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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Feb 1, 1908

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 Legislative A$s
^TnrrYYryy-yyy^innryrifrirrK 1 __ 1908
Kingsford Smito & Co. a-—~
TctSria, b
Stock and Ganert
AUCTIONEERS «K
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
MO Granville,
Vaacoaver.
Q_ujuuuuuulllua_uajuuuuijC'
Victoria
21 British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
Stewart WilUama R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS      .
li PONT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
WaJUUULM.1»t a a» 8 .uujuuU:
Vol. V.   No. i
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908
One Dollar Pbk Ankum
The Week is in a position
Railway to announce that all diffi*
Construction, culties between the Provincial Government and tho
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co. which
stood in the way of early construction have
been removed, and that within a few days
the ternis of the arrangement completed
will be made public and will be a source
of gratification throughout the Province.
This happy result is due to the skilful
diplomacy and the high personal character
of Mr. Wainwright, who came to Victoria
a few weeks ago on instructions from Mr.
Hays to negotiate with the Government.
It is unnecessary here to say anything
about Mr. Wainwright except that he is a
gentleman with lifelong experience in railway work, who long ago established the
highest reputation for integrity and reli-
abality Any man who has had business
dealings with Mr. Wainwright knows that
his word is as good as his bond, and would
just as soon have it.. It is impossible to
express the regret which will be felt under
the happy circumstances now arrived at
that Mr. Wainwright-did not represent the
Company in the negotiations which had
such an unfortunate ending three years
ago. However, the Province can afford
to forget its "bad dream" in anticipation
of what will undoubtedly be achieved in
the immediate future. There has been no
backing down on the part of the Government. Mr. McBride took a stand three
years ago which he has consistently maintained, viz., that Canada has already done
for the G. T. P. all that it had a right to
ask, and that the Province would not
augment its subsidies by one acre of land.
Mr. McBride further contended that the
G. T. P. having contracted to complete
the line to the coast by 1S>11 should be
held to its contract. This, achievement
has now been assured as much by the firmness and justice of Mr. McBride's position as by the wisdom of Mr. Wainwright.
The Week is not at liberty to publish the
details of the arrangement but they involve the adjustment of the difficulty about
the Indian Keserve at Metlakatla upon
terms which will hardly be open to criticism from either side of the House. Whilst
there might be a legal doubt as to the
ultimate result of carrying this vexed question to the Privy Council, it will be found
when the conditions of settlement become
known, that the reversionary rights of the
Province have been conceded and that its
interest will be substantial and clearly defined. Incidentally this settlement further
emphasizes the value of the Kaien Island
deal and fully justifies the statement made
in the House during tlie present week by
Mr. McBride that it was the best deal the
Province had ever made. Knowing what
he did of the new arrangement it is not
surprising that there was an emphasis in
his tone when hc flung this declaration
across the House, nor was it surprising
that the thrust was accepted without protest by the Opposition. Times have
changed indeed, since less than a year ago
the Government was charged with having
I made an unbusinesslike deal. The most
important feature of the G. T. P. settlement is that it ensures immediate con-
Istrnction "from the coast." Those who
criticized the action of the Company three
I years ago and pointed out that the threat
Ito build from the East all the way to the
[Coast was an idle one, arc now fully justified of their opinion. Both on the score
[of economy and expedition the railway had
to be built from West to East as well as
from East to West. Within three months
I railway construction will have commenced
at the mouth of thc Skeenn as the con-
EDITORIAL
tract for the first hundred miles has now
been let. Simultaneously the Kitimaat
Branch, upon which construction has already begun, will be pushed. This section
is also one hundred miles in length. The
intention is to complete both sections
within a year, and unless something entirely unforseen occurs, the line from Edmonton to Prince Rupert will be completed within the time specified in the original charter. This is good news indeed,
and will undoubtedly stimulate many important activities throughout the Province-
It will mean the expenditure of at least
$30,000,000 in British Columbia within
four years and will find constant employment for not less than 10,000 men. The
first hundred miles from the Coast will be
the most expensive of the 4,000 which will
finally connect the Atlantic and the Pacific' The engineer's estimate is $80,000
a' mile.-' In order that there may be no
delay in furnishing material and supplies
for construction in the Rockies, the first
contract. West of Edmonton has recently
been let. This calls for one hundred miles
of construction over a comparatively easy
country, and remembering that M. J.
Haney built 150 miles of the Crow's Nest
line in a year, it is not impossible that
this first section will be completed-in considerably less time. The Week believes
that in spite of the indifference, of the
Federal Government and the unfortunate
attitude of the G. T. P. representative
three years ago, trains will be running
from Edmonton to Princ Kupert by 1912,
and if so whilst fully recognizing the sagacious attitude of Mr. Wainwright it is
only fair that Premier McBride and his
Ministers should receive a share of the
credit due to their persistent and determined stand for the rights of the Province
and tlieir correct anticipation of the result
which must follow, the adoption of such a
policy.
Fruit
Inspection.
The attention of The Week
has been called to the disgraceful condition of much
of the fruit which is exposed for sale in Victoria. The so-called
inspection seems to be a farce, and in the
interests of respect for law it would be
advisable to abolish it altogether if it cannot be more competently attended to. It
is difficult to find an honest box of fruit in
any of our stores, and this is not the fault
of the retailers but of the packers. One
finds the old device of good apples or pears
at, the top and diseased or rotten ones beneath. Then there is no attempt at grading. Apart altogether from the fact that
this condition of affairs constitutes a
flagrant breach of the regulations under
whicli the fruit trade is supposed to be
conducted, there is the consideration of
imposition on the purchaser and to use
an old phrase, giving a "black eye" to the
District. These remarks apply chiefly to
home grown and not to imported fruit.
The Week has made a careful investigation and is prepared to verify the above
statements. It says further that if any
intending investor in fruit growing lands
on Vancouver Island were to judge of their
value and possibilities by tlie marketed
product, he would never invest a dollar.
All this is not because the Island does not
produce first class fruit, it is because tlie
fruit inspector fails to do his duty. He
is either incompetent or over-worked.   The
Department should find out which and act
accordingly.
Cost of
Living.
In last issue The Week
made reference to some
ridiculous strictures in a
Vancouver paper on an
article which had appeared in Westward
Ho! The writer claimed that the article
traduced Vancouver and entered into an
elaborate argument to prove that the cost
of living in the Terminal City was no
higher than in Montreal or Toronto. The
Week was able to show conclusively that
the writer either did not know what he
was talking about or did not talk about
what he knew. On Tuesday of the present
week a long despatch was published in a
leading Vancouver Daily pointing out that
recently reductions ranging from fifteen"
to twenty-five per cent, had been made in
the cost of stable articles of food in Vancouver. This is exactly what Westward
Ho! said would be necessary to bring it
into line with other places. The statement is equally true of Victoria, but the
editor of The Week hardly expected to
receive such prompt and effective support
for his attitude from a Vancouver paper.
It sometimes pays to tell the truth even
in a. weekly journal.
( ;     J"! In its issue of the 31st
Without inst., the Colonist pub-
Acknowledgment. Hshes a copy of a very
important document consisting of a decision of the Privy Council
on the subject of Constitutional Law as it
affects the action of Lieutenant-Governors.
The document is signed "John J. McGee,
Clerk of the Privy Council," and appears
upon page 4 of the Colonist. This document was unearthed at, considerable trouble
and after prolonged search by Mr. S.
Perry Mills, K.C, who simultaneously tendered a copy to the Colonist, The Times
and The Week. The Times published it
on Thursday afternoon, with full acknowledgement to Mr. Mills; The Week does
the same in current issue. The Editor of
the Colonist with his invariable journalistic courtesy ignores Mr. Mills altogether
and incorporates the article in his editorial, a practice which has now become
chronic with him as The Week has frequently had occasion to point out. Tho
AVeek does not agree with Mr. Mills on
many subjects, but believes giving honour
where honour is due. That, however, is
perhaps the least important aspect of the
attitude assumed by the Colonist on a
grave Constitutional question. The whole
editorial while purporting to discuss the
issue is in reality a thinly veiled attack on
the Lieutenont-Governor. In order to
stal) him in the back under the cloak of
sincerity it not only of set purpose misinterprets the document it pretends to discuss, but attempts to discredit the position taken by the Government from the
very beginning of the controversy. The
management cannot have sanctioned such
a prostitution of journalism to private ends
but shares the odium—unfortunately.
aspects of the question involved in the
action of the Lieutenant-Governor in reserving his assent to the Bowser Bill. It
is a long time since 1882 and hardly to be
wondered at that the report of the Privy
Council had been overlooked, but it is so
entirely applicable to the present case that
it might have been framed for the express purpose of meeting it. The memorandum lays down in emphatic terms the
following dicta: "That the Ministers of a
local Government have no right to advise
the Lieutenant-Governor as to the withholding of his assent to a measure."—
"That the right of reserving bills for the
royal assent conlerred by the B.N.A. Act
was not given for the purpose of increasing the power of the Canadian Ministers,
or enabling them to evade their constitutional duty. It was given to prevent legislation which in the opinion of the Imperial Government is opposed to the welfare of the Empire, or its policy."—"That
the only appeal against a reservation of
assent is to the Crown and eventually to
the British parliament for redress."—The
Crown in this connection and with reference to the action of a Lieutenant-Governor, would mean the Governor-General-in-
Council. "That the Lieutenant-Governor
is not warranted in reserving any measure
for the assent of the Governor-General on
the advice of his Ministers, he should do
so in his capacity of a Dominion officer
only, and on instructions from the Governor-General."—The report concludes
with the following very significant paragraph: "It is only a case of extreme necessity that a Lieutenant-Governor should
without such instructions exercise his discretion as a Dominion Officer in reserving
a Bill. In fact, with facility of communication, between the Dominion and Provincial Governments, such a necessity can
seldom if ever arise." In view of this
authoritative decision, it will be interesting to know how tlie Opposition in the
Provincial Legislature will be able to
maintain their attitude of criticism at the
action of the Provincial Government, and
equally interesting to learn how they will
explain away the responsibility of the
Federal Government for the actions of
their official.
Scare
Headlines.
The Final
Authority.
A   careful   perusal   of   the
important    document    referred to above and reproduced elsewhere, will show
tliitt  although Premier McBride did not
have it before him at the time  he stated
witli absolute accuracy the constitutional
In its issue of January 30,
The Colonist has a note with
reference to what it calls
" Typical Headlines" in
English newspapers. It quotes a few of
these presumably in order to show how
typical they are, Thc Week repeats them
"England in grave danger of socialism"—
"Rampant labour throws off the mask"—
"Private initiative imperilled" — "The
have-nots rallying for an assault on the
haves." The Week respectfully asks the
Colonist to state from whicli English
papers these "typical" headlines were
taken. The reason for asking is that the
Colonist has been singularly unfortunate
in its selection of matters "typically" English, and in this instance it is wider of
the mark than ever. Tliere are only two
Old Country papers which could have perpetrated such an atrocity, Reynold's or
Lloyd's. If they were taken from any
other it must have been from one of the
upstart American yellow sheets which are
struggling for a footing, and which are
very far from being "typically" English. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
GRACE GEORGE'S RISE.
Her Series of Successes.
Every young woman who aspires
to theatrical honours—and most
young people are predestined to
stage fever as surely as to the mumps
—will find reason for hope in the record of Grace George, the most
youthful of contemporary stars,
whose rapid advancement is the cause
of much comment in theatrical circles.
Critics who write of the triumphs
of Mrs. Leslie Carter and of other
women whose progress has been astonishing, delightfully point to thc
fact that ten years ago the objects of
their admiration were quite unknown
to fame. Ten years ago Grace George
had acted only as an amateur.
.    She was born in  Brooklyn.   While
anything that had gone before.
Her portrayal of the title role in
the latter sketch caused her to be
pronounced the most subtle and refined of the ingenues in the public
view, and brought about her featuring in William A. Brady's productions of "The Turtle" and "Mlle.
Fifi." Subsequently she was engaged
for the part of Esther in "Ben Hur,"
at the Broadway Theatre. By this
time it was agreed that Miss George
possessed every qualification, both
artistic and financial, for a starring
tour, and Mr. Brady signed a contract
with her, by the terms of which she
was to head a company under his
direction. She was introduced in the
late spring in a piece called "The
Countess Chiffon."
Then Mr. Brady purchased from J.
I. Clark, author of Julia Marlowe's
"For  Bonnie  Prince  Charlie,"  a  ro-
MlSS   Gk.VC'E   GliOHGE,   IN   DlVOKCOiNS.
she was a child she manifested an interest in histrionic art that made her
the inspiration for the founding of a
juvenile company of which she was
the head. With this company she
worked some time, so improving herself that, after an interval spent in a
convent, where she received her education, she successfully applied to
Charles Frohman.
Her debut, accordingly, was made
under thc direction of that manager
in. a farce called "Thc New Boy."
Her impersonation in this piece
brought her newspaper praise, and so
completely satisfied Mr. Frohman
that she was re-engaged the next
season to play "Amec" in "Charley's
Aunt." She might have remained
with Mr. Frohman indefinitely, had
not an offer from Auguste Van Bienc
held forth the tempting bait of big
type and other inducements generally
included in contracts under the word
"featured." Miss George created the
role of Gretchcn in "The Wandering
Minstrel," and scored the deepest impression of her brief career. About
this time variety came to be metam-
orphorsed into vaudeville, and the
consequent growth of salaries in the
continuous houses prompted Miss
George to enter that field. She supported Charles B. Welles in his performance of "Frederick Lcmaitre,"
though only for a few months. Chas.
Dickson promptly secured her to play
with him in "Jealousy," aiid in "An
Undeveloped Bud," and these two
pieces probably did more toward giving her a recognized   position   than
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mantic drama entitled, 'Her Majesty."
The production 'was made early in
September, 1900, at the Columbia
Theatre, Washington, whence it was
taken to thc Manhattan Theatre, New
York, where the presentation remained through thc winter, She then
appeared in the play called "Under
Southern Skies."
Since thc above, Miss George has
had a scries of successes, including
"Pretty Peggy," in which she impersonated the great Woffington; "The
Two Orphans," carrying off, as thc
blind Louise, the honors of a great
all-star cast;; "Abigail," a pretty little
comedy by Kellett Chalmers, which
she abandoned in spite of its success,
because it gave her the chance for
ingenue work only; "The Marriage of
William Ashe," in which her Lady
Kitty was a piece of sound emotional
acting; "The Richest Girl in the
World," which was abandoned also
for thc reason that its exactions were
chiefly in the ingenue line. "Clothes,"
the satirical comedy in which as Olivia Sherwood she showed the follies
of the fashionable world. This season Miss George is appearing in Sar-
dou's comedy, "Divorcons," as the
charming but frivolous Cyprienne. In
this role, both in London and New
York, she is credited with making
the hit of her artistic career.
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Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908
The Drama. J
% ilusic and      $
Florence Roberts.
On Tuesday night, Florence Roberts appeared at the Victoria Theatre
in "Zira," a new name for an old
play. In reality, "Zira" is simply a
dramatization of Wilkie Collins' celebrated story, which Ada Cavendish
popularized more than thirty years
ago in the title of "The New Magdalen." Florence Roberts is a finished
actress, and in pure pathos she has
few if any equals on the American
stage. During thc first two acts she
was rather tame, but in the third she
rose to the full possibilities of the
play, and her appeal to Ruth Wylding
was in every respect inimitable. She
is a natural actress and never overdoes her part; for this reason she is
always acceptable, even though, as
must be admitted, she is deficient in
sympathy. In stage craft, management of her voice, and indeed in all
the arts of the finished actress, she
can give pointers to most of her competitors. Her support was good, without being super-excellent, the leading
man being easily the best. The only
regret one has after a visit from Florence Roberts is that she invariably
appears in such distressing plays. I
should like to see her in Genevieve
Ward's great standby, "Forget-Me-
Not." It is a play of far greater
dramatic possibilities than any in
which Miss Roberts has recently
played. There would be wider scope
for her abilities and in other respects
it would suit her admirably.
fairly claim to have registered another success, but candor forces me
to say that the energetic press notices
of the advance agent were in no sense
justified.
The New Grand.
Manager Jameson has a good bill at
the New Grand this week, with one
item especially attractive to Victorians
in the turn of Miss Loretta Boyd, a
daughter of our well-known citizen,
Mr. Wm. N. Wilson. The young lady
is an excellent mimic, and monologue
artist, and her performance is repeatedly encored. The Melnotte-Lanole
pair do a clever act on the wire, and
Edward Armstrong and Ethel Daly
performed in a very laughable sketch,
entitled "The Amateur Chauffeur."
Perhaps the piece de resistance is the
turn of Five Native Hawaiians, who
sing a selection of Hawaiian songs
and introduce native dances to the accompaniment of stringed instruments.
Altogether the show is well up to the
average, and is attracting good houses.
Pantages Theatre.
The programme here this week is
a good one. The Velde Trio present
an exceedingly clever acrobatic and
contortion act, and Charles Leora, the
aerial gymnast, is also clever. The
comic part of the programme is left
to Wilson and Rich, comedians, singers and dancers, but the really cleverest performance is that of Burt Page,
eccentric skater and acrobat. There
is the usual colored minstrel in Jim
Cowper, whose monologue is much
above the average, and contains no
objectionable features. Miss Crawford sings acceptably, and the moving
pictures are all right.
Herbert Witherspoon.
On Monday night Victorians had a
visit from Herbert Witherspoon, who
played under the auspices of the Victoria Musical Society. Mr. Witherspoon was advertised as a bass singer,
whicli .he is not. This fact makes it
ill the more difficult to understand
why the New York papers in their
numerous criticisms should so describe him. As a matter of fact, he
has a baritone voice, delightfully
smooth and limpid in the upper register, slightly below the average of good
baritones in the middle register, and
distinctly weak in the lower. Mr.
Witherspoon is not by any means a
great singer, but he is a thorough
artist and by dint of nursing his voice
and carefully selecting such songs as
are within its compass, he manages
to score a decided success. He has
mannerisms which are not altogether
pleasing and far from artistic, but
these are outweighed by his temperament and finished execution. He has
been well trained by the German
method, his voice production is faultless and his head tones are good;
what he lacks is a voice. His organ
is limited in range and deficient both
in volume and tone, except in the
upper register. He lacks force, only
on rare occasions does one hear the
full tone which is anxiously looked
for, as number -succeeds number.
My companion gave a very intelligent
criticism when she said, "I was expecting something all the time which
never came," and that is exactly Herbert Witherspoon in a sentence. It
was a great mistake for any one artist to attempt so lengthy a programme; hardly any living singer
could acceptably render twenty-five
selections in the course of two hours.
The most successful was a two-verse
song, given as an encore, the lack of
a programme, a very serious omission,
leaves the title unknown, but it was
a delightful morceau about a rose and
a dewdrop, and was well within the
singer's range. His attempt to render
Annie Laurie was distinctly disappointing. He had style, but his voice
was totally unable to express the full
round tones so essential to give effect to the exquisite ballad. It is announced that Mr. Witherspoon is to
play in London this year in a series
of concerts. It will be interesting to
compare the criticisms in the London
papers with the American.
There was a crowded house, and
both from a financial and artistic
standpoint the Musical Society may
PADEREWSKI.
It is now sixteen years since New
York was first invited to pass judgment on a young Polish pianist of
whom much had been promised by
his sponsors. Truth to tell, the impression made by Paderewski at his
debut in Carnegie Hall did not augur
very well for his future. The audience
was plainly puzzled. It had seen a
slender man of medium height, whose
most marked physical characteristics
were a pair of powerful square shoulders, a pair of inscrutable eyes, and a
golden aureole of hair. His manner
at his instrument was one of diffidence, even of shyness; and. while he
exercised over.his hearers a certain
indefinable charm, they—musicians
and amateurs—went away unconvinced.
Then began his recitals. The first
were given in the concert hall of
Madison Square Garden. It was as if
a new prophet had come to reveal in
a fashion never heard before the beauties of music. Soon it was necessary
to give the recitals in the great auditorium of Carnegie Hall, and even
that was too small to hold the audiences which would listen to his playing. There had been nothing like it
in this country, and in Europe only
Liszt had received such homage.
It would have been wonderful had
Paderewski's season of popularity
lasted but a single year; but, instead
of diminishing, each return, to this
country has seen his favour with the
public increase and grow more solid
At first the element of curiosity was
a powerful factor in building up his
great audiences. The general public
wished to see this pianist who seemed able with his music to sway men
and women as he willed. But successive tours which covered the whole
of the country, North and South,
East and West, have made him
known to all who wished to see him
and to hear him. Yet to-day he holds
as securely as ever the unique place
he created for himself during his first
visit in 1891. If the neurotic idolatry
of which he was an unwilling victim
in his first visits to America has dis
appeared, its place has been more
than taken by healthy and genuine
admiration fbr his rare gifts as a
musician and as a man.
If Paderewski had lived in other
and less sophisticated times, about
him would have grown a myth, even
as one has grown about the name of
the Italian fiddler, Paganini. In fact,
there are to-day not a few who firmly believe that Paderewski weaves in
"THIS GIVES LIFE TO THEE."
—Shakespeare (Sonnet).
When a good physician prescribes
Porter for a patient, it is Carnegie's
Porter. A physician knows the value
of purity. If you knew what we
know and what your physician knows
about Porter, you, too, would insist
on Carnegie's. Brewed and bottled
in the famous Carnegie Brewery, at
Gothenburg, Sweden.
Order it at your club, hotel, bar or
restaurant. If your dealer canot supply you with Carnegie's Porter, for
your health's sake do not put up with
an inferior brand, but 'phone
PITHER     &     LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Residential sad Day School ior Boys
~'f_7^.:__    ■--
Handsome New Buildings. Larg«
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
some mysterious fashion an hypnotic
spell over his hearers. Yet, if his
hold on the public be reduced to its
final analysis, it is doubtful that he
has done more than to bring to the
interpretation of music the qualities
which have characterized those rare
men of all ages who have been able
to charm as well as command their
fellow-beings. They have been found
to possess in an unusual degree a
combination of high intelligence, poetic imagination, self-command, self-
criticism, and a capacity for accomplishment which raises them above
their fellows and stamps them with
the mark of genius. It has been said
of Paderewski by those who know
him best that, had not destiny decreed that he should be a musician,
he would have risen as high in any
other profession or art, such being
his ability and power of concentration.
Fortunately for us,* Music has
claimed him as her own, and his has
been the peculiar function to reveal
to us as no other pianist of his time
does, the thoughts, the fancies, the
creations of the master composers,
which without an interpreter are as
if they did not exist. The painter,
the sculptor, thc poet appeals directly
to the eyes and the ears of the public through the works as he made
them. But music, the most evanescent and elusive of arts, not only
needs a creator, but to exist at all
must have an interpreter, and its
value in art must depend largely on
how successfully the spirit of the
creator is interpreted. It is the faculty of reading truly the fancy of thc
composer that has made Paderewski
what he is.
