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Progress Dec 3, 1904

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 New Houses For Sale
INSTALMENT PLAN.
A number of new homes, Modern in
every respect. Easy monthly inatal-
ments.
11 Land ft Investment Agency Ld.
40 Government St.
Vol.I.   No. 47.
|       JAMES A. DOUGLAS
« Real but. Micas
» 18% Governn
« PHONE 1
For Sale-
}N Desirable s-roomed
a*d stable and
VICTORIA, B. C, SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 1904
DEC 911904
Price 8 Cents.
-k
tv
XMAS FRUIT BARGAINS
' Dixi Brand Seeded Raisins, 3 for     25e
Dixi Brand Mixed Peel, 2 lbs. for   25c
Dixi Brand Re-eieaned Currants, 3 lbs. for ...25e
i Dixi Brand Extract Lemon and Vanilla. 2 oz. tor 20c
• Dixi Brand Extract Lemon and Vanilla, 8 oz. tor     50e
DIXI H. ROSS & CO., The Independent Cash Grocers
Best Bread
London and VancouYer Bakei
73 Fort St.
Van deliveries to all parts of city
and suburbs.
D. W. HANBURY
Proprietor.
fgfprVjthr
^^"■.^PWP. ^lf> ^Fr*. ^Pe* *fW^ *7PV% ^f4» ^^"* ^F#» *9n*» ^■Js^^Pssvs^^r* ^^^t^fp. ^r^K^a^W^p^tT^risv^l^t^^V^w ^Mr^^Is^^WIw^I
NEW  BARUfe/
First car of new season's crop just to hand.   Cheaper than Wheat;
I    makes splendid ChickenIfopd.   Try a.saok.
f       The Brackman»Ker Milling Company. Ltd.
I 186 Government Street
loTnrms»6 a a t ttrvn a u u itafjl's u«■ n inpnnrii b. e riMfmmii
AMERICAN AMD BUROPEAN PLAN
Steam
Heated
Throughout
Good
Sample
Rooms <*,
Fashionable
Marriage
The Hotel Victoria
E. 0AVE, Proprietor
American Plan, 13.00 a Day art Op
Government Street, Viotoria, B. C.
BeWjUUUMAAxJt«JU»AJUU^
ng -        '   '*''      ':  '   '-    ' i>  i .i... . .        , .' .i' j,
•' ■■■'   ' Please cut .out and paat* at tranter Phone Book .,
Twteettia^^vf
\pjil\22 is the Phone (LocaJ or Long Distance) for
■the 20th Century Business Training Co., Ltd.
The New College la now complete, and la situate at theCpmar si Broad
attdYatW..v5toria.B.C.       ~v-^
■Subjects: ?«.^%^!^«S?
and Letter Prow Prtutfug: Kagrsvlag, IUostwIinc:
— » - ■>— -fc_t_*i sv_.*dAAMah*„   g ^aatdaa.d.aBaiakat. O.I.
Beading (pro.... ,^,._ _._-._
"orieetioesaad i-asWand Hehaors Work;
ng: CorisetwM
IPennunshtp; Qoometry; Oeographyj Uaga«f«; Zlooutlon; Cudiahi a«pp(rlng; Advertlil
Ad. Wrltlngi Gobi Lew for Clerks and Sieangrapners; CivilTBervUe; B.nkfog: Stocks I
Shares; RrokW twKifaaee; B«.leg and Belling; Electricity; Teaferafcay; navigation, .to.
POSTAL PUPILS-ALL PAKTaV . vW»': .,
Viotoria. All day, private tuUHs. Iftaiags, 7 to 1. 0B.ce, over Imperial Bank, Victoria,
ir. Fes Ble ' "    ■«-•—----•■ * ■"— --* ■-»»'■— '
Vancouver.
liocirior Shorthand, "Typewriting, and Inquirers. T
We have the largest stock of Fixtures and Electric
• House Fittings in B. C.■ '.
THE HINTON ELECTRIC
NEW PREMISES
a9|Qevernnient Street
Victoria, B. C
STORIES OF THE STREET.
New Caledonia disappeared years ago
land now the Caledonia Park is gone.
• •   •
The latest assault case is that of
iNogi upon Fort Arthur.
• •  •
[The public is still wondering who was
the lucky winner on the late legal elopement contest.
•   •   •
"What a wise creature I am," remark-
led the Monkey as he read the last two
[lumbers of "Progress."
.   .   •
If you want to stand in well with the
ladies you must get your name on Miss
[O'Leary's autograph book.
* *   it
Tommy Atkins or no Tommy Atkins?
is a question which vitally affects the
veil-being of Victoria just now.
* *   *
It is all very well for the Young to
I believe in Christian Science. Old people do not always find its theories practicable.
...
Messrs. Ross & Co., popular franchise
Imerchants of Toronto, have decided to
j:ontinuc the business with a rc-organ-
[ized company.
Mr. J.ID. Pemberton and  Miss
Helen Baiss United at Christ
Church Cathedral
Last Thursday afternoon at half past
two o'clock, Christ Church Cathedral
was/ filled with the fashionable and
expectant guests of Mrs. Baiss, who
were invited to witness the marriage ot
her daughter, Helen Mary Yoder, io
Mr. Joseph Despard Pemberton.
The church was beautifully decorated
with bunches of white crysanthemums
and ferns, tied with large true-lovers'
knots of white satin ribon.
The marriage ceremony Was solemnized by his Lordship the Bishop of Columbia, assisted by the Rev. W. Baugh
Allen. Punctual to the minute the fair
young bride was escorted up to the altar
rails by Mr. H. P. O'Farreli, who, in
the absence of the bride's father, gave
her away. The bridal gown was one
Of dazzling beauty, it being made of
beautiful ivory white duchesse satin,
literally covered in rare old Brussels
point lace. This exquisite lace, together
with the bride's veil, has, many years
been an heirloom in her family. Her
ornaments were pearls, a . beautiful
necklace, pendant and sunburst, and she
carried a lovely shower bouquet of white
l bridal roses and maidenhair fern. Miss
[ Gladys Baiss, sister of the bride, was
maid of honor. She wOre a lovely gown
of soft cream silk draped with Limerick
lace and carried a large bouquet of crysanthemums. Her large picture hat was
of white chiffon and lace, trimmed with
large ostrich plumes. Miss S. B. Pemberton and Miss Amy Angus acted as
bridesmaius, and were beautifully gowned in cream .colored crepe de chene with
much shirring and lace. They w6re
large hats of brown paune velvet artistically trimmed with red and gold-brown
velvete crysanthemums, and long tulle
ties, of the same shades, Their bouquets
were also of golden-brown crysanthemums, tied With long streamers of red-
brown tulle. The gift of the bridegroom
to each of the bridesmaids was a pearl
heart-shaped brooch' with emerald centre, The little train bearers were .the
two pretty children of Mrs. C. vf.'
Rhodes and they performed their part
in a most dignified and stately maimer.
Mr. VV. D. Pemberton acted as best
man, and the ushers were Messrs. Gregory, Bridgman, Scholefield and Charteris
Pemberton.
After the marriage ceremony, the bridal party and guests were conveyed in
carriages to 'TMountjoy," where congratulations and best wishes were tendered to the happy pair.
Mrs. Baiss received in an exquisite
gown of' silver grey liberty silk over
pale pink, taffeta silk, with trimmings
of pink paune velvet and lovely Limerick lace. Her hat was of the same
shade Of grey with pink roses, and she
H carried a large bouquet of pink carnations and ferns,   Mrs. F, B. Pemberton
Pemberton, cheque; MissQ.RirPenvj, |~|AIn    HrvmA
berton, silver sugar spbdnVMr,& Pern-'  ■ ld§/    IIOIIIC
berton, china coffee cup; Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Beaven; one dozen silver spoons;
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Beaven, silver teapot ;  Major C. T. Dupont, silver salt ——
cellars; Mis Nellie Dupont, china cream  Ti,- n.-A..~t. »« ■ -—i   e .   ■
jug and sugar basin; Miss Bell, silver jThe **»** °< Lo««   Factories
Industries
Should be Preferred to
Imported Articles
souvenir; Coloney Gregory, bronze and j
glass vase; Mr. J. C|  Bridgman, pair!
of silver vases; Mr. E .Scholefield, sil-1      	
ver handled riding whip;   Right Rev. | —-—
Bishop of Columtna, scent bottle; Rt. .
Rev.   Bishop  and  Mrs.  Cridge, photo     A wnter ln the Colonist recently drew
and frame; Mr. and Mrs. Daundy, china! attention to the beneficial results that
plate;.Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner Johnson,  would accrue io Victoria if Victorians
silver candelabra and candlesticks; Lady  were  t0 give mon generous support«
Crease, flower,pot; Mrs. G. H. Barn-    ■
ard, carved stand; Mr. and Mrs. Bur-
rell, cut glass and silver vases; Mr.
and Mrs. Ross, silver photo frame; the
Misses Shannon, cheque; Mrs. T. G.
Churton, cheque; Senator and Mrs,
Mrs. Macdonald, leather travelling case;
Mrs; Gavin Burns, silver grape scissors; Mrs. and Miss Alice Bell, silver
dish; Mr. and Mrs. Anmdell, case of
dressing silver; Mrs. James and the
to local industries. This is a subject
that deserves consideration. The ''boys
and girls are growing up and they require a field for their industry. For.
years there has been a steady exodus
of young Victorians who failed to nnu
employment in their native city,' or even
on the Island. This is not well. In a
young community there should be plenty of opportunity for the exercise of
Misses Angus, silver soup ladle; Mt* I*,'"1, """'""'r , • • • e °!
Biggniltcr, lace handkerchief; Miss l™^ and talem> »nd'l Vtf!100"}
Btonilter, set of gold buttons; Mrs.'*8* °ur. young people should have tflf
Brown, leather card case; Miss Brown,|^..^ l!'!^ ^where-and of-
lace table centre; Mr. and Mrs, W. T.
Burton,,cut glass scent bottle; Mr. Bui
Wer, - cheque; Mrs.' Barnet, cheque;
Miss Bodington,; travelling clock; Mr.
C. A. Cornwall, silver vase; Mr. Arthur
D. Crease, cigarette box; Mr. Lindley
Crease, hot .water, bottle; Ms. A. D.
Crease, Japanese table centre; Mrs.
Croft, silver ornament; Mr. A, A. Clayton, silver flower pot; Mrs. Carmichael,
cut glass and silver salts bottle; Dr. and
Mrs. Cobbett, two cut glass and silver
scent bottles ;• Mrs. Courtney, silver
brush and comb, Mrs. Henry Cook,
travelling writing case and ink stand;
Mrs. Cuppage and Miss Kane, silver
photo frame; Mr. Colley, pearl and emerald-brooch; Mr. Downs, cheque; Mr.
Dudley, silver card case; Mr. and Mrs.
ten under a foreign flag.
Such phrases as "Vancouver: Island's:
resources are immense" have been cur- '
rent so long that the meaning is half'
lost sight of. The resources are great,
but it has become almost a; habit to expect "outside" enterprise to develop
them, and so the situation is, that the
best of victoria's young people seek
fortune elsewhere while Americans take
hold of Island industries.
But in (be city itself there are a number of young industries—manufactories
of preserves, clothing, foods, soap, furniture, etc.—which while not' entirely
dependent upon the local consumption,
can be greatly strengthened by home
trade. The products of these factories
are excellent, quite as good and often'
Dumbleton and Miss   LeNevue; brass J*"10/ t0 *e ^ported article, and yet
— ' thorp   art.  manv  V,i.tAr,.n.   wh.    ..!*»<]..
kettle; Mrs,
bottle; Mr. and
there are many Victorians who, chiefly
Few, glass and silver scent ■£"« ™ "W vcronam, wno, cmeny
,. -id Un. Gillegpie, c»t glass ^S^ ** "* «"« th« *£g
celery jar; Mr, A. Gillespie, salts bottle ■**&£%' ,Purch"e thel   S**?*1
goods all the time.   These local indus-
jar; Misses Goward, cut   glass scent
bottle.; Mr. and Mrs. A; T. Goward,'
silver egg stand; Mr. Fox, silver photo -.    ■■• . .. -   u,. .-. , ,
framed Misses Von Fullots, silver »^^d ^ 8re ^bit   of   >**&
tries furnish employment at fair remuneration to a large number of peo-
"Patronize home industries;" ought to
be a motto for Victorians who are
proud of their city and desire to see it
LAW AUD POUOE.
The adjourned Fall Assize Court will
"This, town has a very muggy, cli- wore a beautiful frock of black silk and
mate," said a stranger as he passed a Jape, .and Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, the
third shop with children's cups displayed mother of the bridegroom, also wore a
in the window. | rich black silk gown, with rare old lace
and diamonds.   Mrs. Hugo Beaven. was
"Rather too much exposed for comfort," remarked the Monkey as he climbed the two hundred foot pole on Douglas Rock.
...
The small boy is beginning to flatten
his nose against the store windows.
Unlike a large proportion of the Old
Country boys, he gets his full share of
the treasures behind the glass.
...
Now that St. Andrew's Day is past
and gone and the haggis has all been
eaten the world will turn on its axis
steadily once again.
...
When  the Governor-General  is constrained to swear immediately on landing in this country, what can be expected of the ordinary citizen?
...
More flower beds art being made on
the Parliament grounds on the west side
in order that the first impression of the
tourist may be a good one With a
fountain playing in the centre these
grounds would be very attractive.
becomingly gowned in cream colored
lace over pale green silk. Miss Sophie
Pemberton looked rharming in a picturesque robe of white lace, with large
hat of soft brown beaver and bouquet
of golden-brown crysanthemums. Among the other smartly gowned guests
were Mrs. Gillespie in a grey velvet frock with ermine trimmings; Mrs.
Janion wore . a beautifully brocaded
black and white satin with tacc fishu;
Mrs. Arthur Jones, a lovely mouse grey
velvet with sable stole and large muff;
Mrs. Barnard, dark red cloth and rich
furs.
The bride's going-away dress was a
very smart tailor-made gown of dark
green cloth, and hat to match of soft
beaver. The honeymoon will he spent
in England.
A partial list of the costly and lovely
presents received hy the happy couple,
is as follows: Mrs. Baiss, china tea
service and Japanese silks; Miss Louise
Baiss, cheque; Mrs. Pemberton, cheque
and, turquoise necklace; Mr. and Mrs.
F. B. Pemberton, cheques; Mr. P. W.
D. Pemberton, silver entree dishes; Miss
S. T. Pemberton, cheque; Miss H. S.
buttons; —ir . B. G. Goward, band
painted tea set; Miss Dorothy Green,
silver photo frame; 'Miss Gibson; cut
glass dish;. Mr, and Mts. Gamett, 'In- .^.-i .-j „-„„,; „.„„ .   Tl ■•"
man silver bracelet; Mr. L H. GaMett, Lff^^JS^   *•. *"'
Mrs. Griffiths, cut g)as* dish; Mr. A. H.,' iai>agome **&*• ,
Grantoff and the Misses Grantoff (Eng-1 r    '"■'
land) cheque; Mr. A. Hawey, pair of j
silver sauce ladles; the Misses Hawey,!
silver" bowl; Mr., arid Mrs. and the
Misses   Hickey, silver photo , frames; >
Mr, and Mrs. G. S. Holt, cnt glass dish; ."W"* on Tuesday morning next, Mr.
Lt.-Col. and Mrs. Jone* cut I"* «*d J«*» ***** presMlng.
si|ver stand; Mr. and Mrs. Hamfield,. *  *  *
cut glass vase; Mrs. Arthur Robertson,'   The Fall Court in Vancouver has been
brass candlestick; Miss Bowron, drawn oectipied during the week with the ap-
work embroidered collars; Mr. W. E. peat in Hopper vs. Dunsmuir.
Ward (England), cheque; Mrs. Mac- *  •  *
lure, brass Chinese kettle; Miss K. Mac-1    In the Provincial police   court   On
lure, Japanese work; Miss B. Maclure, Thursday Thomas Marion and Thomas
cloisoune box; Mrs. and Misses Kitto, Young were fined $15 each and costs
four cut glass vases; Mr. A. J. Galletly, for having trespassed on   the Hatley
clock; Miss Musgrave, pair of vases; Park estate, Colwood, contrary to the
Mrs. Solly, poker-work leather bag; Mr. provisions of the Game act.
and Mrs.   Wynne, biscuit* jar;   Mrs.     - *  *  *
Rhodes, Chinese table; Mr. Loundes,}   -r^ Supreme Court will commence a
drawn work table cover; Mrs. Pearse, M8gion on Tuegday next   Thffe „e a
egg boiler; Rev. and Mrs. Lloyd, silver number of divorce rases t0 ^ heard but
umbrella handle; Mr. and Mrs. H. F. it is ^,^,,1 no defence wi„ be put in
Langton, cut glass dish; Mr. and Mrs. by ^y o{ the respondents.
Oliver, half dozen china teg cups; Dr.
and Mrs.  Powell .silver salt cellars;
»   «  *
Jasper, Wirth and Strek have been
Mr. H. B. Walker, silver sugar sifter; committed |or tria| on the charge of
Mrs. George Phillips, pin cushion; Mr.' naVMtg assaulted and inflicted grievous
Welby Solomon, brass gang; Mrs. and, bodily harm upon Conductor   McLeod
Miss Phipps, tea cloth drawn work; Mr. jon a„ Esquimalt car.
and  Miss. O'Neill,  silver  salt  cellars;
Miss  Webling,  Japanese  centre;  Miss
McCandlish,  fur muff;  Mr. and Mrs.
Reid, travelling clock; Miss T. M. and
Mr. R. T. Payne, gold chain and locket;
Mr. and Mrs.  M.  R.  Worlock, paper
knife; Mrs. McGirn, photo frame and
writing case; Mr and Miss Newcombe,
four silver and cut glas vases; Mr. and
Mrs. Joly de Lotbiniere, cut glass and
silver   vase; Mr. Muskett, silver , tea
spoons; Mrs. Leonard, cut glass bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Mahers, carved stand and
flower pot; Mr. and Mrs. Poff, cut glass
dish. .   .
The question agitating thc mind of
thc average male householder is, whether he can evade .paying enough debts
to enable him to buy Christmas presents
and celebrate the festive season in a
lilting manner.
'ANOTHER PAIR OF SLEEVES."
Time was not very long ago,
When Mabel's walking skirt
Trailed half a yard behind to show
How well she swept the dirt.
But "short and sweet" are in again;
No more the grievance rankles,
For Mabel's now curtailed her train
And shows her dainty ankles.
But Mabel has a thrifty mind
To supplement her charms;
The frills that once she wore behind
She fastens on her arms.
Her sleeves are made in open bags
Like trousers in the navy;
No  more she sweeps  thc  streets, but
drags
Her sleeve across thc gravy.
—London Punch. PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEC. 8, 1904
ZION CITY:!
AN INSIDER'S VIEW |
By Agnes Deans Cameron      %
Throw physic to the dogs; I'll X
none of it.—Macbeth V.j ©
0000<XK^>00^00^00000*<^0^00
This week I interviewed an old gentleman who has just returned to Victoria from a year's sojourn in "Zion
City." The returned Zionite is Mr.
Semple, who arrived in Victoria with
the Royal Engineers away back in 1858
and who for 45 years has continually
resided in this Province.
A year ago Mr. Semple and his wife
removed to "Zion" to make their
home within the walls of Dowie's city.
Mr. Semple is an ardent admirer and
faithful follower of John Alexander
Dowie, and very courteously gave me
the following information:—
Zion City was founded three years
ago on the shores of Lake Michigan;
it has two and a half miles of lake
frontage and covers an area of 24
square miles. Zion is 42 miles east of
Chicago and 42 miles north of Milwaukee, "midway between Beer and
Babel;" and the Chicago and Northwestern railroad makes one clear cut
through the city direct as the crow flies.
The town is laid out with mathematical
exactness, all streets lined with shade
trees, and every house removed 30 feet
from the sidewalk. Longfellow says
that the streets of Philadelphia re-echo
the trees of the forest, similarly Zion's
avenues have a Scriptural ichor, Gilboa,
Ezra, Gabriel, Amos. Fancy taking a
morning constitutional along Jehosophat
avenue or watching a dog fight (do
dogs fight in Zion?) at Gabriel Corners.
In Zion City there are 10,000 people,
and the community has many unique
features. There are no saloons in
Zion; and no advertisements inviting
one to "Chew Pay Roll" or "Smoke
Tail Twist." You must leave your cigarettes behind when you essay those
Biblical avenues. No gambling and no
profanity may enter into Zion, so political elections there must be tame affairs. Zion City went strong for Roosevelt in November. Mr. Dowie thinks
his lace factories will prosper best under a gold standard. No Grands, Savoys, Crystals, Edison's, opera houses
or Redmonds relieve the tedium of the
lakeside city, though baseball matches
and sacred concerts are allowed. Women in Zion may sell pork, or dispense
drugs or practice medicine; but there
are two dentists in the midst, one black
and one white, you may take youi*
choice.       ■ -s—<?& Li*.iJHBa,»j,fciJ
Mr. Semple states regarding the financial government of the community that
there is absolutely no coercion; every
man is a free agent. If you become a
convert to Zionism you are at full liberty to live where you will, in Zion City
or elsewhere. You are not called upon
to give up all you have to the move-i
ment, though free-will offerings are not
rejected. A true Zionite gives 10 per
cent, of his gross earning to the Zion
Ecclesiastical Fund, out of which the
schools, colleges and churches in Zion
are administered, together with the missions for propaganda work all over the
world. ■;•'    ;»   -
There are no small stores, nor small
manufacturers or contractors in Zion
City. One big co-operative store supplies the wants of the citizens at Chicago prices, and all building and public works are carried on by the Zion
Building and Manufacturing Association, Believers are encouraged to become stockholders in these and allied
industries, the Zion Sugar and Confection Association, the Zion Lace Industries, the Zion City Bank. Shares are
itsued at the par value of $100 and
carry interest from 9 to 12 per cent.
Zion boasts some beautiful buildings,
the Zion College, Zion Printing and
Puoliining House, the big hotel or Elijah Hospice, and the Administration
Building, where the general manager
has his office.
In nothing is Dowie's executive ability better shown than in the choice of
his lieutenants. At the head of the Educational Department is Overseer Brace-
field, an ex-Presbyterian from California. Mr. Semple says there is no case
of recorded truancy among Zion's 4,000
children; they all cry to go to school,
and in the school scheme of discipline,
punishment gives place to prayer.
The factory works did not all spring
into life at once. They have been a
natural growth. Thc faithful found
Chicago candies deleterious, thc adulterations cunningly added to the seductive "boss chewing candy" and "taffy-
on-a-stick" by the unrcgenerate caused
interior warfare in tiie persons of Zion's
infants and threw 100 much business
into the hands of those two dentists, so
John Alexander said. "Go to! We will
manufacture our ov.:i jaw-stickers and
horehound peppermints I" and it was
done. Zion's canj't! are sent to the
farthest corners of the Seven Seas; a
13-ton order was recently sent to Africa, and the little children of Timbuc-
too and Somaliland now learn their letters off Zion peppermints. The head
of the candy pull is Deacon Rodda,
while a Canadian, Mayor Harper, is the
president of the Building and Manufacturing Association. Africa is a great
field for Dowieism. Recently a Zulu
chief, who was healed of consumption,
through the prayers of Zion, sent $5,000
to the cause, and gave the doctor a
plan.ation of mahogany.
Cnildren born in Zion have never
seen a drunken man, or a pipe (in
active operation), or a patrol wagon (1),
nor have they ever played bridge or
rushed the growler. In three years
there has never been a case in court
of any kind. When Zion's citizens want
to *>u' through Craigflower road or slice
up homesteads to make direct roads to
the 1 aik, when they want to remove
Indian reserves or provide every man,
woman pnd child with a water meter,
Johr. Alexander Dowie calls the people
iGoClher and explains the situation to
then 'in a few well-chosen words," the
people hasten to agree with one another
and vith him, and the thing is done;
ccn-cqueiitly Judge Barnes has a sinecure i»k! a well-stocked box of white
glove.1?.
When the little children in Zion meet
one atm-her on those euphonious streets,
you htai no such worldly salutation as,
"Give us a f-ttit!" "I'll play you,
Skinny!" or "You think you're smart,
don't •■cu?" The chaste greeting is,
"/'< ice to thee," and the retort courteous. "1'cace to thee be multiplied!"
Pr.'iiei meetings are held by deacons
and deaconesses at the homes of the
reoplc all through the week, but Sunday is, of course, the great day for ser-
vK'e. At a quarter to 6 the doctor
speaks ' heart to heart" with his people.
At u is the Junior meeting, and at 10:30
thc 1 ill ti mediate gathering under Judge
Barms. At 11 Deacon Sloan holds his
Bible class. At 2 o'clock is a grand
proce:«.'ion, and afternoon service begins
sat i'ft an Edinburgh Sunday school
ben.'h. A prize had been offered to the
boy who next Sunday would bring in
the feieatest number of new recruits.
Little John A. had three pence which
he .mis-ted in candy bulls-eyes. He
get a gioup of small boys gathered and
promised them each three candies as a
bribe for entering the fold, making a
deposit payment of one bull's-eye down
to cacii pressed man, leaving the deferred payment of two candies to a
more cmvenient season. He was able
lo iiioW a larger contingent than any
rivnl n.issionary and so secured the
trop'.iy. Men are but% children of a
larger growth.
Gaol authorities here think Lawrence
Mooney, Philip Chalk and Jimmy Chickens have quite a local record for appearances at court, but John Alexander
Dowie has been arrested in Chicago no
fewer than 100 times, and thrives on it.
The one great disadvantage of the
present Zion City is the climate. It is
exceedingly cold in winter, and windy
most of the time. It is intended to
build a second Zion in Mexico, and Mr.
Semple thinks that eventually a third
Zion will appear somewhere in thi.^
great Northwest coastal country.
ON CRITICISM
.it j. There is a choir of 500 mixed
voices, supplemented by a junior choir
of 3..0, the choristers affecting white
surplices and mortar boards. Music is
a great factor of all services in the in-
stritnic, lal part of which sixteen violins
and a $1,000 harp, "like that which
David clayed," take part. One must go
early t' secure a seat in the Tabernacle The last day Mr. Semple worshipped there he got his seat at half-
past r snd remained at the services until 8 oc'ock. Seventy different nationalities were represented in the vast audience— 1 v-Presbyterians, Mahommedans,
apostate Jews, Armenians. Doctor
Dowie teaches all foreign recruits that
English is the dominant language, and
foreign-born children soon learn it in
the schools. There are no electric cars
in Zion, but stages ply for a five-cent
fare        "i'■• ■•■_ ■■■:■■ .'*i < ■■' -
Zion City pays taxes to the United
States government, but Zion's schools
arc not state-supported. Mr. Semple
claims that Zion is the one city in the
whole State of Illinois that has paid its
full «ax to Uncle Sam's money box for
the cut lent year.
Zion's citizens are all honest. There
is a Lost and Found department in the
city, presided over by an elder, and no
man ever mistakes a $10 silk umbrella
for the more familiar Gamp,
The great divine healing meeting is
scheduled for every Tuesday. It is no
unusual scene to see 200 people of all
nationalities drawn up in sick chairs
waiting for the intercessory prayers.
Inside the Tabernacle Mr. Semple has
counted a hundred pairs of crutches left
there by cripples who needed them no
longer, and 65 high-heeled boots once
used to supplement shortened legs.
1 Other discarded relics left on the altar
I are stomach pumps, pipes, tobacco
pouches, doctors' implements, prayer
beads, lodge emblems of all kinds.
When you join Zion you must sever
your connection with all secret societies.
Among the followers of Dowie are no
less 'nan 30 ex-Masons of the Mystic
Spr.r<j. Mr. Semple himself ceased to
be ■■■ Forester when he entered the community. God said, "In secret have I
.'.-.'d nothing.''
John Alexander Dowie made his first
appearance in America the year of the
Chicago World's Fair, coming from
Ail'-iflia. Fourteen years ago he was
in Vic oria and preached in St. Andrew's F rcsbyterian Church. In Aus-
Ira'i.- he was a Congregationalist. Mr.
Semple tells a characteristic story of
Dr. 1 owie. It shows admirably how
niissionaiy work, organizing power and
riioney making harmoniously blended in
his character from the cradle. At a
very tender age little John Alexander
Series of Papers on the Interesting $
ubject of the Value of Criticism. %
Written for Progress. a
By N'OUBLIER.     X
III.
In all the elements necessary to form
or evolve as a centre of culture and eiiT
lightenment, Victoria is very rich. Without wishing in the least to truckle to
public conceit, or to offer a sop to local
pride, one may say with truth that this
little city is peculiarly dowered in the
matter of what I might term promiscuous culture. That is, we have here
collected from many and various quarters of the globe men and women who
know the best. Those units leaven
every mass they touch. They are the
red corpuscles in the intellectual side of
any community, because they know intuitively, or have been trained, how to
estimate components that go to make
up the great thing called art. It is a
matter of inherent taste or of careful
cultivation this subtle power of appreciation.
Victoria can gather an audience or a
party of spectators who are as competent to say "good" or "bad" to any sort
of performance in "art as any audience
or any spectators in the world. It is
exceedingly funny to listen to some of
the advance agents of famous actors,
singers, or musicians, wondering if there
will be found in Victoria even a dozen
able to understand the great one. Yea,
it may at all times be answered to those
forerunners, hundreds who understand
and cannot be deceived by flaming placards, hysterical press notices or the
enthusiasm of the impresario, but who
judge by the work done. Scores of
those discriminating persons never attend the local concerts, but avoid them
as they would the path of pestilence.
But, although never seen at the bushels
of concerts that make gay the season in
Victoria, they arc here, and their opinions are the dicta that have real weight.
How can it be otherwise? In Victoria there is a greater number in proportion to the population, of college
and university graduates, or of persons
who received part of their education in
those seminaries of learning, than is to
be found in any other city in Canada.
Then we have retired army and navy
officers, retired members of the British
civil service from many lands, not to
mention the presence on the station >
of the active representatives of the army
and navy, the officers and their families,
who bring here with them the atmosphere of refinement and culture and
taste that makes social life in England
that indefinable something to breathe
which again every young English exile
in the colonies longs and labors.
Hence, when notable persons in art or
music come hither thinking to act or
sing or play to a collection of unin-
structed bumpkins, they err lamentably,
and still more lamentably should they
be so indiscreet as to permit themselves
to be careless or slovenly in their work.
Hundreds in their Victoria audiences
have probably formed part, on previous
occasions, of vast audiences in London,
New York, Paris or Berlin. So that
it is the height of folly for famous players or singers to come to Victoria under
the impression that it is one of   the
"stands" on the rural circuit.
From these premises I argue that Victoria should be more honest with itself.
Introspection is fashionable at present.
