner of Lol 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of commencement
Dated   June   nth,   iqii.
MARY MILLS,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice that Donald Campbell, tof
St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted two miles west and six
miles nortli of south-west corner of Lot 3181
Coast District, Range 3; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, lo point
of commencement
Dated June  nth, 1911,
DONALD CAMPBELL,
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast,  Range  3
TAKE notice tbat James Balk well Sijuance,
of St. Thomas, Ontario, occupation, Carriage
Builder, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles north
and four miles west of south-west corner of
Lot 318, Coast District, Range 3; thence
south So ehains: thence east 8n chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point   of   commencement,
Dalcd   lune   9th,    1911.
JAMES   BALKWELL  SQUANCE.
aug. 12 oct. 7
VICTORTA  LAND DISTRICT
District  of  Coast,  Range  ,?
TAKE notice that Frederick Brooks, of St
Thomas, Ontario, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—-Commencing at a
post planted four miles north and four miles
west of south-west corner of Lot 318, Coast
District, Range 3; thence north So chains;
tbence west 80 chains; thence south So chains;
tiience east 80 chains, to point of commencement
Dated   lune   9M1,   1911.
FREDERICK   BROOKS,
aug. 12 oct. 7 18
THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
The 1912 Cadillac
The popularity entertained by the
Cadillac Motor Car Co. has been emphasized by a great increase in the
sales department. The Cadillac company's agents, A. H. Styles & Co.,
1052 Fort street, are reaping a harvest in commissions. They are the
sole agents for the 1912 Cadillac car,
of Vancouver Island. They attribute
their success to the unlimited merits
of the car itself and their modesty
is not affectation as anyone familiar
with the 1912 Cadillac will readily
understand. The car has been built
with particular attention paid to the
details of beauty, comfort and durability. The lines of the car, though
graceful and symmetrical, show that
strength was mixed with beauty.
The locomotion is simple and tangible and a thorough working knowledge of the car is easily acquired and
although the engines are made along
the most up-to-date and scientific
lines, simplicity is woven in with the
intricate mechanism in a manner that
makes the highest developed machine
of today'the toy of a child, and to
the business man, who spends a great
deal of valuable time going tp and
only fear is that the great demand
is going to advance the price of the
machine.
It is seldom if ever that the public
is offered a bargain in automobiles
and when such a phenomena does accrue the people of Victoria are not
slow to take advantage of it as is
evidenced by the number of Cadillacs
pursuing their stately way through
the streets of Victoria today. A. H.
Styles & Co. are only too glad to
have people drop into the garage and
look at these magnificent cars. They
have at present an augmented force
of expert mechanics whose orders
are: "Show every possible courtesy
to everyone whether he or she is a
prospective buyer or not. Don't hurry through explanations and don't neglect the smallest detail. Don't try
and force the machine upon the
buyer. They know what they want
and if you have it they will take it.
If you haven't, they won't." The
Cadillac Company first made its debut
in the United States and in spite of
the avalanche of competition through
which in its infancy it had to struggle,  it  now  occupies   a  prominence I
the last will come off about the last
week in September. We are turning
out 20 new motor-omnibuses a week
from our factory."
Oldest Lighthouse
The St. Agnes Lighthouse, Scilly
Islands, the oldest lighthouse in existence, has been finally shut down
after continuous service since 1680.
The Trinity Board have decided
that the lighthouse is too extravagant
to work, and have erected a modern
iron automatic lighthouse on the
neighbouring island of St. Mary's.
The new lighthouse, which will flash
continuously throughout the night
without attention, will be lit for the
first time today.
Sudden Death of the Australian
Primate
The death is announced of Cardinal
Moran, Roman Catholic Archbishop
of Sydney, in his eighty-first year.
The Cardinal was found on the floor
of his bedroom at Manly Palace in
a state of collapse and death followed  on  syncope.
Cardinal Moran was born in County Carlow, Ireland, and when twelve
years of age accompanied his uncle
Cardinal Cullen to Rome, where he
remained twenty-five years. He later
returned    to    Ireland    and    became
Dominion and Provincial!
News
coming from different business
blocks, the Cadillac is recommended
as a quick, time-saving and easily
handled means of transportation. To
real estate firms, whose business often makes it necessary to take long
and hard trips into the country, the
Cadillac is recommended as an expense decreaser. To the tourist, who
is seeking pleasure by cross-country
runs, the Cadillac is recommended
for comfort, speed and capabilities
of climbing any and all hills. A. H.
Styles & Co.'s own personal guarantee   goes  with  every  car  and  their
not enjoyed by any other car in America. Its present popularity is due
to its ability to meet all the qualifications of the user in every walk of
life. Its versatility as a. run-about,
roadster or touring car has become
a by-word in the annals of auto history. "Once tried, always bought,"
is a phrase which has become a part
of the car itself and a motto which
has become firmly attached to the
word Cadillac by process of evolution. The 1912 Cadillac is a combination of years of experience and
modern scientific attainment.
Motherland
The Prince as a Midshipman
The following appeared in the
Court Circular of August 7:
The Prince of Wales took leave of
the King and Queen this morning
and joined H.M.S. Hindustan to take
up his duties as midshipman.
His Majesty has appointed Captain
Henry H. Campbell, R.N., A.D.C, to
be Governor to the Prince of Wales
during the time his Royal Highness
is serving on board H.M.S. Hindustan.
M. F. H.'s Retirement
Mr. Frank Bibby, who is retiring
after eleven years' mastership of the
North Shropshire Hounds, was recently at Shrewsbury presented by
the members of the hunt with his portrait in oils.
Irishman Honoured
Mr. Dermod O'Brien, president of
the Royal Hibernian Academy, has
been made an Honorary Member of
the  Royal  Academy.
Military Appointments
It is officially announced that the
King has been pleased to approve the
following appointments to fill prospective vacancies:
General Sir J. D. P. French to bc
Chief of the Imperial General Staff.
General Sir C. W. Ii. Douglas to
be Inspector-General of the Home
Forces.
Lieutenant-General Sir A. H. Paget, to be General Officer Command-
ing-in-Chief the Forces in Ireland.
Lieutenant-General Sir J. M. Grierson to be General Officer Command-
ing-in-Chief, Eastern Command.
Lieutenant-General W. E. Frank-
lyn to be Military Secretary to the
Secretary of State for War and Secretary of the Selection Board.
Lieutenant-General Sir D. Haig to
be General Officer Commanding-in-
Chief, Aldershot Command.
City and the Coronation
The. expenditure of the City Corporation in festivities and arrangements in celebration of their Majesties' Coronation amounted to £14,-
400, which is over £8,000 less than
the  official  estimate   of  the  cost.
New Garden Suburb
A garden suburb, containing 68 villas, is to be erected at Woking, Surrey, at a cost of £20,000, by the local
co-operative society.
Last of  Horse-Omnibus
Thc London General Omnibus
Company are selling off horses at
the rate of 100 a week, and expect
by the end of next month to have
taken off the road their remaining 94
horse-omnibuses, ancl by a few weeks
later to have sold their last horses.
"We have got 1,300 horses left,"
said an official of the company last
month, "and we arc now selling 200
of them every fortnight. Before each
batch is sold we take a certain number of omnibuses off the roads, and
Bishop of Ossory, and in 1884 succeeded to the Primacy of Australia.
Cardinal Moran was a militant
churchman, whose occasional ventures into politics led to acute controversy in Australia. At his own
expense and at a cost of £80,000 he
founded St. Patrick's Ecclesiastical
College at Manly, Sydney.
Dr. Kelly, coadjutor Archbishop,
will succeed Cardinal Moran as
Archbishop of Sydney.