Reports last spring from his concerts in Europe give assurance that
never in his career has his art been
so beautiful as it is to-day. For his
American admirers who will listen to
him this season, no news could he
more welcome.
Thc Victoria Musical Society is indeed to be congratulated in having
secured such an artist for its third
concert.
Our Store
HAS A FINE LINE OF HIGH
CLASS TOILET ARTICLES.
We have just imported a fine assortment of French and English Hair
Brushes.
SEE THE NEW-SHAPED
WHALEBONE BRUSH.
USE BOWES' BUTTERMILK
TOLIET  LOTION   FOR
CHAPPED HANDS.
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CHEMIST
Government Street, near Yates St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
ELECTRIC
BOARD
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In up-to-date styles.   Esllmites and
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HOLLY TREES
Prices from t_ cents to $$job, according
to tun. Write for iced tad tree catalog.
JAY & CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
THURSDAY, FEB. 6.
Direct from the greatest success ever
achieved by an American Actress
in  England
GRACE GEORGE
Assitsed by H. Reeves South and her
London and New York Company,
presenting Sardou's diverting comedy,
DIVORCONS
Three months in London.
Over ioo nights in New York.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $3.00.
Box Offic. opens 10 a.m., Tuesday,
Feb. 4. Mail orders, accompanied by
cheque, will receive their usual attention.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....Ito
Evenings, Balcony  Ite
Lower Floor
Boxes
..He
.ISe
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
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Night Performances
8 and 9.15
|  TRAVELLERS'GUtDp|
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ot all theatrical and vaudev lie
artists while in the Capital city, alteoi
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietor*.
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CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men sad
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
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Hotel King Edward
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Close testation tnd Sulphur,
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VANCOUVER
Signs
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PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub aad shower baths and laundry la
connection.  The miners' heme.
•• DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
ROSSLAND	
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ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates (i.oo per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
QUEEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
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NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
otthe Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in tho City.
$1.0(1 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,        Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Pi ices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write ior "Home List" aad
information.
R.  8.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOOOS
Realty Broken.
tost mm    it
Tenders gives •■ Brick, Stoat aa
frame, Alteration. Parquetry Pleeriai
OSes. Bank. Start aa* Saleea rutlaai
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oeastruetei aat repairs*, 1'Hb WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY i, 1908
Incorporated 1001,
Capital, J600.000.00
Capital increased
in 1H07
to .. (1,000,(00.00
Subscribed
Capital,    IIE0.000
Beserve . . $60,000
Surplus, Jan. I».
1907  .  .  IH0.000
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IB   CLOSING   TJP   ESTATEB
either as Executors or Assignees
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The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
IIV,   Government Street..Vieterla, B.C.
III  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Bdltor
5ocialism-=
and After.
I was greatly interested on Wednesday night in Florence Roberts'
fine acting in "The New Magdalen."
It took mc back thirty-live years to
the time when 1 lirst saw Ada Cavendish in the same part. There is no
comparison between the two actresses, and thc difference is all in
favour of the English woman, but
Miss Roberts played the part as probably no other American actress
could, and it was a treat.
I was even more interested in certain manifestations on thc part of thc
audience, which showed that if some
prophet would arise and preach the
■doctrine of a true socialism in place
of the spurious and illogical substitute which does duty for it, there
Would be a wave of popular enthusiasm in its favour.
The author has put into the mouth
of the reverend mission worker a lot
of so-called socialistic maxims, and
what impressed me.was that they
■ were all cheered to the echo by the
audience. These maxims, if closely
examined, will be found to relate to
the duty of the privileged classes towards ■ those less happily circumstanced. They also cover those duties which are imposed upon all men
by a common humanity, and finally
they emphasize the folly of attempting to save men's souls whilst neglecting their bodies.
There is nothing new in this; it is
many years since Wilkie Collins, who,
like Charles Dickens, may fairly be
considered a great social reformer,
wrote his celebrated book containing
this propaganda. The recital is particularly appropriate to-day, because
it tends to show that zeal for humanity did not spring from writers of the
modern so-called socialistic school,
nor do they or their followers monopolize the virtues of charity and sympathy.
This is neither the time nor the
place to enter into a lengthy discussion of the propaganda of which we
hear unfortunately far too much on
th'e Pacific Coast. No doubt there
are   many  honestly  deluded   by   its
glib, unscrupulous advocates. No one
doubts the honesty of the rank and
file of the followers of socialism, but
any man who brings a trained intellect to bear upon its propositions will
speedily discover that its reasoning
is fallacious and that even if its programme were possible it could never
attain the ends which are desired by
its advocates.
After all, the great heart of humanity is sound; it beats in sympathy
with human woe, and it is its very
eagerness to seek some means of alleviating this which renders it so
easy a prey to the charlatan. The
London Morning Post, in a recent
brilliant editorial, which must have
been written by a master of economics, and whicli would not have done
discredit to the greatest authority on
the subject since Mill, I refer to Professor Leone Levi, points out that
the programme of the socialist party.,
pursued to its logical conclusion, is
one of social -.uicide, and that reduced to its primal elements, it is in
reality a duel between the heart and
the brain.
This is but another method of stating a proposition which has been
voiced by many social reformers, and
when the present contest is over and
thc effervescence of socialistic agitation has subsided, the result will be
that men will strive with unabated
zeal to ameliorate the condition of
their fellows by methods which possess the elements of permanence and
which are npt subversive of elemental
rules which have been established as
the outcome of the wisdom of the
ages.
No thoughtful observer of the
signs of the time can doubt that the
"thoughts of men are widened with
the process of the suns." It is the
universal recognition of this truth
which will ultimately make men free.
Wilkie Collins makes his missioner
say, "True socialism is Christianity,"
and no sincere student of socialism
can question the statement. The
remedy for social ills is not to be
found in cunningly devised fables, nor
in revolutionary legislation, but in a
universal recognition of the truth
which when accepted will influence
and control legislation and all movements affecting humanity.
Present-day socialists are avowed,
uncompromising foes of the churches,
and of orthodox religion; they can
hardly be blamed. If one thing is
more evident than another at the beginning of this twentieth century, it
is that the churches have failed to
achieve what they ought to have
done, and might have done. There is
no more appalling sight in the world
to-day than the complacency of organized religion in the face of the
misery of so many millions of our
fellows. The civilized world has
never witnessed a grosser illustration
of moral turpitude than the acquiescence of the churches in the misdoings of their most conspicuous supporters. In face of this it is not to
be wondered at that socialists are as
antagonistic to organized religion as
they are to organized government. It
is the infidelity of the churches which
furnishes occasion to the socialistic
enemy to blaspheme. If the churches
did their duty, socialism, as it exists
to-day, denouncing every constitutional organization, clamouring for
the destruction of all existing systems, and shrieking for vengeance,
with its hand against every man,
would not find no place. When it
has spent its fury, the men, perhaps
stimulated by its very excesses, will
bend themselves.to remedy thc evils
of which it complains, by methods
rational* and human, and the world
will learn what is that true socialism
which derives its vital force not from
the abstruse and ill-informed economic treatises of German iconoclasts,
but from the simple maxims of thc
founder of a religion which embodies
all the elements of true socialism.
This is not preaching, although I
admit that it sounds like it; it is
teaching, it is all as old as the hills,
but apt to be forgotten, or at any
rate overlooked amid the shrieking of
socialistic upstarts. It is recalled to
my mind by the Florence Roberts
play,  and   it  brings  back  thc   story
which I read with such interest in
the days when I was too young even
to be considered a
A Cantratrice.
On Sunday evening last Mrs. Melville Parry, late of Nelson, but now
of Victoria, was heard for the first
time in this city at the Metropolitan
Methodist Church. Mrs. Parry sang
a difficult selection by Dudley Buck.
Those who have known this lady elsewhere consider Victorians fortunate in
having her to reside among them as
she is one of the most accomplished
singers in the West, lt is not appropriate to comment upon her brilliant singing on Sunday evening, suffice it to say that she created a profound impression.
Bead    Clive    Philipps    Wolley's    story
"Shakmut" ln February Westward Ho!
A Local Industry.
The Week does not carry any advertisement for the B. C. Distillery
Company nor is this a paid "reader,"
but on the principle of supporting
local industries it wishes to call attention to the fact that the product of
the B. C. Distillery Co. has just been
placed on the market for the first
time, after fulfilling the statutory requirement of maturing for two years.
It is undoubtedly the finest rye whiskey ever offered for sale in Canada,
and for those who require a little
rye "for their health's sake" it will
be a boon; at any rate B. C. can now
claim to be producing amongst its
other first best a first best whiskey.
All lovers of good, clean sport in
this city must have been extremely
gratified with the result of last Saturday's matches. The Victoria athletes did themselves proud and if they
can but only maintain the pace they
set last week the time will not be
far away when the Capital will once
more hold its own in athletics. Thc
record which was established is a very
high one and will be hard to beat.
Out of seven games played in this city
against outside teams the local won
no less than five, drew one and lost
one. The Week extends its hearty
congratulations to the participants in
last Saturday's matches and hopes
that the example that has been set
will be maintained by the athletes who
will represent Victoria in the summer
athletics.
Victoria Theatre
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3
DE WOLF HOPPER
Supported by De Wolf Hopper Co.
in Reginald de Koven and Frederick Robert's Comic Opera
Happ land
SIXTY PEOPLE.
The best Singing Company in
America.
Prices—soc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Box Office opens  10 a.m.  Friday,
January 31st.
Mail Orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE XOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about 32
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th, 1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. Jumes and 15
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907,
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
TAKE TIME BY
THE FORELOCK
Seize the opportunity of having your
watch properly cleaned and repaired.
Look inside your watch for a moment. Glance at the balance
wheel. If it is in good condition this wheel is making 18,000
vibrations an hour. If its movement is sluggish there is something wrong. It will move ,558 miles in a year, and requires
less than one-tenth of a drop of oil to make the run. It needs,
however, that little oil badly. The least increase of friction on the
bearings alter the motion.
Let our experts clean, oil and put
your watch in order for a year.. It
doesnt's cost much '.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Government St., Victoria.
Victor-Berliner
How would you like to hear
May Irwin, the queen of fun-makers,
Vesta Victoria and Alice Lloyd, the
famous English comediennes; that
celebrated tenor, Richard Jose;
clever Clarice Vance, with her
irresistibly humorous song-hits;
Harry Lauder, the great Scotch
comedian; popular Eddie Morton,
in your own home?
You can hear them all on the Victor
or Berliner Gram-o-phone just the same
as if you were at the theatre—these
1 famous vaudeville artists who are delighting thousands of people every night in
the theatres all over the United States and Canada and who
make records exclusively for the Victor.
You can do what you can't do at the theatres; you can
pick out your own performers and arrange your own program to suit yourself.
Then there's Billy Murray, Harry Macdonough,
Arthur Collins, Ada Jones, Harry Tally and other favorites
to sing for you.
You can also have a complete minstrel show with a Victor or Berliner
Gram-o-phone.   Or you can have music by famous bands; dance music;
*%,\ classic symphonies; sacred songs; and grand-opera by the world's
^of\. greatest stars.    All these things are absolutely true to life, and
•\\.°<vC are heard at their best on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone.
\'\      Any Victor or Berliner deal*
, Q_^ Call and ask to hear them, a
hi about the easy-payment pi	
Write us for catalogues—Just fill out the
Any Victor or Berliner dealer will gladly play Victor Records for yon.
Call and ask to hear them, and get him to tell
v you about the easy-payment plan.
\ \v\,
coupon and mail it to us.
>. %.
V
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
Company of Canada, Ltd.
Montreal.   607
You can always      — _.      ~^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar _\\9   Jj#      than others«
Union Made. {& I fl 31 f*
Havana Filler.       WIJjClI
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sol      verywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Prank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends io apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north   to  point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON   VROOMAN,
Jan  IS R. W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the foUowing
described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north  to place of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  11107.
FRANK BUFFINGTON  VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains', thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east HI)
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th.December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 1(10 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located  8th December,  1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18546, thence west 40
ohalns; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake In an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36,  township 6, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase  the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains to olacc
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,   and   containing   160   acres,   more  or
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following   described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 ohains west; thence 40 ohalns
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated   November   15,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of  Rupert, Kathleen  Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., lumberman, intends
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 ohalns;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains   to  commencement.
Staked November 30th,  1907.
District of Rupert,  Kathleen Lake.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of T. L. 13,045, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
east 40 chains; theuce north 80 chains;
Ihence west 140 chains; thence*soulh
20 chains to T. L. 13,046; thence following north line of T. L. 13,046 east
and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th,  1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D, Harris, Agent.
DISTRICT OB   CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thenee southwesterly
parellel to high water mark, about 30
ohalns to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(c) Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,745, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim C"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December Sth, 1907.
Dated Viotoria, B.C., Deo. 10th,  1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot 192, on
Quatsino Narrows, marked "E. A. W.'s
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence
east about 30 chains to T. L. 14,467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence
north and west along shore to Indian
Reserve; thence south and west along
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 Thomas D. Harris, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December,  1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 ohains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
ehains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north SO chains; thence
east 80 chains;  thenoe south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thenoe north 80 ohains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
Arthur Gore
Manager
TIMBER MAPS
Office Phone 1634
Residence 4-3S
posted up to date every day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTL MAP CO
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS.
BLUEPRINTING
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny alt
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up in Br iti sh Columbia.
Blue   Prints   Can be    obtained at short   nm
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897.'
Outi _. rl fl *
Province of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Provinoe of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objeots of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at the City of Auckland, in the
Colony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one million pounds, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred pounds each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Provinoe is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose
address is Victoria ,B.C„ Is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office at Viotoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 28th day of November,
one thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON, .
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To carry on the business of Are and
marine insurance in all its branches or
such bf those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as are
incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Deo. 14.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMlcken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on tho
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,   1907.
Dec 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I„ New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thenco
east 20 chains', thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains', thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range '__.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described  lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north SO chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shire
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Conimencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 040 acres,
more or less.
Dated December  16th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
a,bout one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO cluiins;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 610 acres,
more or less,
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one mlle south of
corner post of clnim No. 3 and .; thence
north 80 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO ehains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement, ancl
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 10th, 1907.
No. 0—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 cliains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement nnd
containing 610 acres, more or less.
Dated December  17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commonclng at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 2*11 A. Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile oast of claim No. 6; thence north
SO chains; thence enst SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west SO chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December  17th,  1907.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 ohains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 aores,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains; thenoe
east SO ohains to point of commencement, and containing 640 aores, more
or less
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
Into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 ohains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains', thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 ohains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake SO chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December ISth, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile soutli
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO cluiins to point of commencement, containing 610 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
ibout two mlles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
[•orner pnst of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan.   IS ED.  BROWN.
-**3_f}-*_
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, Sth January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is heeby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal tor Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, Intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described  lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of I.eose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence nortli 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated   December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at n post planted on
the south bank of river running Into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence nor»h 30
chains; thence east 80 chains along bank
of said river to point of comm-sice-
ment.
Dated   December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west of wost boundary
of Lease No.  2,  and on  south bank of
I
a river running Into Beaver Cove; thenci I
south 160 ohains; thenoe west 40 chains!
thence  north   160  chains;   thence  eks
40 chains along bank of said river! ti
point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert ,
4. Commencing at a post plantec '
about the southeast corner of T. L. JJo
11,696; thence south 80 chains; thenci
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, i   I
Dated December 27th, 1907. TJi|
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post plantei;
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,895; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thenct
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thenoe west su
chains; thenoe south 80 chains; thehce
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chalus
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A JOHNSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.     '    ,
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,?
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, ln-«l
tends to apply for a special timber II* |
cence over the following descrlhed land:,.
Commencing at a post planted cwlli
mile   south   and   2u   chalus   wesl   It-.-n
the  southwest  corner  of  L.  222,   Wesl'
Fork of Adams River; thence south su j
chains;   thence  west  80  chains;   tbence ]
uorth 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*,.
December   20th,   1907. '
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CKA1G.
VICTORIA LANn DISTRICT. 1
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney; of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following  described  land:
Commencing at a post planted, on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marine
Bay; thenoe northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1307
M. J. KINNEY. ,'•
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
B. C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP ind BLUE-PRINT CO.
I
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
 ■■ : ! 3?— TTT.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Tower and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, In-
tends to upply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where tbe said
line intersects the shore line on* the <
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
& PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.;,
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of  Victoria,   B.C.,   occupation  Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point  intersecting  the  mouth  ot.
Marble Creek, Including small island on
north  lino  of  section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
DISTRICT  OF CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,  of  Vancouver,  occupation,
 , Intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the  following described land.
about 40 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark south aud
west to the southeast corner of Lot 808;
thence east flve chatns; thence north
and east following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to u
point 5 chains south of point of commencement and thenco to said point of.,
commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Doc. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Tlmher Dealers, Intend to apply for the
rite lo purchase the following dexcrlhuii
lands In Kildalla Bay, Hi vers Inlet; com"
mendhg at this post planted on the e.isl
side of the Bay about one-third ul a
mile from the point at the mouth of Ilia
Bay, being the southwest corner post;
1 heme east 80 chains; thence north 8u
ihalns; thence west 90 chains lo huuuli,
thence south along beach lo point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked  Nov.  25,  1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent.
LAND  REGISTRY  ACT.
Iii the matter of an application  for n
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to  ,
Lot 6 of Lot 7 of Section 10, (Map '■
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice Is hereby niven that it Is my
Intention at the expiration of one mouth
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a  Duplicate  of  the Certlflcate  of Title
lo said  lot,   Issued  to  George A.  Cold-
well on  the 6lh day of June,  1899, and
numbered  6296C.
Land   Registry   Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
the 21st day of November.  1907.
S,  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Reglstrar-Oenertyl. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
|EJW    WESTMINSTER    LAND    DISTRICT.
j     District of New Westminster.
1 TAKE NOTICE that Roman 2. Chancer, of Vancouver, B. C„ occupation
Imber broker, intends to apply for a
pedal timber licence over the follow-
ps described lands:
J No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
It  northwest   corner   of   T. L. 18187;
ftence east 80 chains along the north
Ine of T. L. 18187; thence north SO
lhains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thenoe east 80 chains along the
■orth line of T. L. 12502; thence north
10 chains along the west line of T. It.
12508; thence in a southwesterly course
■long the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, and
Iontaining 640 acres of land, more or
iss.
December 23, 1907.
fen 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
.NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
intend to apply for a licence to pros-
Sect for coal and petroleum over 640
lores, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
lorner of Section 21, Township 4, lira-
lam Island, 'iueen Charlotte Group;
Ihence running 80 chains north; theuce
lu chains east; thence 80 chains south
Io shore Une; thence following shore
line  to   pctint  of  commencement,   coii-
alnl'ie 640 acres.
-Located December 12th,  1907.
GEORGE FBKNCH, Locator.
■an. 4 John Simister, Agent.
. NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. O.,
luncher, Intend to apply for a licence
So prospect for coal and vetroleum over
B40 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
peach at the soutueast corner of Sec-
lion 20, Township 4, Graham island,
Wueeu Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; theuce 80 chains east; thence 60
Lhains south and over and under water;
Ihence 80 chains west over and under
(water to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
Located November UOlli, iu07.
BENJAMIN KBOMF, Locator.
lian. 4 John _>lmister, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICB that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Emends to apply for a special timber
Licence over the following described
Hands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
J. E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 60 and
Barked the N. li. Cor.; thence south 80
hains; thence west 80 chains; thence
Orth 80 chains, more or less, to soutli
■boundary of lot 50; thence east 80
hains along said boundary to point of
ommencement, containing 640 acres,
(lore or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
|Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Tay-
r;_t TOuawrver, occupation, surveyor,
■intends to apply for a special timber
■licence over the following described
llands:—
I * Commencing at a post planted about
HO chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B.
IC. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
■ Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thence east 40
Ichains; thence north 160 chains; thence
140 chains to bank of Salmon River;
Ithence south 160 chains to point of comimencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
I Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Ager,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICB that Thomas H. Tay-
I lor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence   over   the   following   described
I lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
least  bank  of  Salmon   River,  about   2
I miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C.j
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
I    Staked December 6.
, THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C.j thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7,
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 8.
TAKE NOTICB that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 5
mlles north of the N. B. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
".hains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R- Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit River, about 2
miles north of tho N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C.j thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thenco west 80
chains to bank of river; thence south 80
chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
.     Staked  December  o.
' THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R- Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomiis H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence   over   the   following   described
lands:— _.''__,
Commencing at a post planted on the
cast bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsquit Biver, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast, Bange 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, ol Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over tne following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank ot Kimsquit Biver, about 1%
miles nortli of the N. VV. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H.
Taylors S. E. (__.; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tiience south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOB.
Jan. 4 J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast, Bange 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over tne following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit Biver, about 2%
mlles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 61, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C.j thence west 80 chains;
tiience north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. E. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 6, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  29th,  1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE ls hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for conl and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a t>ost planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
then-e running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south;
thenre 80 chain* we.-t to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
r • loss.
Located Tecember  6th,  1907.
EMILlf MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
,f "i. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swhig Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River." will be received by the Hon.
thc Chief commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
Intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the offlce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the offlce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($260)
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
bo returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner In the sum of $3,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,   1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from, west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 100 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec. 19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, town
ship 33, thence west 40 chains', thence
north 1C0 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec, 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south 80 chains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains', thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thonce west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, Intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, whicli is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant tn a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 16, which Is eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains  to  point  of  commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which ls nine and one-half
mlles distant ln a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S„ S.W., No. 18, which is nine and
one-half miles in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains', south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which Is ten and one-half miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains', west 80 chains; south 80 chains',
east SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles in a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south SO chains', east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
nt Iho southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which Is eleven and one-
hnlf miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly dlroctlon from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north SO chatns;
cast SO chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. l8th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which ls seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thenee west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 25—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south SO chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
SO chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on' the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains',
south SO chains; east 80 chains; north
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north.80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S..
N.E. No. 30, which Is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; SO chains east
to  point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, SO chains east to point of
commeneement.
Staked  Dec.  19, 1907.
W.  E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of
Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 30
days after date.
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 1, which is on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
tt cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north 80 chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,
S.W. No. 3, which is 20 chains distant
in a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a mile fro mUpper Campbell
Lake; thence east 80 chains; north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 4, which is one mile distant
in a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east of
T. L. 14864, thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 6, which is one mile distant in
a northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mile east of T. L.
