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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Dec 19, 1908

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GIFTS of
Shaving Sets        Manicure Sets
Perfumes Chocolates
Military Brushes
Ebony Mirrors
Ebony Brushes
AT   TERRY'S
DRUG   STORE
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_
Christmas Number
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vaacoaver B. 6.
HALL & WALKER
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
l£121Government St. Telephone 83
U&jum.Q a a 8a g b »»8 i 19xu__
Vol. V.   No
J__
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908
Onk DOU.A* Pxk Annum
Earely  lias  there  been   a
The Mayoralty. more general concensus of
opinion in favour of the
Mayoralty candidate than exists at
the present time in the city of Victoria. It is not a little singular that
men of all parties are united in support of
Dr. Hall, and that the press is a unit in
the same direction. The reasons for this
are not far to seek. While Dr. Hall may
not be a brilliant man and while Victoria's
Chief Magistrate has on many occasions
been notably more conspicuous for ability
and influence, it still remains that the present incumbent of the office has more than
made a good average, and that under his
regime a large amount of progressive
work has been done, without that bickering
which made the previous year a misery to
everyone who took an interest in Civic
affairs. Dr. Hall has shown himself a
-broadminded man and has not attempted
to monopolise all the virtues. He laid no
claim to the attribute of omniscience, but
was willing to take counsel of his colleagues and to listen to any reasonable
request emanating from the ratepayers.
He has vigorously carried on the general
improvement works under way, street paving, cement sidewalks, boulevarding, and
the installation of water pipes for the salt
water system, and for a larger supply from
Elk Lake being the most conspicuous
features. Not the least satisfactory circumstance in connection with the Mayoralty of the past year ia that the confidence
of the ratepayers in the Council has been
restored, and in consequence there has been
no difficulty in raising the funds applied
for under various By-laws for important
public works. Outside this progressive
policy it must be admitted by all impartial
observers that the city has never been so
well governed, so law-abiding 'or so orderly. Indeed at the present moment Victoria is undoubtedly the safest and the
most orderly city in the West,. Mayor
Hall has shown- himself to be in sympathy
with all movements for promoting genuine
reform whilst opposed to freak notions, and
senseless harrassing of people, who are doing their best to live up to the requirements of the law. A reference to the
records of the last forty years shows that
the average term of office for the Mayor
has been two years, and this circumstance
may fairly be regarded as establishing an
honourable precedent which should not be
departed from except for special reasons.
There seem to be no such reasons applicable to Dr. Hall and there is little doubt
that in the interests of continued good
government and the peaceful administration of Civic affairs he will be sustained
in the Mayoral chair, by the. almost unanimous verdict of the ratepayers.
Toronto Saturday Night,
The Immoral which is a pioneer in all en-
Saw-Off. lightened movements, waxes
very wrath in last Saturday's issue on the subject of "The Immoral Saw-Off." It points out that the
present system of lodging and withdrawing
j electoral protests is nothing more nor less
than a bunco game; that protests are
lodged not with a "bona fide" intention
of prosecuting an enquiry to the end but
I for the sole purpose of furnishing one's
own party with the means of forcing the
other party to abandon what may or may
not be a legitimate protest. The whole
thing is a game in which there is no concern for the public interest, no respect for
purity of election, no desire to vindicate
the majesty of the law, or to bring wrong-;
doers to the bar of justice. The article
points out that the more gross the offences
of a protested candidate the more certain
is it that the protest will' be withdrawn,
because it is so much better worth while
arranging a-saw-off with the opposition;
while if any protested candidate does reach
the stage of trial it is because his offences
are so trivial that he possesses no value
as a pawn in the game and is not worth
while banking for or against. Anyone
who has been behind the scenes knows that
the charges of Saturday Night are substantially correct, and knows also that
there is not a pin to choose between the
two political parties. They are both in
the business; they are agreed upon the
various moves in the game; they play it
according to the accepted rules. The whole
thing is worked by professional leaders
who meet at stated times to "fix" matters
and it is not at all an unusual thing for a
protest to be lodged and withdrawn with-
situation in the language which is commonly applied to it on the street. Whoever may be responsible the public are the
sufferers, and in a Province which has
such splendid legal traditions and which
has always been held up in this regard as
an example to the other Provinces it is a
matter of special regret that the existing
condition of affairs should have been allowed to continue so long. The Week respectfully directs the attention of the
Attorney General to the following facts
which assuredly need no comment. From
September lst to December 17th inclusive
there have been seventy-five working days.
On forty of those days there has heen no
Judge available for Supreme Court work;
although the Supreme Court Act requires
that there shall be a Judge sitting continuously both in Victoria and Vancouver.
In contra-distinction to this state of
affairs in Victoria, it should be mentioned
that Vancouver has had a Judge for Cham-
Gbrietmas.
©orotbea -Mars Wood.
The gossamer has laboured all the night,
His silken thread bepearled with frozen dew,
And our old Mother-World he clothes anew
With supernatural robes of lucent white.
So Love awakes, the old year's latest-born,
To bind our spirits with his ghostly chains,
He casts around our nature's frequent stains
His seamless robe of love on Christmas morn.
out the knowledge or consent of the candidate. No strictures can be too severe
in condemnation of the Immoral Saw-off,
and it is idle to talk of clean elections or
the purification of politics until the leaders
of both parties have not only denounced
but put an end to the present system of
using the protest merely as a political
lever.
The Week does not know
The Injustice what the Attorney General's
Of Justice.       Department   thinks   about
the administration of justice in Victoria. But it does know the
opinion of the legal profession and of the
general public. As it is Christmas time,
and charity and good-will should prevail,
'.The Week refrains from, characterizing the
ber work practically every day. But this
does not cover the worst of the matter;
on many of the thirty-five days on which
a Judge was available in Victoria such
short notice of his coming was given to
the profession that important contested
matters could not be brought forward.
The majority of the thirty-five days when
a Judge has been available since the close
of the legal vacation occurred in the month
of September; since October 5th there has
been no opportunity to set cases down for
trial. The net result of this unprecedented
condition of affairs is that scores of suitors
have preferred to compromise their cases
because they were deprived of their inalienable right to submit them to the
arbitrament of a Court of Justice. Business has naturally gravitated to Vancouver
which should have come to Victoria, necessary legal work such as the probating of
Wills could not be transacted, and apart
from the personal inconvenience and loss
sustained by individuals it cannot be denied that the administration of justice has
been brought into disrepute because men
found themselves unable to invoke its aid.
If publicity in matters affecting the public
interest is of any value there will be a
speedy end to conditions which are neither
creditable to the Province nor to those who
have control of its Courts.
Give Us
A Rest.
The Colonist is to be congratulated on* its Jubilee
number which contained ra/n
immense amount of carefully compiled data and which, in spite of
minor flaws conveyed a very favourable
impression of the possibilities and pro8-
pects of Vancouver Island and Victoria
City. Most people will agree that it exploited the personal element somewhat unduly, and that it established a new pre?
cedent in publishing the names of the lady
contributors to its social department, but
that is a matter of taste. There is one
thing, however, which The Week would
most respectfully suggest to the management of a paper, which has had. so long
and honourable a career, and that is that
two months' slanging of the editor of the
Times is quite sufficient and that the pettifogging personal attacks which disfigure
its editorial columns day after day are
beneath the dignity of any reputable newspaper. The editor of the Colonist seems
to have a feud with the editor of the
Times, but that is no reason why their,
quarrels should be thrust upon the attention of the public. Let them go out into
the back yard and fight it out. If they
have not sufficient grace to do that let
them at any rate give us a rest until after
Christmas. Public opinion crystallized into
one sentence which has been much in evidence lately would be: ' I do not care for
your sentiments."
The editor of The Week
The Amende,    wishes to express his regret
to the editor of the Colonist
for a paragraph which appeared in the
Lounger's column last week. Thc paragraph in question spoke somewhat slightingly of the dramatic criticism on "The
Devil," which appeared in the columns of
the Colonist, and which Lounger attributed to a junior reporter. The Week
understands that the criticism referred to
was tlie work of the Editor.
ptW-^mmmM^^mm^^^^
ft REMEMBER  THOSE  CHRIST-    |
j| MAS  STAMPS  YOU |WERE  TO    |»
I BUY   FOR   THE   BENEFIT   OF
g
I THE    A N TI - TUBERCULOSIS
H FUND!
teis-m^aetmi^^ THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908
One Touch of Christmas Makes
the Whole World Kin
The crowded streets, the brilliantly decorated stores, the glowing Xmas Tree, the interchange of gifts and greetings and the services
in the churches are the chief features of Christmas observance. One might aver that the giving of presents is really the chief
feature, for this has become a source of great delight to kind-hearted people who love this great festival because it gives them an
an opportunity to contribute to the happiness of others—the true joy of giving. To paraphrase Shakespeare, "This one touch of
Christmas makes the whole world kin"—makes one almost clairvoyant in knowing the desire of another. Almost instinctively this
season we turn our attention to the serviceable offering.
A Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, either pf which are der
lightfully cheery and a charming addition to any residence,
will prove one of the most thoughtful and acceptable presents for either lady or man who "batches," even if only
one room forms "home." A furnace may be baulky, or
out altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous,
wood or coal fire entail labor in re-lighting; but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus;
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off. It can
be brought into service in a second without work, so
different from fire-building. It will not only give the required warmth, but will at once dispense a genial air of
hospitality. As a little heat is required almost every day
of the year in British Columbia, a Gas Radiator, or a Gas
Grate will form a most appropriate Christmas offering.
A GIFT WORTHY OF
ACCEPTANCE
For every housewife there is a "Merry Xmas" in a Gas
Range. She will revel in the possession of such a present,
appreciating the saving in time, strength and worry, the
cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of gas for cooking
purposes. Henceforth she will have no kindlings to buy,
no coal to carry in, no ashes to take out, no blinding,
choking smoke in starting wood or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no fear of fire from overheated flues, Early breakfast will have no terrors for her;
just as easy will she be able to get up a late supper for
unexpected guests. If she has a dinner to cook which
takes hours, she will set the Range right and she will find
it hours later just exactly as she left it. Nothing uncertain
about a Gas Range; it is as hot at the beginning as it
ever gets.   What could be better for a Christmas Gift?
A VISIT TO  OUR SHOWROOMS  WILL  SUGGEST  MANY   SPLENDID   IDEAS   FOR   PRACTICAL   CHRISTMAS
PRESENTS.   YOU ARE MOST   CORDIALLY   WELCOME,  WHETHER  TO  PURCHASE   OR MERELY  TO   LOOK.
The Victoria Gas Company,  Ltd.
COR. FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Sporting Comment.
The Victoria Rugby team travels to
Vancouver today to take part in the
second match to determine the championship team of B. C. for the season
of 1908-09.   The fifteen that has been
selected to represent the Capital City
is, if anything, slightly stronger than
that which defeated the Terminal City
players a couple of weeks ago and I
am looking for another win for the
Victoria boys.   Since the last match
everything possible to strengthen the
team has been done, daily drills have
been held in the J.B.A.A. and every
man is in good condition and should
be able to play for all he is worth.
The Vancouver sporting critics have
had  something to  talk about  since
Victoria handed out a surprise and
what they have been saying is to say
the least very amusing.    It will be
still a greater surprise when the wearers of the red jerseys are declared
winners  this  afternoon  and further
comment from the Vancouver press
will be awaited with interest.
In connection with the game in this
city, I have to extend my humble
apology to W. C. Moresby, manager
of the local team, for an oversight on
my part in our last issue. I had intended to refer to the part Mr. Moresby had taken in the team, but overlooked it. But I feel that this opportunity should not be allowed to
pass without congratulating "Billy"
on his efforts to give Victoria a winning team. Very few outside of the
members of the club realize to what
extent Mr. Moresby has assisted the
team. Day after day he has given his
time to the advancement of the players, not only by"running the management of the team, but by being
present at practically every practice
and giving the players the benefit of
his experience. Not only this, but
he has also gone down in his own
pocket and supplied the wherewithal
to carry on. the club. This is something that very few undertake and I
have not the least hesitancy in saying
that, had it not been for Billy Moresby there would not have been a
Rugby Football team in Victoria today, and it is to htm that the lovers
of the good old English game havc
to extend their thanks for the brilliant
showing that has already been made
by the Victoria team.
