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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jan 12, 1907

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Array w
The Vancouver Office of
THE WEEK
Room 14, MacKinnon Block.
Phone 2769.
!fc4ttUUL5UUL>JUUUUL5LtUUUUUUU
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
Stewart.Williams
imnq
R. C. Janion
.WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
^AJL*UUUUUUUL*Ut*H5UUtJJtAAIJtJL
Vol. III.   No. 50.
JANUARY 12, 1907,
One Dollak Pe* Annum
*PI» <*      T2Al+S\W9CL*     DaiMAI LT rowed within ten years, as Mr. "taxed a railway, which for years There is no discontent, one never
I HC     sUUllOr  S     KGYieW Tatlow had the courage to do in had escaped paying its taxes on tears a xn^mur against the As-
...     , v. *j   1    j »   wi,'   „„•*•„•„.„ :„ sessment Act now, and the poor,
order that as far as possible the subsidy land      This_ critic m is ^^   ^^         * ^
Province should pay the cost of neither "candid nor sincere.    Mr. wjj0m   ^   Macdonald   is   so
Administration as it went along, Macdonald knows perfectly well anxious to ' 8jl0W  hia  8ympathy,
Of Current Topics.
THE LIBERAL PLATPOR
not deserve   credit   for   the im- Mr. Macdonald offers the carping that the Government has not mere- ^aye nejtjjer constituted him their
  proved  conditions.     He   merely criticism that the repayment of ly demanded but actually collected moutJ1.pieoe   nor }jave they en-
On  Monday last  the Liberal made this assertion, and such as- the loan should have been extend- from the railway company in ques- horsed his statements.   But is it
campaign was opened in Victoria sertions require no great amount ed  over  fifty  years.   There  is tion all the taxes which it could g £flct ^ ^ (•}<w^r-unent nas
Theatre by W. W. B. Mclnnes, of intelligence or skill to put for- nothing  new  or  original  about legally  demand,  and  if he  was ^one j^-^ to Btimulate to en-
ex-Governor of the Yukon, Spe- ward, but the assertion would have this;   it is simply a continuance willing to be perfectly frank in courage an(i to develop the pros-
cial Commissioner for the Federal been more convincing if he had of the policy which has built up his criticism, he would surely have perrty wm*cn jB s0 mucn j„ evj.
Government,   the Grand   Trunk analysed the work of the Admin- the enormous debt under which pointed out that the assessment ^ence *■    rp0  ^  „uestion   jjr>
Pacific and Senator Cox, and J. istration and shown in what re- the Province is struggling.    In- of the railways had been increased Madonaid registered an emphatic
A. McDonald, the titular leader spects it could have been streng- deed Mr.  Macdonald's criticism at the same time as the other as- affirmative.   They had done noth*
of the Opposition.    The electors thened in the direction of aiding on this point is already discounted sessments of which he complains, •      absolutely nothing. They had
<nn«f   l->*. j-ittit   4* Lin    »ii>-iiiT./*li*i    ii*nA*n    ttt 111 i-il> — .._._ . ".Li
now know the grounds upon which
the Liberal leaders impeach the
McBride Administration, and also
the platform upon which they seek
office. The most noticeable feature of the carefully prepared address delivered by the Leader of
the Opposition is the abandonment of the policy of scandal and
abuse which he and his followers
have waged for more than a year.
It is not necessary to pursue the
subject further than to note the
fact, and to emphasize the inference that by this time Mr. Macdonald has realised that the position that he has hitherto maintained with reference to the
late Commissioner of Lands and
Works and his conduct of departmental business is untenable and
has been virtually repudiated by
the sober judgment of the Province. It is gratifying to be able
to record that so far not only the
Liberal leaders but the Liberal
Press has conducted the campaign
without indulging in Indecent personalities, and with some conception of the importance of the conflict. In the interests of a fair
consideration of the issues and the
arriving at a wise decision it is
to be hoped that this attitude will
be maintained by both parties
throughout the campaign.
Mr. Macdonald's Address.
Turning to the address of Mr.
Macdonald, which must be taken
as the manifesto of his party, it
may fairly be characterised as in-
' effective  in  its  destructive  and
meagre   in its   constructive   features.    It contains nothing new,
I nothing which has not been argued
threadbare either on the floor of
the House or in tlie columns of
■ the Provincial press.   The public
are thoroughly familiar with all
i the ideas to which Mr. Macdonald
I gave utterance, and whatever other
I claim he may make, he is \i least
; unable to say, " Here is a new and
a better policy."   It is hardly to
j be wondered at that Mr. Macdon-
! aid found himself in this difficult
*miwmuwwtiwi
■|HllltllUlltllllllllllltlHIIIIMIMI|lll|IHIIIIIIMIMtllllllHnillrlllll'll!l"'»^''''Mllllllllllllll|llllinllllllllllliili,uilliiiilMllllllllllltllll»Mltl||ll|SI
THE PUPPET.
performed the hitherto impossible
feat of   holding   office for four
years   without   influencing   the
business of the Province.   Surely
a remarkable state of affairs.   Is
it nothing to Mr. Macdonald and
his party that by the exercise of
an enlightened policy persistently
carried on, a steady influx of settlers has been attracted to British
Columbia, and thousands of acres
of agricultural land  settled and
brought under cultivation?   Is it
nothing to Mr. Macdonald and his
party that a similar policy has resulted in making known to the
outside world the splendid possibilities of this Province for fruit
cultivation,   and   that   in  consequence capital is daily coming in
to develop what will yet be one
of our greatest and most profitable
industries.   It would be too much
to   expect  that  Mi'.   Macdonald
should give any credit to the Government for   those   things,   even
though they are actual achievements, the results of legislative
action and of departmental administration.    But their accomplishment   surely   deprives   the
bald assertion of Mr. Macdonald
that the Government have done
nothing to help on general prosperity of the slightest value.   Mr.
Macdonald has been credited, and
rightly,   with   keen   intelligence
and acumen;  his criticism of the
Government    on    these    points
evinces neither;   the occasion demands incisive criticism and not
merely that the critic should assort that thc Government has done
wrong, but tliat he should show
in what respect they were wrong
and how they should have acted
otherwise.    Mr.   Macdonald   has
done neither, and to tliat extent
liis criticism is both pointless and
ineffective.
Railway Policy.
He then turns his attention to
the railway policy and his principal complaint seems to be that
the Government did not hold a
special session in 1903 to deal ex
position, because he was face to prosperity, or in what respects it by the improved condition of af- and that as a matter of fact they clusivcl.y with the subject of rail-
face with the one condition of af- was weak where it should have fairs which enables the Province had contributed the lion's share way legislation.    Leaving for a
[fairs which  always redounds to been strong.                                    to carry out the terms of Mr. Tat- of the  increased revenue.    Can moment the consideration of tho
the credit of a Government, is the             Financial Conditions.             low's arrangement without feeling Mr.  Macdonald be  acquitted of Columbia & Western and the Mid-
[most  difficult  against  which   to     for instance he admitted that anv financial strain. disingenuousness in ignoring this wav & Vernon matters, it may be
|make headway, and which appeals the financial position of the Pro-                 Assessment Act. very important fact ?    The best interesting to see just what value
Imost  strongly  to an electorate— vince was bad in 1903, but he      Mr. Macdonald's next objection testimony to the wisdom of thc there is in Mr. Macdonald's con-
Igeneral prosperity.   Mr. Macdon- did not claim that the methods was to the Assessment Act, and financial policy of the Government tention.    It would be very sur-
lald did not attempt to deny or adopted  by  thc  Government   to here   he   was   upon   even   more 1S that^ it effected every purpose prising  if  the  Premier  of  any
[to minimise this, and he had to remedy the condition were wrong treacherous ground.    He did not *or which it was framed, and that Government   were   indifferent to
[admit that it presented the great- in   principle,   although   he   de- for  a  moment contend  that  in lk  attained  its end  much  more the subject of railway construc-
lest possible contrast with tho con- nounced   them   with   respect   to principle it was wrong to increase quickly than was anticipated by tion.    It is the one thing which
Idition  of affairs  when  the Mc- method.    He admitted that bor- taxation;   his only objection was lts most sanguine supporters. _^ tlie Province needs; the one thing
iBride    Administration    assumed rowing was necessary, this is what that instead of "raising money by Industrial Conditions. without which our great natural
loffice.    That being the case the the Government did, but instead increasing the taxes of the poor, In less than four years every resources cannot even be tapped,
ltmost that Mr. Macdonald could of arranging for the repayment of the struggling mechanic, or of financial and industrial condition still less developed.   The Premier
urge was that the Government did of the  one  million  dollars  bor- the business man," he should have of the Province has been reversed.               Continued on page 4 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1907.
Notes on Provincial News.
No Record.
It is a little puzzling to follow the
reasoning of even so logical a Liberal as the Leader of the Opposition.
At one time he joins with all the
critics of the Government in declaring that its record is bad, and that if
the verdict of the constituencies is
based upon the record the Administration must fall. On the other hand
the Rossland Miner in its issue of
Jan. 3rd reports Mr. Macdonald as
saying that "the Government has no
record." What does Mr. Macdonald
mean. Perhaps he intended to convey the idea that they had no record
to "speak of," which interpretation
leaves him open to the obvious retort
that apparently surpluses, general
prosperity and progressive development do not count.
"Should Messrs. Wilson, Pooley
and Semlin be returned (of which,
heaven be thanked, there is no fear),
what a rare collection of fossils the
Government will have on exhibition.
A stranger visiting the House would
be so overcome by the collection of
bald and grey pates that he would
imagine himself transported to Biblical times, and that he stood in the
august presence of the patriarchs
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob."
A Dividec —-use.
The Vernon News of the 3rd inst.,
in a trenchant editorial on the political situation, reminds the electorate
that a house divided against itself
cannot stand, an_ pertinently asks
how the Liberal Party can expect to
win with two leaders in the field.
They might do worse than take the
advice which C. H. Spurgeon once
offered to William L -- - russia and
Napoleon III of France, to step int 1
a 20-foot ring and fight it out for
themselves.
An Honest Man.
S. S. Taylor, K. C, for many years
the leading Liberal in Nelson, speaking at the recent convention of his
party declared that the Hon. R. G.
Tatlow "is an honest and able man."
The Nelson News, one of the most
rabid of party organs, has more than
once made the same admission, and
indeed it is not too much to say that
Mr. Tatlow bears this reputation
throughout the Province. The interesting point, however, is that if Mr.
Tatlow is both honest and able he
must be a difficult man to deceive,
and an impossible man to corrupt.
Now speaking at the Conservative
Convention in Victoria on the 7th
inst. Mr. Tatlow declared with much
earnestness and with an obvious sincerity which carried conviction that
not a single transaction had been
carried out by the McBride Administration, which was not absolutely in
the best interests of the Province;
and in saying this he wished it to be
distinctly understood he had in his
mind especially the transactions
which had been most severely criticised by the Opposition; viz.: the
Kaien Isalnd deal, the Kitimaat land
deal and the Columbia & Western
grant. After this unqualified declaration of Mr. Tatlow the Liberal press
and thc Liberal leaders must either
accept Mr. Tatlow's statement and
abandon their allegations of improper
dealings, or they must cancel his certificate of good character which they
have so unhesitatingly endorsed.
Houston's Christmas Gift.
Many of John Houston's friends
have spared a kindly thought for the
man who was always erratic but
never uninteresting, and who has
done more kindly deeds than the
world wots of. A cutting from the
Nelson News will be read with keen
interest and with sympathetic appreciation. John Houston was no man's
enemy but his own, although at times
he half persuaded himself to the contrary. At any rate the fact that he
loved little children goes far to redeem some of his errors and will tend
to keep alive the kindly feeling which
those who knew him best have always cherished:
"Fred Bosquet has received a long
letter from ex-Mayor John Houston,
accompanying a Christmas gift to his
children. 'John' has wandered over
many States in the last year and a
half. He is now in California, but
will shortly return to Goldfield. He
says he has no intention of ever returning to Nelson, but sends kindly
New Year wishes to all his old
friends."
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Limited
VICTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View  Sts.
)
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eugene Wacker, northwest corner: thence
east 80 chains; thence south 20 chains
to McKay's northeast corner; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 190G. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Arthur McKay, southwest corner; thence
running north 20 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres.
ARTHUR McKAT, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
Then and Now.
Mr. Smith Curtis, at one time a
Cabinet Minister and now reported
as likely to be a Liberal candidate in
the Similkameen riding, once gave
voice to his opinions very clearly and
freely as to thc qualifications of Mr.
Mclnnes in an interview in the Rossland Miner in thc fall of 1903. Mr,
Curtis said: "Mclnnes is absolutely
impossible if Liberalism is to emerge
from thc cold shades of thc Oppo
sition by putting honourable men at
the helm of the Liberal ship." And
again: "No, no; Mclnnes won't do
at all for a leader and should not
even be allowed in the caucus of the
party."
It is palpable that the Liberal party
is in the field with the leaders divided and rivals of each other; the
rank and file is split on the same
question and how can it ever hope
to win under such circumstances.
Independence in Rule.
The Vancouver Province has sized
up the political situation to a nicety,
and goes straight to the point when
it declares that independence in rule
is an issue, or as it declares, the
greatest issue at the forthcoming
election. This matter cannot be kept
too clearly before the electorate, and
we make no apology for repeating
part of the argument of our contemporary :
"The great overshadowing question in the coming election—the one
which should dominate all others—is
whether we are to have a Government in this Province in sympathy
with the Government at Ottawa, or
one which will concern itself entirely
with the interests of British Columbia. It can quite readily be seen that
if we place an administration in
power which will be satisfied to be
dictated to and controlled by the
Federal authorities we will simply be
handing ourselves over, bound hand
and foot, to a power which has for
ten years shown itself determined to
make the country serve the interests
of a party. . . . With a Government at Victoria acceptable to that
at Ottawa, there is danger that we
might have to resort to rafts, and
push off into the Pacific Ocean as the
only possession left to us."
schemes by appointing honest men
to assist him. Surely this is a little
inconsistent. The old adage runs
that birds of a feather flock together,
and according to the same Liberal
press which praises Mr. Tatlow and
Mr. Manson, and cannot find words
to express its detestation of Mr. McBride and Mr. Green, there are plenty
of bad men in the Conservative
Party to choose from, and the wonder is that Premier McBride has overlooked them all, and that his two
most recent appointments have been
honest men. It would be too much
to expect that the Nelson News
would leave the matter without trying to spoil any encomium it had
passed upon Mr. Manson, and so it
winds up by declaring that he is a
good man "without the strength of
conviction requisite to successfully
mingle with and hold his own against
companions of the coarser grain." A
good man without convictions is a
rarity, and would appear to be an
anomaly to anyone but the editor of
the Nelson News.
More Doukhobours.
The last issue of the Winnipeg
Voice contains an account of an elegant scheme that is calculated to
bring to Canada a plentiful supply of
cheap labor to be utilised in the
building of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway. It seems that Peter Ve-
regin, the Doukhobour chief, has
commissioned to go to Russia and
inveigle 10,000 peasants into this
"Canada of ours."
News from Chilliwack.
The Bank of Montreal opened for
business on Thursday, 27th ult., in
the Masonic Block, in the building
recently vacated by the Royal Bank
of Canada. The building has been
thoroughly renovated, new vaults
constructed, and everything up to
date. Tbe bank is under the management of Mr. George D. Brymner with
Mr. E. Duthie as assistant manager.
Mr. Brymner is also manager of the
Bank of Montreal at Westminster.
An Editorial Curiosity.
Seeing that the ancient and venerable D. W. Higgins is supposed to be
the editor of thc Vancouver World,
the following choice morsel snipped
from its columns will be read with
amusement by all who enjoy the personal acquaintance of thc editor:
Another Good Man.
It must be a little puzzling to people who arc trying to grasp the viewpoint of the Liberal Party who proclaim thc "atrocious, scandalous and
dishonest" conduct of the McBride
Administration to find that a Premier who could bc guilty of such
wickedness is still capable of appointing good honest men to vacant positions in thc Cabinet. According to
.the Nelson News the new Provincial
Secretary, Mr. Manson, is a good
man and entitled to "every respect."
One wonders why the Hon. Richard
McBride, that "incarnation of all that
is bad, insincere, uncandid and tricky"
should     handicap     his     maleficent
The Strongest and Best.
Thc veteran editor of the Cranbrook Prospector, A. B. Grace, is a
veritable thorn in the flesh to the
"old man" who runs the Opposition
organ. The latter has been for more
than three years in possession of the
field with Dr. King, the Liberal whip,
as his supporter, when down swoops
the despised Prospector from Fort
Steele, camps right in the heart of
the Liberal fold, permeates the constituency with good sound Conservative ideas and secures the nomination of the strongest and best candidate ever named by a party in that
district. Editor Grace deserves and
will receive the unstinted praise of all
loyal Conservatives for the excellent
work he has done, and will undoubtedly have the satisfaction of seeing
his nominee head the poll by a large
majority on Feb. 2nd. This is how
he speaks of the Conservative candidate:
"Mr. J. A. Harvey, as the candidate selected by the Conservative
Party to represent this riding in the
next Legisatlive Assembly, is a man
that every Conservative and independent voter can support without evasion or apology. He is the strongest
and best man ever named by a party
in this district. Mr. Harvey is too
well known in every corner of this
riding to need any newspaper or
other introduction of commendation,
and the vote of confidence given by
the convention that selected him will
be ratified by the electors on election
day."
VEGETARIAN
VARIETIES.
TOMATOES, per tin ,Sc
SUGAR CORN, 2 tins for.. 25c
EARLY JUNE PEAS, 2 tins for   25c
STRING BEANS, 2 tins for 25c
IMPORTED  FRENCH  PEA S, per tin  ISC and 25c.
IMPORTED FRENCH  MUSHROOMS, per tin iSc and 35c.
ASPARAGUS, per tin 40c
IMPORTED FRENCH SPINACH, per tin  25c
IMPORTED FRENCH ARTICHOKES, per tin   Soc
IMPORTED FRENCH   MACEDOINES, per tin   50c
DIXI H. ROSS & e©
CASH GROCERS, 111 GOVERNMENT STREET
WHERE YOU GET THE BEST THINGS TO EAT AND DRINK
Mail Orders receive special attention.
rrnnr
TYTTYTrisTrfryTinnr
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Young Scandinavian lady who is
fond of music to Englishman, also
fond of violin.
