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Week Feb 15, 1908

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 i ir_T_v_T_-__-__rr_in.Y_7nrttT>,
Kingsford Smith & Co. ij
Stock and Gonoral
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
8M Qraaville,
'Vaacoaver.
.__
Victoria Edition
The Week
a British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria and Vaacoaver B. ©.
Vol. V.   No. 3
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908
There   is   a  limit  to   all
Judicial things and in all probabil-
Vagaries. ity the limit of public pati
ence with the vagaries of
Mr. Justice Martin has about been reached.
For more than a year he had pursued a
line of conduct with respect to his official
duties which most people regard as truculent and some as insubordinate. His action
at all times has turned upon the subject
of his relations to the Chief Justice.  He
has made himself a laughing-stock and has
brought the judiciary, for whose honour
he professes to be so jealous, into contempt, if not into disrepute. • Probably
the matter does not present itself in this
light to Mr. Justice Martin, and if tliere
were finer phraseology in which The AVeek
I could honestly state the case it would be
I glad to do so, but in this matter the limit
lof language, as well as of patience, has
J been reached and the only thing left is
to call a spade a spade.    The Week has
beforetime pointed out that in insisting
Ion a technical exposition or construction
of certain Court rules, Mr. Justice Martin was in reality airing his own dignity
at the expense of the public interest. That
interest lies in the prompt and economic
administration of justice.    Any line of
j conduct which involves delay and increases
[cost is inimical to the public interest.   It
I not only-renders the procuring of justice
[more difficult but it tends to discourage the
■ poorer litigant from pursuing his legitimate rights and so plays into the hands
lof the wealthier;  if Mr. Justice Martin
{has appreciated this important fact, he
■has ignored it.    Litigation in this Province is costly enough under any circum-
{stances and indeed it is not unlikely that
la movement will be started looking for
lthe simplification of its administration and
[the cheapening of litigation, but this is
I another story.    The important matter at
{present is that, not for the first time, Mr.
{Justice  Martin has disregarded the  instructions of his Chief.   He has elected to
{appoint   the sittings   of   the   Admiralty
j Court over which he presides at a time
{when they would clash with his duties in
{the Assize Court.   The proceedings of the
{Admiralty Court, though important, pos-
Jsess  no  public  interest  except  for  the
{parties concerned whilst the Common As-
Isize touches the public at many points.
{Litigants, witnesses and counsel who jour-
lnied to .Nelson to attend the recently an-
Inounced Assize had a fool's errand and
I incurred some hundreds if not thousands
of dollars of expense, all because Mr. Justice Martin differed from liis chief as to
I where his duty lay.   No one would object
if he indulged his vagaries at his own
expense so long as they did not affect the
public.    In fact, harmless individuals of
I excellent character and kindly disposition
1 have been known to furnish endless amuse-
Iment to the community in which they live
I through the exercise of their idiocyncras-
|ies; and this without protest even.    The
{Week does not advocate the limitation of
IMr. Justice Martin's entertaining propen-
Isities, but it does suggest that the public
■should not be required to "pay the piper,"
land it further most respectfully suggests
Ithat the continued spectacle of a junior
lJudge  in contumacious  defiance of his
I^iief is derogatory to the dignity of the
Ifjench and inimical to the public interest.
iLTitherto Mr. Justice Martin has shielded
{himself under the provisions, or liis interpretation of the provisions, of Rule 10.
Iln the present case^ he cannot do so and
{it will therefore be interesting to know
{his line of defense.    If he rests his case
[on his previous argument the Minister of
E DITORl AL
Justice should have something to say on
the subject.
Fire
Protection.
The Week has always
opposed the expenditure of
additional money at Elk
Lake on the ground set forth
in Mr. Adams' Report, that it could not
be regarded as a permanent source of supply, and further that it could not afford
adequate protection against fire. This has
always appeared to The Week to be an
unsuperable objection. The ratepayers, by
a doubtful majority of one vote, decided
in favour of the expenditure and already
a supplementary scheme is under consideration for utilizing salt water and installing an independent water system in the
business district. This fully justifies the
attitude of The AVeek and demonstrates
that in order to place the Elk Lake scheme
in a fair light for comparison with the
other schemes suggested the cost of this
supplementary system, some $250,000,
should be added to Mr. Adams' estimate.
The Week further stated on the highest
authority that if the city adopted the Elk
Lake scheme, even for two years, and relied on it alone, the fire insurance rates
which had been raised 20 per cent, would
be still further increased. It is now well
known that such increase will take place
unless the supplementary system now advocated is adopted. Meanwhile the Board
of Trade is lining up for an application
in favour of reduced rates, a perfectly
reasonable proposition if fire protection
had been improved, but one which is not
likely to meet with any encouragement
from the underwriters unless satisfactory
guarantees can be given that some effective auxiliary system will be promptly installed. Since the city cannot retrace its
steps it would undoubtedly be good policy
to adopt the salt water system. When,
later on, a gravity system for the whole
city is adopted, the special mains laid for
the salt water can be utilized and the
pumping plant will be a stand-by in case of
difficulty in the supply mains. It is no
use crying over spilt milk, and the best
way to deal with past mistakes is to rectify
them, but every Victorian will be glad
when the reproach of the present ridiculous arrangement has been removed.
Pumping is surely an anachronism in a
city at sea level with large water sheds at
elevation within a few miles.
Mr. J. A. Aikman is re-
Baiting the
garded with justice as a
Police. successful    Police    Court
lawyer. He handles many
cases during the course of a year and into
them all he puts every ounce of his energy
and skill. Just what the shady gentry
who are continually getting into trouble
in Victoria would do without Mr. Aikman to defend them, one shudders to think.
At times, however, the successful lawyer's
zeal outruns his discretion, as during the
past week, when he fell foul of Chief
Lnngley and liis excellent corps of assistants. Even policemen are not infallible,
and the most popular and successful Chief
in the Province would be the first to admit
that he has his failings, but among those
failings no one has ventured to suggest
that an attempt to manufacture evidence
or hoodwink the Court should be included.
It has been reserved for Mr. Aikman to
originate the suggestion.   Needless to say,
it was warmly repudiated by Chief Langley and while it served its purpose of
creating a little diversion it may not be
amiss to suggest to Mr. Aikman that
charges of this kind, unless proven, are apt
to operate in the eccentric but effective
manner of the boomerang.
The annual meeting of the
The Pacts        Asiatic   Exclusion   League
Of the Case,     was held a few days ago in
Seattle.   It was attended by
a large number of delegates from the leading cities in California, Washington, Oregon,   Montana,   Colorado   and   Mexico.
There was only one exclusionist present
from British Columbia, S. Gothard, and
he was not a delegate.   To the credit of
the Vancouver Exclusion League be it said
that they refused to send a representative
for reasons which will hereafter appear.
Mr. Gothard was sent by the Vancouver
World, who put up $35.00 to pay his expenses.    The reason that the Vancouver
branch of the League refused to send a
delegate is that they have at last realized
that they were being made use of to pull
the chestnuts out of the fire for American
agitators, and Mr. Gothard went without
tlieir endorsation.    The Convention met
and an effort was made by the Seattle ancl
other del eg ,*;es to throw off the domination
of the San Francisco clique which has
hitherto ruled the League.   In pursuance
of this policy a Seattle man was elected
president.    Then the fun began, a whole
day and a whole night session resulted in
the  opposition  backing  down   and   surrendering  the  organization  to  the   San
Francisco delegates.   The latter then proceeded to nominate and ultimately to carry
a complete slate of officers; they did more,
they adopted a new title and now rejoice
in the  name  of  The  North  American
Asiatic Exclusion League. The whole project is to organize an International movement.   It originated in San Francisco and
is headed by the most irreconcilable anarchists on the continent.   A large fund
has been raised, in fact, each delegate to
the Seattle convention was allowed transportation and $25.00 a day for expenses.
This shows that the League is in funds
and that it has influential financial backing.    The policy is unmistakable;   it is
to embroil all western America, including
the United States, Mexico and Canada in
an   Asiatic   quarrel.     British   Columbia
members of the Exclusion League have
been warned of this by The Week for six
months;   that tlie warning has not been
unheaded is demonstrated by the attitude
of the Vancouver League in refusing to
send delegates to  Seattle.    This policy
should bc persevered in; let Canadian exclusionists fight their own battle;   to become embroiled with American agitators
would not only serve no good purpose but
would neutralize the effect of peaceful and
constitutional action.   Tlie logical conclusion of tlie course urged by the American
League is that Canadians should appeal
against tlieir own government to tliat of
the United States.   When once this is understood there is no danger that it will
receive a moment's consideration and  a
recital of the above facts, for the accuracy of which The Week vouches, should
go a long wny to determine the decision of
all loyal Canadians.
M<nnnnnnrre« m m-i ■ mm vvna
■o   Stewart Williams R.CJtalM
£    WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION MO
HAL CSTATI A6EHTS
11 FO«T ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
%_9 fl HBMMW "» 0 so tit set
Onb Dolla* Psk Aknu
The   editorial   which   ap-
Fruit peared in a recent issue of
Inspection.       The Week on the subject of
Fruit Inspection in Victoria
has resulted in a chorus of endorsation
from aggrieved purchasers,  and a visit
from the  acting Fruit Inspector.   The
only  dissentient voice was raised in the
columns of the Colonist, which attacked
The Week for making this onslaught, and
charged it with being "unreasonable." If
it be unreasonable to tell the truth in a
matter affecting the public purse and the
public   health   regardless   of   the   consequences to individuals, then is the charge
of the Colonist sustained, but sucli considerations   have  never   influenced  The
Week and never will.   The charge made
was the result of personal investigation
and the sacrifice of sundry dollars to purchase local grown apples, one-half of which
was unfit for consumption.   In each case
the upper layers were large, rosy and attractive, underneath to the extent in some
cases of two-thirds of the box the fruit was
mean in size and of a quality unfit for
consumption.   But in truth the  acting
Fruit Inspector revealed a very interesting state of affairs for which he can hard-
ly be held responsible.   As the public is
probably unaware of the marvellous system of fruit inspection which prevails, it
may be as well to state the facts which are
that fruit inspection in Victoria is in the
hands of three responsible individuals. The
one person who inspects a box of fruit as
to its grading or can take any action with
respect thereto is Mr. Maxwell, the Dominion Fruit Inspector, and his territory
covers the whole of Vancouver Island and
a large part of the Mainland.   If he inspected a box and found the grading all
right, though every apple may be infected '
with a pest, though the box may contain
rotten fruit, he  would  be   powerless to
act—red tape ties him down to grading.
Then along comes Mr. Wilkinson, the Provincial Fruit Inspector; his whole duty is
to look out for pests.    If the apples are
free  from  "codlin moth," "or San Jose
scale," or similar insects, he cannot even
enter a   protest  though  the apples  may
range in size from a gooseberry to a cocoa-
nut, or though half of them may bo rotten.
A third officer who could take action in
respect to the condition of the fruit as to
soundness, can hardly be held responsible
at all, because it would be ridiculous to
suppose that Dr. Robertson, the medical
health officer, can be expected to go around
looking for rotten fruit.    If any comes
under his notice he has the power to condemn it, and that is all that can bc said.
Now was tliere ever such a ridiculous arrangement in a matter affecting public interest?    The red tape regulations which
divide the responsibility for one box   of
fruit among three men having nothing in
common, and who in no case work together,
effectually defeat the object of tlie inspection.    Meanwhile, under the present arrangement, fruit of any grade loaded with
pest or half-decayed, can be and is foisted
on the innocent purchaser pretty much ou
the same principle as the fastidious Englishman declined to save a drowning man
because they had not been introduced.  If
after this the Colonist still thinks that the
attitude of The Week is unreasonable, the
latter has the consolation of knowing that
the public will think otherwise.
MM THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15,  1908.
The Merchants Bank
Cana  a
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: K. P. TAYLOR,
Manager.
phical work, entitled "The Will to
Doubt," by Professor Alfred H.
Lloyd, of the University of Michigan.
Who Are Our Scholars?
Owen Wister found himself the centre of a vigorous controversy as a
result of his( address on American
scholarship, delivered at Harvard a
few weeks ago. It now appears, however, that the criticism directed at
Mr. Wister was the. result of misrepresentation in a press despatch from
Boston printed in a number of news
papers, which said that Mr, Wister
had declared that there were only
three scholars in America. He actu
ally mentioned forty-one American
scholars. Since then, in defense of his
assertions with regard to the position
of the American scholar according to
European standards, Mr. Wister has
elaborated a list of the most eminent
scholars in the world, in which he in
eluded three Americans—Dr. Henry
Charles Lea, author of "A History of
the Inquisition," Professor Simon
Newcomb, and Professor Maurice
Bloomfield.
Literary Notes.
Some Promised Poetry.
Pessimists about present-day literature will find food for thought in the
list of books in poetry and belles-lettres announced for publication this
Spring by the Macmillan Company.
The list is specially remarkable as
containing the names of four writers
who stand at the head in Enlish poetry to-day, in addition to one great
name from the past. The promise of
hitherto unknown poems by Tennyson, as well as of a series of his own
notes o his works, is perhaps of the
greatest significance. Then ther is a
new volume of poems by Alfred
Noyes, generally held to be the. most
promising of thc younger generation
in England, and new dramas by Stephen Phillips and William Butler
Yeats. Mr. Phillips has written a
"Faust," which is to be produced in
London by Mr. Beerbohm Tree, before the close of the present season.
Mr. Yeats' new drama, "The Unicorn
from the Stars," whicli he wrote in
collaboration with Lady Gregory, ha_,
already been played in Dublin, and
will be published in a volume along
with "Kathleen Ni Houlahan," and a'
revised edition of "The Hour Glass."
The American drama is represented
in this list by Mr. Percy McKaye,
with "The Scarecrow," the first
prose drama from his hand to be published.
Of books that may fairly lay claim
to the title of literature, one of the
most important in this list will doubt-
' less be Mr. Fielding Hal's "The Inward Light."    Many readers will remember Mr. Hall's earlier book, "The
Soul of a People," in which he gave a
picture of Burma and the  Burmese,
done with such sympathy and perception as allied him with the late   La_-
cadio Hearn.    His new book is defined as an attempt to determine the
essential   truth   that   underlies   thc
Eastern faith called Buddhism.   Another work that will be accepted   as
literature is the third volume of the
scries of Collected Essays by Frederic
Harrison, of which two volumes have
already  been  issued.    Mr.  Hamilton
W.   Mabie   has   edited a volume of
twelve stories described as Types of
the Best Fiction, which are to be published with thc title, "Famous Short
Stories:   English and American."    A
second  volume  of  Professor  Saints-
btiry's brilliant "History   of   English
Prosody" is also promised, and in the
same  li   sf,orlckat? m s.slySshrdltiuu
same list, for lack of a more convenient classification, may be included the
first complete translation of the "Celebrated Crimes" of Alexandre Dumas.
Ine loscly allied fields thc Macmillan   Company   offers   such   hooks  as
"Monuments of Christian Rome,"  by
Professor   A.   L.   Frothingham,   of
Princeton University; "Thc Evolution
of Modern  Orchestration," by Louis
Adolphc Cocrne; and a new volume in
the revised edition of Grove's famous
"Dictionary of Music and Musicians."
"The Will to Doubt."
The Macmillan Company will publish this week an important philoso-
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No, 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
oi* less
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTBICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 ehains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  November  24th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river' up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following de
scribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th,  1907.
Fob.  15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked in my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.    .
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of cammencement, containing 160
SLCT0S
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Viotoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thenoe
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted south five and one-half miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
H. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
on Cheewhat Lake; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 26th August, 1907.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about \_ mlles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th,  1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on tho
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
SO cbalns; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more  or less.
Dated November 20th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 8»3. VICTORIA
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
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V2 FLUID
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skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. COOPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
Sole Agents for British Columbia.
E. G. PRIOR &e©..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
full particulars of these wonderful insecticides.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of  Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 303, 404 or S34, Victoria.
The V. B. 6. Novelty Works
ran   AMYIQTCB,   ASTXBTXO    A__n»    ABOMOTOTT7__L__X
BBBimill WOBX KAOB XO 0BD2B.
I am now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices, Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
1000 •ruvUle Street      11     11     it     11       11      TJJTOOOTrn, B. O.
_  LsOAXB,  »re»rletor.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotorl
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
tor the views expressed by Its correspondents.
J The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
riot Involve religious controversy.
Communications    will    be    Inserted
■whether  signed  by  the  real   name  of
[the writer or a nom de plume, but the
■writer's   name   and   address   must   be
Igiven to the editor as an evidence of
■bona   tides.   In   no   case   will   lt   be
■divulged without consent.
Shall the Bank Act
Be Revised?
As everyone, in any way connected
I with the business life of Canada, has
been, more or less, affected by the
I monetary stringency so generally felt
during the past six months, I have no
doubt that any discussion of our banking methods and the clauses of the
Bank Act will prove interesting at
I the present time.
In the first place, why should Can-
I ada be affected, to the extent that she
lis, in consequence of a panic in New
I York?
It is not an answer to say that the
I monetary stringency has been worldwide, and that all countries have been
I seriously influenced by these condi-
I tions. Such an answer does not touch
|the root of the matter.
The unscrupulous manipulations of
Istock-jobbing capitalists on the New
I York Stock Exchange—the exploitation of the savings or the wealth of
[the people, till prices have no relation
Ito values, resulted in a slump, which
(rapidly became panic when it was
I found that public confidence had been
I so abused as to be at last completely
I destroyed. The withdrawal of bank
I deposits all over the country followed. People preferred to hoard their
I money rather than leave it in the
Ibanks. To meet these demands realizations became imperative, and every
■ attempt to realize securities accentu-
lated the panic by still further con-
[tributing to a steadily declining mar-
Iket. Banking houses, unable to meet
(demands upon them by borrowing
■abroad, and consequently being com-
Ipelled to realize on their securities at
■prices infinitely below what they had
Icost, were obliged to close their
Idoors.
The immense shipments of gold
Ifrom London to New York, causing
la steady and unprecedented rise in
lthe discount rate of the Bank of Eng-
lland, and the great continental banks,
Iwas the result of the closing out of
lthe foreign balances of American
[houses, and also represented the pro-
Iceeds of foreign loans to American
Ibanks.
Thus the fever of financial fear runs
fits course and is gradually allayed,
Ithen confidence begins to return, and
(when the turning point is reached re-
Icovery is rapid and conditions soon
I become normal.
That the currency laws of the Unit-
led States are unscientific is generally
(admitted, and even an improved and
[ scientifically  balanced   currency   will
not do away with the cause of panics.
It can only fortify the country against
I their ultimate and at all times evil
effects.   The improvement of the currency regulations is a remedy, not a
cure.   The cure, and I believe there is
I only one, is to regulate and control
the stock exchange operations; and to
declare certain classes of operations
I not only illegal but criminal.
There can be no interference with
lthe legitimate fluctuations of the mar-
Iket as regulated by demand and sup-
Iply, or other natural conditions, but
lall artificial manipulations, by means
lof combinations, trickery or fraud,
■should be crushed out with an iron
■hand.
This will, of course, be a difficult
(undertaking, but not an impossible
■nne, in any country, except perhaps in
pe United States, wher capital is all-
Jpowerful and monopoly rampant, and
IVvhere, unfortunately, the people are
Inot interested in a proper and just
ladministration of law.
It goes without saying that Canada
Imust, to a certain limited extent, bc
[influenced by such conditions in the
(United States, because of the intim-
(ate commercial and financial relations
between the two countries, but this
influence is largely sympathetic. In
reality, Canada is independent of American conditions, and when we see
a money panic in New York having
the effect of paralysing Canadian commerce and putting a stop to the natural and healthy expansion of Canadian trade, owing to the inability of
the banks to meet the legitimate and
reasonable business requirements of
the people, an enquiry into the whole
system of Canadian banking methods
and practise becomes of the first importance.
Consider for one moment the far-
reaching and distressing effects upon
the whole country when it is plunged
into a condition of financial chaos, resulting from a partial collapse of the
banking system. That recent events
in New York did bring about a very
grave state of things in Canada does
not require to be argued. ■ If there
had not been a partial breakdown in
our banking system, there would have
been no monetary stringency in Canada. The breakdown in our banking
system is proved by the fact that
practically all usual banking accommodation was discontinued for several
months—during the panic—and only
now, when the financial storm has
spent its force, and conditions are
slowly returning to the normal, are
our banks beginning to assume their
ordinary functions. It must not be
supposed that this suggested enquiry
will in any sense resolve itself into
an attack upon the banks or the banking system of the country. The object of the enquiry would be to clearly understand the causes of the recent
monetary stringency, in so far as Canada has been and is still affected by
it; and to devise means by which the
commercial and industrial interests of
the Dominion can be secured against
the loss, stagnation and distress which
must otherwise result from the recurrence of the conditions we have just
come through.
While any drastic interference with
the rights and privileges of the banks
of Canada is not now advocated, it
is essential at least that their methods
should be clearly understood so that,
if necessary, their policy may be judiciously controlled by the Government
in the public interest.
It is, of course, in every way desirable that any contemplated changes
in the Bank Act shall interfere as
little as possible with the powers now
enjoyed by the banking corporations.
The objects of the enquiry should
be:
1. To protect the public interest.
2. To enlarge the scope and power
of banks and to facilitate their operations.
3. To increase the banking capital
of the country and the circulation of
bank notes, so that the banks can
meet the demands of the expanding
trade of the country.
To this end I submit the following
suggestions for consideration and discussion:
1. That all chartered banks in Canada be compelled to call up the whole
of their authorized capital, thus providing several millions of money to
carry the increasing trade of the country.
2. That the organization of new
banks be permitted with a minimum
capitalization of $250,000—the whole
to be paid up in full before the bank-
is authorized to begin business.
3. That the banks collectively be
compelled to insure their deposits by
the payment to the Receiver-General
of a tax computed on the sum total
of the average deposits, and that the
money so paid shall constitute "The
Bank Depositors' Insurance Fund."
4. That the double liability of bank
shareholders be abolished, because it
is inexpedient and unnecessary.
5. That the chartered banks in Canada be not permitted to lend any part
of their Canadian deposits outside of
the Dominion, except when by special
representations made to the Treasury
Board, they are, by an order-in-coun-
cil, permitted to do so for particular
purposes and for limited periods.
6. That all chartered banks shall
make a special monthly return to the
Department of Finance, showing their
total loans and total deposits in c.ieii
province of Canada.
7. That the banks be authorized co
issue notes against and equal to, but
not in excess of the sum total oi their
combined paid-up capital and reserve,
subject to all of the regulations a'ov-
eming the issue of bank notes.
8. That the following words bc eliminated from Clause No. 76, subsection 2, paragraph C, to wit: "Or upon
the security of any goods, wares and
merchandise"—because it is not e>;
pedient to restrict the lending powers
of a bank so long as its loans are secured by assets,* readily convertible
into cash.
9. That the word "wholesale" be
struck out of Clause No. 88—wherever
it now appears—so that the clause
may be enlarged to cover the requirements of all dealers and shippers
whatsoever, and not limited in its application to wholesale dealers and
shippers only.
10. That Clause No. 91, governing
the rate of interest, be struck out, because it is ineffective and unscientific,
and not in harmony with modern
economic principles.
11. That an annual inspection of-the
head offices of all chartered banks be
undertaken by the Department of Finance.
W. J. HOLT MURISON.
that;  I could even love your money
apart from you."
"Quite right, darling, I want you
always to separate me and my money
in your thoughts."
Nodd—What does this money stringency mean, anyway?
Todd—Why, the thing has simply
spread from me to the whole country.
—Life.
"Robert, this spelling paper is very-
poor," complained the small boy's
teacher. "Nearly every wordi s marked wrong."
"It wouldn't have been so bad," protested Robert; "but Annie corrected
my paper, and she's mad at me, and
for every little letter that I got wrong
she crossed out the whole word."—
Lippincott's.
[
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTORIA
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES* BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Qovernment Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home »t nil theatrical and r.ude-f lie
artists while in tbe Capital city, abo of
other kindred bohemiana.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Preprlotera.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Had a Fellow.