The Victoria Association team in
the P. C. L. lost a point in the race
for the championship last Saturday,
when it allowed the Seattle team to
make a  draw out  of a  game  that
should have been a win.    From the
.start it was apparent that the locals
had the best of the game and they
soon rolled up three goals, but on
starting for the second half, the majority of the local players appeared
to go to sleep and the visitors taking
advantage of the opportunity, scored
three goals.   The worst offenders in
the game were the half-back players.
Time after time they failed to support the forwards in their attempts to
get  goals  and  had  they  played  as
they should have done the score would
have been much larger.   The locals
have now lost a good opportunity to
win the league, but if the players get
together  and  play  the  game  as  it
should be played there is still a chance
to get near the top.   In connection
with these games I have at last been
forced  to refer to the work of the
Selection Committee.   I have refrained from doing so for some time past,
but after the showing that was made
by the team on Saturday I am bound
to confess that it appears to me that
partiality is being shown in the selection.    For  instance,   Beaney   has
played every game in the series, and
while he has played some good games
he has played some that are not above
criticism.    Peden   has  shown   good
form in the City League matches and
should be given a trial.   In the back
division, the Committee is overlooking the work of one of the best backs
in the city when it fails to recognise
the work of Bob White of the Victoria West team.    In the last   two
matches, Prevost has been displaced
in favour of Dunn of Esquimalt. Dunn
used to be a good man, but he is not
playing in P. C. L. form this season.
With the acquisition of Dunn, Prevost was moved to half-back.   It was
stated in the Vancouver papers that
the half-backs were the weak part of
the Victoria  team in the match in
that city a couple of weeks ago and
after the exhibition given by Prevost
last  Saturday  I  can  readily  understand this statement.   Why a regular
half-back player should be dropped in
favour of a back player is beyond my
comprehension.   I refer to Kerchen.
Kerchin was given the credit of being
the best half on the Victoria team in
Vancouver and still he was up against
the best forward on the Vancouver
eleven, but still he is dropped.   Pet
ticrew has the makings  of  a  good
man, but it would do him a lot of
good if he would eat about a quart
of  ginger  before the  match.    This
would liven him up a bit.   Time after
time on Saturday he was playing in
behind the full backs when the locals
should have been pressing their opponents.   Elton tried his best, but he
cannot be expected to play the entire
half-back game.   On the forward line
some improvements can also be made.
Buxton is a good man, while Thomas,
his partner, is very handy to play with
him, as he thoroughly understands his
play, but when it comes to shooting
on goal he is a failure.   Sedger is a
hard player   and   his aggressiveness
should   be   copied   by   the   others.
Sherritt   in   the   last  two   P. C. L.
matches in which he has taken part,
had shown plainly that he is afraid.
This alone is sufficient to cause him
to be left off the team, but in addition  he  has  absolutely  no  idea  of
how to shoot in front of the goal. On
several occasions he had good chances
on Saturday but in every instance hc
fell down.   Tait is a good man to
work, but much of his work is superfluous.   On the whole I think the Selection Committee can do much better
than has been done and it is due the
public of this city that the best team
is selected.
This afternoon two games are in
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TELEPHONES 48. 305, 404 ar 694. THE WEEK   SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908
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DO IT NOW
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VICTORIA, B. C.
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progress in the City League and both
should give good sport.
From the telegraph reports that
have been received regarding the
Longboat-Dorando race on Tuesday
night, it appears that the Indian simply ran the heart out of the Italian
from the start, and although he hung
on for some time it was only how
long would he last and he lasted better than was expected according to
reports.
The Sculling championship of the
world has passed from Webb of Aus-'
tralia to Arnst, another rower from
the land of the Southern Cross. In
this it was simply a case of youth
pitted against age in which youth
won.
Arrangements are being made for
it twenty-round bout between Merryfield of this city and young McGovern
(not the terrible Terry), to take place
within the next few weeks. Those in
charge of the affair promise a good
fight and [I they live up to their
promise any other match they might
arrange will get a big crowd.
UMPIRE.
if
MUSIC AND     I
THE STAGE J
Victoria Musical Society.
Preparations for the Hartmann-
Goodson concert on the 29th inst. are
well in hand and a rich musical treat
may be expected. Mr. Hartman has
been heard here before and needs no
recommendation.
Miss Goodson, who was born in
Watford, England, was a pupil of the
great master Leschetizky. After her
studies in Vienna she returned to
London, where four concerts in a
single season brought her conspicuously into public notice. Success following success, a tour of Belgium
and Holland was made. It was in
Brussels  that she was termed  "Un
It was Nikisch who induced Miss if their work in this particular musical
Goodson to make her first tour of extravaganza may be taken as an in-
the United States—a visit that led dication. It is the best product iim
her immediate acceptance. The im- the field of light operatic entertain*
pression made is best indicated by ment offered in recent years. The
her second American tour, which was sumptuous production is under thc
marked by an-unbroken succession of personal stage direction of Julian Mit-
triumphs—-no less than twelve im- chell, who has produced some of the
portant orchestral engagements be- greatest "record breakers" in the
ing filled in addition to an extended past decade. The company comes ih-
series of recitals. Miss Goodson's re- tact with the original New York pro-
turn for the season of 1908-9 marks duction which will be presented here
her third visit to the United States, complete in every detail.
In private life Miss Goodson is the
wife of Mr. Arthur Hinton, an English composer, whose works are widely known. ,
Male Voice Choir.
With a musical comedy above the
average and a company made up of
entertainers who have earned recognition in this particular form of theatrical pastime, the Company should
Hartmann.
Paderewski en jupons"—a Paderewski
in petticoats—a phrase that many
critics  has  since  employed.
In Berlin, where she won golden
opinions from the critical German
press, Miss Goodson appeared before
the German Emperor and Empress,
both of whom have always evinced
the greatest interest in her career. In
Paris, where she has often played at
the Lamoureux Concerts, and in re
cital  at  the  Salle  Erard, the critics
were  lavish  in  their  praise.
For five years Miss Goodson toured
Germany, Austria, Holland, Belgium,
France and Italy, paying annual visits
to England, Scotland and Ireland. She
appeared under such distinguished
conductors as Richter, at his London
Concerts; Nikisch, both in Leipsic and
Hamburg; Fritz Steinbach, in Cologne; and Henry J. Wood in London.
On Monday evening last Mr. J. M. receive the hearty support of the then-
Morgan and the Male Voice Choir tre patrons of Victoria and vicinity,
gave a splendid entertainment in the It will be well to secure seats iii ad-
Institute Hall. The choir consists of vance as "Babes in Toyland" plays
forty voices carefully trained by Mr. to "capacity" houses wherever prc-
Morgan who weilded the baton and  sentcd.
controlled  his  forces  like  a veteran  ■
campaigner.    The  crowded  audience      The big feature of an exceptionally
was simply enthusiastic in its demon- strong programme arranged for next
strations of delight and many com-  week at thc New Grand will be Mile,
pliments were paid both to the sing- Joyce Gray, who comes direct from
ers and the conductor.   Amongst the  Paris, in her own original version of
•most successful items of the eevning  the   Salome   dance.     Miss   Gray   is
wcre two songs by Miss Nyland who young, beautiful and a graceful dancer
made  a  very  favourable impression,  and has been attracting phenomenal
This young lady, of whom more will business at the houses of thc circuit
be heard in the future, is a pupil of already played.   Other big acts will-
Mr. Morgan's. be Stephen GrattanJfc Co., in a little
Babes in Toyland.                  comedietta, "LocketRput at 3 a.m.";
Discriminating   playgoers   of Vic- Earl Girdellcr, assisted by his sensa-
toria  will  be  delightfully  surprised tional   canine   quartette;    Margaret
to  know  that  the  greatest  musical Severance & Co., presenting "Now-
success on tour tllis season is to be adays"; Emerson and VanHorn, mu-
presented at the Victoria Theatre on sical sketch;  Thos. J. Price, in illus-
Monday, December 21.                         trated song and new Moving Pictures
"Babes in Toyland" possesses the and Overture.
merit of  being  particularly  rich  in 	
music and more than usually sup- The visitors in thc historical mu
plied with comedy of the brand classi- seitm gazed curiously at a small
lied nowadays as wholesome. Victor feather pillow which nestled in a glass
Herbert's music delights the ear and case.
surpasses in many respects to thc "' d0"'1 sec anything unusual about
material supplied by him in the past ,l.,a.t P'llow-".  "marked   one of thc
__• •_ •   visitors, turning to thc guide,
in   his  many  comic  opera  composi-     „..,   ' ,    .,      -,,     ..
r... 1 •    _•        _  tt   _.   .       Its  a very valuable  pillow,    re-
tions.    Thc combination of Herbert plied the guide    .,That £ Wa;hi
as composer and Glen MacDonough ton>s original headquarters.-Decem-
as librettist is proving a happy one, ber Lippincott's. THE WEEK, SATURDAY DCEMBER 19, 1908
Semi-ready Clothes
Have all the Virtues
which you want in
Fine Clothes for Men
Xmas Gifts For Men
■-■ * ■■ *" *
at the
Semi*Ready Wardrobe
DRESS SUITS, $40.00 to $25.00
TUXEDO JACKETS, $20.00 to    -. .$12.00
BUSINESS SUITS, $35.00 to  $12.00
RAINCOATS, $30.00 to  .$10.00
TROUSERS, $9.00 to .$300
FANCY KNITTED JfESTS, $7.00 to $2.00
GOLF JACKETS, $jfcb to ...     .$2.50
CHRISTY HATS J|.   5 $3-oo
HAWES HATS   .*.........       $3-50
STETSON HATS, all shapes and styles $4.50
DRESSING GOWNS, $15.00 to  $7.00
SMOKING JACKETS, $12.00 to $5.00
"SLIP-ON" RAINCOATS, $25.00 to $15.00
PIM'S IRISH POPLIN NECKWEAR, $2.00 to... .50c
DENT'S GLOVES', $3.00 to  $1.00
PRESIDENT  SUSPENDERS, in Fancy Boxes,
$2.00 to  50c
MUFFLERS, $5.00 to 75c
silk Umbrellas, $10.00 to $2.00
FINE   SILK   AND   CASHMERE   UNDERWEAR,
FINE PAJAMAS AND NIGHTROBES. .
FANCY VESTS, $7.00 to .".  ;$i.So
SUIT CASES, BAGS AND VALISES.
NECKWEAR, 500 Dozen New Styles, $1.00 to....25c
SILK AND LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS.
SOUVENIR HANDKERCHIEFS, $1.00 to 50c
_ There may be offered arguments in
rebuttal against Semi-ready: Tailoring.
"I tried it years ago," one gentleman
said.   It's different and better now. ■'
fl "Semi-ready" is as far ahead today of what it was two years ago as
is the present fine factory shoe
superior to the first wooden-pegged
shoe made in the factories.
fl Better designs, better tailoring,
better fabrics—we have grown more
expert in all the branches of the
original conception.
fl Built on a rational basis, the
welcome attitude of the public towards
this much-to-be-desired system of
making Men's Clothes has helped
to make Semi-ready what it is to-day.
Semi-ready Tailoring
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
lift Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
111   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
THE SEMI-READY DRESS SUITS—Ready in Two Hours—Because we make 100 Dress Suits where the
Custom Tailor makes one ours are made better. Semi-ready Tailors are making Dress Suits and Frock Coats
year in and year out. They are experts. Not to mention the saving of $10 or $15 we can offer you better quality,
better style and more expression.   Semi-ready Dress Suits, $25 and $30.
SEMI-READY TAILORING
B. WILLIAriS & CO.
Sole Agents for SEMI-READY TAILORING
614 Yates Street Victoria, B. C.
fl There's fine Australian wool in
the "Blunoz" Serge—the soft, long
fibrous wool' of the famous Australian 1}
lamb.
fl The "Blunoz "Serge is woven and]
made in Canada.-1 We control the*
entire output of tins famous Sergei
both in theinavy.blue andblack.  .   "■
fl It's bur pride—the best $22 worth
of suiting made in Canada.
fl In single and double breasted styles
we sell thousands of;" Blunoz " Suits in
Canada every year. On the Pacific
Coast they sell well because they
withstand the rainy season and hold
their shape, and everywhere else they
are popular because they give everlasting satisfaction.