Since Marie Bashkirtseff published her
thoughts on the mysteries of life, all
sorts and conditions of folk haVe been
turning their minds, or their hearts,
should they happen to possess one of
those clever inventions, inside out, and
I'examining the contents with high power
magnifiers. Every season in Victoria
there are many concerts. Haif, indeed
one-third of the number would be more
than enough, and into those could be
compressed a little of the ingredient
which nearly all of them lack now,
namely, quality. There is more squallity
than quality in a great deal of what is
euphemistically termed singing at these
Victoria concerts. The wild, passionate
rage of the raw, untrained amateur vocalist to "git to them footlights an' give
'em (the unhappy audience) a sample
o' what singin' really is," lies at the root
of the trouble. The disgraceful flattery
of uncultured and therefore critically-
powerless friends aggravates the mania;
the utter lack of attempts by the press
to check the fearful multiplication of
"concerts" and "musicales" all combine
to endanger the progress and .development of culture amongst the general
public in this city.
In Lancashire and Yorkshire there are
numbers of country bands, made up of
miners, farm servants, mechanics,; laborers and other toilers. The music
of those bands has astonished and de-
| lighted critical audiences in, the great
cities of England and Scotland. Is it
to be supposed that the people of Lancashire or Yorkshire would tolerate that
most consummate of all nuisances, a
bad band, bad singing, bad' music of Vny
kind? In the language of the great,
American, ..vot much." ' Over in those
counties when man, woman, girl ;orJboy
takes up music, vocal or instrumental,
he or she; knows that it is useless to
hope for even a hearing until' 'patient,
faithful practice has- given the power
necessary to make a favorable impression. No rushing upon the concert platform there, even at the humblest tea.
meeting or bun feed, unless the singer
or player can do honor to the -fUnda-J
mental principles, at least, of music.
Why should not Victoria's ambitious
amateurs emulate the good example of
Lancashire and Yorkshire and go back
to their practice, determined, to find
something more than the raucous applause of persons' incompetent to tell
whether a note is one or sixteen rows
of apple trees off the chord? What
Victoria amateurs who appear so faith-'
fully at its appalling number b£'winter-
concerts, want, is more training. Let
them just think a moment of the position they would find themselves in Were'
the daily press suddenly to reform and
tell the truth about those performances!
Let them think of the things that might
be said and could be said about their
work were truth-telling popular or fashionable. Back, then, to your studios,
your ateliers, your garrets or wherever
you may dp your work, and practice,,
practice, practice and let Victoria's pub-'
lie in its own significant way remove
the incentive that is spoiling so many
likely young musicians and other artists,
Tearful Wife—Before , ybu married,
me you said you cohld hot live without
me.
Rude Husband—A man never knows
what he can do Without? until he tries.
LOVE IS BLIND;
What color are her eyes?  What, shade?
You ask;.but I could never fjeU'f' !
They're just her eyes, and God ne'er
made , ,:   -
Another pair of eyes so well.
For when she comes, I'm at her side,
, Ah I far too close to recognize
Aught but the welcome quick implied,
The loving laughter in her eyes.
-G. N. H.
* •     DAILY 7Zc°
flatinees ioc. all over.
6
R
fl
D
30C.
Res.
Seats
Management of
ROBT.   JAHIESON.
WEEK OF DEC. 5th
Illustrated Song
Mr. Frederic Roberts
"For the Love of n Girl"	
R.F. Blanche
Murphy and Andrews
High-Class Entertainers
Ida Russell
In her latest offering of Vocal and
Conversational Eccentricities
The Irving-!'rio
Marvelous Acrobats
I.e narge
The Instrumental King
The Star Trio
Jennings O'Brien, Mann and
Franks
Presenting an  original comedy
entitled "Our Uncle"
New pictures
"Joseph Sold by his Brothers"
Savoy Theatge
W. G. Stevenson, Mgr.
WEEK OF DECEMBER 5
A Multifamous Bill
Hewlette's
Merry
Burlesquers
AND
Trccadero Vaudevilles
In the Merry Musical Burlesque,
entitled
"High Rollers"
16-PEOPLE-16
PRETTY GIRLS
SPECIAL SCENERY
DAZZLING COSTUMES
GRAND CHORUS
FUNNY COMEDIANS
ALL STARS
, ALL FEATURES
No Advance iu Prices
Admission 15 and 25c.
Victoria   Theatre
Monday and Tuesdny, Dec. 5 & 6. ;
THE VICTORIA AMATEUR OPERj
,     :, ATIC COMPANY
Will give the Popular Comedy Operl
"Dorothy" j
With Full Orchestra
Special Scenery.    Elaborate Costumes]
Curtain at 8 p.m. sharp.
Reserved tickets $1.00, 75c., 50c.
.Gallery 25c. .
On sale Saturday, Nov. 19th, at Wait1
& Co., Government St
/Victoria Theatn
Saturday, Dec. 3rd
Dim NJffBT ONLY.
the Devil's
Auction
;   Bigger, Better Than Ever;
New Electrical Features, New Ballet'/
Etc. a
Seats on saleThursday.at Waitt 'sir
Johnson Street
Go where the crowd goc.«
m
Victoria's Popular Family Play House
Continued Success of the
ED. REDMOND CO.
Week Commencing  Monday, Dec. vj
and continuing until Wednesday.
Evening
The Western Success
"California"
Souvenir Matinee, Wednesday
Seats 10 cents
A Few Reserved for 25 cents
Thursday and' Balance of Week,
Ending Saturday Matinee
The Scenic.Drama
"The Lighthouse Robbery"
Night Prices, 10 and 25 Cents
Phone No. 822 '
Call us up and Reserve Your Seats
Hotel Davis
Our Rooms aie the most central, tbe
best furnished and most comfortable in
the city.
The famous Poodle Dog Restaurant in
the building.   Cuisine unexcelled. PROGRESS, SATURDAY DEC. 3,   1904
»The Misadventures of
Augustus Sfflitkrins
Told in a series of letters from Mr.
Smitherins to his father, Sir Augustus
Smitherins, Bart., of Smitherins Manor,
Norfold, and edited with an introduction
an d explanatory notes by
-^Arnold Watson.
MISADVENTURE NO. I—AUGUSTUS IS BORN.
, In presenting to the public the interesting letters of my friend, Mr. Augustus Smitherins, I feel that it is my duty
to preface the collection with a brief
introduction, descriptive of the personality of Mr. Smitherins and the circumstances which resulted in his departure
from England to that distant and semi-
civilized colony of British Columbia, the
inhabitants and customs of which arc
so wonderfully depicted in his letters to
his distinguished father.
Augustus Smitherins first saw the
light of day on the first of April, Anno
Domini 1878, and was ushered into the
world by old Dr. Manners, the family
practitioner, assisted by Mrs. Bottan,
the midwife, who, tradition says, was so
elated at the infant being a boy that
the elation started her drinking to excess, so that she contracted a sickness
of the stomach and expired a month
later, somewhat noisily, but full of hope.
i The coming into the world of Augustus
was a great event for his father, the
baronet, and his lady mother. This distinguished couple had been married for
six years prior to the birth of Augustus,
without result in the shape of an heir
to the baronetcy or even in the less desired shape of a daughter. This had
been a grief to Sir Augustus and his
lady, and one-for which even Dr. Manners could not prescribe a remedy. But
with the birth of Augustus, this, the
only source of disagreement between the
baronet and Lady Smitherins, was removed, and in the length and breadth
-if England there was no happier family
ihan the Smitherinses of Smifherin
Manor.
Having shown thus briefly the important position in the world held by ourv
lero, I will pass lightly over the suc-<
•eeding years during which he was be^
ing reared to manhood. There are indeed few authentic documents in existence to be drawn upon for data touch-,
ng the boyhood of Augustus, and as he
is blessed with a short memory he is
unable to supply the missing informa-
f'on. But you, dear Reader, may rest
assured that nothing was omitted fromf
j'is education that would in any way
have assisted towards the desired re-.
suit—a young gentleman of exemplary
manners and with a genteel talent for
spending money. While hunting among
the correspondence of the baronet, 1
found, it is true, a number of letters
from our hero, during his school days,
tied together with blue ribbon. These
epistles, however, were very brief and
their principal point always was to be
found in the postscripts. From curious-
|ty I added up the amounts mentioned
in the postscripts, and as generosity was
always ie of the most notable traits
in the baronets character, I concluded
from my arithmetic that Augustus's
pocket money during his school days
amounted to a very tidy row of figures.
Coming of so distinguished a family
whose fortunes had been founded by an
adventurous sea captain in the reign
' of Elizabeth—a valorous man whom
the Spaniards, in their hatred and malice, turned a Pirate-it was not surprising that Augustus Smitherins should
have begun to display, early in his
career, the traits of an heroic character.
He somewhat neglected the mere bookish studies of Eton College and after
two years at Oxford, spent chiefly in
the study of Human Nature and the
curious effects of wine parties on Man's
Appetite for Breakfast, he listened to
the suggestion of the Dean of Christ
Church and withdrew from the scholastic arena, announcing to his affectionate parents his intention of Seeing the
World. His coming-of-agc was then
due, and, this important event having
been properly celebrated, Augustus set
fbout his preparations for exploring
the globe. First, he laid in a vast store
of wearing apparel and a complete armament of offensive and defensive weapons, and then he set inquiries on foot
as to the most desirable place in which
to commence his explorations. This
|; roved a tedious business, as everybody
had a different opinion on the subject,
but the problem eventually wes solved
by our hero's mother. Lady Smitherins from the first had regarded her
son's taste for exploration with considerable anxiety. This anxiety had increased to real apprehension as she
viewed the arrival and packing up of
an infinite variety of guns, rifles and
revolvers, and in her distress she sought
the advice of her brother, General Sir
Robert Scared. The general was a great
man whose only fault was his unutterable contempt for subalterns and any
youth who possibly develop into a subaltern, and he did not sympathize with
Lady Smitherins' anxiety about her son.
I will not quote all of the language used
by the General on this occasion. Nothing but his relationship to herself would
have permitted Lady Smitherins to listen to some of the General's remarks,
but in conclusion the hardy warrior
suggested British Columbia as a field
for the explorations of Augustus.
"Send him to British Columbia," said
the General, after delivering a remarkable and forceful exposition of his ridiculous opinion of Augustus, "and you
may bet he won't be hurt."
"Are you sure tliere are no cannibals
there?" questioned the fearful mother.
"I don't think so," said the General.
"But even if there are cannibals, they
would have better taste than to eat Augustus."
"But, . . but do you think such
dreadful people have any taste?" cried
Lady Smitherins.
"They won't eat a scarecrow I" growled the General.
"Robert!" exclaimed the horrified
Lady Smitherins. "Scarecrow, indeed I"
"They like 'em plump," explained the
General, " not all arms and legs; d	
•it."
"But where is British Columbia?"
queried Augustus's mother. "And how
do you get there?"
"I don't know," admitted the General.
"But I know a man at the club who
has been there to shoot game. I believe it is somewhere on the other side
of America."
And so it came about that on a nice
rainy day in the early spring of 1900,
Augustus Smitherins set sail from Liverpool bound for Quebec, en route to
British Columbia.
Of course, Sir Augustus and Lady
Smitherins travelled to Liverpool to see
the last, for many a day, of the son and
heir of the house. The last farewells
that were said, the tremulous handshakes of the worthy baronet, the httg-
gings and whispered admonitions of
Lady Smitherins—these may well be
imagined. Suffice it to say that finally
Augustus and his many belongings arrived on the steamer, and that as the
majestic vessel moved slowly away from
the dock and while Augustus waved his
hand to the receding figures of his affectionate parents, he felt himself to be
every inch a hero.
NO.  2—MISADVENTURES ON THE J0URNEV.
It is related by the fellow passengers
of Augustus Smitherins on the voyage
from Liverpool to Canada that our hero
suffered to a considerable extent from
mal-de-mer. In his first letter, written
from Quebec, he makes, however, no
mention of sickness, and indeed it is
hardly to be supposed that the descendant of the great Sea-Captain, Randolph
Smitherins, should be much troubled by
the action of waves upon a vessel, and
I am inclined to believe that he was not
so greatly inconvenienced as has acquaintances of the voyage have declared.
Augustus was not greatly impressed
by his experiences on this voyage, although on board the steamer he met
his First Canadian. In his letter to his
father, dated Quebec, he says:
"The whole thing was rather slow,
don't you know. There were several
Canadians on board, but they were no
class. One of them—a commercail. traveller—persuaded me to play a card game
called Poker. I didn't think much of
it. One does not play one's cards, but
one bets they arc worth more than any
of the other Johnnie's cards, and as
there are three or four other Johnnies
playing, the chances arc dead against
one. Rather stupid rot, I thought, and
also expensive The commercial fellow
was nearly always bucking about Canada, and when he managed to escape
from that subject he told objectionable
stories, most of which he credited to a
former prime minister, Sir John Macdonald."
Neither was Augustus greatly impressed by his first glimpse of the shores
of the New World:
"A steward fellow got mc out of bed
an hour earlier than usual. He said that
land was in sight. I went on deck and
found the weather very much colder
than it had been before. In the distance was a cold, white, rocky coast, covered with snow and no trees in sight.
I went down to bed again."
Of Quebec city, Augustus says:
"A queer, old fashioned place. Most
of the people cannot talk English, Seems
to me rather absurd that people in a
British Colony should talk in French,
don't you know. You might write to
'he Times about it. I found a very fair
hotel in the town. Needless to remark,
it is run by an English corporation."
Augustus, however, did not stay long
in Quebec. His next letter is dated
Montreal, and in that city he met with a
somewhat serious misadventure.
"You will be surprised to hear," he
write, "that Montreal is a fair sized
town with some fine large buildings.
I came across a new sort of drink here.
It is called a Cocktail. It is a mixture
of various stuff, tastes nice, but goes to
a fellow's head. I thought it was mild,
and the chap.who introduced me to it
assured me that it was harmless and
that he was in the habit of consuming
fifteen or sixteen between five o'clock
and his dinner hour. He persuaded me
to try a similar number. From the result, I conclude that the chap was a
liar. When I recovered I was sitting
on the doorstep of a house in some back
street. I had a fearful headache, my
hat and one boot had mysteriously vanished and I found I had no money—I
had about £20 when I started out—and
my watch also was gone. A policeman
helped me to get back to the hotel. The
only other recollection I have of that
terrible night is somewhat vague but I
have a horrid misgiving that at one time
I was trying to dance a highland fling.
Why, I cannot conceive, unless the Cocktail is of Scottish parentage."
From Montreal, Augustus travelled to
Toronto. This, he says in his letter, is
a rather handsome town.   He adds:
"It appears to be run by women's benevolent societies, but it does not strike
me as being a particular religious town
for all that. Every thing is very cheap
and I am told that wages are very low.
The women are well dressed but have
a faded look about them. The girls are
pretty and deuced cheeky. They stare
at you in the streets, or glance out of
the corners of their eyes—like the dress
makers' girls in Paris. The young men
wear their hair long, like school girls,
and let it hang over their ears and foreheads. Some times they even cherish a
curl in front Also they have a tendency towards scenting themselves."
Augustus did not like Winnipeg, his
stopping place, which he described as
ramshackle and bleak. But he was impressed by the prairies. Writing from
Calgary, he says:
"This is a tremendously big country
and it takes a long time to get through
it. People tell me it is being 'settled up
rapidly,' which means, I suppose, that
immigrants are starting farming. The
prairies look pleasant now, but must be
rather miserable in the winter' time
when, I am told, the mercury in the
thermometer goes out of sight. These
railway trains are" very comfortable, although it is awkward work dressing
and undressing in a bunk about Six by
Two, and you are apt lo kick the person
in the bunk below when you climb in or
out. They don't have any bathrooms
on the train, but people in this country
don't seem to go in for the daily tub.
I had to manage in a basin."
At Calgary, Augustus decided to proceed eventually to Victoria, where, he
was informed by a chance acquaintance,
bear shooting was good. But he found,
on inquiry, that the journey was too
long to be comfortably undertaken all
at once, and accepted the suggestion of
a railway official that he ought lo visit
Rossland and see the Mines. Acording-
ly he proceeded 10 the mining town,
and on arrival there met with a very
surprising misadventure which will be
related in the next chapter.
(NEXT WEEK-No. 3. The Surprising Misadventure of the Yellow
Dog.)
VOUNG CRIMINALS.
Society, for its protection, requires
that young men who enter upon a criminal career be arrested in this course as
soon as possible and dealt with according to the stern edicts of the law. It
is useless to palter with this proposition and unwise to seek through pity to
nullify its provisions. But the thing
that may be done and should be done,
in the rational and just interests of all
concerned, is to give young convicts a
chance while undergoing wholesome
prison discipline to improve and build
up their moral fibre. To this end they
should be kept separate and apart from
crime-hardened men, whose lives, even
under the strictest surveillance of the
prison authorities, are but the distilled
essence of degradation—Portland Ore-
gonian.
A gentleman who had read a recent
number of "Progress" came into the
office and after the usual preliminaries
of congratulation, etc. ,remarked: "That
was a great joke of yours this week."
"What joke," wc asked. "That one
about the monkey, you know. Ha, ha I
The idea of a monkey that could talk,
very good joke indeed!"
Price's Gold Medal Brand Catsup,
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and quality second to none.
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It is easy enough to be pleasant
When life goes by like a song,
But it's another thing to keep smiling
When your printing is all done wrong.
Bring your printing to us and we
will help to make things pleasant
by giving you good workmanship,
the best of stock, prompt execution
and low prices. Join our other
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The Thos. R. Cusack Press
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Through Tickets to Alberni, Crofton,   Comox and
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GEO. L. COURTNEY, Traffic Manager
ii
 ," said  the  Monkey, when he
heard that Augustus Smitherins was coining to Victoria.
Name.
Address.
i
Cut Out, Fill In, Mail to PROGRESS. 4
PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEC. 3,   1904
progress
A weekly newspaper  published  at  35
Fort street, Victoria, B.C.,
By S. A. G. FINCH.
Bnbscription Prica .... $1.00 a Taw
Advertising rates on application.
THE BOY CRIMINALS.
"Progress," having expressed its opinion on the subject, had no intention to
revert to thc case now before the Minister of Justice, of the two boys convicted of an indecent assault upon a girl.
But as the "Father of One of the Boys"
has seen fit to go into print with about
the weakest and most unmanly plea
imaginable, "Progress" asks the pardon
of its readers for saying a few more
words on this most unpleasant subject.
The communication under consideration
appeared in last Sunday's Colonist, under the caption "Punishment Should Fit
the Crime," a sentiment with which
"Progress" is entirely in accord. The
letter is reprinted on this page in order
to give, those of our readers who might
not have seen it an opportunity to read
and judge it. The writer of the letter
says that he feels compelled to write
to the press in the interests of fairplay
and justice. He says that "although it
would not have been edifying to have
had the whole of the details published"
he honestly wishes that the case had
been tried in open court. Why? Because "it would have saved a lot of
abominable falsehoods being industriously circulated." Now, "Progress" is
in a position to publish the evidence
given at the trial of those boys, and
wants to know what "abominable falsehoods" could be invented in the premises? The case itself is an abomination,
and except for an unexpected interruption to the boys' design, nothing
worse is to be imagined unless murder
were added lo outrage. "Progress" is
opposed to providing material for the
morbid minds of the community to
brood over, but if these attempts to
condone a beastly crime are to continue,
"Progress" will feel compelled, in the
interests of tbe public to publish the
evidence, given at the trial. It is the duty
of the press to protect the public from
danger in any shape or form, and the
condonement of crime—the cause of
(he lawlessness existent in many parts of
the United States—is one of the gravest
dangers that can threaten any community. When, two weeks ago, "Progress"
expressed an opinion on this case and
on the attempts being made to interfere
with the sentence imposed by Judge
Harrier, .•> friend of one of the r-rim-
ii.aft miade the remark th=>t what "Progress" said did not count for much as
ils voice was "a still, small voice crying in the wilderness." Well, ours
may be a small voice, but we can assure the jocular gentleman that it is
a voice that is heard in the community,
and it is the only voice that is raised
just now to say what the people think
about a very evil thing, and how they
regard the attempts being made to prevent two boys from getting the flogging they so thoroughly deserve.
...
Nothing can be said wisely against
the views of those writers who have
recently advocated reform in the treatment of juvenile offenders. Reform is
desirable, but there is no time so inopportune for the advocacy of this reform as when thc punishment of particular offenders is under consideration.
The issue is apt to be confused in the
minds of the public, and sympathy is
enlisted for those who least deserve it.
But in this case there is a peculiar
feature that docs not seem to have attracted the attention of the reformers,
and that is, thai the efforts being made
in behalf of llic Bartlett and Humber
are directed, not towards the curtailment of lire terms of their imprisonment, but towards saving (heir skins
from the lash. The effect of tbe negotiations, conducted through political
channels, has been that the boys have
not received the flogging ordered by
Judge Harrison, but they arc still in
gaol and likely lo stay there.
*   *   »
A few words about Ihe facts of the
case may be appropriate, because a great
effort is being made to mislead the public. The facts arc briefly as follows:
Three hoys planned to attack a young
girl. They were not acquainted with
her, and her character was so irreproachable that al the trial the defence
did not dare to impeach it. although
that course is almost invariably taken
in cases of this description. The boys
acted deliberately. They wailed on the
road for the girl to come along, and
iheii attacked her. They failed to carry
nnt their design because one of them,
Stationed oil Ihe sidewalk to "keep
guard," pave ihe alarm that somebody
was approaching,   Now, the charge laid
I
against the boys by the officers of the
Crown was not so serious as the offence.
The boys elected forj speedy trial on
that charge; the confessions obtained
from them by the police were ruled out
of evidence, and the Crown, in order
to prove the case, had to persuade one
of the boys—the youngest and least offender—to turn King's evidence. The
other two were then convicted and were
sentenced to very much less punishment
than provided by the Statute for the offence committed.
• »   •
With these facts in view, how can
any responsible citizen say that Bartlett
and Humber have been unjustly or unfairly dealt with by the law? Can such
an offence as that committed by these
boys be condoned and overlooked?
Surely Victorians have more respect for
the honor of their womankind than such
a supposition implies!
* *   *
There is another point of view in this
case, and that is the point of view taken
by the average man. Fortunately for
Bartlett and Humber, the girl they attacked has no father or brother to take
a hand in the business. If her father
was here, he might have been counted
upon to see that if the "impulsive
youths" (vide letter of "Father of one
of the Boys") escape the lash in gaol,
they will get it just the same so soon
as they are let loose on the community.
In other words, if such offenders are
to escape the penally of their offences
through political influence, the manly
section of the community will know just
what to do. "Progress" does not advocate the methods of popular justice, but
there are times wnen those methods are
wholesome.
....
Thc communication signed by the
''Father of One of the Boys" closes with
a statement that demands serious consideration. He says: "These boy arc
not the only transgressors in Victoria."
On its face this statement means little
or nothing; it might be passed over as
a truism. But it is made with a purpose, anu that purpose is to excuse the
sinners on the ground that crime of this
class is more or less common in the
community. Of course, the argument
has the contrary effect to that intended.
Tf it is true that such offenses are not
unusual there is all the more reason for
stern treatment of those whose guilt is
discovered. "Progress" docs not believe that there are many boys in Victoria of the same character as Bartlett
and Humber, but it is true that there is
room for improvement in the moral tone
of the rising generation, and this is a
matter to which the clergy and school
teachers, as well as parents, should devote their earnest attention. "Progress"
hopes that the case of Bartlett and Humber will not have to be referred to again.
The best thing for the boys and for
tbe community would be for the sentence of Judge Harrison to be carried
out so that tbe subject may cease to be
one of public controversy.
I score "Nobody" for saying he has
confidence in our judges, but not in the
Minister of Justice at Ottawa. Shame
on him, to say, in inference, he has not,
and then to hide behind a miserable
"non de plume" If he had an honest
opinion about any matter that ought to
concern the public he should have signed
his name.
There is coming a day (not far distant, I doubt not) when everything must
be open and above board. That Judge
will not judge after the sight of His
eyes nor after hearing of his ears, but
"in righteousness" shall He judge, and
few will escape. He himself says: "Let
us not bear false witness one to another,
as that is fraught with condemnation.
And none can escape but by mercy."
Therefore, "let us be merciful, as we
may obtain mercy, especially in the cases
of impulsive youths.
I feel like saying a few things about
the case that ought to be made public.
In the first place, the boys had no idea
of the enormity of the crime. This I feel
certain of from conversations I had with
them. I will say nothing about the
methods by which convictions were secured. In engaging council I only wanted fair play; but because unfair measures were used I wanted to have it exposed.
One other matter: I learned since
the trial that my boy had gone upstairs
to go to bed on that unfortunate night,
when the boy who got off scot free called or whistled him out. He went, and
the result, we know too well.
I believe good may come out of it
yet. After these few explanations, let
those wlio wish to cast stones now
smite all they feel free to do. I can
bear it. I feel I deserve the blame.
But, friends, remember "what measure
ye meet, it shall be measured to you
again."
Jn conclusion, let me say I have not
any malice or ill will to any one concerned, and inn a thousand times thankful that the re tilt of their folly was no
greater. I trust it will be a warning
to others, as I am afraid these boys
are not the only transgressors in Victoria.
FATHER OF ONE OF THE BOYS.
PUNlariAlENT SHOULD FIT
CRIME.
'HE
(From the Colonist of November 27.)
Sir—In reply to a letter signed "Nobody" in your last Sunday's issue, it is
painful for me, as a parent of one of
ihe boys, to write concerning this matter; but in the interest of truth and
fairplay, I feel I must, as a lot of ignorance, yes, wilful ignorance—exists
about the case. Although it would not
have been edifying to have had the
whole of thc details published, I honestly wish it had been tried in open
court. It would have saved a lot of
abominable falsehoods being industriously circulated. The truth about the mailer was bad enough, surely, but the
stories were simply awful. And T am
sorry that they seem to have got greater publicity.
The letter which appeared in your
last Sunday's issue deserves to be answered, because it is untrue, and savors
of wilful ignorance of published news
of the case. There was no jury of
twelve men, good and true, though 1
wish there had been. Neither do I think
it true to say it was a "child" who was
assaulted by young men. She is 15
years, as old as one of thc boys and just
a year younger than thc others. The
writer, in the interests of fairplay, might
have said "boys" and a girl. Thc sentence may or may not be a light one.
That is a matter of opinion. Personally, T didn't think it was very light—two
doses of lash and twelve months. T
have, however, entered no protest against
it. Thc boys were guilty of thc charge
and deserved to he punished. But it is
possible to overdo this matter of punishment. Law aims at correction as
much as punishment; that is often lost
sjvbt of in these days of hurry and so-
called progress.
TEARS   FON   MAJOR   MAUDE.
Lord Minto has gone, and Major
Maude with him, and thereby the limit
ton of Canadian society suffers irreparable loss.
Tlie major has done much to advance
the cause of etiquette in this country by
kindly suggestion and opportune advice.
At limes he has issued sartorial manda-
m'en'ts that nobody thought of disobeying, and always he has appealed to those
better instincts which have led us to improve on tbe costume of our distant,
wood-painted ancestors.
He has made it his task to polish our
manners and the results are incalculable. Owing to his efforts the merest
child knows that it is bad form to wear
top-boots with a swallow-tail coat, aud
that tan shoes do not chime with a plug
hat. These items of information generally diffused among trie masses, have
had notable effects, which we cannot
specify at this moment.
No one, we venture .'0 say, can vie
with him in our regard. Where in the
wide world is there another Petronius
so firm and yet so gentle in his admonitions? Major Maude was Mrs.
Grundy in a red tunic and striped
breeches, and no one could look at him
without reflecting on the tremendous
social responsibility of the British army.
—Toronto Star.
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ENGLISH   NURSES.
There are many to rejoice over the
birth of a son to the Czar, but no one
is more jubilant than the old English
nurse of the Czarina, who lives at the
Russian Court, and is in her way quite
a personage, "Miss Orchard." The late
Princess Alice of Hesse, before the
birth of her first child, wrote to Queen
Victoria and begged of her to procure
her ah English nurse. The Queen sent
thc homely and respectable Orcbardson,
who in time became the chosen confidante of Princess Alice, and was always
addressed by her as "Orchie," The
Czarina, in the kindness of her heart,
when she married, refused to leave her
old nurse behind her at Darmstadt, and
insisted on her accompanying her to
St. Petersburg.
English nurses are in great request
in all royal nurseries. The Kaiser's
boys had been brought up by English
nurses and governesses, and the Kaiser
himself and his brother Henry owe their
fluency in our language and their love
of cold-tubbing to their nurse "Hobbes."
to whom the Emperor and Empress were
much attached, and who frequently reminded their sons in after life how
('real was tneir debt of gratitude to her
for all (be good things she had taught
them. The Dutch Queen studied under
an English governess: so did the King
The Tourist Overcoat
If a coat can confer distinction on the wearer, a "Tourist"
certainly does.
It's a long, wide shouldered coat, loose fitting in the back,
where it is confined by a belt. It is made from choice fabrics,
some quite fancy, broken plaids and checks.
It is not too heavy, as the fabric is the weight used for Suits.
Swagger garments, every one of them. $15, $18, $20, $25,
$30 is the price range.
FIT-REFORM WARDROBE
1
73 Government Street
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Manufacturers of
English Ale and Stout and Aerated Waters
Telephone 444      Victoria West, B. C.
Have You Seen T. N. Hibben & Co's
B«utifui g^ 0f Victoria $*•
THE FINEST SOUVENIR OF THE  CITY PUBLISHED
None too Good
The best is none to good for my customers. It pays me to
only sell the finest goods. Our Wine Department is now complete for our Christmas trade.
Native Port, famous Quarts   25c
Fine Old Port '.     "       50c
Fine Sheri y     "       50c
Cooking Brandy      "   #1.00
CARNE'S CASH GROCERY
Phone 586 Corner Yates and Broad Streets
UNIQUE
SCALP SPECIALIST
Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors
Room 2 McGregor Blk.
Shampooing, Scalp Treatment and
Massaging 11 Specialty.
of Spain; whilst the King of Italy's
pretty little girls, as also the Czar's
quartette of daughters, have English
nurses and governesses.
ORCHESTRA RESIGNS.
The musicians who have been playing
at the Victoria Theatre for some time
past have sent in their resignations to
Manager Boscowitz and will play in
future at the Redmond Theatre, under
the direction of Frank Sampson.
Messrs. Morris and Gumbert will be
found in the Redmond orchestra, and
Miss Wardrope will also play there.
This new attraction at the Redmond will
be appreciated.
WANTED—Ladies to canvass subscriptions for "Progress." Apply "Progress" Office 11 a.m.
OXYQENCURE
Has cured in Victoria—
1 case of abscess in hip joint.
1 case of pneumonia and pleurisy in
2% days.
1 case of typhoid in five days.
1 case of spinal meningitis .
3 cases of inflammatory rheumatism.
2 cases of consumption, besides any
number of smaller eases. No sen-
sation experienced during use. Call
or inquire Mrs. Herbert Kent, 343
Yates street, or 'phone 185B.
Just Received
A large consignment of
DUTCH BULBS
Extra fine quality.
Ask for Price Lists.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market. PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEG.   3, 1904
Society News and Gossip
Alan S. Dumbleton, who recently disposed of his home on Rockland avenue,
has acquired the fine big residence belonging to the late Theodore Davie, on
Saanich road.