The effort of the Ladies' Home
Journal to prod pastors and church
members to greater effusiveness in
welcoming strangers to public services may lead to overdoing hospitality in various ways. One of these
ways was revealed to a warm-hearted
Western pastor. Coming down from
the pulpit after the evening sermon,
he found a stranger in the person of
a fair-haired Swede, and, greeting her
with a cordial handclasp, said: "I am
very glad to see you; I want you to
feel at home here. I'd like to become
acquainted with you. If you'll give
your address I'll call and see you."
"Thank you," she replied, "but I
have a fellow."—Congregationalism
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.  Estimates and
designs furnished.
And So They Were Married.        !
The Heiress—And would you love1
me if I lost all my money? |
The Count (earnestly) — Dearest,
in that case what else would there
be for me to love?
"But are you sure you love me quite
apart from my money?"
(More     earnestly)—"Move    than
HOLLY TREES
PrfcM fr-Mi lg mm* _» few, Mcording
to rise
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub aad showei baths and laundry ln
connection.  The miners' home.
•< DANNY " DEANE. Proprietor
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SH1TH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,  B. C,
Leading Hotel of th* Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,      -      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON, B. C.
The home ot tbe Industrial Workers
of the Kootenays.
W. E. ricCandlish,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in ths City.
$1.80 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
Write ier iced Mi tret tste-
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
KING WILLIAM IV. V. 0. P.
The Very Oldest Scotch Whisky Procurable.
This is a blend of the rarest selected old Scotch Whiskies to be
found in Scotland. It is pronounced by experts to be singularly
rich in those compound ethers—only developed in the finest spirits
by great age—which impart the delicacy of flavor and constitute the
elegance of bouquet so much prized by connoisseurs. To the
gourmet it is offered as a substitute for the old liqueur Brandies
shipped from Cognac prior to the destruction of the vineyards by
phylloxera.
Call for King William IV. V. 0. P. at any first-
class hotel, bar, cafe or club. If your dealer
cannot supply you for home use.jkindly telephone
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents for B. C.
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOQGS
Realty Broken.
SQO POBT STBIET      ll      TIOTOBIA.
TXOMAS OATTCBAXI.
■alitor  aa* ••■•ral  C.atraoWr.
Tenders glvm an Brick, Ston* an
Frame, Alteration.. Parquetry Fleorlni
Oflce, Bank. 8t*r« and Baleen Fitting*
Pll* Driving, Wharf.s and Dack Shed
constructed and repaired.
mm THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15, 1908
Incorporated IMS
Capital. ISOO.MO.tl
Capital increased
ln 1*07
to ...ia.ooo.MMi
Subscribed
Capital.    fliCttl
Reserve . . IM.OOO
Surplua, Jan. ,M,
1»67  . . $180,000
J. a. 1U.TUXS, Oan. ___*.
ik closino up estates
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor in
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
In our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
338 Hastings St, West.
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Uacaxlao, published every Saturday by
"THE.1WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
Sltt  Government Street..Victoria,  B.C.
ill  Hasting*  St Vancouvor,   B.C.
W. BLAKBMORE. .Manager and Editor
Independence and
Partizanship.
Evidences are not wanting that the
next few years are likely to witness
a decided strengthening of the note
of independence which has been recently heard in the Canadian press.
I want to make it clear at the outset that by independence I do not
mean a repudiation of party obligations, but the cultivation of a method
of looking at public affairs in a manner which will not subordinate public interest to the exigencies of party.
In this respect an evolution is taking place in popular sentiment. In
the early days the only means of financing a newspaper was by drawing
on the party funds. The system still
survives, but it is neither as widespread nor as absolute as it was twenty years ago.
With increased prosperity and the
accumulation of wealth that large section of tbe community which is not
hidebound in its political allegiance
is rapidly increasing. The men who
claim all the virtues for their own
party and who ascribe all the vices to
the oposition, are diminishing in
number, although the race will not
become extinct until the millenium
dawns.
This unreasoning defence of a party
or of a government under all circumstances, cannot be justified upon any
ground. To argue otherwise is to
assert the infallibility of parties and
governments. There is an old proverb which runs, "Faithful are the
wounds of a friend," and on this principle it is difficult to understand why
even a party organ should not offer
fair criticism when it is deserved. It
is impartiality which alone gives
weight to criticism.
The extremes to which newspapers
have gone in upholding every action
of the party they are associated with
has not only weakened their influence,
but strengthened the demand for a
more independent note. Such an attitude is not inconsistent with strict
party  obligations.
If a paper is anything more than a
mere mouth organ, it must do something for itself. Whether it be a
Conservative or a Liberal organ, it
has behind it a great historic past,
and it should have political convictions. Those convictions should be
permanent, and if so the paper will
remain faithful to its ideal. It will
always be recognized as a Conservative or a Liberal paper; it will stand
for the political principles with which
in the main it is identified, and along
those lines may become a leader of
public opinion. But this does not preclude that lofty conception of its
calling which will lead it to set principles before party and to refuse to
sacrifice the former at the bidding of
the latter.
This is the difference between independence and partizanship; the one is
receptive, the other is obstinate.
The time comes in the history of
every political newspaper when it has
to decide between independence and
partizanship. That period is reached
when the government of the day is
faithless to its pledges or violates
principle. The servile press will continue to endorse and to flatter as usual, because it is servile. The party
press, none the less anxious for the
permanent success of its party, but
alive also to its responsibilities to the
public and its regard for principle,
will not hesitate to censure its friends,
not for their undoing, but for the upholding of the principles upon which
the permanent influence of the party
depends.
There are papers in Canada to-day
which have been strong enough and
wise enough to adopt this attitude;
their circulation is increasing and they
are self-supporting.
Such well-known papers as the
Montreal Gazette, the Hamilton Spectator, the Toronto Daily News, and
Saturday Night, whilst preserving
their political complexion, have not
hesitated to speak out very emphatically in denunciation of the policy of
tlieir party. No one suspects them of
weakening or charges them with infidelity, although professional politicians condemn their action as inconvenient; but the people applaud and
frank criticism pays even from the
standpoint of the party manager,
whose unit of valuation is the vote.
A political newspaper must in the
main defend the party with which it
is associated; that it should do so
under all circumstances is a proposition which cannot be maintained, and
if it could the greatest loser would be
the party.
X Social and        *
__ Personal. J
Mr. Joseph Hunter was a passenger
to the mainland on Sunday night.
*       *       *
Miss Ruby Fell entertained a few
friends at dinner on Saturday evening
last.
* *   st-
Captain Rogers of Pier Island has
been a visitor at the Balmoral during
the week.
* *   *
Miss Belle Roberts came down
from Vancouver on Wednesday evening after attending the wedding of
her friend, Miss Annie Spence, formerly of this city.
* *   *
The last session of the Private
Skating Club was held on Tuesday afternoon at the rink on Fort Street.
Some of the skaters present were
Miss Margaret Rickaby, Mr. Holmes,
Miss Winona Troupe, Mr. H.arvey,
Miss Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Mr.
Troupe, Mr. J. Arbuckle, Mr. Fred.
Rome,   Mr.   Stillwell,   Miss  Johnson,
Miss Little, and Mr. W. Barton.
* *   *
A wedding of interest to Victorians
took place in New Westminster two
weeks ago at Holy Trinity Cathedral
between Mr. Gordon Corbould and
Miss Maud Charleson, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Charleson of
Vancouver. The Rev. A. Shildrick
officiated. Mr. Corbould is a brother-
in-law of Mr. Ethelbert Scholefield,
the Provincial Librarian, of this city.
* *   *
All those attending the Fancy
Dress Ball at thc Empress next
week are requested to register their
names and the character they represent in the book which will'bc provided specially for this object.
* *   *
Mrs. 0. M. Jones, Fort Street, gave
an impromptu dance on Friday (.veiling of last week.    The supper table
was superbly arranged with yellow
daffodils. The guests were Mr. and
Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. Spring-
hett, Justice and Mrs. Irving, Mr.
and Mrs. Gillespie, Mrs. Fall, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Crease, Mr. and Mrs. Prentice, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver, Dr. and
Mrs. Helmcken, Dr. Hasell, Dr. and
Mrs. Robertson, Dr. and Mrs. War-
son, Colonel A. W. Jones.
* *   #
Miss Tuck of Roccahella entertained
a number of friends at tea on Saturday afternoon last. A profile guessing competition afforded a great deal
of amusement; the prize for which
was won by Miss Ethel Pitts, who
guessed the greatest number correctly. Some of the invited guests were
the Misses LeSueur, Mrs. Pearce,
Miss Miles, Mrs. Peace, Miss Mackay, Miss G. Mackay, Miss Gillespie,
Miss Keast, Miss Barbara Keast, Miss
Rochester, Miss Monteith, Miss Tiny
Monteith, Miss Little, Miss King,
Miss Newcombe, Miss Blackwood,
Miss Langley, Miss Perry, Miss Irving, Miss Genevieve Irving, Miss
Phipps, Miss Barron, Miss Bullen,
Miss Williams, Miss Mary Lawson,
Miss W. Wilson, Miss Johnson, Miss
Hanington, Miss Earle, Miss L.
Earle, Miss Cann, Miss McKeown,
Miss Angus, Miss Amy Angus, Miss
Tilton, Miss Ethel Tilton, Miss
Browne, Miss Fitzgibbons, Miss P.
Drake, Miss Trenchard, Miss Day,
Miss Griffiths, Miss Newton, Miss
Child, Miss Helmcken, Miss V. Wilson, Miss Kitto, Miss Holmes, Miss
Saunders and  Mademoiselle  Kerpez-
dron.'
* *   *
Mrs. H. Helmcken gave a very
charming tea at the Empress last
Tuesday. The decorations on the tea
tables were most elaborate, being
carried out in pale pink carnations
and asparagus fern. Among the
guests were: Mrs. Roy Troupe, Mrs.
W. R. Higgins, Hon. J. S. Helmcken,
Bishop Cridge, Chief Justice and Mrs.
Hunter, Hon. D. M. Eberts, Miss
Cridge, Attorney-General and Mrs.
Bowser, Hon. Dr. Young, Premier
and Mrs. McBride, Mrs. G. A. McTavish, Mrs. Bullen, Captain and Mrs.
Troupe, Misses McTavish, Miss Bullen, Miss Troupe, Misses Helmcken..
Mrs. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Troupe, Mr. and Mrs. King, Mrs. McLagan, Mrs. Hobson, Mrs. and Miss
Savage, Misses Leiser, Mrs. R. Jones..
Mrs. Lampman, Mrs. Laundy, Mrs.
J. Harvey, Mrs. Blackwood and many
others.
* *   *
On Wednesday afternoon Mrs. F.
Higgins was hostess at a tea given in
the Empress. Among the guests
were Mrs. J. R. Anderson, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mrs. Beaven, Mrs. Laing, Mrs.
Archer Martin, Mrs. Prior, Mrs. King,
Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs.
Worlock, Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Miss Schubert, Mrs. B. Tye,
Mrs. Luxton, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs.
Little, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. G. Wilson, Mrs.
McBride, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. Lamp-
man, Mrs. J. Wilson, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Raymour, Mrs. Black-
lock, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Morley, Mrs. McB. Smith, Mrs. Munn.
Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. H. Kent
Mrs. Cleland, Mrs. Wolfenden, Mrs.
Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Richardson.
Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Rycot, Mrs.
Ackman, Mrs, W. Higgins, Mrs. McTavish, and the Misses S. Blackwood, M. Lawson, Chute, Holmes
Lugrin.
* *   *
Mrs. Charles E. Pooley, Lampson
street, gave an At Home in honour of
her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Charles
Pooley, who is at present her guest.
Among the guests were Mrs. Waghorn, Mrs. H. Pooley, Mrs. Punnett,
Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Tilton, Mrs. McCallum, Capt. and Mrs. Reed, Rear
Admiral Fleet and Mrs. Fleet, Mr.
and Mrs. McCallum, Mr. and Mrs.
Bridgeman, Mrs. McGill, Mrs. McBride, Mrs. F. Pemberton, Mrs.
Prothero, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. R.
Robertson, Mrs. Herman Robertson.
T. Barnard, Mr. Harold Robertson,
Mrs. Luxton, Mr. R. Jones, Mr. Innes,
Mrs. C. Gibson, Mrs. Worsfold, Mrs.
Arundel, Mrs. Janion, Mrs. R. Janion.
Mrs. Stevenson, Mrs. Hollyer, Mrs. V.
Eliot, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs.. Phillips, Mrs. George Gillespie, Mrs.
Lampman, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. McKenzie, Mrs. Good, Mrs. S. Simpson,
Mrs. O. M. Jones, Mrs. Talk, Mrs.
Crowe-Baker, Mrs. R. Wilson, Mrs.
Peters, Mrs. A. Crease and the Misses
Tilton, E. Tilton, H. Peters, Pitts,
Drake, Monteith, P. Irving, Baynes-
Reed, Keast, Bell, Fosterfi Boulton
Holmes, Butchart, Hanington, Clute
and others.
Notice.
Do not forget the Charity Ball at
the Empress on the 18th inst. That
is Tuesday next. It will be the event
of the season and everybody will bc
there. If you admire youth, beauty
and luxurious surroundings do not
miss it. If you wish to aid St.
Joseph's Hospital go for Charity's
sake.
"JEWELRY COSTUMING."
The wonderful blending of tones this season in Precious and
semi-precious Stones appeals forcibly to the choice dresser. In
our immense stock she will appreciate at a glance the harmony
between a Montana sapphire and a piece of electric blue velvet;
she can readily recognize the fact that among garnets she is sure
to find a match for her red gown; for her lavendar reception gown
she will know the shade of amethyst to select, and for the
Soft Neutral Tints of Evening Gowns        |
the gently tinted moonstone, pearl and diamond, pearl and tourmaline, with the lovely art finish, gold mount; Parisian pearl collars
with brilliant-set bars or Parisian collars in irdescient beads or
Baroque pearl will be revealed as eminently suitable.
Necklets to match any costume at any price
Pearl Collars from $1.25 up to $20.00
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
SILVERSMITHS AND JEWELERS
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Victor-Berlinei
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
full orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance! How you could
dance to such  music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone  in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.    No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
-__m_-_----_--_m______--mmm--__m_m entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The world's foremost   -layers and singers make Victor
\ Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone
\'*tJ$\ plays them as no other instrument can.
v     V*_» 9t\. explain the easy-payment plan.
\   ^j,t?-<<>\. Write us on the coupon for  catalogue
fe. \    *_%> vV and full information.
The Berliner Gram-o-pbom
^ Company of Canada, Ltd,
mutual.
You can always      _—      ^^   It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jY|#    L$«      than others.
Cigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICB that Frank Buffiing-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VBOOMAN,
Jan 18 B. W. Wilkinson.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FBANK BUFFINGTON VBOOMAN,
Jan 18 B. W. Wilkinson.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north to place of commencement.
Dated 21st December,  1907.
FBANK BUFFINGTON VBOOMAN,
Jan 18 B. W. Wilkinson.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Benfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILEB BAIED.
STANLEY WOOD.
I Jan 18
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Benfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
IClaim No. 2—Commencing* at a posl
planted SO cliains west of southwest corner o£ Timber Limit No. 1311)3; thence
north SO chains; thence west SU chains;
thonce south 80 chains; thenco east SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1.107.
THOMAS MILLER BAIKI).
STAN LEX   WOOD.
I.Ian  18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
Js. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
[Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
■timber licence over the following del-scribed lands:
IClaim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thenee west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIED.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Benfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
■S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
■Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
■timber licence over the following described lands:
I   Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
■planted  40  chains  west of the north-west corner of Timber Limit No. 18644,
Ithence north 160 chains; thence east 40
Johalns; thence south 160 chains; thence
|west 40 chains to point of commenee-
nent.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIED.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Benfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18646, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chainB; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLEB BAIBD.
STANLEY WOOD.
I Jan. 18
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
326, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated  November  16,   1907.
De. 14 MABK BEENNAN.
Best Buy.
BEST   BUY   IN  VICTOBIA  OF   BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FBONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
DISTBICT Ol  CASSIAB.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 8 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parallel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CBEEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
I
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 fest water
front nge on James Bay. This property
has the Post Offlce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots is unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.   Price $62,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A O. P. FEANCIS, Broker,
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVEB.  B. C.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTBICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.E.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTBICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap In-
NEW WESTMINSTEE LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Eange 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Eamsay Arm, on the
main Quatham Elver, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Bamsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham Elver,
about seven miles east of Bamsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south  80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham Elver,
about seven miles east of Eamsay Arm,
thenee east 80 chains; thenoe north 80
chains; thenee west JO chains; thenee
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 ehains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham Elver, about eight and one-half
miles east of Bamsay Arm; thenee west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 ohains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham Elver, about nine and one-half
mlles east of Eamsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
Ma ha ann
TIMBER MAPS
Office Phone 1534:
Residence 4-38.
posted up to date eyery day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTi, MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C.,
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS. SZ LANGLEY   STftEET.
BLUEPRINTING
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny a//
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up in Br itish Columbia.
Blue Prints can be   obtained at short notice.
let Porcher Island, thenee south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham Biver, about ten and one-half miles
east of Eamsy Arm; thenee west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMEEON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Residential sail Day School lor Boys
SKEENA LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast.
I  TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
if Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
ntends to apply for permission to pur-
ihase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
outhwest corner; thence north 20 chains
o McClure Lake; thence along McClure
_ake in an east southerly direction 43
hains, more or less; thence west 40
hains to place of beginning and mak-
ng 40 acres more or less, and known
s the southwest fractional quarter sec-
ion of 36, township 6, Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
an. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTBICT.
I District of Coast.
1 TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
f Aldermere, B.C., occupation house-
fife, intends to apply for permission to
mrchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
outhwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
hence east 40 chains; thence south 40
ihalns; thence west 40 chains to place
Jif beginning and known as the north-
Ivest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Ege.
p,  and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
ess.
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CBOTEAU.
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
■Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
Be-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTBICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Kesfer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
26 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dee.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTEE LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Sogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thenee
east 20 chains; thence south 20 ehains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK BOGEBS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTEE LAND DISTBICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thenee north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and eontalnlng 610
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 ehains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thenee west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 6; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thenco north
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. S—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chfins; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east su chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel', thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 4o chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one aud one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 ohains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
tlie head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 ehains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mlle east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence soulh 80
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake SO chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and .;
thence north SO chains; thence west Su
chains; thence south SO cliains; theuce
east SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated  December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
about iwo miles south of Lot No. 2-I1A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence .south SO chains;
tiience west SO chains; thence north SO
chains to point uf commencement, and
.ontaining* 0*10 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.  IS ED.  BROWN.
B.C.
Timberl Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO.
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th Tebruary,  1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
ft*
sy&
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that tho
time for rocelving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ure., occupation Lumberman,
intends 10 apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Kupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the moutii of Marble Creek.
Staked the liiui day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A, Grlerson, Agent.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Kupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at tlie head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north  line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A Grlerson, Agent.
DISTBICT  OF CASSAIB.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,  of  Vancouver,  occupation,
 , intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the following described land,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thencs following high water mark south aud
west to the southeast corner of Lot 108;
thence east Ave chains; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark aboul 80 chains to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thence to said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CBEEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for ths
rite to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at ihis post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third uf a
mile from the point at the mouth of tht
Bay, beiug the southwest corner post;
ihunce east so chains; thence nortli 80
chains; thence wesl 90 chains to beaeh;
thence south along beach lo point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
mure or less.
Staked Nov,  26,  1907.
UEOilUK VuC.NU & ARTHUR BELL.
Dec. 1 (Jeorge Young, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Aim, Fraser Biver.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. 0. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the ofllce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner In
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable tho Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of {1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner in tlie sum of (3,000 for
tho due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers und enclosed lu the envelopes
furnished.
Tlle lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND    DISTRICT.
District of Now  Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE tllat Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
timber broker, Intends to apply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwost corner of T. L. 1 SI87;
thenco east 80 chains along the north
line of T. L. 18187; thence nortli 80
chains along the west lino of T. L.
12602; thence east SO chnins along the
north line of T. !.. 12502; theuce north
80 chains alonK the wost line of T. L.
12G03; thenco in a southwesterly course
along tho lino of the Cuplhuio Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 640 acres of land, more or
less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICB that W. E. Simpson of
Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 30
days after date. ,       *
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 1, which is on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
it cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north 80 chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,
SW No. 3, which is 20 chains distant
in a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campoell
Lake; thence east 80 chains; north 80
chains', west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post Planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.b.,
SE No. 4, which is one mile distant
in 'a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east of
T L 14864, thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains  to point  of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
SW No. 6, which ls one mile distant in
a'northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mile east of T. L.
14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
SE No. 6, which ls situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thenoe west 40
chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No, 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S E. No. 7, which is about four miles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 8, which is flve miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 16th,  1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which is four miles distant
in a northerly direction ti-om Crown
Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which ls two miles distant
in a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which Is flve and one-quarter miles distant in a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Lake; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  17,  1907,
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which ls six miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence oast 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
33. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner, marked "W.
E. S., N.W., No. 33," which is five
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain; thence south
&> chain3. east 8o chains, north 8o
chains, west 8o chains to point of
commencement.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which ls three miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80  chains  to  point  of  commencement.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 36, which
is marked W.E.S.,  N.E. which
ls flve miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 36, which ls six miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one-half a mile south of
Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.   20th,  1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 87, S.E., which ls flve miles distant ln a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which is flve mlles distant
ln a southwesterly direction from West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chainB; went., chalna;
south 80 chatns to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where lt Joins the line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 40, which ls throe and one-half
miles ln a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where It
Joins line of Block 110; thenee north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 41—Commencing at a post ilanted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which Is four miles distant
In an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
In an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
east  80  chains;  north  80 chains;  west
SO chains; soutl.  80 chains  to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S,
S.E. No. 43, WiMch is one and one-half
miles distant tin a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
it Joins the line of Block 110, thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east SO chains to point of
commencement.
No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S..
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it Joins the line of
Block 110; thence north SO chains; east
80 chains', south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which is marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and in a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 160 chains; east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.Sn
S.W., No. 47, which Is two mlles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where it Joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
Joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 60—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 50, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 61, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where lt
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 16. 1907.
No. 52—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which is six miles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it joins line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 53—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 53, which is six miles ln a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where it joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 64—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 54, which is two and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the north end of West lake, thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 55—Commencing at a post planted
at the aquthwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 65, which is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; west 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11.        Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence soutli
80 chairs; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section zy, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
DISTRICT   OP   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C., intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north SO chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,  1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. _?., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 160 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chainB to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile In northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Tl Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains', thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south SO
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 15, which is eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commenolng at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which Is nine and one-half
miles distant In a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which is nine and
one-half miles in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which is ten and one-half miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains', west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south SO chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on'the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direc*
tion from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a north*
westerly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east
to  point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast cornei' marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
W.  E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.  2,  situate  on  tlie west Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; souiii
SO   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following deacrlbed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or leas.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, Intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east aide of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan, 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less,
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
6, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
ehains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 83; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence aouth 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or lesa.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a poat planted   at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Sectlol
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chainl
thence north 160 chains; thence east 4\
chains; thence south 160 chains to polil
of commencement, and containing 64f
acrea, more or leas.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted al
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Sectiol
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chainsl
thence north 160 chains; thence east 4l
chains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 64f
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted al
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chainsl
thence north 160 chains; thence east 4a
hains; thence south 160 chains to poinl
of commencement, and containing 64(1
acres, more or leas.
Dated Dec. 17,  1907.
8. Commencing at a poat planted atl
northweat corner of T. L. 16194, Section]
2, Townahip 33; thence east 40 chains]
thence north 160 chains; thence west 401
chains; thence south 160 chains to poind
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted atl
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section!
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;!
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40|
chains; thence south 160 chains to point!
of commencement, and containing 6401
acrea, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a poat planted atl
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section!
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chalna;]
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40l
chaina; thence south 160 chains to point!
of commencement, and containing 640|
acrea, more or leas.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
_t_\
SM
NOTICE  TO LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Hlai.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, suJ
peracribed "Tender for Piles, BrldgeJ
North Arm, Fraser River," will be re*T
ceived by the Honourable the Chief!
Commissioner of Lands and Works]
Victoria, B. C, up to and including!