A "Blunoz" Suit will be out
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Just $22.
Semi-ready Tailoring
Together.
By Bohemian.
I offer no apology for selecting
the most remarkable novel of the
season as thc subject of my Christmas article. However much old-
fashioncd people may decry the present fashion of discussing the most
sacred relationships of life in the
public press, it would be futile to
ignore the fact that the question of
sex relations, marriage, and divorce
are at thc moment in the full limelight of investigation and discussion.
There could be no more appropriate time than Christmas-Tide, the
season when the whole world is
aroused to a contemplation of the
Holy Mother ajid Child, for considering the question which lies at the
root of social *n)i family life. Under the Christian-dispensation it has
always been claimed that Motherhood is the most sacred filing in the
world, and the halo thrown around
it by thc doctrine of thc Incarnation
has elevated it to a position oi supreme importance in human estimation.
The experience of the last quarter
of a century, and the teaching which
is now being promulgated in some
of the foremost countries in the
world, especially in the United States,
may well lead thoughtful men to ask
whether a readjustment of their perspective has not become necessary.
Whether monogamy makes for the
good of the race, and whether thc
marriage relationship has been rightly understood and wisely regarded as
indissoluble.
It is hardly necessary to say that
many causes have tended to precipitate the discussion of these points,
chief among them the phenomenal
increase of divorce in the United
States. It has been authoritatively
stated, although I have no means of
checking the figures, that of late
years one marriage out of every
seven has resulted in separation or
divorce. If this be even approximately true it raises a question the
importance of which cannot possibly
be overestimated. One would think,
that thc reduction ad absurdum has
been reached, when a judge decrees
that a divorce could he-granted on
the plea of incompatibility of disposition, and then defines the latter
as having been demonstrated when
husband and wife co,uld not "live
happily  together."
If such a plea is to be accepted
then marriage may well be relegated
to the background and superseded
by a more modern and convenient
arrangement.
It is not necessary in this article
to consider why marriage, or at any
rate continency in marriage, has fallen into disfavour in the United
States, the reasons are well known,
but for a thorough study of the subject in the most enlightened and intelligent manner I can with every
confidence refer my readers to the
remarkable book entitled "Together"
by Robert Herrick, published in this
country by MacMillan Co.
Mr. Herrick approaches his subject like a sincere student grappling
with a serious problem; he assumes
as a starting point that marriage
means union, and the obligation to
pull together and to seek contentment and happiness in a life-long
union.
He locates his story in the United
States and introduces a very large
number and variety of characters,
practically they are all coupled, and
with   a   single   exception   all dis
gruntled. They start out with a fair
prospect aud the firm belief that
they are mated as well as married,
but in a short time begin to chafe
either at the restrictions or the insipidity of married life. Although the
people occupy different stations none
are immune from the complaint, and
in this respect the whole book may
be regarded as a satire on American
society. Most of the characters, especially the women, seek solace at
one time or another 'in the arms of
an affinity, but in only one instance
out of many does the remedy yield permanent  satisfaction.
I cannot do better than to close
this brief review by allowing the
author to express in a few words his
own-views as expounded; by his most
brilliant character, Dr. Renault: "So
woman no longer the pioneer, no
longer the defender of the house, no
longer, the economist, blossoms as
what? The Spender. The man has
the money, and the woman has herself, ther body and her charm. She
traffics with man for what he will
give, and she pays with her soul. To
tliis'; state has come the honourable
, condition . Of marriage in a country
where men, and surely women, are
born free and equal. The woman
cries; come bring me money, and I
will'kiss you. Make me a name before the world and I will noise it
abroad.*Build me a house more splendid -than" other houses, set me above
my sisters, and I will reflect honour
on you among men for the clothes I
wea£. and the excellent shape of my
figure." * * * "And the poor creature Man, who fights for his Queen?
A trained energy, a vessel of careless
passion, a blind doer, dreaming great
truths and seeing little ends,—Man is
still abroad ranging his forest, his
hunting blood up, 'Playing the game.'
There are moments when his sleep is
troubled with feverish dreams in
which he hears murmurs: 'The body
is more than raiment,' and 'the soul
is more than the,body,' 'There are
other hunting-grounds, another warfare'; But roused from these idle fan-
IMM.—M.1*.*:*
Queen's Market
P. O. Box 18
Business Telephone 32
Offlce Telephone 76
IL. GOODACRE & SONS
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BUTCHERS AND
PACKERS
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Contractors by appointment to His Majesty's Royal Navy
and the Dominion Government.
P
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Corner Government: ajtid Johnson ;5t«., VICTORIA-, B. C.
W-ftVH^V«WVHVHV-HW«»WHWMV-nVMW-H'i
48KK88««K«««««1
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JtiH-HS-SHtSSa-!
Established 1865
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Oysters, Pish, Steaks
and -Shops
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Phone 690 ifif
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Levy's Restaurant
and Safe.
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1316.18 Government Street,        Victoria, B. e. B
cies he sallies forth from his cabin-
palace, or his hotel apartment, or his
steam-heated and childless flat into
the old fray, to kill his meat and bring
it home. * * * We chatter the curse
of Castle Garden, unmindful that in
the dumb animal hordes, who labor
and breed children, lies the future.
FOR   THEIRS   WILL   BE   THE
LAND, when the blond hunter of the
market and his pampered female are
swept into the dust heap."
REMEMBER THOSE CHRIST-
MAS STAMPS YOU WERE TO
BUY FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE A N TI - TUBERCULOSIS
FUNDI THE WEEK' SATURDAY DECEMBER, 19, 1908
■^■^^•^■^■^^■*^^9^*^^*?^
if Short Story  *
* J   if
ififififi?i?ifi?ififiiii&
THE BROTHERS.
By L. McLEOD GOULD.
Esau and Jacob sat on opposite
sides of the fire in the well-furnished library of the latter's house overlooking Regent's Park. Esau sat as
a man at his ease, which was odd,
because his clothes would give an observer the impression that he was
more accustomed to loafing around
the cheaper sort of public house; lying well back in his saddle back chair,
a cigar between his lips, a recently
replenished glass by his side and his
legs comfortably thrust out towards
the cheerful blaze in the old-fashioned
hearth, he looked the very picture of
a man who had lately come into his
own and meant to enjoy it.* Jacob, on
the other hand, with one arm leaning
on his knee, a cigarette nervously
poised in the fingers of his other hand
and his shifty eyes glancing first at
the fire and then furtively at the imperturbable countenance of his companion looked more like a mongrel
cur caught intruding in a prize dog's
kennel, than the rich and prosperous
owner of the house wherein he sat.
"Well, what are you going to do
about it?" queried Esau. I'm not
going to haggle any more with you.
You knowvmy terms, 10,000 down and
I leave you in peace. Failing that
I blab what I know, and though, maybe, I can't get you gaoled I can pull
down this glorified edifice that you
have built up for yourself in Society,
and have you run out of every decent
club in London.   Which is it to be?"
Jacob blinked furiously at the fire
before he made reply.
"I can't," he said. "You know I
can't. I'm a wealthy man all right
and in a month perhaps I might accede in part to your monstrous demand. But positively I can't just yet.
Times have been bad, and for me to
withdraw such a sum of money as
you name out of any of my holdings
at present would precipitate the very
crisis which I have been fighting for
months to avoid. You must see that;
surely you do, don't you?"
"No, I don't," replied the other.
"I know how it is with you financiers; you're always being tied up
for money when it is a case of 'give,'
but let a chance come along of increasing your holdings, and there's
none so quickly able to put his hand
on the boodle as your financier. Come
now, I'm sick of chaffering. This is
a good cigar, the fire is comfortable,
so is this chair, and I can recommend
your taste in Scotch, but I'll leave
them all in half-an-hour i^you don't
come down to my terms. It's half-
past eleven now; by twelve my cigar
will be finished and so will my patience. Give me my answer then, and
don't talk any more about it. I
warn you of one thing, though; if
you don't agree I'll give myself the
satisfaction of twining my fingers
round the flabby throat of yours be-,
fore I leave, and I'll let you see what
it feels like to be half-throttled. I
won't go further because you aren't
worth swinging for. Now get to
work and make up your mind.
And while the clock on the mantelpiece ticked out the remorseless minutes Esau and Jacob sat by the fire;
the former infinitely at his ease; the
latter still nervously fingering his
cigarette and racking his puny soul
as lie blinked at the flames.
*****
William and Herbert .Thornton had
both been born in a little country
town in the Midland counties. No
one had ever dared to call the elder
"Willie," whereas the whole countryside knew the other as "Bertie," and
therein lay the difference in their
characters. A great deal may be
learnt of a man by the way in which
his companions address him. The
"Willie," "Bertie" boys seldom
amount to much; there is too much
femininity about them. Mr. Thornton, senior, was a retired merchant;
scrupuously just and eminently austere;    one   who    inspired   respect;
tv.»r than affection in his children
The Royal City Gas Improvement Co.
Limited
Head Office: Blaikie Block, Columbia St., New Wesminster.
DIRECTORS:
President—L. A. Lewis, Esq New Westminster
Vice-President—C. E. Deal, Esq Vancouver
W. E. Vanstone, Esq., H. A. Eastman, Esq., J. A. Rennie, Esq.
Solicitors—Whiteside & Edmonds, New Westminster.
Bankers—Royal Bank of Canada.
Secretary—J. A. Rennie, Esq., New Westminster.
CAPITAL      -      -      $150,000
Divided into 1,500 shares of $100 each, of which 750 shares are
now offered for subscription at $100.
Terms of Payment—10 per cent, on application; 15 per cent on
allotment, and balance in instalments of 10 per cent, at intervals
of one month.
Agents for Victoria—Stewart Williams & Co., Auctioneers and
Agents, Victoria, from whom  all  particulars can be obtained.
Phone 1324.
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS,
CASH REGISTERS,
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—ask us.
mm
His wife was a weak and somewhat
silly woman who made no secret of
the fact that Bertie was her favourite
son and who took infinite pains to
sheild him from many a well-deserved
thrashing. Consequently William had
grown up totally devoid of any home
sympathy while his brother was an
excellent example of "Mamma's darling." Their father was no believer
in public-school and university education, and after a short but sound
training in the neighbouring Grammar School, both lads had been put
into business, William obtaining a
position in a large factory and Bertie
in the local bank.
It was not unnatural that William,
feeling himself out in the cold at
home, should make many friends outside the circle of his mother's visiting list; he got into a fast set and
spent his spare time drinking and
gambling, not so much from weakness of character, for he was never
weak, but from a sheer determination to live his own life for himself,
as his mother and father would not
allow him the slightest license at
home. His father never rebuked him;
to the mother's occasional reproaches
he merely said that as long as the
boy did not apply to him for aid
outside his allowance it was no business of his. "Let William make his
own bed," he would say; "he's the
one who has to lie in it."
Bertie, on the other hand, was the
model of what every mother's son
should be. He kept regular hours,
sang in the church choir and did all
the other things which the heroes of
did a great many other things, but
they were done so secretly that no
one had any idea of them. For instance, only Willis, the town bookmaker, knew that Mr. Herbert Thornton was one of his most profitable
customers. There was a girl who
served behind the tobacconist's counter and who confidently expected to
become some day Mrs. Herbert
Thornton, but she never told anyone where it was she obtained the
ex-pensive jewelry which she was in
the habit of wearing. Bertie had a
good time all right, but then as nobody knew anything about it, it didn't
matter.
"How different those two Thornton
brothers are," would say dear old
Mrs. Muttlebury, while having tea
with the vicar's wife. "There's that
Bertie who'd be a credit to any family; such.a steady young man, and
such a contrast to that wild fellow
William.    Why  do  you  know,  my
dear, I heard the other day that "
and here would follow such a recital
of poor William's evil doings as
would shame the very Prince of Mischief himself.
And so it went on. William, for all
his wildness, was steady in his work
and was advancing in the house with
which he had been placed. For a
certain length of time it is quite possible to combine the dare-devil life
with that of the strict business man;
of course the two can't live in harmony for ever. Bertie, meanwhile,
was winning laurels in the banking
business and was promoted to the
position of cashier. And it was then
that the long expected crash came.