The bazaar in aid of the St. Andrew's
Roman Catholic Cathedral, has been very
successful''    in    every    way.    During
the past  week  the Institute  Hall  has
presented a most brilliant scene, with
gay bunting, flags, evergreens, and hundreds of colored lights, The decorating committee, under the able supervision of Mrs. A. Stuart Robertson, is to.
congratulated   upon this   success.   The
gaily decked booths, filled with all kinds
of fancy as well as useful articles, were
under the management of a number of
ladies.   In booth No. I were the Misses
McDowell, Miss Kerge, and Mrs. Sabin.
Thc chief attraction in this stall was the
beautiful hand-made lace, large Batten-
berg centre-pieces, dainty duchesse point
handkerchiefs,  honiton   collarettes,  and
linen tea cloths edged with other kinds
of lovely lace.    In booth  No. 2 were
Miss Conlin, Miss Johnson, Mrs. F. Sehl
and Mrs. F. Murray. Sofa pillows seemed to be the leading feature here, pretty
embroidered,  satin  pillows,  as  well  as
many of the more useful kind made of
linen, chintz and muslin.    Mrs. M. C. ]
Brown, Mrs. Hickey, Mrs. Radi.ger and
Mrs. Langton presided over booth No.
3,  where  the  most  prominent  articles
for sale were dolls.   The dolls were of
every size  and description,  even some
made in Klondike and dressed in leather
and beads.   The novelty booth was most
attractive to the fair sex, for it had all
kinds of dainty articles.   The ladies in
charge of this stall were Miss Baines,
Mrs. Goulding, Miss Dickson and Mrs.
O'Brien. A fish pond which was an uncertain delight to the young, was conducted by Miss Baron, the Misses Gray
and Miss Hare. Nearby was a wheel,
of fortune, looked after by the same
ladies. Tn the centre of the hall a dainty
candy stall was erected. The delicious
home-made candy was in great demand
and thanks are duo to the ladies who
so kindly donated this delicacy. Mrs.
Watkis look charge of this booth and
1 was assisted by Miss Gowen and Mrs.
H. A. Goward. The Misses O'Sullivan
sold refreshing drinks at reasonable
prices. This stall was very well patronized by the visitors. The flower booth
was a wilderness of bobbing crysanthemums, ferns and begonias., The willing
workers here were Mrs. B" J. Perry.
Miss McKinnon and Miss Mellon. The
"Corner Grocery" created much excitement, as brooms, sacks of flour, bottles
of pickles and even potatoes were handed out to the expectant ticket-holders.
The.busy grocers were Mrs. A. Stuart
Robertson, Mrs. Taylor and the Misses
Sehl Besides these many attractive Ml, and M„. H p00, Mjss- Be|,
booths, a delightful little tea garden
was artistically arranged by Mrs. Radi-
ger, assisted by ihe Intermediate Choir
in Japanese costume. Mrs. Radiger is
to be complimented on the pretty Oriental effects, which she so cleverly produced. Hot luncheon, afternoon teas
and suppers were served daily, and to
the ladies in charge of this department
is due, to a great extent, the success of
the fair. After the first days, the superiority of their luncheons became
known in town, and laterly, people fairly flocBed in to partake of the succulent
repasts. The management of the dining room was in the hands of Mrs. B.
Powell, helped by Mrs. A. Harlock,
Mrs. M. Sweeney and Mrs. Lawrence.
Many of the beautiful donations were
raffled, and the happy possessors of
lucky numbers are to be envied. Some
of these articles came from foreign
cities, as a number of the ladies have
friends abroad, who at one time or other,
have visited or lived in Victoria. Archbishop Orth wishes to thank all those
who so generously contributed towards
(he fair. He says every one has been
most kind and has given cheerfully.
The bailors of IT. M. warships at Esquimalt kindly gave their services in
helping the ladies to decorate the hall.
Praise also is due to the talented ladies
and gentlemen who took part in the
various musical programmes every evening.
THE REAL FAIRIES.
ing of small gifts for the tree. All
absent members are asked to attend
these meetings. Following is the purchasing committee: Miss Hiscocks,
Miss R. Fell, Miss J. Potts. Rev. Jos.
McCoy and his daughters, having kindly offered to provide a concert at the
hospital, the offer was accepted for the
first Sunday in December. The Daughters of Pity agreed *o provide the music
for Christmas-tide.
•    •    »
On Wednesday evening, in the A.O.U.
W. Hall, the Ladies' Aid of St. Co-
luniba Church, Oak Bay avenue, gave a
concert in honor of St. Andrew's Day.
From 5-.30 until 8 o'clock a hot supper
was provided and all lovers of Scolch
dainties were entirely satisfied with the
menu. Haggis, scones, bannocks, shortbread, oatmeal cakes and other appetizing dishes were much in evidence, and
judging from the manner of their disappearance were greatly enjoyed by all
those who were fortunate enough to
partake of them. After supper the audience adjourned to the large hall and
were entertained by a well selected programme of Scottich songs, dances and
recitations. Miss Hill and Master Hill
accompanied   by   Piper   McKejiizie   on,
the  bag-pipes,    danced  the    Highland j don Quarterly Review
fling, the Scottish reel and the sword |    "It is the aim of Mr. MacRitchie
dance and were enthusiastically encored j to show that the existence of a race
after each number.    Miss Queenie Mc-! of    prehistoric    pygmies    ill    Great
Coy rendered several well chosen selections which were greatly appreciated by
ihe audience.    Airs. Burnett and Mr. J.
G. Brown eacli acquitted themselves in
their usual pleasing manner.   Mr. W. A.
That a race or races of dwarfs
overspread northern Europe in prehistoric times, and that the persistent legends of pixies, elves, fairies,
etc., current among- all European
peoples, are racial recollections of)
these little aborigines is now regarded by many ethnologists as quite
probable. The view was held by
Jacob Grimm fifty years ago, aud
Tylor, in his "Primitive Culture,"
agreed with it. David MacRitchie,
who advanced this view in his
"Finns, Fairiese and Picts" (1S93)
has more to sa/v •'-—1 it in his
"Hints of Evolution in Tradition"
(1902V and other writers have adduced evidence in its support. In
this connection it will be remembered
that the accounts given Iv the Greek
writers of the conflicts between pigmies and cranes, once regarded as
pure myth, are now believed to refer to combats between the African
dwarfs and ostriches. Quatrefages
has shown that most of the pygmy
tales of the Greek and Latin authors
are substantially correct.
Says P. Gath'Whitley, in the Lon-
f
B. C. FUNERAL FURNISHING CO,
52 GOVERNMENT ST., VICTORIA.
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Phone A955  Orders Delivered
AMan gave two very amusing and entertaining recitations. Rev. J. McCoy
and Miss McCoy sang the well known
duet ''Come under my Plaidie" in- ex-,
ccllent style. The singing of "God Save
The Queen" and "Auld Lang Syne"
brought the concert to a close, all present expressing thc hope ihat next year a
similar entertainment might be provided.
Mrs. Pooley, ol" "Fcrnhill," Esquimalt
Road, gave a delightful little dance on
Friday last, thc occasion being the
"coming out" of her youngest daughter,
JMiss Violet Pooley, who has lately returned home from school in England.
The other debutantes of the evening
were Miss Violet Powell and Miss
Drake. The whole house was beautifully
decorated with crysanthemums, ferns
and palms. Among the guests were Ihe
Misses Monteith, the Hon. F. G. and
Mrs.   Hood,  Mr,  and  Mrs.  Lampman,
Britain can be established from traditional legends, as well as from
archeolog'ical st i-nctni-es. He shows
that the flans and fairiese were identical, and labors to prove that the | country folk. These traditions are
Picts were dwarfs, and were the I clearly to be referred to the exist-'
same as the fairies.    He    describes j ence of a prehistoric dwarf race, and
Victoria College of Music
248.0ook|Street, Victoria, B. C.
Principal:   MR. A. LONGFIELD, F. V. C M.
PIANO, VIOLIN, ORGAN; IN  ALL THEIR   BRANCHES!
Special Inducements to Pupils on theJPipe Organ
The Daughters of Pity held their first
regular meeting in the city hall on Monday, afternoon with President Miss D.
Sehl in the chair. There was a good
attendance and the work for the month
was planned. The Cinderella dance is
to take place in Christmas week, with
thc following committees in charge:
Refreshment committee — Miss Hiscocks, Miss M. Fell, Miss Fraser, Miss
Austin. Music—Miss T. Potts, Miss D.
Sehl, Decorating—Miss Williams, Miss
Fraser, Miss D. Sehl. Advertising-
Miss Potts. A sum was voted to provide Christmas trees and gifts for the
patients at the hospital, and the Daughters agreed to meet every Friday at 2
p. m. until Christmas at the bouse of
1he hoU. president to work at the mak"-
Mr. P. Keefer and Miss Keefer, Mis:
Todd, Jir. Scarih, Miss Bullen, the
Misses Flumerfelt, Mr. Roger Monteith, Miss Heyland, the officers from
H. M. S. Bonaventure and Shearwater,
Mr. Alexis Martin and the officers from
the Barracks.
»   *   *
The regular meeting of the Ladies of
the Maccabees was held at the K. of P.
hall Monday night. Owing to the membership contest several new members
were elected. Mrs. Vincent, Mrs. Law-
son, Christopher and Mrs. Foot were
appointed to represent the society at the
annual meeting of the Women's Council. There was a lively discussion on
the resolutions to be considered, which
were all heartily endorsed. A sale of
work will be held shortly, probably on
December loth, during the afternoon and
evening. The election of officers will
take place at the next meeting, which
will commence on Monday, 12 December, at 7:30.
• •   •
' The engagement is announced of Dr.
Frank W. Green, of Cranbrook, son of
the late Mr. A. R. Green, of Victoria,
and brother of Mr. A. R. Green, accountant of the Imperial Bank in Van-'j
couver, to Miss Lilian Staples, daughter
of Mr. Otis Staples, of Stillwater, Minn.
Dr. Grcn is well known in social
circles. Mr. Otis Staples is a familiar
figure in the Northwest States and controls extensive lumber interests in East
Kootenay, Minnesota and elsewhere.
The marriage will take place next
June.
# •    »
Mrs. Dickinson and Mrs. Simpson will
hold their usual social class next Thursday evening, the beginners' class on
Monday, when the new three step and
five step introduced at thc classes last
year will he taught.
If you have beauty,
Wc will take it;
Tf you have none,
We can make it.
Savannah Photo Studio, City.
the various underground dwellings,
nailed the 'Picts' Houses' in Scotland, and in the Hebrides, and shows
that their contracted stone cells and
narrow underground stone-faced passages (which somewhat resemble a
stone drain) could only have been
used by a race of dwarfs. These
'Picts' Houses' often contain the
relics of food and traces of fires,
proving that some of them at leasf>
were places of refuge and habitation.
A dominant race does not hide and
burrow underground, and it is certain
that these subterraneon dwellings
are not in any sense Celtic. The
singular burghs, or brochs, in the
north of Scotland, form another link
in the chain of evidence. They are
stone-built towers with passages in
the walls, and contain a central
chamber. The burgh of Moussa in
the Shetland Islands is the most important that now remains, although
many others, more ruined, rise on
the headlands and hills of the Scottish islands and mainlands in the far
north. Tradition states that these
burghs were built by dwarfs, and it
is singular that the passages which
traverse their walls are often so
small that only diminutive men could
crawl through them. The bee-hive
huts in the Hebrides form another
link in the chain of evidence, though
some are inhabited in the present
dav.
"We think Mr. MacRitchie fully
proves his case, and that it is undoubted that in the beginning of the
Neolithic age the earliest representatives of the human race in northern
Europe were dwarfs and pygmies.
These were exterminated by stronger invaders, after they had for some
lime maintained a precarious existence amid the rocks and forests.
The stories of the satyrs, the legends
of the fairies, elves, and goblins, as
well as the traditions of the pixies
or niskies in Devon and Cornwall, all
seem to be recollections of a prehistoric race of pygmies. The numerous, minute arrow-heads of flint
found in many European countries
seem to have been used by these
dwarf tribes. M. dc Mortillet lias
described and figured many of these,
and they are found in England in
croat numbers. Thev occur in Ireland also, and it is singular that
these stone darts have been called
elf-shots, and tradition says that
they were arrows shot by fairies at
the cattle. In this case tradition may
be perfectly right, and the idea be
merely the recollection of the nightly attacks made by the dwarfs on
the cattle of their stronger neighbors. In the Tsle of Man it is even
now said that the gorse should be
burnt on All Hallow E'en, lest it
should afford a hidinff-plfice for Ihe
fniries (1 pvgmies in prehistoric
lays). The Manxmen dread to wall
-"Ion"- certain paths for fear of thr
'little people.' and in Cornwall, ever
;n recent times. Hie same terror n'
uhf 'little people' ev'jsfefl among th>
to   its   conflicts    with   taller   and
stronger neighbors. i
"Sir Harry Johnston's opinion is!
clearly stated in the following words;
" 'Other dwarf races of humanity j
(than the Kongo pvgmies) belonging !
to the white or the Mongolian species j
mav have inhabited northern Europe |
in ancient times, or it is just possible j
that this type    of    pygmy    negro, j
which survives to-day in the recesses
of inner Africa, may even have overspread Europe in remote times..   If
it did, then the conclusion is irresistible that it gave rise to most of the
myths   and   beliefs connected with
gnomes, kobolds and   fairies.   The
demeanor and actions of the little
Kongo dwarfs at the present day remind   one, over and over again, of
the traits attributed to the brownies
and goblins of   our   fairy   stories.
Their remarkable power of becoming
invisible by adroit hiding in herbage
and behind rocks,    their   probable
habits in sterile or open countries of
making    llieir   homes in holes and
caverns,   their uiischievousness  and
their prankish good nature, all seem
to suggest, that it was some race like
this  which   inspired   most    of    the
stories of Teuton and Celt regarding
a. dwarfish people of quasi-supernatural attributes.
"With these views we fully agree.
We consider it now proved that at
the beginning of. the Neolithic ago
a race of dwarfs overspread north-"
ern Europe, and that the legends of
fairies and gnomes relate to these
pygmies. Mr. MacRitchie, in a further pamphlet, refers to the account
given of the pygmies and ape-like
men of Central Africa by Mr. flro-
jra'n, and illustrates the account by
comparing it with ancient Welsh and
Scotch traditions. We believe he is
perfectly correct, and his conclusions in our opinion are as valuable
as they are interesting."
All Kinds of
Hair Work
Ladies'
Etc., at
Mrs, G.
tone's
55 Douglas St.
A. J. Clyde,
Sole Agent for the
Souvenir
Stoves and ^Ranges
Everything for the kitchen in
Tin, Agate, Wood and Fibre
Wares, and Prices Are
Right.
42 Johnson Street
See Finch's new assortment of choice
lies for Christmas trade, ranging from
50c. to $2 each. Finch & Finch, 57
Government street.
Phone 855
P. 0. Box 46
More than half thc visitors to thc
jail last month were influenced in that
direction by "the cup that cheers." A
cheering record truly. More than one-
third of thc visitors were Indians and
Chinamen.
Preserved PLUMS, PEACHES,
STRAWBERRIES, Etc., home grown
and home made. Insist on having
Price's.
fl. Harris
Yacht, Launch, Boat and Cenoe
Builder.   Repairs etc.
55 Work St., •  Rock Bay
Victoria Fractional  Mineral Claim.
Situated in Ihe Mount Sicker Division of
Chemainus District.
Whorclocati.il.—On Ihe east llopeof Mount
llrontini.
Take notice that, 1. W.A. Dior, agent for tbe
Mount Sicker and Brcnton Mine*, (Limited)
Free Miners' Certificate No. 1)85247 Intend,00
days from da c hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for Certificate of Improvements, for
the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the
above claim. And further take notice that action under section 87 must be commenced before
thc Issuance ol such Certificate of Improve
ment*.
Dated this Mlh day of November, 1904.
W. A. DIEK
Signor Ernesto Claudio
VIOLINIST
Of the Conservtaory of Music, Napoli
(Italy), in addition to tuition on the
Violin, Mandolin and Guitar, will conduct a special class in the art of accompaniment to a limited number of advanced piano pupils. Apply at studio,
over Imperial Bank, corner Yates and
Government Streets.
DANCING  ACADEMY
A. 0. U. W. Hall
M.LESTER
Member National Association Masters of
Dancing.
Classes—Monday ev'g, Advanced.  Wednesday
ev'g, Beginners.  Thursday ev'g Social Clnb
PRIVATE LESSONS. 6
PROGRESS, SATURDAY,   DEC. 3,   1904
1
l.-JUAN DE FUCA.
SOME   MINOR   HEROES |pillars of Hercules-prior to the dis-1
| covery of America, and earned for themselves reputations mellowed to respectable seeming by Time and the kindly
imagination of the historian—not many
of them can claim place beside the
heroes, adventurers and discoverers of
the century that witnessed the death of
Columbus, the conquest of Mexico and
Peru, the discovery of the Pacific and
the birth of Shakespeare. Every century is the architect of its own fortunes, and what De Lille says of the
glorious old chateau of Chantilly may be
fittingly applied to that gorgeous century :—
By T.   L. Grahame.
"Aliquid facit nomen."—Levy.
anybody
"A  circumstance
name."
gtves
Happy the man, said the long thoughts
of childhood and youth, who carries
about with him, tucked snugly beneath
his pate, the talisman Imagination. For,
look you, friendly reader, can not he,
despite of time or place or company,
unwrap the jewel, stroke with fond
fingers its opalescent facets and know
joys angels might envy, pleasures unpurchaseable by millionaires, if they are
millionaires and nothing more? He sees
in bright array forms of glories passed
away now being re-enacted for him, rapt
audience of one, the great deeds of the
days of yore. The kings, tbe queens,
the emperors; earth's mighty conquerors; warrior knights in steel bedight;
paladins and palmers; swart robbers of
the forest glades; high-souled sailors on
seas forlorn praying under the unchanging stars for sign of undiscovered continents ; ladies fair and sprightly squires;
cowled friars chanting orisons and vespers in the monastery cloister or monkish cell; the glittering legions of Rome
marching tne north road, pilum at slope,
buckler slung across shoulder, black
bread for two days in the wallet, sour
wine filling the flask, yet merry withal,
cracking Latin jests to the measured
tread of sandals and the jingle of
armour, off to fight Vercingetorix,
Ariovistus, perhaps Pompeius, tinder the
greatest general of the ancient world.
Or the man with the jewel Imagination can conjure up Spartacus and his
gladiator army; Hannibal at Cannae,
and the debacle of Zama; Cambyses on
his hurrah through Egypt to the gales
of Memphis; Goths and Nervii; Vikings
and Berserks; Marcus Aurelian accept-1
ing the weeping Zenobia's surrender at
Palmyra; Dido burning for Aeneas; Raleigh making a carpet of his cloak for
Elizabeth's fair feet; Roland at Ronsce-
valles; Arminius harking on his Teutons to the annihilation of Varus's legions in the dismal swamps; and the
stricken- Augustus ever after beating his
weary head against the palace wall and
moaning; "Redde Vare, mihi legionesl'
Or he may summon up our own British heroes of the long past legendary,
traditional or historical—Arthur the
King, Cassivellaun, Caractacus and Gal-
gacus; Hotspur and the Douglas, and
from the fierce red day of Mons Gram-
pius down to Otterbourne, the best
stricken field of them all, he may have
high company to while away the dread
hlank spaces of time such as may come
when sickness enforces idleness of hand
and creative brain.
In truth, it seems to me that history
is best likened unto a long gallery
wherein are hung the portraits of all
those grand old folk; portraits made
real things of flesh and blood by the
eye of Imagination. To the sublimed
vision of Fancy those silent pictures
become men and women, as real and
instinct with the ruddy life as the rose
that will be found blooming over the
grave of the Caesars.
"For never blooms the rose so red
As where some dying hero bled."
To be sure, your counting house man,
your arithmetical fellow who sums correctly and "maketh ryche," must smile, J
nay, grin sardonically and pityingly, too,
at all this trumpery poured out from
the rag-bag of the past; the mere dividends of a disordered and unchastened
mind; the intangible toys of an intellect
distraught and out of touch with the
marvellous age of enc wheels, business
"colleges," and corsets for men. But
shall we, therefore, shamefacedly pack
up our dusty puppets in their rag-bag
and unclasp the ledger to regain the
good opinion of those illuminati of the
cash department?   Not I, for one.
"My mind to me a kingdom is,"
Its people are my children fair.
Let muck-rake wielders jibe and quiz—
We dreamers breathe the upper air.
In the long gallery of history there
are few portraits more interesting to an
age like the present—revivified, or galvanized from the intellectual numbness
of purely mechanical achievement and
absorbing practice of physical science, by
hypodermic injections of romance and
swashbucklerie, pur sang—Hewlett,
Weyman, Doyie and the rest—than those
which grin at the gafcer f|rom the section devoted to the sixteenth century.
Not many of the worthies who have
fretted their hour in the former centre
of the world's stage—the Mediterranean
and its coasts from the Levant to the
"Dans sa pompe elegante admirez Chantilly,
De heros en heros, d'age en age em-
belli."
Every man of that robustious time
was a bit of a hero; some of them all
hero. Other ages boast a dozen names
or so that cannot perish while mankind
shall worship the heroic. The sixteenth
century poured forth heroes who, in the
rapturous alliteration of the American
epigrammatist: "Did; died!" and in
fashion, too, worth at least notice of
the chronicler of that time. Mingled
with the great canvasses that adorn the
corridors of Time are "studies" and
sketches unfinished; passing fragmentary thoughts of the artist done into
lime and tint; little things tossed off
while hand and brain rested from the
service of greatness and wandered into
pleasant idlesse—yet fixed there upon
the infinite by Chance, as imperishable
as the carefully-wrought and scrupulously finished "big commissions" beside them on the walls. Those life-size
and colossal presentments are the acknowledged great of their own and all
future times. But there was many a
periwig-pated seeker after fame in that
age of magnificoes who felt as he
breathed his last tolerably sure that he
for one of the queerest paragraphs and
one of the strangest revelations in the
great story of the English nation. His
importunities for aid to seek the fabled
Strait of Anian, forced the Lord Treasurer of Royal Elizabeth, my Lord of
Burleigh, to confess that the treasury
which was to become a few centuries
later the richest treasury the world had
ever known, contained, i' faith, but a
beggarly One Hundred Pounds! Something to think of in these days when
England reckons her accounts in hundreds of millions of pounds.
Five hundred dollars between mighty
England and the sheriff! England the
conqueror of the Armada. England the
humbler of France. The England of
Shakespeare, and Jonson, and Sidney,
and Raleigh, and Spencer! Ah! but
England's dearest riches in that proud
time were not pounds, doubloons, dol
lars, but men. The greatest breed of
men the world has ever seen. So, the
beggarly hundred pounds in England's
treasury may cause nothing more than
a smile; for there were treading the soil
of England in those days many thousands of men whose deeds and words
mankind shall not suffer to pass from
memory,
I can see Juan de Fuca pouring over
the crude charts with the noble Viceroy of Mexico, who carries in his
pocket the gracious permission of his
thrifty sovereign to fit out all the expeditions he may think proper (at his
own expense), for the exploration of
the wild unknown northward of Mexico.
The pilot's muscular, walnut-brown and
hairy paw beside the slender, white,
filbert-nailed hand of the Gothic grandee,
and their grotesquely-contrasted heads
together pouring over the crackling
sheepskin; the naturalized Greek's
broken Spanish telling of the wonders
he has seen where the lone pillar of
rock marks the entrance to the great
sea.
Then   I   can   see .old    Fiery    Jack
from tlle larger sheet of water, they
travelled by the morning train to Koe-
nig's Station. Alighting there, they
started for the lake. Their "bumps of
locality" could not have been properly
developed, for they did, not reach the
tantalizing sheet of water until three
o'clock. A clumsy raft did duty for a
boat, but two hours' fly fishing produced
no results. The boys then went ashore
and tried bait fishing from the banks.
The elder brother soon landed a small
trout about nine inches in length. No
more fish were caught and at half past
six, a start was made for the hotel.
They took a "short cut" through the
woods. Two hours' steady walking
found them still in the woods, and it
became too dark to proceed further.
There was nothing for it but a night
in the open. As a sharp frost had set
in and a bitter wind whistled through
the trees ,a fire was the first consideration. Material was plentiful, but a
search of pockets revealed but one
match! Shielding it carefully with his
cap, the more experienced of the two
boys struck a light, and, sternly ordering his brother to hold his breath, managed to ignite the brush. A huge fire
soon blazed up, and the weary, anglers
threw themselves beside it and passed
the night as best they could. Sleep was
only obtained in snatches, as in spite of
the fire, the wind was too penetrating
for steady repose.
The trout proved a treasure. It was
cooked and carefully divided between
the boys. At daylight, a fresh start was
made, and to their intense disgust, the
enthusiasts discovered that they had
camped a quarter of a mile from the
road! Five minutes' more walking on
the previous night would have seen the
end of their troubles.
Making the best of the situation, they
| quickly tramped to the temporary hotel,
where a hot    bath  and a    substantial
breakfast helped  them  to  forget their
aggravating "night out."
W. REDFERN.
FINE, BEAUTIFUL
English Tea Sets
Just suitable for Xmas Presents, at
$6.50
HASTIER FAIR
77 Government Street.
Victoria's
Continentally-famed and Strictly
First-class Hotels.
The Dallas
Situated on the Dallas Road—Victoria's ocean drive, is pre-eminently THE favorite summer resort of British Columbia.
The Centrally Located
Vernon
Is the Commercial Hotel] par excellence.
Unrivalled Culaine.
Luxurioua Guest Rooms.
Every Modern Comfort and
Convenience.
JAMES PATTERSON, Manager.
had achieved immortality, when, in fact, straightening  himself up and proudly
Oblivion yawned for and received him. | telling the Viceroy of how the galleons
sailed up the strait past Victoria to
where it widened interminably, and giving him the Spanish equivalent for:—
"We were the first that ever burst
Into that silent sea!"
And perhaps the Greek was versed in
On the other hand there were men who
never fashed their thumb about Fame,
or the jade's bargains, who have come
into Fame as elder sons to an inheritance, and despite their contempt and
indifference and low degree.
Very likely had one said to Apostolos i
Valerianos of Cephalonia, pilot of ships ; . ™'"   .
and ancient mariner, that his name, or jthe.S1™00? >°" °f •"" land and
rather his nickname, should go down to cou d * 1 the V1Ceroy of how, when his
the latest syllauie of recorded time, the' .allors M}^ ,what they th°ug"t was
comment of the rude old seaman would ,!he sea of *elrf weary stormy search-
have been vigorously impolite, for he "«?- ««re bum from their throats the
could swear fluently in many languages f^^ ° Xenophons ien Thousand:
-"Full of strange oaths" and, no doubt, Inalassa! fhalassa!
"bearded like the pard." Yet it is strange' Poor old Juan de Fuca! What he
to think that this old tarrybreeks of the \took for tne sea that was to carry him
sixteenth century, a person of little or'on t0 immortal glory amongst the great
no consequence amongst the hijos del j discoverers was only the beautiful sheet
sangre' azul, and the hidalgos and the of water that may be crossed by a good
caballeros who prinked it so grandly in; modern fishing boat under favorable
the centre of tne stage, has given liis | breezes in an hour or two. He de-
sobriquet to a channel which now shows serves ,lis immortality and renown as
every prospect of becoming perhaps the I tlley are borne forever on the lips' of
greatest of the world's waterways; the! men wn,° have dealings between America
passage through which are to pour the and Asia—the Strait of Fuca, with its
incalculable abundance, the commerce, j P1,lar rocki Juan's monument in good
the industrial products of America into so°th.
the lap of ancient Asia. And again, | Somc day Victorians will erect a
from the Father of Continents to the monument to the ancient sailor on the
youngest bom the riches of Ormuz and summit of Beacon Hill park. A bronze
of Ind, and tbe perfumed stores of Far \ monument on a gray granite base to
Cathay, what time the traffic of the At- 'yP'fy the strength and the sternness of
lantic shall have dwindled by compari- the old man, who came hereaway to be
son into insignificance. :t,le nrst white man to cast eyes on the
Strange, too, that like so many doughty sif\,of lvhatfi-w*s t0 be t,,e fairest city
fellows in  history  who  have  achieved,0" the Pac'hc Coast-
greatness or had it thrust upon them, ftllI.i4„  on-^mr t,», ... „„~™
so little is known of the life of this old 0RIGINAL ST0RY BY W' REDFE™
Cepbalonian with the name of a famous     Two brothers, both   Victorians, the
Roman gens Hellenized for birthright, elder an enthusiast in sporting matters,
and a Spanish nickname for immortal- and tbe younger an ardent fisherman,
ity.   For is not Valerianos but the Latin i bad  an  aggravating experience  in  the
Valerianus?   And is not Juan de Fuca vicinity of Shawnigan Lake a couple of
but  Fiery Jack?    Fuego,  fire,  and  a | seasons ago, shortly after Keonig's hotel
slovenly colonial pronunciation  of the. had been destroyed by fire.
Castilian? Intent   upon   a   fishing excursion  to
At any rate, hit   have we to thank! "Little Shawnigan," a lake a few miles
GIRL' SBRAVE FIGHT.
A frail, slender girl, Miss Nelson,
one fine night early in April, 1903,
sat quietly beside her mother. From
the next room, where the two little
children had been left playing, came
a strange grating sound. The older
sister stepped to the door between
the two apartments, only to turn pale
with dismay and horror, for there,
fast asleep on the hearthrug lay the
little brother and sister, and crawling slowly across the floor toward
them a great, slimy aligator,. evidently attracted to the house by the hope
of yoling kittens or puppies. Its
wicked, stony eyes, grim with baleful light, were fixed on the unconscious babies, and the wide jaws, open
and ponderous, dripped with the foam
of eager, unsatisfied greed. Frantically calling to the dogs outside the
front door to enter and help her, the
brave girl caught up a large lamp that
stood just within the mother's room,
and hurled it full at the horrible,
gaping jaws. Then, leaping aside to
escape the furious onslaught thus
brought upon herself, she stooped
quick as thought, and tossed upon
the high bed in the comer the suddenly roused and frightened children.
She turned from the task to find that
the infuriated aligator, diverted from
its original purpose and confused by
the unexpected attack, had dashed
straight through the open door and
made its way to the bedside of the
helpless, terrified mother. Without
a moment's hesitation the devoted
daughter rushed to her aid.
A shovel of hot coals from the
glowing fire thrown directly against
the vicious eyes of the angry creature
only served to strengthen and intensify its fury. Apparently his entire
will was now bent upon the destruction of the helpless woman on the
bed. The awful, snapping jaws were
within a few feet of her body when
the desperate girl, returning from the
kitchen with an axe that had just
recurred to her memory, sank it to
the helve in the thick neck. Narrowly escaping severe injury in the death
struggle that followed, all but fainting with nervousness and conflicting
emotions, the brave girl followed this
blow with others no less telling.
When the still quivering, but no
longer murderous creature had been
reduced to absolute impotence the entire house looked as though it had
been wrecked by vandals, and the
weary conqueror found herself suffering from many bruises.—Woman's
Home Companion.