Lady—'Ven are you coming to play
mit me?
Gent—Oh! er. Any time when you
have nothing on!
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding us particulars
stick to facts.
We will send our expert anywhere.
A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO.
GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
.JLU.JUUJUUJU*^ THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 12 1907.
OUR DINING ROOM FURNITURE COMBINES BOTH
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Six-foot   square   Extension   Table,   in  plain
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Eight-foot square Extension Table, made of
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Price    $12.00
Six-foot  round  Extension  Table,  on  square
pedestal, in quartered oak.   Price  $16.00
Eight-foot round Extension Table, finished in
surfaced oak.    Price    $18.00
Ten-foot round Extension, in quartered oak
and polished; has turned and fluted legs.
Price  $40.00
Dining Chairs.
Made of solid oak, golden finish, has
nice   cane   seat,    exactly   like.    cut.
Price  $4.50
Arm Chair to match  $6.50
We   have   this   same    chair,   with
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WEILER BROS.,
Complete Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers, Victoria
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
News From the Motherland
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
Eve's Work.
In all classes throughout England
—not in Scotland—the scale of living has been greatly raised during
the past half-century, and it is unquestionable that the wives have
caused much of its rise.—" The
Graphic."
Coming Habits.
With regard to the topic of ladies
riding astride, several of them have
told me they are waiting to sec "how
the cat jumps" before ordering new
habits, and many are only waiting for
a lead to follow.—" Madame "
Ballroom Romping.
In my young days it was not considered seemly to romp at all, much
less in ballrooms. I think that it
is a thousand pities that young people should lose all the respect due
to them, and I consider the Lancers a relic of barbarism, only fit
for servants' balls.—Dowager Marchioness, in " The Throne."
Promising Child.
"Mamma!" said little hopeful of
eight summers or thereby, whose
baby brother, three weeks old, was
lying seriously ill. " Mammal If
baby dies can we have his skin for
a rug?"
Matrimonial Rugby.
Thc women of today in Britain
play at a matrimony according to
the " Rugby Rules." It is a violent
entertainment and is frequently accompanied with accidents!—" Marma-
duke," in "Truth."
and goes to his club, or else he says,
" You are not very well, my dear:
shall I send for a doctor?" The
Frenchman, au contraire, has hysterics, too. The. Frenchman, may
fight with his wife, love her, hate
her, kiss her, or kill her; but indifferent to her, superior to her,
never!—Pol de Leon, in "The
World."
onial possessions, with the result
that he refuses to believe the inhabitants capable of any good deed or
any honourable motive. All over-sea
British to him are suspect; if they
were born at home, they must have
emigrated for base and selfish ends;
if born abroad, they arc ipso facto
outside the pale of Britisli civilisation and traditions.—" North China
Herald," Shanghai,
Britain's Mental Fare.
The average Briton does not study
national problems outside party politics, and, it seems increasingly evident, docs not want to understand
them. He fills his mind with a lumber of cricket averages and personalities and football results, and by
the time he has found what his favourite athlete eats, drinks, wears,
and is nicknamed, any greater effort
of mind has become distasteful to
him.—" Macmillan's  Magazine."
Japan Through Russian Eyes.
During the last ten years Japan
has acquired Formosa in the south,
Korea in thc west, half of Saghalien
in the north. Now thc guides of
Japan's destiny look Eastwards. They
wish to settle accounts with their
best friends after thc English. We
are still far from formal war; but
Americans begin already to fancy
they feel the immediate strength of
the yellow fist and to anticipate the
possibility of its heavy blows. Japan
has not yet shaken a finger, but even
now thc United States are passing
unhappy moments.—"Novoe Vremya,"  St.  Petersburg.
A Suffragette Epigram.
The woman ate the apple in the
Garden of Eden—she has been eating
the leek ever since.—" Suffragette,"
in " South African Review," Capetown.
Woman's Diplomacy.
Women are thc finest diplomats in
the world, but I hardly know in saying it whether I am paying my sex
a compliment or not. A woman's
weapons arc tact—in some cases
amounting to incredible deceit—and
a roundabout diplomacy that is truly
Machiavellian.—Mrs. Neish, in " M.
A. P."
How to Enjoy Britain.
There is no doubt that to see and
enjoy Britain aright one must be an
American. The country is, in the
first place, peculiarly rich in small
comforts that her people take for
granted, not knowing their own bliss.
Then there arc the literary reminiscences.—" Nation," New York.
Britain and Canada.
In Canada statesmen in high position privately predict the complete
severing of Britain and Canada within ten years. The slender thread of
the Governor-Generalship may be
severed as imperceptibly as a man
wakes up one day to find he has grey
hair.—" Collier's Weekly," New York.
The Curse of Presents.
Our forbears and sires held it to
be an insult to be offered a present
by any but intimate friends. Today,
in some institutions, present-giving
has degenerated into an organised
system of extortion, or has become
a dangerous absurdity.—" The Hospital."
When St. Paul's Collapses.
Speculation is rife as to what will
happen to the site of St. Paul's Cm
the event of its collapse) when the
debris has been cleared away Dr.
Clifford, interviewed on the subject,
said he thought that there could not
be a better position than this for a
Nonconformist collogc. Mr. Oswald
Stoll, on the other hand, has already completed the plans for a new
Empire, while the old cry that there
is no good central City garare has
again sounded, with some significance. It is also suggested that thc
summit of Ludgate-hill is obviously
the best place on which to erect the
platform from which aeroplanes leaving London for Manchester could
start.—" Punch."
Unhappy Transvaal.
Despite the pious aspirations expressed in the preamble of the Letters Patent on the Transvaal, we arc.
convinced that party government in
thc two new Colonies will bring at
the present time " not peace, but a
sword."—" Manchester Courier."
Woman as a " Great Sham."
There is a " right" which no woman appears eager to seize upon and
defend—thc right to protest against
the vulgar and indecent manner in
which she is given away as a great
Sham in all her own special fashion-books and pictorials. There Man
sees Woman as the Fool Rampant
Thc advertisements catering for her
patronage show her at her worst, She
is exhibited plainly and pitilessly as
a swindle.—Marie Corelli, in " Rapid
Review."
Why Anglo-Saxons Flourish.
The Frenchman of the middle class
sacrifices everything in order to obtain for his children some official
position or other, a mean one, perhaps, but .1 sure one, leading after
thirty year sof penury to a pension
verging on destitution. This is one
aspect of the decay of the French
race. It is easy to understand that
two races are not evenly armed for
the struggle for life if one be made
up of aspirants to official positions
and the other of individuals possessing initiative, daring, and energy. For
this reason do Latin races decline
while Anglo-Saxon races grow and
multiply.—" Siccle,"   Paris.
New Club Life.
Clubs must recognise that facilities
for entertaining the fair sex are a
necessity nowadays, and it is because
they lay themselves out for social
entertaining that such clubs as the
Wellington and thc Cavalry can congratulate themselves on a good balance sheet.—" Thc Gentlewoman."
" Lynching " a Trust.
A number of British soap tnanu
facturers organised a trust on thc
most approved American style. That
they came to grief was due neither
to want of effort nor lack of capital.
The people, figuratively speaking,
lynched them. Thc incident is really
a curious and most instructive illustration of the power of public sentiment to achieve what it believes to
be right and desirable, without recourse to law.—" Eagle," Brooklyn..
French and British Husbands.
When a British wife has hysterics
her   husband   is   immediately   bored,
Little-Englander Creed.
The Little Englander would seem
to have passed into an attitude of undisguised hostility towards our Col-
Traveller's Daring Feat.
Mr. Hans Vischer, British Assistant-Resident at Kano, Nigeria, has
.successfully accomplished au adventurous journey across the Sahara
from Tripoli, and he has safely arrived at Mafoni, Nigeria.
Mr. Vischer, who is the only
European of the present generation
to accomplish the journey through
the heart of the Great Sahara, travelled by way of Murzuk and the oasis
of Belma.
A number of native pilgrims returning via Tripoli to their homes
from Mecca heard of Mr, Vischer's
projected journey, and obtained permission to accompany him. He
travelled as an official representative ■
of the British Government, and there
is no doubt that his journey will have
an important effect in increasing
British prestige among the Mahom-
medan natives of Western Africa. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY ia, 1907.
EDITORIAL,
Continued from page 1.
who did not regard railway construction as a vital necessity demanding all the encouragement
and assistance which his Government could legitimately give,
would be a political phenomenon
with the mind of an infant. But
if there is one thing which entitles the lion. Kichard McBride
to the respect and confidence of
the Province it is the clear-cut,
definite policy, which he has enunciated and to which he has unflinchingly adhered on- this om-
portant subject. Public opinion
has definitely and finally decided
against land grants for future
railway construction in British
Columbia. Mr. McBride as a public servant correctly interpreted
this decision and nailed his colours to the mast. Up to this day
he has not deviated one hair's
breadth from the position he took
up.
G. T. P. Demands.
In spite of the threats of the
G. T. P. he lias resolutely refused,
and will to tlie end refuse to make
any concession on this point.
Their modest demand for a land
grant valued today at $15,000,000
but probably running into at least
four times that value before
they would have disposed of the
whole of the land, has been strenuously resisted, a circumstance
which accounts for W. W. B. Mclnnis' resignation of the Governorship of the Yukon, and the importation of the Ottawa-Toronto
machine into Provincial politics
Mr. Macdonald has not dared to
say that Mr. McBride should have
encouraged railway construction
by conceding this grant, but he is
allying himself with the party
which is putting up the battle of
its life in order to secure that
grant. Mr. Macdonald cannot dissociate himself from the policy of
those whose assistance he has accepted in this campaign, and the
importance of whose advent, he
has himself emphasised; and if
his   condemnation  of  Mr.    Mc
Bride's railway policy means anything, it means that th** Premier
should have made a land grant to
the G. T. P. in the interests of
speedy railway construction in
the Province.
Land Grants.
The last word to be said on this
subject of railway policy is that
never again will a B. C. Government make a land grant for railway construction. Where owing
to exceptional local conditions it
may be necessary to render aid to
branch lines this aid must take the
form of a casli bonus, or tlie guarantee of bonds: such a policy
might bo justified in the case of a
railway like the Kootenay Central,
but the day of land grants to
trunk lines and wealthy corporations has gone by. Mr. Macdonald's attack upon the Columbia &
Western land grant was a simple
reiteration of his arguments on
the floor of the House last session. Mr. Macdonald with a noticeable lack of fairness ignores
the fact that this grant was not
originally made by the McBride
Government, but that they found
themselves saddled with an obligation imposed by the legislative
acts of their predecessors. The
Government had to choose between
taking advantage of a technicality
and fulfilling a moral obligation.
In the interests of fair play and
the credit of the Province they
chose the honourable course, and
in doing so gave Mr. Macdonald
and his friends an opportunity to
make what political capital they
could out of the transaction. They
are now availing themselves of
that opportunity to the fullest extent, but it is a little singular that
the men who could be so denunciatory because Mr. McBride dis
charged an honourable obligation
by confirming the land grant already made to the Columbia &
Western, should have nothing but
blame for him because he steadfastly refused to initiate a grant
to the Midway & Vernon. Just
what it cost the Premier to stand
by his guns in this matter will
never bp known, but few men,
even among premiers, would have
carried the courage of their convictions to the point he did.
Consistency.
Whatever else may be charged
against Mr. McBride, consistency
is the one thing which has characterised the railway policy of his
Government, and if the pursuance
of that policy has engendered some
sectional dissatisfaction, and has
retarded the construction of railways in some parts of the Province it is at least the result of a
well-conceived plan, which has
once received the endorsation of
the electorate, and which in a very
short time they will again either
endorse or turn down. Mr. Macdonald is asking them to turn it
clown, but he lias not said one
word on the subject of what he
would substitute, or how he would
expedite railway construction.
Some silences are eloquent.
Better Terms.
The only other subject of importance upon which Mr. Macdonald touched was that of "better
terms." It is unnecessary to say
that he condemned Mr. McBride's
attitude on this question. But his
condemnation was practically confined to one' point, Mr. McBride
when turned down by the Conference should have gone to Sir Wilfrid, presumably cap in hand, and
begged for something which tlie
Conference had denied him. Is
this the attitude which the people
of British Columbia wish their
representative to assume towards
the Dominion Government ? If so
The Week has no hesitation in
saying at once that Mr. Macdonald is much better fitted for the
role than Mr. McBride. There are
men who, when kicked in the rear,
humbly beg pardon for being in
the way. But Mr. McBride is not
a man of that type. Before he
went to Ottawa he received no information that he would have to
lay his case for "better terms" before a Conference of Provincial
Premiers. He expected that he
would have to treat with the Dominion Government and that if he
succeeded in convincing them of
the justice of the claims of British
Columbia they would negotiate for
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their acceptance or approval by
the other Provinces. Mr. McBride
did not convince the Dominion
Government, not only that B. C.
had a claim for "better terms,"
but for "special terms" beyond
any of the other Provinces; and
he secured what was surely no
mean concession in Sir Wilfrid
Laurier's emphatic endorsation of
that principle. That fact alone
redeemed Mr. McBride's mission
from any suspicion of failure or
ineffectiveness. If any mistake
was committed, if any weakness
was displayed it was not on the
part of Mr. McBride, who won
the principle he went to fight for,
but on the part of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and his ministers, who
having conceded the justice of Mr.
McBride's claims left him to the
tender mercies of the other Provinces with competing claims.
Neither Mr. Macdonald nor Mr.
Mclnnes nor any Liberal leadeT
has dared to say that Mr. McBride
should have accepted the offer of
the Conference as a final settlement, and yet this was the only
condition on whicli it was made.
If they will undertake to say so it
is an absolute certainty that their
supporters at the polls on Feb. 2nd
will not be sufficiently numerous
to constitute a corporal's guard,
and yet if they do not mean this
there is no force in their conten
tion that Mr. McBride did wrong
in refusing. "But," urges Mr.
Macdonald, "he should have gone
to the Government again." "What
for ?" one would like to know. He
went to them first, he was referred
to the Conference; it is true that
Mr. Fielding, anticipating the seriousness of a cleavage in the
ranks of his party if the Conference proved a fiasco, promised to
support a further grant; but unfortunately Mr. Fielding indicated the extent of his generosity,
and it amounted to the adding of
one pepper-corn to another.
Mr. McBride's Attitude.
No, Mr. McBride's action wa3
characterised by all the dignity
which should be associated with
negotiations conducted by the Premier of a Canadian Province, and
with all the consideration for the
interests of that Province which
the ablest ambassador could show.
The firmness as well as the justice
of his attitude has created something* like consternation in the
ranks of the Opposition. British
Columbia is represented at Ottawa
by a "solid seven." If the Province whose claims have been derided by the Dominion Government returns the McBride Admin
istration to power upon a platform
in which "better terms" as inter
preted by Mr. McBride is one of
the principal issues, the consequences of the "solid seven" and
the party they represent will b?
disastrous.'
The Ottawa Machine.
Nobody knows this better than
the men who control the Ottawa
machine, and it is a moot question
whether the greater desperation
exists in the ranks of the political
party which is anxious to postpone
its Waterloo in British Columbia,
or in the ranks of the Toronto
boodlers who are determined to
grab a land grant in the north of
the Province of greater value than
that which ten years ago they secured in the south.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
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TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria 1
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
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Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Proprietor
Go to
FRASER %
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30=32 Government St.
CARLTON SALOON
AND LOUNGE
(Late Vernon Hotel.)
THE FIRST-CLASS BAR
R. P. CLARK, Proprietor,
(Late of Dawson City and South Africa)
Cor. Douglas and View Sts.
PIM'S
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neckwear. New goods just
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Very stylish and most comfortable Caps for gentlemen,
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Victoria, B. C.
Mail Orders Promptly
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BREWERS OF
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The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1907
p By THE LOUNGER f*
Now is the time par excellence for
a stroll down the street with a
pause at each corner. However busy
the passer-by, he always has a moment to discuss the latest news of
the election, and when there are two
such important events as a Provincial and a Municipal election taking
place concurrently, he 'must indeed
be a dullard and a bad citizen who
takes no interest in either. I love
election times; there is an air of
subdued excitement over everything
and everybody; each man is wiser
than his neighbour, and there are few
who can resist the temptation to wear
an appearance of mystery as who
should say, " Ah, yes, well of course
I know from the inside, but my lips
are sealed." This sort of affectation
does no one any harm, and brings
unutterable bliss to many hearts. It
is intensely amusing to one who, like
the Lounger, hears many different
opinions from all sides, each opinion
being backed up by this same secret
information, which is probably based
on nothing more substantial than that
Brown's cousin was secretary to
Smith, who would have had a nomination if he had not had that unfortunate accident. Most of this " inside information " has its foundation
on something equally futile, but we
are curious animals, and on hearing
what Brown has to say we wag our
heads sagely, and back up our own
opinion on a professed statement
which has become public through the
careless talking of an office boy. And
then we go on our way thinking that
if we were only given a little more
authority and scope to show our talents, we should have a fine government indeed, both in the Province and
the City. The mournful apostrophe
of the Preacher " Vanitas vanitatum,"
can never be so effectively applied as
to this game of politics. And, be it
said in a whisper, the ordinary man
in the street finds no difference to
his own life whatever may be the
result of an election, for he still has
to work, eat and sleep, and he finds
the same difficulty in making the two
ends rteet under Rehoboam as under
Solomon.
It is a gratifying sign of the times
, that some of the old hotels are again
! in use in Victoria.     The old Vernon,
I which was at one time nearly, if not
1 quite, the most popular hostelry in
j town, is once more assuming an appearance of life.   The bar has been
I leased by Mr. Clark who has effected
extensive   improvements   and  altera-
l tions.  and  under  the  name  of  the
j Carlton Lounge has opened  a  most
comfortable retreat, where it is possible to while away a quiet hour with
I a paper or magazine.   There is some-
1 thing decidedly respectable about that
name " Lounge."   It is infinitely superior to the common or garden term
"Bar" or "Saloon."   It presupposes
[that the habitues and casuals gathered  there  turn  into  its  hospitable
doors, not for the mere vulgar purpose  of  drinking,  but  for  a  restful
hour snatched from the burdens and
cares of a busy life.   A comfortable
I chair and a few plants on a table here
and there complete the illusion, till
the lemonade counter itself becomes
a  thing of  quite  secondary  importance.   For the most part men, and
[women too, are never quite so happy
as  when  they  ate  deceiving  themselves, and the successful man is the
lone who   manages   to cater   to the
[ weaknesses of others, and at the same
time help them to preserve the fiction that the broad path is the narrow 01 e after all.