14864; thence 80 chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast eorner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 6, which ls situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thence west 40
chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast oorner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 7, which is about four miles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 8, which is flve miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains', south 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  16th,  1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which Is four miles distant
ln a northerly direction tiom Crown
Mountain; thence north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which Is two miles distant
tn a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts the north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north SO chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which Is flve and one-quarter miles distant In a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbell
Lake; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  17,  1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No. 32, which is six miles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east 80
chains; south 80 chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which is three miles
distant In a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80  chains  to  point of commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 36, which
is  marked  W.E.S.,  N.E.' which
is flve miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; to point of
commencement.
No. 36—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 36, which is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one-half a mile south of
Upper Salmon River; thence west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains;
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 37, S.E., which is flve miles distant in a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which is flve miles distant
in a southwesterly direction from West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chains; wesl 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains', east 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No, 40, which is three and one-half
miles in a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 41—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
.at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 43, which is one and one-half
miles distant in a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
It joins the line of Block 110, thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Block 110; thence north SO chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west SO
chains to point of commencement.
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which is marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and in a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 160 chains; east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 47, which ls two miles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where tt joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where lt
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 60—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 60, which ls three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 61—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 61, which is flve miles from
the south end of West lake, where lt
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 15, 1907.
No. 62—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 62, which is six miles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it joins line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 53—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 53, which is six miles ln a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where it joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 64—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 54, which is two and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the north end of West lake, thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 55—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 56, which is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thence east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; west 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11.        Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.   2,   situate  on  the  west  Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked  December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
£<-K>0<><>0<><><><>00<_0<>00000-0<>-0-000<^^
FOLK
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more, and never less, than what the ticke. says.
Quality should be the keynote when buying blankets. If you are not absolutely certain of the quality
of those offered it is doubly important that you should exercise care. There are many "shoddy" blankets
offered as "all wool." Prices look extraordinarily low for such good looking blankets. But wait until they have
seen some service—wait until they strike the water. Quite often it is difficult to find enough to "go round."
Doesn't it seem wise policy to buy from a reliable house that will guarantee their quality? Every blanket we
sell has this firm's guarantee of quality behind it.
EXTRA SPECIAL VALUES IN SILVER-GREY BLANKETS.
Here is what we can safely say, without fear of successful contradiction, is absolutely the best value in
Silver Grey Blankets in the city. These are blanket values v/e are prepared to "pit" against any "special
sale" values offered in this town. Compare these prices judging by the weight, and we think they are better,
but when you compare the quality you will at once see how far superior ours are and how unusually liberal
the pricings. These are fine, fleecy, warmth producing blankets made from the best quality wool and are the best
grey blanket obtainable.
Size 6ox8oin., 6-lb., per pair.. ..$4.30 | Size 62x82 in., 7-lb. p,er pair.. ..$5.00 | Size 64x84 in., 8-lb. per pair..$5.70.
No "charge" orders at these prices.
SEE THESE FAMOUS AYRSHIRE
BLANKETS—SPLENDID VALUES
This far-famed Blanket has indeed
many points of special merit. A
specially long wool is used in the
making. The weave is very close
and firm. This blanket has been
long and favourably known for its
wear-resisting qualities. These
Blankets will stand years of hardest
use.
Size 75x90 in., 8-lb.   Per pair $8.00
Size 76x94 in., 8^2-lb.   Per pair   $8.50
A LINE OF SUPERIOR QUALITY
FLANNELETTE SHEETS
Size 30x40 in.   Per pair  70c
Size 56x75 in.  Per pair $1.35
Size 70x76 in.   Per pair  $1.50
British—6ox76 in.  Per pair $i.7S
British—64x81 in.  Per pair $2.25
British—72x90 in.  Per pair $2.75
FINE GREY BLANKETS
These are exceptionally fine values.
An uncommonly soft and warm
blanket   that   you'll   like.     Liberal
sizes and full weight.
Size 56x76 in., 6-lb. Per pair... .$3.00
Size 58x78 in., 7-lb. Per pair... .$3.50
Size 62x82 in., 8-lb.   Per pair $4.00
SCOTCH BATH BLANKETS
This is a genuinely splendid Blanket.
The wool used is of the very finest.
quality. The weave is a special close
weave,  and makes  a long-wearing
Blanket.     Excellent   value   at   the
price.
Size 76x94 in., 8-lb. Per pair.. .$12.00
SUPERIOR WHITE BLANKETS
These are all woll Blankets, have a
very long fleece and are excellent
sorts.   Judging from the big sales
of  this   style  the  price  must  be
correct.
Size 60x80 in., 6-lb.   Per pair.. ..$5-75
Size 64x82 in., 7-lb.  Per pair.. ..$6.75
Size 68x86 in., 8-lb.  Per pair... .$7.50
SCOTCH   CHEVIOT  BLANKETS
Here is a wear-resisting Blanket
worthy of your attention. The
special weave leaves practically no
fleece. Sizes are larger. Very warm
and best wearing Blanket made.
Size 72x84 in., 7-lb. Per pair—$7.50
80x96 in., 9-lb.  Per pair—$9.50
Size
SEND THE BRIDE SOMETHING
IN CHINA.
There is nothing you can buy for a
modest sum that carries with it the
power of attraction and the evidences
of good taste—as does a bit of china
—or glass. So many small-priced
things.
Try to think of anything else for,
say, a couple of dollars, that is suitable for a wedding present, and you
must confess they are either insignificant or coarse. Make it even five
dollars—almost same result.
Come in and see what our new
Spring importations disclose—you'll
say they're marvelous. We think
they're great ourselves.
GIFTS IN ABUNDANCE     ,
Not everyone is so amply supplied
with the world's goods that he can
make presents without consulting his
pocketbook.
Then one often gets invitations
that require for many reasons a demonstration of friendship that is fully
expressed in a small gift.
We have not overlooked these circumstances, and if your pocketbook
restricts or the conventions dictate—
our display of things at small prices
is all satisfying. Purchases held for
later delivery.
DON'T MISS SEEING THE OFFERINGS OF OUR DRAPERY DEPT.
Close by all our carpet goodness is our magnificent stock of handsome
curtains and draperies. An hour full of interest and pleasure can easily be
spent here. Some of the most handsome creations in curtains, curtain
materials, drapery materials, etc., are shown. We have a staff of experienced men to look after your work—experts with years of experience. Let
us solve your decorative problems.
WEILER BROS.,
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS
vieTORia, b. e.
!5oooooooo-ooooooo6ooo6o6<^
*************
% Social and        *
* Personal. J
* *
*************
Senator and Mrs. McDonald left
on Thursday morning for Ottawa,
where the former has gone to attend
to his Senatorial duties.
* *   *
Mr. Charles Vernon, who has been
surveying in the vicinity of Kamloops,
has returned after an absence of four
or five months.
* *   *
Congratulations are in order to W.
J. Twiss, the Vancouver manager of
the Mutual Life of Canada, on the
birth of a son.
* *   *
Mr. Ernest Muskett returned to
Vancouver on Monday morning. He
has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. H. J.
S. Muskett at their home on Niagara
Street for the last few weeks.
,*   *   *
Mrs. T. R. Smith gave a tea on
Thursday afternoon for Mrs.
Coombe, wife of the captain of the
cable ship "Restorer," and Mrs. Stanley, of Honolulu.
* *   *
Miss Bell-Irving, of Vancouver,
was the guest of Mrs. P. Irving for
a few days. She came down to play
hockey with the Vancouver Ladies'
Hockey team last Saturday.
* *   *
An engagement of great interest to
Victorians is that of Miss Marie Gaudin, second daughter of Captain Gaudin, and Mr. Roger Wilby, who.are
receiving congratulations  from   their
many friends.
* *   *
Among those noticed at the Rink
I on Tuesday afternoon were Mrs. R.
W. Dunsmuir, Mrs. Harry Pooley,
Miss Schubert, Miss Bulwer, Mr.
' Clifford Brown, Mr. Holmes, Miss
Viva Blackwood, Miss Mason, Miss
Doris Mason, Miss J. Lawson, Mr.
Hagerty, Miss V. Pooley, Mrs. Genge,
Mr. J. Arbuckle, Miss P. Irving, Mr.
Troupe, Miss Marian Dunsinuir, Mr.
Harvey, Miss W. Troup, Miss Little,
Miss Nora Coombe and Mr. W. Barton.
* *   *
Mrs .Ker made a most delightful
hostess at a bridge party on Wednesday afternoon. The very handsome
prizes were won by: First, Mrs.
Gaudin; second, Mrs. King. Among
the many guests were: Mrs. C. M.
Roberts, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Freeman,
Mrs. Jones, Mrs. C. Pooley, Mrs. A.
Robertson, Mrs. Love, Mrs. Tuck,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. King, Mrs. T.
S. Gore, Mrs. Crotty, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. Rochester, Mrs. Laing, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs.
Flumerfelt, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Brett, Mrs.
Gibb, Mrs. Bullen, and many others.
»   *   *
On Saturday afternoon last Miss
Phipps gave a very enjoyable and informal tea, at her mother's home in
Carberry Gardens, in honour of Miss
: Mabel Tatlow. Miss Tatlow took
this opportunity to bid farewell to
some of lier numerous friends before
'her wedding and. departure for Ashcroft, where she will in future live for
the greater part of each year.
The tea table looked very pretty
with yellow daffodils and white narcissus, and the hostess received in a
dainty white dress. ' Those present
were: Mrs. Phipps, Mrs. R. Janion,
Mrs. B. Tye, Mrs. Durand, Mrs. E.
Scholefield, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. Spicer Simpson, Mrs. A.
Robertson, and the Misses N. Cambie
(Vancouver), Mary LawsOn, McDonald, Peters, Day, Monteith, Tiny
Monteith, . Gillespie, King, Perry,
.Hanington, Foster, Amy Angus, Irving, Gaudin, P. Irving, N. Dupont,
Tilton,   Tuck,    Browne,    Newcombe,
Tatlow, and Bolton.
* *   *
The marriage tok place on Wednesday afternoon at Christ Church Cathedral, of Miss Mabel Garnet Tatlow
and Mr. Fitzallen Cornwall, of Ashcroft. The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. Canon Beanlands. The
sacred edifice was decorated for the
occasion with white marguerites ' and
tulle.   Only the most intimate friends
of the bride and groom were present.
The bride, who was given away by
her father, was gowned in cream
satin, with tulle veil and orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of lilies
of the valley. The bridesmaid was
Miss Cornwall, sister of the bridegroom, and the train-bearers were
Baby Tatlow and a little nephew of
the groom. The bride's only ornaments were a pearl brooch, gift of the
On Wednesday evening the A. 0.
U. W. Hall was the scene of a merry
dance, about fifty couple enpoying a
very pleasant evening, Miss Thain
and violinist supplying the music.
The supper table was very attractive,
scarlet carnations asparagus fern, and
runners of red crepe paper, tied at
opposite corners in large bows, with
a centrepiece of little red shaded electric lights. This was the clever work
of Miss Hickey and Miss K. Gaudin.
Those present were the Misses Cayzer, F. Phair, V. Phair, LeSueur,
Moresby, P. Mason, Arbuthnot, Savage, Blakemore, Peters, Little, Dunsmuir, V. Mason, M. Gaudin, Nash,
Johnston, Hickey, V. Hickey, Reb-
beck, D. Page, H. Page, G. Loenholm,
D. Bulwer, McDonald, A. King, D.
Day, W. Troup, V. Bolton, Heyland,
F. Drake, E. Brown, N. Dupont
Lawson, B. Irving, G. Irving, Newling, Monteith, Mrs. Rebbeck, Mrs.
Roberts, Mrs. Hickey, Mrs. Newling,
Mrs. Moresby, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs.
J. Harvey, and the Messrs. Cayzer,
Bostock, LeSueur, A. W. Harvey,
Wallace, W. Fisher, J. Gaudin, H.
Fisher, Wilby, Fraser, Holmes, Eberts, Gillespie, C. Brown, W. Brown,
■ Newcombe, Bridgman, McKay, Mason, Harvey, Troup, J. Lawson, C.
Berkley, T. Futcher, Nash, McDou-
gal, Gore, Bishop, J. Heyland, Owen,
C. Vernon, Boyer, S. Powell, Jeph-
son, Bromley,* Talbot, F. Pemberton,
B. Wilmot, Holland, Prior, Barton,
J. B. Bell, Morgan, Dr. Wilmot.
groom, and a pearl necklace, the gift
of his father. Mr. Hugh Cornwall
acted as best man.
Mrs. Tatlow was becomingly gowned in mauve, with lace trimmings.
After the ceremony an informal reception was held at her father's residence.   The honeymoon is to be spent
touring some of the Eastern cities of
Canada and the United States, after
which they will make their home in
Ashcroft.
In addition to payment of interest
on debentures, the sum of $93,809.25
has been credited to the shareholders
of the British Columbia Permanent
Loan and Savings Company, on their
stock, as earnings for the past year.
A large part of this amount was paid
out on dividend day, January 15. The
company has a ten-year record of
meeting all payments of dividends,
withdrawals and maturities on stock,
promptly when due. Each month,
the company is paying out a considerable sum on stock maturities, and all
maturities are taking place within the
time estimated when the stock was
sold. The company has now assets
of over $2,000,000, including a reserve
fund of $200,000, and continues to
make steady and substantial progress
Its stocks and debentures furnish investors with an exceptionally favorable system of investing money,
which returns guaranteed dividends,
ranging from 5 to 7 per cent, per annum, according to the class of stock
selected.
Although the boys from the High
School were successful in defeating
their opponents the girls were not
so lucky the best they could do being
to make a draw without cither sidu
scoring. This is very creditable, especially when it is known that lhe locals
were taken unawares and did not expect to play the game for another
couple of weeks. The locals have the
makings of a first class combination
and with a little coaching should be
able to give their Vancouver friends
and interesting session.    In thc game
on Saturday the locals had by far
the best of the game but failed at
critical moments, in fact they managed to score one but it was given
off side and was not allowed. The
forwards played extremely well until
they got the ball into the shooting
circle and then they stopped and allowed their opponents to clear. These
delects can, however, be easily remedied and it is hoped that when the
locals visit to Vancouver they will
not only havc their full team, but will
in the meantime put in considerable
practice. In this connection it is
hoped that the parents of the girls
will scc their way clear to allow them
to make the trip. They will be accompanied by at least one of the
teachers who will see that they are
well looked after.
The Rugby players from the local
High School also demonstrated their
superiority over the Vancouver High
School by defeating them by four
points in a game where no score was
made until a few minutes before
time. Although the locals won it is
to the credit of the visitors that they
enjoyed as much of the play as the
locals and it was the good judgment
on the part of A. Mclnnis who scored a pretty drop goal. The game was
fast and exciting and thc spectators
were treated to an hour of interesting play. The locals were much faster than their opponents, but they
lacked thc knowledge that thc visitors
had of the fine points. On several
occasions the visiting three-quarters
got away for what looked like sure
goals but were pulled down by the
local back division. It was a pleasing feature to see thc forwards on
both sides always on the ball, no
time being given to make any sensational plays. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
The Constitutional Question.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 30, 1908.
To the Editor of The Week.
Sir,—Enclosed I send you copy of
report of the Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved
by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 29th day of November, 1882. It has a material bearing on the constitutional questions
now being discussed in our Local
Legislature, and I therefore request
you to publish same.
S. PERRY MILLS.
Copy of a Report of the Committee
of the Honourable the Privy Council, Approved by His Excellency
the Governor in Council on the 29th
November, 1882.
The Committee in Council deem it
their duty to call the attention of
your Excellency to the fact that in
several Provinces bills passed by the
legislature have been reserved for the
Governor-General's assent by their
Lieutenant-Governors, on the advice
of their ministers.
This practice is at variance .with
those principles of constitutional government which obtain in England, and
should be carried out in Canada and
its provinces.
As the relation between the Governor-General and his responsible advisers, as well as his position as an
imperial officer, are similar to the relations of a Lieutenant-Governor with
his ministers and his position as a
Dominion officer, it is only necessary
to define the duties and responsibilities of the former in order to ascertain those of a Lieutenant-Governor.
Now, i*- is clear that since the concession of responsible government to the
colonies, the advisers of the Governor-General hold the same position
with regard to him, as the imperial
ministry does with respect to Her Majesty. They have the same powers
and duties and responsibilities. They
ought not to have, and of right they
have not, any greater authority with
respect to the legislation of the Canadian Parliament, than the Queen's
ministers have over the legislative action of the Imperial Legislature.
Now, in England the ministry of the
day must of necessity have the confidence of the majority of the popular
branch of the legislature, and therefore they generally control, or rather
direct, current legislation.
Should, however, any bill be passed
notwithstanding their opposition or
adverse opinion, they cannot advise
its rejection by the Sovereign.
The power of veto by the Crown is
now admitted to be obsolete and practically non-existent. The expression,
"Le Roi ou la Reine s'avisera," has
not been heard in the British Parliament since 1707, in the reign of Queen
Anne, and will in all probability never
be heard again. The ministers in such
a case, if they decline to accept the
responsibility of submitting the bill
for the royal assent, must resign and
leave to others the duty of doing so.
If, notwithstanding their adverse
opinion, they do not think the measure such as to call for their resignation, they must submit to the will of
Parliament and advise the Sovereign
to give the royal assent to it.
Under the same circumstances, your
Excellency's advisers must pursue the
same course.
The right of reserving bills for
the royal assent, conferred by the
British North America Act, was not
given for the purpose of increasing
the power of the Canadian ministers,
or enabling them to evade the constitutional duty above referred to.
This power was given to the Governor-General as an imperial officer, and
for the protection of imperial interests. It arises from our position as
a dependency of thc Empire, and to
prevent legislation which in the opinion of the Imperial Government is opposed to the welfare of the Empire
or its policy.
For the exercise of this power the
Governor-General, with or without
instructions from Her Majesty's Government, is responsible only to the
British Government and Parliament,
and should the Canadian Government
or Parliament deem at any time that
the power has been exercised oppressively, improperly, or without due regard to the interest of the Dominion,
their only course is to appeal to the
Crown and eventually to the British
Parliament for redress.
As has already been stated, the
same principles and reasons apply,
mutatis mutandis, to the provincial
governments and legislatures.
The Lieutenant-Governor is not
warranted in reserving any measure
for the assent of the Governor-General on the advice of his ministers.
He should do so in his capacity of a
Dominion officer only, and on instructions from the Governor-General. It
is only in a case of extreme necessity
that a Lieutenant-Governor should,
without such instructions, exercise his
discretion as a Dominion officer in reserving a bill. In fact, with facility
of communication between the Dominion and provincial governments,
such a necessity can seldom if ever
arise.
If this minute be concurred in by
your Excellency, the Committee recommend that it be transmitted to the
Lieutenant-Governors of the several
provinces of the Dominion for their
instruction and guidance.
JOHN J. McGEE,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
At page 77 of book entitled, "Dominion and Provincial Legislation."
QUEEN     CHARLOTTE     MINES
Lucky Victorians—Coperhead Mining
Company Formed.
Not Discharged.
An old antebellum negro in a small
Southern town was arrested and
brought before the village magistrate
for drunkenness. He asked for a lawyer who had helped him out of scrape
before, and the magistrate sent for
the attorney.
The young man came into the little
office, where the usual crowd of spectators had gathered, and asked for the
old negro, "Well, William, what are
you charged with this time?"
Sadly the ancient darky replied,
"Boss, I's charged with whisky!"
No Relief.
"Does she lose her temper often?"
"Yes,   but  she  gets   it  right  back
again."
Would Render Last Aid.
Miffkins—What would you do if I
were to call you a liar?
Biffkins—I'd mention your indiscretion to the coroner at the inquest.
"The Old Shaft Mine," situate at
Coper Bay, Queen Charlotte Islands,
has proved itself to be the only prehistoric mine or lost mine, that has
come to the surface as an actual mine
of value.
A syndicate of Victoria gentlemen
last June secured an option on this
property, and from the evidences of
ore on the surface, running out into
the sea, they havc decided to undertake the development of this property
and thc unwatering of an old shaft
which yas at that time bulkhcaded in
and covered over with a dense foliage, trees having grown on the old
dump to a size of at least two feet in
diameter. The old bunkhouscs were
rotted away to a mere outline, with
ther fifty feet, and at this point there
was an entire new set of windlasses.
The old lumber sprags were still in a
good state of preservation, and some
old shovels and buckets that were
found in the drifts were also in a
fairly good state, with the exception
that the iron had practically rusted
away.
At this point evidences of ore were
found along on the timbers and in
the bottom of the buckets, from which
assays were taken, showing an average of six per cent, in .'(jbpper, and
small amounts in gold aiid silver.
The syndicate then decided, upon
the report of their superintendent, A.
A. McPhail, to secure the proper appliances for the unwatering of the
shaft to the bottom. They secured a
Cameron pump and further necessary
machinery, which was immediately
forwarded to thc old shaft.
Upon Mr. McPhail's return here today, he reports to the syndicate, which
Pumping Out Old Shaft.
the exception of a pile of stone and
brick, which designated the old fireplaces.
The evidences from the old dump
went to show positively that some
valuable ore had been taken from this
old shaft, and traces of this were
found on the beach, showing positively that it had been shipped to
some foreign port.
The Indians said that the shaft was
only forty-three feet deep. However,
when the bulkhead of some eight or
ten   feet   was   cleaned   away it was
has now been formed into what is
known as The Copperhead Mining
Co.,  Limited.
The officers and directors are:
Dr. J. A. Graham, President.
Mr. P. R. Brown, Vice-President.
Mr. J. Kingham, Treasurer.
C. W. Blackstock, Secretary.
Directors—W. B. Ryan, E. F. Lang.
Solicitors—McPhillips    &   Heisterman.
Bankers—The  Merchants  Bank   of
Canada.
A Card of Warning.
"Did Mr. Borem ever call upon
you?" asked Miss Knox.
"Yes, he called last evening," said
Miss Wise. "I was quite delighted
when the girl brought up his card."
"Delighted?"
"Yes; you see if she hadn't
brought up his card I might have
gone down to him, thinking he was
some one else."
Him—I consulted a fortune teller
today and she told me that I was in
love with a pretty girl, but she would
never marry. It looks like I am up
against it.
She—Oh, not necessarily. No fortune teller is authorized to speak for
me.
Borrowed Greatness.
In strolling through the garden,
while waiting for his hostess to appear, a newly arrived visitor came upon Bob, who was building a fort of
the gravel of the walk.
"And who are you, little man?"
asked the visitor.
"I'm baby's brother," said Bob
proudly.