♦ Salvation Army Man (beginning a
fervid adoress to the crowd)—I have
served the devil for Vj •years.
Soldier (in the crowd)—Then why
don't you serve him another four years,
and get your pension?
B.C. Saddlery Co. Ltd
44 Yates St., Victoria.
Large assortment of English and Mexican Saddles, Harness, Buggy Robes,
Trunks, Dog Collars.
REPAIRING
is one of our specialties.   Come and
look at our prices.
PHONE No. 204
.VANTHD-A boy's bicycle; mutt be In flmt-
claas order. Addreaa Cash, Box 84, F. 0.,
eity.
The Taylor Mill Co.,'
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER,
SASH,
DOORS.
210 Government St. Victoria, B.C.
BREAKFAST, LUNCH,
AFTERNOON TEA,
SUPPER.
A few of our specialties:
Tea and cake, etc..-. 15c
Tea and biscuits ioc
Omelettes 15c i
Sardineson toast ioc
MIKADO
44 Part St.       LO N6H ROOM
MILLINERY
Ladies Hats Artistically Trimmed and
made up, customers furnishing their
own trimming... Panama hats re-blocked and cleaned.
Room 2 MacGREGOR BLOCK
Opposite Driard Hotel.
Furnished Rooms
For gentlemen, with bath and electric
light; every convenience.
GORDON HOTEL,
Yates Street
Hall's Syrup
OF
HYPOPHOSPHITES
wards off La Grippe
Large Bottle $1.00
Central Drug Store
Douglas and Yates Streets.
Phone 201. PROGRESS,   SATURDAY,   DEC.-3, 1934
j   BEFORE THE FOOTLIGHTS   t
»eeeeeeeee»Me»»»»»»»»»»»»*»»»»»»»
cism and, from certain premises, successfully maintained—but this attitude
would require more lines to elucidate,
either pro or con, than those to which
the present writer is limited. The ques-
j tion is perhaps more properly, did
Robinson  Crusoe,  Jr."  as produced      The test of a  farce  comedy is the j Watts, with his technical    inadequacy,
'laughter it produces and through this ■ impress?—and in what was he most im-
test "A White Elephant" passes tri- j pressive? Here is a man so handicap-
umphantly. A packed house greeted the ped by limitations, both in drawing and
first performance and Mr. Pringle in | painting, from the point of view of the
the role of "Slippery Elm," a lawyer, j skilled workman, the virtuoso, that he
sent spasms of merriment through the! seems lo this expert most inadequately
audience and the entire company have | equipped for the mere business of paint-
something to do all the time and fur- ■ ing; for actual painting is a handicraft,
nish their share of the fun.    For the fa  business. .Watts  had  not much of
by the Hewlette Merry Burlesquers, has
proven a big card at the Savoy Theatre
this week, as has been attested by the
large crowds who have nightly witnessed the performances of this merry company. "Robinson Crusoe" will be withdrawn after to-night, and for next week,
commencing Monday December 4th, another Hewlette burlesque, entitled "The
High Rollers," will prove an acceptable
successor. The burlesque is in one act,
and introduces the entire company of
sixteen peoeple, in choruses, medlies,
gavottes, dances and a comedy vein from
first half of next week "Wanted—A
Wife," a farce comedy new to Victoria
theatregoers   and  highly   recommended
this, Where can we recall technical
passages of this painter that can compare with the competent charm of han
HINTS FOB GIRLS.
'Phymars Writes on the Subject of
Suitable and Seasonable
Attire.
by the press of other cities, will be the j dling and lovely qualities of paint that,
bill.   Crystal prices still- remain 10 and
25 cents with to cent matinees Tuesday,
c ■ 1     -n ,• ■;'_ rf.ui.-  Thursday and  Saturday,
start to finish.    Entire new specialties, •> *   «   *
will be introduced by the two "R's"—j
Reilly and Rowe, singers, dancers and I
comedians;  Mae Mulqueen, new illus-1
strated songs; Marie Sparrow, charac- i
ter artiste; Myrtle Bartelle, baritone vocalist ; Minnie Adams, operatice vocalist;
Dorothy   Heather, soubrette;    Phyllis
Courtney, ingenue; The Electric Clark
Sisters, favorite   singers and dancers;
The attraction at the Victoria Theatre
to-night is "The Devil's Auction," a
most popular annual visitant. There are
many new features in the production
which is sure to be bright and amusing.
If "The Pierrots" belong to one of the
titled families of England, are they
Frank Gale, la petite soubrette; Mabel noblemen? or must we say that he is a
Gerry, singer and dancer; Viola LePage,'nobleman and she ,s a noblewoman?
character danseuse and others. The
management of the Savoy are leaving
no-I stone unturned to provide only the
best attractions at people's popular
prices of admission—15 and 25 cents.
The Hewlette Company have in active
preparation for December 12 a superb
spectacular burlesque of "Cinderella,"
and preparations are being made for a
big, Christmas pantomime.
* #   *
The production of the popular light
opera "Dorothy," at the Victoria
Theatre, next Monday and Tuesday,
promises to be a great success. Madame
Myee has been training the amateurs
very busily for some time past and she
will act as stage manager. Mr. George
Werner has composed a song and dance
for the bridesmaids and groomsmen, especially for the occasion.
The cast is as follows:
Dorothy   Miss Lena Breidford
Phyllis  Miss Kneeshaw
Lady Betty   Mrs. Gallagher
Mrs. Privit   Madame Myee
Wilder   Mr. Jno. Petch
Sherwood  Mr. Robert Petch
The Squire Mr. Cecil Berkeley
Lurcher   Mr. Percy Richardson
Farmer Tuppit   Mr. Pelch
The Parson  Mr. Gallagher
Tim Strutt   Mr. J. Carroll
* •   •
An excellent show has been provided
at the Grand during the week and patronage has been as good as usual. Cum-
mings and Berley, in their little comedy,
"The Bogus Count," produced lots of
fun. The Fowlers gave a wonderful
exhibition of feats of strength and balancing. Manager Jamieson has an excellent bill of fare for next week.
Murphy and Andrews, high-class entertainers and travesty artists, will introduce a number of up-to-date" songs.
The star trio, consisting of Messrs.
Jennings O'Brien, Mann and Franks,
will present an amusing comedy entitled "Our Uncle," and Le Barge, the
clever musician, will display his ability
with various instruments. The moving
pictures will illustrate Joseph being sold
by his brothers.
* *  *
The "Pierrots" have been. welcomed
on their return to Victoria in no uncertain way. At the Dallas, last Monday evening when they gave their, first
entertainment there was a large attendance and of the thirteen items on the
programme ten were encored. One of
the most popular of the things done so
well by the "Pierrots" is the telephone
sketch, "Cordelia Malone," and this will,
by request, be repeated in the prop-
gramme provided for Monday evening
at the Dallas. They will perform at
the following places during the coming week:
Monday and Friday The Dallas
Tuesday. ..   .. Cedar Hill
Thursday ..  .. Work Point Barracks
* *   *   •
The production of Michael Strogoff,
the Russian drama, at the Redmond
during the first part of the.week was a
pronounced success and drew overflowing audiences. Rush Bronson; the business manager of the company, made an
to quote another modern, Manet, fre
quently offered to the connoisseur? I
know of none. But, conceding this, conceding inadequate drawing, conceding
painfully labored pigment, let us not forget that Watts was something above
technique—he was an artist. His compositions, literary if you will, were conceived and carried out with an appreciation that the human mind instinctively demands design in a given space
that is to graphically convey an idea;
and in drawing, even Watts seemed to
possess the essential at times, and pro-
Nearly all young girls about the age
of 15 or 16 begin to think of dress, of
what is becoming and what is not. It
is quite necessary that every girl should
be taught to attend to her clothes, how
to put them on properly and to look
(neat and "well groomed," so to speak.
But I think that until a girl actually
"comes out," it is best for the mother
to choose her frocks, the colors, and
decide on the style. If young girls
only knew the charm and attraction of
youth, I am sure they would try to remain young and girlish as long as possible. Some girls of today at the age
of 16 are quite young ladies of fashion.
One sees them arrayed in elaborate
tailor-made gowns, high French heels
and open-worked stockings, huge hats
with ostrich feathers and their hair arranged in the front in the latest coiffure. This is not exaggerated in the
least, as young girls dressed like this
arp to be seen often on Government
street. But how much more attractive
those girls would be if they wore a neat
shirt-waist, moderately long skirt, good,
sensible boots, simple hat and hair
neatly braided in one or two long
braids! Now, there is no need to be
stiff or old-fashioned in one's dress,
just because one's frocks are riiade
plain. The gowns can be made of most
fashionable material and the hat quite
"up-to-date," and at the same time be
simple and attractive. It is so easy
and inexpensive for a young girl to be
well dressed. For winter wear, I have
seen pretty and serviceable shirt-waist
suits made of good corduroy. This is
splendid wearing stuff and the soft
browns and tans are becoming to nearly
every one. Navy serge is always a favorite for girls' winter frocks, and can
be made up in so many pretty styles.
Plaited skirts are very neat, with the
bodice made Russian blouse effect, with
broad, well-boned girdle. Another desirable gown is. made of stone-gray
tweed; the skirt at the top stitched
to flatness upon the sides of tapering
plaits, which fall open at the knees.
White linen collars and cuffs, embroidered in all-white, or colors, are always
fresh and attractive, and look particularly neat when worn with shirt-waist
suits. Loose military coats' are very
fashionable, plain three-cornered hats in
red, or blue soft felt, look smart when
worn with these coats. Tans are always
nice, serviceable and becoming to young
girls; Strong, heavy-soled brown boots
are splendid for wet weather. Good
storm rubbers are a necessity for this
climate and may be worn over lighter-
soled black boots. Care should' be
taken that these- rubbers are not worn
in the house.
PHYMAR.
MISS RAB BRONSON
With the Redmond Co.
WATTS, THE ARTIST.
(Frank Fowler, in Scribncr's.)
England, as large a collection as can be
got together of the personal output of
the late George Frederick Watts. The
collection in this case will include imaginative works, many of large size, works
in sculpture, and lastly a series of portraits which for personal interest, aside
from their artistic merits, will possibly
surpass the production of any contemporary painter of portraits that we may
call to mind. Not that the confreres of
Watts, whose business it has been to
paint portraits, may not have numbered among their sitters as many illustrious
names as did the painter we are discussing, but it is indeed doubtful if their
aggregate work would as inevitably produce the impression of such subtle interpretation of temperament and char-
appearance on the boards in the part of j acter as marks these "human docu-
Laidlaw, an English correspondent, and j ments" left to the nation by Watts,
played it uncommonly well. Theo. Bird,] Much has been said and much will be
was clever as the American correspond- said of the didactic, the literary side of
ent, Blunt, and Mr. Redmond was ex- this painter's art—of his intellectual and
cellent as Michael Strogoff. The play J moral elevation, of the fact that he was
throughout is most interesting and was! a painter of ideas, that he sought to
staged very well, indeed. The very j give expression to thoughts that were
amusing comedy, "Prince Romiro," held I more properly the subjects of poetry or
Ihe boards for the balance of the week. J prose, a writer's theme treated through
The plays for next week are "Califor-1 the medium of plastic or graphic art.
nia" and "The Lighthouse Robbery."    ! Much in this position may be true criti-
duced a sense of power that often moved
the spectator.   He possessed, too, an instinct for line, and an admirable feeling for quantity in spaces, and balance
In pursuance of a custom which ob- of light and shade.   In color he often
tains on the death of a man conspicu- left much to be desired, but here also,
ous in the arts, there will doubtless be, in his portraits, lie was sonorous and
placed on exhibition, sooner or later, in j tonal to a superb degree.   After all, may
it not be through his portraits that he
will finally make the strongest appeal to
the judgment of posterity?
For insight, differentiation of character, noble attitude of mind in the presence of his sitter—a quality most to be
desired in a portrait painter—Watts
may be rated high—I should say very
high. In the notable series of portraits
which, in 1884, was placed on exhibition
at the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
New York, the qualities above mentioned
were conspicuous with, in addition, a
pervading sense of powerful and harmonious color. This is much. He has
left priceless records of men who have
made Victorian England illustrious,
Happy the nation that possesses such an
artist, and happy the nation that has the
good judgment to perpetuate her sons
through the medium of arL while they
are still living and prjj^Fig—an example that other countv^might profitably follow. England was proud of
Watts, and honored him—a baronetcy he
would not accept, but the gift to Ihe nation of practically the work of his lifetime is the legacy of the artist to the
country that recognized his greatness
and sought 111 the conventional way to
.acknowledge it.
See Finchs' overcoats before you buy
elsewhere. Finch & Finch, 57 Government street.
Fire, Life, Marine
and Accident
Losses settled with
promptitude and liberality
Agency Wellington
Household Coal
Hall, Goepel & Co.
Phoue 88
100 Government Street
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of the Application of
William Farrell for a Certificate
of Indefeasible Title to Subdivision Lots D and E of the Garbally Estate (Map 116) Victoria
District (now Victoria City).
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to isBUe a Certificate of
Indefeasible Title to the above land
to William Farrell on the 6th day of
February, 1905, unless, in the mean
time, a valid   objection   thereto   be
made to me in writing by a person
claiming an estate or interest thereim
or in any part of it.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General.
Land Registry Office, Victoria, B.
C, 31st October, 1904.
Selecting
a Piano
Many people experience great difficulty fn answering the question, "What
Flano shall 1 buy?" When many Instruments have certain virtues which are
more or less enlaiged upon by elever
salesmen, it Is difficult for the average
buyer to determine wliich piano will
give the greatest satisfaction and prove
ihe b bt investment. In dealing with
an old, rentable house, you are pretty
sure to be well served, aud whether you
wanta WOKLD-FAMKD STKINWAY, *
standard NOKDHEIMER, or the less
costly llOMIMliN or PALMER Pianos,
we can suit both your taste and your
pocket.
NEW PIANOS AT FROM *250 UP,
and every Instrument sold under our
peisonal guarantee.
Inspection solicited,
Catalogues on application.
M. W. Waitt & Co.
LIMITED.
Established 1862
44 Government St.
WALTER 8. FRASER & GO.
LIMITED.
DEALERS   IN
GENERAL HARDWARE
Full line of
AMMUNITION FOR SPORTSMEN,
Granite and Tinware for Householder!.
CALL AND GET PRICES.
Wharf St. VICTORIA B.C.,
Telephone 3.   P. O. Box 423.
LODGE REGISTER.
Woodmen ol tbe World.
Meets ist and 3rd Fridays. Assessments art
due and payable.ou the first day of the month;
Members must notify clerk of change of occupation and location.
Independent Forcatere.
Court Cariboo No. 743 meets in No. 1 Hnll
A. O. U. W., ist and 3rd Tuesdays at 8 p. m.
Thos. Le Metseurler, Fin. Sec., Garbally Kd.
R. C. Wilson; Rec. Sec., 191 Chatham Steeet.
Fraternal Order of Baglee.
Victoria Aerie No. is F.O.K. meet! every
Wednesday evening in Eagle Hall, Adelphl
Block, at 8:30 p. m. Sojoura kg brothers mad*
welcome. Joseph Wacbter, w, President; Frank
LeRov w. Secretary.
Northern Light, No. 5935.
a. e. f.
Meets ii, and 4th Wedneaday in each month
in K. of P. Hall, Douglas St. Visiting members
cordially invited to all meetings.
J. P. Hancock, Chief Ranger; W.F. Fullerton
Secretary.
Knlghta ot Pythian.
Far West Lodge No. 1 meet* at their Hall, cor
Douglas and Pandora Streets, every Friday nt •
p.m. Sojourning brothers are always welcome.
J.H. Penketh, C.C.; Harry Weber, K. of R.fta.
Boxs44-
Juvenile Ancient Order of Foreetora
Court No, 1 meets first Tuesday ln each month
at K. of P. Hall. Adult Foresters are always
welcome. S. L. Redgrave, President; E. A.
Laken. Secretary.
D. H. BALE
LEIGHTON ROAD
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Building Lota for Sale,
Houses Built on the
INSTALMENT PLAN.
Circulating Library
50 CENTS PER MONTH.
Victoria News Co.
86 YATES STREET.
The Lyric
Broad Street
Between Yates and Johnson
VICTORIA'S ORIGINAL (HOME OF
Polite
Vaudeville
T A. Johnson, Proiri»Vrv-ulMtiig 8
PROGRESS, SATURDAY,   DEC.   3, 1904
THE REALfl OF SPORT
The result of last Saturdays Rugby
football match between Victoria and
Vancouver was disappointing to Victorians, but the score, 14 to nil, did not
represent the respective merits of the
two teams. The Victoria forwards were
considerably superior to their opponents
in most respects but the Victoria three-
quarter backs had little opportunity to
show'what they are made of. The half
backs were not noticable on either side,
but here the vsiitors had an advantage.
It is said that the Victoria forwards
Went on the field with instructions to
play their hardest without trying to pick
up the ball and pass it out of the crowd
to the men on the three-quarter line. If
they had those instructions, they certainly followed them closely. But that
is not Rugby football, all the same, and
is haroiy ever pays. In Saturday's
match that style of play accounted for
the failure of the home team to score.
Victoria' has some excellent three-quarters and given anything like a fighting
'chance they would probably have scored.;
The strong forward game has always
been a feature of the Victoria teams
and it is an excellent feature, but it
should not be overdone so as to nullify
tne value of. the Outside men, who have
a better chance to score by reason of
the more open field presented to them
than the forwards. The old rule of the
game, like all Titles open to occasional
exceptions, still holds good, that the
forwards should pass anywhere but in
their own twenty-five, or very near their
opponents' goal line, provided a fair opportunity is.presented. . The home team
had bad luck early in the game and
the Vancouver men touched down twice
owing to errors of the full-back, A.
Newcombe, In that place the visitors
had on the. contrary a very safe man,
Watson, who did good work whenever
called upon, The Victoria team did
their best. to score and the forwards
played a real hard game. Cornwall was
the star man, on the ball all the time,
and Menzies, Barnacle and Benson and
others distinguished themselves. On tne
three-quarter line Scholefield played a
spelndid game, and Bell also showed up
well. Neither, had many opportunities
for showy play, being called upon mostly to stop rushes or to tackle their opponents. Mr. Alexis Martin refereed to
the satisfaction of both sides. On the
next occasion, when these two teams
meet, Victoria should win. It is only
a question of a little more practice for
the local seniors to be invincible so far
as B. C. teams are concerned.
!   *!li-     M '.x 0     0     0
The rival teams will be the Collegiate
School, High School, Central Club and
South Park Club. It was decided that
the Collegiate and High School should
be entitled to play only their own members, while the Central and South Park
teams, which are composed of younger
and smaller boys, may take boys who
have left school (up to the age of 17),
and thus bring the aggregation upon
even terms with the. two others. The
following schedule was arranged:—
Dec. 3 (morning), Collegiate vs. High
School.
Dec. 7 (afternoon), Collegiate vs.
South Park.      ,
Dec. 10 (morning), Collegiate vs.
Centrals.
Dec. 17, High School vs. South Park.
Dec. 21, South Park vs. Centrals.
. Dec. 24, High School vs. Centrals.
This will be the first round. At its
conclusion a similar second round will
be played. The first game 0 fthe series
will take place at 10 o'clock this morning at Beacon Hill, the rival teams being the Collegiate and High Schools.
*  *  *
• The Fernwood Young Men's "Average" handball tournament is being followed with keen interest. Appended
are the scores:—
Sets. Pts. Pts. Av.    Av.
■ Pld.For.Agst.For.Agst.
this afternoon is expected to be one
of the most interesting struggles of the
season. The city players will make a
very strong bid for victory, for if they
lose, they will be out of the running
for the City League championship. The
Victoria United eleven is composed of
the following players: Goal, J. Finlai-
son; full-backs, H.. A. Goward (captain), S. Lorimer; half-backs, W. Lorimer (centre),. C. S. Thompson, N.
Gowen; forwards, J. Lawson (centre),
L. York and C. Berkeley (left wing),
B. Tye and J. Lorimer (right wing).
» .»   » .
"Battling" Nelson, the hard-hitting
Danish. fighter, • disposed of his formidable opponent, "Young" Corbett, in. ten
rounds at Woodward's Pavilion, San
Francisco,, last. Tuesday • night. The
■fight was fast and furious from the
start, and after the third. round it was
apparent that the conqueror. of "Terrible Teddy" M.cCovern had at last met
his match. Nelson was. his master'at
every point, and. although . his .pluck
enabled him to last through ten,rounds
he was then utterly helpless, and- his
seconds then threw up the ; sponge.
Jimmy Britt will have a warm time
when he meets. Nelson. ■ . - -■
■ *  * .■*'
Bert Clark and I. Abrahams will
meet in .a 20-r.ound boxing contest on
December 7th in the ■ old- Methodist
church. A big crowd will no doubt
attend, as both men • are, • good boxers
and hard hitters. Abrahams.is a-sailor
frpm H. M„ .S. • Bonaventure, while
Clark is from .Denver, Colorado..
• •   • .
The single scull race proposed for the
championship of the coast, the. competing oarsmen, to be D.- DesBrisay, J.
B..A. A., E. Gloss, Portland, and W.
Pap'e, San Francisco, is arousing considerable interest. It is hoped that the
contest will take place on Lake Washington next spring.
• •   •
The J. B. A. A. handball tournament
is now in full swing and the games are
all hotly contested. The biggest surprise so far was the defeat of R. Pede.n
and K.' Hughes, they succumbed to A.
Belyea and J. Hunter, the score being
21-8; 2I-20.
* *,••■.
The Victoria United scored'a victory
against the Bonaventure Asspciation
team at Oak Bay on Saturday last, defeating the sailors by 8 goals to 3. J.
Lawsoif played centre forward and distinguished himself in, his new position,
and W. York pin up a stonewall defence
in goal.
• •   •
Last Saturday's Association League
game, between Victoria West and the
Garrison on the latter's ground resulted
in .the victory, of the Garrison by 3
goals to 1. The. Victoria West team,
showed up pretty well, however, and
gave evidence of much improvement
since the commencement of the season.
* *  *
A Rugby football league has been
formed in order to hold a competition
for the cup generously donated by the
J. B. A. A.
* *•, *
A good game of Rugby football *will
be played at the Canteen grounds this
afternoon between Victoria and H. Mv
S. Bonaventure
. •   •   o
The Victoria Intermediates will play
the Vancouver Intermediates at Brockton Point this afternoon.
. »  * .•
The Victoria Hunt Club will meet at
Burdettc House on Vancouver street, at
2:45 this afternoon.
distance from the base of the mountain,^
and during the first year men had cut
in about 500 yards..
Mr. Langdon then explained ■ the
gradual development of the mine,, its
output, and emphasized the risk the
miners undertook. Accidents had been
frequent. In conclusion, Mr. Langdon
mentioned the steps taken for the relief
of those left without mea:ns of support-
as a result of the disaster. On taking
his seat lie was accorded happy applause,
plause.
riniTTfT1|n|jiy!rflrlll|!l|<l|Mfll|lla|ll|ll|M|,l<lll|ll|UlllflT|ll|ll|llIl
I Our Competitions f
| By th* Editor I
'■■■•'■•■■•■'■"•'■tlltllfntlltnlntllllltlllllll itllllltHJillllllllsltllll
The best "remark" sent in this week
for the Monkey was that of Mr. Godfrey Booth. "The Mint is in the soup,
Gentlemen," said the Monkey, as he
took his seat at the banquet to Senator
Templeman at the Driard. It is to be
hoped that,there is no truth in the remark, but it' is amusing, all the same.
Some of the replies sent in were good
but others again had no particular
point. . "None but the'brave deserve the
fare" is one of the best, and "Whoa,
Bill-!'*, is , suggestive if a little brief.
"Here's to Laurier. aud a full dinner
pail," is quite appropriate as also is this:
"Take a little wine of thy stomach's
sake." ....   '  .- - -,   ;•;.':•,
For an original sketch. the prize" is
awarded to the writer of "A Night
Out,", whfctr -is- printed on another page.
There was only one set of verses sent
in and these while having.some merit,
require retouching before-they see the
light.
If you are in want of a HIQH GRADE SCOTCH WHISKY
Be Sure You Get
BUCHANAN'S   SPECIAL   or
BUCHANAN'S   BLACK   AND   WHITE.
Stevenson Macadam, the well kuown analyst, of London, certifies these whiskies
to be absolutely pure.
FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS
Radiger & Janion, General Agents for British Columbia and the Yukon District.
Your Chickens Will Lay
. AND WE CAN TELL YOU HOW.
Use EXCELSIOR MEAL.   This being a special blending of all grain, cannot
fail to bring good results.
DIRECTIONS—To be fed hot in the morning.
Sylvester Feed Co., 87=80 Yates St.
TELEPHONE 413.
E. A. Gallop ... .4
84   28
14.
P. K. Winch ...5
99   58
8.2
...
F. R. Moore ....5
97   56
8.2
...
W. P. Marchant.6
112   75
6.16
A. Marconini  . .4
78   56
5.5
H. Jameson —5
67   77
2.
W. P. Bassett..5
64   79
....
3-
H. Spengier ...3
40   62
7.33
E. B. Jones ....5
57   99
8.4
W. Wilsor   5
45 105
12.
V.  Heather  . ...1
6  21
15-
N. L. Davis ... .2
9   42
16.5
The most interesting game was played by Gallop and Winch, the former
finally proving too strong for his opponent and  winning with    a score of
21-15.
*   *   *
The Association football match between thc Victoria United and Garrison  elevens  at  Work  Point  Barracks
LECTURE BY MR. LANGDON.
A very interesting lecture, was delivered at the Y. . M-, C, ,A.. rooms on
Wednesday ■ evening- by Mr. K. Langdon, B, A.,, on.the.Frank disaster.-.As;
Mr.' Langdon taught school at FrLik'
for several'years,, he is in a,position to
give an accurate account of .the various
features of the mountain slide. Regarding the cause of the disaster, many experts he said had given opinions, arid in
most cases they differed. One clever
young man had said that, a comet had
struck the fop,of the. mountain .loosening immense pieces, of rock, and stone.
The speaker was inclined to believe that'
a volcanic eruption had been responsible
for the slide which almost smothered
the little' mining camp.
[ Mr. Langdon spoke of the number of
lives lost, the efforts to save those imprisoned, and, lastly, the financial losses.
Thc company that had started coal mining at Fra'rik .had I invested a large
amount of capital. ' The! seam of coal
that was exploited extended for some
WEEKLY COMPETITIONS.
One of the objects of "Progress" is
to stimulate interest,in literary and artistic work, and contributions suitable
for publication are invited. In addition
to this a number of competitions will
be held weekly and a list of these is
given below.
Competitors are requested to note the
following conditions:
1.' Entries for, all competitions will
close on the Wednesday of each week;
any contributions to this: department
received later will be held over until
the next' week.
2. All contributions must be original, that is;' the work 6f the competitor, and must not have been previously
published. ,»   ~f
3. Except when otherwise stipulated
by the competitor, the Editor reserves
the right to print some of the unsuccessful contributions to this department
without payment.
4. All contrioutions must be written
either in ink or by typewriter on one
side of the paper only, and must be accompanied by the contributor's name
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith.
As all Work appearing in "Progress"
will be signed, those who do hot wish
to have their names published must
sign their contributions with such pen-,
names or initials as they desire printed.
VERSE.
For the best set of original verses: '■'■'"'■
on any   subject, not-   exceeding!  .-
20 lines .'........."..... .$1.50
SKETCH.  OR  PHO-TOGRAPHr-
For the best original 'sketch, (suit- .  ..-,
able for reproduction   in "Prb-
■ gres's") or photograph; subject to      .
be of topical interest or humorous
' or haying. other interest to. the,
.public .1....; ..,..'.,.,........,.$1.50
;•';-:.''       ■ PROSE. '
For the best original anecdote, lit-
' erary' sketch, story .or essay, not''. ■
to exceed '400. words ... ,.$1.50
.   THE MONKEY'S REMARK.
• On another page will be found among
the advertisements a' coupon . for this
competition. The competitor must cut
out the coupon, fill in. the space left ..for
that purpose with the most appropriate
remark' he or' she can.' think of; and
mail to "Progress" office so.as .to.arrive
on or before Wednesday evening next..
The-competitor sending in the most appropriate arid ingenious "remark" by. the
Monkey will receive $2. The. decision
will be made without any. reference, to
the political color of the .remark.
FALL A^D WPTER SBITING$.
Our finest stock of West, ot England and Scotch and Irish Goods is
most complete, and cannot be duplicated elsewhere.     '
Suits to Order $20 up.        Overcoats to Order $25 up.
Pants to Order $5 tip.
SCHAPER & REID, Merchant Tailors
Cor. Broad and Trounce ave„ Opp. Colonist Office.
J«jsa*WtyW<<Ml/rtfstyrisatyM*)l^^
LILLET'S Ice Cream Soda
LIKED BY YOUNG
AND OLD.
Never fails to please. That's what
makes our Ice Cream Soda go. And
it .is fine. Always pure, wholesome, '
delicious. Prepared With choicest of
fruit flavors, it is as nectar for the gods.
A glass of our soda when feeling heated
s a treat for the soul. Try one and be
convinced..
105 Douglas St.
Phone 850a
Windsor Restaurant
'Government Street,
.  .-''  Almost Opposite Post Office."
Business Men's Lunch
l_1       a Specialty.
Good Service at Popular Prices,
v Meals at all hours.   Private Rooms
HA    FREDERICK.
• The Finch pique gloves are sewn by
skilled, pique sewers under the accurate
eye. of expert examiners. The Finch
glove fits to perfection and the wearing
qualities are unsurpassed; there is no
more serviceable glove made. Every
pair is guaranteed and fitted. Finch &
Finch,- 57 Government street
WANTED—Ladies to  canvass
scriptions for "Progress."
ply "Progress" Office 11 a.m.
sub-
Ap-
Mesdames Dickinson & Simpson will
resume .their dancing classes Saturday,
Oct. ist, Assembly Hall, Fort St.
Monday, afternoon, children's fancy
dances, 3.30 to5 p.m.
Monday evening, beginners classes.
Tuesday evening, Cotillon club.
Thursday. Social Night, 8.30to 11 p.m.
Friday afternoon,- children's ptivate
class'.   '••..;...
. Saturday afternoon, general class 2.15.
Private Lessons Given.
PHONE  B81
NOTICE.
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in "Progress" up to November 1st
are payable to Charles H .Lugrin or
to Sydney Booth, who is authorised
to collect same. All subscriptions
due on November 1st are collectable
by S. A. G. Pinch, by whom "Pro-
is now published.
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A. W. fyidgman*
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Insurance Agent
Agent Commercial Union Assuranoe Co
Ltd., of London, England.
London Assurance Corporation.
41 Government St. «
For Christmas Presents
What better, than the        >
fl. B. Cigars?
M. BANTLY&SONS
Telephone 381 155 Port Street
WE SELL
FIRE
INSURANCE
HEISTERMAN & CO.
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Established 1895
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ladies, and the ladies do the buying.
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New Houses For Sale
INSTALMENT PLAN.
A number of new homes, Modern In
every respect.     Easy monthly inatal-'
ments.