Everyone had prophesied that William would go to the devil sooner or
later, and therefore, when it came
"sooner" everybody patted themselves on the back and said, "I told
you so."
One morning William appeared in
his father's study and bluntly asked
for an advance on his allowance.
"The fact is, father," he said, "I've
been gambling and if I don't pay up
before mid-day tomorrow I'm a disgraced man. It's a debt of honour,
you see?"
"But   I   don't   see,"    stormed    his
father.   "Debt of honour be d d.
It's a debt of 'dishonour,' that's what
it is, and I'll be no party to paying
it. As you've sown, so shall you
reap; I've never interfered in your
pleasures, but I've always let you see
that apart from the allowance I make
you, you are living on your own responsibility. Don't come to me for
help."
"But, father," pleaded the young
man, "it means that if I don't pay
I shall have to leave this part of thc
world. I can't face people if I don't
make god this debt."
"Go aud make it good, then," said
j Mr. Thornton, turning to his paper
again," or else leaye this part of the
world.   Whichever you do, it is quite
immaterial to me."
And so William left, and when it
was discovered later on that Mr.
Thornton's name had been forged on
a cheque payable to William for seven
hundred pounds, everyone, with two
exceptions, believed that William was
the guilty party, and blackguarded
him to their hearts' content.
The two exceptions were Bertie and
his mother. Bertie was cashier, and
though he swore that his brother had
cashed the cheque in person he knew
that he was lying. He himself had
happened to overhear the conversation
between William and his father, and
had seen a chance to straighten out
his own financial difficulties. He had,
therefore, forged the cheque himself
and had cashed it in the bank when
all the other clerks were out to
lunch. His mother knew, because
she had found in Bertie's bedroom a
piece of paper on which he had been
practising the names. But she refused to give up her darling.
"William is better able to bear it
than lie," she said to herself. "Bertie
could never get a living out in the
world; lie is too tenderly nurtured.
William is made of harder stuff and
will be able to make his own way."
And so this weak woman wilfully
sacrificed her first-born, and, like Rebekah of old, stole for the younger
the inheritance which should have
been his brother's. When Mr. Thornton died it was found that with the
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BAXTER ft JOHNSON, AGENTS,
809 Government Street. Phone 730. Victoria, B.C.
Ribons,   Carbons and Supplies.
o
o
u
o
o
<;
o
o THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908.
I
exception of an annuity to his wife,
the whole of his considerable estate
was left to Bertie unreservedly.
Then it was that Bertie came out
into the world. The past had been a
bitter lesson to him. Now he concentrated all his efforts on the amassing
of wealth with such success that his
name became one to conjure with on
'Change. . Together with his mother
he lived in a regal mansion in the
neighbourhood of Regent's Park. But
between them both and their happiness there lay the secret of his crime,
and though they never spoke of it
tb each other, Bertie indeed did not
know that his mother was cognisant
Of his guilt, the vision of poor wronged William was never absent from
their eyes.
: And what of William? He went
West where he did not make a fortune. Wherever men congregated for
tjie seeking of gold there William was
to be found; and always Fortune
eluded him. He filled many roles in
h]is new life. Bar-tending, faro-dealing, every business in the under-world
was tried by him in the attempt to
keep body and soul together. And
at last, almost penniless he returned
home to find the house sold and the
family gone. Then he went to London and heard of the wonderful
wealth which had come to his brother; that brother1 of whose treachery he had read in the papers, and
filled with a consuming passion for
revenge, he sought his house late one
evening, bent on a settlement.
w     w     w     w     *
Tick—tick—tick—the clock on the
mantel-piece showed the hour, and
presently the chimes rang out proclaiming to the occupants of the room
that it was midnight.
Esau threw away his cigar, yawned
and then got up. . He walked over
to Jacob, who still sat almost paralysed with fear, and roughly shook
him  by  the  shoulder.
"Time's up," he said; "what's your
answer?"
A spasm of courage seemed to
shoot through Jacob, as, looking up,
he cried: "My answer's 'No.' Take
your dirty story where you will; nobody will believe you. The shoe's
on the other foot, by God, and if
you don't clear out of this house immediately I'll have you arrested yourself, and charge you with forgery."
[With a snarl like that of a beast
E&au threw himself upon his brother,
both his lean and sinewy hands entwined themselves round Jacob's
throat, and assuredly the Supplanter
wjbuld then and there have finished
hp- earthly course, in spite of Esau's
promise of half an hour before, had
n^>i the door suddenly opened. Esau
released his brother and sprang Up
to face—Rebekah.
'Mrs. Thornton had heard angry
wprds'coming from the library, and
the note of one voice had been
strangely familiar to her. At length
inj fear she had come down just in
time to prevent her first-born strangling her younger son.
"William," she cried, "Oh William,
h<»ve you come back to forgive me?
I knew all along, William, but I was
weak and let you go with that shame
upon you. William, I the mother
that bore you, pray for forgiveness
both for him and for me."
Esau stood back with the back to
the fire and gazed in wonder at his
mother, who never to his recollection
had addressed a kind word to him.
Could this wild-looking woman with
streaming hair and disordered toilet
indeed be his mother. He pondered
deeply without answering.
"William!" Again she spoke, and
this time her voice was softer, ,but
none the less pleading. "William, do
you know what day this is? Do you
remember that on this day there was
born into the world one, whose mis
sion it was to teach the divine quality
of forgiveness. William, this is
Christmas morning. Say that you
have come to us with forgiveness in
your heart; as you hope to be saved
yourself, forgive us both; give Bertie
and me a chance to make amends.
He is rich and you shall want for
nothing, and as for me, oh, William,
give me an opportunity now, it is
not yet too late, to show how loving
a mother's  heart can be.    For the
sake of Him who was born this day,
William, be merciful."
Esau still stood silent. His shoulders heaved as with a deep emotion,
but his lips breathed no words. Jacob
sat crouched in his Chair, trembling
in every limb, for truly the. bitterness of death had been very near.
Rebekah sank down on the fender-
stool and hid her face in her hands.
Inside the room there was silence.
Then outside arose the quavering
voices of the "waits"; very feeble tltey
were, and not altogether in tune as
they sang the old, old carols which
have been sung for so many countless years, and as the sounds penetrated the room Rebekah raised her
head and with swimming eyes turned
once again to Esau.
"William,"   she   said;   "Forgive."
And Esau was reconciled to his
brother Jacob.
The Desire to Excel.
"Lady," said Plodding Pete, "do
you remember dat piece of pie you
gimme jes' about dis time last year?"
"Let me see! I believe I. do remember giving you a piece of pie. Do
you want another like it?"
'No, lady. I jest wanted to ask
you if you ate any of it yourself."
"Certainly."
"Well! Well! Ain't dat a shame.
An' here I was goin' along pridin'
myself on havin' de digestion record
beat!"
Time For Rejoicing..
The editor of the Bacon Ridge
Beacon came out on Main street and
tossed his hat twenty feet in the air.
"Praise to Providence!" he whopped,
dancing around like an Indian.
"Are you crazy?" demanded the
only policeman iri town. "What do
you mean by cheering when the cyclone has carried away your office?''
'■'that's just it, friend. I have been
complaining twenty years because the
circulation of my sheet was so limited, and now there's a chance of its
being circulated in four states and
twenty counties. Wouldn't be surprised if one copy don't blow clean
to Europe.
"To many cooks spoil the broth,
you know."
"Yes, and too many appetizers spoil
the appetite."
Farmer Giles—How are that first
lot of potatoes for size, Harry?
Harry—Oh, some's bigger'n others,
sur. ..   ;
Farmer Giles—What's the size of
the biggest, then?
Harry*—A bit bigger'n the little
'uns.
"A great, big, able-bodied man like
you ought..to be ashamed to ask a
stranger for moneq," said the well-to-
do citizen.
"I know I ought," answered Meandering Mike. "But, mister, '.I'm
jes' naturally too kind-hearted to tap
'im on de head and take it away from
him."
Color on to Stay.
Mother (viciously scrubbing her
small boy's face with soap and water)
—Johnny, didn't I tell you never to
blacken your face with burnt cork
again? Here I have been scrubbing
half an hour and it won't come off.
Boy (between gulps)—I—ouch!—
ain't your little boy—ouch I I'se
Mose, de colored lady's boy.
Learning Points of the Game.
Girl in Grand Stand—Harry, who
is that man everybody is cheering?
Her Escort—That's Grabsey, thc
right tackle.
Girl—I see; and the fellow he threw
down and jumped on is the wrong
tackle, is he?
She—The man I marry must be
"only a little lower than the angels.'1
He (suddenly dropping)—Here I
am on my knees, a little lower than
one of them.
He got her.
Touched.
"Ever experience a stage robber?"
"Once I asked a chorus girl out to
lunch."
A Famous Recipe for Christmas Pudding
Ingredients \x/_ lbs. raisins, ]_ lb. currants, y2 lb. mixed peel,
Y\ lb. breadcrumbs, y_% lb. suet, 8 eggs, i wineglassful brandy.
Mode: Stone and cut the raisins in half, but do not chop them;
wash, pick arid dry currants, and mince the suet finely; cut the
peel into thin slices; grate the bread into fine crumbs. Mix well
together, then moisten the mixture with eggs, well beaten, and
the brandy; stir well to blend thoroughly and press the pudding
into a buttered mold; tie it down tightly with floured cloth and
boil five or six hours. When served on Christmas Day, place a
sprig of holly in middle of the pudding and pour about a wine-
glassful of brandy round pudding, which at the moment of serving
light and bring to table encircled in flame—the true old English
way.
English Peel, per lb 15c
Raw Sugar, 4 lbs  .25c
Cooking Brandy, per bottle, 50c
and $1.00.
Seeded Raisins, per lb......ioc
Sultana Raisins, per lb ioc
Fancy Shelled Almonds,
Per lb. 50c
Fancy Shelled Walnuts,
Per lb 50c
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS.
1317 GOVERNMENT ST. Tel. 52, 105a and 1590
The Silver Spring
Brewery, Ld.
Under New Management
Brewers of High 'Grade English Ale
and Stout.
Tate's Celebrated Ale.
The Silver Spring Brewery, Limited, has purchased the old
establisshed business of the Messrs. Fairall and is now prepared
to do a large domestic and export trade. THE HIGHEST
GRADE MALT AND HOPS ARE USED BY 'usL.
MAPS
OP
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken up  and  what's  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street ■
Victoria. B. C.
Leave Y»ur -Baggage Cheeks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Phone 893
VICTORIA, B. C.
NOW is the Time
to order the Christmas Numbers.
Black and White now ready.
Illustrated London News
Graphic
Sketch
Queen
Ladies' Pictorial
Pear's Annual
Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic (Holly Leaves)
Westward Ho!
Toronto Globe, etc. etc.
KNIGHT'S BOOKSTORE
Pone 1759 655 Yatea St.
TIOTOBIA, ». 0.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kindi absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.),
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
We give 5 per cent off for spot cash with the. order.   Let us
know if you want it quick.
VICTORIA FUEL COMPANY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
DAYS
ARE
ALWAYS
HERE
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Cockburn's Art Gallery
Y.M.C.A.
A home for young men away from
ttotne. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
.Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
JALLAND BROS.
Pine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT  DAILY.
623.Yates St.    -    VICTORIA, B.C.
(Successors to WILL MARSDEN)
PHONE 1933
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C.
the Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
Alt kinds of Building Material,
LOl-JIBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 664
North Government St.. Victoria
-•-   ■ «---_ y
Key Fitting      Lock Repairing
Telephone 1718
H. M. WILSON
Mechanical Repairs aid Saw
Filing
Up-to-date Machinery for Lawn
Mower Grinding and Tool
Sharpening. Tires put on Go-
Carts and Springs Replaced.
Prompt attention and work
guaranteed.
100a BROAD STREET
Opp. Transfer Stables,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
m finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste. /
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete   line   of   smokers'
sundries.
The Army
and Navy
Cigar Store.
Richardson
Phone 346 THE WEEK,  SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908.
i&
ifi.t
iP.t
if*!