A Relic of 1782
There was a unique demonstration
recently, at Pictou, Ont, to mark the
taking over for future pieservation
of the historic chapel on Hay Bay,
the first church built in Upper Canada. It was erected in the summer of
1782, under the direction of William
Losse, the pioneer Methodist minister in Canada, and the first itinerant
Methodist preacher in the country.
It was enlarged and rebuilt in 1834,
and used until 1868, since when it
has fallen into disuse. The alst general conference, however, voted to
have this cradle of Methodism
brought back and preserved as a
relic.
The   death-rate   from  the   disd
fell from 2.7 per 1,000 in 1907 to|
per  1,000 in  1908;  in the follov
year   the  rate   declined  to   2.4
1,000, and in 1910 to 2.3 per 1,00
Pockets in Hats
Pockets in ladies' hats are a
eity about to be introduced into
don, and they will be worn on |
autumn and winter millinery.
Their Just Deserts
Seven Dominion government grain
inspectors were recently sentenced at
Winnipeg to terms ranging from two
months to six years for thefts from
freight cars in the Canadian Pacific
yards. The proceeds of their robberies were valued at nearly $10,000.
A Gratifying Exchange
The vessels of the China Mutual
Steam Navigation Co, Ltd, formerly known as the White Funnel line,
and which were acquired a few years
ago by the Blue Funnel line, are to
be withdrawn gradually from the
Liverpool-Vancouver service ancl will
be replaced by larger vessels.
The  Kootenay  Central
The Kootenay Central Railway
Company has men at work grading
from Golden for 40 miles south. The
grading of the line for this distance
will  be  completed by fall.
Westminster Guildhall
Middlesex County Council has accepted, subject to the Local Government Board's sanction, the tender of
Messrs. James Carmichael, Wandsworth, S.W, for the proposed construction of the Guildhall at Westminster. The amount of the tender
was £73,360, while the architect's estimate was  £80,000.
New Wagnerian Tenor
The. first Wagner night of the new
promenade concert season at Queen's
Hall was marked by the appearance
of a new Wagnerian tenor, Mr. Frank
Mullings, who sang the forging songs
from "Siegfried" with fine gusto,
clearness,  and  dramatic force.
Will of the Chief Rabbi
The Very Rev. Dr. Hermann Adler, of 22 Finsbury-square, E.C, and
of 6, Craven Hill, W, Chief Rabbi
of the United Hebrew Congregations
of the British Empire, who died on
July 18 last, aged seventy-two years,
left estate of the gross value of £13,-
528, of whicli the net personality has
been  sworn at   £12,589.
Dr. Adler left bequests to servants,
and about £400 to charitable institutions, chiefly Jewish, the bulk of his
fortune being bequeathed to his wife
and daughters.
The Law of Street Music
Mr. Plowden expressed his views
at Marylebone Police Court recently
on the duties of the police with regard to street musicians. It was, he
said, the duty of a constable, when
a householder complained to him of
street musicians, to take the musicians into custody if they refused to
move away.
The fact that other householders
liked to have thc musicians there did
not alter the law or the constable's
duty towards it.
The Canada Bread Co.
Mark Breden, general manager of
the newly formed Canada Bread
Company, Limited, says that it is the
intention of the company to proceed
immediately with the erection of a
modern bread plant in Winnipeg. He
also intimated that the company
would probably erect plants at Regina, Calgary and Vancouver.
NO  WASHING  TAKEN
During a revival meeting in a Metll
church near Cincinnati a number of corf
were secured and several of them reqif
that instead of sprinkling they be ban
by  immersion.
The  Methodist  church  was  provided I
a  baptismal  font,  but not with  a pool|
mersion   being   infrequent   among   its
sions  to  membership.     So  one  of   thel
cons,  anxious that the  new members
not be disappointed in their wholly laJ
desire   to   be   immersed,   constituted
a  committee  to  call   upon  the  ruling !
of the Baptist church—not the pastor,
rather    haughty    gentleman    who    held
Methodist   is   small   favour,   and   whof
slightly  jealous  of  the   success  of  the]
vival.     The   deacon   explained   the   c|
stances to this pillar and asked as a
that   the   Methodist   converts   might   h|
mersed in the Baptist pool.
"What? _ Immerse Methodists in our
ejaculated the  Baptist leader.
"Certainly.   We would appreciate the|
ness very much, and—■"
"Well,  you go back and tell your
that   our  church   isn't   taking  in   any J
ing!"
DISAPPOINTED TIGERS
A   comical   little   story   comes   froml
bourne.     A   parachutist   named   Sebpll
livened   thc   proceedings   at   a   fete   ll
cending   in   a   balloon   and   descendin]
parachute.    Hc came down in the
Zoo,  and  had   the  narrowest   possible
of landing in the open-topped enclosuJ
taining   the   tigers.     The   disappointml
the   tigers   was   most   touching,     ThaJ
now  constantly   gazing  heavenwards,
contemporary,   lest   they   should   be
pared for the next parachutist from thi
Defying the Regulations
The alien problem in connection
with the salmon fisheries of the Fraser continues to give trouble to the
white fishermen. They complain
that the Japanese make a practice
of going into the deep water off the
Heads and fishing with nets below
the 150-fathom line, catching all the
best of the sock-eyes in defiance of
the  fishery regulations.
To Relieve Congestion
In order to relieve as much as possible the grain congestion at Montreal, the harbour commissioners
have decided to erect an extension to
the new grain elevator now under
construction. The extension will be
a storage elevator ancl will have a
capacity of 850,000 bushels. The
new elevator, when finished, will accommodate 1,772,000 bushels and
when both elevator and extension are
complete, which will be May, 1912,
the port will have elevators with a
total capacity of over 5,000,000
bushels.
A New Opera House
A new opera house to accommodate seven hundred is to be erected
at once in Penticton, from the plans
of Architect P. Edwin Corby.
Presbyterian Zeal
The Presbyterians of Fort George
have decided upon the immediate
erection of a new and handsome
church edifice.
Less Consumption in Ireland
One of the most interesting facts
brought out in the annual report of
the Registrar-General for Ireland, is
the maintenance of the decrease in
the mortality in that country from
tuberculosis, which has now been
continuous since the year 1908.
HELPING   FATHER
A preacher, raising his eyes from
in the midst of his sermon, was p*J
with amazement to see his small sonl
gallery pelting the hearers in the pel
low with horse chestnuts. But wh|
goocl man was preparing a frown
proof, the young hopeful cried out:
"You 'tend to your preaching, dadd|
keep 'em awake."
TO  SUIT ALL TASTES
American Manager (to playwright):
touch up plays, I understand; introduj
business, and that sort of thing?".
Playwright—"Oh, yes."
American  Manager—"Very  well,
ing to the backwoods next week with
and I want you to re-write the plaj
to bring in two bloodhounds and a
NOTICE TO CONTRACTOB
Vernon Court-house.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribe!
der for Court-house, Vernon," will]
ceived by the Honourable the Min
Public Works up to 12 o'clock I
Thursday, the 21st day of Septembc]
for the erection and completion of
house at Vernon, B.C, in the C
Electoral  District.
Plans, specifications, bills of quanti
tract and  forms  of  tender  may  be
or  after   the  31st   day   of  August,
the  offices  of the  Government  Agei
non,  Revelstoke,   New  Westminster,,
the Provincial Timber Inspector, Va|
and  the  Department  of  Public  Woi
liatnent Buildings, Victoria,  B.C.
Intending tenderers can ,by appl
the undersigned, obtain one copy!
drawings and one copy of the spec!
and bills of quantities for the sum o|
five dollars  ($25).