M Land ft taYestment Agency Ld.
40 Government St.
Vol.1.   No. 47
VICTORIA, B. C.; SATURDAY, DEC. 3,1904
Price 8 Cents.
XMAS FRUIT BARGAINS
■ Dixi Brand Seeded Ralalna. 3 for 85c
| Dixi Brand Mixed Peel, » lbs, for 25c
> Dixi Brand Re«eicaned eurranta. 3 Iba. for ...SSe
> Dixi Brand Extract Lemon and Vanilla. 3 ox. tor 30c
* Dixi Brand Extract Lemon and Vanilla, 8 ox. for SOe
DIXI H. ROSS & CO., The Independent Cash Grocers
Best Bread
London and Vancouver Bakery
73 Fort St.
Van deliveries to all parts of city
and suburbs.
D. W. HANBURY
Proprietor.     . ■
f.»,fV»hr
L ^SnMS» 3|i» ^Haajsia ^a suk ^la^^^lfc
NEW
First oar of new season's drop just to hand.   Cheaper than Wheat;
makes splendid Chiekeu Food,   fry a sack.
the Brackma|i«Ker Milling Company, Ltd.
116 Govircnient atreet  -
Fashionable
Marriage
Mr. J.£D. Pemberton and  Miss
Helen Baiss United at Christ
Church Cathedral   ,
**
Pemberton, cheque;
berton, silver sugar spwffiyMrrCvi'em-
berton, china coffee cup; Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Beaven, one dozen silver spoons;
Mr. and Mrs. H; R. Beaven, silver teapot; Major C. T. Dupont, silver salt
cellars; Mis Nellie Dupont, china cream Thm u»»A,tetm «# ■ «ii Cm^^mUm
jug and sugar basin; Miss Bell, silver j ** ******* •' M«»l Factories
Help Home
Industries
^'   ■    '   ■/   'AMEWOANAJWS^^ Z--' ;-'*
The Hotel Victoria
B. GAVE, Proprietor .   ■
m T^hout ««•»»«•«• «•■. wM+trnmyr    %SS|
' Government Street, Viotoria, B.O. VVM
l«JUUUU»JlxJUUUUUM M 9 9 99 Mf IUIM t MlJUt «4U
PJaaae eat eat and aaata at fiwatef VMM Baek
a**:
kiXYn is the Phone (Local or Long Oistence) for
e 20th eeBtury8aslMMTrsUilsge0n Ltd.
The New Colltf* Is a^twmpMh ^tef^gtitftheConwef Bra*
■    TT •"Wajjaaaa. sajaaiia  vsaiwan jSBa^s^sjH
objects t arw,
a Lettar.Preis rrl.tjlij.iietri
_knd . „..„.,
■Penmanship; Geometry;
■Shares; Brokli
POSTAL PUriui—aus, ra»«..
Viotoria.  «ild»y,»rlfawtuiu«. ■"•I'm'«<»•• Ofw.or*r Iaprlal Bank. VMerla.
Vaiicourar. FMBlook, lor»*»rni«nd,Typ»WflMn|, -'-----■—rT^   '
We have the largest stock of Fixtures antY Electric
• House Fittings in B. C.   >
THE HINTON ELECTRKCa,U.
NEW PREMISE8i
aQJOovernnient Street VictorU, B.
STORIES OF THE STREET.
New Caledonia disappeared years ago
and now the Caledonia Park is gone.    I
The latest assault case is that of
|Nogi upon Port Arthur.
The public is still wondering who was
he lucky winner on the late legal elope-
Bment contest.
• •   •
"What.a wise creature I am," remark-
id the Monkey as he read the last two
lumbers of "Progress."
• •   •
If you want to stand in well with the
adies you must get your name on Miss
(O'Leary's autograph book.
• *  ■■<
Tommy Atkins or no Tommy Atkins?
a question which vitally affects the
well-being of Victoria just now.
• *   *
It is all very well for the Young to
Ibelieve in Christian Science.   Old peo-
le do not always find its theories prac-
icable.
• •   •
Messrs. Ross & Co., popular franchise
merchants of Toronto, have decided to
H'ontinuc the business with a re-organ-
zed company.
Last Thursday afternoon at half past
two o'clock, Christ Church > Cathedral
was filled wish the fashionable and
expectant guests of Mrs. Baiss, who
Were invited to witness the marriage of
her daughter, Helen Mary Yoder, to
Mr. Joseph Despard Pemberton.
The church was beautifully decorated
with bunches of white crysanthemums
and ferns, tied with large true»k>vers'
knots of white satin ribon.
The marriage ceremony .*as eoleam-
ized by his Lordship the Bishop of Columbia, assisted by the Rev. W. Seng*
Allen. Punctual to the minute the fair
young bride was escorted up to the attar
rails by Mr. H. P. O'Parrell, who, in:
the absence Of the bride's father, gave
her away. The bridal gown was one
of dazzling beauty, it being made of
beautiful ivory white duchesse satin,
literally covered in rare old Brussels,
ppint lace. This exquisite lice, together
with the bride's veil, has, many years
been an heirloptn in her family. Her
ornaments were pearls, a . beautiful
necklace, pendant and sunburst, and she
carried a lovely ahoWer bouquet of whit*
bridal roses and maidenhair fern. Miss
Gladys Baiss, sister of the bride, was
maiiof honor. She wOre a lovely gown
of soft cream silk draped with Limerick
lace ana carried a large bouquet of crysanthemunis. H«r'.tares picture hat was
of white chiffon and lace, trimmed with
large ostrich plumes. Miss S. B. Pemberton stid Miss Amy Angus acted as
bridesmaids, and were beautifully gowned in cream colored crepe de chene with
much shirring and lace. They wore
large halts of brown paune velvet,artistically trimmed with red and fjojavbrown
velvcte crysanthemums, and long tulle
ties of the same shades, Their bouquets
were also o: golden-brown crysahthe-
mums, tied with long atrai^Mii$
brown tulle. The gift of the bridegroom I
j to each of the bridesmaid* w*V a 1*eft
heart-shaped brooch with emerald cei-'
tre> the little train hearers were. na
two pretty ehfldrefi of Mrs. C. , Hf.
Rhodes and they performed their part'
in a most dtgnined and stately maimer.
Mr. W. D. Pemberton acted as belt'
man, and the ushers were Messrs. Gregory, Bridgman, Scholefield and Charteris
Pemberton,     .   * , .'..■
After the marriage ceremony the bridal party and guests were conveyed in
. carriages to 'Tiiountjoy," where con-
| gratulations and best wishes were tendered to the happy pair.
Mrs. Baiss received in an exquisite
gown of' silver grey liberty silk over
pale pink, taffeta silk, with trimmings
of pink paune velvet and lovely Lim-
lerick lace.   Her hat was of the same
shade of grey with pink roses, and she
—"--—-■ ■:■••■ ■   ww,^^, -t.-. ..,,,.. carried a large bouquet ef pink earn*
«ti.-   ,•.•''   ' : tions and fsrnsr Mrs. F, B, Pemberton
This, town has a very muggy ch- wore a beautiful frock of black silk and
mate,   said ^stranger as he passed a .lace, and Mrs. J. D. Pemberton, the
third shop with children's cups displayed mother of the bridegroom, also wore a
in the window. ,   ^ I rich blacfc sOik gown, with rare old lace
land diamonds.   Mrs. Hugo Beaven.was
Rather too much exposed for com- > becomingly gowned in cream colored
fort," remarked the Monkey as he climb-' lace over pale green silk.   Miss Sophie
souvenir; Coloney Gregory, bronze and
glass vase; Mr. J. C| Bridgman, pair
of silver vases; Mr. E .Scholefield, silver handled riding whip; Right Rev.
Bishop of Columns, scent bottle; Rt.
Rev. Bishop, and Mrs. Cridge, photo
and frame; Mr. and Mrs. Daundy, china
plate; Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner Johnson,
silver candelabra and candlesticks; Lady
Crease, flower .pot; Mrs. G. H. Barnard, carved stand; Mr. and Mrs. Bur-
rell, cut glass and silver vases; Mr.
and Mrs. Ross, silver photo frame;,the
Misses Shannon, cheque; Mrs. T. G.
Churton, cheque; Senator and Mrs.
Mrs. Macdonald, leather travelling case;
Mrs. Gavin Bums, silver grape scissors; Mrs. and Miss Alice Bell, silver
dish; Mr. and Mrs. Anmdell, case of
dreuing silver; Mrs. James and the
Misses Angus, silver soup ladle; Mrs.
Biggnilter, lace handkerchief; Miss
:er, set of gold buttons; Mrs.
Should be Preferred to
Imported Articles
A writer in the Colonist recently drew
attention to the beneficial results that
would accrue to Victoria if Victorians
Were to give more generous support*
to local industries. This is a subject!
that deserves consideration.' The Nboys
and girls are growing up and they require a field for their industry. For,
years there has been a steady exodus
of young Victorians who failed to nnd'
employment in their native city, or even
on the Island. This is not well. In a
young community there should be plenty of opportunity for the exercise of;
industry and talent, and it is not good
! that our young people should have tiu/'
Bro^MtterW^^
Pupils.
»%xz
.MdlnlfttUNraTT
lace table centre; Mr. and Mrs. W. T,
Burton, cut glass scent bottle; Mr. Bul-
wer, cheque; Mrs. Barnet, cheque;
Miss Bodington, travelling clock; Mr.
C. A. Cornwall, silver vase; Mr. Arthur'
D. Crease, cigarette box; Mr. Lindley
Crease, hot water bottle; Ms. A.- D.
Crease, Japanese table centre; Mrs.
Croft, silver ornament; Mr. A A. Clayton, silver-flower pot; Mrs. Carmichael,
cut glass and silver salts bottle; Dr. and
Mrs. Cobbett, two cut glass and silver
scent bottles;- Mrs. Courtney, silver
brush and comb, Mrs. Henry Cook,
travelling writing case and ink stand;
Mrs, Cuppage and Miss Kane, silver
photo frame; Mr. Colley, pearl and emerald brooch; Mr. Downs, cheque; Mr-
Such phrases as "Vancotlver: Island's:'
resources are immense" have been cur-'
rent so long that the meaning is half
lost sight of.   The resources are great, ■
but it has become almost a habit to expect "outside"   enterprise to   develop'
them, and so the situation is, that the
best of  victoria's young people seek"■■
fortune elsewhere while Americans take)
hold of Island industries.
But in the city itself there are a number of young industries—minufactoriti
of preserves, clothing, foods, soap, furniture, etc.—which while not entirely
dependent upon the local consumption,
can be greatly strengthened by home
trade. The products of these factories
are excellent, quite as good and often
a^rMirie^^^
kettle; Mrs. Few, glass «id silver scent ■£**ntlSZ^TS^rS 2ft
bottle; Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, cut glass igSL-do-    ™iS.?T.   S«S
silver egg stand; Mr. Fox, silver photo -ZFS^ *f?iJZF^ ^."T
frame;lhe Misies Von^Fulloto, liWer g^gf ^"W W?ble   of   steady
Wj&^j^&Bm T HBSBS °Mt
flvir ahoto frame; MIm Gibson; cot ^Si TSifrt SS-a^L^'-
hu. dish; Mr, and Mrs. Gasnett, In- ^J.*£*«* ""li!?* toT^ rt
»«i»:sfi*W.jeK^.i.rft-tid^ I.,,s'
cutgkSSandtilvermuiWtle;Mr..ml rSdJoi r^n     ^ W
Mrs,Griffiths, cutgis^dlah; Mr>.A>-H.;i'''IM<*0^i-^y?'-'' • ..  "     .'
Grantoff and ttte Muses^Gramoff (Eftf-.   "'     ' " —-«——      ■
land; cheque; Mr. A. Hawey, pair «f •
silver sauce.ladjes; the Misses H»w<-/,j
MW AM) POLIOB.
silver bowl; Sr, arid Mrs. and tiie1
Tie adjourned Fall Assize Court will
on Tuesday rnornlhg next, Mr.
Misses   Hjckey, • silver .photo . frasacs;
Mr. and Mrs. ,G, S. Hofc, cot gtaw dish; , ^_ „ ^_   .,.,.,
Lt.-Col. and Mrs. Jones, cut gun. aud J«*U«e Martm pmidiot.
silver stand; Mr. and Mrs. HandWd,. •  •  •       MHjH
cut glass vase; Mrs. Arthur ■ Robertson, ■   The Fall Court in Vsncouver has been
brass candlestick; Miss Bowron, drawn swapied during the week with the ap-
work embroidtred collars; Mr. W/ E. ft m Hopper vs. Dunsmuir.
Ward (England), cheque; Mrs. Mac- • •  ♦
lure, bras* Chinese kettle; Miss K. Mac-1   la the Provincial police   court   on
lure, Japanese work; Miss B. MKhire, Thursday Thomas Marion and Thomas
cloisoune box; Mrs. and Misses Kitto, Young were fined $15 each and costs
four cut glass vases; Mr, A. J. GaUetly, for having trespassed en   the Hatley
clock; Miss Musgrave, pair of vases; Park estate, Col wood, contrary to tne
Mrs. Solly, pokar-work leather bag; Mr. provisions' of the .Game act.
and Mrs.   Wynne, biscuit'jar;   Mrs.:   > •  •  *
Rhodes, Chinese table; Mr. I^ouudes,)   ^ Supreme 0,^ wi|| commence a
drawn work table cover; Mrs. Peatse, j^^on „, Tuefdty a^   x^,, afe ,
egg boiler; Rey. aftd Mrs. Ltoyd, silver BMnber of divorce cases to be heard, but
umbrella handle; Mr. and Mm. H. F. it j, Wieved no defence will be put in
Langton, cut glass dish; Mr. and Mrs. ^ my of the rMp0ndents.
ed the two hundred foot pole on Douglas Rock.
• *   •
The small boy is beginning to flatten
his nose against the store windows.
Unlike a large proportion of the Old
Country boys, he gets his full share of
the treasures behind the glass.
• •   •
Now that St. Andrew's Day is past
and gone and the haggis has all been
eaten the world will turn on its axis
steadily once again.
• •   »
When the Governor-General is constrained to swear immediately on landing in this country, what can be expected of the ordinary citizen?
• •   *
More flower beds are being made on
the Parliament grounds on the west side
in order that the first impression of the
tourist may be a good one. With a
fountain playing in the centre these
grounds would be very attractive.
Pemberton looked charming in a picturesque robe of white lace, with large
hat of soft brown beaver and bouquet
of golden-brown crysanthemums. Among the other smartly gowned guests
were Mrs. Gillespie in a grey velvet frock .with ermine trimmings; Mrs.
Jahion wore . a beautifully brocaded
black and white satin with lace fishu;
Mrs. Arthur Jones, a lovely mouse grey
velvet with sable stole and targe muff;
Mrs. Barnard, dark red cloth and rich
furs.
The bride's going-away dress was a
very smart tailor-made gown of dark
green cloth, and hat to match of soft
beav.er. The honeymoon will be spent
in England.  .
A partial list of the costly and lovely
presents received by the happy couple,
is as follows: Mrs. Baiss, china tea
service and Japanese silks; Miss Louise
Baiss, cheque; Mrs. Pemberton, cheque
and. turquoise necklace; Mr. and Mrs.
F. B. Pemberton, cheques; Mr. P. W.
D. Pemberton, silver entree dishes; Miss
S. T. Pemberton, cheque; Miss H. S.
Oliver, half dozen china tea cups; Dr,
and Mrs. Powell .silver salt cellars;
Mr. H. B. Walker, silver sugar-sifter;
♦  * •
Jasper, Wirth and Strek. have been
'■ committed for trial on the charge of
1,    . ...      .....     ."
Mrs. George Phillips, pin cushion; Mr.' hlvmB 8Mauited a„d inflicted grievous
Welby Solomon, brass gang; Mrs. and;bodily harm upon Conductor   McLeod
Miss Phipps, tea cloth drawn work; Mr. jon ^ Egquimalt car.
and Miss O'Neill, silver salt cellars
Miss Webling, Japanese centre; Miss
McCandlish, fur muff; Mr. and Mrs.
Reid, travelling clock; Miss T. M. and
Mr. R. T. Payne, gold chain and locket;
Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Worlock, paper
knife; Mrs. McGirn, photo frame and
writing case; Mr and Miss Newcombe,
four silver and cut glas vases; Mr. and
Mrs. Joly dc Lotbiniere, cut glass and
silver vase; Mr. Muskett, silver tea
spoons; Mrs. Leonard, cut glass bowl;
Mr. and Mrs. Matters, carved stand and
flower pot; Mr, and Mrs. Poff, cut glass
dish.
The question agitating thc mind of
the average male householder is, whether lie can evade .paying enough debts
to enable him to buy Christmas presents
and celebrate the festive season in a
fitting manner.
"another pair of sueves."
Time was not very long ago,
When Mabel's walking skirt
Trailed half a yard behind to show
How well she swept the dirt.
But "short and sweet" are in again;'
No more the grievance rankles, .
For Mabel's now curtailed her train
» And shows her dainty ankles.
But Mabel lias a thrifty mind
To supplement her charms;
The frills that once she wore behind
She fastens on her arms.
Her sleeves are made in open bags
Like trousers in thc navy;
No more she  sweeps the streets, but
drags
Her sleeve across tlie gravy.
—London Punch, 2
PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 1904
ZION CITY:
AN INSIDER'S VIEW f
By Agnes Deans Cameron
Throw physic to the dogs; I'll
none of it.—Alacteth V-3
This week I interviewed an old gentleman who has just returned to Victoria from a year's sojourn in "Zion
City." The returned Zionite is ,Mr.
Semple, who arrived in Victoria with
the Royal Engineers away back in 1858
and who for 45 years has continually
resided in this Province.
A year ago Mr. Semple and his wife
removed to "Zion" to make their
home within the walls of Dowie's city.
Mr. Semple is an ardent admirer and
faithful follower of John Alexander
Dowie, and very courteously gave me
the following information:—
Zion City was founded three years
ago on the shores of Lake Michigan;
it has two and a half miles of lake
frontage and covers an area of 24
square miles. Zion is 42 miles east of
Chicago and 42 miles north of Milwaukee, "midway between Beer and
Babel;" and the Chicago and Northwestern railroad makes one clear cut
through the city direct as the crow flies.
The town is laid out with mathematical
exactness, all streets lined with shade
trees, and every house removed 30 feet
from the sidewalk. Longfellow says
that the streets of Philadelphia re-echo
the trees of the forest, similarly Zion's
avenues have a Scriptural ichor, Gilboa,
Ezra, Gabriel, Amos. Fancy taking a
morning constitutional along Jehosophat
avenue or watching a dog fight (do
dogs fight in Zion?) at Gabriel Corners.
In Zion City there are 10,000 people,
and the community has many unique
features. Theie are no saloons in
Zion; and no advertisements inviting
one to "Chew Pay Roll" or "Smoke
Tail Twist." You must leave your cigarettes behind when you essay those
Biblical avenues. No gambling and no
profanity may enter into Zion, so political elections there must be tame affairs. Zion City went strong for Roosevelt in November. Mr. Dowie thinks
his lace factories will prosper best under a gold standard. No Grands, Savoys, Crystals, Edison's, opera houses
or Redmonds relieve the tedium of the
lakeside city, though baseball matches
and sacred concerts are allowed. Women in Zion may sell pork, or dispense
drugs or practice medicine; but there
are two dentists in the midst, one black
and one white, you may take your^
choice.       • -a—"•& Li^iaBax^^l'
Mr. Semple states regarding the financial government of the community that
there is absolutely no coercion; every
man is a free agent If you become a
convert to Zionism you are at full liberty to live where you will, in Zion City
or elsewhere. You are not called upon
to give up all you have to the move-t
ment, though free-will offerings are not
rejected. A true Zionite gives 10 per
cent, of his gross earning to the Zion
Ecclesiastical Fund, out of which the
schools, colleges and churches in Zion
are administered, together with the missions for propaganda work all over the
world. •-'     :(*!■ s.
There are no small stores, nor small
manufacturers or contractors in Zion
City. One big co-operative store supplies the wants of the citizens at Chicago prices, and all building and public works are carried on by the Zion
Building and Manufacturing Association. Believers are encouraged to become stockholders in these and allied
industries, the Zion Sugar and Confection Association, the Zion Lace Industries, the Zion City Bank. Shares are
issued at the par value of $100 and
carry interest from 9 to 12 per cent.
Zion boasts some beautiful buildings,
the Zion College, Zion Printing and
Puoiiiiiing House, the big hotel or Elijah Hospice, and the Administration
Building, where the general manager
has his office.
In nothing is Dowie's executive ability better shown than in the choice of
his lieutenants. At the head of the Educational Department is Overseer Brace-
field, an ex-Presbyterian from California. Mr. Set.ple says there is no case
of recorded truancy among Zion's 4,000
children; they all cry to go to school,
and in the school scheme of discipline,
punishment gives place to prayer.
The factory works did not all spring
into life at once. They have been a
natural growth. The faithful found
Chicago candies deleterious, the adulterations cunningly added to tbe seductive "boss chewing candy" and "taffy-
on-a-stick" by the unrcgenerate caused
interior warfare in rlic persons of Zion's
infants and threw too much business
into the hands of those two dentists, so
John Alexander said. "Go to I We will
manufacture our o\ui jaw-stickers and
horehound peppermints!" and it was
done. Zion's cand'tt are sent to the
farthest corners of the Seven Seas; a
13-ton order was recently sent to Africa, and the little children of Timbuc-
too and Somaliland now learn their letters off Zion peppermints. The head
of the candy pull is Deacon Rodda,
while a Canadian, Mayor Harper, is the
president of the Building and Manufacturing Association. Africa is a great
field for Dowieism. Recently a Zulu
chief, who was healed of consumption,
through the prayers of Zion, sent $5,000
to the cause, and gave the doctor a
plantation of mahogany.
Children born in Zion have never
seen a drunken man, or a pipe (in
active operation), or a patrol wagon (!),
nor have they ever played bridge or
rushed the growler. In three years
there lias never been a case in court
of any kind. When Zion's citizens want
to 'mi! through Craigflower road or slice
up homesteads to make direct roads to
thc iaik, when they want to remove
Indian reserves or provide every man,
woniait ?nd child with a water meter,
Johr- Alexander Dowie calls the people
loj,eihe" and explains the situation to
them 'in a few well-chosen words," tlie
people hasten to agree with one another
and v ith him, and the thing is done;
ccii-cf|ucntly Judge Barnes has av sinecure i"i<! a well-stocked box of white
gloves.
Wl'.ei the little children in Zion meet
one ann-her on those euphonious streets,
you hf.ai no such worldly salutation as,
"Give us a fuit!" "I'll play you,
Skinny!" or "You think you're smart,
don't "mV The chaste greeting is,
"Jlice io thee," and the retort courteous, "i'tace to thee be multiplied!"
Priijei meetings are held by deacons
and d-aconesses at the homes of the
r conic all through the week, but Sunday is, of course, the great day for ser-
viic At a quarter to 6 the doctor
speaks 'heart to heart" with his people.
At (j is the Junior meeting, and at io 130
thc 1 nl 11 mediate gathering under Judge
Barms. At 11 Deacon Sloan holds his
P.iblc class. At 2 o'clock is a grand
procession, and afternoon service begins
.it j. There is a choir of 500 mixed
voices, supplemented by a junior choir
of 3«j; the choristers affecting white
surplices and mortar boards. Music is
a great factor of all services in the in-
slniiiiici lal part of which sixteen violins
and a $1,000 harp, "like that which
David played," take part. One must go
early t> secure a seat in the Tabernacle The last day Mr. Semple worshipped tliere he got his seat at half-
past 1 and remained at the services until 8 or'ock. Seventy different nationalities were represented in the vast audience— '-"-Presbyterians, Mahommedans,
apostate Jews, Armenians. Doctor
Dowie teaches all foreign recruits that
English is the dominant language, and
foreign-born children soon learn it in
the schcols. There are no electric cars
in Zion, but stages ply for a five-cent
fare        ■•> •• ■ <.[ ■■■>■■ *< • -- •-'•
Zion City pays taxes to the United
States government, but Zion's schools
are not state-supported. Mr. Semple
claims that Zion is the one city in the
whole Slate of Illinois that has paid its
full <ax to Uncle Sam's money box for
the cm lent year.
Zion's citizens are all honest. There
is a Lost and Found department in the
city, presided over by an elder, and no
man ever mistakes a $10 silk umbrella
for the more familiar Gamp.
The great divine healing meeting is
scheduled for every Tuesday. It is no
unusual scene to see 200 people of all
nationalities drawn up in sick chairs
waiting for 'the intercessory prayers.
Inside the Tabernacle Mr. Semple has
counted a hundred pairs of crutches left
there by cripples who needed them no
longer, and 65 high-heeled boots once
used to supplement shortened legs.
Other discarded relics left on the altar
are stomach pumps, pipes, tobacco
pouches, doctors' implements, prayer
beads, lodge emblems of all kinds.
When you join Zion you must sever
your connection with all secret societies.
Among the followers of Dowie are no
less 'ban 30 ex-Masons of the Mystic
Srr.r..-. Mr. Semple himself ceased to
be .. Forester when.he entered the community. God said, "hi secret have I
Hid nothing."
John Alexander Dowie made his first
appearance in America the year of the
Ciiieago World's Fair, coming from
Aii'-'rlia. Fourteen years ago he was
in Vir rria and preached in St. Andrew1!) I- resbytcrian Church. In Aus-
ira'i,- be was a Congregationalist. Mr.
Semple tells a characteristic story of
Dr. lowie. It shows admirably how
missionary work, organizing power and
riinivSy. -.,aking harmoniously blended in
his character from the cradle. At a
very (aider age little John Alexander
sat ui'an Edinburgh Sunday school
beii.-h. A prize had been offered to the
boy who next Sunday would bring in
the yeatest number of new recruits.
Little John A. had three pence which
he iiii«fted in candy bulls-eyes. He
get a g;oup of small boys gathered and
promised them each three candies as a
bribe for entering the fold, making a
deposit payment of one bull's-eye down
to each pressed man, leaving the deferred payment of two candies to a
more cr nvenient season. He was able
l-j .,luiw a larger contingent than any
rival n.issionary and so secured the
trophy. Men are but. children of a
larger growth.
Gaol authorities here think Lawrence
Mooney, Philip Chalk and Jimmy Chickens have quite a local record for appearances at court, but John Alexander
Dowie has been arrested in Chicago no
fewer than 100 times, and thrives on it.
The one great disadvantage of the
present Zion City is the climate. It is
exceedingly cold in winter, and windy
most of the time. It is intended to
build a second Zion in Mexico, and Mr.
Semple thinks that eventually a third
Zion will appear somewhere in thi."|
great Northwest coastal country.
I   ON CRITICISM   I
Series of Papers on the Interesting; Y
ubject ol the Value of Criticism. a
Written for Progress. %
By N'OUBLIBR.     A
♦♦o^ooooooo«o«o^o«ooocoo^<>
m.
In all the elements necessary to form
or evolve as a centre of culture and en?
lightenment, Victoria is very rich. Without wishing in the least to truckle to
public conceit, or to offer a sop to local
pride, one may say with truth that this
little city is peculiarly dowered in the
matter of what I might term promiscuous culture. That is, we have here
collected from many and various quarters of the globe men and women who
know the best. Those units leaven
every mass they touch. They are the
red corpuscles in the intellectual side of
any community, because they know intuitively, or have been trained, how to
estimate components that go to make
up the great thing called art. It is a
matter of inherent taste or of careful
cultivation this subtle power of appreciation.
Victoria can gather an audience or a
party of spectators who are as competent to say "good" or "bad" to any sort
of performance in art as any audience
or any spectators in the-world. It is
exceedingly funny to listen to some of
the advance agents of famous actors,
singers, or musicians, wondering if there
will be found in Victoria even a dozen
able to understand the great one. Yea,
it may at all times be answered to those
forerunners, hundreds who understand
and cannot be deceived by flaming placards, hysterical press notices or the
enthusiasm of the impresario, but who
judge by the work done. Scores of
those discriminating persons never attend the local concerts, but avoid them
as they would the path of pestilence.
But, although never seen at the bushels
of concerts that make gay the season in
Victoria, they are here, and their opinions are the dicta that have real weight.
How can it be otherwise? In Victoria there is a greater number in proportion to the population, of college
and university graduates, or of persons
who received part of their education in
those seminaries of learning, than is to
be found in any other city in Canada,
Then we have retired army and navy
officers, retired members of the British
civil service from many lands, not to
mention the presence on the station >
of the active representatives of the army
and navy, the officers and their families,
who bring here with them the atmosphere of refinement and culture and
taste that makes social life in England
that indefinable" something to breathe
which again every young English exile
in the colonies longs and labors.
Hence, when notable persons in art or
music come hither thinking to act or
sing or play to a collection of unin-
structed bumpkins, they err lamentably,
and still more lamentably should they
be so indiscreet as to permit themselves
to be careless or slovenly in their work.
Hundreds in their Victoria audiences
have probably formed part, on previous
occasions, of vast audiences in London,
New York, Paris or Berlin. So that
it is the height of folly for famous players or singers to come to Victoria under
the impression that it is one of the
"stands" on the rural circuit.
From these premises I argue that Victoria should be more honest with itself.
Introspection is fashionable at present.
Since Marie Bashkirtseff published her
thoughts on the mysteries of life, all
sorts and conditions of folk have been
turning their minds, or their hearts,
should they happen to possess one of
those clever inventions, inside out, and
examining the contents with high power
magnifiers. Every season in Victoria
there are many concerts. Haif, indeed
one-third of the number would be more
than enough, and into those could be
compressed a little of the ingredient
which nearly all of them lack now,
namely, quality. There is more squallity
than quality in a great deal of what is
euphemistically termed singing at these
Victoria concerts. The wild, passionate
rage of the raw, untrained amateur vocalist to "git to them footlights an' give
'em (the unhappy audience) a sample
o' what singin' really is," lies at the root
of the trouble. The disgraceful flattery
of uncultured and therefore critically-
powerless friends aggravates the mania;
the utter lack of attempts by the press
to check the fearful multiplication of
"concerts" and "musicales" all combine
to endanger the progress and .develop-,
ment of culture amongst the general
public in this city.
In Lancashire and Yorkshire there are
numbers of country bands, made up of
miners, farm servants, mechanics, •' laborers and other toilers. The music
of those bands has astonished and de-
] lighted critical audiences in. the;, great
cities of 'England and Scotland. Is it
to be supposed that the people of Lancashire or Yorkshire would tolerate that
most consummate of all nuisances, a
bad band, bad singing, bad;rndsic'of *aiiy
kind? In the language of .the great;
American, ..sot, much." Over in fnose
counties when man, woman, girl-or boy
takes up music, vocal or instrumenthl,
he or she; knows that, it-is'useless to
hope for even a hearing until ■patient,
faithful practice has- given the - power
necessary to make a favorable impression. No rushing upotf. the concert'p'lat-!
form there, even at the humblest tea,
meeting or bun feed, unless the singer
or player can do honor to the -funda-,
mental principles, at least, of music.