I
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i&
im
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1
W,
VICTORIA-PHOENIX BREWING CO, Ltd
^^^I^H
The Oldest and float Up-to-Date Brewery on the Coast,
BBfiBBBBBB8BBSB888B8BHHH9BBBB9B88B8B^^
VICTORIA AS A YACHTING CENTRE.
By A. V. KENAH.
In future years the season 1908
will occupy a prominent place in the
hearts of Victorian yachtsmen, for it
marks the resuscitation of the Victoria Yacht Club from the moribund
condition into which it had fallen to
that of an active and very much
alive sporting body of watermen.
As a matter of fact the Club was
organized in June, 1892, when Col.
Prior was patron, and Messrs. J. G.
Cox, J. H. Seeley, A. Mulcahey, W. B.
Charles, and H. F. Lowen were among
the prominent members. The fleet
then consisted of the yachts Volage,
Mona, Victoria, Swallow, Kaloolo,
Undine, Scud and Petrel, and from
existing records it would appear that
these craft were contestants in many
a hard-fought race, the laurels being
pretty evenly distributed between the
Petrel, Scud and Victoria.
Since then an almost entirely new
fleet has come into existence, the Volage apparently being the only survivor of the pioneers of '92.
lt would be out of place here to
enter into the reasons which led to
the gradual falling off in the interest
taken in yachting, as we arc for the
moment concerned with the present
state of affairs in Victoria waters
and the immediate causes which have
brought about this revival of the
Royal sport.
At the start of the. year 1908 the
Club membership totalled about 35
all told, with J. S. Gibb as Commodore; W. S. Chambers, Vice-Commodore; S. Lawrie, Captain; G. V. Cuppage, Hon. Secretary; W. Pigott, Hon.
Treasurer; B. B. Temple, Official
Measurer; Dr. D. B. Holden, Fleet
Physician; and a Committee of Management composed of eight other
members.
Through the energy of these officers, who not only canvassed their
friends   but   called   numerous   mcet-
________
ings in support of the objects they
had in view, the membership was
swelled to about 170, and fund were
raised to enable a site, on the south
side of the Uuter Harbor to be purchased, and a Club House to be
erected thereon.
Too much cannot be said in praise
of the zeal these officers, and those
who then and afterwards became actively associated with them, threw
into their labour, and the present
handsome Club House with its many
conveniences stands as a memorial
to their unceasing labours. It is interesting to note at this point that
the old head-quarters of the Club was
sold ,:to a Steamship Company in
1897, leaving the yacht Club without
a home and in a condition of stagnation, and had it not be en for the
kindness wid courtesty of Mr. B. B.
Temple, who owned a water front lot
on the Outer Harbor and who allowed thc club the use of his premises
and other concessions, the flag of
the Yacht Club would have ceased
to have waved over thc waters of
Victoria Harbor.
Before the completion of the Club
House, the local yachts and motor
boats were marshalled together and
a fine cruise to Albert Head took
place in glorious weather.
A more fitting climax to the untiring efforts of the organizing officials
could not be wished for and, upon the
arrival of the yachts and launches at
Albert Head, their crews assembled
on the grassy slopes and partook of
refreshments provided by the club.
A spirit of enthusiasm pervaded
everyone, and tht stirring speeches
of Commodore Gibb, Vice-Commodore Langley and "Billy" Pigott, the
genial Treasurer, were cheered to an
echo, and that esprit dc corps which
is so essential to the success of any
sporting   fraternity,   was   established
m_________m
on a solid basis of comradeship and
good-fellowship. On the 8th of
August at 4.30 p.m, the formal opening of the new Club House took
place, the ceremony being graciously
performed by Mrs. McBride> wife of
the Hon. Richard McBride, Premier
of the Province of British Columbia.
The ceremony itself consisted in
the presentation, by Commodore
Gibb, on behalf of the officers and
members of the Club, of a handsome
silver key with rope knot in gold and
the Yacht Club flag engraved thereon.
While a cannon boomed in salute
and the Yacht Club's flag bunched at
the masthead was broken out to the
summer sun, Mrs. McBride opened
the doors of the Yacht Club with the
silver key, amid the applause of the
assembled throng.
The Premier, Hon. Richard McBride, speaking on behalf on his wife,
expressed his pleasure at the resuscitation of the Royal sport in Victoria
and of the great future that lay before the club, and complimented the
officials on their zeal which had made
this possible.
The Commodore, Mr. J. S. Gibb,
suitably replied, after which the members and their friends partook of tea
and other refreshments and the band
played popular selections for the edification of the assembled company.
Altogether over 300 ladies and gentlemen attended the ceremony representative not only of Victoria society
but also including the Mayor and
Aldermen of the City, officers of the
Italian warship "Puglia," and other
vessels stationed at Esquimalt.
The Club House was handsomely
decorated for the occasion and altogether the scene was as pretty a one
as could be wished for and will long
be remembered in.the minds of those
who were privileged to witness it.
Afterwards many of the members
took their guests and friends for short
trips round the harbor and in the
evening a rousing smoker was held
in the newly opened quarters, which
was   largely   attended,   and   further
speeches were made by Premier McBride, Dr. Young, the Provincial Secretary, the Commodore and other ollicers and those present were entertained by instrumental and vocal selections rendered by artists from the
Pantages Theatre.
On the following Saturday a Regatta was held under the auspices of
the club which was a combination of
both yacht and motor-boat races. As
far as the former class were concerned the event had to be postponed,
as though an effort was made the
"white wings" were hopelqpsly becalmed.
With regard to the latter three
splendid contests took place which
not only brought out good entries,
but resulted in some very close finishes.
The handicappers, Messrs. Hinton
and O'Reilly, gave the contestants
their positions at the outset on the
showings they had made in the race
from Victoria to Oak Bay a month
previously, and that the handicaps
were well figured out was apparent
shortly after the start. After each
race the officials re-arranged the
handicaps on the basis of their latest
performances, and the third race practically saw a neck and neck finish between Messrs. Clark and Pendray,
whose relative positions for miles did
not appear to vary. As they drew
towards the line, however, it was evident that Clarke had managed to get
into the lead, and accordingly he took
first place, Pendray's "Laurel" being
second, and Phipps' boat third.
On the following Saturday the postponed sailing races took place:
ln Class "A" the sloop "Dorothy,"
Capt. W. H. Langley, finished first.
The victory was a hollow one as,
much to the regret of the "Dorothy's"
crew, the yawl "White Cap," Capt.
Lawrie, met with a mishap before the
start, carrying away her throat halliard block.
In "B" Class three yachts competed, the "Sea Mouse," Capt. A. R. D.
Beatson; "The Oneida," Commodore
Gibb; and "The Clytie," Capt. G. T.
Temple, which was won by the "Oneida."
The official times were as follows:
"A" Class-
"Dorothy," start 2.31, finish 3.49.30.
"Whitecap," start 2.50, finish 4.06.30.
"B" Class—
"Sea Mouse," start 2.35.50, finish
3-57-45-
"Onedia," start 2.35.30, finish 2.53.20.
"Clytie," start 2.35.31, finish 3-56.35-
The course was about nine miles in
length.
Coming to the present state of the
local fleet we find that we have, compared with those of 1892, a much better class of craft, the principals of
which are: "Ariadne," lately owned
by F. S. Barnard; "Guenol," Messrs.
J. S. Gibb, and W. Pigott; "Dorothy,"
W. H. Langley; "White Cap," S.
Lawrie; "Truant," W. Adams; "Helen" Mr. Doig, and "Varuna," Mr.
Barnes.
These are all cabin boats, well fitted
up and capable of going on long
cruises, and it is a rare thing to find
them tied up at their moorings for
any length of time during the summer months. Among the smaller
yachts we have the "Oneida," W. A.
Turner; the "Sea Mouse," Messrs.
Beatson and Laird; "The Clytie," G.
T. Temple; "Sally," L. Foote; and
the "Lurline," A. V. Kenah, Hon.
Auditor, not to mention one or two
others which have not yet been
christened. Besides these there are
a large and ever increasing number
of motor-boats ranging from the large
cruiser cabin type, such as the "Kiora,'
Vice-Commodore Chambers, to the
2-horse power launch. Indeed it is
the motor-boats that constitute the
greater portion of the home fleet, and
it is not too much to say that scarcely a week passes in the season without an additional power boat being
launched and brought under the banner of thc Victoria Yacht Club.
To every true yachtsman this is
somewhat a matter of regret, and
there is no gainsaying the fact that
the veteran lovers of the "white
wings" regard the motor-boat men as THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908
Fine Gift
for ithe Home
Ever thought of Hall Mirrors as
Gifts? Perhaps you have had preconceived ideas of prohibitive prices
or very ordinary designs. Just come
in and see these, and all such erroneous ideas will be quickly dispelled.
And as a Xmas gift—well, it is an
ideal suggestion. In the Halls of
many homes the Hall Mirror is more
desirable than the Hall Rack, and
these mirrors of ours are of such unusually good design, they would be
an acceptable addition to the furnishings of any Hall.
We have them in the popular finishes, Golden and Early English. Hall
Seats to match in many instances.
The mirrors are best quality bevel
plate, and the coat and hat hooks are
of stylish design in all cases. Prices
start as low as $6.00
Beautiful Down Quilts
HANDSOME GIFT SUGGESTIONS THESE.
Why not choose one of these beautiful McLintock Down Quilts as a suitable gift to send that
Homekeeping Friend this Xmas? It is a gift article that is guaranteed appreciation for many Xmas seasons, for its life doesn't end with his Xmas day, nor with the next or next. And not only in winter
is it a desirable addition to the bedroom furnishings, but all the year round. A peculiar feature of these
quilts is the combination of warmth and light weight. They are warm enough for winter, and cool enough
for summer. So all the year your goodness would be appreciated. Why not send one? We have some
very handsome styles and offer a varied price range.
McLINTOCK DOWN QUILT—Covered in "Turkey". Chintz.   An attractive and hard wearing covering.
Size 5x6 ft.    Price, each..— .'.....  $5.50
McLINTOCK DOWN QUILT—Covered in Art Sateen.   Very neat pattern and good wearer.    Size 5x6
feet.   Price, each      $6.50
McLINTOCK DOWN QUILT—Covered on one side with Art Sateen and on   the   other   with Satin.
Paneled.    Size  6x6  feet.   Price  $14.00
McLINTOCK DOWN QUILT—A beautiful quilt covered with sateen on one side and silk brocade and
satin on the other.   Size 5 ft. 6 in. x 6 ft.    $25.00
ECONOMY GIFT ITEMS AT THIS SHOP.
This store brings together the gift thought and economy in an unusual degree. Nowhere else
in this section is there such a breadth of selection for the seeker of gifts. From the single cup and
saucer, berry bowl, cracker jar, chocolate pot, to the complete dinner service; from the little cut glass
bon-bon dish to the dazzling punch bowl; there is no place where the Christmas purchases may be so
satisfactorily made. And never was good merchandise so reasonable. Be sure to see everything when
you come.
Suitable Gifts
for Ladies
And for ladies, can you think of a
much more acceptable gift than one
of these conveniently arranged Ladies'
Writing  Desks?
Desk just the right height for comfortable writing, inside arrangement
as convenient as one could wish, style
just right and finish the best.
We have a great assortment for
this'Xmas business, and we have them
in all sorts of woods and finishes—
Mahogany, Circassian Walnut, Golden
Oak, Early English Oak—something
to suit most any taste.
But we show a splendid value in
a desk made in our own factory. It
comes in either Golden or Early English Oak.   See it.   Priced at....$13.00
■;-   $1.00:.
BUYS SUCH AS THESE
Silyer Butter Knives.
Sterling Manicure Pieces.
Sterling Vaseline Jars. '
Shaving Brushes.1
Silver Mounted Vases.
Silver Toast Racks.
Silver Pickle. Forks.
Silver Olive Spoons.
Austria Bisque Figures;
China Cups and Saucers.
Glass Flower Vases.
China.Flower Vases
Pretty Jardinieres.
Glass Card Trays.
Pretty Cushion Tops.
Tray Cloths.
Bed Spreads.
Napkins, per dozen.
And down the list we might go,
for the list of Dollar Gifts is a
long one.   Spend that dollar here
where values are "better."
$1.50
TAKES ANY OF THESE
Perfume Sprays.
Brass Vases.
Cake Plates.
Salad Bowls.