Ore on Dump at Sea Level.
A Connecticut man has just arrived
home from the civil war which ended
42 years ago. He makes the plausible
excuse that he stayed over in Philadelphia and took a nap.
found by sounding with a line that it
was at least 100 feet deep. To the
surprise of those at work, when
reaching the 100-foot level, it was
found that there was a further fifty
feet in depth. Unwatering was continued down to thc 150-foot level by
hand windlass, when it was again discovered that there was at least a fur-
That after bailing out the shaft to
the bottom he finds four feet of fine
ore in the bottom of the shaft. This
ore was encountered at the 175-foot
level, and has continued down, widening until at the bottom of the shaft
it is  fully four feet in width.
It has now   been   decided   by   the
company to immediately cross-cut the
two parallel ledges which run east
and west some thirty feet apart, the
old shaft being in the middle of these
two ledges.
This apparently is the only lost
mine that has come to life a full-
fledged copper mine so far in the
Province of British Columbia.
In addition to the two east and
west ledges of ore, Mr. McPhail has
discovered that there is another seam
northeast by southwest, having an
average width of thirty feet, and
showing the same character of ore on
the surface as occurs at the old
shaft. A drift from the bottom of the
old shaft about a hundred fet to the
west, should run into this body
of ore, and it is the intention of the
company to immediately begin this
work as soon as short drifts have
been made north and south to cut the
other ledges, as shown on the surface.
To the Coperhead Mining Company,
Limited, Victoria, B. C.
Dear Sirs,—As per your request, I
will giVc my impressions of the showings of the Copperhead Mining Company, at Coppier Bay, Moresby Island.
At the time of discovery, there were
two veins showing on the surface,
one about two feet wide giving 14J4
per cent, of copper and about two dollar's in gold and silver; the other four
feet wide that gave me 8 per cent,
copper and, as the other, about two
dollars gold and silver.
The old shaft, about fifty feet above, ;
was then an unknown quantity, and I
must congratulate the company upon *
the    energy    and    persistency    with ,
which they have cleaned it out and
must congratulate them on the showing at the bottom.
But I predict as good or better a
showing when you cross-cut at the [
bottom, for I do not believe that the
shaft has touched either one of the
veins that are exposed on the surface,
but instead was sunk between them.
This I judge from the fact that the
stratification in this section is practically vertical, and the course of thesej
veins, I believe, would carry them on
either side of the shaft and but a
short distance away.
So I think that a small amount of
cross-cutting cither way will expose
other bodies of good ore. You have
found a body of ore in place 150 feet
below the level of the ocean. This
takes away all danger of its being a
slide or of surface enrichment, and I
believe that these veins will stay to
as great a depth as mining can be
done profitably.
Yours truly,
E. S. TOPPING.
It is not often that a complete cast
for a large theatrical production is
carried over from one season to another, but such has been the case
with "Happyland," in which De
Wolf Hopper appears at the Victoria
Theatre next Monday. When the
piece was given its New York production, the Shuberts, who produced
it, were so satisfied with the cast
with which Mr. Hopper was surrounded, that most of the members
were signed for the persent tour. The
scenery and stage settings will also
be seen here just as they were in
New York, so Victoria theatre-goers
will see a metropolitan production in
every sense of the word.
The coming of a DeKoven opera
is always an event eagerly anticipated by theatre-goers, and there is
every assurance that Mr. Hopper and
his large company will be greeted by
an audience that will tax the capacity
of the opera house. The music of
"Happyland" is in Mr. DeKoven's
happiest vein, and with a star of Mr.
Hopper's ability in the leading role
the enjoyment of the evening should
be complete. The book for the opera
has been written by Frederic Ranken,
who has given Mr. Hopper one of the
funniest parts imaginable.
Her Most Charming Age.
The Widower—Thirty-five is the
most charming age in woman.
The Bachelor—You're right. It's
hard to get away from a woman of
that age. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
An Inconsistent Dad.
"Remember, my boy, there's plenty
of room at the top."
"In that case, dad, why insist on
my beginning at the bottom, where
it's so fearfully crowded?"—Kansas
! City Journal.
In the Church.
. j "Of course," said Tees at Miss Yer-
ner's wedding to Mr. Timmid, "the
bride looks lovely, as 6rides always
do."
1 "Yes," replied Jess, "but the bridegroom doesn't. He appears rather run
down."
> "Run down! Oh, yes; caught after
a long chase."—Philadelphia Press.   .
Rebuked.
YoUng College Woman (interested
in politics)—The office should seek
the man.
Grandma (rather deaf)—I know
that's what girls think nowadays. But
in my time it was considered very unladylike.—Puck. _ ._• _    *    • ' ' '.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to,the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following -described lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement;. containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
' District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 8ft chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
.. 2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
'46 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
thains  to point of commencement,   and
^containing 640 acres, more or less.
|  Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
■'( 3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of Ti L. 16196, Section
.ji, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
Ithence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or .'less. ...
'   Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
»! 4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
,4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains;, thence west 40
■chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, arid containing 640
acres, more or less. , * .
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T; L. 16186, Section
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. __,. 16186, Section
•4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L? 161S6, Section
3, Township 33; thenee west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
. 8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
ehains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17. 1807.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
1, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
cnains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. G„ up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st, of December, 1907,
for furnishing arid delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) .will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particular can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price . per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of,two hundred and fifty dollars, ($250), which, shall .be forfeited
if the party tendering decline oi1 neglect
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope fur-*
nished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 ■■"■,   Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
. , .District of Rupert.
. TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.;
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains. • •
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.      ,
June 14,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW     WESTMINSTER     LAND     DIS-
'     'T'ElCT.'      ■"
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains', thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan  11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
SO chains; thence west SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, Intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
SO chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
VICTOBIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
WEEK 27th JANUAKY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CONSIDINE,    rroprlator*.
M.n.».m.nt ef ROBT. JAMIESON.
THE MUSICAL HAWAIIANS
High-class Singers and Instrumentalists—Five People—Serenading
Scene in Honolulu — Native
Dance and Songs of Hawaii.
JAME__ P. WAITTE & CO.
Nautical Tabloid Comedy-Drama,
"At Lighthouse Point."
Edw. Ethel
ARMSTRONG AND DAVIS
Musical    Comedy    Sketch,    "The
Amateur   Chauffeur."
MEUNOTEE-LANOLE DUO
Tight-Wire Artists.
LAURETTA BOYD
Singing Comedienne.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Down in th'e Old Cherry Orchard"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Pirates."
"The Enchanted Pond."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Selections from "La Modiste," by
Victor Herbert.
EQUIP YOTOSELF
WITB A THOBOUGH
BUSINESS COVBSE
SHORTHAND
TYFEWBITXBO
,    '  ,       BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
IBE  SHOBTBAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.O.
E. A. MaoMlllan.
LADIES       SWEDISH       CENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBATOB  TREATMENT
KB.     BJOBNFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
ami Navy   Richardson
Cigar Store.     >»«vliui v»ov»»i
Phone 345
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for thc purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Befuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A O. Noake, Agent.   ,
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
iTHE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo.Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in tha marke  at
current rates.  Anthracite coal »r Bale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.     Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
n 1 tlVTS  and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BKITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Cheeki at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. O.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers lacubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M. J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
AU Hands
Busy
AT
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
OPENING    UP    LARGE
SHIPMENTS   OF    NEW
SPRING GOODS.
We want you to see the
new SUITS with the long,
wide, soft roll lapels.
COATS cut a trifle shorter and semi-form fitting.
TROUSERS in handsome
stripes, checks and mixtures, in grays, and new
shades in olives and browns.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
1201   GOVERNMENT  ST.,
Victoria, B. C.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post Office,
and one block from car line. Situated in one of thc best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   •   VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY i, 1908,
sand should be placed thereon before
the blocks were laid.
Anyone with an eye can see that
the concrete is irregular, which means
that the pavement will soon conform
to its variations. I also heard a remark from the same gentlemen that
the blocks were made of soft wood,
and that they would fray after a few
months' wear, After waiting so long,
The weather has been so fine this there is no excuse for defective workweek that I have been tempted to manship or inferior material, and I
stroll outside my usual beat and have can only hope that the gentlemen in
spent two afternoons in the country, question were mistaken in their ideas.
It is not my intention to devote a This is not an advertisement, but
column to a description of the charms I think I am justified in using these
of the country around Victoria in columns to make known the fact that
winter time, although that would be a friend of mine has been looking out
a very worthy theme, and one about for more than six months for a thor-
which far too little has been said; ough-bred dog. He doesn't care what
but something occurred which is so breed, except that he draws the line
appropriate an illustration of a sub- at lapdogs and poodles; I think also,
ject dealt with by my esteemed col- although he did not say it, that his
league, Bohemian, a few months ago, domestic arrangements would bar out
that I make no excuse for relating anything as huge as a St. Bernard or
the incident. a  boarhound,   but  if  any  reader  of
In one of the suburbs of Victoria, The Week can tell me where to find
not more than two miles as the crow a thorough-bred Airedale, bulldog,
flies, from the centre of the city, last Scotch or Irish terrier—young,
year there was a great boom in land; healthy, and at a moderate price—1
several of the best residences changed can guarantee a cash customer, and at
hands, and many lots were purchased the same time put an end to the wor-
for building purposes. ries  of my  friend, who  drives   me
An English gentleman and his wife, crazy with his eternal enquiries,
of good family, purchased a lot and An old gentleman, resident in Vic-
built a beautiful bungalow; the gar- toria for nearly fifty years, stopped
den was laid out, and when I last me the other day oh ' James Bay
saw it, four months ago, was a per- causeway, and drew my attention to
feet picture. Now the place is de- the fact that volumes of black smoke
serted, and a large real estate agent's were isuing from the chimney of the
placard displays thc legend, "For Empress Hotel power-house, and also
Sale or To Let." from the funnels of the Chippewa and
I happen to know another English another steamer lying at the inner
gentleman who occupies a nearby wharf. I was the more surprised, for
property, so curiosity led me to pay the following reasons: The C. P. R.,
him a call and ask what had become as is well known, own a coal mine
of his neighbours. He said that after at Bankhead, near Banff; they adver-
occupying their house six months tise their coal as Anthracite, and if
they had left in disgust and had their claim is well founded, it should
bought a house in Vancouver, because be. practically smokeless. Why do
they had found it impossible to ac- they not' use this fuel as their own
quire even a small circle of friends in hotel, rather than burn a bitumnious
Victoria. He further said that he was 'coal, yielding so much black smoke?
very much in doubt as to his own With reference to the Chippewa, I
movements'; that he had bought land understand that the fuel used is crude
with the intention of building a resi- oil, and there is a well-known appli-
dence, and bringing his father and ance-* which perfectly consumes the
. mother from England to spend their carbon produced by firing with oil. I
declining years, but his own expeiji- am satisfied that if this smoke nuis-
' ence along the same lines . as his ance, continues, steps will have to be
neighbour had been so unsatisfactory, taken to suppress it; it is quite unne-
that he was very much divided in his cessary and easily avoidable,
opinion as to the wisdom of such a The new City • Council has been
course. He had just returned frorn a very busy this week, and has certainly
flying trip to the Old Country, hav- laid out for itself a. very etxensive pro-
ing made the journey in six'weeks, gramme, but there,is one .matter of
but be: was still in doubt as to'his urgent importance which has not .even
movements. . '      •*.■■*'     t,een mentioned.   I refer to the dis-
He went on to say that he lived position of garbage. Until the incin-
in Vancouver a year before coming to erator is actually, in operation, special
Victoria, and. found no difficulty in steps should be taken to dispose of
making all the acquaintances he de- the garbage in the manner least offen-
sired in his own social set. . siye'and least injurious to the public.
1 am not going to express any opin- Alderman Meston asked that the
ion myself, being nothing but an in- press be less censorious of the -doings
consequent Lounger, but I have given 6f the Council. It rests with the
a true recital of the facts, and ■ am members of the Council to achieve
strongly inclined to believe that they thi£ by removing all legitimate causes
go a long way to explain why the of complaint, and of these the garb-
population of Vancouver has doubled age is the most obvious and the most
during the present decade, and why urgent.
there are not more people, all told, . I..want to relate my own experi-
in Victoria than there were fifty years ence in connection with a matter well
ago. I am devoutly thankful that 1 worthy of consideration by the local
am a hobbyist and can always fall authorities and by all employees of
back on my own resources for enter- labour. On Wednesday morning a
tainment. I could almost find it in candidate for thc vacant school trus-
my heart to parody Wolsey's pathetic tecship wanted messengers to deliver
reflection: "Ah! how wretched is that leaflets. He bethought himself of the
poor man who hangs on society's opportunity of putting a few dollars
favours (in Victoria)." in thc pockets of the unemployed, and
At last Government Street is being went out on Government Street, and
paved, I am so delighted that I am inside of ten minutes picked up eight
almost afraid of saying a word, lest young fellows between the ages of 23
the evil sprite should wave his male- and 28, who were watching thc paviors
volent wand and restore the puddles at work, and were absolutely penni-
and holes, but it is not forbidden to less. They wcre all strong, healthy,
repeat what I heard from the lips of and willing to work, and of the eight
two well-known civil engineers who only one showed signs of being ad-
have had long experience in thc Old dieted to drink. They were all from
Country, and who were standing by the Old Country, they wcre polite, and
watching the laying of blocks on extremely grateful, even for a little
Wednesday afternoon. They were job which netted them only a few dol-
greatly amused at the foundation of lars each. Thc work was done quicksand, and remarked that in a few ly and satisfactorily, and I could not
months thc new pavement would help reflecting that it was a reproach
Show undulations and hollows, be- to Canada that such men should have
cause the sand was being strewn on to stand idle in our streets, without
an uneven substratum of concrete, enough even to buy a meal or pay
They claim that when thc old blocks for a night's lodging, while in this fair
and loose material had been scraped city of Victoria more than 3,000 inen
away, cement should havc been used of alien races arc able to live in com-
to bring thc foundation up to a true fort,
curve, and a very light sprinkling of     This is an object lesson in the ques
tion which is occupying so much
space in men's thoughts just now, and
it is only when the true inwardness
of the question is brought home to us
in such a pointed manner that we are
able to realize that there is a screw
loose somewhere, and that such a condition of things ought not to be possible in a new country which needs
ten of thousands of white men for development purposes.
Cfri
trz^-iZsr.
at
Desperate Cases.
She — Drowning    men    catch
straws.
He (absently)—So do thirsty men
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENQRAVERS
and DESIQNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Think how little you really know
about the water you are drinking. It
may not be the "pure element." Consider the statements of scientists
who declare that if we drink cold
water we swallow an aquarium; if we
drink hot water we imbibe a graveyard.
Think of
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The World-famous Natural Mineral
Water.
Not only fresh,  sparkling,  and  delightful to the taste, but certified by
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For your health's sake, drink "White
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a dilutant for milk, ine, whiskey, etc.
If your dealer cannot supply you for
home use, kindly telephone
PITHER    &    LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and ln a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160  acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southwest oorner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Islnnd, thence south 20
cbulns; thence wost SO chnins; thence
north 20 chains: thence cast SO chains
to point nf commencement and containing  160  acres,  more or  less.
Dated December ioth, 1:10:.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
OYSTER-OLOGY
"Why, if you only took a score of Oysters every day, sire,
you'd eat a hyponecerous in a month*. Bless you, sir, they works
miracles, they does. Look at old Dick Skedge, Why, he'd both
feet in the grave, and was sayin' his prayers for the last time
when the doctor shouts, "Giv' 'im Oysters; fill 'im chock full on
'em," and they did. Then h e began to reprove, an' by the time
he'd 'ad five score he climbed out of the grave an' thrashed a
fellow as 'ad arranged to m arry his widow that was to be. Why,
you'll live to be a centipede if you go on eatin' Oysters."
Fresh Olympia Oysters, J-4-pint jar 25c
Fresh Olympia Oysters, pint 50c
Fresh Eastern Oysters, quar t tin    85c
Bluepoints, i-lb. tin  5c
Bluepoints, 2-lb. tin  65c
St. James Oysters, i-lb. tin 25c
St. James Oysters, 2-lb. tin 50c
Cherry Stone Oysters, i-lb. tin for 30c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST,
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Vancouver Edition
% DMQrasville, Vnceirer.
U,MA.«» «*JUUL»_f.UUUUUUUULR.i
a British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria and Vaacoaver B. C
■' '-*!!»-,•,
Stewart WUliuM K.C. Jill**
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
■ Ut ESTATE MINTS
.     ii #0«T 8T»       '■"'   VICTORIA, I. C.
g-t3_UUUU»*A tAAJUUUltA»JUUUUU°
Vot. V.   No. i
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908
One Dollar Pa* Annum
It would probably . be too
Tie Coal much to expect of any mere
Trade. mortal that lie should quiet
ly submit to increased taxation witliout protest. On this supposition
and on no other is Lt possible to understand why the coal operators of B. 0. ■
thought fit to interview the Government
for tlie purpose of objecting' to the impost of a ten-cent tax. The basis of the-
proposed legislation has been clearly explained in the public press. It is that
each industry should contribute its fair
share to the revenues of the Province, and
that the contribution of conl mines is below what it should be. Of all our natural
resources coal is the most indispensable,
sonsequently it is in the most regular de-
.inand. This means that over any lengthy
period of time the profits are substantial.
An evidence of this is found in the fact'
that the largest coal mining company in
tlie Province has paid a steady 10 per cent,
dividend for about seven yepi'sand at the'
same time has doubled its valuation from
profits. The next largest concern has been
a money maker for three or four decades
and there is good reason to believe that
its profits last year exceeded one million
dollars. These are the big winners, but
coal mining generally is profitable and
indeed more profitable Avhen judiciously
handled than any other industry. All
other branches of business have been called
upon to increase their contributions to
thc Provincial Treasury, and the raising
of the tax 011 coal from five to ten cents is
but an equalizing of the burden. The News
Advertiser has" very properly explained
that the right adjustment of financial burdens is the only means of enabling the
Government to make substantial reductions
' in direct taxation. This is a policy upon
which all Governments agree and which is
accepted as a test of solid finance, and not
,'Sily is the present proposal an equalizing
of taxation as between the various industries, but as between different coal oper-
r tors, since under existing arrangements
.some pay five and some ten cents a ton.
1 To put them all upon the same footing'
is an act of fairness to the trade and of
justice to the public. Much might be said
on the subject of coal. No one wishes to
restrict its production by oppressive legis-
.ition, in fact such a thing is inconceivable because the people must have all they
require in the way of fuel, but worse
things might happen than an increase of
taxation from five to ten cents a ton and
'n this connection it is not a little signi-
icant that the press is widely voicing the
j mblic sentiment in favour of an investiga- •
lion into the methods and results of conducting the coal industry in this Province.
The truculent attitude of some coal oper-
itors not only towards their employees,
I but towards the Government, which is only
I Peking to make them pay their fair share,
I s not calculated to inspire confidence or
I respect. ■ The constantly recurring labour
I troubles, which' have on more than one
occasion been traced to this cause are a
menace to the public as well as being det-
[I'iinental in every way to the commercial.
EDITORIAL
interests of the Province. Further no one
who understands the question doubts that,
coal costs the consumer far too much.
There is no.'.country in the world which
in ordinary times counts its profits on coal
mining in dollars a ton; but that is not
the worst of it; there is no man who can
satisfactoril^;?e^^;in why coal which is
produced at fyvwc Nanaimo or Wellington should co|t {m% householder $7.50 in
Vancouver. It means that the coal operator and the coal merchant between them
after deducting transportatibn, cartage and
unloading charges make a profit of at least
$3 a ton, which is excessive and which
should not continue in a Province teeming with coal deposits. It is greatly to
be regretted that when the Provincial Government took the first step a few months
ago1 to form an arbitration Board in connection with a certain labour dispute they
did not proceed with the investigation.
Many interesting facts would have been
revealed and the Government and the public would have been placed in possession
of information clearly proving that coal
mining is a profitable enterprise, well able
to increase its contribution to the Provincial Exchequer and in most instances well
able to furnish the consumer with fuel at
substantial reduction on recent rates. Such
an investigation would also show that the
industrial development of the Province is
handicapped by dear fuel, and until the
handicap is removed it means not only restriction in.manufacturing enterprise, but
increased cost in manufactured products.
This is a big question whicli lies at the
root of our industrial development. The
Week has always recommended coal mining as a profitable investment, but it is
killing the goose that lays the golden eggs
to force prices up to a figure which retards development and intensifies the popular demand for Government ownership or
some other new system which will ensure
cheaper fuel. By all means let the Government investigate and The Week .ventures to say that if a Commission is offered to"the coal operators as an alternative to the 10 cent tax, no more will be
heard of opposition, but The Week prefers the Commission in the public interest.
be not so then the blame rests upon the
shoulders oi. the local newspapers, reporters and press agents who have forwarded despatches to every city in Canada declaring that these things are so.
7\.t last the Mayor has made a very necessary move but in ridding Vancouver of
thugs and other undesirable persons it is
only fair to ask that they should be deported across the line en route for the
cities from which they came and not simply moved on to other places in Canada.
It is only a matter of organizing their
deportation; it would involve a little extra
expense, but that should not count in such
a connection. In addition the utmost care
should be taken to prevent the undesirables from scattering and settling again in
other parts of the City. The social evil
is like "every other, when under observation and control it can be kept within
limits; once scattered it becomes irresponsible This fact cannot be too strenuously insisted on. The Week, in common
with every other reform agent, applauds
the intentions of the members of the Vancouver City Council. Their action does
not come a moment too soon; if they do
not wish one of the finest and most prosperous cities in Canada to sink to the social level of Bellingham and Seattle.
The Augean
Stable.
The action of the Vancouver City Council in deciding to take drastic measures
to cleanse the Augean Stable
of infamy and vice which has flourished
for so long in the neighbourhood of Canton and Shanghai Streets, is a wise one.
The success of its policy will depend entirely upon the manner' in which it is
carried out. Vancouver has been singularly unfortunate during the last two
months in connection with the enforcement
of law and order, and even the most per-
fervid Vancouverite realizes that his worst
enemy is the man who would gloss over
the truth and attempt to hide the actual
conditions from the outside world. Riot-
ing, hold-ups, vulgar vice and special vice
in the demoralization of the young have
characterized the social conditions of the
Terminal City for some time past.   If this
confidence on the part of those who understand the conditions, and one of the most
cheering signs of the times is to be found
in the report that the Granby Mining
and Smelting Co. of Grand Forks is negotiating for the purchase of the B. C.
Copper Co., and the Dominion Copper Co.