Why should not Victoria's, ambitious
amateurs emulate,the good example of
Lancashire and Yorkshire and '■ go back
to their practice, determined) to find
something more than che raucous applause Of persons' incompetent to  tell
'whether a note is one or sixteen rows
of apple trees off the chord? What
Victoria amateurs who apptir so faith-"
fully at its appalling number of winter'
concerts, want, is more training, Let
them just think a moment of the .position they would find themselves in rVefe'
the daily press suddenly to reform .and
tell the truth about those performances!
Let them think of the things that .'might
be said and could be said about their
work were truth-telling popular or fash-,
ionable.    Back, then, to your' studios,
|, your ateliers, your garrets or'' wherever
you may do your work, and practice,,|
practice, practice and let Victoria's public in its own significant way remove
the incentive that is spoiling so many
likely young musicians and other artists,
Tearful Wife—Before', yjou rriatfied
me you said you .could .ribfiive with'out
me.
Rude Husband—A man never knows
what he can do without? until he' tries.
LOVE IS BUND    ■ p
What color are her eyes ?  What, shade ?
You ask;.but I cpuld never feil.t'"-
They're just her eyes, and God ne'er
made . r ■ .-.:..'.. ■.;•
Another pair of eyes so well.
For when she comes, I'm at her side,
,Ah! far too close to recognize
Aught but the welcome quick implied,
The loving laughter in her eyes.
-G. N. H.
»:   daily >??j°
JTatinees ioc. all over,
6
fl
D
aoc.
Res.
Seats
Management of
ROBT.   JAHIESON.
WEEK OF DEC. 5th
Illustrated Song
Mr. Frederic Roberta
"Forthet,oveoiaGirl"
R. P. Blanche
Murphy and Andrews
High-Class Entertainers
Ida Russell
In her latest offering of Vocal and
ConversatioiiHl Eccentricities
The IrvfiTgT rlo
Marvelous Acrobats	
r.e Barge
The Instrumental King	
Tbe Star Trio
Jennings O'Brien, Mann and
Franks
Presenting an original comedy
entitled "Our Uncle"
New Pictures
"Joseph Sold by his Brothers"
Johnson Street
Qo where the crowd goes,
Savoy Theatgs
W. Q. Stevenson, Mgr,
WEEK OF DECEMBER 5
A Multifamous Bill
Hewlette's
Merry
Burlesquers
AND
Trccadero Vaudevilles
In the Meriy Musical Burlesque,
: entitled
"High Rollers"
16-PIGPLE-16
PRETTY GIRLS   ,
SPECIAL SCENERY
DAZZLING COSTUMES
GRAND CHORUS
FUNNY COMEDIANS
ALL STARS
"ALL FEATURES
No Advance in Prices '
Admission 15 and 25c.
Victoria   Theatre
Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 5 & 6.
THE VICTORIA AMATEUR OPERj
,    M -:, ATIC; COMPANY
Will give the Popular Comedy OperJ
With Full Orchestra
Special  Scenery.    Elaborate Costumes]
Curtain at 8 p.m. sharp.
Reserved tickets $1.00, 75c., 50c.
■55.       ■    Gallery 25c. .
On sale Saturday, Nov. ,10th, at Haiti
& Col, Government St
Victoria Theatre
,; . 1     : Satnrday, Deo. 8rd   .
ONE NIGHT ONLY.
The Devil's
Auction
Wgger, Better Than Ever:
New Electrical-Features, New Ballet
Ete.
Seats on sale Thursday^at Waitt'sv
Victoria'* Popular Family Play House |
Continued Success of the
ED. REDMOND CO.
Week Commencing Monday, Decs]
and continuing until Wednesday.
Evening
The Western Success
"Calif of nia"
Souvenir Matinee, Wednesday
■   Seats 10 cents
A Few Reserved for 25 cents
Thursday and' Balance of Week,
Ending Saturday Matinee
The Scenic Drama
u Tbe Lighthouse Robbery"
Night Prices, 10 and 25 Cents]
Phone No. 822
Call us up and Reserve Your Seats
Hotel Davis
Our Rooms aie tbe most central, tbe
best furnished and most comfortable in
the city.
The famous Poodle Dog Restaurant in
the building.   Cuisine unexcelled. PROGRESS, SATURDAY  DEC   3,   1904
3
M
O
i
U
Tbe Misadventures of
Augustus Smitherins
Told in a series of letters from Mr.
Smitherins to his father, Sir Augustus
Smitherins, Bart., of Smitherins Manor,
Norfold, and edited withan introduction
an d explanatory notes by
—Arnold Watson.
MISADVENTURE NO. I—AUGUSTUS IS BORN.
. Iii presenting to the public the interesting letters of my friend, Mr. Augustus Smitherins, I feel that it is my duty
to preface the collection with a brief
introduction, descriptive of the personality of Mr. Smitherins and the circumstances which resulted in his departure
from England to that distant, and semi-
civilized colony of British Columbia, the
inhabitants and customs of which are>
so wonderfully depicted in his letters to
his distinguished father.
Augustus Smitherins   first   saw the
light of day on the first of April, Anno
Domini 1878, and was ushered into the
j worid by old Dr. Manners, the family
practitioner,  assisted  by Mrs.   Bottan,
the midwife, who, tradition says, was so
elated at the infant being a boy that
the elation started her drinking to excess, so that she contracted a sickness
of the stomach and expired a month
later, somewhat noisily, but full of hope.
i The coming into the world of Augustus
! was a great   event   for   his father, the
baronet, and his lady mother.   This distinguished couple had been married for
[six years prior to the birth of Augustus,
[without result in the shape of an heir
I to the baronetcy or even in the less de-
| sired shape of a daughter.   This had
I been a grief to Sir Augustus and his
■lady, and one-for which even Dr. Man-
lners could not prescribe a remedy.   But
Irt'iih the birth of Augustus, this, the
■only source of disagreement between the
I baronet and Lady Smitherins, was re-
Ihioved, and in the length and breadth
■of England there was no happier family
lihan the Smitherinses    of    Smitherin
iJlanor.
Having shown thus briefly the important position in the world held by ourx
Jiero, I will pass lightly over the suc-<
Ir.eeding years during which he was ber>
Ing reared to manhood. There are in-1
Ideed few authentic documents in existence to be drawn upon for data touch-.
Ing the boyhood of Augustus, and as he
Is blessed with a short memory he is
■unable to supply the missing informa-
K'on. But you, dear Reader, may rest
■assured that nothing was omitted from'
Ijis education that would in any way
wave assisted towards the desired re-,
■suit—a young gentleman of exemplary,
■maimers and with a genteel talent for
■spending money. While hunting among
Ithe- correspondence of the baronet, I
found, it is true, a number of letters
I from our hero, during his school days,
I tied together with blue ribbon. These
J epistles, however, were very brief and
j their principal point always was to be
I found in the postscripts. From curious-
ity I added up the amounts mentioned
1111 the postscripts, and as generosity was
always one of the most notable traits
in the baronets character, I concluded
from my arithmetic that Augustus's
pocket money during his school days
amounted to a very tidy row of figures.
Coming of so distinguished a family^
whose fortunes had been founded by an
■ adventurous sea captain in the reign
' of Elizabeth—a valorous man whom
the Spaniards, in their hatred and malice, turned a Pirate-it was not surprising that Augustus Smitherins should
have begun to display, early in his
career, the traits of an heroic character
He somewhat neglected the mere bookish studies of Eton College and after
two years at Oxford, spent chiefly in
the_ study of Human Nature and the
curious effects of wine parties on Man's
Appetite for Breakfast, he listened to
the suggestion of the Dean of Christ
Church and withdrew from the scholastic arena, announcing to his affectionate parents his intention of Seeing the
World. His coming-of-age was then
due, and, this important event having
been properly celebrated, Augustus set
1 nbout his preparations for exploring
I the globe. First, he laid in a vast store
of wearing apparel and a complete armament of offensive and defensive weap-
| ons, and then he set inquiries on foot
as to the most desirable place in which
to commence his explorations. This
proved a tedious business, as everybody
I had a different opinion on the subject,
but the problem eventually wes solved
by our hero's mother. Lady Smitherins from the first had regarded her
son's taste for exploration with considerable anxiety. This anxiety had increased to real apprehension as she
viewed the arrival and packing up of
an infinite variety of guns, rifles and
revolvers, and in her distress she sought
the advice of her brother, General Sir
Robert Scared. The general was a great
man whose only fault was his unutterable contempt for subalterns and any
youth who possibly develop into a subaltern, and he did not sympathize with
Lady Smitherins' anxiety about her son.
I will not quote all of the language used
by the General on this occasion. Nothing but his relationship to herself would
have permitted Lady Smitherins to listen to some of the General's remarks,
but in conclusion the hardy warrior
suggested British Columbia as a field
for the explorations of Augustus.
"Send him to British Columbia," said
the General, after delivering a remarkable and forceful exposition of his ridiculous opinion of Augustus, "and you
may bet he won't be hurt."
"Are you sure there are no cannibals
there?" questioned the fearful mother.
"I don't think so," said the General.
"But even if there are cannibals, they
would have better taste than to eat Augustus."
"But, . . but do you think such
dreadful people have any taste?" cried
Lady Smitherins.
"They won't eat a scarecrow!" growled the General.
"Robert I" exclaimed the horrified
Lady Smitherins. "Scarecrow, indeed!"
"They like 'em plump," explained the
General, " not all arms and legs; d	
■it."
"But where is British Columbia?"
queried Augustus's mother. "And how
do you get there?"
"I don't know," admitted the General.
"But I know a man at the club who
has been there to shoot game. I believe it is somewhere on the other_side
of America."
And so it came about that on a nice
rainy day 'm the early spring of 1900,
Augustus Smitherins set sail from Liverpool bound for Quebec, en route to
British Columbia,
Of course, Sir Augustus and Lady
Smitherins travelled to Liverpool to see
the last, for many a day, of the son and
heir of the house. The last farewells
that were said, the tremulous handshakes of the worthy baronet, the hug-
gings and whispered admonitions of
Lady Smitherins—these /may well be
imagined. Suffice it to say that finally
Augustus and his many belongings arrived on the steamer, and that as the
majestic vessel moved slowly away from
the dock and while Augustus waved his
hand to the receding figures of his affectionate parents, he felt himself to be
every inch a hero.
NO. 2—MISADVENTURES ON THE JOURNEY.
It is related by the fellow passengers
of Augustus Smitherins on the voyage
from Liverpool to Canada that our hero
suffered to a considerable extent from
mal-de-mer. In his first letter, written
from Quebec, he makes, however, no
mention of sickness, and indeed it is
hardly to be supposed that the descendant of the great Sea-Captain, Randolph
Smitherins, should be much troubled by
the action of waves upon a vessel, and
I am inclined to believe that he was not
so greatly inconvenienced as has ac-
quaintancesof the voyage have declared.
Augustus was not greatly impressed
by his experiences on this voyage, although on board the steamer he met
his First Canadian. In his letter to his
father, dated Quebec, he says:
"The whole thing was rather slow,
don't you know. There were several
Canadians on board, but they were no
class. One of them—a commercail. traveller—persuaded me to play a card game
called Poker. I didn't think much of
it. One does not play one's cards, but
one bets they are worth more than any
of the other Johnnie's cards, and as
there are three or four other Johnnies
playing, the chances are dead against
one. Rather stupid rot, I thought, and
also expensive. The commercial fellow
was nearly always bucking about Canada, and when he managed to escape
from that subject he told objectionable
stories, most of which he credited to a
former prime minister, Sir John Macdonald."
Neither was Augustus greatly impressed by his first glimpse of the shores
of the New World:
"A steward fellow got me out of bed
an hour earlier than usual. He said that
land was in sight, I went on deck arid
found the weather very much colder
than it had been before. In the distance was a cold, white, rocky coast, covered with snow and no trees in sight.
I went down to bed again."
Of Quebec city, Augustus says:
"A queer, old fashioned place. Most
of the people cannot talk English. Seems
io me rather absurd that people in a
British Colony should talk in French,
don't you know. You might write to
'he Times about it. I found a very fair
hotel in the town. Needless to remark,
it is run by an English corporation."-
Augustus, however, did not stay long
in Quebec. His next letter is dated
Montreal, and in that city he met with a
somewhat serious misadventure.
"You will be surprised to hear," he
write, "that Montreal is a fair sized
town with some fine large buildings.
I came across a new sort of drink here.
It is called a Cocktail. It is a mixture
of various stuff, tastes nice, but goes to
a fellow's head. I thought it was mild,
and the chap.-who introduced me to it
assured me that it was harmless and
that he was in the habit of consuming
fifteen or sixteen between five o'clock
and his dinner hour. He persuaded me
to try a similar number. From the result, I conclude that the chap was a
liar. When I recovered I was sitting
on the doorstep of a house in some back
street. I had a fearful headache, my
hat and one boot had mysteriously vanished and I found I had no money—I
had about £20 when I started out—and
my watch also was gone. A policeman
helped me to get back to the hotel. The
only other recollection I have of that
terrible night is somewhat vague but I
have a horrid misgiving that at one time
I was trying to dance a highland fling.
Why, I cannot conceive, unless the Cocktail is of Scottish parentage."
From Montreal, Augustus travelled to
Toronto. This, he says in his letter, is
a rather handsome town.   He adds:
"It appears to be run by women's benevolent societies, but it does not strike
me as being a particular religious town
for all that. Every thing is very cheap
and I am told that wages are very low.
The women are well dressed but have
a faded look about them. The girls are
pretty and deuced cheeky. They stare
at you in the streets, or glance out of
the corners of their eyes—like the dress
makers' girls in Paris. The young men
wear their hair long, like school girls,
and let it hang over their ears and foreheads. Some times they even cherish a
curl in front Also they have a-tendency towards scenting themselves."
Augustus did not like Winnipeg, his
stopping place, which he described as
ramshackle and bleak. But he was impressed by the prairies. Writing from
Calgary, lie says:
"This is a tremendously big country
and it takes a long time to get through
it. People tell me it is being 'settled up
rapidly,' which means, I suppose, that
immigrants are starting farming. The
prairies look pleasant now, but must be
rather miserable in the winter' time
when, I am told, the mercury in the
thermometer goes out of sight. These
railway trains are" very comfortable, al-
thought it is awkward work dressing
and undressing in a bunk about Six by
Two, and you are apt to kick the person
in the bunk below when you climb in or
out. They don't have any bathrooms
on the train, but people in this country
don't seem to go in for the daily tub.
I had to manage in a basin."
At Calgary, Augustus decided to proceed eventually to Victoria, where, he
was informed by a chance acquaintance,
bear shooting was good. But he found,
on inquiry, that the journey was too
long to be comfortably undertaken all
at once, and accepted the suggestion of
a railway official that he ought to visit
Rossland and see the Mines. Acording-
ly he proceeded to the mining town,
and on arrival there met with a very
surprising misadventure which will be
related in the next chapter.
(NEXT. WEEK-No. 3. The Surprising Misadventure of the Yellow
Dog.)
YOUNG CRIMINALS.
Society, for its protection, requires
that young men who enter upon a criminal career be arrested in this course as
soon as possible and dealt with according to the stern edicts of the law. It
is useless to palter with this proposition and unwise to seek through pity to
nullify its provisions. But the thing
that may be done and should be done,
in the rational and just interests of all
concerned, is to give young convicts a
chance while undergoing wholesome
prison discipline to improve and build
up their moral fibre. To this end they
should be kept separate and apart from
crime-hardened men, whose lives, even
under the strictest surveillance of the
prison authorities, are but the distilled
essence of degradation.—Portland Orc-
gonian.
A gentleman -who had read a recent
number of "Progress" came into the
office and after the usual preliminaries
of congratulation, etc. ,remarked: "That
was a great joke of yours this week."
"What joke," we asked. "That one
about the monkey, you know. Ha, ha!
The idea of a monkey that could talk,
very good joke indeed!"
Price's Gold Medal Brand Catsup,
Pickles and Sauce are condiments
that should be in every house. Price
and quality second to none.
Smile!
It is easy enough to be pleasant
When lite goes by like a song,
But it's another thing to keep smiling
When your printing is all done wrong.
Bring your printing to us and we
will help to make things pleasant
by giving you good workmanship,
the best of stock, prompt execution
and low prices. Join our other
customers and be happy.
The Thos. R. Cusack Press
Cor. Oordon and Courtney Sts.
Victoria Transfer Company, Ltd.,
Best Equipped Hack and Livery
Stable in the Province*   at »*1
All,' Rubber-Tired Hack" and Finest Livery Turnouts.   Baggage, Furniture
and Freight Handled at Reasonable Rates and with Dispatch.
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telephone 129,
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Week End Excursions
AT POPULAR RATES
TO ALL FAVOURITE ISLAND RESORTS.
Through Tickets to Alberni, Crofton,  Comox and
Other Points of Interest.
GEO. L. COURTNEY. Traffic Manager
WhatDidtheMonkeySay?
(See Competitions, page 8.)
 ," said  the  Monkey, when he |
heard that Augustus Smitherins was coining to Victoria.      <'
Name.
Address.
Cut Out, Fill In, Mail to PROGRESS. PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEC. 8,  1904
progress
A weekly newspaper published at  35
Fort street, Victoria, B.C.,
By S. A. G. PINCH.
Snbecription Price .... $1.00 a Tear
Advertising rates on application.
THE BOY CRIMINALS.
"Progress," having expressed its opinion on the subject, had no intention to
revert to the case now before the Minister of Justice, of the two boys convicted of an indecent assault upon a girl.
But as the "Father of One of the Boys"
has seen fit to go into print with about
the  weakest  and   most   unmanly  plea
imaginable, "Progress" asks the pardon
of its readers for saying a  few more
words on this most unpleasant subject.
The communication under consideration
appeared in last Sunday's Colonist, under the caption "Punishment Should Fit
the Crime," a sentiment   with   which
"Progress" is entirely in accord.    The
letter is reprinted on this page in order
to give, those of our readers who might
not have seen it an opportunity to read
and judge it.   The writer of the letter
says that he  feels compelled to  write
to the press in the interests of fairplay
and justice.   He says that "although it
would not liave been edifying to have
had the whole of the details published"
he honestly wishes that the case had
been tried in open court.   Why?   Because "it would have saved a lot of
■ abominable falsehoods    being industriously circulated."    Now, "Progress" is
in a position  to publish* the evidence
given at the trial  of those boys, and
wants to know what "abominable falsehoods" could be invented in the premises?   The case itself is an abomination,
and  except  for  an    unexpected  interruption to the    boys' design,    nothing
worse is to be imagined unless murder
were added to outrage.    "Progress" is
opposed to providing material  for the
morbid  minds    of    the community  to
brood  over,  but  if  these  attempts   to
condone a beastly crime are to continue,
"Progress" will  feel compelled,  in the
interests of tbe  public to publish  the
evidence given at the trial.   It is the duty
of the press to protect the public from
danger in any shape or form, and the
condonement of    crime—ihe    cause of
tlie lawlessness existent in many parts of
the United States—is one of the gravest
dangers that can threaten any community.   When, two weeks ago, "Progress"
expressed an opinion on this case and
on Ihe attempts being made to interfere
with   the  sentence   imposed  by  Judge
Harrfcyf, \ friend of one of the rriin-
ji.afc »made th? remark tl«t what "Progress" said did not count for much as
its voice was "a still, small voice crying  iii   the   wilderness."    Wet),   ours
may be a small voice, but we can assure the jocular gentleman that it is
a voice that is heard in the community,
and it is the only voice that is raised
just now to say what the people think
about a very evil thing, and how they
regard the attempts being made to prevent two boys  from getting the  flogging they so thoroughly deserve.
•   •   *
Nothing can be said wisely against
the views of those writers who have
recently advocated reform in the treatment of juvenile offenders. Reform is
desirable, but there is no time so inopportune for the advocacy of this reform as when the punishment of particular offenders is under consideration.
The issue is apt to be confused in the
minds of ihe public, and sympathy is
enlisted for those who least deserve it.
But in this case there is a peculiar
feature that does not seem to have attracted the attention of the reformers,
and that is, thai the efforts being made
in behalf of the Bartlett and Humber
are directed, not towards the curtailment of the terms of their imprisonment, but towards saving their skins
from thc lash. Tlie effect of the negotiations, conducted through political
channels, has been that the boys have
not received thc flogging ordered by
Judge Harrison, but they arc still in
gaol and likely lo slay there.
»   *   »
A few words about the facts of the
case may be appropriate, because a great
effort is being made to mislead the public. The facts are briefly as follows:
Three hoys planned to attack a young
girl. They were not acquainted with
her, and her character was so irreproachable that al thc trial the defence
did not dare to impeach it. although
that course is almost invariably taken
in cases of this description. The boys
acted deliberately. They waited on (he
road for the girl to come along, and
(ben attacked her. They failed to carry
"lit their design because one of them,
stationed on the sidewalk to "keep
piwrd," pave the alarm tli'al somebody
was approaching.   Now, tlie charge laid
against the boys by the officers of the
Crown was not so serious as the offence.
The boys elected for, speedy trial on
that charge; the confessions obtained
from them by the police were ruled out
of evidence, and the Crown, in order
to prove the case, had to persuade one
of the boys—the youngest and least offender—to turn King's evidence. The
other two were then convicted and were
sentenced to very much less punishment
than provided by the Statute for the offence committed.
• •   >
With these facts in view, how can
any responsible citizen say that Bartlett
and Humber have been unjustly or unfairly dealt with by the law? Can such
an offence as that committed by these
boys be condoned and overlooked?
Surely Victorians have more respect for
the honor of their womankind than such
a supposition implies!
• ♦   «
There is another point of view in this
case, and that is the point of view taken
by the average man. Fortunately for
Bartlett and Humber, the girl they attacked has no father or brother to take
a hand in the business. If her father
was here, he might have been counted
upon to see that if the' "impulsive
youths" (vide letter of "Father of one
of the Boys") escape the lash in gaol,
they will get it just the same so soon
as they are let loose on the community.
In other words, if such offenders are
to escape the penally of their offences
through political influence, the manly
section of the community will know just
what to do. "Progress" does not advocate the methods of popular justice, but
there are times wnen those methods are
wholesome.
• •    •   ,
The   communication   signed by   the
"Father of One of the Boys" closes with
a statement that demands serious consideration. He says: "These boy are
not the only transgressors in Victoria."
On its face this statement means little
or nothing; it might be passed oyer as
a truism. But it is made with a purpose, ami that purpose is to excuse the
sinners on the ground that crime of this
class is .more or less common in the
community. Of course, the argument
has the contrary effect to that intended.
If it is true that such offenses are not
unusual there is all the more reason for
stern treatment of those whose guilt is
discovered. "Progress" does not believe that tliere are many boys in Victoria of the same character as Bartlett
and Humber. but it is true that there is
room for improvement in the moral tone
of the rising generation, and this is a
matter to which the clergy and school
teachers, as well as parents, should devote their earnest attention. "Progress"
hopes that the case of Bartlett and Humber will not have to be referred to again.
The best thing for the boys and for
the community would be for the sentence of Judge Harrison to be carried
out so that the subject may cease to be
one of public controversy.
I score "Nobody" for saying he has
confidence in our judges, but not in the
Minister of Justice at Ottawa. Shame
on him, to say, in inference, he has not,
and then to hide behind a miserable
"non de plume" If he had an honest
opinion about any matter that ought to
concern the public he should have signed
his name.
There is coming a day (not far distant, I doubt not) when everything must
be open and above board. That Judge
will not judge after the sight of His
eyes nor after hearing of his ears, but
"iii righteousness" shall He judge, and
few will escape. He himself says: "Let
us not bear false witness one to another,
as that is fraught with condemnation.
And none can escape but by mercy."
Therefore, "let us be merciful, as we
may obtain mercy, especially in the cases
of impulsive youths.
I feel like saying a few things about
the case that ought to be made public.
In the first place, the boys had no idea
of the enormity of the crime. This I feel
certain of from conversations I had with
them. I will say nothing about the
methods by which convictions were secured. In engaging council I only wanted fair play; but because unfair measures were used I wanted to have it exposed.
One other matter: I learned since
the trial that my boy had gone upstairs
to go to bed oil that unfortunate night,
when the boy who got off scot free called or whistled him out. He went, and
the result, we know too well.
I believe good may come out of it
yet. Af^er these few explanations, let
those wlio wish to cast stones now
smite all they feel free to do. I can
bear it. I feel I deserve the blame.
But, friends, remember "what measure
ye meet, it shall be measured to you
again."
In conclusion, let me say I have not
any malice or ill will to any one concerned, and am a thousand times thankful that the result of their folly was no
greater. I trust it will be a warning
to others, as 1 am afraid these boys
are not the only transgressors in Victoria.
FATHER OF ONE OF THE BOYS.
PUNl.s.1 AlENT SHOULD FIT THE
CRIME.
(From the Colonist of November 27.)
Sir—Jn reply to a letter signed "Nobody" in your last Sunday's issue, it is
painful for me, as a parent of one of
ihe boys, to write concerning this matter; but in the interest of truth and
fairplay, I feel I must, as a lot of ignorance, yes, wilful ignorance—exists
about the case. Although it would not
have been edifying to have had the
whole of the details published, I honestly wish it had been tried in open
court. It would have saved a lot of
abominable falsehoods being industriously circulated. ' The truth about the mailer was bad enough, surely, but the
stories were simply awful. And I am
sorry that they seem to have got greater publicity.
The letter which appeared in your
last Sunday's issue deserves to be answered, because it is untrue, and savors
of wilful ignorance of published news
of the case, 'there was no jury of
twelve men, good and true, though I
wish (here had been. Neither do I think
it true to say it was a "child" who was
assaulted by young men. She is 15
years, as old as one of the boys and just
a year younger than thc others. The
writer, in the interests of fairplay, might
have said "hoys" and a girl. The sentence may or may not he-a light one.
That is a matter of opinion. Personally, I didn't think it was very light—two
doses of lash and twelve months. T
have, however, entered no protest against
it. The boys were guilty of the charge
and deserved lo be punished. But it is
possible to overdo this matter of punishment. T.aw aims at correction as
much as punishment; that is ofjen lost
sir-Ill of in llicsc days of hurry and so-
called progress.
TEARS   FOK   MAJOR   MAUDE.
Lord Minto has gone, and Major
Maude with him, and thereby the haut
ton of Canadian society suffers irreparable loss.
The major has done much to advance
the cause of etiquette in this country hy
kindly suggestion and opportune advice.
At times he has issued sartorial manda-
ments that nobody thought of disobeying, and always he has appealed to those
better instincts which have led us to improve on the costume of our distant,
wood-painted ancestors.
He has made it his task to polish our
manners and the results are incalculable. Owing to his efforts the merest
child knows that it is bad form to wear
top-boots with a swallow-tail coat, and
that tan shoes do not chime with a plug
hat. These items of information generally diffused among the masses, have
had notable effects, which we cannot
specify at this moment.
No one, we venture Jo say, can vie
with him in our regard. Where in the
wide world is there another Petronitis
so firm and yet so gentle in his admonitions? Major Maude was Mrs.
Grundy in a red tunic and striped
breeches, and no one could look at him
without reflecting on the tremendous
social responsibility of the British army.
—Toronto Star.
THE SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
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Factory and Office Pacific Coast Depot for the
131,133 and 135 Johnson St.       Wilson, Lytle Badgeron Co's
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ENGLISH  NURSES.
There are many to rejoice over the
birth of a son to the Czar, but no one
is more jubilant than the old English
nurse of the Czarina, who lives at the
Russian Court, and is in her way quite
a personage, "Miss Orchard." The late
Princess Alice of Hesse, before the
birth of her first child, wrote to Queen
Victoria and begged of her to procure
her an English nurse. The Queen sent
the homely and respectable Orchardson,
who in time became the chosen confidante of Princess Alice, and was always
addressed by her as "Orcbie." The
Czarina, in the kindness of her heart,
when she married, refused to leave her
old nurse behind her at Darmstadt, and
insisted on her accompanying her to
St. Petersburg.
English nurses are in great request
in all royal nurseries. The Kaiser's
boys had been brought up by English
nurses and governesses, and the Kaiser
himself and his brother Henry owe their
fluency in our language and their love
of cold-tubbing to their nurse "Hobbes."
to whom the Emperor and Empress were
much attached, and who frequently reminded their sons in after life bow
preai was tneir debt of gratitude to her
for all the p-ood things she had taught
them. The Dutch Queen studied under
an .English' governess: so did the Kirjg
The Tourist Overcoat
If a coat can confer distinction on the wearer, a "Tourist"
certainly does.
It's a long, wide shouldered coat, loose fitting in the back,
where it is confined by a belt. It is made from choice fabrics,
some quite fancy, broken plaids and checks.
It is not too heavy, as the fabric is the weight used for Suits.
Swagger garments, every one of them. $15, $18, $20, $25,
$30 is the price range.
FIT-REFORM WARDROBE
73 Government Street
t
Q»yV»«^t>>»»V»>«a»'«W,**»»A»^«»»^»*«»ti
FAIRALL BROS.
Manufacturers of
English Ale and Stout and Aerated Waters
Telephone 444      Victoria West, B. C.
Have You Seen T. N. Hibben & Co's,
j&utiful Book of Victoria JJ*
THE FINEST SOUVENIR OP THE CITY PUBLISHED
None too Good
The best is none to good for my customers. It pays me to
only sell the finest goods. Our Wine Department is now complete for our Christinas trade.
Native Port, famous Quarts   25c
Fine Old Port     "       50c
Fine Sheny     "       50c
Cooking Brandy      "   $1.00
CARNE'S CASH GROCERY
Phone 586 Corner Yates and Broad Streets
OXYGENCURE
UNIQUE
SCALP SPECIALIST
Manicuring and Hair Dressing Parlors
Room 2 McGregor Blk.
Shampooing, Scalp Treatment and
Massaging a Specialty.
of Spain; whilst the King of Italy's
pretty little girls, as also the Czar's
quartette of daughters, have English
nurses and governesses.
ORCHESTRA RESIGNS.
The musicians who have been playing
at tbe Victoria Theatre for some time
past have sent in their resignations to
Manager Boscowitz and will play in
future at the Redmond Theatre, under
the direction of Frank Sampson.
Messrs. Morris and Gumbert will be
found in the Redmond orchestra, and
Miss Wardrope will also play there,
This new attraction at the Redmond will
be appreciated.
WANTED—Ladies to canvass subscriptions for "Progress." Apply "Progress" Office 11 a.m.
Has cured in Victoria—
1 cue of abscess in hip joint
1 case of pneumonia and pleurisy in
a% days.
1 case of typhoid in five days.
1 case of spinal meningitis .
3 cases of inflammatory rheumatism.
2 cases of consumption, besides any
number of smaller eases. No sensation experienced during use. Cell
or inquire Mrs. Herbert Kent, 243
Yates street, or 'phone 185B.
Just Received
A large consignment of
DUTCH BULBS
Extra fine quality.