Each tender must be accompaniel
accepted bank cheque or certmcat-I
posit on a chartered bank of Canatl
payable to the rlonourable the Mil
Public Works, for a sum equal to I
per cent, of his tender, which shall
feited if thc party tendering decline I
into contract when called upon tel
Thc cheques or certificates of deposl
successful tenderers will be returned!
upon the execution of the contract, f
Tenders will not be considerel
made out on the forms supplied, sigf
the actual signature of the tendd
enclosed in the envelopes furnished.I
The lowest or any tender not n|
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Ei|
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C, August 24th, 1911.
sept. 2 THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
19
^
Cadillac 1912
Automatically Started, Lighted and Ignited by one Electrical System
Cadillac Progress Endows the Motor Car with New
and Vital Functions
It Draws a Well Defined Line Between the Motor Car of the Past and the Motor Car of the Present
CADILLAC 1912 MODEL—A surprisingly fine car made infinitely finer, an impractical idea resolved into a practical realty
A FEW OF THE IMPROVEMENTS IN THE 1912 CADILLAC
Automatic electric starting device, current generated by dynamo, which  also furnishes current for electric lights and ignition.
Increased power resulting from several motor refinements and new carburetor,  developed  in  our  own  laboratories.   This  new  carburetor  has   not  only
simplified the matter of adjustments, but possesses maximum flexibility and maximum efficiency from low to high speeds without change of adjustment, excepting
air adjustment controlled by small lever at the steering wheel.   We have tested the best known carburetors on the market and have found  nothing possessing
the wide range of efficiency of this one.
Wheels and Tires.   Increased from 34 in. x 4 in. to 36 in. x 4 in.
Brake drums.   Increased from 14 in. to 17 in. diameter.   Service brake has ratchet to lock if desired.
Bodies.   New and handsome designs.   Steel panels.
Gasoline capacity increased to 20 gallons on all models, excepting Phaeton and Roadster, in which the increase is to 18 gallons.   Gasoline gauge on dash
makes emergency tank unnecessary.
SPECIFICATIONS IN   BRIEF
MOTOR—Four-cylinder, four-cycle;  cylinders cast singly, 4!/2 inch bore by 4l_ drop forked yokes, spring perches, tie rod ends and steering spindles.   Front
inch  piston   stroke.    Five-bearing  crank  shaft,   ifl   inch  diameter.    Five- wheels fitted with Timken bearings,
bearing cam shaft. BRAKES—One internal and one external brake direct on wheels, 17-inch by
HORSEPOWER—Actual brake test, 40.2. 2^   inch   drums.   Exceptionally  easy  in  operation.   Both  equipped   with
COOLING—Water, copper-jacketed cylinders, copper inlet and outlet water mani- equalizers.
folds. Gear driven centrifugal pump; radiator tubular and plate type of STEERING GEAR—Cadillac patented worm and worm gear, sector type, ad-
unequalled efficiency; fan attached to motor running on two point ball justable, with ball thrust; \Y_\ inch steering post; 18-inch steering wheel
bearings. with walnut rim;  aluminum spider,
IGNITION—See description under Electrical System. WHEEL BASE—116 inches.
LUBRICATION—Automatic splash system, oil uniformly distributed. TIRES—36-inch by 4-inch.
CARBURETOR—Special Cadillac design of maximum efficiency, water jacketed. SPRINGS—Front,   semi-elliptical,   36   inches   long   by   2   inches   wide.    Rear,
Air may be adjusted from driver's seat. three-quarter   platform.   Sides,   42   inches   long   by   2   inches   wide.   Rear
CLUTCH—Cone type, large, leather faced, with  special  spring in  fly wheel. cross, 39 inches long by 2 inches wide.
Clutch readily removable and most easily operated ever devised. STANDARD  EQUIPMENT—Silk  mohair  top,  with   full  set  storm   curtains.
TRANSMISSION—Sliding   gear,   selective   type,   three   speeds   forward   am! Hood  envelope.   Automobile windshield.    Dynamo with  80 A.  H.  battery
reverse.   Chrome nickel steel gears, running on five annular bearings; bear- for  automatic  starter,  electric  lights,  and  ignition.    Lamps  especially  de-
ings oil tight. signed for Cadillac cars, black enamel with nickel  trimmings;   two head-
CONTROL—Hand gear change lever at driver's right, inside the car. Service lights with adjustable globes to regulate light rays; two side lights, tail
brake, foot lever. Clutch, foot lever. Emergency brake, hand lever at light. Hans gasoline gauge; robe rail; tire irons; set of tools, including
driver's right, outside. Throttle accelerator, foot lever. Spark and throttle pump and tire repair kit; cocoa mat in all tonneaux except closed cars,
levers at steering wheel. Carburetor air adjustment, hand lever under Speedometer, Standard, improved, with 4-inch face and electric light; clock,
steering wheel. STYLES AND PRICES-
DRIVE—Direct shaft to bevel gears of special cut teeth to afford maximum               Touring car    $2700.00
strength.   All gears cut by us.   Drive shaft runs on Timken bearing.   Two Phaeton  $2700.00
universal joints, the forward telescopic, each enclosed in housing and runn- Roadster  $2700.00
in oil bath. Torpedo  $2850.00
AXLES—Rear Timken full floating type;   special  alloy steel live axle  shaft; Coupe   $3250.00
Timken roller bearing.   Double torsion  tube arranged in triangular form, Limousine, "Rothchild"  Model    $4500.00
affording unusual strength.   Front axle, drop forged I-beam section with Prices F. O. B. Victoria.
We have only 50 Cadillacs in our allotment for 1912.   We have a lot of orders booked already for Spring delivery.   If you are anticipating a Cadillac for the
coming year we advise you to book your order at once to insure delivery.
A. H. STYLES & COMPANY
Sole Agents for Vancouver Island
Garage and Salesroom: 1052 Fort St. For Demonstration and Enquiries, Phone 2058
9 20
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,   1911
h
I
The Factory Behind the White Car and
White Truck
Fifty-one Years of Manufacturing Experience
A crew of sign painters sent out
by The Diamond Tire Company have
just completed a winding route from
Memphis, Tenn., to St. Paul, Minn.
The trip began on March 15th and
ended in St. Paul on August 2nd.
The main stops were made ill St.
Loiiis, Kansas City, Omaha, Des
Moines, Cedar Rapids and Minneapolis. Between these places many
side trips were made, so when St.
Paul was reached the total mileage
approximated 12,000 miles.
We presume a motorist could
hardly lose his way now between
Memphis and St. Paul, if he'd only
look for the vividly colored Diamond
Tire advertisements that are painted on barns, fences, and bill boards
between these two cities.
The work of the White truck on
this trip would do credit to any touring car and when one considers that
the truck was of the. 1500-pound capacity and carried a load averaging
2,500 pounds it is a remarkable endorsement for the design and construction  of this machine.
Only one accident marred the trip.
These companies are doing a great
service to motorists by erecting signs
pointing out the best roads to take
and incidentally advertising their product as well. It is their plan to
eventually cover the entire country
with these guide posts.
When it is said that an auto truck
made 56 miles in 8 hrs., kjK min. and
carried a load of 10,660 lbs. it sounds
like a passage from the Arabian
Nights entertainment. This wonder
fete was, however, actually accomplished by the White motor truck and
this record is sworn to by five bona
fide witnesses. The motor truck has
been gradually displacing the horse
in every field of industry. To the
farmer it has become one of the necessities of life. In the industrial
centre its use has become a common
though important factor in facilitating drayage of every description.
They are even employed upon the
field of battle by all the powers and
no fire department would consider itself complete without it. Naturally,
then, the question evolves in the
brain   of   the   man   who   needs   one,
Thos. Plimley and
the Overland
Car
5000 Miles Overland — Wonderful
Performance of a Wonderful Car
—The Story of Miss Scott's Journey Overland.
"Get out of doors and stay there
as much as possible," said my doctor, four years ago, when I was on
the verge of nervous prostration, so
I bought a small car and spent almost every clay on the country roads
around Rochester. When fall came,
I found, instead of being such a nervous wreck as I was in the Spring, I
had gained ten pounds and didn't
seem to know what a nerve was.