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 19071
for furnishing and delivering at thrf
bridge site on the North Arm of tha
Fraser River, on the line of the Ceme-J
tery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600)  will be re-l
quired, varying in length from twentjf
(20) to forty-five (45) feet.   They mustj
be  straight,  sound,  and  not  less  than,
ten   (10 inches  at  the  small  end.   No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be ob-L
talned on application to the under-|
signed.
Tenderers must state the price per)
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furu-j
ished with a list giving the number!
of piles required and the length of eachj
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate)
of deposit on a chartered bank of Ca-j
inula, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, iij
the sum of two hundred and fifty dol-f
lars ($250), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglecd
to enter into contract when called upuil
to do so, or fail to complete the worl<f
contracted for. The cheques or certi-l
flcates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-l
tenderers will be returned to them up-]
on  the execution  of  the  contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless]
made out on the form supplied, signed,
with the actual signatures of the tenJ
derera, and enclosed in the envelope fur-]
nlshed. ]
The lowest or any tender not necea-l
sarlly accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer]
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, ofl
Victoria, B.C., Merchant, and James H.I
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Con-f
tractor, intend to apply for a special!
timber licence over the following de-r
scribed lands: i
No. 4—Commencing at a post plantedl
about 4 mllea to the weat of Robinson's!
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being!
the northeast corner post; thence west!
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thencel
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains'!
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER    LAND    DIS-I
TRICT.
Diatrlct of New Weatmlnater.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chan-,
dier,    of   Vancouver,   B. C,   ocupation I
Broker, intends  to apply for a special I
timber licence  over the following   deacrlbed lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post plantedl
ten chains south of the aoutheaat cor-1
ner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence]
south 160 chains; thence weat 40 chains ]
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle ofl
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James I
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Con-I
tractor, Intend to apply for a speciall
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a poat plantedl
about 4 miles to the west of Roblnson'sl
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being!
the southeast corner post; thence northl
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thencel
south 80 chains; thence eaat 80 chainsl
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert Diatrlct,
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle,
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James __..
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, con-L
tractor, intend to apply for a apeclall
licence over the following deacrlbed!
lands: 1
No. 2—Commencing at a post plantedl
about 4 miles to the west of Roblnaon'sl
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being!
the northeast corner post; thonce west I
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thencel
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chainsl
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. Jamea H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
j?0<X>0-0-00-00<>00000000©000<>00<>^^
SOOOO'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'O'OOOO'^^
Dinnerware Newness
Silverware Goodness
OF MERIT—SURPASSING FAR ALL OUR PREVIOUS EFFORTS.
Never in the history of this store's merchandising have we shown such a
magnificent assortment of medium-priced Dinner Services as is now offered. We
have spent much time in planni.ig this showing, and exercised the greatest care in
selection, and the new creations in Dinner Ware just lately unpacked are, indeed,
delightful. The ware in every case is much above the ordinary, and the decorations
have been executed with such marvelous detail, these sets are genuinely fascinating. The decorations are sumptuous—the gold work being worthy of special note.
We are greatly pleased with this new and' fine showing, and want you to see the
offerings. Even you, with your intimate knowledge of wares and value, will be
surprised at the superior character of the goods and the very special values offered.
If you have longed for a pretty Dinner Service, "now" is your opportunity. Such
pretty sets and such unusual values aren't common, by any means, and we advise
ycu to see these at once. Come in and let us show you these. The salesmen are
enthusiastic over them, and they'll be delghted to have the opportunity to show
them. These handsome sets may be seen in our First Floor Showrooms, and at
any time, but we advise an early visit, because the finest are sure to disappear very
quickly.
TEN ESPECIALLY GOOD VALUES FROM AMONG THE NEW LOT
DINNER SERVICE—In semi-porcelain.
A very neat and pretty floral decoration.
97 pieces.   Special value at, per set $8.50
DINNER SERVICE—A "stock" pattern
in a pretty blue rose decoration. There
are 114 pieces in this set.' Matchings
from stock at any time $13.50
DINNER SERVICE—One of the newest
decorations. A tulip in blue with lots
of gold as well. 96 pieces of newness
for  $14.00
DINNER SERVICE—In semi-porcelain, 96
pieces in a very pretty green and gold
carnation decoration. Neat and pretty.
Per set  $14.00
DINNER SERVICE—A 105-piece set in
semi-porcelain. A "stock" pattern which
you can replenish at any time. Pretty
apple  blossom  decoration.    Price $15.00
DINNER SERVICE—Here is one of our
daintiest sets. A pretty pink rose and
wreath of gold make a pleasing decoration.    Price    $15.00
DINNER SERVICE—Here is one of our
daintiest sets. A pretty pink rose and
wreath of gold make a pleasing decoration.   102 pieces.   Per set  $18.00
DINNER SERVICE—Another 102-piece
set in semi-porcelain. Dark green,
orange and gold, make a very attractive
decoration on this.    Per  set $20.00
DINNER SERVICE—Flown green, orange
and gold on finest semi-porcelain makes
this set a set worth special note. 102
pieces.    Price,  per  set    $20.00
DINNER SERVICE—A 107-piece service
in light green and gold decoration. A
really handsome style and excellent
value at price marked.   Per set $25.00
DINNER SERVICE—Another semi-porcelain set of 107 pieces. Flown blue and
gold decoration. A set you'll be pleased
with.     Jer   set    $27.50
CHINA DINNERWARE AT THE PRICE OF COMMON CLAY.
Direct from the famous Calsbad China Potteries we have received some excellent
examples of the superior art and skill of the workers of this renowned pottery. The
four sets here listed stand far above the ordinery sets usually sold at this figure in
point of artistic merit and excellence of material. That Victorians appreciate their
goodness is evidenced by the many sales since we have received them a short time
since. We have still, however, a full range and advise that you see the dainty
offerings soon.
CHINA DINNER SERVICE-A new importation of famous "Carlsbad" china
services discloses this excellent set.
Clusters of pretty pink roses and heavy
gold on fine china makes 115 pieces of
niceness.    Per  set    $50.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE—Another of
our new "Carlsbad" dinner services. This
is another 115-piece set. Heavy gold
border and dainty pink roses complete
the decoration of this. Excellent value,
at, per set  $50.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE—Still another set in "Carlsbad" china. This style
has an exceptionally heavy gold border
and a pretty and novel combination of
roses, green leaves and gold. 119 pieces,
at, per set  $65.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE—This is a
very rich and handsome set and has been
a favorite set with many. A heavy blue
and gold band on an excellent china 's
the secret of its popularity. 139 pieces
for   $90.00
Yes, especially worthy of mention are these few items picked from the hundreds
of dainty pieces in our Silverware Department. In this department we stock an immense variety for the home. The newest and best creations from the world's best,
makers are being constantly added and you'll always find in our silver offerings the
very "latest" efforts. Quality here, as in all other departments of our business, is
the first consideration. Not a single unworthy piece ever passes over our counter.
Investigate our offerings!
ROGERS' 1847 SILVERWARE
The following lines of "Rogers 1847" Silver-,
ware are put up in pretty plush lined
boxes and are especially suitable for
wedding gifts:
PIE KNIVES, each, plain $2.50, gilt..$3.00
SOUP LADLES, plain or satin bowls $4.00
BERRY SPOONS, plain, $2.00, gilt..$2.50
AFTER DINNER COFFEE SPOONS,
box six  $2.00
OYSTER FORKS, plain or fancy, box
six   $3.00
CHILDREN'S SETS, of Knife, Fork and
Spoon, plain patterns, set $1.75, fancy designs,, set  $2.00
AVON SETS, 3 pieces, consisting of Sugar
Shell,   Butter  Knife,   and  Cream   Ladle,*
set   $3.50
BUTTER*KNIFE AND SUGAR SHELLS
set, $1.00 and  $1.75
SUGAR TONGS, several designs, each $1.75
BOUILLON SPOONS, set six  $4.50
Gravy Ladles, Fruit Knives, Butter Knives,
Cheese Scoops, and many other things.
"MERIDEN" SILVERWARE
SILVER   PLATED   TEA   SERVICE,   4
pieces.   Plain design or satin engraved
 $15.00
SUGAR BASINS AND CREAM JUGS to
match, large choice, newest patterns. Pair
$5.00, $6.00, $7.50, and  $10.00
TOAST RACKS, each $1.00, $1.50, $2.00,
$2.50 and  $3.50
MARMALADE DISHES, in crystal, best
quality silver plated frames, each $3.50,
$4.00 and    $5.00
In daintily decorated China Dishes, each
$3.50 and  $7.00
FRUIT STANDS, in crystal and decorated
glass dishes, each $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00,
$6.00 to   $8.50
BUTTER DISHES, covered, in plain, engraved and satin finished styles, each
$3*50, $4-50, $5.50, $7.00 and  $10.00
CRUET STANDS, 3 bottles, breakfast
size, in the very latest designs, each $2.00
and  $5.00
CRUET STANDS, 2 bottles, each $2.00,
$2.50, $3.00 and  $3.50
A FEW OF THE POPULAR PIECES IN SILVER-MOUNTED OAK
Worthy of particular mention is our very fine stock of handsome silver-mounted
Oak Goods. This handsome ware, always popular, is now more so than ever. Equally
adapted for everyday use or "occasions." We have an excellent variety of these excellent pieces—Silverware department, first floor.
Salad Bowls, each $10.00, $8.00 and ...$7.50
Dinner Gongs, each  $6.00
Cigar Cabinets, each  $9.00
Afternoon Tea Trays, each $20.00 to..$6.00
Butter Dishes, each $4.50, $4.00, $3.50, $3.00
Biscuit Jars, each $6.50, $6.00, $4.50, $4.00
and as low as  $3.50
Liqueur Frames, 3 bottles, each $18.00, and
as low as  $8.50
Splendid Values in McLintock Quilts.
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered
plain and printed sateen, 6 ft. x
Price 	
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered
plain and printed sateen, 6 ft. x
Price 	
DOWN  FILLED   QUILT,  covered
plain   and   printed   sateen,   with
edge, 6 ft. x 5 ft.    Price 	
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered with
satin on one side and sateen on thc other,
6 ft. x 5 ft.   Price $13.00
with   j DOWN   FILLED   QUILT,   covered   with
5 ft. j Turkey Chintz, 6 ft. x 5 ft. Price ..$5.50
$6.50 , DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered with
with  *     the choicest of the choice sateens in very
6 ft.        artistic designs.   Price $14.00
$8.00 I ALSO SOME BEAUTIFUL QUILTS, in
with  ',     sateen and silk covers, at, each, $20, $25,
frilled to   $35.00
$9.50 : SMALL   SIZES,   for   cradles   and   cribs,
dainty, small patterns, 24x36 inches, 30x42
!     inches,   36x48  inches,   36x54   inches,   at,
each, $4, $5 and   $6.oc-
ggfgTgef
*   f TMOME.lhOTtL'ANO.ClUi-rURNISMtR'S'i VICTORIA'.* Bit.     .' I
S^oooooooooo-oo-oooooooooo-o©^
SSSoooooooo-oo-oo-ooooooooo-oooo^
At The Street
Corner
*
By THB LODNOER
The ceremony of giving royal assent to Bills in the local Legislature
is  not  a  very  exhilarating  function.
Shorn of the trappings of State, it is
almost a humdrum proceeding. When
His   Honour   marches   through   the
principal entrance and along the aisle
of the  Legislative  Chamber  to  the
throne, accompanied by his guard of
honour in military dress, there is an
air of old world pomp which reconciles the new world to the pageant.
, When, on the other hand, His Honour, clad in ordinary morning dress
land carrying his topper in his hand,
1 enters by a back door, quietly takes
Ihis seat, and without a word listens
Ito the monotonous drone of the clerk
I reading the  bills to be assented to,
Igiving one gentle nod after each and
la more pronounced one at the end of
Khe affair, it savours of the perfunctory.
This   is   just   what   happened   on
iTttesday afternoon, when eleven bills,
lincluding the notorious Natal Act, rc-
Iceived the royal assent through the
Imedium of His Honour's nods.   No
Idoubt  some  ceremony is  necessary,
I but just why it should involve the attendance of His Honour in the House
to nod, when he has to perform the
far more important duty of signing
each bill in the privacy of his own
apartments, deponent knoweth not.
From my eerie in the press gallery
I witnessed a very pretty little comedy. Naturally, when the Lieutenant-
Government entered the House everyone rose to his feet, except the member for Nanaimo—and the editor of
the Colonist. The former was but
following his own bad precedent;
whether the latter was contaminated
by the evil communication which corrupted good manners, or whether his
erstwhile American citizenship imposed too great a strain upon his loyalty he alone knows, but he openly
joined the rebellious Comrade and
achieved the distinction which has already made the Socialists notorious.
I noticed that the Lieutenant-Governor's secretary transfixed him with
a piercing loow, which, however, had
no effect but to cause him to look into
his hat.
It just occurs to me to say that as
the issuance of tickets admitting
strangers to the floor of the House is
entirely within the province of the
Speaker, of whose loyalty there is no
doubt, it ought not to be too much to
ask that gentleman to exercise his
discretion to the exclusion of persons
having no prescriptive right to the
floor such as is enjoyed by a member,
and who apparently knows as little of
decent manners as the Socialists.
I think the most amusing lounge I
have indulged in this week was outside the vestibule of the Victoria
Theatre on Wednesday morning. It
was the occasion of the sale of tickets
for the great and only Paderewski
show. On the previous day Manager
Denham had disposed of all the members' tickets, and there were some 300
left for the general public; a few of
them were at $2, a few more at $3, and
the balance at $4. For these 300 tickets there was a line of applicants
stretching out from the vestibule
along View Street and southward on
Douglas as far as the stage entrance;
and great was the disappointment
when the supply of tickets was exhausted long before the tale end of the
queue reached the box office. I know
that Victoria is a musical city, but I
am confident that not 10 per cent, and
possibly not five per cent, of those
who were purchasing tickets could, if
they were blindfolded, tell the difference between the playing of Paderewski and that of the commonest piano
thumper on the road. I am convinced,
after sitting in the box oflice for an
hour and listening to the conversation
of the ticket purchasers, that the sole
reason why they were willing to spend
$4 on a ticket to hear Paderewski was
simply because he is the fashion.
Now, I do not want to depreciate
his extraordinary talents, but I am
going to give my readers a little bit
of information on the authority of an
eminent musician who has spent some
years in Germany. He assures me
that in that country of musicians, and
in the most select musical circles, neither Paderewski nor Kubelik had any
status, and that there are scores of
players who are rated higher by the
Conservatories. Unfortunately, however,  they have not  such  long hair,
nor are they as proficient in the art of
advertising.
I expect my musical colleague, Bohemian, will be down on me for saying this, but I would respectfully remind him that it is not an expression
of opinion but a statement of fact. A
knowledge of it may comfort those
who do not hear Paderewski play on
Friday night.
It is astonishing to me how Manager Jamieson keeps up the quality of
the entertainments at thc New Grand
Theatre. Week succeeds week, but
with tlle exception of an occasional
poor turn, the general standard of excellence is the same, tl is safe to say
that few vaudeville houses in the
West get as good value for their
mone;, as the New Grand, which accounts for its popularity.
Judging from the advertisements,
the Fancy Dress Ball at the Empress
Hotel will be a popular affair. As it
is for charity's sake, it is fitting that
it should be as cosmopolitan as possible, and I am glad to learn that the
tickets are being purchased by people
in every rank and station; it will be
essentially a function for the Hoi
Polloi. There is little doubt that the
accommodation of the hotel will be
taxed to the utmost, and even if $3 is
a little stiff, it includes a splendid
supper, and all the profits will go to
St. Joseph's Hospital. So, my merry
Lounger, dig up! Not so much for
the sake of the function as for the
benefit of thc charity.
In many Victoria gardens snowdrops are now in full bloom, and
even  crocuses arc peeping out.    On
Sunday afternoon, while strolling in
the vicinity of Moss Street, I heard
the bleating of lambs, the lirst of the
season. Thc delightful weather o;
the present week makes one believe
that spring is here. For at least two
months yet, Canada east of thc Rockies will be battling with ice and snow,
and for two months after that may
not have seen the last of the white
coverlet. What is thc matter with
Victoria?
I want to make an appeal to the
athletic authorities of Victoria. It is
that they will agitate, in season and
out of season, and will never let up
until they have secured a central
ground. Much could be said on this
subject, and it can be better said in
the sporting columns, but after close
observation for two years, I am convinced that athletics will never be a
success in the Capital City as long as
the public have to travel to Oak Bay
in order to see matches. The delay,
the inconvenience, the uncertainty,
and the impossibility of thc tramway
coping with the traffic, bc they never
so willing, is a determining factor in
this matter. When the athletic
grounds are more central, spectators
will be counted by thousands instead
of hundreds.
Odri
ft_rK^r_ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
Staking the Mountain
Echo.
By Arthur P. Woollacott.
MRS. WALTON thought that her
niece's beauty was of the kind
that an artist would have made
use of in giving a soft yet generous touch to a primitive scene from
one of the earlier pages of history. She
admired the style, perhaps because she
knew that it held many points of distinction in common with her own. The
elder lady indeed, found a singular fascination in watching the play and luster
of Eleanor's countenance and was in the
habit of exciting her for her own aesthetic gratification.
"Eleanor," she said, "I believe there is
something of the savage in you after
all."
The younger lady nodded a solemn
affirmative and put aside her volume.
"Savages are victims of a limited horizon and hence lack appreciation. Consider what it is that lends so great a
charm to the Oddyssey, the Earthly
Paradise, and such twilight literature. To
my mind the interest is always infinitely
greater when the romance is brought to
the very threshold of the present. Here
we are, living in the Stone Age, with
Drake, Vancouver, Quadra and a host of
wild adventurous spirits flitting in the
offing. It is the contrast I suppose that
makes it so delightful." She nodded in
the direction of the fleet of war-ships anchored in the bay.
A soft, autumnal haze reduced the
mountainous scenery to a glimpse of
fairyland. In the west the wooded shore
of Vancouver Island was a mere silhouette in Vandyke brown touched sharply
into the warm tints of the sunset. Camp
fires blazed along the beaches; launches
were coming and going, and a large
swarm of Indian canoes drifted among
the ships imbibing twilight ideas of
greatness.
A number of gentlemen, including
some officers from the ships, greeted the
ladies from the promenade and passed
on.
"There is safety in numbers," Mrs.
Walton commented, smiling at her niece's
warmth of colour. "I envy you the romance that is brought to the very threshold of the present. It glorifies the future."
They looked at each other and went
into helpless laughter.
"Thank heaven, they are occasionally
gregarious," said Eleanor, with great relief. "This is the first whole day I've
had to myself."
Mrs. Walton, with a relish derived
from her recollection of similar experiences, dilated at length on Eleanor's persecutors. During the recital the victim
frowned stormily, laughed, sighed, and
generally responded with such readiness
to the descriptive touches that her aunt
prolonged the torture and exaggerated
for her own pleasure. "And you still
persist in keeping me in the dark," she
concluded.
"Will you believe me when I say that
the question interests me in a spectacular way only?"
Mrs. Walton scoffed. "In a sense,
yes," she conceded, recalling certain ludicrous complications. "But otherwise"
—well, with all your coolness I know
that there is a whirlwind of feeling lying dormant. But really, Eleanor, it is
not right. Your attitude is a premium
on presumption. I believe after all you
are indifferent. I have my theory all the
same, and it has been partially confirmed. When it became known that that
mineral claim of yours in the mountains
yonder had to be re-staked at once, how
many of them, do you think, like chivalrous knights of old, volunteered to start
off at an instant's notice?"
Eleanor awoke from her seeming indifference, but with her customary wariness she avoided the pitfall.
"How could you, aunty! You've placed me in a dilemma. It was my intention to employ Letherdale."
"Well, it wasn't altogether my doing,"
her aunt said, with momentary compunction. "Both Mr. Twining and Dr. Lor-
ing volunteered and start tomorrow
morning—separately, of course." Mrs.
Walton watched the effect of the announcement.
Eleanor was lost in thought a moment.    "It's too bad.    It places me in
an awkward position.    I must  forbid
them," she said, with decision.
"They will be justified in ignoring youi
prohibition."
lhe statement startled her and she
turned to hide a rosy countenance. How
to extricate herself and preserve her independence was the question that required prompt solution.
"What did they—Mr. Twining say?"
"He told me that he had instructed his
architect to add a large conservatory to
his house," the aunt returned, cooly inspecting her niece's features.
"I believe I told him yesterday that
I had a passion for orchids," Eleanor
commented absently.
"Dr. Loring said that immediate action is necessary to forestall claim-jumpers. He knows that Twining is going,
but will go himself in any case to make
sure. I think it very generous of him."
"Very!" was the answer murmured
with some asperity.
"What a girl you are to sit there pondering a scruple with a fortune hanging
in the balance," Mrs. Walton pursued
with amazement. "Why, according to
Letherdale's computation, there's a handsome fortune in sight, and lie said there
would be a stampede the moment the
fact became known."
Eleanor, however, was not easily mollified. She remained silent and oblivious
to her aunt's further remarks. Late in
the evening she sprang from her chair
and observing that Mrs. Walton had
gone into the house, she put on her hat
and a light cloak and walked rapidly to
the village where, after some searching,
she found Maquilla, the Indian guide.
Some minutes later Maquilla began gathering together his poles, paddles and
camping gear.
Early next morning Letherdale heard
the regular thudding of poles in the river
bottom and went to the door of his cabin
expecting that it was a messenger from
Miss Newcombe with instructions to proceed to the Canyon in the interior of the
island to re-stake her claim. It was
too dark to distinguish objects clearly,
especially under the shadows of the forest-clad shore. The canoe, with two
polers, and someone sitting amidship
passed up, a dim shadow in the gloom.
Letherdale hailed it but received no answer, and he wondered, hoping that none
of the crowd of unscrupulous prospectors had become aware of the fact that
Eleanor's claim was practically at their
mercy.
Presently another canoe came up and
Genelle, his colleague in the river business, swung lazily up to the landing and
spread himself out comfortably in the
stem-sheets under the shelter of his sombrero. Letherdale watched the smoke
curling from a hole in his head-gear for
a while, and then concluding that he
was bursting with importance went down
to interview him.
"See here, Letherdale, jump in and
come over.   The Doc wants you."
"Sure?"
Genelle wiggled his pipe by way of
affirmative. "Twining hired me this
morning to take him to the Canyon as
fast as I knew how. I suspected the
Doctor would want you. There's some
sort of race on. Both are going up to
stake Miss Newcombe's diggins. You
know what that means."
The river-men crossed the straits to
the Bay. Letherdale at once proceeded
to the shack where the Doctor was engaged in biological experiments. In a
few minutes the backwoodsman was
making arrangements with a typical product of the west—a lithe graceful chap,
with a gravely cheerful eye and a head
eloquent of more than the average share
of brains. There was a tenseness in his
manner, and a concentrated decisive look
in his expressive eyes that excited Letherdale's curiosity.
On the verandah of a cabin near by,
Tony Genelle and a capable looking fellow in knickerbockers, a soft fedora, a
well-trimmed beard, with the manners of
a penegrinating millionaire were discussing the details of a canoe trip to the
Canyon. The man's voice was frank
and hearty, but with a ring to it that
made one think the speaker had a thing
or two up his sleeve. Letherdale knew
at once that the man was Twining and
observed him with interest, and was not
at all surprised that Miss Newcombe had
shown her preference for him, for he was
decidedly a likeable man in appearance
and was, moreover, reputed to be
wealthy.
Loring proceeded to Constable Haddington's office for the necessary papers
and Twining followed on his heels with
an air of provoking nonchalance.
Tony turned to Letherdale: "Say!
Look at Twining's back, Bet he's the
politest kind of devil. He's worrying the
other. You can tell the way his back
moves."
Letherdale's attention was attracted by
Mrs. Walton, who was coming from the
government office, and began telling him
breathlessly when within fifty paces, that
Eleanor had mysteriously disappeared.
"Mr. Letherdale, I really don't know
what to make of it. She's such a daring girl, but eminently sensible. I see
you smile, but of course you know her
well."
He thought that he knew her as well
as anyone can be expected to know a
woman in this world, for he had mothered her when her parents, former neighbors of his, died and left her on his
hands. Since that time Eleanor had
travelled extensively and was now not
only accomplished, but exceptionally
beautiful as well.
Letherdale assured her that Miss Newcombe was well able to take care of herself.