It has often occured to me that we
I should appreciate the advantages of
[modern life a great deal more if we
J could all be suddenly called back a
I hundred   years   for a week   or so.
J Imagine the discomforts of an age
without electric light, without telephones, without electric cars, like the
[man in the adage, "sans everything."
I How many times have I anathema-
Itised the telephone, and heard others
do the same thing, because it inter
rupts us at our leisure, or when we
are busy; and yet how quickly we
fly to it for aid, and bless its existence when we need it. At the same
time there are but few of us who, if
we were carried back, as was the
hero of Alark Twain's book, to the
days of King Arthur, would have the
slightest idea of how to produce for
ourselves the conveniences which we
enjoy now. We should be able to
string up a wire, but how to get the
juice into it would be beyond us. It-
would be but an occasional stranger
whom Merlin would have to fear, and
the rest of us would find our vocation in making sport for the court by
an exhibition of how twentieth century giants comported themselves
while undergoing a course of torture
for attempted witchcraft.
Charles Kingsley is said to have
been the only man who ever wrote an
eulogy on the North-East Wind. I
suppose most people have heard his
" Ode to the North-East Wind " sung
in cantata form, but I couldn't help
wondering last Monday if he would
have written it as he did, had he been
in a dust-storm such as was caused
on that day by its violence. Dust is
bad at all times, but I think it is
worse when driven by a piercing gale,
than when stirred up by a hot, dry
wind in the summer time. It was
astonishing that so much dust could
have accumulated in such a short
time. But all the same there is something grandly virile about a sharp
frost; it stirs the blood and quickens
the energies, and for those who have
time to put on skates there is no time
in the year where so much healthy
enjoyment can be gained. On Beacon
Hill the ponds were crowded with
those who lacked the means or inclination to go to Colwood, to which
place a cheap excursion was run. It
is a curious fact that one never meets
a bad-tempered person on skates.
Why this should be so is a question
which I fail to answer, but good-
humour is the order of the day: Accidents which would call forth a
snarling rejoinder on the street are
passed over with a cheerful laugh;
chaff and banter of a friendly nature
are exrhanged between people who
would scowl at each other on terra
firma; a sudden immersion consequent on broken ice is the sign for
a hearty laugh enjoyed by the victim no less than by the spectator.
The best cure for a grumpy temper
is an hour on the ice, but unfortunately we have not the ice always
with us, and one or two days skating is not sufficient to ensure an
equable temper throughout the year.
To my mind the most effective antidote for a bad temper is a sense of
humour. Everything has its humourous side, and in most cases the more
an incident annoys us, the more comical is its other aspect. Bad temper
is such a waste of time, and in almost every case it never effects any
good. An occasional explosion of
honest wrath; it is true, sometimes
works wonders, but it is like a sleeping draught in that it is as well not
to become too dependent upon it.
However,! appear to be usurping the
functions of " Buster Brown," whose
duty it is to point the obvious morals,
beginning with his well-known " Resolved." It is not my place to turn
the Street Corner into a preacher's
column, but all the same, my readers,
cultivate your sense of humour and
you may then possess a temper even
more mild and amicable than that of
THE LOUNGER.
mmmmmmmm
OLLA PODRIDA
Schoolboy " Howlers."
Among the gems of a collection of
schoolboy " howlers" given in the
" University Correspondence and
College Magazine " are the following:
Socrates died from a dose of wedlock.
The name of Caesar's wife was
Caesarea;  she was above suspicion.
Simon de Montfort formed what
was known, as the Mad Parliament-
it was something the same as it is
at the present day.
The Star Chamber was a room
decorated with stars in which tortures were carried out. From this
we have the modern expression " to
see stars "—that is, to be in pain.
" Cabal" is a short name for the
English Prime Minister; ca stands
for Campbell, and bal for Bannerman,
and the 1 at the end means that he
is a Liberal.
The Duke of Marlborough was a
great general, who always fought
with a fixed determination to win or
lose.
Not Wanted.
A Calcutta telegram states that
Lord Minto, the Viceroy, has given
notice of a request he has received
from Earl Grey, the Governor-General of Canada, asking that emigration from India to Canada should be
discouraged. The Governor-General
states that there is no suitable employment in Canada for Indians, and
destitute persons are liable to be deported.
Doctor and Patient.
Should doctors mislead in order to
cure? Are misrepresentations a medicine?
Such are the questions raised by
an article in this week's " Hospital"
on the medical conscience.
" It not infrequently arises," says
the writer, " in the relations of the
doctor with his patients that perplexing problems present themselves
to his mind as to how far he is
justified in withholding the truth.
" It is now very generally recognised that in many morbid conditions
especially in those of a nervous or
neurasthenic order, suggestion forms
a most useful therapeutic measure,
and this frequently involves methods
of deception.
" We have no hesitation in saying
that a doctor will not further the
interests of his patient, any more
than his own interests, by making a
frontal attack upon pernicious habits.
Aggressive plain speaking will effectually drive the patient away to another more discreet doctor, but will
have no effect upon his consumption
of liquor. It is only by securing his
confidence, by careful and diplomatic
treatment, that one can hope to influence such an individual."
The Archbishop's Wit.
The Archbishop of Canterbury has
the knack of saying the right thing
to the particular people he is addressing. He had once to open a
chess congress, and observed that,
though he could not claim to be a
brilliant player, he had, nevertheless,
had a great deal to do with kings
and queens, he had lived successively in two great castles, and he believed he was the only man living
who was both a bishop and a knight!
Tough Ones.
Some punning catches are appreciated by a good many people. Here
is an old one that is good:
If a father gave one of his sons
19 cents and the other 6 cents, what
time would it be?
The answer is, "Quarter to two."
And here is one of more recent
birth:
If a postmaster went to a menagerie and was eaten by one of the
wild beasts, what would be the hour?
Perhaps you'll have to think this
over a little. Yet the answer is very
simple.   It is "8 p. m.," of course.
An English wit remarked of English women that while romance made
wrecks of them, marriage made them
look like public buildings.
Mr. Churchill Optimistic.
Home Rule on lines similar to the
Transvaal Constitution is to be granted to the Orange River Colony next
year, and it is expected that the new
Legislature will meet at Bloemfontein
in the autumn. The new Constitu-
tution was outlined in debates in
both Houses of Parliament on Monday as follows:
Two Chambers.
Upper of it members, to be nominated for first Legislature.
Lower of 38 (as against the old
Volksraad's 60), 27 rural and 11
urban.
In case of dispute both Chambers
sit together.
Same reservation of laws as in
Transvaal (" servila labour," etc.)
Th Sanitarium Hotel, which is bountifully shunted, overlooking the Bow Hivcr and its lovely nnd
rninantic valley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
ntted with every appointment calculated to briiitr
Measure and comfort to thc tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, whioh, though isolated, is in
close proximity to tho Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a lirst class institution
of its kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel,
wnere lurkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
oatns arc given undor medical supervision, with
water.direct from tlio celebrated hot sulphur springs.
A first class 1 very in connection so that rides and
drives through the m vgniflciuit scenery may be 011-
loyed.   Excellent cuisine.
Terms: l&ntla day upwards. Spoeinl rates by week
or month.  Open all the year.
A. C. THOMPSON? Manager.
Medical Staff:
It. G. Bubtt, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
Land Settlers' Board, the Government abandoning the scheme of further land settlement.
Payment of members up to  £300.
Manhood suffrage with six months'
residential qualification.
Contribution to cost of war remitted.
Government's guarantee of interest
on £35,000,000 regarded as quittance
of any outstanding obligations or
claims for compensation.
plain to a female.   Anyway, it's what
de Lawd's a-cussin' de country fer."
Seeing Is Believing.
Pat Shaughnessy, hearing that the
bank in which he kept his savings
had failed, rushed around with the
bank-book and demanded all his
money. The paying teller straightway began to count it out.
"Oh, ye've got it, have ye?" said
Shaughnessy, with a sigh of relief.
"Kape it, then. Oi don't want it as
long as ye have it."
What Ma Wants to Know.
A teacher in one of the public
schools of Baltimore was one day
instructing her pupils in the mysteries of etymology, when she had
occasion to question a boy pupil with
reference to thc word "recuperate."
"As an example," said thc teacher,
"we will take the case of your father.
He is, of course, a hard-working
man."
"Yes'm," assented Charley.
"And when night comes, he returns home tired and worn out,
doesn't he?"
"Yes'm," in further assent from
Charley.
"Then," continued teacher, "it becomes night his work being over, and
he being tired and worn out, what
does he do?"
"That's what ma wants to know,"
said Charley.
A Bright '"Farden."
What's up, Tommy?" said a good-
natured London coster, who was
passing, to a small boy who was sobbing bitterly.
"Oh, me farden! Hi've lorst me
brite farden!" wailed the little lad,
continuing his search.
" 'Ere, mates," said the man to
some others standing near, "let's
help the pore kid to find 'is farden,"
and the company set to work.
In a few minutes one of them
picked up the missing coin.
"'Ere y'are, Tommy," he said;
" 'ere's yer farden."
Then, looking at it in the light of
a street lamp, "W'y, it ain't a farden
at all; it's a 'arf-quid."
"Gam!" said the boy, as he snatched away the coin. "D'ye think Hi
was going to let yew blokes know
hit was a 'arf thick 'un? W'y, wun
of yer would 'a' 'ad 's foot on it
afore Hi'd 'ad tyme ter turn rahnd."
And he vanished around the corner like a streak of lightning.
THE    WESTMINSTER    CONFESSION.
Graft Defined.
There is an old negro in the city
of Windsor who is over-fond of delivering impromptu addresses on
public occasions. But his ideas of
the subjects he discourses upon arc
as vague as those of many other
orators.
"Sam," asked his wife after one of
his evening declarations, "what's dis
yer graft you'se allers so mad about?"
"Graft," repeated Sam, "is what
you might call—well, it's hard to ex-
Thc discussion In Boston on the Westminster Confession of Faith Is being
carried on with a great deal of vigor,
as is evidenced by tho following poem
from the Boston Transcript, which, as
nny Cnlvlnlst will sny, does not bear
examination as a prose argument on
the question:
An unelected Infant sighed out Its little breath,
And wandered through the darkness
along the shores of death,
Until thc gates of heaven, agleam with
pearls,  lt  spied,
And ran to them, and clung there, and
would not be denied—
Though still from earth rose mutter-
Ings:    "You cannot enter ln;
Depnrt Into Gehenna, you child of
wrath and sin."
At lnst the gates were opened; a man
with features mild,
Stooped down and raised the weeping
nnd unelected child.
Immortal light thrilled softly down the
avenues of bliss,
As on the Infant's forehead the spirit
placed a k'si.
"Who are you, fius to hallow my unelected brov.V"
"Dear child, my name was Calvin—but
I see things better now."
ll THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 12, 1907.
% flusic and      *
I   The Drama. |
5^*^^-^^^9^9^^9^?^#^?
On Wednesday night the German
prima-donna, Madame Schumann-
Heink appeared at the Victoria Theatre, and held a large audience spellbound for more than an hour. Although not exactly in her youthful
prime, Madame Schumann-Heink still
has a very powerful contralto voice
with remarkably rich tones in the
lower register, and a few phenomenal
notes in the upper. All her selections were in German, except an encore which was the best number of
the evening. For this Mme. Heink
sang the exquisite solo from Mendelsohn's great Oratorio, St. Paul, " But
the Lord is Mindful of His Own."
Both in the recitative and the air the
rich, full tones of her voice were heard
to grent advantage, and the conviction was carried to more than one
hearer that her future career will probably be in Oratorio. In the selection
from " La Prophet," which concluded
the programme Mme. Heink added
tremendous dramatic fervour to the
vocal rendition, and the audience
would gladly have heard it repeated,
but the programme had been arduous
and no fault could be found with the
singer for declining a final encore.
The engagement was a notable one
and the audience large, although
there were a few vacant seats both
upstairs and down. This is a matter
for regret and is undoubtedly a reproach to the musical reputation of
Victoria. People in the front ranks
of Victoria musical circles, to whom
a dollar more or less makes no difference, rushed for the cheap seats
and left Manager Ricketts and his
indefatigable local agent, Mr. Den-
ham, to sell the $3 tickets where they
could, which means largely among
people who have no musical pretensions, but who arc loyal to their city
and to those who cater for the public amusement. If such high class
engagements as these are not made
in future it will he the fault of Victorians who masquerade as musicians,
but who do not live up to their professions.
In no respect has the New Grand
Theatre, Victoria, Improved to a
greater extent during the past few
weeks than i.. the ->tyle of comedy
sketch which is presented on its
boards. 'The Last of the Troupe,"
as played by Mr. Coombs and Miss
Stone is no exception to this rule and
has been exceptionally well received
by large houses. Mr. Coombs is the
possessor of a f;ood high tenor voice
and in the course of the act he sings
two songs which met with general
approval. The acrobatic turn of Inza
and Lorella is excellent, the double
somersaults off thc spring-board, the
one-legged tumbling fairly brought
the house down on Tuesday evening.
Wire-walking is always an attraction
and the Noetzel family introduce
some startling novelties in this line,
including a dog and bicycle which arc
"wheel-barrowed" across by the
youngest member of the party, her
legs being held by another of thc
troupe, and a perilous voyage with
thc same girl doing "the splits" on
the shoulders of the other two. Claire
Maynard has a fine soprano voice and
her high notes are splendid, but he*.*
middle and lower register appear
weak. I fancy that but few people
had any idea as to what her first
song was about, but her rendering
of "The Toreador" was above the
average. The illustrated song this
week utterly fails to do any justice
to Mr. Keane's voice; the words are
mawkish, the tune poor, and the pictures bad. It is a great pity that
decent music and words cannot be
provided together with good pictures
for this turn, especially when thc
singer has a high tenor voice of the
character of Mr. Keane's. The moving pictures gave an interesting and
amusing exhibition of the chase and
capture of a diamond smuggler.
There are few things more worthy
of notice in Victoria than the inarked
improvement which has taken place
in  vaudeville  show  since  thc   New
Grand Theatre was opened, and both
the citizens themselves and Manager
Jameson should congratulate themselves on the success which ahs hitherto attended this deservedly popular
playhouse.
Pollard's open Tuesday, Jan. 15th,
at the Victoria Theatre, with their
musical comedy "In Town." In a
recent criticism of the Pollard's Lilliputian Opera Company one of the
Montreal scribes wrote:
"The best yet." "Bright as it could
possibly be." "Funny, I just died
laughing." Such were the expressions heard coming out of the Academy of Music, Montreal, recently, after the Lilliputians had given "In
Town." It was the first time that
this delightful musical comedy has
been staged in Canada, and is considered one of the best operas in their
repertoire. Master Teddie McNa-
mara was Capt. Coddington, "a man
about town." He was bubbling over
with fun, and was frequently recalled
to the footlights. His cake walk song
with four of the youngest of the
company brought down the house,
which did not ever seem to be satisfied. Miss Olive Moore appeared as
Lord Clanside, made a charming boy
and her acting and singing were
good. She was one of the trio that
sang "Such a Funny Feeling," the
others being Teddie McNamara and
Freddie Heintz. It was the most
popular song and was resung in the
final. Miss Eva Pollard portrayed
Miss Kittie Hetherton, the prima
donna of the Ambiguity Theatre, and
was a real prima donna. Master
Freddie Heintz as chaplain and Master Johnnie Heintz as Shrimp, the
call boy, amused the audience greatly.
The chorus and dancing were excellent and scenery and costumes very
pretty. In fact, "In Town" was a decided success in every way.
Not a Bad Amateur Ad.
"Say, you ought to see the way
they took my stuff—just yelled for it
— ate it up — shouted themselves
hoarse over it—couldn't get enough.
Why there wasn't anything to it;
they went wild over it. And there
were half a dozen professionals out
there in the audience I could see taking notes of my act. I suppose they'll
spring it in the next town they.go to
as their own!"
No, gentle reader, this is not as it
might at first sight appear, a breakfast food proprietor's little con talk.
It is simply what one may expect to
hear fiom some of the society vaudeville artists after the big charity entertainment at the month's end,
whereby the Jubilee Hospital is to be
ever so much richer than it now is.
For the amateurs promise to give
a show that will make the professional Thespians sit up and take decided
notice—and this being so, the professional form of gloating will be duly
adhered to afterwarus.
And it is to be all amateur too! To
bc sure, Manager Jamieson, on behalf
of Messrs. Sullivan & Considine, who
are giving the house, with attaches,
light, orchestra, etc., all in the good
cause, also went the limit, and proffered the services of any of the
week's professionals who might be
desired as assisting performers. The
programme was already long enough,
and good enough, and they were
properly dispensed with. If they
want to pay their dollars at the door
—for it will be $1 to everyone—they
may come and welcome, even if they
do gain many dollars' worth of valuable professional pointers.
Enlightened.
Jones—So you were held up last
night, I saw in the paper.
Johnson—Yes.
Jones—Did the highwayman get all
your money?
Johnson—Yes, even the fifty I had
stowed away in a secret pocket.
Jones—How did hc find it?
Johnson—Oh, he didn't find it.
Jones—But you surely didn't tell
him where it was?
Johnson—No. My wife was with
me, and the smooth villain made her
go through my pockets and turn over
the stuff to him.
Jones—But I thought it was a secret pocket?
Johnson—So did I.
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO J
UNION-MADE
»RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collieries.
New Wellington Coal.
Thebest household coal in the marke   ar
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
WEEK JANUARY 7
The New Grand
SULLIVAN ft CONSIDINE,    ProprUtora.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Frank Muriel
COOMBS AND STOKE,
—IS—
" Tbe Last of the Troops."
Inza and Lorella
The   Greatest   of   all   Comedy
Acrobats.
The KToetsell Family
Novelty Tight Wire Artists.