Since then I have been driving cars
of one make or another almost constantly, and have been so strong and
healthy that I felt that I was in good
physical condition to make a long
tour this summer, as my drives hitherto have been only in New York
State and Jersey.
While in New York City, one of
my friends made the remark that
while women would always be able
to drive in and around cities, especially in electrics, they would be more
or less dependent upon a man if they
attempted to tour any great distance.
This remark piqued me. While not
a suffraget, it hurt to feel that if I
wished to go anywhere, I must, to
some extent, depend upon a mer.e
man for at least physical aid. This
fact coupled with the love of outdoor
life and adventure prompted me to
accept gladly an offer of a coast-to-
coast trip. I felt that it would prove
to everyone that woman was not always dependent upon man and that
her horizon was bound only by the
limits of her own mind.
In making this trip, I wanted to
prove to every woman and girl that
Near Cedar Falls, Iowa, the outfit
was travelling over roads heavy with
mud and to avoid collision with a
passing vehicle the driver turned too
far to one side of the road and the
outside wheel slipped into a ditch
causing the machine to turn completely over. None of the crew was
seriously hurt and the motor and
wheels continued running until stopped in the usual way. The only
damage done to the truck was a
twisted steering column and the fenders were somewhat bent.
The truck's climbing ability was
demonstrated when near Council
Bluffs. Iowa, thc party lost their way
and started across country seeking
the main road. They came to a place
where a small canal was being constructed and iu order to cross it was
necessary to construct an improvised
platform. On the other side of thc
ditch was a mound of loose dirt
high which had been thrown out of
the hole. The driver speeded up the
car and easily mounted to the top of
the obstruction. On account of the
sharpness of the apex the truck had
to be helped over the top. This was
a very simple job. Besides doing
their work the outfit averaged to
cover eighty-five to one hundred miles
per day, and averaged fifteen to seventeen miles per gallon of gasoline
on the entire trip. The driver states
that on roads that were at all good
a speed of thirty-live miles an hour
was easily made.
The Diamond Rubber Company
has several White trucks at work in
various parts of the country doing
this same kind of work. The Goodrich Rubber Company also uses these
trucks on their "Good-Roads-Mark-
ink' tours.
"Which is the best?" The above record should satisfy the most skeptical. It is a record so far unequalled
by any other truck in existence and
a source of much envy and awe to
competing firms. The White Motor
Truck Company, the maker of this
truck, with the wonderful record, is
at present enjoying a area of prosperity that puts a very optimistic
face upon the future. The secret of
their success lies in the fact that they
have centralized their every energy
towards the development of this
truck and although their passenger
cars are equal to any car of that
kind on earth, they have become a
secondary matter in relation to the
White truck. Their greatest recommendation lies iu the repetition of
orders of former buyers. Those who
already own one invariably, if in
need of another, order the same car.
The White truck is a time, money
and labour saving proposition. And
the man who wishes to conduct his
business along economic lines would
do well to try one. Their constant
and ever-increasing use is evidence of
their economy. Endurance is a proverbial quality of the White motor
truck.
THE   WHITE   GARAGE
Cars of Quality
Telphone 2908 1218 Wharf St.
Ask for Demonstration
SURPRISED
A sea captain and his mate went ashore on
getting into port and made for the nearest
restaurant.
They ordered soup; when it arrived the
captain examined thc curious-looking fluid and
shouted:   "Here, waiter, what d'ye cal! this?"
"Soup, sir," said the waiter.
"Soup?" said thc captain, turning to the
mate; "blame me, Bill, if you and me ain't
been sailin' on soup all our lives and never
knowed it."
it does not take a great physical
strength or, as some put it, a knack
for mechanics, but just ordinary judgment and good sense, which all American women have, as is well known.
My car equipment was standard
with no extras of any kind with the
exception of two additional tires. It
had, of course, top, windshields and
speedometer, and I had the tonneau
removed and in its place a box built
to hold wearing apparel, kodak, maps,
etc.
I expected to take it easy going
across, stopping a day or so in every
town or even running forty or fifty
miles north or south of my regular
route, if it might bc called that, to
some interesting historical place or
pretty summer resort on an inland
lake, such as abound in Illinois and
Wisconsin. From Denver on, I looked forward to taking a camping outfit ancl living out of doors as much
as possible. I took a rifle, expecting
to have some fair shooting. In
short, if anyone asked me for my
idea of an ideal vacation, I can think
of nothing that would come as near
to it as my trip; ancl what few hardships I encountered, I think were
easily offset by the many pleasant incidents and general enjoyment I derived from tl\e trip.
— Blanche Stuart Scott.
Story of "Lady Overland"
Lady Overland, the little white ancl
silver car which Miss Blanche Stuart
Scott drove, unassisted, 5,393 miles
from New York to San Francisco, is
a stock car, model 38 A 25 H. P.
Overland.
Although no attempt for speed was
made, Lady Overland unconsciously
established a record; for, dividing the
hours of actual driving up into twen-
E. S. STILES, Auctioneer & Valuato\
Upholstering, French Polishing, Packing
and Removing
Leather Work and Special Designs Made to Order
Loose Covers and Boat Cushions
Iioq Fort St.,
Victoria, B. C.
Phone 21A
Phone 2235
The B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co1
Successor to Charles Hayward
Funeral Director and Embalmer
1016 Govt. St. Established 1867 Victoria, B.
R. RUTLEY
Ladies' Tailor
has just received the latest fashions
Ladies' Tailor Made
Suits
We undertake to make both Fancy and Plain Si
and guarantee the work and material to be of
best.   We will be pleased to forward patterns
styles on receipt of P. C. and guarantee satisfactij
408-409 Sayward Block
A for.ee of this kind
ti  23c.   per  runnii]
I..': ■_::.(!  i:i   rolls,
can pui it on the posl
out special tools,
the origir.ators of thii
Have sold hundreds 1
for enclosing parks,!
gardens, cemeteries, cl
station   grounds,
Supplied in any lend
sired,   and   paintedl
white or green.   AlsoT
Farm Fences and Gal
ting,  Baskets, Mata
Tools, etc.   Ask for |
catalog, the most
fence catalog ever pi
MESSRS. E. G. PRIOR & COMPANY
Victoria and Vancouver, B.O.
UPTONS TE
OVER 2 MILLION PACKAGES SOLD WEEKLY
ty-four clays, the time would be seventeen clays ancl the distance covered
two thousand miles more than the
last made record of fifteen days. This
is allowing a ten-hour average for
each  of  the  forty-one  driving  clays.
There was no shift at the wheel
—Miss Scott drove the car every mile
of the road. Block and tackle weren't
used once, but a great deal of the
extra mileage was because of detours
made to avoid unnecessarily bad
places in the roads. Better time was
made in this way ancl the result something almost unheard of. Absolutely
no motor trouble at all; not a loose
rod, not a lazy cylinder, no carburetor  adjustments  except  in  the  high
altitudes, everything running
fectly when she pulled into
cisco   as   when   leaving   Nel
and two of the original spa|
as they were  first placed.