It is to be hoped that the deal may g.
through, as it will mean financial stability for the great industries of the Boundary. In this brief review it is not necessary to dwell upon the projects under way
on Vancouver Island, they are so frequently referred to in the daily papers,
but it is a fact that never before in its
history has so much development work
actually been contracted for. What with
railway construction, land clearing, road
building and boring and prospecting for
coal and minerals, Vancouver Island
stimulated and assisted by the businesslike policy of the Provincial Government
is just inaugurating an era of development
which is certain to result in prosperity.
Visitors from the Kootenay
Good Prospects, -who have recently been at
the Coast whilst admitting
some local weaknesses are full of optimism
for the future. The lumbering industry is
already showing signs of reviving. Mr.
A. Leitch of Cranbrook, President of one
of the largest lumber companies in East
Kootenay, says that the mills will resume
work after the winter stoppage quite as
early this year as last. Mr. W. R. Ross,
the Member for Fernie, speaks most hopefully for the future of this industry in the
Elk Valley, where milling capacity is being increased. The opening up of the new
coal town of Hosmer is one of the features
of East Kootenay development, and there
is every reason to believe that within a
few years Hosmer will be a second Fernie.
At the time of Mr. Ross' report the latest
Fernie strike had not occurred, and at the
moment of writing no definite information
is to hand with respect to it, but as there
is a two years' working agreement, it is
hardly conceivable that either party would
be so reckless as to precipitate strikes by
a breach of the agreement whether as to
its letter or its spirit. Mr. Lindmark, the
newly elected Mayor of Revelstoke, speaks
most hopefully of the mining and lumbering prospects of that District. Ur. Hall,
the Member for Nelson, reports that tho
Capital of the Kootenay is still floating on
a wave of prosperity, that the population
is increasing, buildings going up and fruit
lands selling almost daily. Mr. Joues,
the Member for Cariboo, brings information of new placer discoveries in his celebrated country. He also reports that improved methods are being adopted in deep
raining for gold, and that the present year
is likely to see more activity and a larger
production of gold in Cariboo than for
many years past. The unemployed in
Victoria and Vancouver, while still too
numerous are gradually finding employment, and the severity of the crisis has
distinctly abated. Courage, economy and
judicious management combined will soon
have tided Britisli Columbia over a momentary .depression.    There is no lack of
The Monetary Times is the
Western Banks, accredited organ of the
Chartered Banks of Canada.
They are the largest contributors to its
advertising columns, and together with the
Insurance and Mortgage Companies with
which they are financially allied, furnish
practically the whole of its advertising.
The Monetary Times is edited in Montreal, and is the stanch and insistent advocate, in all banking matters, of the
"laissez faire" policy. In its issue of January 25, it has an editorial on new banks,
which, if it were not conceived solely in
the interest of existing banks, might.be
regarded as a very purposeless and weak
handling of an important topic. It is
written either in ignorance of, or with the
intention to ignore financial conditions in
the West. Needless to say it discourages
the establishment of local banks, and
roundly declares that while one day there
may be room for them, that day has not
arrived. It says that the Directors of
the proposed Banks could not have chosen
a worse possible era for their* promotion.
It surmises that the idea of promoting
Western Banks is due to money stringency,
and since that is only likely to be a temporary condition it fails to see the "raison
de'etre" for establishing institutions to
relieve it. The Monetary Times is entirely in error; the agitation for Western
Banks was started nearly two years ago,
when there was no money stringency, when
no one dreamt of such a condition and
when the whole of the West was more
prosperous than it had ever been before.
Since all tlie leading Eastern papers read
ancl commented on the articles in The
Week which first voiced the movement, it
must be aware that the motive power behind it was dissatisfaction with the fixed
policy of the Eastern Banks which drained
the AVest of its currency and invested the
deposits of Westerners in the East, instead of using them to develop Western
resources and Western industries, thereby
denuding the country of what has been,
not inaptly, called the life-blood of commerce. It is not because Canadian Banks
were either "hoarding tlieir money or
gambling with it," this was not suspected
at the time, it only leaked out afterwards,
but the fact certainly does not strengthen
Western confidence in Eastern Banking
methods. In view of these facts the Monetary Times is entirely wrong in stating
that the idea of starting new banks is to
relieve the strain upon capital, and therefore the fantastic argument which it builds
upon a false foundation is naturally erroneous, to say nothing of its illustration
which does not apply. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
GRACE GEORGE'S RISE.
Her Series of Successes.
? Every young woman who aspires
to theatrical honours—and most
young people are predestined to
Stage fever as surely as to the mumps
—will find reason for hope in the record of Grace George, the most
youthful of contemporary stars,
whose rapid advancement is the cause
of much comment in theatrical circles.
Critics who write of the triumphs
of Mrs. Leslie Carter and of other
women whose progress has been astonishing, delightfully point to* tho
fact that ten years ago the objects of
their admiration were quite unknown
to fame. Ten years ago Grace George
had acted only as an amateur.
She was born in Brooklyn.   While
anything that had gone before.
Hef portrayal of the title role in
the latter sketch caused her to be
pronounced the most subtle and refined of the ingenues in the public
view, and brought about her featuring in William A. Brady's productions of "The Turtle" and "Mlle.
Fifi." Subsequently she was engaged
for the part of Esther in "Ben Hur,"
at the Broadway Theatre. By this
time it was agreed that Miss George
possessed every qualification, both
artistic and financial, for a, .starring
tour,' and Mr. Brady signed a contract
with her, by the terms of which she
was to head a company under his
direction. She was introduced in the
late spring in a piece called '"The
Countess Chiffon."
Then Mr. Brady purchased from J.
I. Clark, author of Julia Marlowe's
"For  Bonnie  Prince  Charlie,"  a ; ro-
Miss Gkace* Geokge, in Divokcons.
she was a child she manifested an interest in histrionic art that made her
the inspiration for the founding of a
juvenile company of which she was
the head. With this company she
worked some time, so improving herself that, after an interval spent in a.
convent, where she received her education, she successfully applied to
Charles Frohman.
Her debut, accordingly, was made
under the direction of that manager
in a farce called "The New Boy."
Her impersonation in this piece
brought her newspaper praise, and so
completely satisfied Mr. Frohman
that she was re-engaged the next
season to play "Amee" in "Charley's
Aunt." She might have remained
with Mr. Frohman indefinitely, had
not an offer from Auguste Van Biene
held forth the tempting bait of big
type and other inducements generally
included in contracts under thc word
"featured." Miss George created the
role of Gretchen in "The Wandering
Minstrel," and scored the deepest impression of her brief career. About
this time variety came to be metam-
orphorsed into vaudeville, and the
consequent growth of salaries in the
continuous houses prompted Miss
George to enter that field. She supported Charles B. Welles in his performance of "Frederick Lemaitrc,"
though only for a few months. Chas.
Dickson promptly secured her to play
with him in "Jealousy," and in "An
Undeveloped Bud," and these two
pieces probably did more toward giving her a recognized   position   than
mantic drama entitled, 'Her Majesty."
The production was made early in
September, 1900, at the Columbia
Theatre, Washington, whence it was
taken to the Manhattan Theatre, New
York, where the presentation remained through the winter. She .then
appeared in the play called "Under
Southern Skies."
Since the above, Miss George has
had a series of successes, including
"Pretty Peggy," in which she impersonated thc great. Woffington; "The
Two Orphans," carrying off, as the
blind Louise, the honors of a great
all-star cast;; "Abigail," a pretty little
comedy by Kellctt Chalmers, which
she abandoned in spite of its success,
because it gave her the chance for
ingenue work only; "The Marriage of
William Ashe," iu which her Lady
Kitty was a piece of sound emotional
acting; "The Richest Girl in the
World," which was abandoned also
for the reason that its exactions were
chiefly in the ingenue line. "Clothes,"
the satirical comedy in which as Olivia Sherwood she showed the follies
of the fashionable world. This season Miss George is appearing in Sar-
dou's comedy, "Divorcons," as the
charming but frivolous Cypriemie. In
this role, both in London and New
York, she is credited with making
the hit of her artistic career.
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Reserve Funds  4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal.
Banking By Mail.
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Savings Bank Department.
Interest   allowed   quarterly   at
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Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to tho West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
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Easy terms can be arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
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For further particulars apply to
A O. P. FRANCIS, Broker,
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VANCOUVER.  B. C.
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Her—Nope. Corner lots all taken.
Any other location suit you?-—Cleveland Leader.
I used to know a country lad—a guileless, lovesick swain.
His thoughts were always sweet, because he'd lasses on the brain.
—Judge.
Spaniards have a weakness for proverbs. Among these are some about
women that do not show a very high
estimation of the sex.
Choose neither a wife nor color by
candlelight.
Women and weather are not to be
trusted.
No season is as brief as a woman's
love.
He who has a handsome wife or a
castle on the frontier is never without fear.
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Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908
I nifsic and      %
I   The Drama. J
Florence Roberts.
On Tuesday night, Florence Roberts appeared at the Victoria Theatre
in "Zira," a*new name for au old
play. In reality, "Zira" is simply a
dramatization of Wilkie Collins' celebrated story, which Ada Cavendish
popularized more than thirty years
ago in the'title of "The New Magdalen." Florence Roberts is a finished
actress, and in pure pathos she has
few if any equals on the- American
stage. During the first two acts she
was rather tame, but in the third she
rose to the full possibilities of the
play, and her appeal to Ruth Wylding
was in every respect inimitable. She
is a natural actress and never overdoes her part; for this reason she is
always acceptable, even though, as
must be admitted, she is deficient in
sympathy. In stage craft, management of her voice, and indeed in all
the arts of the finished actress, she
scan give pointers to most of her com-
•petitors. Her support was good, without being super-excellent, the leading
man being easily the best. The only
regret one has after a visit from Florence Roberts is that she invariably
appears in such distressing* plays. I
should like to see her in Genevieve
Ward's great standby, "Forget-Me-
Not." It is a play of far greater
dramatic possibilities than any in
which „ Miss Roberts has recently
played. There would be wider scope
for her abilities and in other respects
itXvould suit her admirably.
fairly claim to have registered, another success, but candor forces me
to say that the energetic press notices
of the advance agent were in no sense
justified.
The New Grand.
Manager Jameson has a good bill at
the New Grand this week, with one
item especially attractive to Victorians
in the turn of Miss Loretta Boyd, a
daughter of our well-known citizen,
Mr. Wm. N. Wilson. The young lady
is an excellent mimic, and monologue
artist, and her performance is repeatedly encored. The Melnotte-Lanole
pair do a clever act on the wire, and
Edward Armstrong and Ethel Daly
performed in a very laughable sketch,
entitled "The Amateur Chauffeur."
Perhaps the piece de resistance is the
turn of Five Native Hawaiians, who
sing a selection of Hawaiian songs
and introduce native dances to the accompaniment of stringed instruments.
Altogether the show is well up to the
average, and is attracting good houses.
Pantages Theatre.
The programme here this week is
a good one. The Velde Trio present
an exceedingly clever acrobatic and
contortion act, and Charles Leora, the
aerial gymnast, is also clever. The
comic part of the programme is left
to Wilson and Rich, comedians, singers and dancers, but the really cleverest performance is that of Burt Page,
eccentric skater and acrobat. There
is the usual colored minstrel in Jim
Cowper, whose monologue is' much
above the average, and Contains no
objectionable features? Miss Crawford sings acceptably, and the movirig
pictures are all right. * j
':'      Herbert Witherspoon., ;
On Monday night Victorians had a
visit from Herbert Witherspoon, who
played under the auspices of the Victoria Musical Society. Mr. Wither-
dpSbn was! advertised as a.bass singer,
whicli he is* not..'This'.fact makes it
all the more difficult to understand
why the New York papers in their
numerous criticisms should so* describe him. As a matter of fact, he
Has a baritone ' voice, delightfully
smooth and limpid* in the, upper register, slightly below the average of good
baritones in the middle register, and
distinctly weak in the lower. Mr:
Witherspoon is not by any means*, a
great singer,, but he is a thorough
artist and by dint of nursing his voice
and carefully selecting such songs as
are within its compass, he manages
to score a decided success. He has
mannerisms which are not altogether
pleasing and far from artistic, but
these are outweighed by his* temperament and finished execution. He has
been well trained by the German
method, his voice production is faultless and his head tones are good;
iwhat he lacks is a voice. His organ
is limited in range and deficient both
in volume and tone, except in the
upper register. He lacks force, only
on rare occasions does one hear the
full tone which is anxiously looked
for, as number succeeds number.
My companion gave a very intelligent
criticism when she said, "I was expecting something all the time which
never came," and that is exactly Herbert Witherspoon in a sentence. It
was a great mistake for any one artist to attempt so lengthy a programme; hardly any living singer
could acceptably render twenty-five
selections in the course of two hours.
The most successful was a two-verse
song, given as an encore, the lack of
a programme, a very serious omission,
leaves the title unknown, but. it was
a delightful morceau about a rose and
a dewdrop, and was well within the
singer's range. His attempt to render
Annie Laurie was distinctly disappointing. He had style, but his voice
was totally unable to express the full
round tones so essential to give effect to the exquisite ballad. It is announced that Mr. Witherspoon is to
play in London this year in a series
of concerts. It will be interesting to
compare the criticisms in the London
papers with the American.
There was a crowded house, and
both from a financial and artistic
standpoint the Musical Society may
PADEREWSKI. . j
It, is no* sixteen years s'hrce: Ne-tv
York was first invited to pass judgment on a young Polish pianist of
whom much had been promised by
his sponsors. Truth to. tell, the impression made by Paderewski at his
debut in Carnegie Hall did not augur
very well for his future. The audience
was plainly puzzled. It had' seen a
slender man of medium height, whose
most marked physical characteristics
were a pair of powerful square shoulders, a pair of inscrutable eyes, and a
golden aureole of hair. His manner
at liis instrument was one of diffidence', even of shyness; and, while he
exercised over his hearers* a certain
indefinable charm, they—musicians
ancl amateurs—went away • unconvinced. ,
Then began his* recitals., The first
were given in the concert hall of
Madison Square Garden: It was as if
a new prophet had come to reveal in
a fashion never heard before the beauties of music. Soon it was necessary
to give the recitals in the great auditorium of Carnegie' Hall, and even
that wa3 too small to hold the audiences which* would listen to his playing. There had been nothing like it
in this country, and in Europe only
Liszt had received such homage,
It would have been wonderful had
Paderewski's season of popularity
lasted but a single year; but, instead
of diminishing, each return to this
country has seen his favour with the
public increase and grow more solid
At first the element of curiosity was
a powerful factor in building up .his
great audiences. The general public
wished to see this pia'nist who seemed able with his music to sway men
and women as he willed. But successive tours which covered the whole
of the country, North and South,
East and West, have made him
known to all who wished to see him
and to hear him. Yet to-day he holds
as securely as ever the unique place
he created for himself during his first
visit in 1891. If the neurotic idolatry
of which he was an unwilling victim
in his first visits to America has disappeared, its place has been more
than taken by healthy and genuine
admiration for his rare gifts as _.
musician and as a man.
If Paderewski had lived in other
and less sophisticated times, about
him would have grown a myth, even
as one has grown about the name of
the Italian fiddler, Paganini. In fact,
there are to-day not a few who firmly believe that Paderewski weaves in
"THIS GIVES LIFE TO THEE."
—Shakespeare (Sonnet).
When a good physician prescribes
Porter for a patient, it is Carnegie's
Porter. A physician knows the value
of purity. If you knew what we
know and what your physician knows
about Porter, you, too, would insist
on Carnegie's. Brewed and bottled
in the famous Carnegie Brewery, at
Gothenburg, Sweden.
Order it at your club, hotel, bar or
restaurant. If your dealer canot supply you with Carnegie's Porter, for
your health's sake do not put up with
an inferior brand, but 'phone
PITHER    &    LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A ktsld.atlal aad Day School for Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
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Lower and* Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
some mysterious fashion an hypnotic
spell over his hearers. Yet, if his
hold on the public be reduced to its
final analysis, it is doubtful that hc
has done more than to bring to the
interpretation of music the qualities
which have characterized those rare
men of all ages who have been able
to charm as well as command their
fellow-beings. They have been found
to possess in an unusual degree a
combination of high intelligence, poetic imagination, self-command, self-
criticisin, and a capacity for accomplishment which raises them above
their fellows and stamps them with
the mark of genius. It has been said
of Paderewski by those who know
him best that, had not destiny decreed that he should be a musician,
he would have risen as high in any
other profession or art, such being
his ability and power of concentration.
Fortunately for us, Music has
claimed him as her own, and his has
been the peculiar function to reveal
to us as no other pianist of his time
does, the thoughts, the fancies, the
creations of the master composers,
which without an interpreter are as
if they did not exist. The painter,
the sculptor, the poet appeals directly
to the. eyes and the ears of the public through the works as he made
them. But music, the most evanescent and elusive of arts, not only
needs a creator, but to exist at all
must have an interpreter, and its
value in art must depend largely on
how successfully the spirit of the
creator is interpreted. It is the faculty of reading truly the fancy of thc
composer that has made Paderewski
what he is.
Reports last spring from his concerts in Europe give assurance that
never in his career has his art been
so beautiful as it is to-day. For his
American admirers who will listen to
him this season, no news could be
more welcome.
The Victoria Musical Society is indeed to be congratulated in having
secured such an artist for its third
concert.
Our Store
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THURSDAY, FEB. 6.
Direct from the greatest success ever
achieved by an American Actress
in  England
GRACE GEORGE
Assitsed by H. Reeves South and her
London   and   New   York   Company,
presenting Sardou's diverting comedy,
DIVORCONS
Three months in London.
Over 100 nights in New York.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
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TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
1
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artists while in tbe Capital city, also of
other kindred bohemians.
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Leading Hotel of the Kootetnys.   -
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Silver King Hotel,
NELSON, B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
of the Kootenays.
W. E. ilcCandlish,
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Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
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Evenings, Balcony  lte
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Matinees
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at
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$1.00 a day.
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Victoria
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY i, 1908
Incorporated KOIJ
Capital. $S00,00».0l|
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...|3,000,t00.00
Subscribed
Capital,   J«0,«00
Beserve . . $60,000
Surplus, Jan. 10,
1907 . . $110,000
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the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
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The Week
A. Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
ISM Qovernment Street. .Victoria, B.C.
IIS  Hastings  St Vancouver,  B.C.
W. BLAKB1IORB..Manager and Baiter
Socialism—
and After.
I was greatly interested on Wednesday night in Florence Roberts'
fine acting in "The New Magdalen."
It took me back thirty-five years to
the time when I first saw Ada Cavendish in the same part. There is no
comparison between the two actresses, and the difference is all in
favour of the English woman, but
Miss Roberts played the part as probably no other American actress
could, and it was a treat.
I was even more interested in certain manifestations on the part of the
audience, which showed that if some
prophet would arise and preach the
doctrine of a true socialism in place
of the spurious and illogical substitute which does duty for it, there
would be a wave of popular enthusiasm in its favour.
The author has put into the mouth
of the reverend mission worker a lot.
of so-called socialistic maxims, and
what impressed me was that they
were all cheered to tlie echo by the
audience. These maxims, if closely
examined, will be found to relate to
the duty of thc privileged classes towards those less happily circumstanced. They also cover those duties which are imposed upon all men
by a common humanity, and finally
they emphasize the folly of attempting to save men's souls whilst neglecting their bodies.
There is nothing new in this; it is
many years since Wilkie Collins, who,
like Charles Dickens, may fairly bc
considered a great social reformer,
wrote his celebrated book containing
this propaganda. The recital is particularly appropriate to-day, because
it tends to show that zeal for humanity did not spring from writers of the
modern so-called socialistic school,
nor do they or their followers monopolize thc virtues of charity and sympathy.
This is neither the time nor the
place to enter into a lengthy discussion of the propaganda of which we
hear unfortunately far too much on
the Pacific Coast. No doubt there
are   many  honestly  deluded   by  its
glib, unscrupulous advocates. No one
doubts the honesty of the rank and
file of the followers of socialism, but
any man who brings a trained intellect to bear upon its propositions will
speedily discover that its reasoning
is fallacious and that even if its programme were possible it could never
attain the ends which are desired by
its advocates.
After all, the great heart of humanity is. sound; it beats in sympathy
with human woe, and it is its very
eagerness to seek some means of alleviating this which renders it so
easy a prey to the charlatan. The
London Morning Post, in a recent
brilliant editorial, which must have
been written by a master of economics, ancl which would not have done
discredit to the greatest authority on
the subject since Mill, I refer to Professor Leone Levi, points out that
the programme of the socialist parly.,
pursued to its logical conclusion, is
one of social --uicide, and that reduced to its primal elements, it is in
reality a duel between the heart and
the brain.
This is but another method of stating a proposition which has been
voiced by many social reformers, and
when the present contest is over and
the effervescence of socialistic agitation has subsided, the result will be
that men will strive with unabated
zeal to ameliorate the condition of
their fellows by methods which possess the elements of permanence and
which are not subversive of elemental
rules which have been established as
the outcome of the wisdom of the
ages.
No thoughtful observer of the
signs of the time can doubt that the
"thoughts of men are widened with
the process of the suns." It is the
universal recognition of this truth
which will ultimately make men free.
Wilkie Collins makes his missioner
say, "True socialism is Christianity,"
and no sincere student of socialism
can question the statement. The
remedy for social ills is not to be
found in cunningly devised fables, nor
in revolutionary legislation, but in a
universal recognition of the truth
which when accepted will influence
and control legislation and ail movements affecting humanity.
Present-day socialists are avowed,
uncompromising foes of the churches,
and of orthodox religion; they can
hardly be blamed. If one thing is
more evident than another at the beginning of this twentieth century, it
is that the churches have failed to
achieve what they ought to have
done, and might have done. There is
no more appalling sight in the world
to-day than the complacency of organized religion in the face of the
misery of so many millions of our
fellows. The civilized world has
never witnessed a grosser illustration
of moral turpitude than the acquiescence of th ; churches in the misdoings of their most conspicuous supporters. In face of this it is not to
bc wondered at that socialists are as
antagonistic to organized religion as
they are to organized government. It
is the infidelity of the churches which
furnishes occasion to the socialistic
enemy to blaspheme. If the churches
did their duty, socialism, as it exists
to-day, denouncing every constitutional organization, clamouring for
the destruction of all existing systems, and shrieking for vengeance,
with its hand against every man,
would not find no place. When it
has spent its fury, the men, perhaps
stimulated by its very excesses, will
bend themselves.to remedy the evils
of which it complains, by methods
rational and human, and the world
will learn what is that true socialism
which derives its vital force not from
thc abstruse and ill-informed economic treatises of German iconoclasts,
but from the simple maxims of thc
founder of a religion which embodies
all thc elements of true socialism.