Clairie Maynard
Prima Donna  Soprano,  in Melodies
old and new.
Geo. F. Keane
Song Illustrator
"The Belle of the Ball."
New Moving Pictures,
"Secret Service."
Prof. M. Nagel's Orchestra.
To  the   Electors   of  Ward   No.   2,
Victoria:
Ladies and Gentlemen:
I beg to offer you my services as
Alderman for the current year and
respectfully solicit your vote and influence.
HARRY M. GRAHAME.
AMATEUR CHAHPIONSHIP
Boxing
Tournament
VANCOUVER ATHLETIC CLUB
VANCOUVER, B. C.
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY  24
The championship and medals will be
presented in each of the following
classes:
Bantam, 105 lbs and under. Feather,
115 lbs. and under. Light, 133 lbs. and
under. Welter, 145 lbs. and under.
Middle, 158 lbs. and under. Heavy, 158
lbs. and over.
General admission 50c, reserved seats
$1.00, Ringside $1.50.
To Club members 50c., 75c. and $1.00.
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE FEELING" DROP
IN AT THE
QARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET.
Nupf Sbd !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
Gloves
Ladies', Gentlemen's
and Children's
Fowne's Dogskin (Ladies),
$1.25 and $1.50.
Silk Lined Antelope  (Men's, $2.00.
Men's Suede, $1.50.
Ladies' Silk Lined Mocca, $2.00.
Dent's   Chevrette   Gloves,
$1.50 and $1.75.
Fowne's Driving Patent Grip, $2.25.
Men's Reindeer, $3.00 and $4.00.
Cadette Gloves, sizes 00 to 7.
$1.00 and $1.25.
Foxe's Patent Puttees, $1.50, $2.25.
E. Chapman
Davis Chambers, Vancouver, B.C.
Sole Agents in B.C. for R. A. Hin-
son's Royal Irish Poplin Ties.
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Large Game Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 35 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
M. j. HENRY'S
NURSERIES and SEED HOUSES
VANCOUVER, B. C
Headquarters for Pacific Coast grown
Garden, Field and Flower Seeds for
Spring planting.
A large stock of home grown Fruit
and Ornamental Trees now matured
for the Spring trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay—and are prepared
to meet all competition.
Let me price your list before placing your order. Greenhouse plants,
floral work, bee supplies, fruit packages, fertilizers, spraying material,
etc.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
Farewell   Engagement,
Commencing
TUESDAY, JAN. 15TH.
50—Clever Juvenile Artists—50.
POLLARD'S LILLIPUTIAN
OPERA COMPANY.
Tuesday   In Town
Wednesday   In Town
Thursday  A Runaway Girl
Friday       Mikado
Saturday (Mat.)   In Town
Saturday    Belle of New York
Prices—Evening,  25c,  50c and 75c;
Matinee, children 25c; adults 50c.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Saturday,
January 12th.
EMPIRE
TYPEWRITER
The Perfect Typewriter should hav
as few parts as possible. In this ag
we avoid complicated machinery, an
simplicity is the rule in mechanic:
engineering if we wish to avoid afte
trouble.
The straight from the shoulder d
rect stroke of the typebar in th'
Empire is absolutely covered by pat
ents, and just here is the great ac
vantage this machine has over a
others.
The Empire is the only
perfect visible writing
machine. It is the only
one made in Canada as
well as in the United
States. The price is
only   	
$6*
In buying an Empire you not onl
secure a stronger and better machir
but you save in the first instance $1.
cash, plus 6 per cent interest on th
for five to ten years, plus the cost c
repairs required by the more compl
cated construction of other m,
chines.
General B. C. Agents, the—
THOMSON
STATIONERY C(l
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
■BaaBH-eBta
L^ita
_jj THE WKKK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907.
BY WIRELESS FROM
THE COAST.
First shot of campaign fired in
Victoria Theatre Monday, Jan. 7.
'Honest John" not in evidence; said
o have "pressing" social obligations
n Delta. Titular chief had icy re-
•.eption. Actual leader did not fizz as
isual. When Macdonald sat down
he cheers could have been heard
three seats away. Mclnnes' reception
blanched Macdonald, who scowled
ind went "as white as a sheet." All
aver by 10:15.   The squib was damp.
* *   *
Latest from Carson, Nevada, announces receipt of invitation to John
Houston from Nelson Liberal Com-
nittee, offering him $1,000 and ex-
senses to go to Nelson and split
Conservative vote in interests of Dr.
Sail. Houston said to have replied
is follows:   "See Proverbs 1:17."
* *   *
At daybreak Tuesday  Capt.  John
irving paddled from Esquimalt Har-
tour in birch canoe bound for Atlin.
Inly cargo blankets and case of
vhiskey. If weather holds good ex-
Lects to reach Skagway before Feb.
Ind.
* *   *
ticket through at the next Provincial
election," is expected to "make good."
Following message received by J.
A. Macdonald at Victoria during
progress of meeting on Monday
night: "Hedley City, Similkameen
Valley. Come over and help us.
Fourteen inches of snow. Temperature 30 below zero. (Signed), Smith
Curtis." "The third night comes a
frost, a killing frost." Adapted to
political reminiscences.
*   *   *
John Oliver sent following wire to
W. B. Mclnnes immediately on the
latter's arrival in Victoria: "Your
assistance in Delta will be highly appreciated. Am encountering difficulties similar to those you met with in
Yukon. If cannot come wire your
recipe.   Am almost distracted."
If
SPORT.
The first match in the Vancouver
Island League will be played at
Ladysmith on Saturday, Jan. 19th.
This will be a match between Egeria
and Ladysmith. On Saturday, 26th
inst., Egeria will meet Victoria United at. Oak Bay, and the selection of
the latter team for that event is al-
Latest despatches from Ottawa an- ready exciting considerable interest
Jounce departure of Sloan, who has in sporting circles. The selection
fired tug to be loaded with whiskey will be made some time next week
or distribution on west coast of
Island, and as far north as Port
limpson. The ex-Klondiker is bringing plans of up-to-date lighthouses,
Ife-boats and a choice sample of
Ihesthuts-
* *   *
Cablegram from London, England,
Innounces formation of powerful
lyndicate with R. W. Perks, M. P., as
president. Prospectus will be in
lands of public on 16th inst. Agent
has reported favourably on all the
Enterprises involved.
* *   *
GREATEST
SALE
Campbells
RECORD
REDUCTIONS
and the committee will have no easy
job, as the material available is excellent, and for several positions
there is more than one claimant of
the highest rank. There are six
teams qualified to contribute players.
After watching all these teams play,
the sporting editor of The Week ventures to suggest the following as thc
strongest combination which can be
put in the field: Goal, Whyte (Y. M.
C. A.). Full-backs, H. A. Goward
and S. Lorimer (Wanderers). Halfbacks: Left, S. G. Thompson (Rovers) ; centre, B. P. Schwengers (Waii-
, ,   ,   derers); right, —. Hill (Y. M. C. A.).
In consequent of -scarcity of juel  Forwards;    ^^ Mereditn  (Rov.
throughout the Northwest and Brit
Ish Columbia, Minister of Mines has
lleclared intention of forwarding
large consignments of coal from
•lova Scotia. C. P. R. has yranted
Special freight rates from byuney, C.
to Vancouver of $25 a ton.
* *   *
Large business being done by ex-
/innipeggers recently arrived at
l/ictoria in fur coats of every description, coon being the most popular.
Prices ranging from one to two hundred dollars each. Local furriers importing sheepskins by carload. The
lldest inhabitant declares this the
[oldest snap ever known here. Old-
|st inhabitant always was a .
* *   *
The      Schumann-Heink      concert
irgely  patronised    by    wealth  and
ers); outside right, E. Todd (Wanderers); inside right, T. Peden (Rovers); outside left, C. Provins (Garrison); inside left, L. S. V. Yorke
(Rovers).
In making this selection it will be
noticed that several men are suggested for positions in which they do
not usually play, but any one who has
watched thc games this season must
realise that Schwengers at centre
would greatly strengthen the halfbacks, and would make room for
Meredith to occupy the position for
which he is best adapted by his
weight and speed. Placing him in
the centre would also solve another
difficulty by giving the outside right
position to Todd, who has been playing a star game and could not possibly be overlooked in the selection.
ashion of Victoria, who crowded thc Meredith   as   inside   right  would   be
lollar and dollar-fifty seats. thrown away, whereas Peden exactly
*   *   * suits the position, and he and Todd
Large consignment of megaphones would make a splendid wing.    If thc
OUR GREATEST JANUARY SALE has wiped out all previous records, but by timely
arrivals of special purchases we will keep you interested throughout January.    Here
are a few more sale snaps showing tremendous reductions   on   excellent  materials in
three departments:
Ladies'
Under*
wear.
N   WHITE   and    natural    wool,
short   and   long    sleeves;    our
regular  standard  dollar line, at
per garment  50c
LADIES' VESTS, only, in white and
natural wool, also in extra quality
pure merino, short and long sleeves;
our standard $1.25 and $1.50 lines, at
one price, per vest  75c
LADIES' CASHMERE HOSE, a
splendid line will be cleared at, per
pair  3SC
ts
CROMPTON'S ERECT FORM,
in white and grey; all sizes;
regular   $1.25 value;   to   clear,
per pair   50c
D. & A. and CROMPTON'S Corsets,
in white and grey; regular $1.50 and
$2.25 value; to clear, per pair....75c
GIRDLES, all   sizes,   in   pink and
blue, to clear, each  50c
LADIES' full fashioned, seamless
Llama Hose, a standard line of exceptional quality; regular 65c value;
will be cleared at, per pair 50c
SEE OUR BEAUTIFU L " Ready-to-wear " GOODS FOR THE BALL.
Angus Campbell & Qo.
THE LHDIES ST0RE.
Promis Block, Government St., Victoria.
Irrivcd on Thursday for use of Lib-
Iral candidates in Victoria and Van-
iouver. They are furnished with po-
ltical orations written at Ottawa and
lung into the machine by star percenters.
*   *   *
Great indignation in Saanich Division among old-time Liberals at
reatment of Tanner, who is general-
positon of centre-forward depended
almost entirely upon shooting ability
there is no doubt that Provins would
be the best man, but he is rather too
light and his fine turn of speed would
furnish him with better opportunities
on the wing. He and Yorke working
together would be as strong as the
right wing combination.   If the above
selection   is   decided
The   Week
considered to have deserved well of ventures to predict that at the end of
lis party. Is regarded as having been the season the cup will rest with thc
facrificed to the machine. Victoria United, in spite of the prow-
*   *   * ess of the    redoubtable   Ladysmith
Among the names most generally team.
lanvassed  for the vacant Governor-  	
Ihip of the Yukon is that of C. H. Notjce is hereby given that there
lugrin,  a stalwart Liberal who has will be offered for sale at public auc-
endered yeoman service to his party, tion at the Lands and Works Depart-
4 j •        n -„r„ „,i .i.»i.. ti,nt  ment, Victoria, on Tuesday, the 22nd
eported in well-informed c.rcles that (,ay ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^
in the forenoon, all that piece or parcel of land situated in the City of
Victoria, Victoria District, containing fifty-six one-hundredths of an
acre, more or less, and forming part
of section numbered sixty-eight (68)
on the official map of the said Victoria District—said parcel being more
particularly described on a plan thereof filed in the Lands and Works Department.
The said land will be offered for
sale subject to a right of way over
the western portion thereof, as shown
on the said plan, and subject also to
a reserve bid.   Terms of sale, cash.
Dated at the Lands and Works Department, Victoria, B. C, this ninth
day of January, 1907.
NEIL F. MacKAY.
Deputy Commissioner of L. & W.
management of Colonist will lib-
Irate him from twenty-five years' engagement he may be induced to ac-
ept. Monster petitions from New
[trunswick and Quebec urging his
appointment have been received at
j)ttawa. In the event of his ulti-
liately accepting, W. C. Wells is
llated for treasurer, and Fred Peters,
C, for legal adviser.
*   *   *
The alcoholic and bucolic political
rimmer who fell upon thc neck of
he Hon. William Templeman after
he latter's election and in a bur«t of
naudlin sentiment declared, "You're
111   right,   Bill,  and   we'll   put   your
MARK THE DISTINCTION
All Rolled Oats Are Not
[HI Rolled Qats
WITHIN RECENT YEARS many brands of Rolled Oats have been introduced
to the public notice, all attempting to emulate the popolarity of B. & K,
ROLLED OATS ;  all have signally failed in their object owing to three
distinct points of difference between B. & K. ROLLED OUTS and all other Rolled
Oats.
FIRST    DISTINCTION     The finest white oats in the world are grown right
~~~~"~""—————————~~   nere Jn Western Cannda.   By their widespread
distribution of Elevators and Mills throughout Western Canada from Edmonton to the
Pacific Coast The Brackman»Ker Milling eompany annually secure the VERY
PI(2K of these finest white oats.
SECOND    DISTINCTION  The B. & K. Milling Process is EN-
    TIRELY distinct and SUPERIOR to any
other process.
THIRD     DISTINCTION   And '•■ 's a Kreat 0,le*     Owing to their unique
~"——~~"~-"■""~~~~~"~~""~"—""""" system of mills, elevators and depots all over
Western Canada, coupled with their system of DAILY DELIVERIES to the Grocery
Stores, B. & K. Rolled Oats are PRESH and SWEET every day, whereas all
oaher oats are often MANY months old before they reach the consumer.
(HT REMEMBER Every
Grocer Sells B.&.K.
ROLLED OHTS. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offlces:
88%  Government Street. .Victoria,  B.C.
Rm. 14, McKinnon Blk. .Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE. .Manager and Editor
Electoral
Reminiscences.
By BOHEMIAN.
At the present moment all the talk
is of politics, and every city, town
and hamlet, to say nothing of isolated
log cabins in this pioneer Province,
is in the turmoil of an electoral campaign. There are men to whom a
political contest is as the breath of
their nostrils, however lymphatic or
dormant they may be at other times,
no sooner does the tocsin of war ring
out its martial note than they emerge
from their habitual quiescence, and
become for the nonce militant and
aggressive.
Such an occasion as this furnishes
a valid excuse for reminiscence, and
in order to be in the fashion I want
to recall a few memorable occasions,
when from the safe vantage-ground
of the Press Gallery, or from behind
the scenes, I witnessed the opening
of historic campaigns. I remember
an old-time contest in a well-known
English constituency, Wolverhampton, when the late Charles Pelham
Villiers, who represented that constituency for nearly fifty years, and
who ere he died was the Father of
the House, waged a three-cornered
fight with W. F. Fryer, a local banker, and the redoubtable "Sammy"
Griffiths, an iron master, and for
many years subsequently, proprietor
and editor of "The Iron and Coal
Trade Review.'' Griffiths was a great
character; hc was a stout, burly, aggressive man, who always wore a
broad-brimmed Quaker hat and was
surcharged with what in England
was called nerve, but on this side of
the water is known as gall. He was
a splendid stump orator, knew how
to talk to thc people in the vernacular, was celebrated for his mother
wit, and had a large fund of humorous anecdotes, many of them of a
questionable character, with which he
regaled the electors.
At an election in the early 'Go's, he
harangued a crowd of at least 50,000
people in the principal square of the
town, which was then known as High
Green, but later, when Queen Victoria visited the town to unveil the
first equestrian statue of Prince Albert, the name was altered to Quecn?s
Square. Most of Griffiths' auditors
on this historic occasion were miners
and iron workers, who received his
sallies of wit with good-humoured
banter, and returned them with volleys of rotten eggs, cabbages, turnips,
potatoes and stones. The hustings
were constructed of lumber, and looked like a huge scaffold, reared about
twelve feet from the ground; there
was a strong hand-rail all round and
thc candidates with their nominators
and friends were provided with seats.
Every candidate was expected to face
thc music; nominating day was a gala
day; all the neighbouring iron works
and mines were closed, and men and
women flocked to see the fun. From
then until election day very little
work was done; money was spent
freely, and thc supply of drink, especially strong ale, was unlimited. Dragooning was a common occurrence
and on election day many a press-
gang was busy at work securing
doubtful voters, making them drunk,
Carrying them off to some quiet spot
where they would be locked up and
kept under guard until the polls were
closed.
The worst time, however, was at
night, whilst the votes were being
counted, or immediately after. At
this time pandemonium reigned; free
fights were taking place at every
street comer. There were no ambu-
|ancs in those days, and the injured
Were driven to the hospital in cabs.
For days afterwards nearly every surgeon in thc town would be kept busy
repairing broken heads and limbs.
Those were certainly "the good old
times," but a little too strenuous for
the men of the twentieth century.
The death-blow to rowdyism and
fighting at election times was administered by the passing of the Ballot
Act.
I recall another lively time in the
late '6o's, when the notorious Dr.
Kenealy, fresh from the fame which
he had acquired in the Tichborne
case, contested the constituency of
Wednesbury against Alexander Brog-
den, a wealthy iron master. Kenealy
was an excitable, irresponsible, fire-
eating Irishman; brilliant, eloquent,
unprincipled and thirsting for glory.
He never stood a ghost of a chance
against his opponent, who was a local
man of influence and popularity.
Probably Dr. Kenealy or rather Mrs.
Kenealy, set the fashion, which afterwards became so general for ladies
to take part in canvassing and other
electioneering work. Mrs. Kenealy
was much younger than her husband.
I rather think she was his second
wife; in any case she was very beautiful, and dressed in the finest style.
Fancy such a lady forty years ago
penetrating the slums and back alleys
of a black country town to solicit the
votes of miners and iron workers.
Needless to say she had a mixed reception; all the same her pluck
gained much support for the doctor,
and some popularity for herself, and
I well remember that on the declaration of the poll, when thc doctor was
defeated by a large majority, there
was a loud shout of "Three cheers
for Mrs. Kenealy," which were heartily given by more than 20,000 people.
And then followed a scene I shall
never forget, an experience for the
lady which must have been as disconcerting as it was intended to be
complimentary. She was carried
from the hustings, hoisted on the
shoulders of three or four men, and
borne round the town in triumph.
She wore a beautiful blue silk dress
which was considerably damaged on
the tour, and for years afterwards
women of Wednesbury treasured a
shred of that dress, and would show
it with pride.