"Well, you are exasperating—really as
bad as Constable Haddington, who looked at me in the same way, smiled his
cool, ominiscient smile, and dismissed the
matter with provoking indifference. What
is one to do if one cannot depend on one's
friends?"
An hour later the two canoes were
leisurely ascending a series of rapids en
route to the interior of the Island. As
there was nothing to be gained by racing
up a succession of stiff rapids, the guides
agreed during one of their portages to
be loyal to each other until the ground
was staked, after which each was at liberty to make the water fly.
Twining chafed considerably at what
he called Tony's blessed laziness. The
canoes kept abreast like sections of a
catmasan. Tony, however, was as
touchy as a lord and as proud as most
of them: "Say, boss!" he said, with incisive pathos, after Twining had been
nibbling at him for about an hour, "Take
it all in a lump or by the mile?"
Twining wisely accepted him as an
irreducible proposition and thereafter
kept his peace.
On the afternoon of the second day out
they reached their destination, ancl spent
the remainder of the day in blazing lines,
planting stakes and in traversing the
island.
That night the parties pitched their
camps on a level spot surrounded by a
fringe of berry bushes overhanging the
water and prepared for a good night's
rest. The tug-of-war would begin with
the first break of dawn.
The Indians hated the spot for ,like
many camping grounds on the coast, it
had in earlier days been the scene of
tribal conflicts.
Late in the evening Genelle became
troubled and uneasy in manner. Letherdale watched him closely until at length
Tony called him aside and pointed to the
further bank of the river, where in the
intense shadows they saw what they
thought was a woman's face, standing
out like a ghostly blurr. It was gone in
a flash.
"Did you see that, Letherdale?" said
Tony. "I've glimpsed it once or twice
before."
It was one of those mystifying appearances that impress one like the vague
adumbrations of the seance room.
"Prospectors sneaking past," Tony
thought.
"Couldn't have been. Well—there was
one canoe ahead of us too. It may be
Indians."
The matter was dismissed. "Any more
claims around. I want to stake one,"
said Genelle.
"This island's the only outcropping.
Low grade. Wasn't worth a grub-stake
until the railway began to loom up. Now
it means a fortune."
"Who's going to get it, Twining or
the Doctor?"
Letherdale laughed. "Dunno! Eleanor's peculiar. Her dad and Loring's
governor discovered it when they were
partners. Both died before it was any-
good to them. Canoe went to splinters
in a log-jam—Newcombe was sucked
under and drowned. Loring footed it
thirty miles through the jungle nursing
a broken leg right to my place—and died.
The location was lost.   I found it when
Eleanor was in Europe. That was when
she had just thrown over the Doctor in
favour of the rich man. I wrote to Loring and he made me swear to leave him
out of it."
Genelle whistled: "So he's entitled to
half and won't look at it!"
"He's peculiar too. Bet he'd hammer
me if I went and told Eleanor now. Say
what in the deuce—"
An avalanche of small pebbles rolled,
down the opposite bank into the stream.
"Otter," said Tony.
"What would an otter be climbing that,
bluff for?" Letherdale wanted to know.
Genelle was about to take a pot shot
in that direction, when the voices of
Loring and Twining were heard, near
the canoes in the heat of an altercation.
Twining apparently was baiting the
other into action of some sort: "Surely
you'r game!" he was heard to say, with
insulting sarcasm.
Loring swung on his heel and returned
to the camp-fire looking pale and preoccupied. For the next hour he was in a
state of suppressed excitement and was
plainly making a great effort to keep
his temper down.
Conversation was more or less difficult
and was not pursued. Beetling cliffs surrounded the camp and the forks chroning
and swirling on either side filled the air
with endless uproar.
The Indians of the party, wrapped im
their blankets and with heads half hidden in the smoke of a communal pipe,
were talking with mysterious solemnity
among themselves. Twining was as indifferent and as placid as a man in
church and at the moment was engaged
in cleaning a revolver with all the leisurely care of a cow-puncher, while the
firelight played over him in its own wild
way, splashing him with the hues proper
to a son of the wilderness. He suddenly
threw up his head and looked enquiringly at Letherdale. Genelle and Loring
did the same. It was necromantic, but
Letherdale understood their movements
when he heard what he thought was the
river singing one of its impromptus. It
suggested a woman's voice. The hour,
the circumstances and the growing excitement incident to the race on the morrow had its effect on the men. Loring
presently leaned forward from his place
with a noticeable pallor and handed Letherdale an army revolver.
"Try it," he said.
Letherdale fired several shots at a bit
of fungus standing out from the hole
of a tree, and pronounced it as accurate
as a rifle. The crack of the gun produced a remarkable effect. The singing
sounds ceased, the result impressing
Letherdale like a sudden silence. He felt
queer as though he had unwillingly killed
something.
Twining bounded up and joined the
group: "Target practice ?" he said, tossing cigars to the men. "I'll go you a
bout, Loring," he added, swinging abruptly and facing him with a cold, steely
glance.
The Doctor met the challenge with a
manner as suddenly resolute as that of
Twining.
"What's the matter with the lot of us
chippin' in?" said Tony.
Twining looked at him, studied him
with the keen scrutiny of one whose purposes are definite, immutable.
"You put up a couple of empty bottles
on those stumps," he said incisively, dismissing Tony from his attention and
stepping off a distance of twenty-five
paces.
The pair took their places at either end
of the line. There was a personal element, a desperate sort of preoccupation
in the manner of both that made Tony
say, with a lot of the enthusiasm gone
out of his face: "Holy Mackinaw! This
looks darn like a dool!"
At the same instant one of the Indians
began telling Letherdale with much excitement that he had heard the men arranging to have some sort of scrimmage.
"We fire when you count ten Letherdale!"
"Ready?" said Twining in a voice that
had the reckless mounting ring of a man
who is being whirled into a galloping fit
of intoxication.
They turned their backs to each other.
The Indians were piling armfuls of
resinous branches on the fire which sent
the flames into a towering blaze.
(To be continued.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
Notes on
Provincial News
Out of Work.
The meeting of unemployed held in
the Athletic Club Rooms at Nanaimo
on Monday night last, was an important one. It showed several things
which may as well be recognized:
First, that there are a large number
of unemployed in the Coal City; next,
'that there is no immediate prospect of
resumption of work at the mines; and,
last, that work which these men might
have done has been let to Japanese.
It is gratifying to know that Comrade Hawthornthwaite was less extravagant in his utterances than usual; he was probably impressed by
the gravity of the situation. The
most practical outcome of the meeting was the receipt of a telegram
from Premier McBride to the effect
that public works would be started in
the neighbourhood of Nanaimo which
would relieve existing conditions. It
is inconceivable that, with several
hundred of our own countrymen out
of employment, there should be any
further hiring of Orientals. No railway company or contractor can afford so far to run counter to public
sentiment, even if they were callous
enough to ignore the appeal of work-
'meti of our own race.
seems to have reached him this winter. They must have had a great
time at Champagne Landing, wherever that may be. Jack Pringle tells
of their Christmas feast, when the
piece de resistance consisted of a
dish of roast gophers stuffed with
mice. On the bill of fare, amid many
other delicacies, the following items
figured: Bear steak, knuckle of lynx,
leg of wolverine, owls' eyes poached
o.' hard tack, scrambled weasles'
brains, brazed mink hearts, muskrat
pie, fricassee of otter, squaw berries,
high balls and low balls. One thing
can be said for Whitehorse—it is all
alive.
By the Hundred Thousands.
The greatest herd of caribou ever
reported in the Yukon is now moving
southward across the head of Sixty-
mile river, a hundred miles west of
Dawson. Reports say the herd has
been crossing there for nearly a hundred days, and it is estimated that
100,000 caribou have already crossed,
with no end of the mammoth procession in sight.
Coal and Coke Tax.
The Fernie Free Press has a rabid
land not very discriminating editorial
lon the subject of the proposed coal
land coke tax. Under .existing conditions, it may fairly be assumed that
[the Free Press could hardly do othcr-
Jwise than attack the proposal of the
[Government, but no one can read the
[editorial without a feeling of regret, if
[not of sadness, that a paper which for
I so many years enjoyed independence,
[and was wont to discuss public questions in an intelligent manner, should
[have sunk to the degrading position
lof a corporation organ. It should
■surely be possible for a writer of aver-
lage intelligence to advocate the in*
Iterests of a corporation without ignor-
ling those of the public. To fail in
[this or tn deny its possibility is to
■abrogate the functions of a newspaper, To demonstrate its impossibility
lis to remove any plea of justification
■for its existence.
Too Partizan.
In the same column in which the
|01d Man of the Cranbrook Herald
claims credit for running a decent
Inewspapcr, and declares that the Her-
lald has proved that this is a paying
Ipolicy, he has a paragraph anent Dun-
lean Ross' speech at Ottawa. In this
■paragraph the Old Man claims that
iRoss showed up the hypocricy of the
iMcBride Government on the Oriental
{immigration   question   "in  a  concise
nanner," also that he placed Mr. Bow-
Iser, "whose legal firm acted as at-
Itorneys for the Japanese Immigration
■Agency," in a very bad light indeed.
Iln view of Mr. Bowser's emphatic
■denial of Duncan Ross' charges on
■the floor of the local Legislature, it
[is a little difficult to harmonize this
[paragraph with the Old Man's claim
[to decency. It is easier to appreciate
[the point of his concluding paragraph,
Ithat "nothing under the heavens can
prevent Duncan Ross being returned
[at the next election." The Week
[quite agrees with the prediction; the
[prevention will not come from any-
Ithing "under the heavens."
Are We Suckers?
Apropos of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the Whitehorse Star
comes out editorially in the following
manner:
"Seattle has always found Yukon-
ers and Alaskans to be easy marks
in the matter of disgorging money.
Seattle has grown rich and affluent at
the expense of Yukon and Alaska.
The money has all gone one way—
towards Seattle. Now a scheme is on
foot to make a grand coup in 1909—
make 'the big cleanup' at the expense
of Yukon and Alaska, whose names
are being traded on for that purpose.
" 'The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition' is a rather 'sausagefied' name
for a real estate boom, but that is all
it is, and all the name is being used
for, and it is not Alaska or Yukon
real estate that is to be boomed either.
"Both Alaska and Yukon have broad
expanses of real estate which need
booming, but it is not likely that either will find much recognition at
Seattle, her own interests being paramount to anything outsiders may wish
to exploit.
"No one objects to Seattle having
as many expositions and fairs as she
desires, but she should rely on her
own resources as bait for thc unwary
and not on her efforts to play Alaska
and Yukon as 'good things.'
"There are a few people yet in the
North who enjoy being patted on
their backs and called gc . fellows',
and that is what Seattle i" doing ih
the matter of her hyphenated re. 1 estate promotion scheme. But the
'taffy' is too transparent, and very few
Yukoners will be lured by it.
"Seattle is playing the people of the
North for suckers.   Are we?"
WEEK 17TH FEBRUARY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COMIBINI,    fr»»rl.tor«.
Management *f MIT. J«_lieS-»N.
CARLISLE'S DOG AND PONY
CIRCUS
Including   "Tom,"    the   World's
Greatest Talking Pony.
ALVA YORK
English Singing Comedienne.
SEYMOUR EMILIE
HOWE and EDWARDS
Comedy Sketch
"The Arrival of Mr. Dooley."
THE PIOTTES
Character Singers
"The Italian and His Sweetheart."
EDDIE POWERS
Blackface Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"There's Another Picture in My
Mama's Frame.
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pearl Fisher."
"The Exciting Ride."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA   '
M. Nagel, Director.
"IL BACIO."
Nothing Like Contentment.
The Whitehorse Weekly Star of
January 24 is full of newsy items
about the North country. It is full
pf rejoicing because the lowest tem-
berature that week was 25 degrees
|)elow zero, whereas a ^ear ago 50 decrees below was reckoned to be "a
liarbinger of spring." The content-
Inent of spirit which pervades White-
jbrse society is something to be
Ifroud of and easily puts to shame the
prowlers who enjoy perpetual sttm-
Iner in Victoria. E. J. White, the
Humourous "stroller" of the Star, relives the chestnut that last winter the
[scientific research department of
Washington, D.C., wrote asking him
for information regarding ice-worms,
[but no such cheering correspondence
Free School Books.
The Cranbrook Prospector is a
strong supporter of the proposal th; t
the Provincial Government should arrange for supplying free text books
in the public schools of the Province.
In an intelligent editorial on the subject the Prospector says that the children are called upon to provide themselves with too many books, that the
books they get are ont fair value for
the money paid, and that a Minister of
Education of the ability of Dr. Young
could undoubtedly devise a satisfactory method of overcoming the difficulty. This puts the case in a nutshell, and there is some reason to
hope that friend Grace will not be
disappointed.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ef house) 10c
Evenings, Balcony  Wo
Lower Floor  J«e
Boxes    «o
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
; EQUIP YOtJBSELF
j WITH  A  THOROUGH
BUBIHESB COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. Vou can
miter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE   SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.C.
B. A. KacMlllan.
Knows Him.
The Hedley Gazette knows Duncan
Ross pretty well, having had experience of his vagaries when the redoubtable member for Yale-Caribou
was campaigning for the last election.
It has his peculiarities down to a fine
point, and gently reproduces one of
them in the following paragraph:
"While Duncan Ross was deprecating British Columbia anti-Asiatic legislation in Ottawa, his paper was
whooping it up allee samce other
British Columibans, in Greenwood.
Duncan should havc used the wires
to kill that little editorial endorsement
of the Natal Act in last week's
Times."
T.ADIT8       SWEDISH       GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
TIBBATOB  TREATMENT
HB.     BJOBNFBLT,     SWEDISH
HASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
p$T$   Richardson
Cigar Store.     n,vuul uow"
Phone 345
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Ii Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yatea St, Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
I'ictoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
rhe best household coal in the marke  at
Current ratea.   Anthracite coal fir sale.
34 Broad Street.
VICTORI*
Phone 647
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
HTtNTS   and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Vour Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 24*.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LLOYD & CO, chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. 0.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road,  Vancouver
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
$27.50, $80, $B5.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
\ Victoria, B. C.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
IS minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. VV. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C.
■MM
wm
mm THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15, 1908,
Spo
rting
Comment.
is up to the Island League to take Mr. and Mrs. David Alexander of
the necessary steps to put a stop to Duncans are registered at the Bal-
the practice, and I hope that this wil' *   *   *
be done at the meeting this evening. Mr. and Mrs. H. Dallas Helmcken
The local rugby team had an easy have taken quarters at the Empress
                             victory over the Nanaimo players at Hotel for the remauider °f the Wmter-
The   first   test   match   to   select Oak Bay last Saturday.    A win was Mrs   p   £>e jjoe Walker left dur-
eleven players to represent the Van- expected, but it was hardly thought ing the week for the mainland.    She
couver  Island   Football   Association that such a big score would be rolled expects to be away for several weeks,
against the Mainland, was played at up.   The game was a very poor ex- Mf  A  R Johnston and Mr. Frank
Ladysmith last Saturday, and result- hibitton of the grand old game, net- Lloyd of Westholme were guests at
ed in the selection of a team which  ther side making any effort to exert the  King Edward  Hotel during the
is expected to defeat the Mainland- themselves. week.
ers,  but at the same time ii might     The   Vancouver   Rugby   Union is
Mr.   Donald   Fraser  of  the   Cana-
have been strengthened considerably, working itself into a fury over the al- dian 'Bank  0f   Commerce  has   been
The selection of the team has occa- leged  treatment  of  Referee  Tait  at transferred to the New Westminster
sioned  considerable   comment,   some Nanaimo a couple of Saturdays ago.  branch,
of which  is not of a very compli- It is claimed that the players from w-   , .   *.    ,
mcntary nature to the committee, the. Coa. City treated him in a very J^?^ ^ she* hTbS
From the twenty-two players who ungentlemanly manner and threaten-
took part in the test match, the com- ed him with all kinds of dire wrongs,
mittee had sufficient available mater- Nanaimo, on the other hand, claims
ial to form a very strong combina- that he received proper treatment, but
tion, but in some unaccountable man- even if he was called a few ungentle
staying with  her  sister,  Mrs.  R.  C.
Furlonger.
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ritchie are
expected in Victoria very soon. They
intend to spend the summer here with
ned   they   have   overlooked   players  manly  names, it is  hardly  sufficient  Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Flumerfelt.
who should have had their place. for the Vancouver players to ask for
Bradshaw in goal and Lorimer and the suspension of the whole Nanaimo
Hewitt   at   full   back   make   a   very team.
strong combination, while in the for- I was surprised to learn that   the  Belcher Avenue,
ward line the team has one  of the Victoria Cricket Club was in a bad
best scoring aggregations that could state  financially.    It  is  well  known
be chosen, but the half-back division that the club is maintained by sub-
*   *   *
Miss McDonald of Winnipeg has
returned to her home again.   She has
been  the  guest  of  Miss Arbuthnot,
Lieut. Eaton of the Army Service
Corps   has   arrived   at   Work   Point
,   . , Barracks to take the place of Captain
is weak, and it would not be surpris- scnptions  collected  from  ex-players,  Reecj  w[10 js returning to England.
ing if this division cost the Islanders but last season the collections were *   *   *
the game.   Johnston at centre half is not sufficient to cover the expenses. Miss Heneage, who is leaving Vic-
the  best  that  could  be  chosen,  but  I hope that some arrangements  will toria next week to make her home on
had Connors, of the Shearwater, been be made to get the club out of debt "">«*»! Island  is giving a small fare-
,            it      _,,,-,         ,   _■      li                            l   l Lt well tea this afternoon,
in port, he would undoubtedly have before the commencement of the sea- *   *   *
gained the place.    But with the elec-  son, as to  start the season in debt One of the last social functions be-
tion of Johnston we have no  com- would be a hard blow to the team, fore the Lenten season which is be-
plaint.    At right half, however,  Mc- The prospects for the season are verv ing looked forward to by Victorians
v„ ,      .             , . , .,            ,  .            ,   . ,         _           ,    ■      ■                 j is the ball to be given by the Union
Ktnley is a rank failure and is not bright as far as playing is concerned, ^-^   on t|le 2gtjj 0f t]jjs month,
entitled to a position.   After the ex- and it is expected that the team will *   *   *
hibition he gave in the All-Island vs. be as strong as ever.   I have to con-     The    engagement    has    been    an-
All-Mainland match of last season, it gratulate L. S. V. Yorke on his elec- £ou"cei.  °.f Miss   £ml,. ^Mc%: ?f
,     ...        , a- ■   l c     li     l- r   l ■      c _.i_ ' nt i_    u*   •    Bath, England, to Mr. Bird, of Smta
should  have  been  sufficient  for  thc tion as Captain of the Club.    He is i_uia  gask    Miss Holley made many
committee to realize that he was not an ardent lover of the game, and has friends here while on a visit to Brit-
fit to fill the place, and another given already won his cap as a representa- ish Columbia about a year ago.
an opportunity, and from those who tive  of  Canada  in  the  international      ,r    „,     ,     ...      ,  ,    _      ,.
..."".. _ T   j       •_-.    -a       _ 1      -_i_ ..1    tt •_. j ___ _ j t      Mr. Moorhead, late of the Canadian
witnessed the game at Ladysmith, it match with the United States, and I  Ban(. of    commerce    in Vancouver,
is learned that other players gave a  hope that he will be able to lead his  spent the week-end in Victoria,  before going on to Alberni on Monday
far better exhibition than him.    Har-  team to the championship.
Icy, at left half, is at the best an experiment. He has been playing on
the forward line of one of the Mainland teams all season, and on his
showing in one game, has been given
his place on the All-Island team, ln
place of these two players, Thackeray
of the Y.M.C.A., and Dufty, of the
Esquimalt teams, should have been
selected. The former is one of the
most consistent half-backs in the
league, and it is certainly a hardship
that he has been overlooked.    Dufty,
UMPIRE.
night, where he has accepted a good
billet.
*   *   *
Mr. Thornton of Thetis Island has
been spending a few days in Victoria.
 ■ Miss Blakemore is visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Vickers of Kamloops has been  Mrs. Shirley Blakemore of Haro St.,
Victoria Social.
visiting friends in the Capital.
* *   *
Colonel Gregory was a passenger to
Vancouver on Thursday morning.
* *   *
Vancouver,
*   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Crowe-Baker have
returned after spending several
months  travelling in   Europe.   They
Mr,  and  Mrs.  E.  B.  Marvin have  were the guests of Mrs. Herbert Ross
on a trip to California.
Miss Leigh Spencer of Vancouver
on'his form this season,'is better tha'n is "altered aMhe Empress Hotel.
McKinley; in fact, it is hardly possi-     Mr   A  T   parry of Cowichan Bay
ble to choose a weaker half-back than is at the King Edward Hotel.
McKinley.   Outside of these positions
in Vancouver for a few days before
coming on to Victoria.
*   *   **■-.
The betrothal is announced between
Amy Campbell (Maisie) Campbell-
Johnston, the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs.  Ronald  C.   Campbell-Johnston,
duties.
*   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lamb of So-
the team is a strong one and should
give the Mainlanders a hard run for
a victory. But in the next test match
it is hoped that a more careful selection is made than has been the case
in this team. Now that the team has
been selected it is impossible to
change it, and whatever our com- mcnos have been in Victoria for a
plaints, we hope that the Island team  'ew c'a--*'s' ^
will be returned victorious on the Mrs H,garn; MJffl NorrJe and Miss
occasion of the first match in Van- Hadwen of Duncans were in town
couver early next month. for  the  Paderewski  concert  on  Fri-
It is rather hard on a player to be ^ evening.     ^   ^   ^
selected in the first twenty-two, and      Mr   and   Mrs    MauHce   of  Shaw.
yet never be given his place in the nigangan Lake, have been guests at
line-up by the press.   This is exactly the Empress during the week.
what happened to Peden, of the Bays,  -— ■ —	
who was selected as goalkeeper for
"B" team. Peden was chosen and
made the trip to Ladysmilh and incidentally played a good game, but
on every occasion when thc team appeared in the press credit was given
to Dunn, of the Esquimalt team. It
is very evident that it was a mistake
the first time the teams appeared, but
the committee should have seen that
the error was corrected. I believe in
giving credit to whom credit is due.
A meting of the Vancouver Island
League has been called for this evening, at the request of the Ladysmith
club, to discuss the question of importing players from the Mainland.
This matter was referred to last
week, and I am pleased that the
league is taking steps to prevent the
rapid  approach  to  professionalism.
The Vancouver players arc already
registering a kick about ex-Mainland-
ers playing on the Island team, but
until they show that these players
have been coaxed to thc Island on
the promise of good situations, it will
be a hard matter to do anything.    It
Mrs. Arthur Crease entertained at and J. R. Armytage Moore, son of the
an  informal  tea  on   Monday  after- late Wm. Armytage Moore of Arn-
lloc"1' *   *   *   "• more, Co. Cavan, Ireland, and Mrs.
Miss Fanny Devereux has returned Fl'ank Hardcastle, of Lancaster Gate,
to   Duncans   to   resume   her  school Londor..
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phllippi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commenolng at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chatns;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MAHIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Grand Fancy Dress Ball
in aid of St. Joseph's Hospital, will be held in
"^ THE EMPRESS HOTEL
ON TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18TH, AT 8.30
Tickets are now on sale at M. W. Waitt & Co.'s, the J. M.
Whitney Co.'s, C. E. Rcdfern's, Challoner & Mitchell's, The
Victoria Book & Stationery Co.'s, T. N. Hibben & Co.'s, Fletcher
Bros., and Mrs. Aaronson's, Government Street.
While fancy dress or poudre will be en regie, neither is compulsory.
TICKETS $3.00 EACH
"Drink and Fear Not."—Shakespeare.
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Old Pensioner Dry Gin, per bottle $1.00
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Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
MQ Granville, 'Vancouver.
Vancouver Edition
The Week
» British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
*) mmnnr t * innnrmt id «t »• * »c
Stewart William
R.CJsnlon
^ol. V.   No. 3
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908
£ WILLIAMS & JANION
£ AUCTIONEERS
£ COMMISSION ANt
W REAL ESTATE AGENYS
jo |i FO«T ST.             VICTORIA, S. C.