Ask for Price Lists.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market. PROGRESS, SATURDAY, DEG.   3, 1904'
Society News and Gossip
►♦♦<•>♦«►<
The bazaar in aid of the St. Andrew's
Roman Catholic Cathedral, has been very
successful in every way. During
the past week the Institute Hall has
presented a most brilliant scene, with
gay bunting, flags, evergreens, and hundreds of colored lights. The decorating committee, under the able supervision of Mrs. A. Stuart Robertson, is to
congratulated upon this success. The
gaily decked booths, filled with all kinds
of fancy as well as useful articles, were
under the management of a number of
ladies. In booth No. i were the Misses
McDowell, Miss Kerge, and Mrs. Sabin.
Thc chief attraction in this stall was the
beautiful hand-made lace, large Batten-
berg centre-pieces, dainty, duchesse point
handkerchiefs, honiton collarettes, and
linen tea cloths edged with other kinds
of lovely lace. In booth No. 2 were
Miss Conlin, Miss Johnson, Mrs. F. Sehl
and Mrs. F. Murray. Sofa pillows seemed to be the leading feature here, pretty
embroidered, satin pillows, as well as
many of the more useful kind made of
linen, chintz and muslin. Mrs. M. C.
Brown, Mrs. Hickey, Mrs. Radiger and
Mrs. Langton presided over booth No.
3, where the most prominent articles
for sale were dolls. The dolls were of
every size and description, even some
made in Klondike and dressed in leather
and beads. The novelty booth was most
attractive to the fair sex, for it had all
kinds of dainty articles.   The ladies in
ing of small gifts for the tree. All
absent members' are asked to attend
these meetings. Following is the purchasing committee: Miss Hiscocks,
Miss R. Fell, Miss J. Potts. Rev. Jos.
McCoy and his daughters, having kindly offered to provide a concert at the
hospital, the offer was accepted for the
first Sunday in December. The Daughters of Pity agreed *o provide the music
for Christmas-tide.
•   •   •
On Wednesday evening, in the A.O.U.
W. Hall, the Ladies' Aid of St. Co-
ltimba Church, Oak Bay avenue, gave a
concert in honor of St. Andrew's Day.
From 5:30 until 8 o'clock a hot supper
was provided and all lovers of Scotch
dainties were entirely satisfied with the
menu. Haggis, scones, bannocks, shortbread, oatmeal cakes and other appetizing dishes were much in evidence, and
judging from the manner of their disappearance were greatly enjoyed by all
those who were fortunate enough to
partake of them. After supper the audience adjourned to the large hall and
were entertained by a well selected programme of Scottich songs, dances and
recitations. Miss Hill and Master Hill
accompanied by Piper McKejnzie on
the  bag-pipes,    danced  the
Alan S. Dumbleton, who recently disposed of his home on Rockland avenue,
has acquired the fine big residence belonging to the late Theodore Davie, on
Saanich road.
THE REAL FAIRIES.
That a race or races of dwarfs
overspread northern Europe in prehistoric times, and that the persistent legends of pixies, elves, fairies,
etc., current among all European
peoples, are racial recollections of,
these little aborigines is now regarded by many ethnologists as quite
probable. The view was held by
Jacob Grimm fifty years ago, and
Tylor, in his "Primitive Culture,"
agreed with it. David MacRitchie,
who advanced this view in his
"Fiaus, Fairiese and Picts" (1893)
has more to sav rU-■-<■ it in his
"Hints of Evolution in Tradition"
(19021. aud other writers have adduced evidence in its support. In
this connection it will be remembered
that the accounts given b-" the Greek
writers of the conflicts between pigmies and cranes, once regarded as
pure myth, are now believed to refer to combats between the African
dwarfs and ostriches. Quatrefages
has shown that most of the pygmy
tales of the Greek and Latin authors
are substantially correct.
Says D. Gath' Whitley, in the Lon-
Highland j don  Quarterly Review
B. C. FUNERAL FURNISHING CO.
52 GOVERNMENT ST.
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VICTORIA.
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TELEPHONES 48. 305, 404 or 594.	
fling, the Scottish reel and the sword I    "It is the 'aim of Mr. MacRitchie
dance and were enthusiastically encored [ to show that the existence of arace
after each number.    Miss Queenie McCoy rendered several well chosen selec-
DON'T WORRY
when the Chinaman breaks jyour^Crockery. You need
some TEA or COFFEE, pay cash and get our
PREMIUM TICKETS for,thejnew cup or teapot.
HALLAM  &   WYNDHAM
25 Government St.
Phone A955 	
Opposite! Post Office.
Orders Delivered
charge. of this stall were Miss Baines, | tic-ns which were greatly appreciated by
Mrs. Goulding, Miss Dickson and Mrs.
O'Brien.   A fish pond which was an uncertain delight to the young, was conducted by Miss Baron, the Misses Gray
and Miss Hare.    Nearby was a wheel
of fortune,  looked  after  by the same
ladies. In the centre of the hall a dainty
candy stall was erected.   The delicious
home-made candy was in great demand
and thanks are due to the ladies who
so kindly donated this delicacy.    Mrs.
Watkis look charge of this booth and
was assisted by Miss Gowen and Mrs.
H. A. Goward.   The Misses O'Sullivan
sold   refreshing   drinks  at    reasonable
prices.    This stall  was very well  patronized by the visitors. The flower booth
was a wilderness of bobbing crysanthemums, ferns and begonias.. The willing
workers here  were  Mrs.  B.  J.  Perry,
Miss McKinnon and Miss Mellon.   The
"Corner Grocery" created much excitement, as brooms, sacks of flour, bottles
of pickles and even potatoes were handed out to the expectant ticket-holders.
The.busy grocers were Mrs. A, Stuart
Robertson, Mrs. Taylor and the Misses
Sehl.    Besides   these many   attractive
booths,  a   delightful   little  tea  garden
was artistically arranged by Mrs. Radiger, assisted by ihe Intermediate Choir
in Japanese costume.    Mrs. Radiger is
to be compliihented ou the pretty Oriental effects, which she so cleverly produced.   Hot   luncheon, afternoon   teas
and suppers were served daily, and to
the^ladies in charge of this department
is due, to a great extent, the success of
the fair.   After the first days, the superiority of   their    luncheons   became
known in town, and laterly, people fairly flocked in to partake of the succulent
repasts.    The management of the dining room was in the hands of Mrs. B.
Powell, helped  by  Mrs.   A.   Harlock,
Mrs. M. Sweeney and Mrs. Lawrence.
Many of the beautiful donations were
raffled, and the happy    possessors of
lucky numbers are to be envied.   Some
of these articles came  from    foreign
cities, as a number of thc ladies have
friends abroad, who at one time or other,
have visited or lived in Victoria.   Arch
bishop Orth wishes to thank all those
who so generously contributed towards
Ihe fair.   He says every one has been
most   kind   and   has   given   cheerfully.
The Jailors of H. M. warships at Esquimalt  kindly  gave  their  services  in
helping the ladies to decorate the hall.
Praise also is due to the talented ladies
and  gentlemen  who  took part  in  the
various musical programmes every evening.
*   *   *
The Daughters of Pity held their first
regular meeting in the city hall on Monday afternoon with President Miss D.
Sehl in the chair. There was a good
attendance and the work for the month
was planned. The Cinderella dance is
to take place in Christmas week, with
thc following committees in charge:
Refreshment committee — Miss Hiscocks, Miss M. Fell, Miss Fraser, Miss
Austin. Music—Miss T. Potts, Miss D.
Sehl. Decorating—Miss Williams, Miss
Fraser, Miss D. Sehl. Advertising-
Miss Potts. A sum was voted to provide Christmas trees and gifts for the
patients at the hospital, and the Daughters agreed to meet every Friday al 2
p. m. until Christmas at thc house of
the hon. president to work at thc mak-
the audience. Airs. Burnett and Mr. J,
G. Brown each acquitted'themselves in
(heir usu:!l pleasing manner. Mr. W. A.
Allan gave two very amusing and entertaining recitations. Rev. J. McCoy
and Miss McCoy sang the well known
duet "Come under my Plaidie" in excellent style. Thc singing of "God Save
The Queen" ;m'l "Auld Lang Syne"
brought the concert to a close, all present expressing ihe hope that next year a
similar entertainment might be provided.
Airs. Pooley, of "Femhill," Esquimalt
Road, gave a delightful' little dance on
Friday last, the occasion being file
"coining out" of her youngest daughter,
Miss Violet Pooley, who has lately returned home from school in England.
The other debutantes of the evening
were Miss Violet Powell and Miss
Drake. The whole house was beautifully
decorated with crysanthemums, ferns
and palms. Among ihe guests were the
Misses Monteith, the Hon. F. G. and
Mrs. Hood, Mr. and Mrs. Lampman,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pooley, Miss Bell,
Mr. P. Keefer and Miss Keefer, Miss
Todd, Mr. Scarfh, Miss Bullen, the
Misses Flumerfelt, Mr. Roger Monteith, Miss Heyland, the officers from
H. M. S. Bonaventure and Shearwater,
Mr. Alexis Martin and the officers from
the Barracks.
»   *   *
The regular meeting of the Ladies of
the Maccabees was held at the K. of P.
hall Monday night. Owing to the membership contest several new members
were elected. Mrs. Vincent, Mrs. Law-
son, Christopher and Mrs. Foot were
appointed to represent the society at the
annual meeting of the Women's Council. There was a. lively discussion on
the resolutions to be considered, which
were all heartily endorsed. A sale of
work will be held shortly, probably on
December 10th, during the afternoon and
evening. The election of officers will
take place at the next meeting, which
will commence on Monday, 12 December, at 7:30.
• •   •
' The engagement is announced of Dr.
Frank W. Green, of Cranbrook, son of
the late Mr. A. R. Green, of Victoria,
and brother of Mr. A. R. Green, accountant of the Imperial Bank in Vancouver, to Miss Lilian Staples, daughter
of Mr. Otis Staples, of Stillwater, Minn.
Dr. Grc?n is well known in social
circles. Mr. Otis Staples is a familiar
figure in the Northwest States and controls extensive lumber interests in East
Kootenay, Minnesota and elsewhere.
The marriage will take place next
June.
• •   •
Mrs. Dickinson and Mrs. Simpson will
hold their usual social class next Thursday evening, tbe beginners' class on
Monday, when the new three step and
five step introduced at the classes last
year will be taught.
If you have beauty,
We will take it;
Tf you have none,
We can make it.
Savannah Photo Studio, City.
of   prehistoric   pygmies   in   Great
Britain can be established from traditional ■ legends, .as well    as    from
archeological  structures.    He  shows
that the flans and fairiese were identical, and labors to prove that the
Piets    were    dwarfs, and were the
same us the fairies.    He    describes
the   various underground dwellings, I
called the 'Picts' Houses' in Scotland, and in the Hebrides, and shows
that their contracted stone cells and
narrow underground stone-faced passages  (which somewhat resemble  a
stone drain)  could only have   been
used by a race   of   dwarfs.   These
'Picts'   Houses'   often contain the
relics of food and   traces of   fires,
proving that some of them at leasfi
were places of refuge and habitation.
A dominant race does not hide and
burrow underground, and it-is certain
that these    subterraneon    dwellings
are not in any sense  Celtic.    The
singular burghs,  or brochs, in the
north of Scotland, form another link
in the chain of evidence.   They are
stone-built towers with passages in
the   walls,   and   contain a central
chamber.   The burgh of Moussa in
the Shetland Islands is the most important that now remains, although
many others, more  ruined, rise  on
the headlands and hills of the Scottish islands and mainlands in the far
north.    Tradition    states that these
burghs were built by dwarfs, and it
is singular that the passages which
traverse    their   walls are often  so
small that only diminutive men could
crawl  through  them.    The  bee-hive
lints in the Hebrides form another
link in the chain of evidence, though
some    are inhabited in the present
day.
"We think Mr. MacRitchie fully
proves his case, and that it is undoubted that in the beginning of the
Neolithic age the earliest representatives of the human race in northern
Europe were dwarfs and pygmies.
These were exterminated by stronger invaders, after they had for some
time maintained a precarious existence amid the rocks and forests.
Tlie stories of the satyrs, the legends
of the fairies, elves, and goblins, ns
well as the traditions of the pixies
or niskiea in Devon and Cornwall, nil
seem to be recollections of a prehistoric race of pygmies. The numerous, minute arrow-heads of flint
found in many European countries
seem to have been used by these
dwarf tribes. M. de Wnrtillet has
described and figured many of these,
and they nre fonnd in England in
.'ireat numbers. Thev occur in Ireland also, and it is singular that
these stone darts have been called
elf-shots, and tradition says that,
thoy were arrows shot by fairies at
the cattle. In this case tradition mny
he perfectly right, and the idea he
merely the recollection of the nightly attacks made hy the dwarfs on
the cattle of their stronger neighbors. In the IrIp of Man it is even
now said that the gorse should be
burnt on All Hallow E'en, lest it
should afford a hidinff-plnce for Hip
fairies (? pytrmies in prehistoric
lays). The Manxmen drend to wall
ilon? certain paths for fenr of thr
'little people,,' and' in Cornwall, ever
!n vpcent times. Hip same terror o'
11ip 'littlp nenple' e-n'steirl nmon? th<
Victoria College of Music
24SlCook|Street, Victoria, B. C.
Principal:   MR. A. LONGFIELD, F. V. C- M.
PIANO, VIOLIN, ORGAN; IN  ALL THEIR   BRANCHESl
Special Inducements to Pupils on theJPipe Organ
country folk.    These traditions are
clearly to be referred to the exist-'
euce of a prehistoric dwarf race, and ;
to   its   conflicts   with   taller   and j
stronger neighbors.
"Sir Harry Johnston's opinion is
clearly stated in the following words.
" 'Other dwarf races of humanity j
(than the Kongo rwgmies) belonging !
to the white or the Mongolian species '
mav have inhabited northern Europe
in ancient times, or it is just possible
that this type of pygmy negro,
which survives to-day in the recesses
of inner Africa, may even have overspread Europe in remote times.. If
it did, then the conclusion is irresistible that it gave rise to most of the
myths and beliefs connected with
gnomes, kobolds and fairies. The
demeanor and actions of the little
Kongo dwarfs at the present day remind one, over and over again, of
the traits attributed to the brownies
and goblins of our fairy stories.
Their remarkable power of becoming-
invisible by adroit hiding in herbage
and behind rocks, their probable
habits in sterile or open countries of
making their homes in holes and
caverns, their niisehievousness and
their prankish good nature, all seem
to suggest that it was some race like
this which inspired most of the
stories of Teuton and Celt regarding
a dwarfish people of quasi-supernatural attributes.
"With these views we fully agree.
We consider it now proved that at.
the beginning of. the Neolithic age
a race of dwarfs overspread north-"
ern Europe, and that the leeends of
fairies and gnomes relate to these
pygmies. Mr. MacRitchie, in a further pamphlet, refers to the account
given of the pygmies and ape-like
men of Central Africa hy Mr. Gro-
s'.in. and illustrates the account by
pomparina- it witli ancient Welsh nnd
Scotch traditions. We believe he is
perfectly correct, and his conclusions in our opinion arc as valuable
ns they nre interesting."
Ml Kinds of
Hair Wort
Done
A. J. Clyde,
Sole Agent for the
Souvenir
Stoves and ^Ranges
Everything for the kitchen in
Tin, Agate, Wood and Fibre
Wares, and Prices Are
Right.
42 Johnson Street
See Finch's new assortment of choice
ties for Christmas trade, ranging from
50c. to $2 each. Finch & Finch, 57
Government street.
More than half thc visitors lo the
jail last month were influenced in that
direction by "the cup that cheers." A
cheering record truly. More than one-
third of the visitors were InJ.iarjs and
Chinamen.
Phone 855
P. 0. Box 45
Victoria Fractional Mineral Claim.
Situated In ilie Mount Sicker Division ol
Chcmainus Dlst let.
Where local 31I -On the east slope of Mount
Hrentim.
Take notice thai, I, W. A. Dior, agent lor the
Mount Sicker and Brcnton Mines, (Limited)
Free Miners' Certificate No. 11*5247 intend,60
days from da'c hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder (or Certificate of improvements, for
the purpose of obtaining a crown grant of the
above claim. Anil further take notice that action under scciion 17 must be commenced before
the issuance <>l such I'ertlllcate of Improve
men Is.
Dated this Mih da., of November, 1M4.
W. A. DIER
Preserved PLUMS, PEACHES,
STRAWBERRIES, Etc., home grown
and home made. Insist on having
Price's.
fl. Harris
Yacht, Launch, Boat and Can**
Builder.   Rcpalra ate.
55 Work St., • Rock Bay
Signor Ernesto Claudio
VIOLINIST
Of '.he Conservtaory of Music, Napoli
(Italy), in addition to tuition on the
Violin, Mandolin and Guitar, will conduct a special class in the art of accompaniment to a limited number of advanced piano pupils. Apply at studio,
over Imperial Bank, corner Yates and
Government Streets.
DANCING  ACADEMY
A.O. U.W. Hall
M. LESTER
Member National Association Masters of
Dancing.
Classes—Monday ev'g, Advanced.  Wednesday
ev'g, Beginners. Thursday ev'g Botial Clnb
PRIVATE LESSONS. i«J,ll...!,."mWWJftWLll
6
PROGRESS, SATURDAY,   DEC. 3,   1904
\
SOME MINOR HEROES
1.-JUAN DE FUCA.
-By T.   L. Grahame.
"Aliquid facit nomen."—Levy.
"A circumstance gives, anybody a
name."
Happy the man, said the long thoughts
of childhood and youth, who carries
about with him, tucked snugly beneath
his pate,, the talisman Imagination. For,
look you, friendly reader, can not he,
despite of time or place or company,
unwrap the jewel, stroke with fond
fingers its opalescent facets and know
joys angels might envy, pleasures unpurchaseable by millionaires, if they are
millionaires and nothing more? He sees
in bright array forms of glories passed
away now being re-enacted for him, rapt
audience of one, the great deeds of the
days of yore. The kings, the queens,
the emperors; earth's mighty conquerors; warrior knights in steel bedight;
paladins and palmers; swart robbers of
' the-ferest glades; high-souled sailors on
seas forlorn praying under the unchanging stars for sign of undiscovered continents ; ladies fair and sprightly squires;
cowled friars chanting orisons and vespers in the monastery cloister or monkish cell; the glittering legions of Rome
marching tne north road, pilum at slope,
buckler slung across shoulder, black,
bread for two "days in the wallet, sour
wine filiing the flask, yet merry withal,
cracking Latin jests to the measured
tread of sandals and the jingle of
armour, oil to fight Vercingetorix,
Ariovistus, perhaps Pompeius, under the
greatest general of the ancient world.
Or the man with the jewel Imagination can conjure up Spartacus and his
gladiator army; Hannibal at Cannae,
and the debacle of Zama; Cambyses on
his hurrah through Egypt to the gates
of Memphis; Goths and Nervii; Vikings
and Berserks; Marcus Aurelian accepting the weeping Zenobia's surrender at
Palmyra; Dido burning for Aeneas; Raleigh making a carpet of his cloak for
Elizabeth's fair feet; Roland at Ronsce-
valles; Arminius harking on his Teutons to the annihilation of Varus's legions in the dismal swamps; and the
stricken- Augustus ever after beating his
weary head against the palace wall and
moaning: "Redde Vare, rnihi legionesi'
Or he may summon up our own British heroes of the long past legendary,
traditional or historical—Arthur the
King, Cassivellaun, Caractacus and Gal-
gacus; Hotspur and the Douglas, and
from the fierce red day of Mons Gratn-
pius down to Otterbourne, the best
- stricken field of them all, he may have
high company to while away the dread
hlank spaces of time such as may come
when sickness enforces idleness of hand
and creative brain.
In truth, it seems to me that history
is best likened unto a long gallery
wherein are hung the portraits of all
those grand old folk; portraits made
real things of flesh and blood by the
eye of Imagination. To the sublimed
vision of Fancy those silent pictures
become men and women, as real and
instinct with the ruddy life as the rose
that will be found blooming over the
grave of the Caesars.
"For never blooms the rose so red
As where some dying hero bled."
To be sure, your counting house man,
your arithmetical fellow who sums correctly and "maketh ryche," must smile,
nay, grin sardonically and pityingly, too,
at all this trumpery poured out from
the rag-bag of the past; the mere dividends of a disordered and unchastened
mind; the intangible toys of an intellect
distraught and out of touch with the
marvellous age of cor wheels, business
"colleges," and corsets for men. But
shall we, therefore, shamefacedly pack
up our dusty puppets in their rag-bag
and unclasp the ledger to regain the
good opinion of those illuminati of the
cash department?   Not I, for one.
"My mind to me a kingdom is,"
Its people are my children fair.
Let muck-rake wielders jibe and quiz—
We dreamers breathe the upper air.
In the. long gallery of history there
are few portraits more interesting to an
age like the present—revivified, or galvanized from the intellectual numbness
of purely mechanical achievement and
absorbing practice of physical science, by
hypodermic injections of romance and
swashbucklerie, pur sang—Hewlett,
Weytnan, Doyle and the rest—than those
which grin at the gafcer fjrom the section devoted to thc sixteenth century.
Not many of the worthies who have
fretted their hour in thc former centre
of the world's stage—the Mediterranean
and its coasts from the Levant to the
Pillars of Hercules—prior to the discovery of America, and earned for themselves reputations mellowed to respectable seeming by Time and the kindly
imagination of the historian—not many
of them can claim place beside the
heroes, adventurers and discoverers of
the century that witnessed the death of
Columbus, the conquest of Mexico and
Peru, the discovery of the Pacific and
the birth of Shakespeare. Every century is the architect of its own fortunes, and what De Lille says of the
glorious old chateau of Chantilly may be
fittingly applied to that gorgeous century ;—
"Dans sa pompe elegante admirez Chantilly,   .
De heros en heros, d'age en age em-
belli."
Every man of that robustious time
was a bit of a hero; some of them all
hero. Other ages boast a dozen names
or so that cannot perish while mankind
shall worship the heroic. The sixteenth
century poured forth heroes who, in the
rapturous alliteration of the American
epigrammatist; "Did; died!" and in
fashion, too, worth at least notice of
the chronicler of that time. Mingled
with the great canvasses that adorn the
corridors of Time are "studies" and
sketches unfinished; passing fragmentary thoughts of the artist done into
lime and tint; little things tossed off
while hand and brain rested from the
service of greatness-and wandered into
pleasant idlesse—yet fixed there upon
the infinite by Chance, as imperishable
as the carefully-wrought and scrupulously finished "big commissions" beside them on the walls. Those life-size
and colossal presentments are the acknowledged great of their own and all
future times. But there was many a
periwig-pated seeker after fame in that
age of magnificoes who felt as he
breathed his last tolerably sure that he
for one of the queerest paragraphs and
one of the strangest revelations in the
great story of the English nation. His
importunities for aid to seek the fabled
Strait of Anian, forced the Lord Treasurer of Royal Elizabeth, my Lord of
Burleigh, to confess that the treasury
which was to become a few centuries
later the richest treasury the world had
ever known, contained, i' faith, but a
beggarly One Hundred Pounds! Something to think of in these days when
England reckons her accounts in hundreds of millions of pounds.
Five hundred dollars between mighty
England and the sheriff! England the
conqueror of the Armada. England the
humbler of France. The England of
Shakespeare, and Jonson, and Sidney,
and Raleigh, and Spencer! Ah! but
England's dearest riches in that proud
time were not pounds, doubloons, dollars, but men. The greatest breed of
men the world has ever seen. So, the
beggarly hundred pounds in England's
treasury may cause nothing more than
a smile; for there were treading the soil
of England in those days many thousands of men whose deeds and words
mankind shall not suffer to pass from
memory.
I can see Juan de Fuca pouring over
the crude charts with the noble Viceroy of Mexico, who carries in his
pocket the gracious permission of his
thrifty sovereign to fit out all the expeditions he may think proper (at his
own expense), for the exploration of
the wild unknown northward of Mexico.
The pilot's muscular, walnut-brown and
hairy paw beside the slender, white,
filbert-nailed hand of the Gothic grandee,
and their grotesquely-contrasted heads
together pouring over the crackling
sheepskin; the naturalized Greek's
broken Spanish telling of the wonders
he has seen where the lone pillar of
rock marks the entrance to the great
sea.
Then  I  can  see .old   ,Fiery    Jack
from the larger sheet of water, they
travelled by the morning train to Koe-
nig's Station. Alighting there, they
started for the lake. Their "bumps of
locality" could not have been properly
developed, for they did. not reach the
tantalizing sheet of water until three
o'clock. A clumsy raft did duty for a
boat, but two hours' fly fishing produced
no results. The boys then went ashore
and tried bait fishing from the banks.
The elder orother soon landed a small
trout about nine inches in length. No
more fish were caught and at half past
six, a start was made for the hotel.
They took a "short cut" through the
woods. Two hours' steady walking
found them still in the woods, and it
became too dark to proceed further.
There was nothing for it but a night
in the open. As a sharp frost had set
in and a bitter wind whistled through
the trees ,a fire was the first consideration. Material was plentiful, but a
search of pockets revealed but one
match! Shielding it carefully with his
cap, the more experienced of the two
boys struck a light, and, sternly ordering his brother to hold his breath, managed to ignite the brush. A huge fire
soon blazed up, and the weary, anglers
threw themselves beside it and passed
the night as best they could. Sleep was
only obtained in snatches, as in spite of
the fire, the wind was too penetrating
for steady repose.
The trout proved a treasure. It was
cooked and carefully divided between
the boys. At daylight, a fresh start was
made, and to their intense disgust, the
enthusiasts discovered that they had
camped a quarter of a mile from the
road! Five minutes' more walking on
the previous night would have seen the
end of their troubles.
Making the best of the situation, they
quickly tramped to the temporary hotel,
where a hot bath and a substantial
breakfast helped them to forget their
aggravating "night out."  -
W. REDFERN.
Lome
Perfume
An Exquisite Perfume, very
Penetrating. Economical on account
of its strength.
It is superior to many 75c and S1.00
per ounce extracts we have seen. We
•fferitat •; *
Oc C$z.:'S'., ~x.;
8 Ozs. for $3.50
It's a quick seller at that. See if
you ever bought a better at twice the
figure.
CYRUS H. BOWES, Chemist, '8 °T"
Yates St.
had achieved immortality, when, in fact,
Oblivion yawned for and received him.
On the other hand there were men who
never fashed their thumb about Fame,
or the jade's bargains, who have come
into Fame as elder sons to an inheritance, and despite their contempt and
indifference and low degree.
Very likely had one said to Apostolos I
Valerianos of Cephalonia, pilot of ships;
and ancient mariner, that his name, or!
rather his nickname, should go down to |
the latest syllaoie of recorded time, the
comment of the rude old seaman would j
have been vigorously impolite, for he 1
could swear fluently in many languages:
—"Full of strange oaths" and, no doubt,
"bearded like tbe pard." Yet it is strange!
to think that this old tarrybreeks of the |
sixteenth century, a person of little or'
no consequence amongst the hijos del j
sangre azul, and the hidalgos and the
caballcros who prinked it so grandly in'
the centre of tne stage, has given his j
sobriquet to a channel which now shows
every prospect of becoming perhaps the I
greatest of the world's waterways; the,
passage through which are to pour the
incalculable abundance, the   commerce, i
the industrial products of America into
the lap of ancient Asia.    And again, |
from the Father of Continents to the,
youngest born the riches of Ormuz and
of Ind, and the perfumed stores of Far,
Cathay, what time the traffic of the- Atlantic shall have dwindled by comparison into insignificance. j
Strange, too, that like so many doughty
fellows in history who have achieved,
greatness or had it thrust upon them,1
so little is known of the life of this old,
Cephalonian with the name of a famous
Roman gens Hellenized for birthright,
and a Spanish nickname for immortality.   For is not Valerianos but the Latin 1
Valerianus?   And is not Juan de Fuca
but  Fiery Jack?    Fuego,  fire,  and  at
slovenly colonial pronunciation of the.
Castilian ?
At any rate, him have we to thank \
straightening himself up and proudly
telling the Viceroy Of how the galleons
sailed up the strait past Victoria to
where it widened interminably, and giving him the Spanish equivalent for:—
"We were the first that ever burst
Into that silent sea!"
And perhaps the Greek was versed in
the glorious lore of his own land and
could tell the Viceroy of how, when his
sailors beheld what they thought was
the sea of their weary, stormy search-
ings, there burst from their throats the
glad cry of Xenophon's Ten Thousand:
"Thalassa! Thalassa!"
Poor old Juan de Fuca! What he
took for the sea that was to carry him
on to immortal glory amongst the great
discoverers was only the beautiful sheet
of water that may be crossed by a good
"modern fishing boat under favorable
breezes in an hour or two. He deserves his immortality and renown as
they are borne forever on the lips of
men who have dealings between America
and Asia—the Strait of Fuca, with its
pillar rock; Juan's monument in good
sooth.
Some day Victorians will erect a
monument to the ancient sailor on the
summit of Beacon Hill park. A bronze
monument on a gray granite base to
typify the strength and the sternness of
the old man, who came hereaway to be
the first white man to cast eyes on the
site of what.was to be the fairest city
on the Pacific Coast.
ORIGINAL STORY BY W. REDFErn
Two brothers, both Victorians, the
elder an enthusiast in sporting matters,
and the younger an ardent fisherman,
had an aggravating experience in the
vicinity of Shawnigan Lake a couple of
seasons ago, shortly after Keonig's hotel
had been destroyed by fire.
Intent upon a fishing excursion to
"Little Shawnigan," a lake a few miles
GIRL'SBRAVE FIGHT.
A frail, slender girl, Miss Nelson,
one fine night early in April, 1903,
sat quietly beside her mother. From
the next room, where the two little
children had been left playing, came
a strange grating sound. The older
sister stepped to the door between
the two apartments, only to turn pale
with dismay and horror,.for there,
fast asleep on the hearthrug lay the
little brother and sister, and crawling slowly across the floor - toward
them a great, slimy aligator,. evidently attracted to the house by the hope
of young kittens : or puppies. Its
wicked, stony eyes, grim .with baleful light, were fixed on the unconscious babies, and the wide jaws, open
and ponderous, dripped with the foam
of eager, unsatisfied greed. Frantically calling to the dogs outside the
front door to enter and help her, the
brave girl caught up a large lamp that
stood just within the mother's room,
and hurled it full at the horrible,
gaping jaws. Then, leaping aside to
escape the furious onslaught thus
brought upon herself, she stooped
quick as thought, and tossed upon
the high bed in the corner the suddenly roused and frightened children.
She turned from the task to And that
the infuriated aligator, diverted from
its original purpose and confused by
the unexpected attack, had dashed
straight through the open door and
made its way to the bedside of the
helpless, terrified mother. Without
a moment's hesitation the devoted
daughter rushed to her aid.
A shovel of hot coals from the
glowing fire thrown directly against
the vicious eyes of the angry creature
only served to strengthen and intensify its fury. Apparently his entire
will was now bent upon the destruction of the helpless woman on the
bed. The awful, snapping jaws were
within a few feet of her body when
the desperate girl, returning from the
kitchen with an axe that had just
recurred to her memory, sank it to
the helve in the thick neck. Narrowly escaping severe injury in the death
struggle that followed, all but fainting with nervousness and conflicting
emotions, the brave girl followed this
blow with others no less telling.