China Cups and Saucers.
China Berry Dishes.
Glass Vases.
Steins.
Jardinieres.
Frilled Cushions.
Sterling Sugar Tongs.
Sterling Table Bells.
Silver Toast Racks.
Silver Napkin Rings.
Silver Berry Spoons.
Silver Child's Mugs.
In pretty China pieces we are
especially strong at this modest
figure. For $1.50 you may purchase some splendid pieces here.
$2.50
GOOD VALUES IN
Art Cushions.
Lace Curtains.
Oak Jardiniere Stands.
Umbrella Stands.
Mission Book Shelf.
Mission Dining Chairs.
Large Arm Rockers.
Oak Book Shelf.
Child's Reed Rockers.
Jardinieres.
China Cups and Saucers.
Ruskin Vases.
Sterling Whisks.
Sterling Pin Trays.
Sterling Match Safes.
Cut Glass Nappies.
Linen Tea Cloths.
Axminster Rugs.
Pretty Table Covers.
Two-fifty is a modest sum, still
it is surprising what an excellent
variety of gift things we show
marked at this small price.
$3 00
TAKES THE PICK OF
Sterling Pin Trays.
Sterling Hat Brashes.
Ebony Hair Brushes.
Ebony Hand Mirrors.
Oak Butter Dishes.
Ruskin Vases.
China Cups and Saucftrs.
Child's Reed Chairs.
Child's Sets (Table and a Chairs).
Folding Card Tables.
Large Arm Rockers.*;
Leather Seat Diners.
Parlor Tables.
Drawn Linen Centrepieces.
Beautiful Pictures.
Sterling Sugar Tongs.
Dainty Tea Cloths.
Three Dollars is as much as
some wish to expend and at this
figure you'll find one of the grandest assortments of Xmas Fifts in
the city.
$5.00
SUCH GOOD THINGS AS f
Cut Glass Nappies.
Cut Glass Oil Bottles.     ■'"'   '"" '
Cut Glass Vases. j-jfi;]!
Silver Creams and Sugars.   *, ■
Silver Bake Dishes.
Breakfast Cruets.
Five o'clock Kettle and Stand.
Silver Berry Dishes.
Bentwood Cake Stands.
Child's .Reed Rockers.
Reed Rockers.
Oak Jardiniere Stand.
Oak Parlor Tables.
Lace Curtains.
Silver Cake Dishes.
Silver Card Receivers.
Axminster Rugs.
Child's Table Chair.
Five Dollars is a popular figure
and our range of gifts at this
figure will surprise you in their
excellence. Many seem worth almost double.
HOTEL  AND
STEAMSHIP
FURNISHERS
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
OFFICE AND
SHOWROOM
FURNISHERS
_ „__.--.
I
I
i
n.
1
l
Family Paints
DO YOUR OWN PAINTING WITH
The SHERWIN FAMILY PAINT
In Half Pint and Pint Tins
FOR SALE BY
Peter McQuade & Son
78 (1314) Wharf Street   *■„•
VICTORIA, B. C.
•te:^m.i«M^^^^^
somewhat of the nature of tenderfoots, but, on the other hand, "tem-
pora mutantur et nos in illis muta-
mur," and undoubtedly the power boat
has many advantages over the craft
which is solely dependant on the wind
for its mode of propulsion, and it is
also far more easy to handle.
Another point should also be remembered that, as with motor cars
so with motor boats, the more familiar one gets with them the more desirous are they to branch out on a
large scale and this is not only good
for the club but also for all the local
builders and engineers.
As far as racing yachts are concerned, there need not be any fears
as to their extinction, for there are
too many devotees of this most exciting and entrancing of all sports
right in our midst to warrant such
a conclusion for a moment.
fa^THEATRi
(Continued  Next Week)
•^>\UV1.S\
MONDAY, DECEMBER 21
Victor    Herbert    and    Glen    Mac-
Donough's Greatest Musical Success of the Century
BABES   IN   TOYLAND
Presented with an Augmented
Orchestra.
Cast of Twenty Principals and the
Best Singing Chorus Ever Seen
on Tour.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50. .
Box Office opens Friday, Dec.  18th,
at 10 a.m.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29
KATHARINE   GOODSON
Pianist.
ARTHUR HARTMANN.
Violinist.
ALFRED CALZIN
Pianist.
Prices—$3, $2, $1.50.   Gallery, $1.
Box Office opens December 28.
GIFTS FOR 'HIM'
GIFTS FOR 'HER'
Shaving Sets, an exceptionally
fine line, from $3.00 to $4.00
Manicure Sets, $2.50 to $16.00
(Also full line of Combination
Sets).
Ebony Mirrors, an excellent variety, $1.00 to  $4.00
Work Baskets, the handsomest
ever shown in Victoria, $1.76
to $6.76
Ebony Brushes for Ladies, $1.00
to $4.00
Military Hair Brushes,  $2.60
to   $7.00
Clothes Brushes,  $1.00  to...$3.75
Toilet Sets( Brush, Comb ana
Mirror), a most attractive assortment, wide choice, $1.50
to $12.00
Perfumes, the world's best manufacturers, newest odors, cut
glass bottles daintily cased, all
prices.
Handbags, a most comprehensive
display, genuine alligator, seal,
morocco, etc., at any desired
price; beautiful Satchels thai
will harmonize with every
smart costume.
You are cordially welcome whether to purchase or merely to
look.
CYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt. St., Near Yates.
VICTORIA, B.C.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
To James Jackson Erskine, Registered
and Assessed Owner of Lots 1, 2, 7
and S, of Part of Lot 31, Cloverdale
Estate, Map 336;
To   William   McGrath,   Registered   and
Assessed Owner of Lot 370, Mount
Tolmie Park, Map 402 D.:
To Arthur B. Bule, Registered and Assessed   Owner   of   Lot   621,   Mount
Tolmio Park, Map 402C;
To  C.  Alwyn,  Assessed  Owner  of  Lot
630, Mount Tolmie Park, Map 402c;
To Sarah Olive, Assessed Owner of Part
20  acres  of  Section   69,  Esquimau
District;
And   to  Edna  R.   Hammill,   Registered
and Assessed Owner of Lot 8, Block
1,  Lots  7 and 14,  Block  7,  Lots  2
and  5,  Block  8,  Town  of  Sidney,
Map   381:
TAKE  NOTICE  that  an   application
has been made to register Samuel Jen-
nines and John R. Jennings as the owners in fee simple of above landa under
a Tax Sale Deed from the Assessor of
Victoria District and you are >-<.<julred :
to contest the claim of the se _d Trx I
Purchasers within 30 days from thu !
first  publication  hereof.
Dated at the Land Registry Offlce,
Victoria, British Columbia, this llth
day of December, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Dec. 26 Registrar-General of Titles.
"LAND  REGISTRY ACT."
To   L.   A.   Blanc,   Assessed   Owner   or
83 1-3 acres of Section  %0, Esquimalt District.
TAKE NOTICE    that an   application
has   been   made   to   register   Watson
Clarke as the owner in fee simple of
above land under and through Tax Sale
Deeds to John R. Jennings and Samuel
Jennings  and   to  Watson  Clarke,   ano
you are required to contest the claim
of the said Watson Clarke within  so
days from the first publication thereof.
Dated  at  the  Land  Registry  Office,
Victoria, British Columbia, this llth daj
of December, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Dec. 26        Registrar-General of Titles.
Worthy
Xmas
Presents
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
SHEET MUSIC.
MUSIC FOLIOS.
TALKING MACHINE
RECORDS.
PIANOS,  ORGANS.
Prices, $75.00 up.
WAITT'S
MUSIC STORE
Herbert Kont, Mgr.
1004 GOVERNMENT STREET
WEEK DECEMBER ai.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a C0MIBINE,    Pre»rl«ter-a.
The Greatest Feature Act of
Modern Vaudeville
MLLE. JOYCE GRAY
In Her Own Original Version of
the..
Salome Dance.
STEPHEN   GRATTAN   &   CO.,
Presenting the Unique Comedietta
"Locked Out at 3 a.m_"
EARL GIRDELLER
Assisted by the Sensational Canine
Quartette,
MARGARET  SEVERANCE
& CO.
In  "Nowadays."
EMERSON and VANHORN
Eccentric Musical Sketch.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Nobleman's   Rights   in   the   16th
Century."
"Student's  Jokes."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Prince Rupert Improvements.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, owing
to delays in the. Northern malls, the
time for receiving tenders for the Improvements at Prince Rupert has been
extended until Tuesday, the 15th Instant,
at 10 a.m.
FRED. J. PULTON,
Chief Commissioner ot       	
,     .      _, -.  ,    ~ ■kM"18 and WorB.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., Sth December, 1908.
Dec. 12 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1908
The
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The Motor of Merit
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Built for all classes of service.
Heavy duty, slow speed, for Tugs,
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Medium duty, medium speed for pleasure
launches and speed boats.
Two and Four Cycle, High and Low Tension Ignition.
Write for full particulars of the 1909 model.
HUTCHISON BROS. & CO,,
ENGINEERS AND FOUNDERS
MbTtJRI^,  B. G.
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Ignition Systems and
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Steam Turbines
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At The Street    ^
Corner h
W By THE LOUNOEK &
ty**\/*»f%/*'**\m<m0ttlfr_,_J%j_£
Aldermanic candidates arc increasing in number and are almost daily
- coming to the fore. The latest ar-
* rival is Mr. T- N. Hibben, than whom
there is no better known man in Victoria. Mr. Hibben is the younger son
of the late Mr. T. N. Hibben, and is
connected with a firm which celebrated its Jubilee this year and which lias
been honourably identified with Victoria business for half a century, a
man of the highest personal character, and possessing all the best
qualifications for public life. Mr. Hibben will undoubtedly receive wide
support.
I do not often burden my column
with quotations, but this week I am
compelled to do so because a most
remarkable thing has happened. My
readers will remember that last week
I registered a kick against the Colonist for leaving its dramatic reporting in prentice hands. My comment
was widely approved and will no
doubt bear fruit, but lo! and behold
when* Toronto Saturday Night of the
same date reached me on Thursday
last I found the following article on
page io. I venture to think that it
is one of the most remarkable instances of duplication on record, and
perhaps the most remarkable thing
about it is that the duplication should
have occurred in connection with the
same play, at the same time, in Toronto and Victoria. I venture to
think it will be a long time before
anything quite so remarkable in coincidences  occurs:
"A Dramatic Incident.
"Recently   on?   of   Mr.   Savage's
companies playing the much-discussed Hungarian play, 'The Devil,' was
announced to appear in the city of
Ottawa, and, realizing that it was
an occasion of some interest, the managing director of one of thc daily
newspapers decided that in order to
have the play properly covered he
would write up the performance himself. Now, he is a man of old-fashioned views on the subject of the
drama, and as in this play His Satanic Majesty succeeds in accomplishing the ruin of the other characters
and there is no triumph of virtue, he
was shocked. He went to the office
and wrote a hot roast, declaring that
such plays should not be permitted in
the modern theatre, and more to the
same effect.
"Next day this was followed by a
letter from the manager of the Russell Theatre cancelling all advertising and demanding return of the season passes. Thc unkindest cut of all
was contained in the conclusion of the
letter, when the manager, unaware,
it is said, of the authorship of the
attack, added:
" 'From the ignorance of literature
and the drama displayed in the article 1 assume that it was written by
the office boy.'
"The staff consider that a pretty
good joke on 'the Boss,'"
At last the lower end of Fort
Street is being rcpaved, congratulations to all concerned. Having regard
to its importance it has been for the
last year or two the worst piece of
street in the city and every shopper
and everyone who patronizes the cars
will be thankful that for another ten
years at any rate they will escape the
puddles which have for so long decorated this thoroughfare from Government to Douglas. Whilst on the
subject of streets let mc again mention Cook street which at the present
moment is almost impassable. If
there are no funds to build a proper
street it ought to be possible to remove a few hundred tons of slush
which at any point between Fort and
May render one of the best residential streets in the city "a quagmire.