This is not preaching, although I
admit that it sounds like it; it is
teaching, it is all.as old as the hills,
but apt to be forgotten, or at any
rate overlooked amid thc shrieking of
socialistic upstarts. It is recallcn to
my mind. by.the Florence Roberts
■play,  and   it  brings, back   the. story
which I read with such interest in
the days when I was too young even
to be considered a
A Cantratrice.
On Sunday evening last Mrs. Melville Parry, late of Nelson, but now
of Victoria, was heard for the first
time in this city at the Metropolitan
Methodist Church. Mrs. Parry sang
a difficult selection by Dudley Buck.
Those who have known this lady elsewhere consider Victoria fortunate iu
having her to reside among them as
she is one of the most accomplished
singers in the West, lt is not appropriate to comment upon her bril
liant singing on Sunday evening, suf*
lice it to say that she created a profound impression.
Bead    Clive   FhiUppa   Wolley's    story
"Shakmut" in February Westward Ko!
A Local Industry.
The Week does not carry any advertisement for the B. C. Distillery
Company nor is this a paid "reader,"
but on the principle of supporting
local industries it wishes to call attention to the fact that the product of
the B. C. Distillery Co. has just been
placed on the market for the first
time, after fulfilling the statutory requirement of maturing for two years.
It is undoubtedly the finest rye whiskey ever offered for sale in Canada,
and for those who require a little
rye "for* their health's sake" it will
be a boon; at any rate B. C. can now
claim to be producing amongst its
other first best a first best whiskey.
All lovers of good, clean sport in
this city must have been extremely
gratified with the result of last Saturday's matches. The Victoria athletes did themselves proud and if they
can but only maintain the pace they
set last week the time will not be
far away when the Capital will once
more hold its own in athletics. The
record which was established is a very
high one and will be hard to beat.
Out of seven games played in this city
against outside teams the local won
no less than five, drew one and lost
one. The Week extends its hearty
congratulations to the participants in
last Saturday's matches and hopes
that the example that has been set
will be maintained by the athletes who
will represent Victoria in the summer
athletics.
Victoria Theatre
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3
DE WOLF HOPPER
Supported by  De Wolf Hopper  Co.
in Reginald de Koven and Frederick Robert's Comic Opera
Happ land
SIXTY PEOPLE.
Thc best Singing Company  in
America.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
Box  Office  opens   10 a.m.   Friday,
January 31st.
Mail Orders accompanied by cheque
will receive their usual attention.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about VI
mlles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; tiience east 80
chains,  to  place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEO.  B.  WATSON.
STUART  LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the nortli side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. Jumes and 16
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east SO chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
TAKE TIME BY
THE FORELOCK
Seize the opportunity of having your
watch properly cleaned and repaired.
Look inside your watch for a moment. Glance at the balance
wheel. If it is in good condition this wheel is making 18,000
vibrations an hour. If its movement is sluggish there is something wrong. It will move ,558 miles in a year, and requires
less than one-tenth of a drop of oil to make the run. It needs,
however, that little oil badly. The least increase of friction on the
bearings alter the motion.
Let our experts clean, oil and put
your watch in order for a year.. It
doesnt's cost much	
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
47 and 49 Qovernment St., Victoria.
Victor-Berliner
Vaudeville
How would you like to hear
May Irwin, the queen of fun-makers,
Vesta Victoria and Alice Lloyd, the
famous English comediennes; that
celebrated tenor, Richard Jose;
clever Clarice Vance, with her
irresistibly humorous song-hits;
Harry Lauder, the great Scotch
comedian; popular Eddie Morton,
in your own home ?
You can hear them all on the Victor
or Berliner Gram-o-phone just the same
as if you were at the theatre—these
_t___m__m_-_-___m_-mfamous vaudeville artists who are delighting thousands of people every night in
the theatres all over the United States and Canada and who
make records exclusively for the Victor.
You can do what you can't do at the theatres; you can
pick out your own performers and arrange your own program to suit yourself.
Then there's  Billy  Murray,   Harry   Macdonough,
Arthur Collins, Ada Jones, Harry Tally and other favorites
to sing for you.
You can also have a complete minstrel show with a Victor or Berliner
Gram-o-phone    Or you can have music by famous bands; dance music;
■^X classic symphonies; sacred song9; and grand-opera by the world's
V greatest stars.    All these things are absolutely true to life,  and
VVK\ are heard at their best on the Victor or Berliner Gram-o-phone.
«.%  \\.      Any Victor or Berliner dealer wilt gladly play Victor Record! for you.
. \, "\».-**>,\.Ca" and ask to hear them, and get him to fell
'*-.
you about the easy-payment plan.
Write us for'catalogues—jiisi: fill out the
coupon and mail it to us,
\
\ ••-.. •-.. VV
ft,*!' K-
%- w
\%_1*
The Berliner Gram-o-phone
Company of Canada, Lid.
Montreal.   607
You can always
It tastes different
luiiwnaiwap -*_ _•        i_~_,     ll u,aw:s  uiiici
tell an M. B. cigar _\\9    |j,     than others.
^^_ eigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Ev erywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY "i, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
*      District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICB that Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner of
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one I hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
*i   FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT,
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that'Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north to point of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north to place of commencement.
Dated  2 lst December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W.  Wilkinson.
.   VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber, Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 ehains; thence east'80 chains;
thence south.80 chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Doc, 1907.
THOMAS M1LER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
",}_    VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a posl
planted 80 chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. .13193; thonce
i.orth 80 phains; thence .west SO cluiins;
tiience south '80 chains: thence east SO
chains to point of commencement;
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY  WOOD.
Jan 18*   ' .    .
VICTORIA LAND DISTRlC'i..     ■
*    District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
! S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
1 Cruiser,  intends  to apply for a special
timber   licence  over   the   following   described lands:
Claim  No.  3—Commencing at a  post
I planted SO chains west of southwest cor-
I ner of Timber Limit No.  13.193; thence
I east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thonce west GO chains;, thence north 40
i chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brentian, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following  described  land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B:
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 ehains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 ehains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated  November  15,   1907.
De,14 MARK BRENNAN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted  40  chains  west of  the  north-
I west corner of Timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 16) cliains; thenco east 40
| chains; thence south 160 chains;, thonce
I west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18646, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
I of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
1    Commencing at a post planted at the
[southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
Ito McClure Lake; thence along McClure
I Lake in an east southerly direction 43
Ichains,   more  or  less;   thence west  40
Ichains to place of beginning and mak-
I ing 40 acres more or less, and known
las the southwest fractional quarter sec-
Itlon of 36, township 5, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
I Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Jennie  Croteau
I of  Aldermere,   B.C.,   occupation   house-
I wife, Intends :o apply for permission to
I purchase  the following described  land:
1    Commencing at a post plnnted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains;  thence south  40
chains; thence west 40 chains to nlace
■ of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,   and   containing   160   acres,   more   or
less.
Dated  23rd of November,  1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., lumberman, intends
to apply for a special timber license
over the following described lands:
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the southwest corner of T. L. 16,381, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim No. 8"; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains  to commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
District of Rupert, Kathleen Lake.
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of T. L. 18,045, on
Kathleen Lake, marked "E. A. W.'s S.W.
corner post to Claim No. 1"; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 140 chains; thence south
20 chains to T. L. 13,045; thence following north line of T. L. 13,046 east
and south to commencement.
Staked November 30th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 T. D. Harris, Agent.
DISTRICT Ol  CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at 'the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parellel to high .water mark, about 30
chains to:'west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 25th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(c) Commencing at a post planted at
the northeast corner of P. R. 1,746, on
Marble Creek, marked "E. A W.'s N.W.
corner post to Claim C"; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
tnence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 120 chains to commencement.
Staked December 5th, 1907.
Dated Victoria, B.C., Dec. 10th,  1907.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
(d) Commencing at a post planted at
the northwest corner of Lot 192, on
Quatsino Narrows, marked "E. A. W.'s
S. W. corner post to Claim D."; thence
east about 30 chains to T. L. 14,467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
about 80 chains to Marble Creek; thence
north and west along shore to Indian
Reserve; thence south and west along
line of Indian Reserve to Quatsino Narrows; thence following shore of said
narrows southwesterly to commencement.
Dated Victoria, December 10th, 1907.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Dec. 21 Thomas.D. Harris, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchant, Intends to apply for a special timber licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 ehains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S? E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction, from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
A°THU°MG:::SE„ timber maps £r;,;r^r
posted up to date every day
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINTi. MAP CO.
Y/CTORIA. B.C.,
CHANCERY     CHAMBERS. SZ   Lt.NGLEY~ STftEET.
BLUEPRINTING
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps showmy alt
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands  taken  up in Br itish Columbia.
Blue   Prints   Can be    obtainpd nt shnr-l   ***■/_-*,
LICENCE TO AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Aot, 1897."
Canada:
Provinee of British Columbia.
No.  417.
THIS is to certify that "The New
Zealand Insurance Company" is authorised and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority.of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at the City of Auckland, In the
Colony of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is one million pounds, divided
into ten thousand shares of one hundred pounds each.
The head offlce of the Company In
this Province is situate at Victoria, and
James Hill Lawson, merchant, whose
address is Victoria ,B.C, is the attorney
for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
ofllce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 28th day of November,
one thousand nine hundred and seven.
(L. S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
Tho objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To carry on the business of fire and
marine Insurance in all Its branches or
such of those branches as the Company shall from time to time determine,
and to do all such other things as are
incidental or conducive to the attainment of those objects.
Dec. 14.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south SO chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on tho
N. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
26 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chains to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated  Dec.  2nd,   1907.
Dec 14      HARRY  McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated  November  26th,   1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thonce north 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 6*10
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three miles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile soutli of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Lated December 10th,  1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, ancl one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
nortli 80 chains; thence east SO chains;
thence soutli SO chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6*—Commencing at a post plantod
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241 A.
Burke Channel, and two miles south ot
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chuins;
thence east 40 chains; thence soutli 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 610 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17tli,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half miles south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile east of claim No. 6; thence nortli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thenoe
soutli 80 chains', thence west SO cliains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907,
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two mlles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
"into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east SO chains; tnence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying Into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17,  1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line 80 chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres.
' Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thonce north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south SU
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake SO chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mile south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4;
thenee north SO chains; tiience west SO
chains; theuce soutli SO chains; thence
cast SO chains to point of commencement, containing (j lu acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17-rr-Commencing at a post planted
about iwo miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east SO chains; thonce south 80 chains;
thence wost SO chains; thence north SO
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.   .
Jan. IS ED. BROWN.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th February, 1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must be deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been ox-
tended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 190S.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that J. A. Johnson, of
Vancouver, cruiser, Intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:—
1. Commencing at a post planted on
the southwest corner of Leose No. 2;
thence south 80 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west along south boundary of said lease
SO chains to point of commencement,
Dated  December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
2. Commencing at a post planted on
the south bank of river running Into
Beaver Cove, and on the west boundary
of Lease No. 2; thence south 80 chains;
tbence west SO chains; thonce north SO
chains; thence east 80 chains along bnnk
of said river to point of co.nnieM-.e-
ment.
Dated   December   27th,   1907.
District of Rupert.
3. Commencing at a post planted
about 80 chains west o£ west boundary
of Lease No.  2,  and on south  bank of
a rivor running into Beaver Cove; thenee
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thenee east
40 chains along bank of satd I river to
point of commencement,
Dated December 27th, 190T.
Distriot of Rupert.
4. Commencing at a post planted
about the southeast corner of T. L. No.
11,596; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
5. Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains east of the south-east
corner of T. L. 11,395; thence east 160
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 160 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
District of Rupert.
6. Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of Lease No. 2; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Dated December 27th, 1907.
Jan 4. J. A JOHNSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Roland D. Craig,
of Vancouver, occupation Forester, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one (1)
mile south and 20 chains west from
the southwest corner of L. 222, West
Fork of Adams River; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 80 chalus.
December   20th,   1907.
Jan. 4 ROLAND D. CRAIG.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Kupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side, of Marbie
Bay; thenee • northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of tot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
B. C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP aad BLUE-PRINT CO,
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers,
VANCOUVER, B. C.        ,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Kupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Puip Coihpany, Intends 10 apply for permission to lease
lhe following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Slaked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, Including small Island on
north  line  of  section   10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
DISTRICT   OF  CASSAIR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden Creek
Mining  Co.,  of  Vancouver,  occupation,
, Intends to apply for permission
to  lease  the  following described  land,
about  40  acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 479; thence following high water mark soulh and
west to tlle southeast corner of Lot 3t)8;
thence east flve chains; thence north
and cast following a line parallel to
high water mark about 80 chains to a
point 6 chains south of point of commencement and thence to Bald point of
commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., Timber Dealers, intend to apply for the
rite to purchase the following described
lands In Kildalla Bay, Rivers Inlet; commencing at this post planted on the east
side of the Bay about one-third of a
mile from the point at the mouth of the
Bay, being tbe southwest corner post;
Ihence cast 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 90 chains to beach;
thence south along beach to point of
commencement; containing 40 acres,
more or less.
Staked Nov.  26,  1807.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Dec. 7 George Young, Agent.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certlllcate   of   Title   to
Lot 5 of Lot 7 of Section 10,  (Map
280),   Esquimalt   District,   Victoria
City.
Notice Is hereby given that It Is my
Intention nt the expiration of one month
from the first publication hereof to Issue
a  Duplicate of  the Certificate of Title
to Bald  lot,  Issued  to George A. Cold-
well on the 6th day of June, 1899, and
numbered  6296C.
Land   Registry   Offlce,  Victoria,   B.C.,
the 21st day of November, 1907.
S.  Y.  WOOTTON,
Nov. 23 Registrar-General. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
NEW     WESTMINSTEE     LAND     DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C-, occupation
timber broker, intends to apply for a
special timber licence over Uie following described lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at northwest corner of T. L. 1S187;
thence east 80 chains along the north
line of T. L. 18187; thence north 81)
chains along the west line of T. L.
12502; thence east 80 chains along the
north line of T. L. 12502; thence nortn
80 chains along the west line of ■__*. L.
12603; thence ln a southwesterly course
along the line of the Capilano Water Reserve to place of commencement, aud
containing  040  acres  of  land,  more or
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C; thence east SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, more or less to River; thence
southerly SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less
Staked December 7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR. :
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, George
French, prospector, of Skidegate, B.C.,
Intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 040
acres, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast
corner of Section 21, Township 4, (iraham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains south
to shore line; thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located December  12th.  1907.
GEORGE FRENCH,  Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Benjamin Kromp, of Skidegate, B. C,
rancher, intend to apply tor a licence
to prospect for coal aud vetroleum over
640 acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted near the
beach at the southeast corner of Section 20, Township 4, Graham Island,
Queen Charlotte Group; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains east; thence 80
chains south and over and under water;
thence 80 chains west over and under
water to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
Located  November  30th,   1907.
BENJAMIN KROMP, Locator.
Jan. 4 John Simister, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S; E. Cor. of B. C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 60 and
marked the N. E. Cor.; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; ihence
north 80 chains, more or less, to south
boundary of lot 50; thence east so
chains along said boundary to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east of the N. E. Cor. of B
C. Dev. Co.'s Lot 50, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. Cor.; thenee east 40
chains; thence north 160 cnains; thence
40 chains to bank of Salmon River
thence south 160 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsciuit River, about 4
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C; thence east 80 chains',
thence north 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence soulh SO chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 1%
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Kimsquit River, about 2_
mlles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. E. C.; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Staked December 10.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast. Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Salmon River, about 2
miles north of the N. E. C. of Lot 60
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. W. C;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, more or
less, to bank of river; thence southerly
80 chains along bank of river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
Staked December 6.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Salmon River, about 5
miles north of tho N. E. C. of Lot 50
and marked T. H. Taylor's S. E. C;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to River; thence
southerly along river 160 chains to point
of commencement.
Staked  December  7.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT,
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H. Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
licence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 2
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
Dev. Co.'s Lot 51, and marked T. H.
Taylor's S. W. C.j thence east SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to bank of river; thenco south 80
cliains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked   December  9.
THOMAS H. TAYLOR.
Jan. 4 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast, Range 3.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas H, Taylor, of Vancouver, occupation, surveyor,
Intends to apply for a special timber
lloence over the following described
lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
east bank of Kimsqult River, about 3
miles north of the N. W. C. of B. C.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, James
Alfred Owens, prospector, Skidegate, B.
C, intend to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over 640
acres of land bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted northeast corner, near the beach on south
shore of Skidegate Inlet, B.C.; Graham
Island, Queen Charlotte Group, supposed to be Section 5, Township 1;
thence running 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence SO chains north
to shore line; thence following shore line
to point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
Located  November   29th,  1907.
JAMES ALFRED OWENS,
Jan. 4 Locator.
NOTICE is hereby given that I, Emily
Margaret Johnston, of Victoria, B.C., intend to apply for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum over 640 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the south-east
corner of section 33, township one (1),
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group;
thence running 80 chains north; thence
80 chains east; thence SO chains south;
thence 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Located December 0th, 1907.
EMILY MARGARET JOHNSTON,
Locator.
Jan. 4. Christopher Johnson, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and Including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b., scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure of a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the ofllce of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the ofllce of the Provincial Timber In
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certificate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner in
the sum of two hundred and fifty ($250)
dollars, which shall be forfeited If the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter into contract when called upon
to do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, ln
the sum of $1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner ln tho sum of $3,000 for
the duo fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers nnd enclosed In the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Worka Engineer.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted,-at. the southeast corner section 3,
township 25, marked T.*S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of...Quntsino
Sound, thence north'. 86 chains', west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec.  19th,   1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 25, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thonco east 100 chains; north 40
chains, west 100 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thenco
north 100 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 100 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wl-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
2.., thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mile from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake in northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner section 32,
township 25; thence south SO chains',
thence east following shore line SO
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains;, thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commenting at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 80. chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec.  20, 1907.'
Jan. 11. T.. S. McPHERSON.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that, W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker,-intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which is seven and one-half
miles distant and in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. '13, which Is eight mllea distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and'one mile nortli of Upper
Salmon River; thence west SO chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; soutli
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
SO chains; east 80 chains; south SO
chains; west SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 15, which is eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chains   to  point   of  commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S„ S.E. No. 16, which is nine miles
distant In a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement. *
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of hank of .Upper
Salmon River; thence west SO chains;
north SO chains; east 80 chains; south
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted nt the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. IS, which Is nine and
one-half miles in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
hnlf miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east SO chains north 80 chains;
west SO chains; south SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest cornor marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19. which Is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east SO chains;
south SO chains; west SO chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which Is ten and one-half miles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of tho Upper Salmon River, thence north SO
chains; west SO chains; south SO chains;
east SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 21, which Is eleven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles in a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains', west SO
chains', south SO chains; east SO chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner inarked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which ls eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles In a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of tho Upper
Salmon River; thenco north SO chains;
east SO chains; south SO ehnlns; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 23—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which* is seven and one-
half miles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east SO chains; south 80 chains'; West
80 chains.to point-of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S.i S.E:, No. 24, whioh is eight and
one-hajf miles distant in a northerly
direction ifromi.CroWn Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east. SO chains; south SO chains to, point
of commencement.
No. 25—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest' corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 25, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 ehains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which Is seven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and' on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east SO chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which ls seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west SO chains; south
SO chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south SO chains; east 80 chains; north
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter, miles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Tipper Salmon River; thence
west SO chains; north SO chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which is ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence SO chains south; SO chains
west; SO chains north; SO chains east
to   point  of  commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which is ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; SO
chains.south,..SO chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec.  19,  1907.
W. E. SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson of
Iowa Falls, Iowa, Banker, intends to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special timber licence
over the following described lands 3.0
days after date.
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
-J3.W.** No. 1, which is on the southeast
bank of Upper Campbell Lake, where
it cuts the C.P.R. line; thence east
following the C.P.R. line 100 chains;
north SO chains; thence following shore
line of said lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked WE..S.,
S.W. No. 3, which ls 20 chains distant
in a northerly direction from the south
east corner of T. L. 14864 and three-
quarters of a milo fro mUpper Campbell
Lake; thence east SO chains; north SO
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 4, which is one mile distant
in a northerly direction from Upper
Campbell Lake, and one mile east of
T. L. 14S64, thence west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains  to point of commencement.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 5, which is one'mile distant in
a northerly direction from Upper Campbell Lake, and one mile east of T. L.
14S64; thence SO chains north; 80 chains
east; 80 chains south; 80 chains west
to point of commencement.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 6, which is situated on the
north shore of Upper Campbell Lake,
on the C.P.R. line; thence west 40
chains; north 160 chains; east 40 chains;
south 160 chains to point of commencement.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 7, which is about four miles in
a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain; thenco north SO chains; west
80 chains; south SO chains; east SO
chains to point of commencement.
No. S—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 8, which Is flve miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain; thence north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south SO chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  16th,  1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 9, which Is four miles distant
in a northerly direction tmm Crown
Mountain; thonce north 160 chains; west
40 chains; south 160 chains; east 40
chains to point of commencement.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 10, which Is two miles distant
In a northerly direction from where the
C.P.R. line cuts tlie north shore of Upper Campbell Lake; thence west 80
chains; north SO chains; east SO chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 11—Commencing at a post plantod
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 11, which is five and one-quarter miles distant In a northerly and
westerly direction from where C.P.R.
line cuts north shore of Upper Campbol!
Lake; thence north 80 chains', west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Staked Dec.  17,  1907.
No. 32—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W. No, 32, which ls six miles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain, and one-half mile south of
Upper Salmon River, thence east SO
chains; south SO chains; west 80 chains,
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 34—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., N.E. No. 34, which is three miles
distant   ln   a   northerly   direction   from I
Crown Mountain; thence south 80 chainB,
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
SO chains * to point of commencement.
No. 35—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner No. 35, which
is marked W.EIS:, N.E: which
is flve miles distant in a northerly' direction from Crown Mountain; thence
south 80 chains; west SO chains; nftrth
80 chains; east 80 chainsl to point of
commencement.
No, 36—Commencing at 'a post planted
at the, northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 36, which is six miles distant
in a northerly direction from Crbwn
Mountain arid one-half a mile south of
Upper Salmon River; thence. West SO
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains; '
north 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked  Dec.   20th,   1907.