I have only room in this article to
refer to one other occasion, far more
memorable and of greater historic
value than either of the foregoing.
A reference particularly apposite at
thj present moment, when according
to the latest, and I fear, alas, the
most authentic accounts, the most
brilliant statesman if not the greatest
man in the Empire, has closed his
public career and will soon be known
no more. It was in the early '70's
that Mr. Joseph Chamberlain made
his first appearance on a public platform as a Parliamentary candidate.
The meeting was held in Bingley Hall,
Birmingham, an immense structure in
which the annual agricultural shows
have been held for nearly half a century. At that time Mr. Chamberlain
was a pronounced Radical, in fact he
was looked upon as a revolutionist,
and a propagandist of the most pronounced views. With him on the
platform were R. W. Dale, the great
Congregational divine; John Skirrow
Wright, the great Liberal stalwart of
Brummagem; Henry Hartley Fowler
of Wolverhampton, and the Rt. Hon.
W. E. Gladstone. Of course every
one had come to hear Gladstone.
The hall was packed, thc numbers
present being estimated at 30,000. The
chairman had the utmost difficulty in
keeping anything like order; the people were all standing and packed together, In order to prevent accidents, and indeed fatalities, strong
barricades bad been built, and radiated like the spokes of a wheel from
thc platform towards the confines of
thc hall. But these were insufficient,
and the constant swaying of the vast
multitude would cause first one barricade and then another to break with
a crash, when there would be shrieking, struggling and not infrequently
fighting. Major Bond, the chief of
police, an Irishman and an ex-military man, stood on thc edge of the
platform with a small black cane in
his band and a whistle suspended
round his neck. From this vantage-
point hc directed thc operations of
three hundred policemen, who did
their best to control the crowd. Time
and again I saw a person who had
fainted, and again one who had become obstreperous lifted shoulder-
high and rolled out of the hall on the
heads of the people. The floor, which
was of earth, was strewn with sawdust so that the padding of hoofs
made very little sound.
When the chairman called the
meeting to order and asked J. S.
Wright to speak, there were loud
yells of "Gladstone, Gladstone," and
so with each successive speaker; they
were heard reluctantly and impatiently, and all but one abandoned the attempt to deliver the address he had
prepared. Even Mr. Chamberlain for
once was refused a hearing by his
fellow-townsmen, who wanted no one
but Gladstone. After vainly endeavouring to deliver his campaign speech
he judiciously wound up and resumed
his seat. There was, however, one
exception. When the chairman announced Mr. Henry Fowler of Wolverhampton the yells were louder
than ever. Who was Fowler? Who
wanted to hear Fowler? But in those
days Mr. Fowler was a very determined man, with a very determined,
not to say forbidding aspect, and he
stood his ground as bold as Ajax defying the lightning. One minute
passed, two minutes, five minutes and
still Mr. Fowler stood there, and to
use a simile "the band played on."
Then came a slight lull from sheer
exhaustion, and the greatest orator
the Liberal party has possessed since
John Bright and W. E. Gladstone,
raised his superb voice, using his
right hand also with an imperative
gesture. The voice was rich, deep,
musical and had a sympathetic strain.
It caught the ear of that vast assembly; for one moment they listened
out of sheer curiosity, and in that
moment they were lost. Mr. Fowler
had captured them. Without the
slightest interruption 30,000 people
who had been roaring at the other
speakers heard him for ten minutes;
he compressed what would have been
an historic oration into that brief
period and when he sat down was
greeted with thunders of applause.
I regret to say that not for twenty
years afterwards was Mr. Fowler
asked to speak in Birmingham again.
These are the principal incidents
of that memorable evening. Of
course Mr. Gladstone's great speech
followed, but I have no time to deal
with it here; it was simply one of his
unrivalled and unapproachable oratorical triumphs, the impression of
which will forever remain with
BOHEMIAN.
A FABABLE.
James Russell Lowell.
Worn and weary was the prophet,
When he gained the holy hill,
"God   hath   left   the   earth,"   he   murmured;
"Here His presence lingers still.
God of all the olden prophets,
Wilt Thou speak with man no more?
Have I not as truly served Thee
As Thy chosen ones of yore?
Hear me, Guider of my fathers,
Lo! a humble heart is mine.
By Thy meroy, I beseech Thee,
Grant Thy servant but a sign."
Bowing then his head, he listened
For an answer to his prayer.
No loud burst of thunder followed,
Not a murmur cleaved the air.
But the tuft of moss before him
Opened while he waited yet,
And from out the rock's hard bosom
Sprang a tender violet.
"God, I thank Thee," said the prophet,
"Hard of heart and blind was I,
Looking to the holy mountain
For the gift of prophecy,
Had I trusted ln my nature,
And had faith In lowly things,
Thou,    Thyself,    wouldst    then    have
sought me
And set free my spirit wings.
But I looked for signs and wonders
That o'er men should give me sway;
Thirsting to be more than mortal
I was even less than clay.
Ere I entered on my journey,
As I girt my loins to start,
Ran to me my little daughter—
Best beloved of my heart.
In her hand she held a flower,
Like to this ns like may be,
Which beside my very threshold
She had plucked and brought to me."
Shades of Madame Blavatsky.
Under the auspices of the Theoso-
phical society of Victoria there will
be given three stereopticon lectures
by Prof. Heindel of Los Angeles at
the Sir Wm. Mallace Hall Friday,
Saturday and Sunday nights. The
latest discoveries in Occult science in
tracing thc evolution of man will be
shown by colored lantern views
placed on canvass.
**"**
TABLE ART
Take as your background a modern dining-
room in British Columbia; in the centre a dining
table with its pure white cloth relieved by the
delicate designs of Wallace Silverware, flanked
by sparkling wine glasses and tumblers in most
beautiful cut glass, illuminated with the soft glow
from tinted candles gracefully shaded with bead-
work; at each corner sterling silver salt cellars;
at intervals, nestling in Imperial Austrian Vases,
a beautiful gleam of pink roses, and you get
some idea of the art of table decoration. But
you will get a far better idea if you will permit
us to show you our Sterling Silver and Silver-
plate Knives, Forks and Spoons, including Wallace Ware; our fine English Cutlery; our
beautiful Cut Glass; Candlesticks and Candelabra
and also the latest and most fashionable candle
shades. If you live in the country our MAIL
ORDER Department will give you full particulars.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
THE JEWELLERS
47-49 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
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flavouring essences is a guarantee of the ABSOLUTE
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Solid Comfort
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and this may be easily attained by using a
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They are universally known and recognized as
the STANDARD carriage, wagon, sleigh and automobile Heater. 350,000 LEHMAN HEATERS
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Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
Subscribe for the Week THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907
ifipikififififiiififififif
•*te i?
* A Lady's Letter *
Y By BABETTE. ^
ifif^ififitififififipifi
Dear Madge:
A demand note from those who
, sit in the seats of the tax collectors
and the election, together, have
plunged me in the depths of pessimistic reflections. It is manifestly unfair
that woman should not be allowed a
still small voice in the polling booth
when she is considered equal to the
flow of language which constitutes
the average " salve" to the missive
from the receipt of custom. Not that
I am one of those who think the
power to vote should render women
eligible to sit in the House. The
latter would be as ridiculous as the
former is reasonable; and glancing
for a moment at the methods of the
campaign, what thoughtful woman
would wish to stand in the pillory
which is the portion of the aspirant for parliamentary honours during
the election period?
It makes one shiver to think of the
faults and failings which the other
side would rake up from somewhere
—the ghosts of umbrellas which in
all innocency one forgot to restore
would return to brand one as a
thief. The fact that one had been
seen going into the establishment of
a smart coiffeur, would be sufficient
to set the seal of false hair on one's
brow. Imagine being asked by some
tactful knight errant at the close of
a glowing peroration why y^u were
not at home rocking the cradle you
had never possessed, and if not, why
not? And if so, why so? Fancy being given over to the tender mercies of the opposition cartoonist, who
would drag into the utmost publicity
all those disadvantages which for
years you had successfully kept in
the background and travestie your
best points until you would forever
he ashamed to look yourself in the
glass. It does not bear thinking
about, does it? And even if one
could glide into the House without
any unladylike epithets being hurled
at one's head, I should hate to be
kept under lock and key at it were,
and pounced on by some officious
whip just as I was sneaking out for
a little relaxation during a deadly-
dull debate. One might as well be
back at school with no responsibilities and much more fun.
We are being told that everyone is
living beyond his income nowadays,
and that so much is spent on show,
dress, entertaining, motors, diamonds,
and other expensive necessaries (sic)
of this luxurious age that nothing is
left for old age and the rainy day,
while children are out of the calculation altogether. If this be true
—and the indications point that way
—the world is in a fair way of going
to-the "bow-wows." A melancholy
object lesson on the subject was afforded by the English papers some
time ago, when a young Stock Exchange clerk killed himself because
he had been keeping a motor car
and living luxuriously on £175 per
annum. Economy and thrift have
become obsolete virtues in this self-
indulgent generation, mere by-words
to laugh at and pass on. How many
dozens of families do we each of us
know who apparently live well up to
and beyond their means. It certainly, moreover, seems a crying injustice that children should be brought
into the world and no provision made
for them. I have heard men say: "I
made my money; and my children
must do likewise," but in what circumstances! Competition, overcrowding, underselling on every side face
the young man entering life today.
In the good old days of fifty, forty
or even thirty years ago, how much
easier life and living were than now.
Yet he is left to struggle against such
odds because his parents lived up
to the hilt, and in vulgar parlance,
"had a good time." In France, in
Germany, in Sweden, a little is put
by each month, each year, for the
little ones; thc girl has her "dot,"
however modest, the youth has his
little nest-egg with which to start
business and become self-supporting.
Why, then, one asks, should English
and Canadian parents be less generous, less just) than others? It is a
question with which governing powers that be might with more profit
concern themselves than with trying
to deprive the coming generation of
another chief support—the practice
and freedom of religious training.
To turn to a brighter theme it
really does one's heart good to see
the bright, rosy faces of the young
girls boarding the morning and afternoon trains with their skates for an
hour or two's exercise in the keen,
frosty air. The clerk of the weather
has indeed proved himself capable
of gallantry the last week, for seldom have we had the opportunity of
enjoying a week's skating. Everyone is clamouring for skates and for
the benefit of those who wish to
enjoy the fun while it lasts a hint
would be in season to say that Prior
& Co. have in stock the best makes
of skates in all sizes, at reasonable
prices.
I should imagine that there can be
almost no one so utterly devoid of
taste and a sense of the beautiful
that she cannot appreciate old lace,
and there are few of us who can resist buying every scrap we can afford,
but now there is still another relic
of the past for us to pursue; this
new love is for old waistcoats. That
does not somehow sound at first attractive—too suggestive of " David
Copperfield" and the gentleman who
exclaimed so terrifyingly about his
lungs and liver. ' But the waistcoat
I mean are those delightful long-
waisted silk and delicate satin affairs
worn by the gallants of Charles I.
and IL, and the Georges. Somehow
no modern work on silk is quite
the same, and their exquisite colorings are so exactly the thing we seek
as a relief to many of our smart
gowns. These waistcoats are not, as
one might think, unobtainable, for
they are still to be found in many
family boxes stored away with grandmother's laces and brocades in perfect preservation. I often wish I
could rumage in some of the old
chests belonging to people I know,
and be allowed to appropriate to myself a few of their contents.
BABETTE.
An Excellent Choice.
It would have been impossible to
make a better selection for the Nelson Conservative nomination than
John A. Kirkpatrick, and if it had
been known earlier that he could have
been induced to accept no other
names would have been canvassed.
He possesses unique qualifications
for the position, such qualifications
indeed as render a man invincible in
a public contest. He is a pioneer
of his city, a successful business man,
honourable, enlightened, modest, enterprising and genial. He has made
no enemies and in addition to the
straight party vote he will receive
the support of many moderates who
would have voted for the Liberal
candidate if a less admirable man had
been selected for the Conservative
ticket. Beyond all this, however, his
long friendship and personal fidelity
to the interests of John Houston will
ensure the support of every Houston-
ite in Nelson. The party is to be
congratulated on having overcome
Mr. Kirkpatrick's disinclination to
seek public office, and Nelson will undoubtedly be congratulated on February 2nd on having returned one of
thc most reputable of Provincial
members to the local Assembly.
King Edward drank
WHITE ROCK at the
Lord Mayor's banquet
Mayor Morley's
Electoral Address.
Suggested by the Shade ol
W. S. Gilbert.
Amateur Theatricals.
Amateur theatricals are never sufficiently appreciated if- only because
they supply so much amusement of
a character that was not intended.
At a recent performance at Plymouth
of Pygmalion and Galatea the heroine was disgusted. Describing the
event to a friend she said that in that
part where Pygmalion falls on his
knees at the foot of the pedestal and
exclaims in tones of ecstatic adoration, "Ye gods, it lives!" her man
flopped down and said, "My God, it's
alive!" for all the world as though
he was looking at a stuffed rabbit
that had suddenly shown signs oi
animation.
A. J. Morley, Loquitur.
Oh, I am Mayor Morley, I'm a model
of propriety;
I scorn the evil goings-on of everyday society.
The godly League of Citizens, who
cherish your morality,
Are thoroughly determined you shall
give me a plurality.
I don't believe in bashfulness—a species of timidity—
Besides, unless you advertise, you're
branded with stupidity,
And so I hasten to declare with absolute security
That never did a Mayor bear a record
of such purity.
The principle I've acted on is that
the whole electorate
Is anxious for a patronising, fatherly
protectorate.
The City Council isn't quite so diligent and dutiful,
But in a little while I'm sure our
concord will be beautiful.
Opinions   ought   to  all   be   stamped
with perfect uniformity
And I intend to put an end to this
absurd enormity.
Now as to civic questions, while just
now we don't all think alike,
Before I've done my task we shall
not only think but drink alike.
For look around and contemplate a
sad, sad sight—a city full
Of Grottoes cool and bright Brown
Jugs!   Oh, Heavens, it is pitiful!
Why  are  you  not  content  to  taste
plain soda's harmless fizziness?
Oh, surely this should be enough to
tickle up your business.
But if you want some stronger stuff,
there's Elk Lake; its profundity
Produces   wholesome   tadpoles   with
astonishing fecundity,
Some    people    don't    like    tadpoles
(their perversity's satanical!)
And even claim that water should be
free from things botanical.
Instead of looking on it as a culinary
thickening
They claim that this addition to the
liquid is quite sickening!
Perhaps you think nie daring—I admit I'm not meticulous—
But really I consider their contention
is ridiculous,
And  what   I  say  is  right,  is  right;
there isn't any doubt of it;
And what I say is wrong, is wrong;
you simply can't get out of it.
All argument's absurd.   .
How's that?    You say
I'm merely gassing?    Mc?
Excuse my grammar, but I'm shocked!
I almost think you're sassing me!
Confound   you,   won't   you    let   me
speak?    Then rise and sing thej
Gloria,
And  cheer  the  only  Mayor  who  is
worthy of Victoria!
—W. H. S.
"Who carried off the gates of
Gaza?" asked thc superintendent; and
the class of small boys rose to its
feet and denied thc charge with
warmth.
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Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
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Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
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V
10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907
The Conservative Candidates for Victoria City.
H. P. W. BEHNSEN.
Provincial Notes.
Bachelors' Dance.
Victoria and Vancouver are not the
only cities which can enter with vim
into the festivities of Yuletide. The
lads and lassies of Hedley City seem
to have had a good time this Christmas if one may judge from the following paragraph taken from the
Hedley Gazette:
"A dance that was semi-impromptu
—being hurriedly got up—was given
by thc bachelors in Fraternity Hall
last year, on the 28th ult. About 30
or 40 guests were present. This
number permitted greater freedom of
movement and did away with much
of the crowding that detracted from
former dances where the number was
greater than the floor could accommodate with comfort to all concerned. The music was supplied by
Messrs. Rolls, Gibbon and Hill, and
was eminently satisfactory to the
dancers, while the floor was in prime
condition. The committee also had
a bon ton lunch served in thc hall."
Good Advertising Agent.
Every one who knows Princeton
knows C. O. French; he is one of
the pioneers of the principal city of
the Similkameen District, and has
probably staked more mineral claims
than any man. For fifteen years he
has been singing thc praises of thc
valley, and when things looked their
worst four years ago, and the population had dwindled from a thousand
to a little more than a hundred, he
still held his ground and continued
to tell thc outside world what would
happen when the iron horse came
along. That time is rapidly approaching, and Mr. French with many other
old-timers will reap a well-deserved
reward. The following paragraph
from the Similkameen Star will interest all friends of C. O.:
"C. O. French hns been extolling
the Similkameen to Washingtonians
through the medium of thc press. He
points out to them that as soon as
railroad connection is established via
the V., V. & E. and Great Northern
it will be possible to supply them
with a first-class quality of coal at
little more than half what they now
pay for an inferior article. Price of
coal now ranges from $10 to $12 per
ton in Central Washington, which
with reasonable freight rates from
Princeton admits of a saving of quite
50 per cent. Mr. French has already
had many inquiries from prospective
investors regarding Similkameen mineral resources. He goes to Chicago
this week and will offer speculators
and financiers in the Windy City a
sort of Xmas pudding which will
consist of townsite and mineral propositions."
H. B. THOMSON.
HON. R. McBRIDE,
Good Mining Laws.
British Columbia has an ideal mining law, says a Toronto contemporary. It contrasts our law with that'
of Ontario, saying that whereas in
Ontario the lawyers have to settle
every mining title, and whether one
is finally obtained or not is a question of government policy. In British Columbia thc miner does his own
staking and advertising, and only the
courts have a right to say whether
or not his claim is valid. Our mining
laws have long been recognised as at
least as good as any in the world and
a great deal better than most. They
were framed by practical men.
A New Year's Greeting.
Among the many New Year greetings which have appeared in the Provincial press, the best that has come
under the notice of The Week is to
be found in the columns of the Enderby Progress. Few writers could
compress more beautiful sentiment,
lofty thought and human sympathy
into an article of 350 words. It is a
model of literary composition and of
timely utterance; it has found an
echo in many a heart and the Okanagan Valley is to be congratulated
on securing the services of an editor
who can rise to this high level. The
editor of The Week knows him not,
but gladly extends the right hand of
fellowship to a worthy craftsman.