Onb Dou_a* P«a Anno
^^^B The Week wonders whether
_he Natal Act.  the Times has altered its
^^^H        opinion of Attorney-General
I_Bowser   and   his   legal   attainments,   or
whether it still thinks that he is an in-
iompetent, who knows nothing of Constitutional law and usage.   If it were per-
Jinissable The AVeek would further wonder
Iwhether the views of the Times with respect to the McBride Administration have
_een modified in consequence of the news
.lashed over the wires from Ottawa as to
the action of the Federal authorities with
respect to the Bowser Bill.    It is only a
few short days since the public was told
n precise terms that the Local Govern-
nent was simply playing a game of bluff.
Dhat the Bowser Bill was not worth the
_aper it was written on.    That the Government knew this  and that they were
imply playing with the House by forcing
hrough a piece of legislation which they
.new was valueless.    It was represented
hat the Bill would be ineffective even if
(t were not disallowed, but that in any
vent it was unconstitutional in vieAv of
he treaty obligations of the British Government and the invariable attitude of
jondon and Ottawa in respect to such
.jgislation.   By the irony of fate the Vic-
joria Times, yesterday, had to publish a
I.ispatch from Ottawa stating that the
Sowser Bill, so far from being a nonentity,
ad sufficient effect to necessitate an appeal to the courts on default of the
federal Government to determine its val-
Jity. A piece of legislation which could
ot be brushed aside lightly and which
ossessed sufficient status to justify an
ppcal to the courts must be a very dif-
jrent thing from that so graphically de-
3ribed by the Opposition press. Further,
; has been found sufficiently effective to
revent the immigration of several Japs
^to the Province and so to raise in a
■jractical form the whole question as to
diether British Columbia has a legal
ight to prevent undesirable immigration.
f Mr. Bowser's Bill effected no more than
lis it would justify the action of the
government to raise the question in such
form that it will now have to be settled
v the highest tribunal in the Empire is
0 mean achievement. The Federal Gov-
I'nment has played ball with this great
uestion of Oriental Immigration for ten
ears   ancl   has   effectually   blocked   the
I'ishes of the people when any measure
f redress has been passed by the local
legislature. Whatever else results from
Jr. Bowser's Act, this will no longer be
.ossible. Once it is determined whether
Ur Wilfrid Laurier's opinion, or the ad-
rice of Mr. Chamberlain possesses the
renter validity thc Province will know
.hat to do. As matters stand now the
IcBride Government has made good. It
as again interpreted the wishes of the
'rovince and this time has forced the
federal Government to abandon its atti-
lide of unconditional veto and allow the
(atter to go to the tribunal which knows
(.thing of political influence, and which
ill solve the question of the powers bf
e Local Legislature in this connection,
this is not statesmanship The AVeek
I ould be glad to have a little enlighten-
.ent on thc subject. At present it; would
ipear that thc head of tlie Local Govern-
bnt has for the second time scored against
ie powers at Ottawa.
EDITORIAL
Now  that  Dr.   McGuire's
McGuire's  position for an investigation
jetition. into the conduct of the coal
industry  of   the   Province
Ias been approved by the House it may
ot be unprofitable to suggest several di-
■ctions in whicli investigation might with
advantage be made.    The first is as to
the cost of fuel to the actual consumer.
Upon this point the following facts may
be of interest; they certainly furnish food
for reflection and would appear to justify
all  that has  been  said  about excessive
charges:   The cost of producing coal and
putting it on board vessels at Nanaimo or
Wellington, inclusive of all charges, does
not exceed $2.50 a ton.   Water transportation to Alctoria and Vancouver costs 50c
per ton; handling and delivering within
the city limits of either place costs well
within a dollar, making a total cost of
$4.00.    The retail selling price is $7.50.
This leaves a margin of $3.50 to be divided
between the mine owner and the middle
man, a sum which is nearly 100 per cent
added to the actual cost.   The Investigating Commission may well ask the question
—Is this a fair price?   Fernie coal costs
not more than $2.00 per ton loaded and
shipped at the mine.   It retails in Fernie
at $5.00 a ton.   It retails in Nelson at
$7.50 a ton;   allowing $1.50 freight and
$1.00 for distribution, the profit on Fernie
coal sold in Nelson is $3.00 a ton, divided
between the producer and middle man. It
might be well in this case for the Commission  to   ascertain  whether  the   Coal
Company is content with a few cents per
ton profit, which is all they can get, if
they do not divide any portion of the
middleman's profit, or whether there is an
arrangement for rebate.    Throughout the
Kootenay there is an impression that the
latter is the case and the statement has
been made freely in the lobbies of the
House during the last week.    These are
the two main sources of supply and against
the above facts may be set this one—that
today Vancouver Island coal is selling in
San Francisco at $7.00 a ton, which is
50c less than at A7ictoria and Arancouver,
with the disadvantage of 1,000 miles of
difficult transportation.    If one goes further afield it would look as if the Province
is being even more unfairly treated than
these figures would indicate.   During the
present winter coal has been selling at
Saskatoon and Prince Albert, 1,000 miles
from the point of production, at $7.00 a
ton.    It has been selling in AVinnipeg,
nearly a thousand miles from Fernie, at
$S.00 a ton.    Allowing $-1.00 for transportation,  $2.00 for cost of production
and $1.00 for distribution in the case of
AVinnipeg, the profit for both producer
and middleman could not have exceeded
$1.00 a ton.    In Saskatoon and Prince
Albert, it is probable that the transportation company made a special rate in order
to insure fuel for those towns, but even
then the profit would not exceed that of
the AVinnipeg coal.    If these facts are
established, and they will be if the investigation is held, the Government of British Columbia will be forced to take one
of two steps, either to demand 01 the
Dominion    Government    some    measure
which will control the cost of fuel in the
public interest, or they will have to operate their own coal areas.    Further, the
above facts taken in connection with others
whicli have leaked out during the recent
labour troubles would seem to indicate that
the coal trade of this Province is in pretty
much the same position as tlie lumber business of the Northwest, and that a combine
exists for maintaining fictitious prices.   If
such a charge is established there will be
no difficulty in dealing with it effectually.
One other matter of importance remains
to be covered.    It is the question of dis
crimination in favour of American as
against Canadian consumers. On this
point it will not be so easy to secure evidence, but it will not be impossible, and
if a Dominion Commission is granted
tliere is no reason why the American Government should not throw open their customs department and so settle a question
whicli has been agitated for seven or eight
years. Important evidence on this point
could be obtained from Great Falls and
Spokane. Dr. McGuire has been the
means of setting in motion very important
and powerful machinery; he has received
the support of the McBride Administration; it remains to be seen how far the
Dominion Government will allow it to
operate.
Last AVednesday Mr. Joseph
Unstable Martin addressed a crowded
As Water.      meeting in the A. O. U. AV.
Hall, A'ictoria.    The meeting was held under the auspices of the
Asiatic Exclusion League and was organized by Mr. John Jardine, M.P.P., its
President.     The   speakers   were   Joseph
Martin,   J.   H.   Hawthornthwaite,   John
Staples, S. Perry Mills, J. C. Watters,
John Kay and John Jardine.    A movement supported by  public men of this
calibre cannot be pooh-poohed.   Just how
many of the audience were ardent exclusionists and how many went to witness the
fun which Mr. Martin always makes, may
be a matter of some doubt, but everybody
had a good time; the hall was packed; the
cheering was enthusiastic and Mr. Martin
enjoyed himself most of  all.    The ex-
Premier has lost none of his entertaining
faculties, but a careful perusal of his address  would  indicate  that  his  grip  on
logical reasoning is by no means secure.
For instance, it would be difficult to find
any speech in which so many contradictory
statements were made.    He claimed to
have been a life-long Liberal, but admitted
that at the last  Provincial election he
voted for a Conservative Government; then
he declared that he was sorry he had done
so.    By way of rounding up his attitude
towards the party with which he had been
allied for so many years, ancl the one for
which he voted a year ago, and possibly
also through a desire to restore a consistent equilibrium, he expressed the hope that
when the general election come along the
people would throw Mr. McBride out of
oflice ancl send seven Conservative members to Ottawa.    It is to bc hoped that
after this re-adjustment of his political
horizon   Mr.   Martin's   conscience   is   at
peace.   Mr. Martin's discussion of the Exclusion question was not very illuminating.
It consisted mainly of an unreasoning attack upon Sir AVilfrid Laurier and Mr.
McBride, with a side kick at the Hon.
William Templeman.   Of the latter gentleman  ilr.   Martin   declared   that   "he
knew nothing about public questions," a
conclusion with which it: was only fair to
say that Mr. Templeman knows nothing
about politics, because he has said to himself,  but. to  deny him  a  knowledge  of
public questions after more than twenty
years of public service is to deny him
Ordinary intelligence and on that subject
Mr. Martin is not authority.   He declared
that the only way to deal with this question was to pass the Natal Act and that
Mr. McBride had deliberately allowed the
House to go through that farce for the
second or third time, knowing all the time
that the Lieutenant-Governor would not
assent to it.   Yet at the very moment that
Mr. Martin was given utterance to this
picturesque phraseology, Ottawa was iu
receipt of the latest edition of the Natal
Act which had already received the assent
of the Lieutenant-Governor.    Of course,
Mr. Martin's criticism was directed at the
action of Mr. McBride last year, but there
is not a scrap of evidence to show that his
action has been any different this year.
In fact the evidence is all the other way,
since there is consistency in the course
pursued by the Government who have repeated   tlieir   previous   legislation.   Mr.
Martin  reiterates  the  argument  of  the
Liberal press that when His Honour reserved his assent last year Mr. McBride
should have resigned, but he does not fortify the statement with any Constitutional
precedent or authority. In seeking to make
political capital for the party of his longer
allegiance Mr. Martin enunciates a false
proposition.   He declares that the position
brought about could have been correctly expressed by the Lieutenant-Governor in the
following words: "I did not do it, I was
told to do it, and I have the man right
there who stands for it, attack him." The
declaration of Mr. McBride is on record
that he  did  not  advise the  Lieutenant-.
Governor in the matter.   There is also on
record a telegram from Ottawa which can
only be construed by any fair-minded man
as a distinct suggestion to His Honour to
withhold his assent.   There is also on record the letter from His Honour explaining why he reserved his assent, in which he
states distinctly that he did so because he
conceived that the legislation was of a
similar character to that which had been
repeatedly   disallowed   at   Ottawa.      It
should further be noted that in this letter
no reference whatever is made to advice
from the local Government.    In order to
secure the slightest sub-stratum of plausibility even, for his proposition Mr. Martin must establish that Mr. McBride is a
liar, that the Lieutenant-Governor is a
prevaricator and that the Hon. Mr. Scott
is an ignoramus.   In view of the political
vagaries of the gentleman who makes the
proposition this again is a large order. On
the Exclusion question, strange to say, Mr.
Martin does not look for salvation either
from the Federal or Provincial Government; neither can do the right thing; in
fact he makes it pretty clear that there is
only one man in Canada who docs know
how to settle the question.   As a final illustration of the  peculiar attitude of the
"stormy petrel" take the following paragraph  produced  verbatim  from  his  address: "The present ministry is about on
its last legs and I would like to say this,
both with regard to Mr. McBride and Sir
AVilfrid Laurier's Governments, but I am
sorry to say that they look to he pretty
well installed in power, with a majority
prepared  to follow them  and  see them
through."    .lust how a ministry "011 irs
last leis" can be "pretty well installed in
power" may be clear to the mind of Mr.
Joseph Martin, but to the average intellect
it is as clear as "mud."    Time was when
thc speaker could  have delivered an instructive and illuminating address upon
the Constitutional aspects of a great question, but apparently that time has passed,
and he has  reached the stage  when  liis
highest ambition seems to bc to tickle the
cars of the groundlings.   Instead of rising
to the occasion he descended to the level
of those who prefer sophistry to logic and
prejudice to reason. The insincerity of
the whole performance is demonstrated by
the fact that for the Government which
alone has had the courage to give legislative effect to the wishes of the Province
and to its own declarations he had nothing
hut condemnation. 'T~
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15,  1908.
The Merchants Bank
Cana a
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid 16,004000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
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Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
phical work,  entitled  "The Will   to'
Doubt,"    by    Professor    Alfred    H.
Lloyd, of the University of Michigan.
Who Are Our Scholars?
Owen Wister found himself the centre of a vigorous controversy as a
result  of  his  address   on  American
scholarship, delivered at  Harvard  a
few weeks ago.   It now appears, however,  that  the  criticism  directed at
Mr. Wister was the result of misrepresentation in a press despatch from
Boston printed in a number of newspapers, which  said that  Mr,  Wister
had   declared  that   tliere   were   only
three scholars in America.   He actually  mentioned   forty-one   American
scholars.   Since then, in defense of his
assertions with regard to the position
of the American scholar according to
European standards, Mr. Wister  has
elaborated a list of the most eminent
scholars in the world, in which he included three Americans—Dr.  Henry
Charles Lea, author of "A History of
the    Inquisition,"    Professor    Simon
Newcomb,   and   Professor   Maurice
Bloomfield.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked in my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
Literary Notes.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th,  1907.
Feb. IB GEORGE B. WATSON.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE S»3- VICTORI/
Some Promised Poetry.
Pessimists about present-day literature will find food for thought in the
list of books in poetry and belles-lettres announced for publication this
Spring by the Macmillan Company.
The list is specially remarkable as
containing the names of four writers
who stand at the head in Enlish poetry to-day, in addition to one great
name from the past. The promise of
hitherto unknown poems by Tennyson, as well as of a series of his own
notes o his works, is perhaps of the
greatest significance. Then ther is a
new volume of poems by Alfred
Noyes, generally held to be the most
promising of the younger generation
in England, and new dramas by Stephen Phillips and William Butler
Yeats. Mr. Phillips has written a
"Faust," which is to be produced in
London by Mr. Beerbohm Tree, before the close of the present season.
Mr. Yeats' new drama, "The Unicorn
from the Stars," which he wrote in
collaboration with Lady Gregory, ha.-,
already been played in Dublin, and
will be published in a volume along
with "Kathleen Ni Houlahan," and a
revised edition of "The Hour Glass."
The American drama is represented
in this list by Mr. Percy McKaye,
with "The Scarecrow," the lirst
prose drama from his hand to be published.
Of books that may fairly lay claim
to thc title of literature, one of the
most important in this list will doubtless be Mr. Fielding Hal's "The Inward Light."    Many readers will remember Mr. Hall's earlier book, "The
Soul of a People," in which he gave a
picture  of Burma and the  Burmese,
done with such sympathy and perception as allied him with the late   Laf-
cadio Hearn.    His new book is de-
lined as an attempt to determine the
essential   truth   that   underlies   the
Eastern faith called  Buddhism.    Another work that will bc accepted   as
literature is the third volume of the
series of Collected Essays by Frederic
Harrison, of which two volumes have
already  been  issued.    Mr.  Hamilton
W.   Mabie   has   edited a volume of
twelve stories described as Types of
the Best Fiction, which are to be pub-1
lishcd with thc title, "Famous Short
Stories:   English and American."    A
second  volume  of  Professor  Saints-
btiry's brilliant "History   of   English
Prosody" is also promised, and in the
same   li   sf,orlckat? m s.slySshrdltuiu
same list, for lack of a more convenient classification, may bc included thc
first complete translation of the "Celebrated Crimes" of Alexandre Dumas.
Ine losely allied fields the Macmillan   Company   offers   such   books   as
"Monuments of Christian Rome,"  by
Professor   A.   L.    Frbthingham,   of
Princeton University; "The Evolution
of Modern  Orchestration," by Louis
Adolphe Cocrne; and a new volume in
the revised edition of Grove's famous
"Dictionary of Music and Musicians."
"The Will to Doubt."
The Macmillan Company will publish this week an important philoso-l
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains', thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Wat-
.on, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following de-
icribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  November  24th,  1907.
Feb.  15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE tliat William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Cemmencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chatns; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
lo point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY  OLD  LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St, James and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted south flve and one-half miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
H. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
on Cheewhat Lake; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 26th August, 1907.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1% miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English.
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commenolng at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
SO chains; thence west 80 chalna; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more  or less.
Dated November 20th,  1907.
Feb.  15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
4e BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
By Appointment to H. M. the King.
A REVOLUTION IN FRUIT CULTURE.
V FLUID
The Winter Spray-Fluid kills the eggs of insects and mites
and the spores of Fungi.
V2 FLUID
The Summer Spray-Fluid is deadly to Aphis, Psylla, and Scale
Insects, and does not injure leaf or blossom. One spraying a year
with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. eOCPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
Sole Agents for British Columbia.
E. G. PRIOR & CO.. K?
VICTORIA, B.C.
Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
full particulars of these wonderful insecticides.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
The Y. B. e. Novelty Works
ran abtiqub, abtibtio   abb   abokitbotttbax,
nutno won hadb to obdeb.
I un now ready to fulfil any orders for all kinds of Banks, Stores,
Offices. Churches, Barber Shops and Hotel Bar Fixtures and Furniture.
100* «h»__Y_lle Mrs*      :i _  »     11      " __»      TAMOOVnM, B. a
T.  LeOAIB,   rroyrletar.
Investigate the I
"Cushman" flarine r\oto\
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Qovernment Stree
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona rides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
Shall the Bank Act
Be Revised?
As everyone, in any way connected
with the business life of Canada, has
been, more or less, affected by the
monetary stringency so generally felt
during the past six months, I have no
doubt that any discussion of our banking methods and the clauses of the
Bank Act will prove interesting at
the present time.
In the first place, why should Canada be affected, to the extent that she
is, in consequence of a panic in New
York?
It is not an answer to say that the
monetary stringency has been worldwide, and that all countries have been
seriously influenced by these conditions. Such an answer does not touch
the root of the matter.
The unscrupulous manipulations of
stock-jobbing capitalists on the New
York Stock Exchange—the exploitation of the savings or the wealth of
the people, till prices have no relation
to values, resulted in a slump, which
rapidly became panic when it was
found that public confidence had been
so abused as to be at last completely
destroyed. The withdrawal of bank
deposits all over the country followed. People preferred to hoard their
money rather than leave it in the
banks. To meet these demands realizations became imperative, and every
attempt to realize securities accentuated the panic by still further contributing to a steadily declining market. Banking houses, unable to meet
demands upon them by borrowing
abroad, and consequently being compelled to realize on their securities at
prices infinitely below what they had
cost, were obliged to close their
doors.
The immense shipments of gold
:rom London to New York, causing
I steady and unprecedented rise in
:he discount rate of the Bank of Eng-
and, and the great continental banks,
was the result of the closing out of
he foreign balances of American
houses, and also represented the pro-
eeds of foreign loans to American
banks.
Thus the fever of financial fear runs
ts course and is gradually allayed,
hen confidence begins to return, and
hen the turning point is reached re-
overy is rapid and conditions soon
ecome normal.
Tllat the currency laws of the Unit-
d States are unscientific is generally
dmitted, and even an improved and
cientifically balanced currency will
ot do away with the cause of panics,
t can only fortify the country against
heir ultimate and at all times evil
ffects. The improvement nf the cur-
ency regulations is a remedy, not a
ure. The cure, and I believe there is
|only one, is to regulate and control
he stock exchange operations; and to
eclare certain classes of operations
ot only illegal but criminal.
There can be no interference with
he legitimate fluctuations of the mar-
:et as regulated by demand and sup-
ly, or other natural conditions, but'
II artificial manipulations, by means
combinations,   trickery or  fraud,
ould be crushed out with an iron
nd.
This will, of course, be a difficult
ldertaking, but not an impossible
ie, in any country, except perhaps in
e United States, wher capital is all-
werful and monopoly rampant, and
here, unfortunately, the people arc
t interested in a proper and just
ministration of law.
It goes without saying that Canada
ust, to a certain limited extent, be
fluenced by such conditions in the
nited States, because of the intim-
e commercial and financial relations
between the two countries, but this
influence is largely sympathetic. In
reality, Canada is independent of American conditions, and when we see
a money panic in New York having
the effect of paralysing Canadian commerce and putting a stop to the natural and healthy expansion of Canadian trade, owing to the inability of
the banks to meet the legitimate and
reasonable business requirements of
the people, an enquiry into the whole
system of Canadian banking methods
and practise becomes of the first importance.
Consider for one moment the far-
reaching and distressing effects upon
the whole country when it is plunged
into a condition of financial chaos, resulting from a partial collapse of the
banking system. That recent events
in New York did bring about a very
grave state of things in Canada does
not require to be argued. If there
had not been a partial breakdown in
our banking system, there would have
been no monetary stringency in Canada. The breakdown in our banking
system is proved by the fact that
practically all usual banking accommodation was discontinued for several
months—during the panic—and only
now, when the financial storm has
spent its force, and conditions are
slowly returning to the normal, are
our banks beginning to assume their
ordinary functions. It must not be
supposed that this suggested enquiry
will in any sense resolve itself into
an attack upon the banks or the banking system of the country. The object of the enquiry would be to cler.r-
ly understand the causes of the recent
monetary stringency, in so far as Canada has been and is still affected by
it; and to devise means by which the
commercial and industrial interests of
the Dominion can be secured against
the loss, stagnation and distress which
must otherwise result from the recurrence of the conditions we have just
come through.
While any drastic interference with
the rights and privileges of the banks
of Canada is not now advocated, it
is essential at least that their methods
should be clearly understood so that,
if necessary, their policy may be judiciously controlled by the Government
in the public interest.
It is, of course, in every way desirable that any contemplated changes
in the Bank Act shall interfere as
little as possible with the powers now
enjoyed by the banking corporations.
The objects of the enquiry should
be:
1. To protect the public interest.
2. To enlarge the scope and power
of banks and to facilitate their operations.
3. To increase the banking capital
of the country and the circulation of
bank notes, so that the banks can
meet the demands of the expanding
trade of the country.
To this end I submit the following
suggestions for consideration and discussion:
1. That all chartered banks in Canada be compelled to call up the whole
of their authorized capital, thus providing several millions of money to
carry the increasing trade of the country.
2. That the organization of new
banks be permitted with a minimum
capitalization of $250,000—the whole
to be paid up in full before the bank
is authorized to begin business.
3. That the banks collectively be
compelled to insure their deposits by
the payment to the Receiver-General
of a tax computed on the sum total
of the average deposits, and that the
money so paid shall constitute "The
Bank Depositors' Insurance Fund."
4. That the double liability of bank
shareholders be abolished, because it
is inexpedient and unnecessary.
5. That the chartered banks in Canada be not permitted to lend any part
of their Canadian deposits outside of
the Dominion, except when by special
representations made to the Treasury
Board, they are, by an order-in-coun-
cil, permitted to do so for particular
purposes and for limited periods.
6. That all chartered banks shall
make a special monthly return to the
Department of Finance, showing their
total loans and total deposits in eacn
province of Canada.
7. That the banks be authorized to
issue notes against and equal to, but
not in excess of the sum total oi their
combined paid-up capital and reserve,
subject to all of the regulations governing the issue of bank notes.
8. That the following words be eliminated from Clause No. 76, subsection 2, paragraph C, to wit: "Or upon
the security of any goods, wares and
merchandise"—because it is not es
pedient to restrict the lending powers
of . bank so long as its loans are secured by assets, readily convertible
into cash.
9. That the word "wholesale" be
struck out of Clause No. 88—wherever
it now appears—so that the ciai.se
may be enlarged to cover the requirements of all dealers and shippers
whatsoever, and not limited in its application to wholesale dealers and
shippers only.
10. That Clause No. 91, governing
the rate of interest, be struck out, because it is ineffective and unscientific,
and not in harmony with modern
economic principles.
11. That an annual inspection of the
head offices of all chartered banks be
undertaken by the Department of Finance.
W. J. HOLT MURISON.
that;  I could even love your money
apart from you."
"Quite right, darling, I want you
always to separate me and my money
in your thoughts."
Nodd—What does this money stringency mean, anyway?
Todd—Why, the thing has simply-
spread from me to the whole country.
—Life.
"Robert, this spelling paper is very-
poor," complained the small boy's
teacher. "Nearly every wordi s marked wrong."
"It wouldn't have been so bad," protested Robert; "but Annie corrected
my paper, and she's mad at me, and
for every little letter that I got wrong
she crossed out the whole word."—
Lippincott's.
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES" BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION  FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
J
VICTORIA
Had a Fellow.