No. 37—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
No. 37, S.E., which ' is live miles distant in a southwesterly direction from
West Lake, Sayward District; thence
west SO chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 38—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 38, which is five miles distant
In a southwesterly direction frorii West
Lake, Sayward District; thence east 80
chains; north 80 chains; west 80 chains;
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 39—Commencing at* a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 39, which is three and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where* It joins the line of
Lot 110; thenco north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south' 80 chains; east 80
chains to point of commencement. \
No. 40—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest.corner markted' W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 40, which is three.and one-half
miles in a southwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 chains;
west 80 chains to point of commencement.   --■--• 	
No. 41—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast cor. marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 41, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line of Block 110;
thence west SO ehains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 42—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,:
S.W. No. 42, which is four miles distant
in an easterly direction from south end
of West Lake, on line Block 110; thence
east 80 chains; north 80 chains; west
80 chains; south' 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 43—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 43, which Is one and one-half
miles distant ln a westerly direction
from the south end of West Lake, where
it joins the line of Block 110, thence
north SO chains; west SO chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of *
commencement.
: No. 45—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 45, which is one and one-half
miles distant from the south end of
West Lake, where it joins the line of
Block 110; thence north SO chains; east
80 chains; south SO chains; west' 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 46—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner which is marked W.E.S., S.W., No. 46, which is one
mile distant and In a southeasterly direction from West Lake adjoining Block
110; thence north 100 chains; east 40
chains; south 160 chains; west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 47—Commencing at a post plantod
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 47, which Is two miles northwesterly from south end of West lake,
where It joins the line of Block 110;
thence north 80 chains; east SO chains;
south SO chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 48—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E., No. 48, which Is two miles distant
and in a northwesterly direction from
the south end of West Lake, where it-
joins line of Block 110; thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. .49—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 49, which Is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from centre of shore line of West Lake,
thence east 80 chains; north 80 ehains;
west SO chains; thenco south 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 50—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S., '
S.E. No. 50, which is three and one-half
miles distant in an easterly direction
from the centre of shore line on West
Lake, thence west 80 chains; north 80
chains; east 80 chains; south 80 ohains
to point of commencement.
No. 51—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 51, which Is five miles from
the south end of West lake, where tt
joins the line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 15, 1907.
No. 52—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 52, which Is six mlles westerly
from the south end of West Lake where
it Joins line of Block 110; thence north
80 chains; wost SO chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 63—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 63, which Is six miles In a
westerly direction from the south end
of West lake, where It joins line of
Lot 110; thence north 80 chains;, east
80 chains; sonth 80 chains; west 80
chains to point of commencement.
No. 64—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 54, which Is two and one-half
mlles distant in an easterly direction
from tho north end of West lake, thence
west SO chains; north 80 chains; east
SO chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement. •
No. 55—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 55, which Is two and one-half
miles distant westerly from the north
end of West lake; thenco east 100 chains;
north 40 chains; west 40 chains; north
40 chains; wost 60 chains; south 80
chains to point of commencement.
Staked December 14th, 1907.
W. E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. Thos. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.  2,  situate on  the  west Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thenco west SO chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked  December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11, T. S. McPherson, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
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psooooo-oooooo-oooooooo-ooooo^
FOR  FEMININE  FOLK
No lady who delights in dainty Linen Drawn Work should
miss seeing our present extensive showing of handsome
pieces just received direct from
Mexico.
SOME BLANKET SPECIALS.
Don't let the delightfully moderate winter weather we are having to date deceive you into thinking colder
times aren't coming this winter. There will be nights, before the Summer comes, when a great, big, warm
blanket on that bed of yours would be appreciated. Now, the mild winter weather to date sees us with a stock
too large for this late season of the year, and we are making an endeavour to clear our whole blanket stock
at once.   To that end we are offering you absolutely the best blanket values in the city.
Blankets that'll make you forget the dreary and disagreeable cold outside, and send you quickly to the land
of dreams, are waiting here for you. Warm, fleecy kinds that are not oppressively heavy. Blankets that are
better than the ordinary—made of "wool"—not a "mixture." Full weight, too, and sizes that often measure
more, and never less, than what the ticket says.
Quality should be the keynote when buying blankets. If you are not absolutely certain of the quality
of those offered it is doubly important that you should exercise care. There are many "shoddy" blankets
offered as "all wool." Prices look extraordinarily low for such good looking blankets. But wait until they have
seen some service—wait until they strike the water. Quite often it is difficult to find enough to "go round."
Doesn't it seem wise policy to buy from a reliable house that will guarantee their quality? Every blanket we
sell has this firm's guarantee of quality behind it.
EXTRA SPECIAL VALUES IN SILVER-GREY BLANKETS.
Here is what we can safely say, without fear of successful contradiction, is absolutely the best value in
Silver Grey Blankets in the city. These are blanket values we are prepared to "pit" against any "special
sale" values offered in this town. Compare these prices judging by the weight, and we think they are better,
but when you compare the quality you will at once see how far superior ours are and how unusually liberal
the pricings. These are fine, fleecy, warmth producing blankets made from the best quality wool and are the best
grey blanket obtainable.
Size 6ox8oin., 6-lb., per pair.. ..$4.30 I Size 62x82 in,, 7-lb. p,er pair.. ..$5.00 | Size 64x84 in., 8-lb. per pair.. $5.70.
,    No "charge" orders at these prices.
SEE THESE FAMOUS AYRSHIRE
BLANKETS—SPLENDID VALUES
This far-famed Blanket has indeed
many points of special merit. A
specially long wool is used in the
making. The weave is very close
and firm. This blanket has been
long and favourably known for its
wear-resisting qualities. These
Blankets will stand years of hardest
use.
Size 75x90 in., 8-lb.  Per pair $8.00
Size 76x94 in., _y_t-\b.  Per pair   $8.50
A LINE OF SUPERIOR QUALITY
FLANNELETTE SHEETS
Size 30x40 in.    Per pair   70c
Size 56x75 in.  Per pair $1.35
Size 70x76 in.   Per pair  $1.50
British—6ox76 in.  Per pair $1.75
British—64x81 in.  Per pair $2.25
British—72x90 in.  Per pair $2.75
FINE GREY BLANKETS
These are exceptionally fine values.
An uncommonly soft and warm
blanket   that   you'll   like.     Liberal
sizes and full weight.
Size 56x76 in., 6-lb. Per pair $3.00
Size 58x78 in., 7-lb.   Per pair.. ..$3.50
Size 62x82 in., 8-lb.  Per pair $4.00
SCOTCH BATH BLANKETS
This is a genuinely splendid Blanket.
The wool used is of the very finest
quality. The weave is a special close
weave, and makes  a long-wearing
Blanket.     Excellent   value   at   the
price.
Size 76x94 in., 8-lb.  Per pair... $12.00
SUPERIOR WHITE BLANKETS
These are all woll Blankets, have a
very long fleece and are excellent
sorts.   Judging from the big sales
of  this   style  the   price  must   be
correct.
Size 60x80 in., 6-lb.  Per pair.. ..$5.75
Size 64x82 in., 7-lb.  Per pair.. ..$6.75
Size 68x86 in., 8-lb. Per pair... .$7.50
SCOTCH   CHEVIOT  BLANKETS
Here is a wear-resisting Blanket
worthy of your attention. The
special weave leaves practically no
fleece. Sizes are larger. Very warm
and best wearing Blanket made.
Size 72x84 in., 7-lb. Per pair... .$7.50
Size 80x96 in., 9-lb.  Per pair—$9.50
SEND THE BRIDE SOMETHING
IN CHINA.
There is nothing you can buy for a
modest sum that carries with it the
power of attraction and the evidences
of good taste—as does a bit of china
—or glass. So many small-priced
things.
Try to-think of anything else for,
say, a couple of dollars, that is suitable for a wedding present, and you
must confess they are either insignificant or coarse. Make it even five
dollars—almost same result.
Come in and see what our new
Spring importations disclose—you'll
say they're marvelous. We think
they're great ourselves.
GIFTS IN ABUNDANCE
Not everyone is so amply supplied
with the world's goods that he can
make presents without consulting his
pocketbook.
Then one often gets invitations
that require for many reasons a demonstration of friendship that is fully
expressed in a small gift.
We have not overlooked these circumstances, and if your pocketbook
restricts or the conventions dictate—
our display of things at small prices
is all satisfying. Purchases held for
later delivery.
DON'T MISS SEEING THE OFFERINGS OF OUR DRAPERY DEPT.
Close by all our carpet goodness is our magnificent stock of handsome
curtains and draperies. An hour full of interest and pleasure can easily be
spent here. Some of the most handsome creations in curtains, curtain
materials, drapery materials, etc., are shown. We have a staff of experienced men to look after your work—experts with years of experience. Let
us solve your decorative problems.  .
WEILER BROS.,
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS
VICTORIA, B, 6.
   ^.„„._^,„„„.m^,__^^w»»w^,„w_id0000<X>O60OOO0OS
390000000COOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Social and        *
Personal. *
Senator   and   Mrs.   McDonald   left
...  Thursday  morning   for   Ottawa,
vhere the former has gone to attend
his Senatorial duties.
* *   *
Mr. Charles Vernon, who has been
[mrveying in the vicinity of Kamloops,
returned after an absence of four
Ir five months.
* *   *
Congratulations are in order to W.
, Twiss, the Vancouver manager of
[he  Mutual   Life  of  Canada,  on  the
l_irth of a son.
* *   *
Mr.  Ernest   Muskett   returned   to
■Vancouver on Monday morning.    He
|has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. H. J.
Muskett at their home on Niagara
street for the last few weeks.
* *   *
Mrs. T. R. Smith gave a tea on
|riuirsday afternoon for Mrs.
"oombe, wife of the captain of the
Fable ship "Restorer," and Mrs. Stanley, of Honolulu.
■ *   *   *
Miss Bell-Irving, of Vancouver,
^as the guest of Mrs. P. Irving for
few days. She came down to play
lockey with the Vancouver Ladies'
llockey team last Saturday.
* *   *
An engagement of great interest to
I'ictorians is that of Miss Marie Gnu-
lin, second daughter of Captain Gau-
tn, and Mr. Roger Wilby, who are
peciving congratulations from   their
lany friends.
* *   *
1 Among those noticed at the Rink
|i Tuesday afternoon were Mrs. R.
Dunsmuir, Mrs. Harry Pooley,
lliss    Schubert,   Miss   Bulwer,   Mr.
lifford Brown, ■ Mr. Holmes, Miss
(iva Blackwood, Miss Mason, Miss
loris Mason, Miss J. Lawson, Mr.
iagerty, Miss V. Pooley, Mrs. Genge,
lir. J. Arbuckle, Miss P. Irving, Mr.
Troupe, Miss Marian Dunsmuir, Mr.
Harvey, Miss W. Troup, Miss Little,
Miss Nora Coombe and Mr. W. Barton.
* *   ♦
Mrs .Ker made a most delightful
hostess at a bridge party on Wednesday afternoon. The very handsome
prizes were won by: First, Mrs.
Gaudin; second, Mrs. King. Among
the many guests were: Mrs. C. M.
Roberts, Mrs. Little, Mrs. Freeman,
Mrs. Jones, Mrs. C. Pooley, Mrs. A.
Robertson, Mrs. Love, Mrs. Tuck,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. King, Mrs. T.
S. Gore, Mrs. Crotty, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. Rochester, Mrs. Laing, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs.
Flumerfelt, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Brett, Mrs.
Gibb, Mrs. Bullen, and many others.
* *   *
On Saturday afternoon last Miss
Phipps gave a very enjoyable and informal tea, at her mother's home in
Carberry Gardens, in honour of Miss
Mabel Tatlow. Miss Tatlow took
this opportunity to bid farewell to
some of her numerous friends before
her wedding and departure for Ashcroft, where she will in future live for
the greater part of each year.
The tea table looked very pretty
with yellow daffodils and white narcissus, and the hostess received in a
dainty white dress. Those present
wcre: Mrs. Phipps, Mrs. R. janion,
Mrs. B. Tye, Mrs* Durand, Mrs. E.
Scholefield, Mrs. B. Heisterman, Mrs.
Brett, Mrs. Spicer Simpson, Mrs. A.
Robertson, and the Misses N. Cambie
(Vancouver), Mary Lawson, McDonald, Peters, Day, Monteith, Tiny
Monteith, Gillespie, King, Perry,
Hanington, Foster, Amy Angus, Irving, Gaudin, P. Irving, N. Dupont,
Tilton,   Tuck,   Browne,   Newcombe,
Tatlow, and Bolton.
* *   *
The marriage tuk place pn Wednesday afternoon at Christ Church Cathedral, of Miss Mabel Garnet Tatlow
and Mr. Fitzallcn Cornwall, of Ashcroft. Tiie ceremony wns performed
by the Rev, Canon Beanlands, Thc
sacred edifice was decorated for the
occasion with white marguerites and
tulle.   Only the most intimate friends
of the bride and groom were present.
The bride, who was given away by
her father, was gowned in cream
satin, with tulle veil and orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of lilies
of the valley. The bridesmaid was
Miss Cornwall, sister of the bridegroom, and the train-bearers were
Baby Tatlow and a little nephew of
the groom. The bride's only ornaments were a pearl brooch, gift of the
On Wednesday evening the. A. 0.
U. W. Hall was the scene of a merry
dance, about fifty couple enpoying a
very pleasant evening, Miss Thain
and violinist supplying the music.
The supper table was very attractive,
scarlet carnations asparagus fern, and
runners of red crepe paper, tied at
opposite corners in large bows, with
a centrepiece of little red shaded electric lights. This was the clever work
of Miss Hickey and Miss K. Gaudin.
Those present were the Misses Cayzer, F. Phair, V. Phair, LcSucur,
Moresby, P. Mason, Arbuthnot, Savage, Blakemore, Peters, Little, Dunsmuir, V. Mason, M. Gaudin, Nash,
Johnston, Hickey, V. Hickey, Rcb-
beck, D. Page, H. Page, G. Loenholm,
D. Bulwer, McDonald, A. King, D.
Day, W. Troup, V. Bolton, Heyland,
F. Drake, E. Brown, N. Dupont
Lawson, 13. Irving, G. Irving, Newling, Monteith, Mrs, Rcbbeck, Mrs.
Roberts, Mrs. Hickey, Mrs. Newling,
Mrs, Moresby, Mrs. Courtney, Mrs.
J. Harvey; and the Messrs. Cayzer,
Bostock, LeSueur, A. W. Harvey,
Wallace, W. Fisher, J. Gaudin, 11.
Fisher, Wilby, Fraser, Holmes, Eberts, Gillespie, C. Brown, W. Brown,
Newcombe, Bridgman, McKay, Mason, Harvey, Troup, J. Lawson, C.
Berkley, T. Futcher, Nash, McDoU-
gal, Gore, Bishop, J. Heyland, Owen,
C. Vernon, Boycr, S. Powell, Jeph-
son, Bromley, Talbot, F. Pemberton,
13. Wilinot, Holland, Prior, Barton,
J. B. Bell, Morgan, Dr. Wilmot.
groom, and a pearl necklace, thc gift
of his father. Mr. Hugh Cornwall
acted as best man.
Mrs. Tatlow was becomingly gowned in mauve, with lace trimmings.
After the ceremony an informal reception was held at her father's residence.   The honeymoon is to be spent
touring some of the Eastern cities of
Canada and the United States, after
which they will make their home in
Ashcroft.
In addition to payment of interest
on debentures, the sum of $93,809.25
has been credited to the shareholders
of the British Columbia Permanent
Loan and Savings Company, on their
stock, as earnings for the past year.
A large part of this amount was paid
out on dividend day, January 15. The
company has a ten-year record of
meeting all payments of dividends,
withdrawals and maturities on stock,
promptly when due. Each month,
the company is paying out a considerable sum on stock maturities, and all
maturities are taking place within the
time estimated when the stock was
sold. The company has now assets
of over $2,000,000, including a reserve
fund of $200,000. and continues to
make steady and substantial progress
Its stocks and debentures furnish investors with an exceptionally favorable system of investing money,
which returns guaranteed dividends,
ranging from 5 to 7 per cent, per annum, according to the class ol" stock
selected.
Although thc hoys from the High
School were successful in defeating
their opponents the girls were not
SO lucky the best they could do being
to make a draw without cither side
scoring. This is very creditable, especially when it is known that the locals
wcre taken unawares and did not expect to play the game for another
couple of weeks. The locals havc thc
makings of a first class combination
and with a little coaching should bc
able to give their Vancouver friends
and interesting session.   In the game
on Saturday the locals had by far
the best of the game but failed at
critical moments, in fact they managed to score one but it was given
off side and was not allowed. The
forwards played extremely well until
they got the ball into the shooting
circle and then they stopped and allowed their opponents to clear. These
defects can, however, be easily remedied and it is hoped that when the
locals visit to Vancouver they will
not only have their full team, but will
in the meantime put in considerable
practice. In this connection it is
hoped that the parents of the girls
will see their way clear to allow them
to make the trip. They will be accompanied by at least one of the
teachers who will see that they are
well looked after.
The Rugby players from the local
High School also demonstrated their
superiority over the Vancouver High
School by defeating them by four
points in a game where no score was
made until a few minutes before
time. Although the locals won it is
to the credit of the visitors that they
enjoyed as much of the play as the
locals and it was the good judgment
on thc part of A. Mclnnis who scored a pretty drop goal. Thc game was
fast and exciting and thc spectators
were treated to an hour of interesting play. The locals were much faster than their opponents, but they
lacked the knowledge that the visitors
had of thc fine points. On several
occasions the visiting three-quarters
got away for what looked like sure
goals but were pulled down by the
local back division. It was a pleasing feature to sec the forwards on
both sides always on the ball, no
time being given to make any sensational plays. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not Involve religious controversy.
Communications will be inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
Writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fldes. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
The Constitutional Question.
Victoria, B.C., Jan. 30, 1908.
To the Editor of The Week.
Sir,—Enclosed I send you copy of
report of the Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved
by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 29th day of November, 1882. It has a material bearing on the constitutional questions
now being discussed in our Local
Legislature, and I therefore request
you to publish same.
S. PERRY MILLS.
Copy of a Report of the Committee
of the Honourable the Privy Council,, Approved by His Excellency
tjhe Governor in Council on the 29th
November, 1882.
The Committee in Council deem it
their duty to call the attention of
your Excellency to the fact that in
several Provinces bills passed by the
legislature have been reserved for the
Governor-General's assent by their
Lieutenant-Governors, on the advice
of their ministers.
This practice is at variance with
those principles of constitutional government which obtain in England, and
should be carried out in Canada and
its provinces.
As the relation between the Governor-General and his responsible advisers,, as well as his position as an
imperial officer, are similar to the relations of a Lieutenant-Governor with
his ministers and his position as a
Ddiriinion officer, it is only necessary
to define the duties and responsibilities of the former in order to ascertain those of a Lieutenant-Governor.
Ndw, it is clear that since the concession of responsible government to the
colonics, the advisers of the Governor-General hold the same positibn
with regard to him, as the imperial
ministry doe's with.respect to Her Majesty. They have the same powers
and' duties and.responsibilities. They
ought not to have, and of right they
have not, any greater authority with
respect to the legislation of the Canadian Parliament, than the Queen's
ministers have over the legislative action of the Imperial Legislature.
Now, in England the ministry of the
day must of necessity have the confidence of the majority of the popular
branch of the legislature, and therefore they generally control, or rather
direct, current legislation.
Should, however, any bill be passed
notwithstanding their opposition or
adverse opinion, they cannot advise
its rejection by the Sovereign.
The power of veto by the Crown is
now admitted to be obsolete and practically non-existent. The expression,
"Le Roi ou la Reine s'avisera," has
not been heard in the British Parliament since 1707, in the reign of Queen
Anne, and will in all probability never
be heard again. The ministers in such
a case, if they decline to accept the
responsibility of submitting the bill
for the royal assent, must resign and
leave to others the duty of doing so.
If, notwithstanding their adverse
opinion, they do not think the measure such as to call for their resignation, they must submit to the will of
Parliament and advise the Sovereign
to give the royal assent to it.
Under the same circumstances, your
Excellency's advisers must pursue the
same course.
The right of reserving bills for
the royal assent, conferred by the
British North America Act, was not
given for the purpose of increasing
the power of the Canadian ministers,
or enabling them to evade the constitutional duty above referred to.
This power was given to the Governor-General as an imperial officer, and
for the protection of imperial interests. It arises from our position as
a dependency of the Empire, and to
prevent legislation which in the opinion of the Imperial Government is opposed to the welfare of the Empire
or its policy.
For the exercise of this power the
Governor-General, with or without
instructions from Her Majesty's Government, is responsible only to the
British Government and Parliament,
and should the Canadian Government
or Parliament deem at any time that
the power has been exercised oppressively, improperly, or without due regard to the interest of the Dominion,
their only course is to appeal to the
Crown and eventually to the British
Parliament for redress.
As has already been stated, the
same principles and reasons apply,
mutatis mutandis, to the provincial
governments and legislatures.
The Lieutenant-Governor is not
warranted in reserving any measure
for the assent of the Governor-General on the advice of his ministers.
He should do so in his capacity of a
Dominion officer only, and on instructions from the Governor-General. It
is only in a case of extreme necessity
that a Lieutenant-Governor should,
without such instructions, exercise his
discretion as a Dominion officer in reserving a bill. In fact, with facility
of communication between the Dominion and provincial governments,
such a necessity can seldom if ever
arise.
If this minute be concurred in by
your Excellency, the Committee recommend that it be transmitted to the
Lieutenant-Governors of the several
provinces of the Dominion for their
instruction and guidance.
JOHN J. McGEE,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
At page T] of book entitled, "Dominion and Provincial Legislation."
QUEEN     CHARLOTTE     MINES
Lucky Victorians—Coperhead Mining
Company Formed.
"The Old Shaft Mine," situate at
Coper Bay, Queen Charlotte Islands,
has proved itself to be the only prehistoric mine or lost mine, that has
come to the surface as an actual mine
of value.
A syndicate of Victoria gentlemen
last June secured an option on this
property, and from the evidences of
ore on the surface, running out into
the sea, they have decided to undertake the development of this property
and the unwatering of an old shaft
which yas at that time bulkheaded in
and covered over with a dense foliage, trees having grown on the old
dump to a size of at least two feet in
diameter. The old bunkhouscs were
rotted away to a mere outline, with
ther fifty feet, and at this point there
was an entire new set of windlasses.
The old lumber sprags were still in a
good state of preservation, and some
old shovels and buckets that were
found in the drifts were also in a
fairly good state, with the exception
that the iron had practically rusted
away.
At this point evidences of ore were
found along on the timbers and in
the bottom of the buckets, from which
assays were taken, showing ari average of six per cent, in copper, and
small amounts in gold and silver.
The syndicate then decided, upon
the report of their superintendent, A.