We are yet a week from Christinas
but the stores are busy until late at
night and the streets are thronged
with eager buyers. I cannot help contrasting the Victoria of today with
the Victoria of three years ago when
I came to live here. At that time
I was struck with the deserted appearance of the streets; there seemed
to be nobody about and the general
aspect of affairs could be best described as "dead alive." Now there
is movement everywhere and at all
hours. Any fine afternoon the sidewalks on Government Street are
crowded. The same thing is .true in
the evening whenever the stores arc-
open and whatever dull times may
have done for other places they have
certainly not diminished the number
of shoppers and sightseers in Victoria.
I question if more business has ever
been done than at the present time.
Withal there is an air of cheerfulness
and literally no complaining in our
streets.
This reminds me that in spite of
the general prosperity which abounds
there must be some even in this favored city whose   Merry   Christmas
will depend on the consideration of
their  fcllowmen.    Happily they are
few and inconspicuous, but the clergy
and the kind-hearted women at the
head of our various Philanthropic and
Charitable organizations know where
to find them.   There is no man or
woman in Victoria whose Christmas
will  not  be the happier for having
helped one who needed it.    In England, alas, poverty and misery stalk;
in Canada they hide, and have to be
sought.     Let   us   all   out   of   our
comparative plenty  place  a  little  at
the disposal of our clergyman or thc
officers of any of the well known societies, to be used for the benefit of
those  who  need  it, but will  not be
likely to ask for it.
The accident which happened this
week to the team belonging to R.
Porter & Sons, which fell over the
Belleville Street embankment, has
long been expected, and it is a won
der that the victim has not been a
hack loaded with passengers instead
of a runaway tradesman's team. The
fact that the horse was drowned
shpws how little chance the occupants of a hack would have under
similar circumstances, especially at
high tide. I have always maintained
that the city would be liable in case
of accident, probably not in the case
of a runaway team which should of
course have been kept under control,
but in any ordinary accident I venture to assert that the City would
have to pay up. This may be a low
ground on which to put it, but, on
every ground the embankment referred to should be fenced.
I heard a good story the other day
about the Victoria & Sydney Railway which probably holds the record
for slow speed. There was a quiet
looking Englishman on board who
had stretched his legs at several wayside stations while the train meandered up and down the track doing
its usual amount of shunting:
When the conductor was punching his ticket he remarked:
"Does this railroad company allow
passengers to give it advice, if they
do so in a respectful manner?"
The conductor replied in gruff
tones that he guessed so.
"Well it occurred to me that it
would be well to detach the cow
catcher from the front of the engine
and hitch it to the rear of the train,
for, you see, we are not liable to overtake a cow, and what's to prevent a
cow from strolling into this car and
biting a passenger?"
A PRODIGY.
"There goes a man who has never
spoken an unkind word to his wife,"
said  Willoughby.
"Fine! Who is he?" asked Dorring-
ton.
"He's a deaf and dumb old bachelor named Harkaway," said Willoughby.—December Lippincott's.
FOR MAYOR
To the
Electors of the City of Victoria:
Ladies  and  Gentlemen:
I beg to offer myself as a Candidate for the office of Mayor (second
term) for the year 1909.
If elected my aim will be as in the
past, to further the best interests of
the City, material as well as moral.
Requesting your vote and influence.
1 remain,   Yours respectfully,
LEWIS HALL.
For Alderman
To the Electors of Ward No. 4.
I beg again to offer myself as a
Candidate for above Ward and solicit your votes and influence.
A. McKEOWN.
FOR ALDERMAN
To the Ratepayers of No. V Ward:
In response to the request of a
large number of Rate-payers in Ward
V, I have consented to become a candidate for the office of Alderman at
the ensuing Municipal Election.
I venture to think that my lifelong residence in the city and my
association with one of the oldest
businesses will be a sufficient recommendation to the good-will of thc
electors whose votes I respectfully
solicit.
T. N. HIBBEN.    '
A Grand Ball
Will be given in the
EMPRESS    HOTEL
on
THURSDAY    EVENING,   JAN. 7, 1908.
by the Woman's Auxiliary Society of
the Provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital,
ln aid of the funds of the society. The
patronage of the public ls very earnestly solicited for this event.
Patron*
His Honor the Lieutenant Qovernor,
Mrs. Dunsmuir, His Worship the Mayor
and Mrs. Lewis Hall, the Premier and
Mrs. McBride, Col. Holmes, D.C.O. and
officers R. C. G. A., Capt. Parry, R. N.
and Mrs. Parry and officers of H. M.
Navy, Lieut. Col. Hall and Mrs. Hall
and officers of the Fifth Regiment.
Tickets $3.00.   Dancing at 9 p.m.
The engagement is announced of
Miss Elizabeth Langstaff-Hall of this
city, to Mr. Cyril E. Richards, of
Chilcotin, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1968
11
__\m _&* *A* _m%_ •£• t-_m •&• oue aAt -tAa aAa •*&• lib
$ Social and        $
$ Personal. *
aMalaauiliaMMaiM B^^ A-lA-ft-^^ ___W___a___t
'f '4' 'J.' VP TP'JT 'JT f 'I1 W V *V vF
Mrs. Little gave an evening party
last week in honour of her little
daughter,   Lucy's,   birthday.
Games and dancing were both indulged in and a very jolly evening was
spent by all.
* w   w
Mr. W. R. Dockrill of Chemainus
was in town during the week and
was registered at the Empress.
* *   *
Mr. James Gaudin has returned to
Victoria after a very enjoyable shooting trip up the coast.
ii*   *   *
Mr. J. Knox of Duncans was in
town for a day or two during the
week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Palmer of Chemainus were among the numerous
visitors in town this week.
* *   *
Mrs. Burton made a very charming hostess at a dance given in her
pretty residence on St. Charles St.,
on Friday evening last.
* *   *
The Arion Club left today for Duncans to give a concert.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Munroe, Lampson St.,
Esquimalt, left last week for Alert
Bay,   where  they  will   spend  Xmas
with  relatives.
* *   *
The Bridge Club met on Tuesday
afternoon at the residence of Mrs.
Richard McBride on the Gorge Road.
The drawing-room floral decorations, which were very pretty and attractive, were composed of holly, ivy
and chrysanthemums, and the dainty
tea table, which was also profusely
decorated, was ably presided over by
Mrs. * Young and Miss Mary Lawson.
* There was a full i attendance of
, members, '.Mrs. Ker capturing the
prize,  which  was  a  very handsome
cut  glass bowl..
* *   *
Mrs. Shallcross made a most de-
lgihtful hostess at an At Home at
her new residence on the Foul Bay
Road on Tuesday last. A most attractive programme had been arranged, the ladies who were kind enough
to take part being: Mrs. McLaren,
who delighted the guests with several very pretty, solos; Miss Helen
Peters, also sang charmingly, being ably assisted by Miss Cordelia
Grylls and the Misses Shallcross.
The artistic hall was beautifully arranged with greenery and chrysanthemums, the tea room also being arranged with chrysanthemums.
Among the guests were: Mrs. Atkins, Mrs. Dupont, Mrs. Hanington,
Miss McDonald, Mrs. Pemberton,
Mrs. Kirkbride, Miss Dupont, Mrs.
Burton, Miss Nellie Dupont, Mrs. F.
Pemberton, Mrs. Roper (Cherry
Creek), Mrs. Fitzgibbon and Miss
Fitzgibbon, Mrs. McLaren, Mrs.
Howitt, Mrs. McClure, Mrs. Laundy,
Mrs. W. Higgins, Mrs. Fletcher, Mrs.
Grisley, Mrs. Alister Robertson, Mrs.
Arthur Robertson, Miss Newcombe,
Mrs. Lampman, Miss Crease, Miss
Helen Peters,   Miss   C.   Grylls, the
Misses Shallcross and others.
* *   #
The engagement has been announced of Mrs. Tweedale and Mr. Sydney
Roberts, both of Victoria.
* «   »
Miss Dorothy Day left on Tuesday
morning via C.P.R. for Winnipeg,
where she will spend a short visit.
* *   *
Mr.. D...W- Higgins left early in
the week for Vancouver.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Rismuller enjoyed a
short holiday in Seattle this week.
...
Invitations have been issued for a
private subscription dance to be held
at the A.O.U.W. Hall, Yates street,
on Tuesday, December 22nd. The following ladies acting as chaperons:
Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. G. H. Barnard,
Mrs. Gordon Hunter, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. S. Powell, Mrs. Butchart,
Mrs. J. Irving, Mrs. A. Stewart Robertson, Mrs. Lampman.   Gentlemen's
tickets $1.50, Ladies, 50c.
* *   *
Mrs. Mainguy of Westholme was
in town for a short visit this week.
* *   *
Mrs. Carew Gibson went over to
Vancouver by Tuesday's boat.
* *   *
On last Saturday afternoon Mrs. W.
F. Bullen, Esquimalt Road, entertained a few friends at Bridge. The
floral decorations wcre extremely artistic and dainty, being carried out
in chrysanthemums and carnations of
delicate tints. Among the guests
■were: Mrs. James Harvey, Mrs. T.
S. Gore, Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Arthur Jones, Mrs. F. S.
Barnard, Mrs. Gaudin, Mrs. Berkeley,
Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. Coles, Mrs.
Ker,   Mrs.  Heisterman,  Mrs.  Little.
The first prize was captured by
Mrs. Arthur Jones and the second by
Mrs. T. S. Gore.
* *   *
The Cricket Club gave a most sue
cessful dance in the A.O.U.W. Hall
on Friday evening of last week. Miss
Thain's orchestra was in attendance.
The hostesses were: Mrs. George Gillespie, in pale blue with a corsage of
pale pink roses; Mrs. A. E. Irving,
in a black net. gown; Mrs. J. H. Gillespie in pale pink; Mrs. T. B. Tye,
in a pale blue Empire gown.
The hall was artistically decorated
with flags which had been kindly lent
by Captain Parry, H.M.S. Egeria.
The supper room was prettily arranged with ivy, smilax, holly and red
bells, and the table with red carnations and red streamers. The centrepiece of the table consisted of the
silver challenge cup (won by the team
last summer) which held a bouquet
of red carnations.
Among those present were: Mrs.
Gordon Hunter in pale blue with
black, Miss P. Irving in white satin;
Miss P. Mason, white satin; Miss M.
Pitts, white trimmings of pale blue;
Mrs. Lampson, black; Miss Gillespie,
pale pink; Misses Ellis, Miss Pooley,
Mrs. Bradley, black lace robe, Miss
Irving, pale blue, Mrs. G. Irving,
white, Mrs. Bromley, rose-colored
gauze gown, Miss McKay, white brocade, Miss V. Pooley, white lace, Mrs.
Parry, pale blue, and the Misses Sehl,
Gardiner, Mason, Helmcken, Wigley,
Drake, Mrs. Lagan, Mrs. Coles, Miss
Keast, Misses Page, Savage, Mrs.
York; Mrs. Rant, Miss Brown, Mrs.
Cullen, Miss Blackwood, Miss Troupe,
Mrs. Butchart, Miss Cambie, Misses
Lugrin, Mrs. Shaw, and the Messrs.
Keefer, Powell, G. Johnson, B. Bell,
Templeton, Laundry, Lampman, Wilson, Mr. A. Coles, Mrs. J. W. D.
York, Mr. Rant, Capt. Cullen, Capt.
Parry, E. Dewdney, Monteith, Holland, Raymur, Barton, Bailey, Cambie, Bland, Julien, Capt. McDonald
and others.
The New Grand.
The show at the New Grand this
week is the best for a long time.
Every turn is good and three at least
are excellent. While Creo is the
chief attraction it is by no means a
mystery, although the trick is well
down with a skill and neatness calculated to deceive the uninitiated. Indeed no better trick of the kind has
been seen on the local Vaudville
stage. The cleverest work in the programme is that of the veteran actor,
Mr. Holmes, whose portraiture of the
two old brothers in "Shore Acres"
is an exquisite piece of dramatic work
well worthy of the legitimate. Next
in order of merit is Miss Emelie Ben-
ner, who has a really fine baritone
voice with some beautiful rich tones,
and but for a slight tendency to
strain for effect Miss Benner would
be one of the most acceptable singers
heard here for a long time. Phil
Staats is a very entertaining monologist in appearance if in nothing else,
he recalls visions of the inimitable
Corney Grain. His patter is very
bright and amusing, he has a more
cultured style than is generally found
in his class, and his handling of the
piano indicates that he is a fair musician, altogether his turn is very entertaining. The other turns do not
call for special mention.