The effort of the Ladies' Home
Journal to prod pastors and church
members to greater effusiveness in
welcoming strangers to public services may lead to overdoing hospitality in various ways. One of these
ways was revealed to a warm-hearted
Western pastor. Coming down from
the pulpit after the evening sermon,
he found a stranger in the person of
a fair-haired Swede, and, greeting her
with a cordial handclasp, said: "I am
very glad to see you; I want you to
feel at home here. I'd like to become
acquainted with you. If you'll give
your address I'll call and see you."
"Thank you," she replied, "but I
have a fellow."—Congregational ist.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date atjrles.  Estimates and
designi f urniihed.
And So They Were Married.
The Heiress—And would you love
me if I lost all my money?
The Count (earnestly) — Dearest,
in that case what else would there
be for me to love?
"But are you sure you love me quite
apart from my money?"
(More     earnestly)—"More    than
HOLLY TREES
Prices irtm ag MM to fe.ee, aeeerd-mg
to tiie.   Write tor seed set tn
let.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
KING WILLIAM IV. V. 0. P.
The Very Oldest Scotch Whisky Procurable.
This is a blend of the rarest selected old Scotch Whiskies to be
found in Scotland. It is pronounced by experts to be singularly
rich in those compound ethers—only developed in the finest spirits
by great age—which impart the delicacy of flavor and constitute the
elegance of bouquet so much prized by connoisseurs. To the
gourmet it is offered as a substitute for the old liqueur Brandies
shipped from Cognac prior to the destruction of the vineyards by
phylloxera.
Call for King William IV. V. O. P. at any first-
class hotel, bar, cafe or club. If your dealer
cannot supply you for home useilkindly telephone
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents for B. C.
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home nl nil theatrical and wider He
artiats while in the Capital city, aire at
Other kindred bohemlans.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Prsprieters.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarter! for mining men and
commercial traveller*.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular fa a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Bathe.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New Modern hot water ijrstem. Etcctria
lighted. Tub aad shower batha and laundry In
connection.   The miners' home.
••DANNY" DEANE. Proprietor
 ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
R05SLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe io
Connection.
QREEN & SHITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B.C,
Leading Hotel of tha Kootonajri.
J. FRED HUME, Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Worker!
of the Kootenaja.
W. E. HcCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal
Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in the City.
.$1.80 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress*
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R   8.   DAY
•nd
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
690 tobt nun    n    txotobu.
TIOIUI OATTZBAX.L
Mlier  a__4  esters!  Otatractsr.
TenSara   flrsa   en   Brick, Stone   an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Floorlm
Oflcs, Bank, Btsra and Balosn Fitting-
Pile Driving, Wharrea and Dock Shad
constructed and repaired.
TIOTOBIA. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15, 1908
Incorporated 1101*
Capital, $SO0,000.tt]
Capital Increased
IS ^°lV<>0M.M.j
Reserve . . |M.**M|
Surplus, J«»-.!'«aa
1907  .  . $H0,0M
J. B. KATKEBS, Gen. Kan.
IK   CLOSING   OT   ESTATES
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
338 Hastings St, West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Ilagaslae, published every Saturday hy
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
MM  Government Street. .Vlcterla, B.C.
it*  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C,
W. BLAKB1CORE..Manager and Editor
Independence and
Partizanship.
Evidences are not wanting that the
next few years are likely to witness
a decided strengthening of the note
of independence which has been recently heard in the Canadian press.
I want to make it clear at the outset that by independence I do not
mean a repudiation of party obligations, but the cultivation of a method
of looking at public affairs in a manner which will not subordinate public interest to the exigencies of party.
In this respect an evolution is taking place in popular sentiment. In
the early days the only means of financing a newspaper was by drawing
on the party funds. The system still
survives, but it is neither as widespread nor as absolute as it was twenty years ago.
With increased prosperity and the
accumulation of wealth that large section of the community which is not
hidebound in its political allegiance
is rapidly increasing. The men who
claim all the virtues for their own
party and who ascribe all the vices to
the oposition, are diminishing in
number, although the race will not
become extinct until the millenium
dawns.
This unreasoning defence of a party
or of a government under all circumstances, cannot be justified upon any
ground. To argue otherwise is to
assert the infallibility of parties and
governments. There is an old proverb which runs, "Faithful are the
wounds of a friend," and on this principle it is difficult to understand why
even a party organ should not offer
fair criticism when it is deserved. It
is impartiality which alone gives
weight to criticism.
The extremes to which newspapers
have gone in upholding every action
of the party they are associated with
has not only weakened their influence,
but strengthened the demand for a
more independent note. Such an attitude is not inconsistent with strict
party  obligations.
If a paper is anything more than a
mere mouth organ, it must do something for itself. Whether it be a
Conservative or a Liberal organ, it
has behind it a great historic past,
and it should have political convictions. Those convictions should be
permanent, and if so the paper will
remain faithful to its ideal. It will
always be recognized as a Conservative or a Liberal paper; it will stand
for the political principles with which
in the main it is identified, and along
those lines may become a leader of
public opinion. But this does not preclude that lofty conception of its
calling which will lead it to set principles before party and to refuse to
sacrifice the former at the bidding of
the latter.
This is the difference between independence and partizanship; the one is
receptive, the other is obstinate.
The time comes in the history of
every political newspaper when it has
to decide between independence and
partizanship. That period is reached
when the government of the day is
faithless to its pledges or violates
principle. The servile press will continue to endorse and to flatter aj usual, because it is servile. The party-
press, none the less anxious for the
permanent success of its party, but
alive also to its responsibilities to the
public and its regard for principle,
will not hesitate to censure its friends,
not for their undoing, but for the upholding of the principles upon which
the permanent influence of the party
depends.
There are papers in Canada to-day
which have been strong enough and
wise enough to adopt this attitude;
their circulation is increasing and they
are self-supporting.
Such well-known papers as the
Montreal Gazette, the Hamilton Spectator, the Toronto Daily News, and
Saturday Night, whilst preserving
their political complexion, have not
hesitated to speak out very emphatically in denunciation of the policy of
their party. No one suspects them of
weakening or charges them with infidelity, although professional politicians condemn their action as inconvenient; but the people applaud and
frank criticism pays even from the
standpoint of the party manager,
whose unit of valuation is the vote.
A political newspaper must in the
main defend the party with which it
is associated; that it should do so
under all circumstances is a proposition which cannot be maintained, and
if it could the greatest loser would be
the party.
J$jh>C?7rt<£^.
-A-
* Social and
* Personal.
*
*
*
Mr. Joseph Hunter was a passenger
to the mainland on Sunday night.
* *   *
Miss Ruby Fell entertained a few
friends at dinner on Saturday evening
last.
* *   *
Captain Rogers of Pier Island has
been a visitor at the Balmoral during
the week.
* *   *
Miss Belle Roberts came down
from Vancouver on Wednesday evening after attending the wedding of
her friend, Miss Annie Spence, formerly of this city.
* *   *
The last session of the Private
Skating Club was held on Tuesday afternoon at the rink on Fort Street.
Some of the skaters present were
Miss Margaret Rickaby, Mr. Holmes,
Miss Winona Troupe, Mr. H.arvey,
Miss Mason, Miss Doris Mason, Mr.
Troupe, Mr. J. Arbuckle, Mr. Fred.
Rome, Mr. Stillwell, Miss Johnson,
Miss Little, and Mr. W. Barton.
* *   *
A wedding of interest to Victorians
took place in New Westminster two
weeks ago at Holy Trinity Cathedral
between Mr. Gordon Corbould and
Miss Maud Charleson, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Charleson of
Vancouver. The Rev. A. Shildrick
officiated. Mr. Corbould is a brother-
in-law of Mr. Ethelbert Scholefield,
thc Provincial Librarian, of this city.
* *   *
All those attending the Fancy
Dress Ball at the Empress next
week are requested to register their
names and thc character they represent in thc book which will be provided specially for this object.
* *   *
Mrs. 0. M. Jones, Fort Street, gave
an impromptu dance on Friday evening of last week.    The supper table
was superbly arranged with yellow
daffodils. The guests were Mr. and
Mrs. Bodwell, Mr. and Mrs. Spring-
hett, Justice and Mrs. Irving, Mr.
and Mrs. Gillespie, Mrs. Fall, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Crease, Mr. and Mrs. Prentice, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver, Dr. and
Mrs. Helmcken, Dr. Hasell, Dr. and
Mrs. Robertson, Dr. and Mrs. War-
son, Colonel A. W. Jones.
Miss Tuck of Roccahella entertained
a number of friends at tea on Saturday afternoon last. A profile guessing competition afforded a great deal
of amusement; the prize for which
was won by Miss Ethel Pitts, who
guessed the greatest number correctly. Some of the invited guests were
the Misses LeSueur, Mrs. Pearce,
Miss Miles, Mrs. Peace, Miss Mackay, Miss G. Mackay, Miss Gillespie,
Miss Keast, Miss Barbara Keast, Miss
Rochester, Miss Monteith, Miss Tiny
Monteith, Miss Little, Miss King,
Miss Newcombe, Miss Blackwood,
Miss Langley, Miss Perry, Miss Irving, Miss Genevieve Irving, Miss
Phipps, Miss Barron, Miss Bullen,
Miss Williams, Miss Mary Lawson,
Miss W. Wilson, Miss Johnson, Miss
Hanington, Miss Earle, Miss L.
Earle, Miss Cann, Miss McKeown,
Miss Angus, Miss Amy Angus, Miss
Tilton, Miss Ethel Tilton, Miss
Browne, Miss Fitzgibbons, Miss P.
Drake, Miss Trenchard, Miss Day,
Miss Griffiths, Miss Newton, Miss
Child, Miss Helmcken, Miss V. Wilson, Miss Kitto, Miss Holmes, Miss
Saunders  and  Mademoiselle  Kerpez-
dron.
*   *   *
Mrs. H. Helmcken gave a very
charming tea at the Empress last
Tuesday. The decorations on the tea
tables were most elaborate, being
carried out in pale pink carnations
and asparagus fern. Among the
guests were: Mrs. Roy Troupe, Mrs.
W. R. Higgins, Hon. jf. S. Helmcken,
Bishop Cridge, Chief Justice and Mrs.
Hunter, Hon. D. M. Eberts, Miss
Cridge, Attorney-General and Mrs.
Bowser, Hon. Dr. Young, Premier
and Mrs. McBride, Mrs. G. A. McTavish, Mrs. Bullen, Captain and Mrs.
Troupe, Misses McTavish, Miss Bullen, Miss Troupe, Misses Helmcken.
Mrs. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Troupe, Mr. and Mrs. King, Mrs. McLagan, Mrs. Hobson, Mrs. and Miss
Savage, Misses Leiser, Mrs. R. Jones,
Mrs. Lampman, Mrs. Laundy, Mrs.
J. Harvey, Mrs. Blackwood and many
others.
On Wednesday afternoon Mrs. F.
Higgins was hostess at a tea given in
the Empress. Among the guests
were Mrs. J. R. Anderson, Mrs.
Berkeley, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. W. S.
Gore, Mrs. Beaven, Mrs. Laing, Mrs.
Archer Martin, Mrs. Prior, Mrs. King,
Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs.
Worlock, Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Miss Schubert, Mrs. B. Tye,
Mrs. Luxton, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs.
Little, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. G. Wilson, Mrs.
McBride, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. Lamp-
man, Mrs. J. Wilson, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Raymour, Mrs. Black-
lock, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. C. Todd, Mrs.
Morley, Mrs. McB. Smith, Mrs. Munn.
Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. H. Kent..
Mrs. Cleland, Mrs. Wolfenden, Mrs.
Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Richardson.
Mrs. Courtney, Mrs. Rycot, Mrs.
Ackman, Mrs. W. Higgins, Mrs. McTavish, and the Misses S. Blackwood, M. Lawson, Chute, Holmes
Lugrin.
"JEWELRY COSTUMING."
The wonderful blending of tones this season in Precious and
semi-precious Stones appeals forcibly to the choice dresser. In
our immense stock she will appreciate at a glance the harmony
between a Montana sapphire and a piece of electric blue velvet;
she can readily recognize the fact that among garnets she is sure
to find a match for her red gown; for her lavendar reception gown
she will know the shade of amethyst to select, and for the
Soft Neutral Tints of Evening Gowns
the gently tinted moonstone, pearl and diamond, pearl and tourmaline, with the lovely art finish, gold mount; Parisian pearl collars
with brilliant-set bars or Parisian collars in irdescient beadf or
Baroque pearl will be revealed as eminently suitable.
Necklets to match any costume at any price
Pearl Collars from $1.25 up to $20.00
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
SILVERSMITHS AND JEWELERS
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Mrs. Charles E. Pooley, Lampson
street, gave an At Home in honour of
her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Charles
Pooley, who is at present her guest.
Among the guests were Mrs. Waghorn, Mrs. H. Pooley, Mrs. Punnett,
Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. Tilton, Mrs. McCallum, Capt. and Mrs. Reed, Rear
Admiral Fleet and Mrs. Fleet, Mr.
and Mrs. McCallum, Mr. and Mrs.
Bridgeman, Mrs. McGill, Mrs. McBride, Mrs. F. Pemberton, Mrs.
Prothero, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. R.
Robertson, Mrs. Herman Robertson.
T. Barnard, Mr. Harold Robertson,
Mrs. Luxton, Mr. R. Jones, Mr. Innes,
Mrs. C. Gibson, Mrs. Worsfold, Mrs.
Arundel, Mrs. Janion, Mrs. R. Janion.
Mrs. Stevenson, Mrs. Hollyer, Mrs. V.
Eliot, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Phillips, Mrs. George Gillespie, Mrs.
Lampman, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. McKenzie, Mrs. Good, Mrs. S. Simpson,
Mrs. 0. M. Jones, Mrs. Talk, Mrs.
Crowe-Baker, Mrs. R. Wilson, Mrs.
Peters, Mrs. A. Crease and the Misses
Tilton, E. Tilton, H. Peters, Pitts,
Drake, Monteith, P. Irving, Baynes-
Reed, Keast, Bell, Fosterfi Boulton
Holmes, Butchart, Hanington, Clute
and others.
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Notice.
Do not forget the Charity Ball at
the Empress on the 18th. inst. That
is Tuesday next. It will be the event
of the season and everybody will be
there. If you admire youth, beauty
and luxurious surroundings do not
miss it. If you wish to aid St.
Joseph's Hospital go for Charity's
sake.
Just imagine having a
foil orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance ! How you could
dance to such music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner Gram-o-phone in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time. No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
         entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits;  minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The world's foremost   -layers and singers make Victor
. S. Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone
>\\\p'ays t'iem as no ot'ier instrument can-
%»V.. t>X Gc to any Victor or Berliner dealer's and hear
\
Gc to aiiyr.wv, ... — - 	
these wonderful instruments.    Ask him to
V*_» Q«\ explain the easy-payment plan.
TJ-?<C>\. Write us on the coupon for   catalogue
*tiB_'l\ s-__\_ and full information.
\\\W
xvwsi*
..x The Berliner Gram-o-phone
W\ \ \ ^V&V Company of Canada, Ltd.
You can always      -_      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar jV|#    D.      than others.
Sigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICB  tliat Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation   Gentleman,   intends   lo   apply   for
a special timber licence over the fol-
. lowing described lands;
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thenco forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands;
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
nortli   to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 11)07.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jail 18 R.  W. Wilkinson.
J    VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
"Vlooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Cintleman, intends to apply tor a spe-
ckl timber licence over the following
■ascribed  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
Artlieust corner of section 20, thence
Ighty chains west, eighty chains south,
Ighty chains east and eighty chains
.orth to place of commencement.
' Dated  21st December,  11)07.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Ian IS R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thenoe south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS  MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
|Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
(TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
! Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest cornel' of Timber Limit No. 13i:j3; thence
nortli SO chains; tiience west SU chains;
thenco south SO chains; thence oast so
chains to point of commencement.
Located rth December, i.)07.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD,
STAN LEV   WOOD.
|lan  18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
I TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
.. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Uriiissr,  intends to apply  for a special
imber   licence   over   the   following   de-
iCPibed lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
ilanted SO chains west of southwest eerier of Timber Limit No.  13193;  thence
Jast 160 chains; thence south 10 chains;
Alienee west CO cliains;  thence north 40
|_hains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
i. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
bruisers, intends to apply tor a special
Imber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
ilanted 40 chains west of the north-
vest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
hence north 160 chains; thence east 40
ihalns; thence south 160 chains; thence
vest 40 chains to point of commence-
nent.
Located  Sth December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
tan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
■ TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
l_. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
fcrutsers, intends to apply for a special
limber licence over the following described lands:
| Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of tlm-
jber limit No. 18546, thence west 40
Jchains; thence north 40 chains; thence
■west 80 chatns; thence south about 60
Ichains; thence easterly along shore 120
Ichains; thence north about 60 chains to
lioint of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
, STANLEY WOOD.
|ian. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
I TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
E Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
itends to apply for permission to pur-
hase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
juthwest corner; thence north 20 chains
) McClure Lake; thence along McClure
,ake ln an east southerly direction 43
naiiis,   more  or   less;   thence  west   40
nains to place of beginning and mak-
lg 40  acres more  or less,  and known
3 the southwest fractional quarter see-
on of 36, township 5, Range  5.
Dated November 20, 1007.
an. IS WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
J TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
le Aldermere, B.C., occupation house-
life, intends to apply for permission to
lurchase the following described land:
1 Commencing at a post planted at the
'outhwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
Jience east 40 chains; thence south 40
lhains; thence west 40 chains to place
If beginning and known as the north-
Vest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
and   containing   160   acres,   more  or
eDated 23rd of November, 1907.
tan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chatns north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated  November  15,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
Best Buy.
BEST  BUY  IN  VICTORIA  OF  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMES BAY.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feat water
frontnge on James Bay. This property
has ihe Post Ofllce to the North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of lt.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots is unrivaled In the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by the Provincial Government, the City Council and the
C. P. R.    Price $52,600.
Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
510 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
DISTRICT OB  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parallel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J, Herrick MacGregor.
I
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.      •
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap In-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thenee east 80 ohains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 ohains distant and in an east-
Arthur Gone T/MfDCD   AAADQ  Office Phone 1534
Manager     * Mlri_gJ____.lt _Yl_rli    O   Residence 4-33
posted up to date erery day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT &. MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHAN C ERY     CHAMBERS.
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps showny al/
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands  taken  up inBritishColumbi
Blue   Prints   Can be    obtained ot .-ihorf  noi
let Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thonce east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. IS J. J. TEMPLETON.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
ehains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
ST. ANDREWS
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Residential aad Day School ior Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universiiies and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
CommencinK at a post planted on the
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
26 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence wast 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chatns
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY McMICKENKBEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thenco
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 aores more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three mlles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thenee west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north SO chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 2I1A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thenee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles soutli
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north SO chains; tiience wesl
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east so chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing ai a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south* 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 ohains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commenolng at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
iuto Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south ol
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west '40 chains to poinl
of commencement, containing 640 acres
moro or less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles soutli of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence wost 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; theuce west SO ehains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mlle east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake SO chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 aeres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot *241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and .;
thence north SO chains; thence west Su
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
cast SO chains lo point of commencement, containing 610 acres, more or less
Dated December 16th, 1907.
.No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
.ibout two miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile soutn of
..■orner post of claims No, 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains;
.hence we**,t 80 chains; theuce north 80
chains to point ut' commencement, and
containing 6*10 acres mure or iess.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.   15 ED. BROWN.
B.C.
Timber] Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO,
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of thc
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February,  1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends 10 apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
tlie north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore lino a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to upply for permission to lease
tlie following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the liitn duy of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP  COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Griarson. Agent.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been ox-
tended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works  Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at tlie head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chainB
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north  line  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co,,  of   Vancouver,  occupation,
 , Intends to apply for permission
lo  lease  the following described laud,
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south and
west to the southeast corner of Lot 308;
thence east tive chains; thence uorth
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains 10 a
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thence to "said point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rile to purchase the following described
lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers inlet; commencing ut tbis post planted on lhe east
side of tlle Bay about one-third ul a
mile from the point at the mouth ol the
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
thence eust SO chains; theuce north 30
chains; Ihence west 90 chuins to beach;
thence suuth along beucli lo point ol
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked  Nov.   25,  1907.
UEOKUE .OLNU ,4 ARTHUR BELL,
Dec. 7 George Young, Agenl.
NOTICE TO CON .TRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will bo received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. 0. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the ofllce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certilicate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner ln
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited If the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
bo returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
culled upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guaranteo Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissionet' in the sum of $3,000 for
lhe due fulfilment of the work contracted  for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed tn the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND    DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman __. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C.„ occupation
tlmbor broker, Intends to npply for a
special timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at 1 post planted
at northwest cornor of T. L. 18187;
thonco east SO chains along the north
llne of T. L. 18187; thence north SO
chains along the west lino of T, L.
12502; theuce oust 80 chalus along tho
north llne of T. L, 12502; thonce north
80 chains along the wost lino of T. L.
12503; thonce lu a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
containing 610 acres  of  land,  more or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER. The week, Saturday, February 15, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of
Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 30
days after date. ,    ._.
No. 1—Commencing at a post Planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.b.,
S.W. No. 1, which Is on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
lt cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north 80 chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commonclng at a post Planted
at the southwest corner marked WB,.b,
S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant
in a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campoell
Lake; thence east 80 chains; northi 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 4, which Is one mile distant
in a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east pt
T. L. 14864, thence west 80 chains; north
80 ohains; east 80 chains; south 80
ehains to point of commencement.
No. 5—Commencing at a post Planted
at the southwest corner marked W.i..b.,
SW. No. 6, which is one mile distant ln
a northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mile east of T. L.
14864; tbence 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.      '
No. 6—Commencing at a post Planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.b.,
S.E. No. 6, which is situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thence west 40
chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.b.,
S.E. No. 7, which ls about four miles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.B. No. 8, which ls five miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 16th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which ls four miles distant
ln a northerly direction ti-om Crown
Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which ls two miles distant
In a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement. _._._,
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which is five and one-quarter miles distant in a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Lake; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 17,  1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chainB to point of commencement.
33. Commencing at a post planted
at the north-west corner, marked "W.
E. S., N.W., No. 33," which is five
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain; thence south
ik> chains, east 8o chains, north 8o
chains, west 8o chains to point of
commencement.
No. 84—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.B.S., N.E. No. 34, which ls three miles
distant In a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80  chains  to point  of commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 35, which
ls marked W.E.S., N.E. which
ls five miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 86, which ls six miles distant
ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one-half a mile south of
Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20th,  1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 87, S.E., which ls flve miles distant ln a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 88—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which is flve miles distant
ln a southwesterly direction from West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chains; wexttO chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which ls three and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where lt joins the line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.
S.W. No. 40, which Is three and one-half
miles In a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where lt
Joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chatns; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 41—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains,
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line Block 110; theme
east 80 chains;  north 80 chains; west
80 chains;  south  80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 43, which is one and one-half
miles distant in a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
it joins the line of Block 110, thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Block 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which ls marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and in a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 160 chains; east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 47, which is two miles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where it joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which is three and one-half
miles distant In an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 60—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 60, which Is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 61—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 51, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where lt
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 16. 1907.
No. 62—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 62, which is six miles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it joins line of Block 110: thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 53—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 53, which is six miles in a
westerly direction from the soutli end
of West lake, where lt joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; east
30 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 54—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 64, which ls two and one-half
miles distant ln an easterly direction
from the north end of West lake, thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 56—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 55, which is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; west 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11.        Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 1(0 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM,
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 26, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,  1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 160 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec. 19, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 100 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wl-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thenfce
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chatns to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 15, which ls eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which ls nine miles
distant in e northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
mlles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which is nine and
one-half miles in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
miles distant ln a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which ls ten and one-half miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles in a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which ls seven and one-
half miles ln a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24,' which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, which ls seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E,, No. 26, which ls seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which ls marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, whioh is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chains; north
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No, 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant ln a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east
to point  of commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which ls ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
W.  E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11,     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.  2,   situate  on  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.H.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   lu
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 182, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 86 cha'ns to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the* shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chatns; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICB, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to  apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1, Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 82, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
5, Township 38; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east i0
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a poat planted  at
northwest corner of T. L. 18186, Beetle!