There   were   hard   roads
sands;  six springs were bro
many tires blown out; truss 1
and   snapped,  but   the  fran
twisted and the axles bore tl
mous strain they were subj-J
Characterized    by    fewer
than     any    other     transco|
drive; heralded in every clay ;
with  wildest  enthusiasm;  a I
ful record ancl a marvelous ll
This is a true story of La<J
land. THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
21
The Women's
\<_w
Page
i_W>
summer evening gowns, white
[pale tinted silks, and daintily
Ired brocades, lace-flounced, and
Iwise adorned with lace, are pre-
|l to the more elaborate confec-
J of the formal season. Pretty
|ng gowns of transparent ma-
show the new combination of
tray and beige, a combination
Jtruly works wonders with the
Icomplexion that accompanies a
|ar shade of pale, dull gold hair
alas , only occasionally. Of
j colours, a gown worn by such
luty was wonderfully enhanced
Iilf-hidden touches of shrimp
J mingled with the lace of the
fee and sleeves.
brim of the little "Niniche" hat
lite Tagal, worn with it, was
Id low over the ears. Above
prehead it poked into a point
ared high at the back, showing
le hair there. Clipped, beige-
fed feathers clustered about the
In a narrow border and held by
ly bow of shrimp pink velvet, a
linch of beige-coloured heron's
|rs smartly waved their ragged
from one side. The combin-
[of beige and white, or beige
lli-gray, is one of the unexpect-
Icesses of the season. Appear-
|te, it is likely to  continue its
until well into the autumn.
Inen  who  object  to  the  great
]ty of false hair necessary to fill
ace at the back of the head left
pred by the "Niniche hat," sub-
puffings of tulle matching the
of  their  hair,  or  of the  hat
on  yellow  gowns  in  silk and
voile, heavily embroidered in
lis a combination eagerly taken
•swagger women.   For the rea-
1 seldom appeals to an unculti-
laste it has particularly attracting    Smoke  gray with  cream
and white linen gowns trim-
vith   yellow  linen—the   yellow
|an straw, called here "biscotte"
rie  coarsest  sort,  like  kitchen
pr common bagging, and pale
Ibrown,  are  all  tone  combina-
|t present confined to exclusive
They mark  a  distinct line
|"i  them and the masses, who
ling  to   the   brilliant-coloured
lin white facings that, reach-
Jir height some weeks ago, are
landoned    by    the mondaines.
the  knowing  accessories  of
Jimple but chic summer gowns
Kelt of black varnished leather.
Ian   important  part  this  inch-
Ijind plays in their adornment!
I *   *   *
liugh the extremely tight skirts
lng ground there is yet little
|de of material. The width
Iskirt is merely eased a bit, in
lof grace and freedom in walk-
Ime fulness being displayed in
lie or drapery, while the foun-
Ibf the gown is not perceptibly
ll—an inch or so being only a
lile quantity. In fact, a little
|de is absolutely necessary for
■[erie or lace gowns which, if
Id too tightly about the figure,
Irm immediately and become
lible. The modern fashion of
|enwork designs requires that
either reinforced underneath
transparent foundation that
Ihem from pulling apart, or
pre shall be looseness enough
a strain.
lis better adapted for autumn
|tan almost any other colour,
light enough to come in just
Ir the warm days that linger
|:o    November,    and   yet    is
fciough in aspect to do service
the winter if it is the only
gown you have.   A suit de-
in    a   rough-finished,    fine-
Itheviot of a colour known as
cinder gray, which is not light enough
to be perishable. The skirt of this
model is especially good, for though
it preserves the straight lines it is far
from tight, and follows the new
move toward fuller skirts in its over-
draping. The edge of this apron
drapery carries down exactly from
the line of the jacket fastening. The
skirt is raised slightly above the
waist-line and is finished without a
belt. Simple and conventional as the
coat is, it is yet very smart, and its
collar of white cloth is excellent.
(This is not as extravagant as it may
sound, for this cloth cleans readily
with pipe clay.) Purple and white
striped silk is used for the lining, and
the buttons are of the suit material.
There is a shade of tan known as
oatmeal that is a decided success
when worked out to suit.
* *   *
You can make for yourself very
handsome blouses at a small cost if
you adhere to a simple yet smart
model that is a favourite this summer with Newport women. It is of
sheer linen with tucks an eighth of an
inch wide running lengthwise
through the body of the waist, the
only trimming a very tiny edging of
Irish lace, so narrow that it can
hardly be described as having any
width at all. This is sewn on the
edge of every sixth tuck, making
from three to four rows on either
side of the front. There is no frill
at the middle front, but a two-inch
band bordered by the Irish edging
and fastening through with small-
sized crochet buttons. The sleeves
are perfectly plain and at the wrist
have a turned-back cuff with the lace
around it and held together by links.
For a collar there is a plaited frill
of the material, hemstitched and finished with the edging. Most of
these blouses are made from handkerchief linen, but the quality, to be
suitable, must be very fine, and this
is expensive. You will find batiste
more in keeping with your purse and
just as effective. The cost of the lace
is very little, the high price asked
for the waist at the makers being
due to the handwork that it entails.
By doing the sewing yourself you
will have a model that cannot be outdone in distinction by any wardrobe.
Whatever suggests the quaint or
the old-fashioned is especially favoured, and tliere is a predisposition for
what is daring and barely escapes being bizarre. Piquant little ruffllings
and ruchings, shirred bandings, and
the flutings which were treasured
trimmings of years ago, are cropping up with such persistency to
adorn, both skirts and blouses that
they cannot possibly have their in
nings in this short summer, and so
are bound to reappear on the pretty
silks and other indoor gowns of the
fast approaching autumn. Just now
there is a craze for cordings and fine
tucks arranged in masses, just as they
used to be when the cloth itself was
woven at home and all the exquisitely fine stitches taken by hand. One
sees a dozen rows, or two dozen,
making up the border of a handsome
linen, with lace, if there is any at all,
quite a secondary consideration; or a
series of tucks, it may be, in carefully graduated sizes, forming a stole
or a panel, while some of the daintiest blouses are completely of hand-
done tucks and hand-run cordings.
* *   *
The motor hat, of malachite green
felt, trimmed with a rosette of darker
green velvet and a long veil of green
mousseline de soie, is very smart. The
evening hat of gold, bead-embroidered net, is trimmed with immensely
high loops of black wired net; a
wreath of coloured silk roses circles
the base of these wired loops.
A Study of Arnold
Bennett
To Mr. Arnold Bennett life is interesting as an extraordinary experience. It is the most interesting thing
that ever happened to him. A pageant of delight, a phenomenon to be
forever curious about, and a miracle
for endless reflection. It interests
him not as a spectator, but as a participator; only occasionally as a virtuoso. He is insatiably curious about
it. Possessing in an eminent degree
what is called an experiencing nature,
he absorbs life, at every pore, and
brings it forth, vivid and glowing,
from the crucible of his ardent mind.
He brings nothing to life and takes
nothing from it, but imparts a radiancy, a vitalizing quality to all that
his experience seizes on. He makes
you surprised that life is such a lively matter. Life just as it is, Mr. Bennett does not protest that one aspect
of life is more interesting than another. All life that he experiences
is equally interesting—equally phenomenal and miraculous.
He will take you into a commonplace locality situate in the Five
Towns, introduce you to commonplace people doing common-place
things in a common-place way, and
yet you are interested. Not because
you are persuaded that these common-place people are not really common-place. Mr. Bennett's lasses and
geese are not represented as queens
and swans, but because the impact of
an intensely interested mind on such
scenes has generated the necessary
heat to inform them with life. The
interest is communicated, and it is
a truth Mr. Bennett helps us to realize that any and every phase of life
is interesting to us if it is served up,
so to speak, alive and kicking.
It is a psychological truism that a
work of art inevitably communicates
the condition in which it is produced.
What is written easily will be read
easily; the work of a thoughtful
man will be read thoughtfully; what
is pleasant to write will be pleasant
to read; and thus it is the passionate
interest with which Mr. Bennett portrays life that endues his work with
the power to make life equally interesting to others.
Many people imagine that Mr.
Bennett has made a deliberate choice
of the material of the best-known of
his novels; that he has given us an
insight into life in the Five Towns
because it seemed new ground to
break, and nobody had done it before
him. This is not the case. Every
novelist worth considering writes at
first hand, and only out of his own
experience. His material is his life,
and Mr. Bennett has only written of
the life that went on around him. It
happened to be life in the Five
Towns. Had it been life anywhere
else, Mr. Bennett would have described it with equal zest and fidelity.