A Skin ef Bsaaty ls a Joy Vomer
an. t. rautx ootoatis'b
Oriental Cream
ob haoiou luumm
Purifies as well as SMUtlflss the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do lt.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Bash and Skin diseases, anl
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test ot 10
years; no other has, and ls se harmless—we taste it to be sure lt Is properly made. Accept no counterfeit ot
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre satd to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Qourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAVS'I O-UBVTAX TOH.XT
nvna
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Believes Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and rendsrs an excellent complexion.
Me* 88 esats, fer mall.
OOUBAVB-V BOVBBB IUBTOB
Bemoves superfluous Hair.
.Pries ai-oe, _j w__
naa. t. mot—in, bmp*
V «rsa» Jeaes it,       Sew Ted
AT  HENDERSON  BRO!
Wholesale Distributors.
YMeewra ami Tletetta. B.g.
PITHER & LEISER"
&
Importers of Wines
and Liquors
VICTORIA, B. C.
G. H. MUMM & CO.'S EXTRA DRY AND SELECTED BRUT.
G.   PRELLER   &   CO.'S   CLARETS,   BURGUNDIES   AND
SAUTERNES.
COSSART, GORDON & CO.'S PORT WINES.
DEINHARD'S RHINE WINES.
WM. J. LEMP BREWING C.'S EXTRA PALE BEER.
CARNEGIE'S SWEDISH PORTER.
ALLSOPP'S BURTON-ON-TRENT PALE ALE.
KOLA TONIC WINE.
JOHN WALKER & SON'S KILMARNOCK AND KILMARNOCK EXTRA SPECIAL.
MACKIE'S & CO.'S WHITE HORSE CELLAR WHISKY.
JAS. MUNRO & SONS' GLENVIEW, HOUSE OF LORDS
AND WHITELEY'S LIQUEUR.
JOHN GILLON & CO'S KING WILLIAM IV. "V.O.P."
WHITE ROCK MINERAL WATER.
ALL   THE   LEADING   BRANDS   OF   IMPORTED   AND
DOMESTIC CIGARS.
i
I
a
We wish Ial our Friends and Customers a Merry Christmas and
a Happy and Prosperous New Year.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Wholesale Distributors Wines and Liquors.
WATER STREET, VANCOUVER.
CORNER FORT AND WHARF STREETS, VICTORIA, B.C.
tammEHmNM^
_
I
1
I
Z_
*_*
s
V
I
3
_?
1
I
♦I*
March of the Toys in "Babes in Toyland."
"LAND RBGISTBT ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Tltile to
Part (145 acres) of Section 3, Otter
District
NOTICE Is herpby given that it ls
my Intention at the expiration of one
month from the date of the first publication hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certificate of Title to above lands Issued
to Joseph Plaement on the 18th day of
July, 1890, and numbered 10288a.
Land Registry Office, Victoria, B.C..
the lst day of December, 1908.
S. T. WOOTTON,
Reglstra-General of Titles.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the re-
reserve existing on Lot 7,946, Group 1,
Kootenay, by virtue of the notice dated
December 24th, 1907, and appearing In
the British Columbia Gazette of December 27th, 1907, is cancelled for tne
purpose of effecting a sale of said lot
to Edgar S. Home.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and WorKs.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1908.
Dec. 17
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the reserve covering the fractional sections
31, 32 and 33, Denman Island, notice
of which was published ln the British
Columbia Gazette of October 21st, 1876,
is cancelled.
BOBT. A. BENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th. 1908.
Dec.  17 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY DECEMBER 19, 1908,
Challoner & Mitchell
25c to $2.00.
We have this year, as in the past, arranged a number of trays containing a
collection of inexpensive articles suitable
for Xmas. The first tray contains articles
at 25c and 35c, the second at 50c and so
on, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 and $2.00.
Our stock will supply the needs of the
most modest purse.
DAINTY CHINA.
Single Cups and Saucers, Plaques, and
Tea Sets in Imperial Crown, Doulton and
Austrian China, magnificent hand-painted
Dresden China.
Genuine Old Satsuma Ware, Vases and
Bric-a-Brac in great variety.
We make the price one of the chief at-
, tractions of all our gods.
SMOKERS' REQUISITES.
OJki, two or three pipes in
nice case   $2.50 to $28.50
Sterling Cigar Cases  $12.75
Sterling Cigarette Cases....$4.50to$12.00
Sterling Match Boxes  $1.50 to $ 6.00
Cigar Cutters  .$1.25 to $ 3.75
Cigar Holders  ,'.. .$1.25 to $ 3.00
Cigarette Holders, 50c, in casesof six. .$1.50
Sterling Tobacco Boxes $6.50 to $12.00
Leather Tobacco Pouches... .$1.00 to $ 2;00
UMBRELLAS.
Someone you know would he delighted
to receive a good UMBRELLA at Xmas.
We have a large selection of UMBRELLAS with good covers and handsome
handles, of Gold, Silver, Gun Metal, Buck
Horn, Ivory, Boxwood, etc.
Come in and see these goods.
OPERA GLASSES.
The important part of a pair of OPERA
GLASSES is the LENS. The best European Lens makers have contributed to our
stock. A pair of our glasses will aid won-
werfully to the pleasure of an evening at
the theatre.
As acceptable gifts we have them in
Oriental, Plain and Smoked Pearl, with
beautifully finished gild fittings.
Some have telescope handles which are
very convenient to hold.
LADIES' SOLID GOLD RINGS.
We have a full Une of rings for ladies,
set with varieties of stones from $5.00
to $20.00.
These goods are particularly well suited
for Christmas Gifts. Stones are well set
and rings nicely finished and polished.
SCARF PINS.
To-day, the well dressed man has about
as great a variety of Scarf Pins as of
ties. He cannot have too many. We carry
a large stock of well selected pins set with
all the various stones.
Call and see if we cannot supply you with
a pin which will meet some Xmas requirement.
CANES AND WALKING STICKS.
Our stock is large and well chosen. If a
cane would fill the bill for Husband, Father,
Brother or Friend, you will be sure to find
one in our store which will please.
All goods going from our store bear our
name.
ORIENTAL IVORY.
Can you conceive of anything in toilet
ware that you would appreciate more than
a set in Rare and Beautiful Ivory? The
goods that we are showing are of perfect
color and texture. We think no other class
of Toilet ware can equal them in Beauty
and Refined Taste.
We have imported them direct, so you
are assured of fair prices and correct
quality.
BERRY BOWLS.
Cut Glass BERRY BOWLS are always in
demand for the Christmas Gift. We have
very handsome howls varying in price from
$5.00 to $20.00. Our Exclusive Pattern
Bowl is a particularly attractive piece.
These goods bear our trade mark which
ensures quality. All packages sent out in
box or parcel bearing our name.. Prices
always right.
BRASS AND COPPER.
Many handsome TEA SETS, HOT
WATER KETTLES, DESK SETS, and
CANDLE STICKS are now being made in
these metals.
Of ANTIQUE DESIGN and HAMMERED they are decidedly ATTRACTIVE
and UNIQUE.
The prices as usual are the lowest.
BON BON DISH, $2.00.
This neat Cut Glass 5-inch BON BON is
exceptional value at $2.00.
Same size and cut, but with handle,
sells for $2.25.
Other BON BONS range in price as high
as $5.75.
ENGLISH SILVERWARE.
For substantial weight and character in
design nothing surpasses our magnificent
Hall Marked Sterling Silver TEA SETS
and TRAYS.
In the smaller pieces also, we have a
large selection—Salt and Pepper Sets,
Vases, Butter Dishes, Sugar and Cream
Sets, etc.
We import these direct and so can give
the very lowest price.
/T
%
WE OFFER
YOU
The largest selection in the city
Courteous treatment by efficient salesmen.
Prompt attention.
An adequate delivery service.
The most up-to-date goods.
The lowest prices.
Sincere   appreciation   of your
trade.
YOUR GUARANTEE
The reputation of a successful and growing business house of more than
fifteen years standing.
^
^
PHOTO FRAMES.
We have a splendid stock of handsome
Sterling Silver Hall Marked Photo Frames.
One dainty little round frame costs $1,00.
Then increasing in cost by easy stages
they reach $28.00, covering a great assortment in different shapes and styles.
These are very nice for the dresser,
mantle, etc.
GOLD LOCKETS.
Our Christmas stock is now complete.
The Locket is one of the favorites whose
popularity continues year after year.
Ladies' Solid Gold Lockets:
Round or Heart shaped....$4.00to$20.00
Diamond set up from  $10.00
Men's Oval and Square
Lockets  .$5.00 to $15.00
Diamond set up from ...... $10.00
Our personal guarantee is behind these
goods.
PLATED FLATWARE.
Here is one of the stable lines that come
in for a lot of hard usage in our homes.
What you want to know is that they will
stand the WEAR AND TEAR OF CONSTANT USE. We exercise every care in
the selection of our stock and submit
samples to BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT ASSAY from time to time so
that we know whether the manufacturers
are maintaining the HIGH STANDARD we
demand for our trade, or not. They are
finished well, too, so that you could not
tell them from Sterling except by examining the stamp.
GOLD FILLED LOCKETS.
Of splendid quality and finish the gold
filled locket is to all appearance, a gold
locket and will wear for years.
Finished in Bright and Colored Gold,
just the same as Solid Gold goods, 75c to
$4.50.   SHOP EARLY.
WATCHES FOR MEN.
Give a watch to a man and he will appreciate it. If it keeps good time he will be
grateful for all time.
'lhe Challoner & Mitchell movement is
a well constructed and nicely finished
article which will give the fullest satisfaction.
In Nickel, up from $ 1.00
In Silver, up from $ 5.00
In Gold Filled, up from... .$14.00
In Solid Gold, up from... .$35.00
Our personal reputation is behind these
goods.
SOLID GOLD LINKS.
A pair of GOLD LINKS are ever acceptable to a man of any age. Our variety is
great. With either dumb-bell or chain connection. Bright or colored gold, plain or
ornamented.
Prices from $2.75 to $18.00.
NECKLETS.
Some friend of your would be delighted
to have a necklet.
We can supply you with a solid gold
Necklet for   $ 3.50
Necklet, with dainty gold pendant,
up from  $ 5.25
Pearl Necklets, well made and set
with genuine pearls, up from $25.00
We have also a good stock of very handsome necklets in peridot and pearl,
amethyst, and pearl and diamond set.
Our selection is large and our prices are
the best obtainable.
LADIES'WATCHES.
Whether for Mother, Sister or Sweetheart, a watch will form a fitting token of
your kindly Christmas Greeting.
Our Ladies' Watches vary in price from
$6.00 to $150.00.
We strongly recommend the Challoner &
Mitchell Movement which is made to keep
time—and does it.
If you are not prepared to make your
purchase now, call and select, pay a deposit
and we will hold your goods until you want
them.
Be an early shopper.
ENGLISH PLATED WARE.
In style and finish equal to sterling ware
the splendid English Plate on Nickel Silver
is sure to give the fullest satisfaction to the
purchaser.
No other plated ware made will equal the
English Plate for wearing qualities.
A large stock can he found in our store
which will please anyone who is not prepared to pay the price of Sterling Silver.
DIAMOND RINGS.
We pride ourselves upon the large and
beautiful stock of DIAMOND RINGS
which we display. In quality, design and
workmanship, they challenge comparison.
Solitaires, Twin, Three-stone, Five-stone
aud Cluster Rings. All diamond, or combined with the Ruby, Sapphire, Emerald,
Pearl or Opal.
Our system of buying for cash and direct
from the Amsterdam Cutters, combined
with the quantities we handle and our Factory facilities enables us to give you prices
which cannot he equalled elsewhere.
Our reputation is your safeguard.
SIGNET RINGS.
Almost any man would gladly accept a
SIGNET RING as a Christmas Gift.
Our range in price and style is quite wide.
The price is of course, regulated by the
weight.
Small rings sell as, low as $3.00.
Then we have rings at every price from
that to a very massive ring at $25.00.
We have them with both the gold top
and set with Bloodstone, Sardonyx, etc.
Don't put off your Christmas Shopping.
Government Street Vietoria

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