AM). PRED DAVEY-
ments for the necessary work in the
harbour.
The King Edward Dredge.
The expectations and hopes of Victoria are dashed to the ground. After
a year of agitation and an endless
number of promises from the Hon.
William Templeman thc authorities
at Ottawa have finally decided that
the historic dredge is to remain at
New Westminster. Just how this
will inconvenience Victoria neither
troubles Mr. Templeman nor the Dominion Government. It adds one
more to the interminable list of his
broken promises, and drives one
more nail into the coffin of "The Sordid Seven." Presumably the object
of the Dominion Government is the
same in Provincial as in Federal politics, namely, to withhold the rights
of the district until it returns a solid
Liberal ticket. If that is really the
policy there is no chance of the
dredge coming to Victoria, and the
local authorities would do well to
lose no time in making other arrangc-
A New Industry for Victoria.
Another step in the advancement
of the city is evidenced by the rapid
extension of tlie business of Hutchison Bros., electrical and gas engine
experts. This young firm commenced
business less than two years ago with
a machine shop and automobile garage on Broughton street; they soon
found it necessary to add a marine
branch, and a yard on Rock Bay was
procured for the construction and repair of motor launches and small
craft. No fewer than seventeen vessels of various descriptions passed
through their hands last season, and
in order to be prepared for the coming demand another site has been acquired on which thc company is
erecting a complete line of workshops
and offices; the foundations are finished and materials for the superstructures on the spot, and given favourable weather thc new works wil!
be in operation in February.
They consist of a two-storey suite
of offices facing Work street; a large
machine shop behind, in which will
bc installed a number of the most
modern machine tools procurable and
which are now on order, in addition
to thc plant already possessed by the
company,   which   is   practically   new
and of high-class make. In the rear
of the machine shop is a foundry in
which the intricate castings required
for gasoline engines will be made,
and also brass and other alloys. On
the waterfront, commanding a fine
view down the harbour, will be built
a motor-boat garage. This is a want
already much felt by those who possess boats and launches and have not
the facilities for storing them; it is
centrally located' and close to the
Gorge, therefore perfectly sheltered
in all weathers. Boats will be constructed here and a slipway built for
hauling vessel osut of the water.
A special designer for small craft
is being imported from the East. The
automobile branch of the business
will be conducted from the present
central premises; two additional new
cars are on order for the ensuing
season for hire purposes, and with
thc increasing popularity of Victoria
as a summer resort this part of tell
business should prove very lucrative.
The above expansion is the result of
the recent incorporation as a joint
stock company, the officers of which
are: Mr. W. Winterbum, M. L. N.
A., as president, Messrs. D. C. and
R.  Hutchison, managing directors.
Noblesse Oblige.
It is not usual for a party organ to
publish the details of an Opposition
nominating convention. Neither is it
usual for a party organ, when publishing an account of the proceedings
of a nominating convention of its
own party to mutilate the record. In
thc former case if the paper is not
restrained by considerations of delicacy or professional etiquette, and
thinks that it can make political capital by violating the ethics of journalism the first move will undoubtedly
be to make a false report, and then
to comment upon it as if it were correct. In connection with the recent
nominating convention of the Conservative Party in Victoria the Colonist and the Times, although as widely severed as the poles by their political differences, were as closely
united as David and Jonathan in a
common desire to prevent The Week
from receiving any kudos through
the nomination of its editor. The
Colonist bridged the difficulty rather
neatly, and in order to avoid mentioning him at all cooly ignored all
thc unsuccessful candidates, although
they included such a stalwart as H,
D. Helmcken, K. C. It was, however, hardly to be expected that the
Times would be satisfied with merely
ignoring the incident, and so in pursuance of its usual methods it manufactured a vote of 234 for Mr. G. Jay,
and then stated that at the bottom
of the list was the editor of The
Week with 17. This is about as near
to the truth as the Times ever gets.
The singular circumstance being that
since the figures are inaccurate the
one should have been placed more
than a hundred higher than thc actual
vote. The simple fact is that the
editor of The Week not only did not
seek a nomination but was totally
unaware until a few hours before
that such a thing was contemplated,
and in spite of the misrepresentation
of the Times he regards it as one of
the highest compliments he has ever
received that on the spur of the moment he should have received 49
votes in open convention. Such a result affords some little consolation
for the misrepresentation and abuse
which he has received at the hands of
the Victoria Times. Now that the
matter has been brought before the
public in this form, and as reporters
were present, The Week has no hesitation in giving the correct figures to
the public: Thomson, 231; Behnsen,
230; Davey, 138; Jay, 117; Lewis, 98;
Blakemore, 49.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described land*,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 2*4 miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
F. S. E.," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomicaliy
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J. FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
PRIVATE BILLS NOTICE.
The time limited by the Rules of
the House for receiving petitions for
Private Bills will expire on Saturday,
the 16th day of March, 1907.
Bills must be presented to the
House not later than the 28th day of
March, 1907.
Reports from Committees on Private Bills will not be received after
the 4th day of April, 1907.
Dated this 2nd day of January, igo7.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907.
11
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ot specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
Victoria Property is the safest and best
investment to be found m Real Estate on
the PaciEe Coast.   There will be a
BO PER CENT. INCREASE
IN VALUES IN 1907.
Vou cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacOregor Bl*k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
PointGrey
Lands.
Some Choice  Blocks on 4th
and 6th Avenue at
$1,500 to $1,700
an acre.
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
Tel.   1373,
Bsmsmme.mmw.wv&m
Ladies and
Gentlemen
We give yon au opportunity
to buy a nice Xmas Gift at a
low cost. See our line of English Cowhide Travelling Bags,
Rugs, etc., Fancy Vests. We
can make the vests from an
old one and guarantee a fit.
We are making special reductions in all tbese lines,
Peden's
TAILORINT PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
X'XixlXtX.X.X'X'X.X.X'X'X'X'XlX.X.X.XtX.X.X.X.XiX.X
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots.
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E* ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B. C.
******************** *** **|
REAL
ESTATE
F RE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
Victoria Real Estate today is the
best investment in the Province.
Prices advancing rapidly.   I advise immediate investment.
Consult me,
J S. Murray
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
p. o. box 77 phone 1279 I
] [*************************
i
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6% acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, #600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B.C.
■ P. O. Box 739
Victoria, B. C.
Phone 1208
Cables,
"Phoenix   Victoria.'
Codes,
Western Union and
Private.
Loans and Mortgages
Arranged.
The Phoenix
Land - Trust - and - Investment
Association
Acting strictly on commission for the sale and purchase of city and suburban real estate, agricultural,
timber and mineral lands, the promotion of industrial corporations, and all business of a fiduciary
choracter. ,
Rooms 9 and 11 Macgregor Block, corner Vfew and
Broad Streets,
Agents throughout
Canada, United States
& Great Britain.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Have an excellent list of exclusive properties
for sale, including the finest residential sites in
Victoria, Business Blocks, Fruit and Agricultural
Acreage, at bed-rock prices. If you are interested
in real estate in Victoria and Vancouver Island, or
have money to invest you should write for this list.
In all financial transactions we save you money,
We have also some excellent investments in Bank
and Railway Shares.
We Will
Sell
1,000 International Coal 66;,''
2,000 Ramblre Cariboo 29
1,000 Nicola Coal Mines 07
500 B. C Amalgamated     Bid
2,000 Sullivan 08
100 Dominion Copper     6.90
1,000 La Plata Mines 21
500 Denora Mines   12*4
25 Cons. Smelters     145.00
2,000 Diamond Vale 27
If you will buy at prices above
named, we shall be pleased to have
you wire us at our expense.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers.
Drawer 1083. Kelson, B. O.
Ahead In
Service.
We are ahead of all competitors in
our service to customers. Ask anybody who knows and then come
and experience what we mean by
our drug store service. We have
the pleasantest store in town to
trade in.
"Make us prove it."
CYRUS H. BOWES
CHEniST
98 Government St.    ::    Near Yates.
VICTORIA.
Chilliwack
$1,000 will buy 25 acres, l'A miles
from town and close to Ferry;
land easily cleared; birch, alder
and cedar; $300 cash, balance on
long terms.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay Lake and West Arm.
Lake and Elver frontage, We
have large and »mall tract, of
food land anl prices to suit all.
Also several partly improved
ranches. Pun particulars willing*-
17 given.
H. E. CR0AS0AILE &  CO. '
Nelson, B. C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,   .
erected aud repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Ete.
R.W. Hinton     NclSOH. B. C.
Collectors!
I carry an assortment of 400
subjects of
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
Park, also of Northwest Indians,
Mountain and Game Scenes.
PRICE 60c PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest iu Canada. Photo post
cards made from any subject yon
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
Westminster Avenue | assay charges.
and Dufferin Street L ..
Gold      $1.00
88 by  132 feet; brick block on  Silver   1.00
corner;  store and   17 rooms; 8-  Copper   1.25
room house to south and 9-room Lead1  ,. i«
house  in   rear    of  brick  block;   .        " ..............
$31,000;  half  cash;  will  arrange  l*0™   *™
for balance.                                   j Zinc   zoo
Gold and Silver  1.50
AA   n   C            •     C F     t^0^ and Copper    zoo
. U. P. rranCIS CC L0   Gold, Silver and Copper  2.50
Gold, Silver and Lead  2.50
510 Pender Street j        other metals on application.
VANCOUVER, B. C. i A discount allowed to regular customer*.
Subscribe for The Week.
W.B.Smith
35 YATE5 51
PHONE,     892
YMIR l«a ihrlvlnp mining
town, situated 18 "'Heii
south of Nelson in tho rich
mineral diatrlct of Wen Kom.
tenav It is essentially a
Irce-'milllnRCamii, and there
are six stHmp-ml! Is operating
In the vicinity—one of them
(the Ymir) beiiiK the lamest
ln Canada, with ItsfjosiampB
eonsiamly dropping. There
are numerous mines in active
operation In the camp, and
reliable information is always available iu Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B. 6.
G. S. eOLBMnN,
Proprietor.
YMIR enjoys every facility
for mining operations.
Timber and Watorareabiind-
11 tit. Ihe roads and trails are
In good coiidiiion In Ihe
main, and now ones are being opened up. Thero is direct railway communication
with threeBmeltors, all within fifty miles ol lhe town.
Thc climate Is rongenlBl and
cverv necessary and luxury
of lite can be seen ed in tbe
camp and at prices that compare fnviinriilily with those
of anv other distriot.
M 12
TI^E. WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 12, 1907.
FIVE HUNDRED NEW SUITS AND OVERCOATS
AT THE SEMI-READY WARDROBE
Suits, Overcoats,
and Raincoats,
from $12.00 to $30.00
Trousers
from $4.00 to $7.00
B. WILLIAMS & CO.,    Sole Agents for Semi-Ready Tailoring
and "Salem" Shirts        = =        Yates Street, VICTORIA.
ififififififiiifififififif'^
if •§•
if Short Story  if
9$? #
ififififififififipipififif
Two Diplomatic Matchmakers.
By Porter Emerson Browne.
The Boy tossed a pebble into the
dark water before him, and then
watched, discontentedly, the little
rings that pursued one another outward and over outward from the centre of the disturbance. Thc Girl, too,
sat with dark eyes bent thoughtfully
upon the little ripples just below her
dainty, swinging feet.
At length the Boy looked up.
"It isn't so much that I object to
marrying you," he said. "You're a
good sort—too good for any man,"
he continued, magnanimously. "But
I don't like to be driven into it. It
makes a man feel too much like a
kid being dragged to school after a
summer holiday."
The Girl smiled a little. She was
a very pretty girl, and when she
smiled even prettier, for then one
caught a glimpse of the whitest of
teeth framed by the reddest of lips.
And there was a dimple. And these
things she did not realise, which
made them the more irresistible.
The Boy sat watching her. His
eyes roved from the dark, wind-
tossed masses of her hair, gathered
in a heavy knot at the nape of her
neck, to the lithe young figure just
entering into the glories of womanhood, and thence to the small, firm,
sun-browned hands and the idly
swinging feet in their little slippers.
" Do you know, Sue," he said, at
length, judicially, "you have grown
to bc a pretty girl—a very pretty
girl. And you used to be so long-
legged and skinny."
The Girl reddened a little. "Do
you wish mc to bc pleased by your
praise or angered by your condemnation?" she asked. As a matter of
fact, she was a little of both.
"I'd rather you'd be pleased," the
Boy replied. "You're so much nicer
that way." Hc threw another pebble into the water. "I wish they'd
let us alone," he said, returning to
his first topic. "They have no right
to make us marry. We're old enough
to know our own minds."
The Girl nodded.   "Yes," she said.
" There's only one thing to be said
in its favour that I can see," went on
the Boy, "and that is that, if things
should go wrong, we'd have someone
else to blame." He spoke half whimsically, and she so understood it, and
smiled.
The Boy returned to his grievances. "I won't do it," hc cried. "I'll
marry whom and when and how and
where and why I choose!" It was an
ultimatum.
The Girl placed the tips of her little  shoes  together    and eyed them
critically.   " So    shall    I,"    she    declared, positively.
******
The Girl sat on a little bench at
the third tee. Beside her stood the
Boy, fussing with a little handful of
wet sand.
"What did your father say?" he
asked, compressing the sand in one
tanned hand.
"Well," replied the Girl, "at first
he was cross, and said it was too bad
that I couldn't see what was for my
own good. He said that I ought to
respect his judgment, and follow it,
and—he was most unreasonable indeed."
The Boy nodded, sympathetically.
"So was mine," he said, retrospectively. "He called me an opinionated
young idiot," he continued, "and said
that you were a million times too
good for me. Quite possibly he is
right—only that has nothing to do
with it that I can see." He continued to mould the damp sand. "Go
on," he adjured.
The Girl considered. "Then, after
a day or two," she said, "he seemed
to get used to the idea of our not
marrying, and told me that, of
course, if I didn't wish to I needn't—
that there were other good men, and
I could marry one of them when I
got ready,"
The Boy stopped moulding the
sand. He didn't seem to like what
she was saying. But he did not interrupt.
"And then, this morning," she went
on, "he told me that he was very
glad that I had been wise enough to
see,that a marriage with you would
be inadvisable. He didn't say anything against you, understand," she
continued, quickly. "He just said
that he didn't think we'd be suited
to one another."
"A lot he knows about it," sniffed
the Boy, scornfully. "What else did
he say?"
"Nothing, except that I must forget that any idea of marrying you
had ever been advanced, and that hc
was glad that we had all come to our
senses before some terrible mistake
had been made."
" What did you say?" he asked.
"Why, I told him I thought so,
too."
Thc Boy turned quickly. "You
did!" hc cried.
"Why, of course," she replied, resting her dark eyes on his. "I had to,"
she went on, naively. "Hc was doing
just what we wanted him to do,
wasn't he?"
The Boy's face changed. "I suppose so," he admitted, reluctantly,
and fell to kneading the sand again.
"What did your father say?" asked
thc Girl, after a pause.
"Much the same as yours," he answered. "At first he was very cross
about it. But then he said that if we
didn't think we'd be compatible, he
wouldn't insist. And then, just like
your father, he said that, after all, he
had probably been mistaken, and
that now, even if we wanted to mar
ry, he wouldn't give his consent under any circumstances."
The Girl straightened. "Did your
father say that?" she demanded,
quickly,
The Boy nodded.
"Why, so did mine!" she cried,
The Boy sat down beside her upon
the bench. Hand clasped in hand,
elbows upon knees, he remained for
some moments, deep in thought.
Then he turned to her.
"Would it be any use, do you
think?" he asked, at length.
"Would what be any use?" she
questioned.
"To ask their consent," he replied,
slowly.
"But why should we?" she queried.
"You don't want to marry me."
He turned to her impulsively. "I
do!" he cried, and positively.
"But you said "
"Hang what I said!" he declared,
vehemently, illogically—but most naturally. "I do want to marry you,
and I'm going to."
"But," she objected, "I don't "
"Yes, you do!" he interrupted, seizing both her hands in his.
The red blood surged to her
cheeks.   She shook her head.
"Say you do," he commanded.
She looked up. Her dark eyes
caught his grey ones and dwelt there.
Then she nodded, slowly.
"I do," she whispered, so softly
that he scarce heard. But he understood.
And at the club two middle-aged,
well-groomed fathers sat and
chuckled, and chuckled, and chuckled
again; and the waiter who served
them their .champagne quite forgot
the terrible oppression of his responsibilities and began to chuckle too,
for hc was a sociable soul, and, even
though he did not know what the
joke was, he felt sure that it was a
good one, and did homage accordingly.
One middle-aged, well-groomed
father lifted a brimming glass on
high.
"To the bride and the bridegroom!"
he cried.
"Shall we forgive them tomorrow,
or next day?" laughed Father Number One.
"Next day," laughed Father Number Two. "They have been disobedient, most disobedient."
In making his statement to the
Commons, Mr. Churchill described
the Orange Free State as having
been the small model Republic of
the world. He held the Boers had
definitely abandoned their aim of creating a Dutch South Africa, and he
was highly optimistic as to the future. Lord Elgin told the Lords that
hc regretted that owing to the peace
terms the natives were prevented
from having any representation in
the Legislature. He hoped, however, that the Legislature would remedy this later on.
Reviews.
"The Face of Clay," by Horace
Annesley Vachell, is a book which
will appeal to the artistic sense of
those who love the sea and the wind;
those who find peace in the woods
and who discern the mystic charm of
the mighty forest. The scene is laid
in the most exquisitely beautiful <and
restful provinces of Europe, the old
world land of Brittany, where one
can get so far from the murmur of
the madding crowd as to be lost in
the by-ways of life. A land of peasants, of simple life, of elemental
thinking and of primitive occupation;
albeit on the north coast a rugged
land where the fisher-folk ply their
perilous calling, and the great waves
batter the protecting cliffs. For the
artist here is colour as well as life,
and quaint touches, and half-revealed
beauties. The story which the author has developed with this background is original, dramatic and at
times almost painfully realistic. The
face of clay is a mask around which
the interest of the story revolves.
Some chapters are melodramatic and
can hardly be defended in a work
otherwise exquisitely satisfying. The
book will be appreciated by those
who read for style and originality.