When the still quivering, but no
longer murderous creature had been
reduced to absolute impotence the entire house looked as though it had
been wrecked by vandals, and the
weary conqueror found herself suffering from many bruises.—Woman's
Home Companion.
• Salvation Army Man (beginning a
fervid adoress to the crowd)—I have
served the devil for 17 -years.
Soldier (in the crowd)—Then why
don't you serve him another four years,
and get your pension?
FINE, BEAUTIFUL
English Tea Sets
Just suitable for Xmas Presents, at
$6.50
HASTIE'S FAIR
77 Government Street.
Victoria's
Continentally-famed and Strictly
First-class Hotels.
The Dallas
Situated on the Dallas Road—Victoria's ocean drive, is pre-eminently THE favorite summer resort of British Columbia.
The Centrally Located
Vernon
Is the Commercial Hotel] par excellence.
Unrivalled Cuisine.
Luxurious Guest Rooms.
Every Modern Comfort and
Convenience.
JAMES PATTERSON. Manager.
B.C. Saddlery Co. Ltd
44 Yates St., Victoria.
Large assortment of English and Mexican Saddles, Harness, Buggy Robes,
Trunks, Dog Collars.
REPAIRING
is one of our specialties.   Come and
look at our prices.
PHONE No. 204
ftANTED—A boy't bicycle; must be la Ont-
elusj order. Address Cain, Box 94, P. O.,
eity.
The Taylor Mill Co.,(
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER,
SASH,
DOORS-
210 Government St. Victoria, B.C.
BREAKFAST, LUNCH,
AFTERNOON TEA,
SUPPER.
A few of our specialties:
Tea and cake, etc 15c
Tea and biscuits  ioc
Omelettes 15c
Sardineson toast    .. ioc
MIKADO
44 Part St.       LD N6H ROOM
MILLINERY
Ladies Hats Artistically Trimmed and
made up, customers furnishing their
own trimming?. Panama hats re-blocked and cleaned.
Room 2 MacGREGOR BLOCK
Opposite Driard Hotel.
Furnished Rooms
For gentlemen, with bath and electric
light; every convenience.
GORDON HOTEL,
Yates Street
Hall's Syrup
or
HYPOPHQSPHITES
wards off La Grippe
Large Bottle $1.00
Central Drug Store
Douglas and Yates Streets.
Phone 201. r
PROGRESS,   SATURDAY,   DEC.- 3, 1934
|   BEFORE THE FOOTLIGHTS
"Robinson Crusoe, Jr." as produced
by the Hewlette Merry Burlesquers, has
proven a big card at the Savoy Theatre
this week, as has been attested by the
large crowds who have nightly witnessed the performances of this merry company. "Robinson Crusoe" will be withdrawn after to-night, and for next week,
commencing Monday December 4th, another Hewlette burlesque, entitled "The
High Rollers," will prove an acceptable
successor. The burlesque is in one act,
and introduces the entire company of
sixteen peoeple, in choruses, medlies,
gavottes, dances and a comedy vein from
start to finish. Entire new specialties
will be introduced by the two "R's"—
Reilly and Rowe, singers, dancers and
comedians; Mae Mulqueen, pew illus-
strated songs; Marie Sparrow, character artiste ; Myrtle Bartelle, baritone vocalist; Minnie Adams, operatice vocalist;
Dorothy Heather, soubrette; Phyllis
Courtney, ingenue; The Electric Clark
Sisters, favorite singers and dancers;
Frank Gale, la petite soubrette; Mabel
Gerry, singer and dancer; Viola LePage,
character danseuse and others. . The
management of the Savoy are leaving
no*i stone unturned to provide only the
best attractions at people's popular
prices of admission—15 and 25 cents.
The Hewlette Company have in active
preparation for December 12 a superb
spectacular burlesque of "Cinderella,"
and preparations are being made for a
big, Christmas pantomime.
♦   *   *
The production of'ithe- popular; light
opera "Dorothy," at the Victoria
Theatre, next Monday and Tuesday,
promises to be a great success. Madame
Myee has been training the amateurs
very busily for some time past and she
will act as stage manager. Mr. George
Werner has composed a song and dance
for the bridesmaids and groomsmen, especially for the. occasion.
The cast is as follows:
DotOthy   kiss Lena Bradford
Phyllis ;..... Miss Kneeshaw
Lady Betty   Mrs. Gallagher
Mrs; Privit .. .... Madame Mye6
Wilder   Mr. Jno. Petch
Sherwood  Mr. Robert Petch
The Squire ..'...... Mr. Cecil Berkeley
Lurcher   Mr. Percy Richardson
Farmer Tuppit .,  Mr. Pelch
The Parson  Mr. Gallagher
TSn Strutt Mr. J. Carroll
* *. .*
An excellent show has, been, provided
at the Grand during the week and patronage has been as good as usual. Cum-
mings and Be'rley, in their little comedy,
"The Bogus Count," produced lots of
fun, The Fowlers gave a wonderful
exhibition of feats of strength and balancing. Manager Jamieson has an excellent bill of fare for .next week.
Murphy and Andrews, high-class entertainers and travesty artists, will introduce a number, of up-to-date songs.
The star trio, consisting of Messrs.
Jennings O'Brien, Mann and Franks,
will, present an amusing comedy entitled "Our Uncle/' and Le Barge, the
clever musician, will display his ability
with various instruments. The moving
pictures will illustrate Joseph being sold
by his brothers.
* *   *
The "Pierrots" have been, welcomed
on their return to' Victoria in no uncertain way. At the Dallas. last Monday evening when they gave their, first
entertainment there was a large attendance and of the thirteen items on the
programme ten were encored. One of
the. most popular of the things done so
well by the "Pierrots" is the telephone
sketch, "Cordelia Malone," and this will,
by request, be repeated In the prcf
gramme provided for Monday evening
at the Dallas. They will perform. at
the following. places during, the coming week;J
Monday and Friday The Dallas
Tuesday; ..  ,.   ;; W. ...   ..Cedar Hi|l
Thursday ....  Work Point Barracks
***''
The production of Michael Strogoff,
the Russian drama, at the Redmond
during the first partof the.week was a
pronounced success and drew overflowing audiences. Rush Bronson, the business manager of the company, made an
appearance on the boards in the part of
Laidlaw, an English correspondent, and
played it uncommonly well. Theo. Bird,
was clever as the American correspondent, Blunt, and Mr. Redmond was excellent as Michael Strogoff. The play
throughout is most interesting and was
aged very well, indeed. The very
amusing comedy, "Prince Romiro," held
(he boards for the balance of the week.
The plays for next week are "California" and "The Lighthouse Robbery."
The test of a farce comedy is the
laughter it produces and through this
test "A White Elephant" passes triumphantly. A packed house greeted the
first performance and Mr. Pringle in
the role of "Slippery Elm," a lawyer,
sent spasms of merriment through the
audience and the entire company have
something to do all the time and furnish their share of the fun. For the
first half of next week "Wanted—A
Wife," a farce comedy new to Victoria
theatregoers and highly recommended
by the press of other cities, will be the
bill. Crystal prices still- remain 10 and
25 cents with to cent matinees Tuesday,
Thursday  and  Saturday.
*   *   *
The attraction at the Victoria Theatre
to-night is "The Devil's Auction," a
most popular annual visitant. There are
many new features in the production
which is sure to be bright and amusing.
If "The Pierrots" belortg to one of the
titled families of England, are they
noblemen? or must we say that he is a
nobleman and she is a noblewoman?
cism and, from certain premises,, successfully maintained—but this attitude
would require more lines to elucidate,
either pro or con, than those to which
the present writer is limited. The question is perhaps more properly, did
Watts, with his technical inadequacy,
impress?—and in what was he most impressive? Here is a man so handicapped by limitations, both in drawing and
painting, from the point of view of the
skilled workman, the virtuoso, that he
seems lo this expert most inadequately
equipped for the mere business of painting; for actual painting is a handicraft,
a business. . Watts had not much of
this. Where can we recall technical
passages of this painter that can compare with the competent charfh of handling and lovely qualities of paint that,
to quote another modern, Manet, frequently offered to the connoisseur? I
know of none. But, conceding this, conceding inadequate drawing, conceding
painfully labored pigment, let us not forget that Watts was something above
technique—he was an artist. His compositions, literary if you will, were conceived and carried out with an appreciation that the human mind instinctively demands design in a given space
that is to graphically convey an idea;
and in drawing, even Watts seemed to
possess the essential at times, and pro-
HINTS FOR GIRLS.
'Phymars Writes on the Subject of
Suitable and Seasonable
Attire.
Nearly all young girls about the age
of is or 16 begin to think of dress, of
what is becoming and what is not. It
is quite necessary that every girl should
be taught to attend to her clothes, how
to put them on properly and to look
ineat and "well groomed," so to speak.
But I think that until a girl actually
"comes out," it is best for the mother
to choose her frocks, the colors, and
decide on the style. If young girls
.only knew the charm and attraction of
youth, I am sure they would try to remain young and girlish as long as possible. Some girls of today at the age
of 16 are quite young ladies, of fashion.
One sees them arrayed in elaborate
tailor-made gowns, high French heels
and open-worked stockings, huge hats
with ostrich feathers and their hair arranged in the front in the latest coiffure. This is not exaggerated in the
least, as young girls dressed like this
are to be seen often on Government
street. But how much more attractive
those girls would be if they wore a neat
shirt-waist, moderately long skirt, good,
sensible boots, simple hat and hair
neatly braided in one or two long
braids! Now, there is no need to be
stiff or old-fashioned in one's dress,
just because one's frocks are made
plain. The gowns can be made of most
fashionable material and the hat quite
"up-to-date," and at the same time be
simple and attractive. It is so easy
and inexpensive for a young girl to be
well dressed. For winter wear, I have
seen pretty and serviceable shirt-waist
suits made of good corduroy. This is
splendid wearing stuff and the . soft
browns and tans are becoming to nearly
every one. Navy serge is always a favorite for girls' winter frocks, and can
be made up in so many pretty styles,
Plaited skirts are very neat, with the
bodice made Russian blouse effect, with
broad, well-boned girdle. Another desirable gown is, made of stone-gray
tweed; the skirt at the top stitched
to flatness upon the sides of tapering
plaits, which fall open at the knees.
White linen collars and cuffs, embroidered in all-white, or colors, are always
fresh and attractive, and look particularly neat when worn with shirt-waist
suits. Loose military coats are very
fashionable, plain three-cornered hats in
red, or blue soft felt, look smart when
worn with these coats. Tans are always
nice, serviceable and. becoming to young
girk Strong, heavy-soled brown boots
are splendid for wet weather. Good
storm rubbers are a necessity for this
climate and may be worn over lighter-
soled black boots. Care should' be'
taken that these' rubbers are not worn
in the house.
PHYMAR.
MISS RAE BRONSON
With the Redmond Co.
WATTS. THE ARTIST.
(Frank Fowler, in Scribner's.) j
In pursuance of a custom which obtains on the death of a man conspicu-
'ous in the arts, there will doubtless be
placed on. exhibition, sooner or later, in
England, as large a collection as can be
got together of the personal output of
the late George Frederick Watts. The
collection in this case will include imaginative works, many of large size, works
in sculpture, and lastly a series of portraits which for personal interest, aside
from their artistic merits, will possibly
surpass the production of any contemporary painter of portraits that we may
call to mind. Not that the confreres of
Walts, whose business it has been to
paint portraits, may not have numbered among their sitters as many illustrious
names as did the painter we are discussing, but it is .indeed doubtful if their
aggregate work would as inevitably produce the impression of such subtle interpretation of temperament and character as marks these "human documents" left to the nation by Watts.
Much has been said and much will be
said of the didactic, the literary side of
this painter's art—of his intellectual and
moral elevation, of the fact that he was
a painter of ideas, that he sought to
jgive expression to thoughts that were
I more properly the subjects of poetry or
] prose, a writer's theme treated through
i the medium of plastic or graphic art.
I Much in this position may be true criti-
duced a sense of power that often moved
ithe spectator. He possessed, too, an instinct for line, and an admirable feeling for quantity in spaces, and balance
of light and shade. In color he often
left much to be desired, but here also,
in his portraits, lie was sonorous and
tonal to a superb degree. After all, may
it not be through his portraits that he
will finally make the strongest appeal to
the judgment of posterity?
! For insight, differentiation of character, noble attitude of mind in the presence of his sitter—a quality most to be
: desired in a portrait painter—Watts
imay be rated high—I should say very
high. In the notable series of portraits
which, in 1884, was placed on exhibition
at the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
New York, the qualities above mentioned
were conspicuous with, in addition, a
pervading sense of powerful and harmonious color. This is much. He has
left priceless records of men who have
made Victorian England illustrious.
Happy the nation that possesses such an
artist, and happy the nation that has the
good judgment to perpetuate her sons
through the medium of arL while they
are still living and prja^Pi!?—an example that other counti^might profitably follow. England was proud of
Watts, and honored him—a baronetcy he
would not accept, but the gift to the nation of practically the work of his lifetime is the legacy of the artist to the
country that recognized his greatness
and sought in the conventional way to
.acknowledge it.
See Finchs* overcoats before you buy
elsewhere. Finch & Finch, 57 Government street.
Fire, Life, Marine
and Accident
Losses settled with
promptitude and liberality
Agency Wellington
Household Coal
Hall, Goepel & Co.
Phone 88
100 Government Street
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of the Application of
William Farrell for a Certificate
of Indefeasible Title to Subdivision Lots D and E of the Garbally Estate (Map 116) Victoria
District (now Victoria City).
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue a Certificate of
Indefeasible Title to the above land
to William Farrell on the 6th day of
February, 1905, unless, in the meantime, a valid   objection   thereto   be
made to me in writing by a person
claiming an estate or interest therein*
or in any part of it.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General.
Land Registry Office, Victoria, B.
C, 31st October, 1904.
Selecting
a Piano
Many people experience great difficulty in answering the question, "What
Piano shall I buy?" When many instruments have certain virtues which are
more or less enlarged upon by clever
salesmen, it is difficult (or tbe average
buyer to determine wblch piano will
give the greatest satisfaction and prove
the b -bt investment. In dealing with
an old, reallable house, you are pretty
sure to be well served, and whether you
wanta WOKLD-FAMKD STEINWAY, a
Btandard NOKDHKIMER, or tbe less
costly DOMINION or PALMER Hanoi,
we cau suit both your taste and your
pocket.
NEW PIANOS AT PROM 1250 UP,
and every instrument sold under our
peisonal guarantee.
Inspection solicited,
Catalogues on application.
M. W. Waitt & Co.
LIMITED.
Established 1862
44 Government St.
WALTER S. FRASER & GO.
LIMITED.
DEALERS   IN
GENERAL HARDWARE
Full line of
AMMUNITION FOR SPORTSMEN,
Granite and Tinware for Householder*.
CALL AND 6ET PRICES.
Wharf St. VICTORIA B.C.,
Telephone 3.   P.O. Box423.
LODGE REGISTER.
Woodmen ol the World.
Meets tat and 3rd Fridays.  Assessments art
due and payable.on the first day of the month.
Members must notify clerk of change of occupation and location.
Independent Poraatera.
Court Cariboo No. 743 meeta ln No. 1 Belt
A. O. U. W., ut and 3rd Tueadaya at 8 p. at.
Thoa. Le Meaaeurier, Fin. Sec., Garbally Rd.
R. C. Wilson,- Rec. Sec., ioi Chatham Steed
Fraternal Order ot Eagle*.
Victoria Aerie No. la P.O.K. meeta
Wednesday e.enlng in Eagle Hall, Adelpal
Block, at 8:30 p. m. Sojourj tig brothera made
welcome. Joseph Wacbter, i», President; Prank
LeRov W. Secretary.
Northern Light. No.  SMS.
B. O. P.   •
Meets lb and 4th Wednesday in each month
ln K. of P. Hall, Douglas St. Visiting members
cordially invited to all meetings.
J. P. Hancock, Chief Ranger; W. P. Fullerton
Secretary.
Knight* ol Pythian.
Par West Lodge No. 1 meeta at their Halt, cot
Douglas and Pandora Street.; every Friday at I
p.m. Sojourning brothera are alwaye welcome.
J.H. Penketh, C.C.i Harry Weber, K. of R.kt.
Boaw.
Juvenile Anelent Order al Paraatara
Court No. 1 meeta first Tuesday in each month
at K. of P. Hall. Adult Foresters are always
welcome.  S. I.. Redgrave, President;  B. A.
taken. Secretary.
D. H. BALE
LEIGHTON ROAD
CONTRACTOR AND BUHDER.
Building Lots for Sale,
Houses Built on the
INSTALMENT PUN.
Circulating Library
50 CENTS PER MONTH.
Victoria News Co.
86 YATES STREET.
The Lyric
Broad Street
Between Yates and Johnson
VICTORIA'S ORIGINAL [HOME OF
Polite
Vaudeville
T A. Johnson, ProwM-rr id M* 1 «g 8
PROGRESS, SATURDAY,   DEC.   3,1904
THE REALfl OF SPORT
The result of last Saturday's Rugby
football match between Victoria and
Vancouver was disappointing to Victorians, but the score, .14 to nil, did not
represent the respective merits of the
two teams. The Victoria forwards were
,considerably superior to their opponents
ih most respects but the Victoria three-
quarter backs had little opportunity to
show:what they are made of. The half
backs were, not noticable on either side,
but here the vsiitors had an advantage.
It is said that the Victoria forwards
went on the field with instructions to
play their hardest without trying to pick
up the ball and pass it out of the crowd
to the men on the three-quarter line. If
they had those instructions, they certainly followed them closely. But that
is not Rugby football, all the same, and
is haruiy ever pays. In Saturday's
rhatch that style of play accounted for
the failure of the home team to score.
Victoria' has some excellent three-quarters and ..given anything like a fighting
chance they would probably have scored.
The strong forward game has always
been a feature of the Victoria teams
and it is an excellent feature, but it
should not be overdone so as to nullify
tne Value of.the Outside men,'who have
a better chance to.score by reason of
the more open field presented to them
than the forwards. The old rule of the
game, like all rules open to occasional
exceptions, still holds good, that the
forwards should pass anywhere but in
their own twenty-five, or very near their
opponents' goal line, provided a fair opportunity is. presented. The home team
had bad luck early in the game and
the Vancouver men touched down twice
owing to errors of the full-back, A.
Newcombe, ■ In that place the visitors
had on the. contrary a very safe man,
Watson, who did good work .whenever
called upon, The Victoria team did
their best.to score and the forwards
played a real hard game. Cornwall was
the star man, on the ball all the :time,
and Menzies, Barnacle and Benson and
others distinguished themselves. On tne
three-quarter line Scholefield played a
spelndid game, and Bell also showed up'Prise so far was the defeat of R. Peden
well.   Neither, had many opportunities and ^ Hughes.   They succumbed to A.
this afternoon is expected to be one
of the most interesting struggles of the
season. The city players will make a
very strong bid for victory, for if they
lose, they will be out of the running
for the City League championship. The
Victoria United eleven is composed of
the following players: Goal, J. Finlai-
son; full-backs, H. A. Goward (captain), S. Lorimer; half-backs, W, Lorimer (centre),. C. S. Thompson, N.
Gowen; forwards, J, Lawson (centre),
L. York and C. Berkeley, (left-wing),
B. Tye and J. Lorimer (right wing).
'.♦.*».
"Battling" Nelson, the hard-hitting
Danish fighter, disposed of his formidable opponent, "Young" Corbett, in ten
rounds at Woodward's Pavilion,. San
Francisco,, last. Tuesday • night. The
tight was fast and-furious from the
start, and after fhe third >ound it was
apparent that the conqueror, of. "Terrible Teddy" McGovern had at last met
his match. Nelson was. his. master, at
every point, and. although . his. pluck
enabled him to last through ten.rounds
he was then, utterly helpless- and his
seconds then threw "P the ; sponge,
Jimmy, Britt will have a warm time
when he meets. Nelson. -•■.,..'■-.,
. * . * ,*
Bert Clark and I. Abrahams will
meet in .a 20-r.ound. boxing contest on
December 7th in the old- Methodist
church. A big crowd will- no .doubt
attend, as both. men -are, good boxers
and.hard hitters. .Abrahams.is a-sailor
from H. M.. S. • Bonaventure, -while
Clark is from .Denver, Colorado.,'..-■
■'"•„•*.
The single scull race proposed for the
championship of the coast, the competing oarsmen-to be D. DesBrisay, J.
B. A, A., E. Gloss, Portland, and W:
Pap'e, San Francisco, is arousing considerable interest. It is hoped that the
contest will take place on Lake Washington next spring.
•"■■•"'■•■■■•
The J. B. A. A. handball tournament
is now in full swing and the games are
all hotly contested.   The biggest sur-
distance from the baseof the mountain,
and during the first year men had cut
iii about 509 yards-
Mr. Langdon then explained . the
gradual development of the mine,: its
output, and emphasized the risk the
miners undertook. Accidents had been
frequent. Iu conclusion, Mr. Langdon
mentioned the steps taken for the relief
of those left without means of support-
as a result of the disaster. On taking
his seat he was accorded happy applause,
plause.
al****M*Vs**takaAa«ft*a*V*fc*t*al***W*hrfejaAa s4* athaaVelf tAttaVaaMia taaaalasala
I Our Competitions I
I By th* Editor §
The best "remark" sent in this week
for the Monkey was that of Mr. Godfrey Booth. "The Mint is in the soup,
Gentlemen," said the Monkey, as he
took' his seat at the banquet to Senator
Templeman.at 'the Driard. It is to be
hoped that.there is ho truth in the remark, but it is amusing, all the same.
Some of the replies sent in were good
but others again had- no particular
point'. . "None but the: brave deserve the
fare" is one of the best, and "Whoaj
Bill;!'*, is /suggestive, if a little brief.
"Here's to Lauriei; and a full dinner
pail," is quite appropriate as also is this:
"Take a little wine of thy stomach's
sake," r':->: ;.'.v''. - ■ '-. „
For an original sketch. the prUe.';is
awarded to the writer of "A Night
OuC,wMsft-iB1 printed on another page.
There was ohly one set of verses sent
in and these whiie haVing.-some merit,
require retouching before -they see the
light.
If you are in want of a HISH GRADE SCOTCH WHISKY
Be Sure You Get
BUeHBlVfllV'S  SPECIAL  or
BUeHflNrWS   BLHeK   AND   WHITE.
Stevenson Macadam, the well kuown analyst, of London, certifies these whiskies
to be absolutely pure.
FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS
Radiger & Janion, General Agents for British Columbia and the Yukon District.
Your Chickens Will Lay
. AND WB CAN TELL YOU HOW.
Use EXOELSIOR MEAL.  This being a special blending of all grain, cannot
fail to bring good results.
DIRECTIONS—To be fed hot in the morning.
Sylvester Feed Co., 87-89 Yates St.
TELEPHONE 413.
for showy play, being called Upon mostly to stop rushes or to tackle their opponents. Mr. Alexi* Martin refereed to
the satisfaction of both sides. On the
next occasion, when these two teams
meet, Victoria should win. It is only
a question of a little more practice for
Vbe local seniors to be invincible so far
as B. C. teams' are concerned.
The rival teams will be the Collegiate
School, High School, Central Club and
South Park Club. It was decided that
the Collegiate and High School should
be entitled to play only their own members, while the Central and South Park
teams, which are composed of younger
and smaller boys, may take boys who
have left school (up to the age of 17),
and thus bring the aggregation upon
even terms with the. two others. The
following schedule was arranged:— .
Dec. 3 (morning), Collegiate vs. High
School.
Dec. 7 (afternoon), Collegiate vs.
South Park.
Dec. 10 (morning), Collegiate vs.
Centrals.
Dec 17, High School vs. South Park.
Dec. 21, South Park vs. Centrals.
. Dec 24, High School vs. Centrals.
This will be the first round. At its
conclusion a similar second round will
be played. The first game 0 fthe series
will take place at 10 o'clock this morning'at Beacon Hill, the rival teams being the Collegiate and High Schools.
*  *  *
Belyea and J. Hunter, the score being
2i-8; 21-20.
■•••..
The Victoria United scored? a victory
against the Bonaventure Association
team at Oak Bay on Saturday last, defeating the sailors by 8 goals to 3. J.
LawsorT played centre forward and distinguished himself in his new position,
and W- York put up a stonewall defence
in goal.
»••■•■.''
Last Saturday's Association League
game, between Victoria West and the
Garrison on the latter's ground resulted
in .the victory, of the. Garrison by 3
goals' to 1. The. Victoria; West team,
showed up pretty well, however, > and
gave evidence of much improvement
since the commencement of the season.
* *  *
A Rugby football league has been
formed in order to hold a competition
for the cup generously donated by the
J. B. A. A.
* *-, * ■
A good game of Rugby football *will
be played at the Canteen grounds this
afternoon between Victoria and H. M.
S. Bonaventure.
.. •   •   •
The Victoria Intermediates wHl play
the Vancouver Intermediates at Brockton Point this afternoon.
The Victoria Hunt Club will meet at
iBurdette riouse on Vancouver street, at
2:45 this afternoon.
■ The Fernwood Young Men's "Aver
age" handball tournament is
being fol-
lowed with   keen
interest.
Appended
are the scores:—
Sets. Pts. Pts.
Av.    Av.
Pld.For.Agst.For. Agst.
E. A. Gallop ... .4
84  28
14.      ...
P. K. Winch .'..'$
00  58
8.2    ...
F. R. Moore ... .5
07  56
8.2    ...
W. P. Marchant.6
"2  75
6.16   ...
A. Marconini   .,4
78  56
5.5    • •"•
H. Jameson —5
67  77
    2.
W. P. Bassetti.-S
64  79
....   3-
H. Spengler ...3
40  62
....   7.33
E. B. Jones ....5
57   99
....   8.4
W. Wilsor  S
45 105
 12.
V. Heather  ....1
6  21
.... 15.
N. L, Davis  2
9   42
.... 16.S
The most interesting game was played by Gallop and Winch, the former
finally proving too strong for his opponent and  winning with    a score of
21-15.
*   *   *
The Association football match between the Victoria United and Garrison elevens at Work Point Barracks
LECTURE BY MR. LANGDON,
A very interesting lecture was delivered at the Y....M; £.,,A., rooms on
Wednesday • evening- by -Mr.' K." 'Langdon, B, A.,, on. the. Frank disaster. •, As.
Mr. '■ Langdon taught school at Frank
for several'years,, be is in a position to
give an accurate,account"of,the various
feature's of the mountain slide. Regarding the cause of the disaster, many experts he said had given opinions, and in
most cases they differed. One clever
young man had said that, a comet had.
struck the top of th?, mountain .loosen
ing immense pieces, of rock and stone.
The speaker Was inclined to believe that',
a volcanic eruption had been responsible
for the Slide which almost smothered
the'little'mining camp.
] Mr. Langdon spoke of the number of
lives lost, the, effprts to save those imprisoned, and, lastly, the financial losses.
The company that had started coal mining at Frank .had ' invested a large
amount of capital. : The' seam of coal
that was exploited extended for some
WEEKLY COMPETITIONS.
One of'the objects of "Progress" is
to stimulate interest,in literary and artistic work, and contributions suitable
for publication are invited. In addition
to this a number of competitions will
be held weekly and. a list ot these is
given below.
Competitors are requested to note the
following conditions: .
1. Entries for all competitions will,
close on the Wednesday of each week;
any contributions to '.this; department
received later will be heid over until
the next- week.
2. All contributions must be original, that is? thewo-fkbt the "competitor, and must not have been previously
published. ..»   ■si"
.  3.   Except when'other wise stipulated
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the right to print some of the unsuccessful contributions to this department
without payment.
4.   All contnoutions must be written
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and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a. guarantee of good faith.
As all Work appearing in "Progress"
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-     VERSE.
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on any   subject, not   exceeding;:.-.
26 lines ...........W.....'..'..'. .$1.50
SKETCH. PR .PHONOGRAPH.-
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'able for. reproduction-, in "Progress") or photograph; subject to
be,Of.topical interest.or humorous      ;
' or having, other interest ''j to. the . '-.,
,." public'.;'-...1 ..,.;'..,.,..•'•..i.,.$i<5o
'•--;-'f   '.' ■" PROSE.;''      ','■[ ■  '■
For the best original aheeddte, lit:
|_"' erarjr" sketch; story .or essay, not".
'" -to exceed "400. words.......... ,.$1.50
..  THE MONKEY'S REMARK.
■On another page will be found among
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competition. The'competitor must cut
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that purpose with the most appropriate
remark' he Or' she ' can.' think of; and
mail, to-"Progress" office so. as .to.arrive
dn or before' Wednesday evening next.
The'competitor sending in the most appropriate arid ingenious "remark" by. the
Monkey will receive $2. The" decision,
will he "made without any, reference to
the political color of the .remark.
FALL AND WPTPR $eiTlNe$.
Our finest stock of West, ot England and Scotch and Irish Goods is
most complete, and cannot be duplicated elsewhere.  ■■'
Salts to Order $20 up.        Overcoats to Order $35 up.
Pants to Order $5 up.
S6HAPER & REID, Merchant Tailors
Cor. Broad and Trounce ave., opp. Colonist Office.
Ice Cream Soda I
LIKED BY YOUNG
AND OLD.
Never fails to please. That's what
makes our Ice Cream Soda go. And
it is fine. Always pure, wholesome,
delicious. Prepared with choicest of
fruit flavors, it is as nectar for the god*.
A glass of our soda when feeling heated
s a treat for the soul. Try one and be
convinced.,
105 Douglas St.
Phone 851a
, The Finch, pique gloves are sewn by
skilled- pique sewers under the accurate
eye, of expert- examiners. The Finch
glove fits to perfection and the wearing
qualities are unsurpassed; there is' no
more serviceable glove made. Every
pair is- guaranteed and fitted. Finch &
Finch,- 57 Government street.
Windsor Restaurant
■iXSovernnient Street,
,,.    Almost opposite Post Office/
Business Men's Lunch
:!      a Specialty.
Good Service at Popular Prices,
. '' Meals at all hours.  Private Rooms
HA;   FREDERICK,
Mesdames Dickinson & Simpson will
resume their dancing-classes Saturday,
Oct. ist, Assembly Hall, Fort St.
' Monday, afternoon, children's fancy
dances, 3.30 to s p.m.
Monday evening, beginners classes.
Tuesday evening, Cotillon club.
Thursday. Social Night, 8.3otb 11 p.m.
. Friday afternoon,- children's ptivate
class.  ;   ■'-..;. ■'
. Saturday afternoon, general class 2.15,
Private Lessons Given.
PHONE  B81
Established 1858.
A. W. ftridgmafo
Real Estate, Financial am
Insurance Agent.
Agent Commercial Union AssuruoeOo.
Ltd., of London, England.       ■ ;
London Assurance Corporation.
.,..'■'. 41 Government St. ••   >
For Christmas Presents
What better-then the,:      .    '
H.B. Cigars?
M. BANTLY&SONS
Telephone 38a 155 Fort Street
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are payable to Charles E .Lugrin or
to Sydney Booth, who is authorised
to collect same. All subscriptions
due on November 1st are collectable
by S. A. G. Finch, by whom "Pro-
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