He has a consummate gift for accurately describing what he sees. It
is the distinguishing feature of his
work. Drawing always from the
model, as it were, he takes nothing
on trust, but scrutinizes everything
that comes within his experience, and
records it with almost scientific
exactness. Mr. Bennett describes,
we should say, rather than expresses;
is curious about things rather than
filled with wonder at them. He
makes you see people as they are,
and as you could have seen them for
yourself if you had been as interested
in them. But Mr. Bennett is something more than an infallible
draughtsman. He draws not only
accuracy, but with great tenderness
and sympathy; with a relish and
sprite-like humour. Eschewing sentimentality as a mist more than anything else responsible for distorting
the true outlines of life, Mr. Bennett
exhibits a fine feeling for life; his
sympathies arc always on the side of
humanity.
Not all Mr. Bennett's books are
concerned with the Five Towns. Circumstances presently led him elsewhere, and enlarged the ambit of his
experience. The first twenty-one or
two years of his life were spent in
Hanley,  where    he  was  born,    and
Finch & Finch
Ladies9 Outfitters
A Most Complete Range of
Fall Goods are now being
displayed at
Victoria's Premier
Fashion Centre
Consisting of
NEW FALL SUITS
MOTOR AND TRAVELLING TWEED COATS
CHIC MILLINERY
FRENCH HAND-MADE WHITEWEAR
THOMSON  GLOVE   FITTING  CORSETS
NEW SWEATER COATS
"HOLEPROOF," "ONYX" AND "EVERWEAR"
HOSIERY
" PERRIN," KID AND FABRIC GLOVES
LADIES' BLANKET ROBES
CHILDREN'S " GOODNIGHT " ROBES AND
PYJAMAS
GIRLS' AND MISSES' CLOTH COATS
CHILDREN'S SAILOR DRESSES AND PLUSH
COATS
NEW OSTRICH AND MARABOUT
FEATHER STOLES
Also Smallwares
Never before have we been in a position to place before our
Customers such a Wide Range of Fall Goods as
at present, and we invite a visit to our
Up-to-Date Sections
Finch & Finch
717-719 Yates St       Victoria, B. C.
where as a youngster of 18 he entered into the world of print through
the portals of the local paper. These
first contributions did not meet with
the unqualified praise of the provincial editor. They were sketches of
life in the Five Towns, and were provocative of such difficulties as might
have been anticipated between a contributor who presented life as it was
and an editor who demanded life as
in the opinion of his readers, it ought
to be.
It is amusing to think that Mr.
Bennett was pigeon-holed for the
law. His father, a practising solicitor, looked to his son to carry on the
legal traditions of the family. With
this intent Mr. Bennett came to London, and under cover of a solicitor's
clerkship in Lincoln's-inn-ficlds began to form literary tastes, not with
any vaulting ambition, but in obedience to a natural lust for knowing
about such things. The law was not
an engaging mistress; the wooing
was desultory and lukewarm, and
when the first examination occurred
she    administered    her   rebuke    by
plowing   the    philanderer    in   every
single subject.
It will be encouraging to those
about to write a novel to know
that Mr. Bennett, after accompilsh-
ing a certain amount of miscellaneous
journalism, approached the task of
writing his first novel, "A Mau from
the North," with a good deal of diffidence. Acquaintances persuaded
him that "he had it in him," though
he protested he had no gift for novel
writing. Their persuasions luckily
prevailed, and were amply justified.
The usual travail accompanied the
first-born, but it came into the world
alive, and was presently frocked by
Mr. Lane. It is now in its fourteenth year, and ready for a new
suit.—Toronto Saturday Night.
A   HINT
One day recently a school teacher was examining his class in history, and asked one
of  the  hoys:   "How  did   Charles  I.   die?"
Thc boy paused for a moment, and one
of the other hoys, hy way of prompting
hiin, put his arm up to his collar to signify
decapitation. Hoy Xo. i at once grasped, as
hc thought, his friend's meaning, and exclaimed, to tlle great amusement of the
class:    "Please, sir, he died of cholera." 22
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
I  i
*
Society
Miss Garrett of Seattle is staying
with Mrs. C. E. Pooley.
* *   *
Mrs. Van Innis of Vancouver was
a guest at the  Empress  during the
week.
* *   *
Mrs. James K. Rebbeck of Vancouver was visiting friends in Victoria,
for a few days this week.
* *   *
Mr. Carew Gibson, Vancouver,
spent a day or two in Victoria during the past week.
* *   *
Mrs. John Hope and son of Vancouver, are staying with Mr. and Mrs.
James   Dunsmuir  at  "Hatley  Park."
The Messrs. Floier from Victoria
are enjoying the fishing at Cowichan
Lake.
Mrs. Berkeley, who has been visiting in Vancouver, has returned to
Victoria and returned to the "Angela."
* *   *
Mrs. Rismuller, Burdette avenue,
Mrs. Albert Griffiths and Miss Gaudin made a delightful trip by motor
to Duncans and Cowichan this week.
* *   *
Mrs. John Piggott will be hostess
at an "at home" to be given in the
Alexandar Club on Wednesday, September 20th.
* *   *
There will be a meeting of the
Daughters of the Empire at the Alexandra Club on Tuesday, September
12th, at 2.30 p.m. A large attendance
is requested.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gordon, 1138
Richardson street, left on Wednesday for a two months' trip to Montreal, Toronto, New York and Boston.
The many friends of Mr. Gresham
Williams of the Northern Crown
Bank, Victoria branch, will regret to
learn that he is lying seriously ill at
the Jubilee Hospital and that grave
fears are entertained as to his ultimate recovery.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Matthews and
party motored from Victoria to
Cowichan Lake, during the week, and
were guests at the Lakeside Hotel
for a couple of days.
Miss Lomas, from Duncan, Miss
Wilemar from Comox, Mr. Wilfred
Prevost from Duncan, and Mr. Bert
Green from Victoria, were among
the guests at the Lakeside Hotel,
Cowichan Lake, during the week.
*   *   *
Among the guests registered at the
Riverside Hotel, Cowichan Lake, during the past week were: Emile Bennett (Missoula, Montana), G. Grigs-
by, John Dilworth, A, B. Gonnasson,
A. Nelson, Benj. Gonnasson, C S.
Gonnasson, A. T. S. Shewan, Mr.
and Mrs. S. P. Moody, Mr. and Mrs.
Wm.  Bell, Victoria.
Mrs. Herbert Carmichael, Oak Bay,
gave an informal dance for young
people early in the week.
Among the guests were: The
Misses McCallum, Wolfenden, Gibson, Boggs, Scott, /Maclure, Fort,
Heyland, Mr. and Mrs. Townsend and
the Messrs. Matthews, Monteith,
Barton, Lawson, McCallum, Rowcroft, O'Grady, Thomas, Spencer,
Gray, Fort, Brown, Raymur, Scott,
Heyland and others.
*   *   *
The dance given in honour of the
visiting cricketers in the Alexandra
Club last week, proved a great success.
Among those present were: Mr.
and Mrs. C. E. Pooley, Mrs. P. A.
Irving, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs. Gray, Mrs.
Walter Langley, Mrs. S. Wise, Mrs.
Nixon, Mr. and Mrs. S. James, Mrs.
Galliher, Mrs. J. Bryden, Miss Garrett, Miss Pooley, Miss Baker, Mr.
and Mrs. C. M. Roberts, Mr. and Mrs.
Norman Rant, Mr. and Mrs. V. Eliot,
Mrs. Hickey, Mr. and Mrs. Floyer,
Mrs. Genge, Mrs. A. Gore, Mrs. A.