A. McPhail, to secure the proper appliances for the unwatering of the
shaft to the bottom. They secured a
Cameron pump and further necessary
machinery, which was immediately
forwarded to the old shaft.
Upon Mr. McPhail's return here today, he reports to the syndicate, which
Not Discharged.
An old antebellum negro in a small
Southern town was arrested and
brought before the village magistrate
for drunkenness. He asked for a lawyer who had helped him out of scrape
before, and the magistrate sent for
the attorney.
The yourtg man came into the little
office, where the usual crowd* of spectators liad gathered, and asked for the
old negro, "Well, William, what are
you charged with this time?"
Sadly the ancient darky replied,
"Boss, I's charged with whisky!"
Pumping Out Old Shaft.
No Relief.
"Does she lose her temper often?"
"Yes, but she  gets  it right back
again."
Would Render Last Aid.
Miffkins—What would you do if I
were to call you a liar?
Biffkins—I'd mention your indiscretion to the coroner at the inquest.
the excepti'on of a pile of stone and
brick, which designated the old fireplaces.
The evidences from the old dump
went to show positively that some
valuable ore had been taken from* this
Old shaft, and traces ' of this wcre
found on the beach, showing positively that it had been shipped to
some foreign port.
The Indians said that the shaft was
only forty-three feet deep. However,
when the bulkhead of some eight or
ten   feet  was   cleaned   away it was
has now been formed into what is
known as The Copperhead Mining
Co.,  Limited.
The officers and directors are:
Dr. J. A. Graham, President.
'   Mr. P. R. Brown, Vice-President.
Mr. J. Kingham, Treasurer.
C. W. Blackstock, Secretary.
Directors—W. B. Ryan, E. F. Lang.
Solicitors—McPhillips    &   Heisterman.
Bankers—The Merchants  Bank   of
Canada. .
two  parallel  ledges  which  run  east j
and west some thirty feet apart, the
old shaft being in the middle of these
two ledges.
This apparently is the only lost
mine that has come to life a full-
fledged copper mine so far in the
Province of British Columbia.
In addition to the two east and
west ledges of ore, Mr. McPhail has
discovered that there is another seam
northeast by southwest, having an*
average width of thirty feet, anu'
showing thd same character of ore on
the surface as occurs at the old
shaft. A drift from the bottom of the
old shaft about a hundred fet to the
west, should run into this body
of ore, and it is the intention of the
company tdv immediately begin this
work as soon as short drifts have
been made north a'nd south to cut the
other ledge^*, as, shown on the surface. :  ;*   j  [
To the Coperhead Mining Company,
Limited!. Victoria* B. C.
Dear Sir&-—As per your request, I
will give ri$ imptessions of the showings of the'Copperhead Mining Company, at Copper Biiy, Moresby Island. '?; ■';.' I
At the time of'disfcovery, there were
two veins showing on the surface,
One about, itwo feet wide giving 14J4
per cent, of copper and about two dollars in gold and silver; the other four'
feet wide that gave me 8 per cent,
copper and, as the other, about two'
dollars gold and silver.
The old shaft, about fifty feet above,
was then ah unknown quantity, and I
must congratulate the company upon
the energy . and, persistency with
which, they have cleaned it out and*
must congratulate them on the showing at the bottom.
But'-'I predict) as good or better a
showing when you * cross-cut at the
bottom, for J do not believe that the
shaft has touched either one of the;
veins that are exposed on the surface',
but instead was sunk between thetn.
This I judge from the fact that the
stratification in this section is prac-,
tically vertical, and the course of these
veins, I believe, would carry them on
either'side o{ the shaft and but. a
short 'distance away.
So I think that a small amount of
cross-cutting either way will expose
other bodies of good ore. You have
found a body of ore in place 150 feet '
below the level of the ocean. ThivS
takes away all danger of its being a
slide o'f'rji surface enrichment, and I
believe that these Veins will stay to
as great a depth, as mining can be
done profitably.       . ■
Yours: truly, ' ■'■' <
<■  ... E, S. TOPPING. -  I
A Card of Warning.
"Did Mr. Borem ever call upon
you?" asked Miss Knox.
"Yes, he called last evening," said
Miss Wise. "I was quite delighted
when the girl brought up his card."
"Delighted?"
"Yes; you see if she hadn't
brought up his card I might have
gone down to him, thinking he was
some one else."
Him—I consulted a fortune teller
today and she told me that I was in
love with a pretty girl, but she would
never marry. It looks like I am up
against it.
She—Oh, not necessarily. No fortune teller is authorized to speak for
me.
Borrowed Greatness.
In strolling through the garden,
while waiting for his hostess to appear, a newly arrived visitor came upon Bob, who was building a fort of
the gravel of the walk.
"And who are you, little man?"
asked the visitor.
"I'm baby's brother," said Bob
proudly.
Ore on Dump at Sea Level.
A Connecticut man has just arrived
home from the civil war which ended
42 years ago. He makes the plausible
excuse that he stayed over in Philadelphia and took a nap.
found by sounding with a line that it
was at least 100 feet deep. To the
surprise of those at work, when
reaching the 100-foot level, it was
found that there was a further fifty
feet in depth. Unwatering was continued down to the 150-foot level by
hand windlass, when it was again discovered that there was at least a fur-
That after bailing out the shaft to
the bottom he finds four feet of fine
ore in thc bottom of the shaft. This
ore was encountered at the 175-foot
level, and has continued down, widening until at the bottom of the shaft
it is fully four feet in width.
It has now   been   decided   by   the
company to immediately cross-cut the
It js not often, that a complete cast |
for a large theatrical production is
carried over from one season to another,? but such has been the case
with "Happyland," in which De
Wolf Hopper appears at the Victoria
Theatre next Monday. When the J
piece was given its New York pro- 1
duction, the Shuberts, who produced
it, were so satisfied with the cast
with which Mr. Hopper was surrounded, that most of the members
were signed for the persent tour. The
scenery and stage settings will also
be seen here just as they were in
New York, so Victoria theatre-goers
will see a metropolitan production in
every sense of the word.
The coming of a DeKoven opera
is always an event eagerly anticipated by theatre-goers, and there is
every assurance that Mr. Hopper and
his large company will be greeted by
an audience that will tax the capacity
of the opera house. The music of
"Happyland" is in Mr. DeKoven's
happiest vein, and with a star of Mr.,
Hopper's ability in the leading role
the enjoyment of the evening should
be complete. The book for the opera
has been written by Frederic Ranken ,
who has given Mr. Hopper one of the ]
funniest parts imaginable.
Her Most Charming Age.
The   Widower—Thirty-five  is   th(|J
most charming age in woman.
The Bachelor—You're right. It's |
hard to get away from a woman 01
that age. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i, 1908.
An Inconsistent Dad.
"Remember, my boy, there's plenty
I of room at the top."
"In that case, dad, why insist on
J my beginning at the bottom, where
it's so fearfully   crowded?"—Kansas
City Journal.
In the Church.
"Of course," said Tees at Miss Yer-
' ner's wedding to Mr.   Timmid, "the
bride looks  lovely,  as Brides always
V
' "Yes," replied Jess, "but the bridegroom doesn't. He appears rather run
down."
"Run down!   Oh, yes; caught after
a long chase."—Philadelphia Press.
Rebuked.
Young College Woman (interested
in politics)—The office should seek
the' mafl. '
Grandma (rather deaf)—I know
that's what girls think nowadays. But
iri my'time it was considered very unladylike.—Puck.   . ;
VICTORIA LAND DISTBICT. *
District of Rupert. '?,'■'
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands: ,' ,'■
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest  corner  of  Lot  192,   at   the
I Narrows, Quatsino  Sound,  thence   east
I about 35 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve;  thence west to the   shore   of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
I to point of commencement;  640 aores,
[more or less.
I Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
| NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
land Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., tlm-
Iber dealers, Intend to apply for the
I right to purchase the following de-
I scribed lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
I Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
Ion the east side of the bay, about one-
1 third of a mile from the point at the
I mouth of the bay, being the southwest
■ corner post; thence east 20 chains;
Ithence north 20 chains; thence west 20
■chains to beach; thence south along
Ibeach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
|Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
fii
£>M
NOTICE  TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Piles.
• ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at the
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of the Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be ire-
quired, varying ln length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, in
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
to enter. Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail' to complete the work
contracted for, The cheques or certificates Of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them, upon the. execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed in the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 80 Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT?
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Wash., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands: .   j
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east'80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907.
VICTORIA  LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE,  that I, Frank Kelly,
■of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, intend
|to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
Southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
Ito point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 190'7.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
Bf Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north, 160 chains;
|thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 040 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 1619G, Section
Ji, Township 33; thenee west 40 chains;
Ithence north, 160 chains; thence east 40
Ichains; thence south 160 chains to point
of  commencement,  and  containing   640
aeres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
ToWrishlp 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
phalns; thence south 160 chains to point
Of commencement, and containing 640
acres,* more or less.
Dated Dee. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner'of T. L; 16186, Soction
Township 33; thenee west 40 chains;
[thence north 160 ohains; thence east. 40
(ehains; thence south 160 chains to poin't
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
|4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
Ithence north 16;0 chains; thence east 40
■ehains; thence stiuth 160 fth'alns trt point
lof commencement, and containing 640
lacres, more or less.
Dated Doc. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
■ northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
13, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
Ithence north 1G0 chains; thence east 40
Ichains; thence south 100 chains to point
lof commencement, and containing 640
lacres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
■northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
J, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
Ithence north 160 chains; thenco east 40
pains; thence south 160 chains to point
bf  commencement,  and  containing  640
■teres, more or less.
Dated Dec.  17,  1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
liorthwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
■hence north 160 chains; thence west 40
Ihalns; thence south 160 chains to point
If commencement, and containing 640
lores, more or loss.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
lortheast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
I, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
Ihence north 160 chains; thence east 40
Ihalns; thence south 160 chains to point
If commencement, and containing 640
lores, more or less.
Dated Dee. 17, 1807.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
lorthwest oorner of T. L. 16195, Section
Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
hence north 160 chains; thence west 40
Ihalns; thence south 160 chains to point
If commencement, and containing 640
Icres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
I'an 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north SO chains
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER     LAND     DISTRICT.
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten: chains south of the southeast corner of D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south* 160 chains; tiience west 40 chains
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z. CHANDLER.
VICTORIA   LAND  DISTRICT.   ,
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE tiiat James Hastio: of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and Janies
McLauchlah, of.* Victoria, B.C., Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, ou a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner*post;, thence north
80 chains;'thence wejk SO chains; thenco
south 80 chains; thWeoaSt 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June  11,  1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11..., James H. McLauchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James 11.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, Intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the went of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains: thence
east 80 chains; thence, north 80 cliains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan.
WEEK 27th JANUAKY.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN A CONSIDINE,    Proprietors.
Management ot NOST. JAMIESON.
THE MUSICAL HAWAIIANS
High-class Singers and Instrumentalists—Five People—Serenading
Scene in Honolulu — Native
Dance and Songs of Hawaii.
JAMES R, WAITTE & CO.
Nautical  Tabloid  Comedy-Drama,
"At Lighthouse Point."
Edw. Ethel
ARMSTRONG AND DAVIS
Musical    Comedy    Sketch,    "The
Amateur   Chauffeur."
MEUNOTEE-LANOLE. DUO
Tight-Wire Artists.
LAURETTA BOYD
Singing Comedienne.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Down in the Old Cherry Orchard"
NEW MOVING PICTURES
'"The Pirates."
"The Enchanted Pond."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
Selections from "La Modiste," by
Victor Herbert.'
EQUIP YOURSELF
WITH A THOROUGH
BUSINESS COURSE
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Night Classes. You can
enter school any time. Individual
instruction. A diploma from this
school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best firms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THE  SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.C.
E. A. MacMlllan.
LADIES       SWEDISH       GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TREATMENT
UR.     BJORNPELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
Illf   Richardson
Cigar Store.     «««'>■"*• u"u"
Phone 345
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Vietoria, B. O, Merchant, and James
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement. i
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailali Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that 1, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate N'o. B173S0, intend
60 days from thc date hereof, ot apply
lo the Mining Recorder for* a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON  & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
JTHE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.'..
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
V ictoria Agents for the Nanaimo .Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke  at
current rates.   Anthracite eoal Ar sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard   or   conservatory.     Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C.
P
Al EIVTS  and Trade Marks
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Your Baggage Check* at thc
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.       A. E, KENT, Proprietor
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of cemmencement, containing 160
acres,
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.   ,
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. O.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. AH orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.   \
PHONE 191,
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M. J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster  Road, Vancouver
ln^t^^^V^t^^^ltU
-Vtr-iA
All Hands
Busy
AT
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
OPENING    UP    LARGE
SHIPMENTS    OF    NEW
SPRING GOODS.
We want you to see the
new SUITS with the long,
wide, soft roll lapels.
COATS cut a trifle shorter and semi-form fitting.
TROUSERS in handsome
stripes, checks and mixtures, in grays, and new
shades in olives and browns.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform
Wardrobe
1201   GOVERNMENT  ST.,
Victoria, B. C.
1
*
1
■
\j»r*VUf' #*At*_**j*&#**0**h%)
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
15 minutes' walk from Post OITice,
and one block from car line, Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in the
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly, Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   •   VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY i, 1908,
The weather, has,been,so fine this
week that I have been tempted to
stroll outside my usual beat and have
spent two afternoons in the country.
It is not my intention to devote a
"column to a description of the charms
of the country around Victoria in
winter time, although that would be
a very worthy theme, and one about'
which far too little has been said;
but something occurred which is so
appropriate an illustration of a subject dealt with by my esteemed colleague, Bohemian, a few months ago,
that I make no excuse for relating
the incident.
In one of the suburbs of Victoria,
not more than two miles as the crow
' flies, from the centre of the city, last
year there was a great boom in land;
several of the best residences changed
hands, and many lots were purchased
for building purposes.
An English gentleman and his wife,
of good family, purchased a lot and
built a beautiful bungalow; the garden was laid out, and when I last
saw it, four months ago, was a perfect picture. Now the place is deserted, and a- large real estate agent's
placard displays the legend, "For
Sale or To Let."
I happen to know another English
gentleman who occupies a nearby
property, so curiosity led me to pay
him a call and ask what had become
of his neighbours. He said that after
occupying their house six months
they had left in disgust and had
bought a house in Vancouver, because
they had found it impossible to acquire even a small circle of friends in
Victoria. He further said that he was
very much in doubt as to his own
movements; that he had bought land
with the intention of building a residence, and bringing his father and
mother from England to spend their
declining years, but his own experience along the same lines as his
neighbour had been so unsatisfactory,
that he was very much divided in his
opinion as to the wisdom of such a
course. He had just returned from a
flying trip to the Old Country, having made the journey in six weeks,
but he was still in doubt as to his
movements.
He went on to say that he lived
in Vancouver a year before coming to
Victoria, and found no difficulty in
making all the acquaintances he desired in his own social set.
I am not going to express any opinion myself, ,J.eing nothing but an inconsequent Lounger, but I have given
a true recital of the facts, and am
strongly inclined to believe that they
go a long way to explain why the
population of Vancouver has doubled
during the present decade, and why
there are not more people, all told,
in Victoria than there wcre fifty years
ago. I am devoutly thankful that 1
am a hobbyist and can always fall
back on my own resources for entertainment. I could almost find it in
my heart to parody Wolsey's pathetic
reflection: "Ah! how wretched is that
poor man who hangs on society's
favours (in Victoria)."
At last Government Street is being
paved. I am so delighted that I am
almost afraid of saying a word, lest
the evil sprite should wave his malevolent wand and restore the puddles
and holes, but it is not forbidden to
repeat what I heard from the lips of
two well-known civil engineers who
have had long experience in the Old
Country, and who were standing by
watching the laying of blocks on
Wednesday afternoon. They wcre
greatly amused at the foundation of
sand, and remarked that iu a few
months thc new pavement would
show undulations and hollows, because thc sand was being strewn on
an uneven substratum of concrete.
They claim that when thc old blocks
and loose material had been scraped
away, cement should have beeu used
to bring the foundation up to a true
curve, and a very light sprinkling of
sand should be placed thereon before
the blocks were laid.
Anyone with an eye can see that
the concrete is irregular, which means,
that the pavement will soon conform
to its variations. I also heard a. ire-
mark from the same gentlemen that
the blocks were made of soft wood,
and that they would fray after a few
months' wear. After waiting so long,
there is no excuse for defective wpfkr
manship or inferior material, and I
can only hope that the gentlemen in
question were mistaken in their ideas.
This is not an advertisement, but
I think I am justified in using these
columns to make known the fact that
a friend of mine has been looking out
for more than six months for a thorough-bred dog. He doesn't care what
breed, except that he draws the line
at lapdogs and poodles; I think also,
although he did not say it, that his
domestic arrangements would bar out
anything as huge as a St. Bernard or
a boarhound, but if any reader of
The Week can tell me where to find
a thorough-bred Airedale, bulldog,
Scotch or Irish terrier—young,
healthy, and at a moderate price—I
can guarantee a cash customer, and at
the same time put an end to the worries of my friend, who drives me
crazy with his eternal enquiries.
An old gentleman, resident in Victoria for nearly fifty years, stopped
me the other day on James Bay
causeway, and drew my attention to
the fact that volumes of black smoke
were isuing from the chimney of the
Empress Hotel power-house, and also
from the funnels of the Chippewa and
another steamer lying at the inner
wharf. I was the more surprised, for
the following reasons: The C. P. R.,
as is well known, own a coal mine
at Bankhead, near Banff; they advertise their coal as Anthracite, and if
their claim is well founded, it should
be practically smokeless. Why do
they not use this fuel as their own
hotel, rather than burn a bitumnious
coal, yielding so much black smoke?
With reference to the Chippewa, I
understand that the fuel used is crude
oil, and there is a well-known appliance which perfectly consumes the
carbon produced by firing with oil. I
am satisfied that if this smoke nuisance continues, steps will have to bc
taken to suppress it; it is quite unnecessary and easily avoidable.
The new City Council has been
very busy this week, and has certainly
laid out for itself a very etxensive programme, but there is one matter of
urgent importance which has not even
been mentioned. I, refer to the disposition of garbage. Until the incinerator is actually in operation, special
steps should be taken to dispose of
the garbage in the manner least offensive and least injurious to the public.
Alderman Meston ask»d that the
press be less censorious of the doings
of the Council. It rests with the
members of the Council to achieve
this by removing all legitimate causes
of complaint, and of these the garbage is the most obvious and the most
urgent.
I want to relate my own experience in connection with a matter well
worthy of consideration by the local
authorities and by all employees of
labour. On Wednesday morning a
candidate for the vacant school trusteeship wanted messengers to deliver
leaflets. He bethought himself of the
opportunity of putting a few dollars
in the pockets of the unemployed, and
went out on Government Street, and
inside of ten minutes picked up eight
young fellows between the ages of 23
and 28, who were watching the paviors
at work, and were absolutely penniless. They were all strong, healthy,
and willing to work, and of the eight
only one showed signs of being addicted to drink. They wcre all from
the Old Country, they wcre polite, and
extremely grateful, even for a little
job which netted them only a few dollars each. The work was done quickly and satisfactorily, and I could not
help reflecting that it was a reproach
to Canada that such men should have
to stand idle in our streets, without
enough even to buy a meal or pay
for a night's lodging, while in this fair
city of Victoria more than 3,000 men
of alien races are able to live in comfort.
This is an object lesson in the ques-1
tion which is ■ occupying so* much
space in men's thoughts just now, and
it is only when the true inwardness
of the question: is brought home to us
in such a pointed manner that we are
able'to.realize that there is a screw-
loose some\tyhere, and that such a condition of things ought not to be possible iii "a new country which ■needs
ten of thousands of white men for de-
velopmfent.-purpqses,     *.,•;.••, :.?   .*?
Ofri
°~k*L£Z*.
Desperate Cases.
She — Drowning    men    catch    at
straws.
He (absently)—So do thirsty men.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
518 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Think how little you really know
about thc water you are drinking. It
may not be the "pure element." Consider the statements of scientists
who declare that if we drink cold
water we swallow an aquarium; if we
drink hot water we imbibe a graveyard.
Think of
"WHITE ROCK
»
The World-famous Natural Mineral
Water.
Not  only  fresh,   sparkling,  and   delightful to the taste, but certified by
all leading analysts as being "absolutely pure."
For your health's sake, drink "White
Rock" all the time, either alone, or as
a dilutant for milk, ine, whiskey, etc.
If your dealer cannot supply you for
home use, kindly telephone
PITHER     &    LEISER
Wholesale Distributors.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north*ost corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and ln a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thenee east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 ehains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres,  more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan.  18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Poroher Island, thenco north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Victoria, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod. one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west SO chains: thenee
north 20 e>inlns; thence east 80 chains
to pnlnt of commencement and containing  160 acres,  more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
QYSTER-OLOGY ?; t
... ■■ _'■ "WhyJ. if you only took a,score of Oysters every day, sire,
'yOu'd eat*a.; hyponecerous in a "month.   Bless you, sir, they works'
miracles, they does.    Look at-lold Dick Skedge.'  Why,'he'd both
feet in tli'e\grave, and was saVin'  his  prayers ifor the  last time
wfyen theMpctor shouts, "Givf..'im, Oysters; fill 'im chock full on
'em," and they did.   Then he'began to reprove, an' by the time*
he'd 'ad five score he climbed out *,of. the grave anvi'.thrashedv'.a'
fellow as 'ad arranged to marry his widow that was to be.   Why,.!
you'll live to be a centipede if**yoii:g;o/o'ri fiatin' Oysters"■■' .'?''?•■
Fresh Olympia Oysters, y2- pint jar  25c    B
Fresh Olympia Oysters, pint 50c   **s
Fresh Eastern Oysters, quar t tin    85c
Bluepoints, i-lb. tin 5c
Bluepoints, 2-lb. tin  65c
St. James Oysters, i-lb. tin ,25c
St. James Oysters, 2-lb. tin 50c
Cherry Stone Oysters, i-lb. tin for  30c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS, 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
00000000000000000000000000 ooooooooooooooooooooooooot
The
Poodle
Dog
Grill
Yates Street
Victoria, B. C, is
The only real
Grill in British
Columbia—the
only plaoe
where you can
actually obtain
your choice of
meats and all
the delicacies of
te season.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
When You Know
Where To Go
for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only the most thoroughly
trained union operators. We use
only the best materials and
charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
A HOT TIME
In your new parlor, if you
select one of our new, strictly up-to-date
GAS RADIATOR
These excellent Heaters burn
but little Gas yet throw out
an enormous heat, making
gas a much more economical
fuel than wood or coal, beside being safer and more
hygeinic. Call in and let us
explain their merits.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANV, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

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