The plot is weaker than its presentation, but the teaching rings true and
may be summed up in the heading of
chapter XIII: "Sorrow gives the
accolade." "The Face of Clay," published by John Murray, London; on
sale at the Victoria Book & Stationery Store, Government street, Victoria, B. C.
"The Saint," by Antonio Fogaz-
zaro, is now in its fifth edition and
has created something approaching a
sensation in European literary circles. It is the strom centre of religious and literary debate. One reviewer declares that it is the greatest
religious novel since "John Ingle-
sant," which is high praise indeed.
The Westminster Gazette at the close
of an intelligent criticism declares
that it is epoch making. It is the
third of a series of novels by the
greatest living Italian novelist. Its
interest is derived from the fact that
it treats of that always difficult subject, the relation of the priest and the
woman, and does so in a manner as
admirable and convincing as that
which characterised the treatment of
the same subject in "Via Crucis," and
in a far more enlightened manner
than that resorted to by E. L. Voy-
nich in his great work, "The Gadfly." The central figure in the novel,
Piero Maironi of Brescia, is the son
of Don Franco Maironi, who had incurred the violent displeasure of the
Marchesa Maironi, the grandmother,
with whom he had lived ever since
he had been left an orphan, in consequence of his marriage with a lady
neither wealthy nor noble. He was
killed in the war of 1859 and his wife
did not long survive him. Piero was
then taken charge of by the imperi
ous old lady, who, at her death, left
a large fortune to her young great-
grandson. From that time forward
he was brought up by some Venetian
relations, the Marchese and Marchesa
Scremin. When still very young he
was induced, half against his will, to
marry their daughter, and shortly after their marriage his wife went out
of her mind. Piero now finds himself
in the tragic position of a widower
who, still bound, is exposed to all the
temptations likely to assail a young
hot-blooded man of his age. But his
is no ordinary character. Even at
that early stage of development he
is at heart deeply religious, indeed a
mystic with a strong leaning towards
asceticism. He struggles against
temptations of every kind, and endeavours to lead a useful life in the
public service, no easy matter in the
society to which he belongs by birth
and position. At last, however, he
meets Jeanne Dessalle, a young, fascinating, intellectual and beautiful
married woman, whose marriage has
been a most unhappy one—she is
separated from her husband — and
who is an agnostic. They fall in
love with one another at first sight,
and he becomes the object of the
great absorbing passion of her whole
life. They are about to yield to this
unconquerable feeling when Piero is
called to the bedside of his dying
wife. She has recovered her reason
at the last and wishes to see him.
What they say to each other, the impression made by her purity and
trusting sympathy, her Christian
resignation to her sad fate, and her
holy death, will never fade from his
mind, and bring about a complete revulsion of feeling. While praying in
the little chapel, close to the Asylum,
he has a vision which changes his
whole life and outlook on life. It culminates in a vision of his death in
the habit of a Benedictine monk. At
the same time he hears the words,
ever after the key-note of his being:
"Magister adest ct vocat te." His
passion for Jeanne fades far away, as
it were into a far distant and insignificant past. He gives all his possessions to the poor. He commits
the written record of his vision to
the keeping of a saintly priest, Don
Guiseppe Flores, to whom he had
previously confided, going to him frequently for counsel and ghostly comfort, and then disappears from Bres-
ciam leaving no trace behind him.
Three years are supposed to have
passed since Piero's disappearance
when the present story opens.
The Saint, by Antonio Fogazzaro,
is published by Hodder and Houghton, and is on sale at T. N. Hibben &
Co., Victoria.
The Boston Post retorts upon some
"smart" fellow in the following manner:
"The person who sent us a copy of
the Boston Post with 'Jackass' written ,j
upon the margin, is requested to Inform 1
us at what stable he can be found." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 1907.
13
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 33, Township 8, Range 6, Coast
District, Bulkley Valley.
S. S. ROGERS,  Locator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 2, Township 7, Range 6, Coast
District, Bulkley Valley.
G. A. ROGERS, Locator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12,
NOTICE ls hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
(1) Starting from a post on the S.
boundary ofSec. 70 on the S. shore of
Great Central Lake; thence 40 chains S.;
thence 230 chains E.; thence N. to lake
shore; thence following the shore line
W. to E. boundary of Sec. 70; thence
following the boundary S. and W. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 3, 1906.
(2) Starting at a post on the S. shore
of Great Central Lake, about 2 miles
W. of Thunder Mountain; thence S.
to the N. boundary of Sec. 70; thence
W., following the N. boundary line of
Sec. 70, 100 chains; thence N. to lake
shore; thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 4, 1900.
(3) Commencing at a. post about IY2
miles from Great Central Lake, on the
S. shore of river, entering at the head
of lake on the W. side; thence 80
chains W.; thence 80 chains S.; thence
80 E.; thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 5, 1900.
(4) Commencing on the S. shore of
river entering at head of Central Lake
on the W. at a post by N. E. corner of
No. (3); thence 100 chains E.; thence
40 N.; thence 160 W.; thence 40 S.;
thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 5, 1906.
(6) Commencing   at   post   on   the   E.
shore of Central Lake, about 1%  miles
from   the  head;   thence   40   chains  N;
thence 40 E.;  thence 80 N.;  thence W.
to E. boundary of Sec. 73; thence S. to
lake shore;  thence following the shore
line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1900.
(6) Commencing at a post about 1%
miles from the head of Central Lake,
E. shore, by the initial post of No. (5);
thence 60 chains E.; thence 40 chains
N.; thence 40 E.; thence S. to shore
line; thence following shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 6, 1906.
(7) Commencing at a post on the W.
boundary of Sec. 73, on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence SO chains
W.; thence 80 N.; thence 80 E. to point
of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December C, 190G.
(8) Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. (7) on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains
W.; tnence 80 S.; thence E. to lake
shore; thence following shore line to
W. boundary of Sec. 73; thence N. to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(9) Commencing at a post on tlie E.
shore of the river entering the head of
Central Lake, Clayoquot District, about
5 miles from the head of the lake;
thence 40 chains W.; thence 80 S.;
thence 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence W.
to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(10) Commencing at a post on the N.
side of the E. Fork of the river entering
the head of Central Lake from the N„
about 1% miles from the main river;
thence 80 chains N.; thence SO W.;
thence 80 S.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(11) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10), on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence 80 chains S.; thence SOW.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(12) Commencing at a post by S. E.
corner of No. (10) on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence CO chains E.; thenco 40 N.;
thence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence 100
W.; thence S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(13) Commencing at a post by the
S. E. corner of No. (10), on the E. fork
of the river entering the head of Central Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence
40 S.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 S.; thence
100 W-; thence N. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(14) Situated on the E. fork of the
river entering the head of Central Lake,
commencing at a post about 60 chains
easterly of S. E. corner of No. (10);
thence 100 chains E.; thence SO N.,
thence 60 W.; thence 40 S.; thence 40
W.; thence S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, I9«t>.
(15) Commencing at a post by ti'e
S. W. corner of No. (14), on the E.
fork of the river entering tlie head of
Central Lake; thence 100 chains E.:
thence 80 S.; thence GO W.; thence 40
N.; thence 40 W.; thence N. to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(16) Commencing at a post near the
N. boundary of No. (7), on the river
entering the head of Central Lake, about
2 miles from the lake; thence 40 chains
N ; thence 140 E.; thence 60 S.; thence
W. to E. boundary of Sec. 73; thence
N. and W., following boundary of 73;
thence W. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(17) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Central Lake, about 3 miles
from the head; thence 100 chains W.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to shore line;
thence S. following the shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(18) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Great Central Lake, and lying
S. of Lot 83, about 1% miles E. of S. E.
corner of No. (17); thence 100 chains
S.; thence 80 W.; thence 60 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following shore line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(19) Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of No. (18) on Great Central
Lake S. shore, and lying S. of Lot 83,
Clayoquot District; thence 100 chains
S.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot-District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(20) Commencing about 1 mile W. of
Lot 82, Clayoquot District, at a post on
the S. shore of Great Central Lake,
about 2 % miles E. of N. W. corner post
of No. (19); thence 40 chains S.; thence
120 chains W.; thence N. to shore line;
thence following shore line to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.    Jan.12
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated near
Uamelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, commencing at a post marked G. B. Wadham's N.
W. corner adjoining C. Takada's purchase claim; thence running east *>0
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated  2nd November.  1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS. Locator.
Jan. 6.
VsA
DEPARTMENT  OF  MINES.
COAL MINES REGULATION ACT.
BOARDS  OF EXAMINERS.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated on the
south bank of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked
C. Takada's N. W. corner; thence running east 80 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 80 chains to shore;
thence north along shore to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated 2nd November, 1900.
C. TAKADA. Locator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District,  Vancouver  Island:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post placed
at the north-east corner of Section 28,
Township 18; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
Jan.  5. F. H.  EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing at a post situated at the S.
W. corner of Sectiin 34, Township 18;
thence E. SO chains; thence N. 80
chains; thence W. 80 chains; thence S.
SO. chains. ,
Jan. 6 C. W. MCDONALD.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situated ln
Rupert   District,   Vancouver   Island:
No. 2—Commencing at a post placed
at the N. W. corner of Section 27,
Township 18; thence east SO chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence along
shore line 80 chains, more or less;
thence north 80 chains to place of beginning.
Jan.  5 W. F. BEST.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following constitute the Boards of Examiners for the various Collieries during
the year 1907:—
CUMBERLAND  COLLIERY.
Appointed  by  the  Owners — Charles
Matthews.
Alternates—David Walker, David Nel-
list.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—John Kesley.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Ripley.
Alternates — John Horbury, Daniel
Stewart.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John Kesley, of
Cumberland, B. C.
EXTENSION  COLLIERY.
Appointed    by    the    Owners—James
Sharp.
Alternates—Alex. Bryden, Alex. Shaw.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—W. G. Simpson.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Do-
herty.
Alternates—William Anderson, Benjamin Berto.
All persons interested may obtain full I
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. W. G. Simpson,
of Ladysmith, B. C. '
NANAIMO COLLIERY.
Appointed   by   the   Owners—Thomas
Mills.
Alternates—George Wilkinson, Charles
Graham.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor In
Council—Thomas Budge.
Elected by the Miners—John Carr.
Alternates—Thomas C. Piper, George
Moore.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. Thomas Budge,
of Nanaimo, B. C.
MICHEL COLLIERY.
Appointed    by    the    Owners-rRobert
Strachan.
Alternates—John John, James Derbyshire.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor In
Council—Evan Evans.
Elected by the Miners—Sidney Birt.
Alternates — Joseph    Thomas,    John
Laurenson.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. Evan Evans, of
Michel, B. C.
COAL CREEK COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—David Martin.
Alternates—John Hunt, Henry Miard.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—John McCliment.
Elected by the Miners—W. H. Moore.
Alternates—Charles Webber, Abraham
Brown.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John McCliment,
of Fernie, B. C.
Note.—Alternates act as members of
the Board in the absence of those regularly appointed or elected to act thereon.
Dated this 20th day of December, 190b.
RICHARD McBRIDE,
Dec.22 Minister of Mines.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing
at a post situated at the south-east
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains. ,
JamJ. M.A. MACDONALD.
NOTICE is hereby "given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert. District, Vancouver Island:
5. Commencing at a post placed at
the south-east corner of Section 22,
Township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east 80 chains.
Jan. 5. A. B. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date. I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase in
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the south side
of the Bulkley River: Commencing at a
post located at the N. E. corner of Geo.
A. Petty's land, and marked "D. Petty,
initial post"; thence south SO chains;
thenco east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Jan.  5. D. PETTY.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
No. 3.—Commencing at the N. E. corner of Section 29, Township 18; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence north 80
chains to place of beginning.
Jan. 5 L. S. EATON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. I intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of. Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated ln Rupert District, Vancouver Island:
No. 4.—Commencing at the N. E.
corner of Section 19. Township 18;
thence south to shore line; thence following the coast line 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains to place of beginning.
Jan. 6 „ R. W. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
6. Commencing at a post placed at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 27; thence S. 80 chains;
thence W. 80 chains; thence N. 80
chains; thence E. 80 chains.
Jan. 5. E. A. HALL.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
timber on the following described lands,
situated in Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
7. Commencing at a post situated at
the north-west corner of Section 14.
Township 27; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains;  thence north  SO chains.
Jan. 5. W. G. DICKINSON.
NOTICE_is~herebygive'ipthat7~thlrty
days after date. I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated In Rupert  District.  Vancouver Island:
8. Commencing at a post at the northwest corner of Section 13, Township
27; thence north 40 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Jan.  5. R. McNAUGHTON.
64. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Hubert
Haines' land, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept 10th, 1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British Columbia at its next Session by the Securities Corporation of British Columbia,
Limited, for an Act empowering any
Court of Law or Equity to appoint the
Company, without security, to exercise
the office of executor, or trustee, or
guardian of the estate of any minor, or
committee of the estate of any lunatic
or liquidator of any company or corporation, or Official Administrator under
the " Official Administrators Act," for
any one or more counties In the said
Province, and conferring power on the
said company to accept and execute the
duties of any of the said offices, and
giving the company the right to be
appointed a sole trustee notwithstanding
that but for such Act it would be necessary to appoint more than one trustee,
and enabling the said Courts to direct
that moneys brought or paid into Court
shall be deposited with the Company,
and giving the Company power to
guarantee, by means of policies of Insurance or otherwise, the payment of
money secured by or payable under or
In respect of debenture bonds, debenture stock, contracts, mortgages,
charges, obligations and securities of
any Company or of any authority, supreme, municipal, local or otherwise, or
of any persons whomsoever, whether
corporate or unlncorporate.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day
of December, 1906.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
Solicitors for the said Company.
Jan.  3. 	
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
ten miles from Fort St. James, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E J. M. S. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically west
40 chains; thence astronomically north
40 chains, more or less, to said southwest shore at a point near the head of
what is known as the Big Bay; thence
following said shore in southeasterly direction for about 60 chains; and thence
astronomically south'for about 20 chains
to point of commencement, and containing about 400 acres, more or less.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent
August 30, 1906.
December 8.
on assignment or assignments all or
any of such liabilities.
NOTIOB to hereby given thit 40 dam
atter date, I intend to apply to tbe Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Work* (or
permission to purchase tlie following land.
adjoining Lot 487 on Portland Canal:
Starting from a post marked "W. P. v.
N. W. Corner"; thence 20 chains south;
thence 40 chains east; tbence 40 chalna
north; thence 40 chalna, more or leaa, weat
to shore line; thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement, containing
120 acres, more or less.
W. P. "TLB-WIN.
November 17, 1806.
NOTICE Is hereby given tha.t 60 daya
after date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of -Lands and Worka for
permission to purchase the following land,
situate on Observatory Inlet, adjoining
Lot 478: Starting from a post inarked
"W. G. P'a. 3. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chains; thence east 30 chains; thence
south 20 chains, more or less, to shore
line; thence along the shore line westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
acres, more or less.
W. G. PINDER.
November 17, 1806.
NOTICE) la hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date we Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated near Graveyard
Point, commencing at a post on the North
bank of tbe Skeena river, thence In a
westerly direction 40 ohaina; thence north*
erly 40 chains; thence easterly 40 chains;
thence southerly 40 chains along bank of
river to point of commencement, contain*
lax 160 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1806.
■B.  EBY AND &  McKENZIE,
Locators. '
November 17, 1806.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty (60)
uays after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
the North bank of the Skeena river; thenee
in a westerly direction 40 chains; thencs
southerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence northerly 40 chains alone
bank of river to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or leaa.
Located October 16, 1806.
H. McKBNZIB, Locator.
S.   McKENZIE,    Agent.
November 17, 1906.
LICENSE  TO  AN  EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty
days after date. I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase in
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the north side
of tho Bulkley River: Commencing at
a post located about 60 chains east of
the N. E. corner of Lot 9, and marked
"Geo. A. Petty, Initial post"; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence SO
chains east to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
Jan.   6. GEO.  A.   PETTY.
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 370.
THIS is to certify that the "National Drug and Chemical Company
of Canada, Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to which the Legislative authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate in the City of Montreal, in
the Province of Quebec.
Thc amount of the capital of the
Company is six million dollars, divided into sixty thousand shares of
one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Vancouver,
and William Henderson, Druggist,
whose address is Vancouver, is the
attorney for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office, at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this third day of January, one thousand nine hundred and
seven.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which thc Company has been established and licensed are:
To manufacture, import, purchase,
sell and deal in drugs, chemicals,
medicines, alcohol, paints, oils, dye
stuffs, glassware, toilet articles, tobaccos, liquors, cigars, stationery,
fancy goods, perfumeries, surgical
apparatus, physicians' and hospital
supplies, bottles, jars, cans, boxes,
containers, labels and other similar or
kindred articles and druggists' and
general store sundries and supplies
and articles entering into thc composition thereof; and for the said
purposes to acquire and take over as
going concerns the undertakings of
any persons, firms or corporations
engaged in any such business and all
or any portion or portions of thc
assets and liabilities of said persons,
firms or corporations; and to acquire
and hold stock in any other corporations carrying on any such business
or operations and to use the funds
of this Corporation in the purchase
thereof, and to assume and pay thc
whole or any portion or portions of
the liabilities of such other corporation, and if deemed advisable, to take
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date I fntend to apply to tha
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
tihe North bank of the Skeena river; thencs
ln a westerly direction 40 ohaina; thence
northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence southerly 40 chains following bank of river to point of commencement, containing 16u acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1806.
G. B. BAILLIB, Locator.
B. BBY,   Agent.
November 17, 1808.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, marked *'E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away qimber from lthe following described land, situated at Kum-ea-lon Inlet, Skeena District: Commencing at
a stake marked "W. R. F.'s Initial
Post," planted near shore of Inlet,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 60
chains, thence south 100 chains, thence
west 40 chains to shore line, thence
westerly alon gshore line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R FLEWIN.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands:
Commencing at a stake marked "G. A.
B. No. 1," planted on the east bank of
Mammon River, thence north 180
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on the east bank
of Marmon River, Graham Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G. A.
B.'s No. 2 Claim; thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, beginning at a post situate
at tbe mouth of Kitsonschultz River, on
the north bank of the Skeena River,
marked "S. W. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
Timber Claim;" thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 160 chains to point
of beginning.