W. Harvey, Miss Blackwood, Miss
Hickey, Miss Gray, Miss Little, Miss
Devereaux, Misses Dunsmuir, Miss
Finlayson, Mr. and Mrs. H. Pooley,
Miss Coombe, Misses Mason, Miss
Irving, Miss Day, Miss Kennedy,
Miss Rant, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas,
Mr. and Mrs. L. S. York, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Gillespie, Miss Gillespie,
Miss McDowell, Miss Rome, Miss
Lawson, Miss Barnard, Miss McB.
Smith, Miss Angus, Mr. and Mrs.
Byng-Hall, Mr. and Mrs. W. D.
York, the Philadelphia Cricket Team,
and the Messrs. Arbuckle, Kane,
Twigg, Ross, Cuppage, Martin,
James, Keefer, Monteith, Loenholm,
Marshall, Silver, Dalby, Bullen, B.
Irving, Angus, Eberts, Bagshawe,
Prior, Rome, Morton, Oldfield, Gore-
Langton, Montague, Gore-Langton,
Galliher,  Bromley and  many others.
The marriage of Miss Marguerite
Little and Mr. Despard Twigg was
solemnized at Christ Churqh on
Wednesday afternoon. The bride,
who was given away by her father,
wore a lovely gown of silver brocade, trimmed pearl embroidery, the
design being shamrocks. She wore a
Limerick veil, held in place by a coronet of orange blossom and carried
a bouquet of bridal roses.
Miss Lucy Little, maid of honour,
and the Misses Dunsmuir, Miss Audain,   and   Miss   Kirk   were   daintily
gowned in pale pink mousseline de
soie with touches of pale blue and
little Empire coats of pink taffeta
with roses, forming dainty Empire
bouquets.
Their hats were large pink tagel
straw, trimmed with pink lace,
touches of gold and tiny bouquets
of link and blue leather, and were
lined with pale blue, the hand bouquets were of pale pink surrounded
by pale blue.
Mrs. Little's gown was of white
satin, with an overdress of black
chantilly lace, with blue embroidery.
A smart hat of white lined with
black velvet and a white plume tipped
with  blue.
After the ceremony a reception
was held at the residence of the
bride's parents, The Highlands.
The bride wore a blue tailored suit
and small blue beaver hat with
touches of blue and green to go
away in. Colonel Prior's residence
at Shawnigan was kindly lent for the
honeymoon.
A   STORY   OF   THE   SCOTCH   EXPRESS
A man entered a sleeping carriage at London.
"Look here, guard," said he, "I want to
get out at Rugby. Now mind you call me.
I may be a bit sleepy, but don't you mind
what I say or do. If I don't feel inclined
to wake up when you call me, you just get
hold of me and thorw me out, and here's
half-a-cro\vn  for you."
"All right, sir," said the guard; "thank
you."
Thc tarin steamed into Edinburgh about
six  o'clock in the morning.
A man emerged from thc berth and
alighted   on   the  platform.
"Guard,   where   are  we?"   asked   the  man.
"Edinburgh,   sir."
"Edinburgh!" shrieked the man in a towering passion. "I thought I told you to
call me at Rugby?"
At this the guard looked up inquiringly.
"Are you the gentleman that gave me the
half-crown?"
"Yes,   I   am,"   answered  the  man   fiercely.
The guard was sorely puzzled. "Now I
wonder who the gentleman was that I threw
out of the train at Rugby?" were the only
words he could utter.
Sweedish Massag
Medical Gymnastic
Vibratory Treatmer
G. Bjornsfelt, SJV
Phone 1856
821 Fort
TELEPHONES
248 AND 249
A. E. KEi
PR0PRIE1
Pacific Transfe
Co.
Trucking and Expressing
Baggage Checked and Furniture
Removed to any part of City
504 fif 506 FORT STREI
VICTORIA, B. C.
NO   WONDER
Mrs.   Baye—"She   is   simply   mad   on   the
subject   of   germs,   and   sterilizes   and   filters
everything in the house."
"How does she get along with her family?"
"Oh, even her relations are strained."
Mrs. S. Shelton
Ye Old Country Dry Goo
Store, 734 Yates St.
English Serge Dress Skirts, navy-
black.    Machine stitched bottoi
$2.25 each.   Come and see.
ART PERFECTED
Donald, who was keen on fishing,
to dress his own fly-hooks. He w
by   a  crony  one  day,   who   said:
"I hear ye're begun to dress yer a
noo',  Donal\    Is that true?"
"It's a' that," answered Donald.
"An' yer can put them up onyth
teral   like ?"   inquired  the  crony.
"I dinna ken for that," replied
"but there were a spider ran away
of them yesterday."
GENUINE   PLUCK
Jones—"Are  you   the   man   who
wife a lot of impudence?"
Brown™"I  am."
Jones—"Shake!    You're a hero."
Why Not Enjoy All the Comforts of Home From
the Beginning ?    You—Every Young Couple May
You say you cannot?   We say you can, and if you'll but come to this store we will show you how you can, for this is a store that
will make possible a home for everyone.   Home furnishings here to satisfy every longing, prices to satisfy every purse,
and the quality of the very highest.   All this assures you a home of your own.
Sets
3-Piece Parlor Suite, in mahogany finish, upholstered in
denim, settee and 2 arm chairs, latest design high
backs.   You'll like this suite, and not the price..$35.00
3-Piece Mahogany Finish Parlor Suite, consisting of
settee, arm rocker and arm chair, upholstered in green
denim, backs are also upholstered, massive design,
only $55.00
5-Piece Parlor Suite, mahogany finish with settee and
spring rockers, arm chair, and 2 parlor chairs are
upholstered seats and backs, of floral design in tapestry, carved throughout of exquisite design, only $75.00
3-Piece Solid Mahogany Parlor Set, consisting of settee,
one large arm rocker and chair upholstered in denim,
is of handsome new design  $85.00
3-Piece Mahogany Parlor Suite, including settee and
round chair with round back and arms ancl parlor
chair in the very latest exquisite design. Very reasonable for the three pieces at  $100.00
Saturday Evening
Specials
English Steel Fry Pans
WA, WA, and 12 inch
25c
Chairs
Reception Chair, inlaid mahogany, upholstered in pretty
green silk _ $13.50
Reception Chair, mahogany rocker, upholstered back and
seat in pretty material  $22.50
Reception  Chair,  mahogany  finish,  upholstered in  silk,
at.  $18.50
Reception Chair, mahogany, upholstered in denim, $14.00,
rocker to match  $15.00
Parlor Arm  Chair, in mahogany finish,  upholstered in
denim   $8.50
Parlor Arm Chair, upholstered in denim, $12.50, $13.00,
and  $15.00
Solid Arm Chair, solid mahogany, upholstered back and
seat in denim  $37.50
Rocker  to   match    $40.00
Parlor Arm Chair, upholstered back and seat in green
denim  $45.00
Rocker to match, latest handsome design $47.50
Easy Chairs
Parlor Tables
Easy Arm Chair, all upholstered in tapestry  $11.00
Empress Arm Chair, upholstered back and arms and seat in denim $30.00
Easy Arm Chair, all upholstered in silk tapestry $25.00
Arm Chair, upholstered in velour, back arms, etc $20.00
Parlor Tables, in mahogany finish, from $35.00 to  ; $3.25
Parlor Tables, in golden oak, up from  ! $3.25
Parlor Tables, in golden finish, up from  $1.50
Parlor Tables, in solid mahogany, at  $30.00
ON EACH TABLE IN OUR WINDOWS IS A PIECE OF KINRAN, THE LATEST SENSATION IN FLOWER VASES
Be Sure that You
See Our Saturday
Evening Specials
Be Sure that You
See Our Saturday
Evening Specials THE WEEK, SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,  1911
23
(Continued from Page i)
ice of the application of the railway
inies.   It was therefore issued delib-
f, and for the express purpose of
hing  them  with   American   labour,
luncan Ross in a lengthy letter to the
admits this and attempts to justify
estimating the value  of his  argu-
it must be borne in mind that Mr.