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chainl
thence north 160 chains; thence east \
chains; thence south 160 chainB to poll!
of commencement, and containing 6<f
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted 1
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Sectlo
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains
thence north 160 chains; thence east 4
chains; thence south 160 chains to poln
of commencement, and containing 64
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted a
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Sectlo:
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains
thence north 160 chains; thence east 4i
hains; thence south 160 chains to poln
of commencement, and containing 64|
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17,  1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted al
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 41
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L, 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thonce west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence eas; 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to ptlnt
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Deo. 17, 1807.
10. Commencing at a post plantedat
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Sacton
1, Township 83; thence east 40 chats;
thence north 160 chains; thence westjo
chains; thence south 160 chains to poit
of commencement, and containing 60
acres, more or less.
Dated Dee. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chiel
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at th«
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (46) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 Inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be ob-
tained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price pei
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Eacli tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars (3260), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter Into contract when called upoi
to do so, or fail to complete the wort
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them up*
on  the execution  of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope fur-
nished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICB that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chatns; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chainB; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMBS HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER    LAND    DISTRICT.
Distriot of Nsw Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C„ ocupation
Broker, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN _ CHANDLER.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
Victoria, B.C., Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B.C., Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post* planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chatns; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICB that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C„ contractor, Intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907. !
JAMBS HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
sssssssssssssssssssssssssss^^
Dinnerware Newness
OF MERIT—SURPASSING FAR ALL OUR PREVIOUS EFFORTS.
Never in the history of this store's merchandising have we shown such a
magnificent assortment of medium-priced Dinner Services as is now offered. We
have spent much time in planning this showing, and exercised the greatest care in
selection, and the new creations in Dinner Ware just lately unpacked are, indeed,
delightful. The ware in every case is much above the ordinary, and the decorations
have been executed with such marvelous detail, these sets are genuinely fascinating. The decorations are sumptuous—the gold work being worthy of special note.
We are greatly pleased with this new and fine showing, and want you to see the
offerings. Even you, with your intimate knowledge of wares and value, will be
surprised at the superior character of the goods and the very special values offered.
If you have longed for a pretty Dinner Service, "now" is your opportunity. Such
pretty sets and such unusual values aren't common, by any means, and we advise
ycu to see these at once. Come in and let us show you these. The salesmen are
enthusiastic over them, and they'll be delighted to have the opportunity to show
them. These handsome sets may be seen in our First Floor Showrooms, and at
any time, but we advise an early visit, be:aise the finest are sure to disappear very
quickly.
TEN  ESPECIALLY  GOOD VALUES  FROM AMONG THE NEW LOT
DINNER SERVICE—In semi-porcelain.
A very neat and pretty floral decoration.
97 pieces.   Special value at, per set $8.50
DINNER SERVICE—A "stock" pattern
in a pretty blue rose decoration. There
are 114 pieces in this set. Matcliings
from stock at any time $13.50
DINNER SERVICE—One of the newest
decorations. A tulip in blue with lots
of gold as well. 96 pieces of newness
for   $14.00
DINNER SERVICE—In semi-porcelain, 96
pieces in a very pretty green and gold
carnation decoration. Neat and pretty.
Per set  $14.00
DINNER SERVICE—A 105-piece set in
semi-porcelain. A "stock" pattern which
you can replenish at any time. Pretty
apple  blossom  decoration.    Price $15.00
DINNER SERVICE—Here is one of our
daintiest sets. A pretty pink rose and
wreath of gold make a pleasing decoration.    Price    $15.00
DINNER SERVICE—Here is one of our
daintiest sets. A pretty pink rose and
wreath of gold make a pleasing decoration.   102 pieces.   Per set  $18.00
DINNER SERVICE—Another 102-piece
set in semi-porcelain. Dark green,
orange and gold, make a very attractive
decoration on this.    Per set.. $20,00
DINNER SERVICE—Flown green, orange
and gold on finest semi-porcelain makes
this set a set worth special note. 102
pieces.    Price, per set    $20.00.
DINNER SERVICE—A 107-piece service
in light green and gold decoration. A
really handsome style and excellent
value at price marked.   Per set... .$25.00
DINNER SERVICE—Another semi-porcelain set of 107 pieces. Flown blue and
gold decoration. A set you'll be pleased
with.     Jer   set    $27.50
CHINA DINNERWARE AT THE PRICE OF COMMON CLAY.
Direct from the famous Calsbad China Potteries we have received some excellent
examples of the superior art and skill of the workers of this renowned pottery. The
four sets here listed stand far above the ordinery sets usually sold at this figure in
point of artistic merit and excellence of material. That Victorians appreciate their
goodness is evidenced by the many sales since we have received them a short time
since. We have still, however, a full range and advise that you see the dainty
offerings soon.
CHINA DINNER SERVICE—A new importation of famous "Carlsbad" china
services discloses this excellent set.
Clusters of pretty pink roses and heavy
gold on fine china makes 115 pieces of
niceness.    Per  set    $50.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE—Another of
our new "Carlsbad" dinner services. This
is another 115-piece set. Heavy gold
border and dainty pink roses complete
the decoration of this. Excellent value,
at, per set  $50.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE-Still another set in "Carlsbad" china. This style
has an exceptionally heavy gold border
and a pretty and novel combination of
roses, green leaves and gold, ng pieces,
at, per set  $65.00
CHINA DINNER SERVICE-This is a
very rich and handsome set and has been
a favorite set with many. A heavy blue
and gold band on an excellent china 's
the secret of its popularity. 139 pieces
for   $90.00
Silverware Goodness
Yes, especially worthy of mention are these few items picked from the hundreds
of dainty pieces in our Silverware Department. In this department we stock an immense variety for the home. The newest and best creations from the world's best
makers are being constantly added and you'll always find in our silver offerings the
very "latest" efforts. Quality here, as in all other departments of our business, is
the first consideration. Not a single unworthy piece ever passes over our counter.
Investigate our offerings!
ROGERS' 1847 SILVERWARE
The following lines of "Rogers 1847" Silverware are put up in pretty plush lined
boxes and are especially suitable for
wedding gifts:
PIE KNIVES, each, plain $2.50, gilt..$3.00
SOUP LADLES, plain or satin bowls $4.00
BERRY SPOONS, plain, $2.00, gilt..$2.50
AFTER DINNER COFFEE SPOONS,
box six  $2.00
OYSTER FORKS,  plain  or  fancy, box
six   $3.00
CHILDREN'S SETS, of Knife, Fork and
Spoon, plain patterns, set $1.75, fancy designs, set  $2.00
AVON SETS, 3 pieces, consisting of Sugar
Shell,   Butter  Knife,  and  Cream  Ladle,
set $3.50
BUTTER KNIFE AND SUGAR SHELLS
set, $1.00 and  $1.75
SUGAR TONGS, several designs, each $1.75
BOUILLON SPOONS, set six  $4.50
Gravy Ladles, Fruit Knives, Butter Knives.
Cheese Scoops, and many other things.
"MERIDEN" SILVERWARE
SILVER   PLATED   TEA   SERVICE,   4
pieces.   Plain design or satin engraved
 $15-00
SUGAR BASINS AND CREAM JUGS to
match, large choice, newest patterns, Pair
$5.00, $6.00, $7.50, and  $10.00
TOAST RACKS, each $1.00, $1.50, $2.00,
$2.50 and  $3.50
MARMALADE DISHES, in crystal, best
quality silver plated frames, each $3.50,
$4.00 and   $5-oo
In daintily decorated China Dishes, each
$3*50 and  $7.00
FRUIT STANDS, in crystal and decorated
glass dishes, each $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00,
$6.00 to    $8.50
BUTTER DISHES, covered, in plain, engraved and satin finished styles, each
$3*50, $4*50, $5.50, $7.00 and  $10.00
CRUET STANDS, 3 bottles, breakfast
size, in the very latest designs, each $2.00
and  $5.00
CRUET STANDS, 2 bottles, each $2.00,
$2.50, $3.00 and  $3.50
A FEW OF THE POPULAR PIECES IN SILVER-MOUNTED OAK
Worthy of particular mention is our very fine stock of handsome silver-mounted
Oak Goods. This handsome ware, always popular, is now more so than ever. Equally
adapted for everyday use or "occasions." We have an excellent variety of these excellent pieces—Silverware department, first floor.
Afternoon Tea Trays, each $20.00 to..$6.00
Butter Dishes, each $4.50, $4.00, $3.50, $3.00
Biscuit Jars, each $6.50, $6.00, $4.50, $4.00
and as low as  $3.50
Salad Bowls, each $10.00, $8.00 and .. .$7.50
Dinner Gongs, each   $6.00
Cigar Cabinets, each  $9.00
Liqueur Frames, 3 bottles, each $18.00, and
as low as  $8.50
Splendid Values in McLintock Quilts.
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered
plain and printed sateen, 6 ft. x
Price 	
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered
plain and printed sateen, 6 ft. x
Price 	
DOWN   FILLED   QUILT,   covered
plain   and   printed   sateen,   with
edge, 6 ft. x 5 ft.    Price 	
DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered
satin on one side and sateen on the
6 ft. x 5 ft.   Price.	
with I DOWN   FILLED  QUTLT,   covered  with
5 ft. 1 Turkey Chintz, 6 ft. x 5 ft. Price ..$5.50
$6.50 ; DOWN FILLED QUILT, covered with
with the choicest of the choice sateens in very
6 ft. artistic designs.   Price  $14.00
$8.00 * ALSO SOME BEAUTIFUL QUILTS, in
with : sateen and silk covers, at, each, $20, $25,
frilled *     to  $35.00
.$9.50 ; SMALL   SIZES,   for   cradles   and   cribs,
with J dainty, small patterns, 24x36 inches, 30x42
other, ! inches,   36x48  inches,   36x54   inches,   at,
$13.00        each, $4, $5 and   $6.00
\WiT3_ nrsTran ftse
fl   VrMOME.IMOTEL AND.CLUa-rURNISMtRS^ VICTORIA':* B:t. '■■< i
«0000*0-i»-»00<>00-0*000-0000-^^
At The Street   ^
Corner        h
By THB LOUNQBR
*
The ceremony of giving royal as-
lent to Bills in thc local Legislature
not a  very  exhilarating  function,
■fthorn of the trappings of State, it is
almost a humdrum proceeding. When
•lis   Honour   marches   through   the
lirincipal entrance and along the aisle
Iif  the   Legislative  Chamber   to  the
llirone, accompanied by his guard of
lonour in military dress, there is an
lir of old world pomp which recon-
|iles the new world to the pageant.
Men, on the other hand, His Hon-
r, clad in ordinary morning dress
Ind carrying, his topper in his hand,
liters by a back door, quietly takes
Js seat, and without a word listens
the monotonous drone of the clerk
lading the bills to be assented to,
Iving one gentle nod after each and
I more pronounced one at the end of
lie affair, it savours of the perfunc-
Iry.
J This is just what happened on
luesday afternoon, when eleven bills,
[eluding the notorious Natal Act, revived the royal assent through the
ledium of His Honour's nods. No
oubt some ceremony is necessary,
ut just why it should involve the at-
ndance cf His Honour in the House
noi], when he has to perform the
far more important duty of signing
each bill in the privacy of his own
apartments, deponent knoweth not.
From my eerie in the press gallery
I witnessed a very pretty little comedy. Naturally, when the Lieutenant-
Government entered the House everyone rose to his feet, except the member for Nanaimo—and the editor of
the Colonist. The former was but
following his own bad precedent;
whether the latter was contaminated
by the evil communication which corrupted good manners, or whether his
erstwhile American citizenship imposed too great a strain upon his loyalty he alone knows, but he openly
joined the rebellious Comrade and
achieved the distinction which has already made the Socialists notorious.
I noticed that the Lieutenant-Governor's secretary transfixed him with
a piercing loow, which, however, had
no effect but to cause him to look into
his hat.
It just occurs to me to say that as
the issuance of tickets admitting
strangers to the floor of the House is
entirely within the province of the
Speaker, of whose loyalty there is no
doubt, it ought not to be too much to
ask that gentleman to exercise his
discretion to the exclusion of persons
having no prescriptive right to the
floor such as is enjoyed by a member,
and who apparently knows as little of
decent manners as the Socialists.
I think the most amusing lounge I
have indulged in this week was outside the vestibule of the Victoria
Theatre on Wednesda" morning. It
was tiie occasion of the sale of tickets
for the great and only Paderewski
show. On the previous day Manager
Denliam had disposed of all the members' tickets, and there were some 300
left for the general public; a few of
them were at $2, a few more at $3, and
the balance at $4. For these 300 tickets there was a line of applicants
stretching out from the vestibule
along View Street and southward on
Douglas as far as the stage entrance;
and great was the disappointment
when the supply of tickets was exhausted long before the tale end of the
queue reached the box office. 1 know
that Victoria is a musical city, but I
am confident that not 10 per cent, and
possibly not five psr cent, of those
who were purchasing tickets could, if
they were blindfolded, tell the difference between the playing of Paderewski and that of the commonest plant,
thumper on the road. I am convinced,
after sitting in the box office for an
hour and listening to the conversation
of the ticket purchasers, that the sole
reason why they were willing to spend
$4 on a ticket to hear Paderewski was
simply because he is the fashion.
Now, I do not want to depreciate
his extraordinary talents, but I am
going to give my readers a little bit
of information on the authority of an
eminent musician who has spent some
years in Germany. He assures me
that in that country of musicians, and
in the most select musical circles, neither Paderewski nor Kubelik had any
status, and that there are scores of
players who are rated higher by the
Conservatories. Unfortunately, however, they have  not  such  long hair,
nor arc they as proficient in the art of
advertising.
I expect my musical colleague, Bohemian, will be down on me for saying this, but I would respectfully remind him that it is not an expression
of opinion but a statement of fact. A
knowledge of it may comfort those
who do not hear Paderewski play on
Friday night.
It is astonishing to me how Manager Jamieson keeps up the quality of
the entertainments at the New Grand
Theatre. Week succeeds week, but
with the exception of an occasional
poor turn, the general standard of excellence is the same, tl is safe to say
that few vaudeville houses in the
West get as good value for their
money as the New Grand, which accounts for its popularity.
Judging from thc advertisements,
the Fancy Dress Ball at the Empress
Hotel will be popular affair. As it
is for charity's sake, it is fitting that
it should be as cosmopolitan as possible, and I am glad to learn that the
tickets are being purchased by people
in every rank and station; it will be
essentially a function for the Hoi
Polloi. There is little doubt that thc
accommodation of the hotel will be
taxed to thc utmost, and even if $3 is
a little stiff, it includes a splendid
supper, and all the profits will go to
St. Joseph's Hospital. So, my merry
Lounger, dig up I Not so much for
the sake of the function as for the
benefit of thc charity.
In many Victoria gardens snowdrops arc now in full bloom, and
even  crocuses are peeping out.    On
Sunday afternoon, while strolling in
the vicinity of Moss Street, 1 heard
the bleating of lambs, thc lirst of thc
season. The delightful weather 01
the present week makes one believe
that spring is here. For at least two
months yet, Canada east of the Rockies will be battling with ice and snow,
and for two months after that may
not have seen the last of the white
coverlet. What is the matter with
Vietoria?
1 want to make an appeal to the
athletic authorities of Victoria. It is
that they will agitate, in season and
out of season, and will never let up
until they have secured a central
ground. Much could be said on this
subject, and it can be better said in
the sporting columns, but after close
observation for two years, I am convinced that athletics will never be a
success in the Capital City as long as
the public have to travel to Oak Bay
in order to see matches. The delay,
the inconvenience, thc uncertainty,
and the impossibility of the tramway
coping with the traffic, be they never
so willing, is a determining factor in
this matter. When tlie athletic
grounds arc more central, spectators
will be counted by thousands instead
of hundreds.
OQri
cot-c^r. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
Staking the Mountain
Echo.
By Arthur P. Woollacott.   ,
MRS. WALTON thought that her
niece's beauty was of the kind
that an artist would have made
use of in giving a soft yet generous touch to a primitive scene from
one of the earlier pages of history. She
admired the style, perhaps because she
knew that it held many points of distinction in common with her own. The
elder lady indeed, found a singular fascination in watching the play and luster
of Eleanor's countenance and was in the
habit of exciting her for her own aesthetic gratification.
"Eleanor," she said, "I believe there is
something of the savage in you after
all."
The younger lady nodded a solemn
affirmative and put aside her volume.
"Savages are victims of a limited horizon and hence lack appreciation. Consider what it is that lends so great a
charm to the Oddyssey, the Earthly
Paradise, and such twilight literature. To
my mind the interest is always infinitely
greater when the romance is brought to
the very threshold of the present. Here
we are, living in the Stone Age, with
Drake, Vancouver, Quadra and a host of
wild adventurous spirits flitting in the
offing. It is the contrast I suppose that
makes it so delightful." She nodded in
the direction of the fleet of war-ships anchored in the bay.
A soft, autumnal haze reduced the
mountainous scenery to a glimpse of
fairyland. In the west the wooded shore
of Vancouver Island was a mere silhouette in Vandyke brown touched sharply
into the warm tints of the sunset. Camp
fires blazed along the beaches; launches
were coming and going, and a large
swarm of Indian canoes drifted among
the ships imbibing twilight ideas of
greatness.
A number of gentlemen, including
some officers from the ships, greeted the
ladies from the promenade and passed
on.
"There is safety in numbers," Mrs.
Walton commented, smiling at her niece's
warmth of colour. "I envy you the romance that is brought to the very threshold of the present. It glorifies the future."
They looked at each other and went
into helpless laughter.
"Thank heaven, they are occasionally
gregarious," said Eleanor, with great relief. "This is the first whole day I've
had to myself."
Mrs. Walton, with a relish derived
from her recollection of similar experiences, dilated at length on Eleanor's persecutors. During the recital the victim
frowned stormily, laughed, sighed, and
generally responded with such readiness
to the descriptive touches that her aunt
prolonged the torture and exaggerated
for her own pleasure. "And you still
persist in keeping me in the dark," she
concluded.
"Will you believe me when I say that
the question interests me in a spectacular way only?"
Mrs. Walton scoffed. "In a sense,
yes," she conceded, recalling certain ludicrous complications. "But otherwise"
—well, with all your coolness I know
that there is a whirlwind of feeling lying dormant. But really, Eleanor, it is
not. right. Your attitude is a premium
on presumption. I believe after all you
are indifferent. I have my theory all the
same, ami it has been partially confirmed. When it became known that that
mineral claim of yours in the mountains
yonder had to be re-staked at once, how
many of them, do you think, like chivalrous knights of old, volunteered to start
off at an instant's notice?"
Eleanor awoke from her seeming indifference, but with her customary wariness she avoided the pitfall.
"How could you, aunty! You've placed me in a dilemma. It was my intention to employ Letherdale."
"Well, it wasn't altogether my doing,"
her aunt said, with momentary compunction. "Both Mr. Twining and Dr. Loring volunteered and start tomorrow
morning—separately, of course." Mrs.
Walton watched the effect of the announcement.
Eleanor was lost in thought a moment.    "It's too bad.    It places me in
an  awkward  position.    I  must  forbid
them," she said, with decision.
"They will be justified in ignoring youi
prohibition."
The statement startled her and she
turned to hide a rosy countenance. How
to extricate herself and preserve her independence was the question that required prompt solution.
"What did they—Mr. Twining say?"
"He told me that he had instructed his
architect to add a large conservatory to
his house," the aunt returned, cooly inspecting her niece's features.
"I believe I told him yesterday that
I had a passion for orchids," Eleanor
commented absently.
"Dr. Loring said that immediate action is necessary to forestall claim-jumpers. He knows that Twining is going,
but will go himself in any case to make
sure. I think it very generous of him."
"Very!" was the answer murmured
with some asperity.
"What a girl you are to sit there pondering a scruple with a fortune hanging
in the balance," Mrs. Walton pursued
with amazement. "Why, according to
Letherdale's computation, there's a handsome fortune in sight, and he said there
would be a stampede the moment the
fact became known."
Eleanor, however, was not easily mollified. She remained silent and oblivious
to her aunt's further remarks. Late in
the evening she sprang from her chair
and observing that Mrs. Walton had
gone into the house, she put on her hat
and a light cloak and walked rapidly to
the village where, after some searching,
she found Maquilla, the Indian guide.
Some minutes later Maquilla began gathering together his poles, paddles and
camping gear.
Early next morning Letherdale heard
the regular thudding of poles in the river
bottom and went to the door of his cabin
expecting that it was a messenger from
Miss Newcombe with instructions to proceed to the Canyon in the interior of the
island to re-stake her claim. It was
too dark to distinguish objects clearly,
especially under the shadows of the forest-clad shore. The canoe, with two
polers, and someone sitting amidship
passed up, a dim shadow in the gloom.
Letherdale hailed it but received no answer, and he wondered, hoping that none
of the crowd of unscrupulous prospectors had become aware of the fact that
Eleanor's claim was practically at their
mercy.
Presently another canoe came up and
Genelle, his colleague in the river business, swung lazily up to the landing and
spread himself out comfortably in the
stem-sheets under the shelter of his sombrero. Letherdale watched the smoke
curling from a hole in his head-gear for
a while, and then concluding that he
was bursting with importance went down
to interview him.
"See here, Letherdale, jump in and
come over.   The Doc wants you."
"Sure?"
Genelle wiggled his pipe by way of
affirmative. "Twining hired me this
morning to take him to the Canyon as
fast as I knew how. I suspected the
Doctor would want you. There's some
sort of race on. Both are going up to
stake Miss Newcombe's diggins. You
know-what that means."
The river-men crossed the straits to
the Bay. Letherdale at once proceeded
to the shack where the Doctor was engaged in biological experiments. In a
few minutes the backwoodsman was
making arrangements with a typical product of the west—a lithe graceful chap,
with a gravely cheerful eye and a head
eloquent of more than the average share
of brains. There was a tenseness in his
manner, and a concentrated decisive look
in his expressive eyes that excited Letherdale's curiosity.
On the verandah of a cabin near by,
Tony Genelle ancl a capable looking fellow in knickerbockers, a soft fedora, a
well-trimmed beard, with the manners of
a penegrinating millionaire were discussing the details of a canoe trip to the
Canyon. The man's voice was frank
and hearty, but with a ring to it that
made one think the speaker had a thing
or two up his sleeve. Letherdale knew
at once that the man was Twining ancl
observed him with interest, and was not
at all surprised that Miss Newcombe had
shown her preference for him, for he was
decidedly a likeable man in appearance
and was, moreover, reputed to be
wealthy.
Loring proceeded to Constable Haddington's office for the necessary papers
ancl Twining followed on his heels with
an air of provoking nonchalance.
Tony turned to Letherdale: "Say!
Look at Twining's back. Bet he's the
politest kind of devil. He's worrying the
other. You can tell the way his back
moves."
Letherdale's attention was attracted by
Mrs. Walton, who was coming from the
government office, and began telling him
breathlessly when within fifty paces, that
Eleanor had mysteriously disappeared.
"Mr. Letherdale, I really don't know
what to make of it. She's such a daring girl, but eminently sensible. I see
you smile, but of course you know her
well."
He thought that he knew her as well
as anyone can be expected to know a
woman in this world, for he had mothered her when her parents, former neighbors of his, died and left her on his
hands. Since that time Eleanor had
travelled extensively and was now not
only accomplished, but exceptionally
beautiful as well.
Letherdale assured her that Miss Newcombe was well able to take care of herself.
"Well, you are exasperating—really as
bad as Constable Haddington, who looked at me in the same way, smiled his
cool, ominiscient smile, and dismissed the
matter with provoking indifference. What
is one to do if one cannot depend on one's
friends?"
An hour later the two canoes were
leisurely ascending a series of rapids en
route to the interior of the Island. As
there was nothing to be gained by racing
up a succession of stiff rapids, the guides
agreed during one of their portages to
be loyal to each other until the ground
was staked, after which each was at liberty to make the water fly.
Twining chafed considerably at what
he called Tony's blessed laziness. The
canoes kept abreast like sections of a
catmasan. Tony, however, was as
touchy as a lord and as proud as most
of them: "Say, boss!" he said, with incisive pathos, after Twining had been
nibbling at him for about an hour, "Take
it all in a lump or by the mile?"
Twining wisely accepted him as an
irreducible proposition and thereafter
kept his peace.
On the afternoon of the second day out
they reached their destination, and spent
the remainder of the day in blazing lines,
planting stakes and in traversing the
island.
That night the parties pitched their
camps on a level spot surrounded by a
fringe of berry bushes overhanging the
water ancl prepared for a good night's
rest. The tug-of-war would begin with
the first break of dawn.
The Indians hated the spot for ,like
many camping grounds on the coast, it
had in earlier days been the scene of
tribal conflicts.
Late in the evening Genelle became
troubled and uneasy in manner. Letherdale watched him closely until at length
Tony called him aside and pointed to the
further bank of the river, where in the
intense shadows they saw what they
thought was a woman's face, standing
out like a ghostly blurr. It was gone in
a flash.
"Did you see that, Letherdale?" said
Tony. "I've glimpsed it once or twice
before."
It was one of those mystifying appearances that impress one like the vague
adumbrations of the seance room.
"Prospectors sneaking past," Tony
thought.
"Couldn't have been. Well—there was
one canoe ahead of us too. It may be
Indians."
The matter was dismissed. "Any more
claims around. I want to stake one,"
said Genelle.
"This island's the only outcropping.
Low grade. Wasn't worth a grub-stake
until the railway began to loom up. Now
it means a fortune."
"Who's going to get it, Twining or
the Doctor?"
Letherdale laughed. "Dunno! Eleanor's peculiar. Her dad ancl Loring's
governor discovered it when they were
partners. Both died before it was any
good to them. Canoe went to splinters
in a log-jam—Newcombe was sucked
under ancl drowned. Loring footed it
thirty miles through the jungle nursing
a broken leg right to my place—ancl died.
The location was lost.   I found it when
Eleanor was in Europe. That was when
she had just thrown over the Doctor in
favour of the rich man. I wrote to Loring and he made me swear to leave him
out of it."
Genelle whistled: "So he's entitled to
half and won't look at it!"
"He's peculiar too. Bet he'd hammer
me if I went and told Eleanor now. Say
what in the deuce—"
An avalanche of small pebbles rolled
down the opposite bank into the stream.
"Otter," said Tony.
"What would an otter be climbing that
bluff for?" Letherdale wanted to know.
Genelle was about to take a pot shot
in that direction, when the voices of
Loring ancl Twining were heard, near
the canoes in the heat of an altercation.
Twining apparently was baiting the
other into action of some sort: "Surely
you'r game!" he was heard to say, with
insulting sarcasm.
Loring swung on his heel and returned
to the camp-fire looking pale and preoccupied. For the next hour he was in a
state of suppressed excitement and was
plainly making a great effort to keep
his temper down.
Conversation was more or less difficult
and was not pursued. Beetling cliffs surrounded the camp and the forks chroning
and swirling on either side filled the air
with endless uproar.
The Indians of the party, wrapped in
their blankets and with heads half hidden in the smoke of a communal pipe,
were talking with mysterious solemnity
among themselves. Twining was as indifferent and as placid as a man in
church and at the moment was engaged
in cleaning a revolver with all the leisurely care of a cow-puncher, while the
firelight played over him in its own wild
way, splashing him with the hues proper
to a son of the wilderness. He suddenly
threw up his head and looked enquiringly at Letnerdale. Genelle and Loring
did the same. It was necromantic, but
Letherdale understood their movements
when he heard what he thought was the
river singing one of its impromptus. It
suggested a woman's voice. The hour,
the circumstances and the growing excitement incident to the race on the morrow had its effect on the men. Loring
presently leaned forward from his place
with a noticeable pallor and handed Letherdale an army revolver.
"Try it," he said.
Letherdale fired several shots at a bit
of fungus standing out from the hole
of a tree, and pronounced it as accurate
as a rifle. The crack of the gun produced a remarkable effect. The singing
sounds ceased, the result impressing
Letherdale like a sudden silence. He felt
queer as though he had unwillingly killed
something.
Twining bounded up and joined the
group: "Target practice ?" he said, tossing cigars to the men. "I'll go you a
bout, Loring," he added, swinging abruptly and facing him with a cold, steely
glance.
The Doctor met the challenge with a
manner as suddenly resolute as that of
Twining.
"What's the matter with the lot of us
chippin' in?" said Tony.
Twining looked at him, studied him
with the keen scrutiny of one whose purposes are definite, immutable.
"You put up a couple of empty bottles
on those stumps," he said incisively, dismissing Tony from his attention and
stepping off a distance of twenty-five
paces.
The pair took their places at either end
of the line. There was a personal element, a desperate sort of preoccupation
in the manner of both that made Tony
say, with a lot of the enthusiasm gone
out of his face: "Holy Mackinaw! This
looks darn like a dool!"
At the same instant one of the Indians
began telling Letherdale with much excitement that he had heard the men arranging to have some sort of scrimmage.
"We fire when you count ten Letherdale !"
"Ready ?" said Twining in a voice that
had the reckless mounting ring of a man
who is being whirled into a galloping fit
of intoxication.
They turned their backs to eacli other.
Thc Indians were piling armfuls of
resinous branches on the fire which sent
the flames into a towering blaze.
(To be continued.)
mt_m THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1908.
Notes on
Provincial News
Out of Work.
seems to have reached him this winter. They must have had a great
time at Champagne Landing, wherever that may be. Jack Pringle tells
of their Christmas feast, when the
piece   de   resistance   consisted   of   a
The meeting of unemployed held in ^ish of roast gophers stuffed w,th
he Athletic Club Rooms at Nanaimo mjce 0n the bill of {are) amid many
I Monday night last, was an import- other delicacieS) the following items
nt one. It showed several things rigured. Bear steak, knuckle of lynx,
•/hich may as well be recognized: ,£g of wolverjne, owls' eyes poached
?irst, that there are a large number on hard tack] scrambled weasles'
_f unemployed in the Coal City; next, brainSi brazed mink heartS| muskrat
:hat there is no immediate prospect of pie. fricassee of otter| squaw berries,
■esumption of work at the mines; ancl, high balls and ,ow ba]ls 0ne thing
ast, that work which these men might c.m be said for Whitehorse—it is all
lave done has been let to Japanese. ajjve
It is gratifying to know that  Com- 	
:ade Hawthornthwaite was less   ex- _-, the Hundred Thousands.
:ravagant in his utterances than us- jlie greatest herd of caribou ever
tal; he was probably impressed by reported in the Yukon is now moving;
:he gravity of the situation. The southward across the head of Sixty-
nost practical outcome of the meet- mj]e rjver| a hundred miles west of
ng was the receipt of a telegram Dawson. Reports say the herd has
rom Premier McBride to the effect been crossing there for nearly a hun-
:hat public works would be started in dred daySj and jt |s estimated that
he neighbourhood of Nanaimo which IOo,ooo caribou have already crossed,
vould relieve existing conditions. It with no end 0f the mammoth proces-
s   inconceivable   that,   with   several  sjon jn sight,
uindred of our own countrymen out	
if employment, there should be any Are We Suckers?
urther hiring of Orientals. No rail- Apropos of the Alaska-Yukon-Paci-
vay company or contractor can af- fie Exposition, the Whitehorse Star
ord so far to run counter to public comes out editorially in the following
entiment, even if they were callous manner:
nough to ignore the appeal of work- "Seattle has always found Yukon-
lien of our own race. ers and Alaskans to be easy marks
  in  the matter of disgorging money.
Coal and Coke Tax. Seattle has grown rich and affluent at
The Fernie Free Press has a rabid the expense of Yukon and Alaska,
nd not very discriminating editorial The money has all gone one way—
n the subject of the proposed coal towards Seattle. Now a scheme is on
nd coke tax. Under existing condi- foot to make a grand coup in 1909—
ons, it may fairly be assumed that make 'the big cleanup' at the expense
ie Free Press could hardly do other- of Yukon and Alaska, whose names
^■ise than attack the proposal of the are being traded on for that purpose,
rovernment, but no one can read the     " 'The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Expo-
Iditorial without a feeling of regret, if sition' is a rather 'sausagefied' name
ot of sadness, that a paper which for for a real estate boom, but that is all
many years enjoyed independence, it is, and all the name is being used
nd was wont to discuss public ques- for, and it is not Alaska or Yukon
ons in an intelligent manner, should real estate that is to be boomed either,
ave sunk to the degrading position "Both Alaska and Yukon have broad
f a corporation organ. It should expanses of real estate which need
trely bc possible for a writer of aver- booming, but it is not likely that ei-
re intelligence to advocate the in* ther will find much recognition at
^rests of a corporation without ignor- Seattle, her own interests being para-
g those of the public. To fail in mount to anything outsiders may wish
|iis or to deny its possibility is to to exploit.
irogate the functions of a newspa-      "No one objects to Seattle having
cr.   To demonstrate its impossibility as many expositions and fairs as she
to remove any plea of justification desires, but she should rely on  her
r its existence. own resources as bait for the unwary
  and not on her efforts to play Alaska
Too Partizan. and Yukon as 'good things.'
In the same  column in which the      "There are a few people yet in the
ld Man of the Cranbrook Herald North who enjoy being patted on
|aims   credit   for   running a decent their backs and called good fellows,
ewspapcr, and declares that the Her- and that is what Seattle is doing in
■Id has proved that this is a paying the matter of her hyphenated real es-
licy, hc has a paragraph ane.it Dun-  tate    promotion   scheme.     But    thc
|in Ross' speech at Ottawa.   In this 'taffy' is too transparent, and very few
aragraph the  Old Man claims  that  Yukoners will be lured by it.
loss showed up the hypocricy of the      "Seattle is playing the people of the
IcBride Government on the Oriental
nmigration   question  "in   a   concise
anner," also that he placed Mr. Bow-
:r,  "whose   legal  firm  acted  as  at-
irneys for the Japanese Immigration
North for suckers.   Are we?"
Free School Books.
The   Cranbrook   Prospector   is   a
 [strong supporter of the proposal that
.gency," in a very bad light indeed, the Provincial Government should aril view of Mr. Bowser's emphatic range for supplying free text books
enial of Duncan Ross' charges on jn the public schools of the Province,
ie floor of the local Legislature, it fn an intelligent editorial on the sub-
a little difficult to harmonize this ject the Prospector says that the chil-
aragraph with the Old Man's claim dren are called upon to provide them-
0 decency. It is easier to appreciate selves with too many books, that the
he point of his concluding paragraph, books they get are ont fair value for
hat "nothing under the heavens can the money paid, and that a Minister of
Irevent Duncan Ross being returned Education of the ability of Dr. Young
t the next election." The Week could undoubtedly devise a satisfac-
ttite agrees with the prediction; the tory method of overcoming the diffi-
revention will  not come from any-  cttlty.    This puts the case in a nut-
bing "under the heavens."
Nothing Like Contentment.
The Whitehorse Weekly Star of
inuary 24 is full of newsy items
lout the  North country.    It is full
shell, and there is some reason to
hope that friend Grace will not be
disappointed.
WEEK 17TH FEBRUARY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN A C«MI»INE,    Proprietor*.
Management at RtiT. JAMIIMN.
CARLISLE'S DOG AND PONY
CIRCUS
Including   "Tom,"    the   World's
Greatest Talking Pony.
ALVA YORK
English Singing Comedienne.
SEYMOUR EMILIE
HOWE and EDWARDS
Comedy Sketch
"The Arrival of Mr. Dooley."
THE PIOTTES
Character Singers
"The Italian and His Sweetheart."
EDDIE POWERS
Blackface Comedian.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"There's Another Picture in My
Mama's Frame.
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pearl Fisher."
"The Exciting Ride."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"IL BACIO."
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part ef house).. ..lie
Evenings, Balcony  10c
Lower Floor  20e
Boxes   lte
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH A THOROUGH
:' BUSINESS OOVRSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Nieht Classes.    You can
j enter  school   any   time,    individual
1 instruction.    A  diploma   from   this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best Arms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
TBE   SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Victoria, B.O.
B. A. KacIUUan.
Knows Him.
The Hedley Gazette knows Duncan
rejoicing because the lowest tern- Ross pretty well, having had expenditure  that  week was  25  degrees ence of his vagaries   when   the    re-
:low zero, whereas a year ago 50 dc- doubtable  member  for  Yale-Caribou
■ees below was reckoned to be   "a was campaigning for the last election,
irbingcr  of spring."    The content- It has his peculiarities down to a fine
ent of spirit which pervades White- point, and gently reproduces one  of
jrse   society   is   something   to   be them in the following paragraph:
oud of ancl easily puts to shame the      "While Duncan Ross was deprccat-
■owlers  who  enjoy  perpetual   sum- ing British Columbia anti-Asiatic leger  in  Victoria.    E.  J.  White,  the islation   in   Ottawa,   his   paper   was
imourous "stroller" of the Star, re- whooping   it   tip   allee   samee   other
ves the chestnut that last winter the British   Cnlutnibans.   in   Greenwood,
.ientific     research     department   of Duncan  should  have used the  wires
"•hington, D.C., wrote asking him to kill that little editorial endorsement
l^r information regarding ice-worms, of   the   Natal   Act   in   last    week's
|ut no such cheering correspondence Times."
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HB.     BJOBNFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
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Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
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Cigar Store.
Phone 345
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
la Warn and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierlet.
New Wellington Coal.
rhe beat household coal in the marke  at
current rates.   Anthracite coal f-Sr sale.
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the  farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
iflTtNTS   an< Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Enjiaeer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Lctve Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTORIA, B. 0.
LLOVD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster  Road,  Vancouver
1
.
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
$^7.50, $30, $35.
ALLEN & CO.      I
iFit=Reform Wardrobe*
* Victoria, B. C.
New House to Rent, or
Por Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city, Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow,    with    large    balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete   floor;   electric   light   in   every
room  in  the  house.    Hot  and  cold
water   equipment;   heavy   porcelain
wash  bowl  and  bath,  also separate
toilet in basement.    Laundry in the
basement  equipped with  latest  concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk  has  been  laid  in  extra heavy
I concrete   from   street   to   verandah
I steps.   This is a proposition that will
! be   snapped   up    quickly.     Call    or
! phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
I Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C. &
THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15, 1908,
sorting
Comment.
Mr. and Mrs. David Alexander of
Duncans are registered at the Balmoral.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. H. Dallas Helmcken
have taken quarters at the Empress
Hotel for the remainder of the winter.
* *   *
Mrs. P.  De Noe Walker left dur-
ff . • is up to the  Island League  to take
■^^Ptiri 111 If the necessary steps to put a stop to
* the practice, and I hope that this will
be done at the meeting this evening.
The local rugby team had an easy
T"~~"" victory over the Nanaimo players at
The first test match to select Oak Bay last Saturday. A win was
eleven players to represent the Van- expected, but it was hardly thought ing the week for the mainland. She
couver Island Football Association that such a big score would be rolled expects to be away for several weeks,
against the Mainland, was played at up. The game was a very poor ex- Mf A R Johngton and Mr Frank
Ladysmith last Saturday, and result- lnbition of the grand old game, net- Lioy(j of Westholme were guests at
ed in the selection of a team whicli ther side making any effort to exert the King Edward Hotel during the
is expected to defeat the  Mainland- themselves. week. *   *   *
ers, but at the same time it might The Vancouver Rugby Union is Mf_ Dona,d Fr&ser of ^_ ^
have been strengthened considerably, working itself into a fury over the al- dian Bank 0f Commerce has been
The selection of the team has occa- leged treatment of Referee Tait at transferred to the New Westminster
sioned considerable comment, some Nanaimo a couple of Saturdays ago.
of which is not of a very compli- It is claimed that the players from
mentary nature to the committee, the Coal City treated him in a very
From the twenty-two players who ungentlemanly manner and threaten-
took part in the test match, thc com- ed him with all kinds of dire wrongs,
mittee had sufficient available mater- Nanaimo, on the other hand, claims
ial to form a very strong combina- that he received proper treatment, but
tion, but in some unaccountable man- even if he was called a few ungentle-
ned they have overlooked players manly names, it is hardly sufficient
who should have had their place. for the Vancouver players to ask for
Bradshaw in goal and Lorimer and the suspension of the whole Nanaimo
Hewitt   at   full   back   make   a   very team.
strong combination, while in the for- I was surprised to learn that the
ward line the team has one of the Victoria Cricket Club was in a bad
best scoring aggregations that could state  financially.    It  is  well  known
be chosen, but the half-back division that the club is  maintained by sub-  Corps   has   arrived   at   Work   Point
'     , ,, , .   . „       ,   , , Barracks to take the place of Captain
is weak, and it would not be surpris- scnptions  collected from  ex-players,  Reed> wj10 is returning to England.
ing if this division cost the Islanders but last season the collections were *   *   *
the game.   Johnston at centre half is not sufficient to cover the expenses.      Miss Heneage, who is leaving Vic-
the  best  that  could  be  chosen,  but I hope that some arrangements   will toria next week to make her home on
had Connors, of the Shearwater, been be made to get the club out of debt Thf}[s Island  is giving a small fare-
' ' , . ., . t ... well tea this afternoon
in port, he would undoubtedly have before the commencement of the sea-
gained the place. But with the elec- son, as to start the season in debt
tion of Johnston we have no com- would be a hard blow to the team,
plaint. At right half, however, Mc- The prospects for the season are very
Kinley is a rank failure and is not bright as far as playing is concerned,
entitled to a position. After the ex- and it is expected that the team will
hibition he gave in the All-Island vs. be as strong as ever. I have to con-
All-Mainland match of last season, it gratulate L. S. V. Yorke on his elec-
should  have  been  sufficient  for  the tion as Captain of the Club.    He is
branch.
* *   *
Miss Doris Mason has returned
from Duncans where she has been
staying with her sister, Mrs. R. C.
Furlonger.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ritchie are
expected in Victoria very soon. They
intend to spend the summer here with
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Flumerfelt.
* *   *
Miss McDonald of Winnipeg has
returned to her home again. She has
been the guest of Miss Arbuthnot,
Belcher Avenue.
* *   *
Lieut. Eaton of the Army Service
"Drink and Fear Not."—Shakespeare.
AROMATIC SCHNAPPS
Distilled with Juniper. The very latest and best appetizer on the
market. It is not only an appetizer in the true sense of the word,
but it is also an excellent tonic and system-builder. It has proved
most marvellously beneficial already to hundreds of invalids
afflicted with chronic rheumatism, gout, kidney disease, etc.
Those who appreciate good Gin and Whiskey should
try these fine brands.
Old Pensioner Dry Gin, per bottle $1.00
Simpson's Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle $1.25
DIXI H.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS.
ROSS & CO.
1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
*   *   *
One of the last social functions before the Lenten season which is being looked forward to by Victorians
is the ball to bc given* by the Union
club, on the 28th of this month.
The engagement has been announced of Miss Amy Holley, of
Bath, England, to Mr. Bird, of Sinta
Luta, Sask. Miss Holley made many
committee to realize that he was not an ardent lover of the game, and has friends here while on a visit to Brit-
fit to fill the place, and another given already won his cap as a representa- ish Columbia about a year ago.
an opportunity, and from those who tive of  Canada in the  international „,    _.     ,     ,  ,         . ,,    _
■           1 _,                 _ T    ,       •__.   •.       .. 1      *_i   _._     tt •_  1  ___ .           it Mr. Moorhead, late of the Canadian
witnessed the game at Ladysmith, it match with the United States, and I g.^ of    Commerce    in Vancouver
is learned that other players gave a hope that he will be able to lead his spent  the  week-end in Victoria, be-
far better exhibition than him.    Har- team to the championship,
Victoria Social.
ley, at left half, is at the best an experiment. He has been playing on
the forward line of one of the Mainland teams all season, and on his
showing in one game has been given
his place on the All-Island team. In
place of these two players, Thackeray
of the Y.M.C.A., and Dufty, of the
Esquimalt teams, should have
selected.    The former is one of the
most   consistent    half-backs   in   the 0n'a tripto*Ca"lifornia!
league, and it is certainly a hardship
UMPIRE.
fore going on to Alberni on Monday
night, where he has accepted a good
billet.
*   *   *
Mr. Thornton of Thetis Island has
been spending a few days in Victoria.
Miss Blakemore is visiting Mr. and
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-OOOOOOOTO
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. 0., is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you oan
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te  season.
Mrs. Vickers of Kamloops has been  Mrs. Shirley Blakemore of Haro St.,
visiting friends in the Capital. Vancouver.
*   *   * *   *   *
Colonel Gregory was a passenger to      Mr.   and   Mrs.   Crowe-Baker  have
been Vancouver on Thursday morning.        returned     after     spending     several
* months  travelling  in   Europe.   They
B.  Marvin have were the guests of Mrs. Herbert Ross
in Vancouver for a few days before
coming on to Victoria
Mr. and  Mrs.
E.
that he has been overlooked.    Dufty,      Miss  Leigh Spencer of Vancouver
on his form this season, is better than is "entered at Ae Empress Hotel.
McKinley; in fact, it is hardly possi
ble to choose a weaker half-back than
McKinley. Outside of these positions
thc team is a strong one and should
give the Mainlanders a hard run for
a victory. But in the next test match
it is hoped that a more careful selection is made than has been the case
in this team. Now that the team has
been selected it is impossible to
change it, and whatever our complaints, we hope that the Island team
will be returned victorious on the
occasion of the first match in Vancouver early next month.
It is rather hard on a player to be
selected in the first twenty-two, and
yet never be given his place in thc
line-up by the press. This is exactly
what happened to Peden, of the Bays,
who was selected as goalkeeper for
"B" team. Peden was chosen and
made the trip to Ladysmith and incidentally played a good game, but
on every occasion when the team appeared in the press credit was given
to Dunn, of the Esquimalt team. It
is very evident that it was a mistake
the first time the teams appeared, but
the committee should havc seen that
the error was corrected. I believe in
giving credit to whom credit is due.
A meting of thc Vancouver Island
League has been called for this evening, at the request of the Ladysmith
club, to discuss the question of importing players from the Mainland.
This matter was referred to last
week, and I am pleased that the
league is taking steps to prevent the
rapid  approach  to  professionalism.
The Vancouver players arc already
registering a kick about ex-Mainland-
ers playing on the Island team, but
until they show that these players
have been coaxed to thc Tsland on
the promise of good situations, it will
be a hard matter to do anything.    It
Mr. A. T. Parry of Cowichan Bay
is at the King Edward Hotel.
The betrothal is announced between
Amy  Campbell   (Maisie)   Campbell-
Johnston, the daughter of Mr. ancl
Mrs.  Ronald  C.   Campbell-Johnston,
Mrs. Arthur Crease entertained at  and J. R. Armytage Moore, son of the
an  informal  tea  on  Monday  after- late Wm. Armytage Moore of Arn-
noon' *   *   * more, Co. Cavan, Ireland, and Mrs.
Miss Fanny Devereux has returned  Frank Hardcastle, of Lancaster Gate,
to   Duncans   to   resume   her   school  London,
duties.
* *   *
Mr, and Mrs. Charles Lamb of So-
menos have been in Victoria for a
few days.
* #   *
Mrs. Heam, Miss Norrie and Miss
Hadwen of Duncans were in town
for the Paderewski concert on Friday evening.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice of Shaw-
nigangan Lake, have been guests at
the Empress during the week.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phlllppi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent.
ANNOUNCEMENT
|L
Grand Fancy Dress Ball
in aid of St. Joseph's Hospital, will be held in
THE EMPRESS HOTEL
ON TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18TH, AT 8.30
Tickets arc now on sale at M. W. Waitt & Co.'s, the J. M.
Whitney Co.'s, C. E. Redfern's, Challoner & Mitchell's, The
Victoria Book & Stationery Co.'s, T. N. Hibben & Co.'s, Fletcher
Bros., and Mrs. Aaronson's, Government Street.
While fancy dress or poudre will be en regie, neither is compulsory.
TICKETS $3.00 EACH
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
<KXXX>000000<>00<>0000<>0<><>00000<XK>0<>0000<>0000000000000<
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
"Be not simply good, be good
for Something."
It's a great thing to be a
good cook and it is so easy
if you
Cook With Gas
Nothing but the most satisfactory results if you follow our simple instructions.
Won't you call and let us
show you some new ranges.
Splendid values. Illustrated
catalogue free for the asking.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LAN. LEY STREETS.

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