a contractor, or a sub-contractor, of
and Trunk Pacific.   It must also be
sered that  in the contest  for the
Atlin division Mr. Ross is receiving
11 support of the Grand Trunk in-
Whether or not this circumstance
ulated to depreciate the value of Mr.
defence of the Grand Trunk Rail-
company and the Dominion Govern-
nay safely be left to the judgment of
blic.   What the voters are most con-
with is that the Dominion Governed issue a private circular through its
ration agent of which nothing was
the public or on the floor of the
although the House was sitting at
ie, and, what is perhaps more singular,
ch nothing was said when Mr. Bar-
aised the question in the House dur-
last week of the Session.   He was
ining on behalf of the working-men
oria of the wholesale importation of
.bour.   He claimed that this was bene in violation of the Immigration
Nothing would have been simpler
Dr Mr. Frank Oliver or Mr. Mac-
King to have pointed out that the
ation agents were acting on special
tions,  for the express purpose of
X the wishes of the railway com-
This was the only possible answer
inister who desired to be "frank or
" but nothing was said, ancl it was
I the matter came up in the local
that  the  circular  was discovered,
lonist has asked Mr. Templeman the
.rtinent question: "Did he know of
lance of the circular at the time, and
a party to it ?"   Mr. Templeman has
refused to answer, yet it is a fair
and the electors are entitled to
hat the attitude of the Minister was
in this connection. If in the affirmative, it
means that Mr. Templeman approved a
relaxation of the immigration clauses
which has resulted in bringing in some hundreds of aliens while many of our own
workmen were unemployed. It has also
had the effect of an attempt to reduce
wages. If Mr. Templeman did not know,
it places him in the humiliating position of
having been ignored in a matter of vital
importance, although he is the only Minister representing the district immediately
affected. ' As to the progress of the campaign generally there is no reason to modify the opinion expressed in these columns
for several weeks past, that the Liberals
are conducting the campaign without courage or conviction, and nothing short of a
miracle can save Mr. Templeman and Mr.
Ralph Smith from overwhelming defeat.
The National and Imperial aspects of the
Reciprocity question continue to loom bigger ancl bigger in every part of the Dominion. The number of well-known Liberals
who are seceding from the party ranks on
this question increases daily. Men of the
type of Mr. Thomas Donovan, a life-long,
consistent Liberal, are finding it impossible
to stay with their party when any question
of allegiance to the Flag is threatened.
The country is already convinced that this
is the crux of the question, and the conviction presages not so much a Conservative victory as a victory for British ancl
Imperial sentiment.
Without any disrespect to the Mayor it may
be said that Victoria might on occasion
have a Mayor who was not thoroughly "au
fait" with agricultural matters, and to make
him "ex officio" president of an expert organisation is a mistake. In Dr. Tolmie
we have an undoubted expert and one to
whose loyalty ancl energy the ultimate success of the Agricultural Association is
mainly clue. Under his continued direction
the citizens of Victoria need have no fear
about the future. It is impossible to say
more about the exhibits than that they are
more numerous and excellent than in previous years. It may seem invidious to mention any one particular district, especially
in face of the various awards of the judges,
but The Week wishes to say that it was
most impressed by the surprisingly' good
exhibit from the Metchosin district. Some
of the fruit from this section was a revelation, especially the peaches, which have not
been surpassed by any produced in British
Columbia, unless it be a few special ones
grown on the celebrated ranch of the late
Mr. Frank Richter at Keremeos. If
Metchosin can continue to put up such an
exhibit it is bound to make a great advance
in popular favour as a farming district.
$1.40 per yard to the Canadian Mineral
Rubber Company. This decision justifies
all that The Week said, but still leaves the
public without any explanation as to why
the same course was not adopted in the
first instance. In this connection it is also
well to remember that the competition of
the Worswick Company has had the effect
of reducing the Canadian Mineral Rubber
Company's bid to a figure about eight cents
lower than on the former occasion. It will
probably be as difficult to get an answer to
the question why the Council have acted
as they have as it will be for the Colonist
to obtain any reply to its very pertinent
questions addressed to Mr. Templeman—
at any rate until after the election.
THE FALL FAIR—All the goocl
things which were predicted for the
Fall Fair have been realised. To
sum up the situation in a few words it may
be said that an institution whicii only a
few years ago appeared to be moribund
has by excellent management been brought
to a state of vigour ancl success. This is
the result of good organisation ancl hard
work. The credit must be given to the
members of the Committee ancl most of it
undoubtedly belongs to Dr. Tolmie ancl Mr.
George Sangster. The election of the former gentleman to the position of President
is a move which everyone will applaud.
PAVING CONTRACTS—All things
come to those who wait—even paving contracts. A few months ago
The Week animadverted strongly on the
action of the City Council in awarding the
whole of the paving contracts then being
let to the Canadian Mineral Rubber Company. It was pointed out that the Worswick Company put in a lower tender on
about twenty streets near their asphalting
plant, and that the acceptance of their tender would have resulted in a saving of
$5,000. The Council in its wisdom ignored
the lowest tender and made a present of
the $5,000 to the Canadian Mineral Rubber
Company. Three months later they have
reversed their own action under precisely
similar circumstances, ancl have divided the
contract, giving 65,000 yards at a uniform
bid of $1.35 a yard to the Worswick Company and 70,000 yards at an average of
A GREAT HONOUR—It is a great
honour to be elected President of
so learned and important a Society
as the Pacific North-West Library Association; it is a still greater honour when
the electee is a young man. By electing
Mr. E. O. S. Scholefield to this position the
Association has recognised the sterling
worth of one who has attained a very high
position in the public service of this Province, and has shown himself to be a most
capable ancl indefatigable Provincial Librarian. Only those who have occasion
to visit Mr. Scholefield's office frequently
have any conception of the amount of
work he gets through under the serious
handicap of cramped quarters ancl an insufficient staff. It is gratifying to know
that his Department will be the first to be
housed in commodious quarters in the new
buildings, when he will for the first time
have an opportunity to place the Provincial
Library upon a sound footing. Outside the
specific duties of his office Mr. Scholefield
has proved himself to be a book-lover, a
student and an archivist; he has unearthed
many treasures of profound historic ancl
literary value, and in "his spare moments
has found time to write a number of
treatises to which he will yet add many
more, and whicli will no doubt ultimately
find their way into book form.
s
p
E
E
D
W
E
L
L
SPEEDWELL
Model 12 F, Special Touring Car, 60 H. P.
Seven Passenger
Model 12 H, 50 H. P., Semi-Racer Roadster
Victoria Motor Company
Sole Agents for Vancouver Island for Speedwell Pleasure Cars and Speedwell Trucks
Garage and Salesroom, 926 Johnson Street, Victoria, B. C.   Telephone 2861 \
24
THE WEEK,  SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 9,   1911
la
'
1
Thc Car That
Beals Them All
WHITE PLEASURE
& COMMERCIAL
CARS
1912 Model, Six Cylinder, 60 H. P., Seven Passenger
Touring Car
1912 Model, 30 H. P., Five
Touring Car
ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION
W
H
I
T
E
W
H
I
T
E
The WHITE 5 ton Gasoline Truck Carrying a Load of 8 tons.  Fourteen of these
White Trucks are Used by the Standard Oil Co.
THE WHITE GARAGE
Cars Of Quality 1218 Wharf Street
Telephone 2908
Visit Onr Repair Shops. Best and Finest in the City. All Work guaranteed.
1

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