Dated Novcr 17th, too6.
WILFRED LOISELLE, Locator.
December 8. 14
THE WEEK  SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range 6, Poudrier Survey; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to a point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 18,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of Section 8, Township 12, Range 6, of said
survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1006.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17,
Township 10, Range 6, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 17 of said
survey,
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitssumkalum Valley commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck. S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 100 acres more or less.
Located 26th October,  1906.
C. W. PECK. Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
land situated on the south bank o*. the
Skeena River adjoining H. A. Drapers
preemption claim, south boundary line,
at a post marked M. V. Wadham's N.
W. corner post, thence east 40 chains,
thence south 40 chains, thence west to
bank of river, following the river bank
north to post of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres,
more or less.
Located 26th October. 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS, Locator.
H. DRAPER. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M. Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October 26th.  1906.
D. M. MOORE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated In
the Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing
at a post planted at the S. W. corner
of D. Menard's purchase claim marked
D. Curther's S. E. corner, thence running 40 chains west, thence 40 chains
north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J. CURTHERS,  Locator.
D. MENARD. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to me
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands,
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted
on the north boundary, about 20 chains
west of the northeast corner of application No. 7, on the east bank of the
Kaowinch River; thence east 20 chains;
north 160 chains; west 40 chains; south
160 chains; east 20 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH,
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1906.
Jan. 5
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from tlie following
described lands:
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
at the west side of inlte at the crossing of the south line of lease 33, thence
following the shore o... mile south;
thence 30 chains west; thenee SO chains
north; thence SO chains, more or less,
to point of commencement.  .
CHARLES WATKINS,
J. DORSEY. Agent.
Jan. 5
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to the
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a speclnl license to cut
and carry awny timber from the following described lands:
No. 34. Commencing at a post at the
of the north fork of the Managunm
northwest corner of claim No. 25, north
River, New Westminster district; thence
west '0 ohains; north 160 chains, east
40 chains; south 160 chains to point of
commencement.
C. T, DUNBAR.
J. McShane, Agent.
Jan. 5
No. 289.
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   BEQISTBA-
TION OF AN EXTBA-FBOTIHCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
I hereby certify thnt the " Henry
Swart Lumber Company" has this day
been registered ns an Extra-Provincial
Compnny under the "Companies Act,
1897." to carry out or effect all or any
of thc objects of thc Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legis
lature of British Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
sltunte In the City of Marinette. County
of Marinette nnd Stnte of Wisconsin.
The amount of the capital of the
Companv ls one hundred thousand dollars, divided Into one thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company In
this Province Is situate at 34 1-2 Government Street. Victoria, and James
Hill Lawson, Junior, barrister-at-law,
whose address is the same. Is the attorney for the Company. Not empow
ered to Issue and transfer stock.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal   of
office at Victoria. Province of British
Columbia, this 20th day of December,
one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  six.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
To buy. manufacture and sell logs,
timber, lumber and all kinds of forest
products and for that purpose to improve streams, obtain franchises thereon for the floating of logs, lumber and
other forest products, and owning and
maintaining logging railroads, sawmills, machine shops, docks, wharves,
tugs, boats, vessels and other plants
necessary and convenient for the purpose of carrying on the logging and
timber operations of said corporation;
to iwn, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
timber lands, mining lands, farm lands,
buildings and real estate ln general;
to mine, smelt, quarry and prospect for
minerals and mineral products and to
purchase, produce, manufacture, sell
and distribute the same; to purchase
and sell and deal generally at wholesale or retail in all goods, wares and
merchandise and lumbermen's and
miners' supplies, tools, implements and
other outfits and equipments; to generally do, carry on and conduct any
and all matters and things connected
with or incidental and appurtenant to
the foregoing business and purposes,
or any part thereof.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham island, Queen Charlotte Group:
Commenging at a post planted in the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. E.,
N. E. corner"; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated  November  7th,  1906.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2% miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "R. S.
C," placed at the north-east corner of
lot 331; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically east
SO chains; thence astronomically south
SO chains; thence astronomically west
SO cnains, and thence astronomically
north 40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or  less.
ROBERT SENIOR,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August   24,   1906.
December 8.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands, and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more
or less
Located 26th October, 1906.
W. BRUCE, Locator.
D. MENARD, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
tho Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotltiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H, S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
L    Located Oct.  1st,  1906.
L. S. HUTCHESON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L. L. Watson, thence running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham's purchase claim, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON, Locator.
„      „ F.W,      HIitilt, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase thc
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chnins north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
soutli to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located20th•Oct.. HOU.
E, A. WADHAMS, Locator.
F. W.  BOHLER, Agent.
Ucc. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days from date we intend to npply to
Iho Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchnse
tlie following described lnnds in the
Nechaco  Vnlley, Coast District:
I. Commencing at a post planted nt
tho north-east corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
tiience soutli SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
cast SO chains, to point of commencement, nnd being said section 25 of snld
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4 P.oudrler Survey;
tiience east SO chnins. thence south SO
chnins; tiience west SO chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY,
A.  T.  Clark, Agenf.
August 6th, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, sixty dnys from
date. I Intend to npply tn the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, commencing nt a nost
plnnted on the bnnk of the Skeenn River
two nnd a half miles below Kltwangat,
at the N. W. corner of A. K. Price's
purchnse claim; thence S. 22 chains,
more or less, to tbe S. W. corner of
A. E. Price's purchase clnim; thence
W. 40 chnins to tlie S. E. corner of
Elizabeth Price's purchnse claim;
thence N. 31 cbnlns, more or less, to
tho Skeenn River, eontnlulng 100 ncres
more  or  leas.
F.  PRICE.
A.  W.  Hnrvey,  Agent.
Dec.   15.
.NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days i.ii0> after date, I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
.Lands and Works, Victoria, B.C., for
permission to purchase the south-west
quarter of Section Twenty-three (23),
Township Eight (8), Range Five (5.,
Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres,  more  or  less.
H. E. WILDMAN.
1st December, 1906. Dec. 15.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," thence running west 8o chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1006.
R. BRAUN.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 5th, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
7. Commencing at a jost planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October.
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the Indian Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.: thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by tbe N. E
bo '-rv  net of the  Indian Reserve
a"d at the S. E. corner of No. t;
*i.„„r. "o chains N.; thence F. t^ W.
boundary of Lot 7Q_: thence S. to shore
line; thence following the shore to E.
hnnnrlary of T. R.; thence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1006.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. no29
Two locals were discussing the
Rugby match at Swansea, and one
remarked that the Taffies lost because most of their players were too
old.
"Look at the Springboks!" hc exclaimed. "Hardly a man of them
has reached the age of maternity."
"Waiter! What's the Gorgonzola
like? Good?" and he eyed it suspiciously from a distance.
"Unapproachable, sir."
Nothing doing.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
. R. BRAUN.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 15,
Township 10, Range Si Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 1$
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section I,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1006.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of • Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 0,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-
vev. thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement, and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being ciid Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
.vugut 6th, 1906.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains: 'nence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence -orth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and being said Section 5
of said sttrvev.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1006.
17- Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section if,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey: thence north 80 chains; tkence
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1006.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of   Section   7,']
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east 1
80 chains; thence   south    80   chains;'
thence west 80 chains to point of com-!
mencement, and being said Section 7 of1
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Dark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted atj
the south-east corner of Section 12, J
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-1
vey; thence north 80 chains; thence!
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tnence east 80 chains to point of com- I
mencement, and being said Section 12 I
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1006.
23. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 11,
Township n, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-J
vey; thence south 80 chains; thence east J,
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section II;
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August ioth, 1906.
NOTTCE is hereby given that sixty,
days after date I intend to applv to the'
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about four miles above
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' north-1
west corner, and marked "N. M. J.s' N.I
W. Corner." thence running south 80
chains: thence east 80 chains: thence
north 80 chains: thence west 80 chains;
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands ane*
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lands, Range V.
Skeena River District, about 1 milt
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on thc!
South-west comer, marked A. O. Cunningham's S. W. Corner, thence North;
40 (forty) chains( thence East 4c!
(forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty),
chains to Little's Southwest corner,';
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to point i
of commencement, and containing 16c
(one hundred and sixty) acres more ot
less.
Located October ist, 1006.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM. Locator|
S. C WEEKS, 4*\gent
NOTICE is hereby given that sixr*:
days after date I intend to apply to th«|
Chief Commissioner of Land am';
Works for permission to purchase th*'
following described land: Commencin'!
at a post planted on the left bank 0 ;
Skeena River, about 31/9 miles abov{
the Lakelse River, and joining Johi!
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marke*]
"L W. S.'s Northwest Corner," anrj
running south 80 chains; thence east 8*
chains; therce north 80 chains, more oil
less, to lefl bank of Skeena River"
thence westwardly along Skeena Rive
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E BATEMAN, Agent.
.M.-.-.-.M.H THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 12, 1907.
15
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
lays after date 1 intend to apply to the
llonorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half way between Pinchi
and Tac'ier Rivers and about 3lA miles
inland in the Coast Distritc qf the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary
of Walter J. Friedlander's purchase,
about 40 chains from the northeast corner; thence astronomically north 80
chains^ thence astronomically east 80
chains} thence astronomically south 80
chains, and thence astronomically west
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
nine miles from Fort St. Jmes, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. N. E.," and
placed about io chains west from the
lake shore, thence astronomically west
80 chains; thence astronomically south
40 chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains, thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically west 40
chains; thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomiclly north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomically north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 30, 1906. December 8
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Timber Licence No. 8661, at the north end of
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminster
District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to the shore; thence following the shore to the point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
near the shore on the east side of
Agamennon Channel, New Westminster
District, thence E. about 60 chains;
thence N. to the S. boundary of No. 2
claim, at the N. end of Sechelt Peninsula ; thence E. about 60 chains to shore
of Long Lake; thence following the
shore southerly about 100 chains ,* thence
W. to shore; thence following the shore
to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a post at N.W.
corner of Lot 672, N. end of Sechelt
Peninsula, New Westminster District;
thence N. 40 chains; W. 80 chains to the
shore; thence S. following the east
boundary of T. L. 8661 to S.E. corner
ihereof; thence E. 40 chains to S.W.
corner of Lot 672; thence N. 40 chains
to lake; thence following the lake shore
easterly and northerly to point of commencement.
M. GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
1 NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
[days after date, I intend to apply to
,the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet into Effingham Inlet, Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence t6o chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence  100 chains N.; thence
|8o W., along boundary No. 2; thence
|6o S.; thence 40  E.;  thence 40 S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4.   Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of thp
S.  E. corner  of  No. 3;  thence  100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. bound
ary of No. 3;  thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.J thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
vv. tu point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6: thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1006.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
thence 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st. 1006.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
tiience oo chains west; tiience 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 souti; thence
east to the waterfront, thence following
the shore line to point of commencement.
C. LUTKIN,
W. B. Gi»kRR4\RD. Ag eat
Oct. 27th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
40 chains west; thence south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'ii,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east cofner of Section 117,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of said
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1506.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Laads
and Works for a special license to cat
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner poet of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the land* covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 39th, 1906.
00. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-west coiner 01 J. A. xiarvey s
land; tnence norm 00 cuaiiis; tnence
west do cnains; tiience south bo cnains;
tnence east Ho chains 10 pouu ot coiu-
uieucunent
HARRIET NELSUN,
G. H. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 190b.
Oi. Commencing at a ; >st planted at
the north-west comer of J. A. Harvey's
laud; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 80 chains; tiience south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement.
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett s
laud; theuce north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; ihence east 80 chains;
theuce south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson. Agent
September ioth, 1906.
6c. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
a B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east, thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 8b
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains: thence west 80
chains: thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commis-: f Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chains
west and 20 south ofsoufheast boundary
post of Lot 658: thence 80 chains west:
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to point of commencement.
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date T intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.!
Commencing at a post by the shore of j
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658: thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
6g: thence east to Alberni Canal: ihencr*
following the shore line to point of commencement.
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1006.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry awav timber from t'*e followirg
described lands, in Alberni District:   5.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north So chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west So chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September loth, 1906.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
thc north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north So chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark. Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So il.'.ms; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E. L. Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 8a
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank of
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or less.
MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, 4*\gent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence fast 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 13th, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence uorth 80 clmiis; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range s. Poudrier survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshm 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement ; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
73. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
ithe Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey* thence south 80 chains; thence east
3o chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Towa-
ship 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite tlie south-west
corner nf Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence soulh 80 chains, thence
cast 80 chain1!, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River: 'hence followinp
hank of said river to point of com-
mencement; 640 acres, rrore or less.'
EDGAR I.. BLAKE.
A. T. Dark, Agent.
September 12th, igo6.
Located July ll't-U.  1U06.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence tbence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that Oo days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
the Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to thc south-east corner of Lot 9,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
December 1, 1906.
e. f. g. McGregor.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9. Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence soutli 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 9, thence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains more or les** to
the Haewilghet River, thence following
the river in a westerly direction to the
point of commencement, con'aini-g fo
acres more or less.
December 1, ro^fi.
G. P. ROBERTS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described hind on the right
hank of thc Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, Initial
post," at the N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
cast 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1906. Dec.15
TAKE NOTICE that. 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission t'o purchase the following described lands, situated on
the left bank* of the Skeena River,
M)Otit one mile below the Little
Canon and commencing at Ed, Midland's N.E. corner post on thc hank
of the Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
thence 1*? 40 chnins; thence N, 42
chain*;, more or less, to Sousic's S.
boundary; thence W. 38 chains, more
or less, to the Skeena River; tiience
\? 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N, GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dec.15 U
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1907.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range 6, Poudrier Survey; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to a point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 18,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
West 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of Section 8, Township 12, Range 5, of said
survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1006.
4.  ■  -
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17,
Township 10, Range 6, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 17 of said
survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitssumkalum Valley commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck. S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains easl, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
C. W. PECK. Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
land situated on the south bank of the
Skeena River adjoining H. A. Draper's
preemption claim, south boundary line,
at a post marked M. V. Wadham's N.
W. corner post, thence east 40 chains,
thence south 40 chains, thence west to
bank of river, following the river bank
north to post of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres,
more or lt-ss.
Located 26th October. 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS, Locator.
H. DRAPER. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M. Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
Bouth to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October 26th.  1906.
D. M. MOORE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in
the Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing
at a post planted at the S. W. corner
of D. Menard's purchase claim marked
D. Curther's S. E. corner, thence running 40 chains west, thence 40 chains
north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J.  CURTHERS,  Locator.
D. MENARD. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to iue
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands,
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted
on the north boundary, about 20 chains
west of the northeast corner of application No. 7, on the east bank of the
Kaowinch River; thence east 20 chains;
north 160 chains; west 40 chains; south
160 chains; east 20 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH,
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1906.
Jan. 5
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following
described  lands:
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
at the west side of lake at tl 3 crossing of the south line of lease 33, thence
following the shore o... nine south;
thence SO chains west; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement.  .
CHARLES WATKINS,
J. DORSEY. Agent.
Jan. 5
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to the
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a spe'clal license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands:
No. 34. Commencing at a post at the
of the north fork of the Managuum
northwest corner of claim wo. 25, north
River, New Westminster district; thence
west 40 chains; north 160 chains, east
40 chains; south 160 chains to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
J. McShane, Agent.
Jan. 5
No. 289.
CERTIFICATE    OF   THE    BEOISTBA-
TION OF AH EXTBA-PBOVIZrCIAX.
COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
I hereby certify that the "Henry
Swart Lumber Compnny " has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the " Companies Act,
1897." to carry out or effect all or any
of thc objects of the Company to whicli
the legislative authority of the Legis.
lature of British Columbia extends.
The head ofllce of the Company Is
Situate In the City of Marinette. County
of Marinette and State of Wisconsin.
The amount of the capital of the
Company Is one hundred thousand dollars, divided Into one thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company ln
this Province ls situate at 34 1-2 Government Street. Victoria, and James
Hill Lawson, Junior, barrlster-at-law,
whose address Is the same, is the attorney for the Company. Not empowered to Issue and transfer stock.
Given   under  my  hand  and   seal   of
office at Victoria.  Province of British
Columbia,  this  20th  day  of December,
one thousand nine hundred and six.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
To buy. manufacture and sell logs,
timber, lumber and all kinds of forest
products and for that purpose to improve streams, obtain franchises thereon for the floating of logs, lumber and
other forest products, and owning and
maintaining logging railroads, sawmills, machine shops, docks, wharves,
tugs, boats, vessels and other plants
necessary and convenient for the purpose of carrying on the logging and
timber operations of said corporation;
to iwn, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
timber lands, mining lands, farm lands,
buildings and real estate in general;
to mine, smelt, quarry and prospect for
minerals and mineral products and to
purchase, produce, manufacture, sell
and distribute the same; to purchase
and sell and deal generally at wholesale or retail in all goods, wares and
merchandise and lumbermen's and
miners' supplies, tools, implements and
other outfits and equipments; to generally do, carry on and conduct any
and all matters and things connected
with or incidental and appurtenant to
the foregoing business and purposes,
or any part thereof,
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner or Lands
and Works for a special licence to cul
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Group:
Commenglng at a post planted in the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. E.,
N. E. corner"; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated November  7th,  1906.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about five miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thence
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands, and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated In the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more
or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
W. BRUCE, Locator.
D. MENARD, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
tho Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
1110 acres more or less.
L   Located Oct.  1st,  1906.
L. S. HUTCHESON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L. L. Watson, thence running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham's purchase claim, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON, Locator.
I*. W,      HLElt, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Brace's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
10 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 20th-Oct.. liOli.
E. A. WADHAMS, Locator.
F, W.  BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty
days from date we Intend to apply to
lhe Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described lands in the
Nechaco Valley,  Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
tho north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south SO chains: thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east SO chains, to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4 P.oudrler Survey;
thence east SO chains, thence south SO
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north SO chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY,
A.  T.  Clark,  Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, sixty days from
date, I Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, commencing at a post
planted on the bnnk of the Skeena River
two and a half miles below Kltwangat.
at the N. W. corner of A. K. Price's
purchase claim; thence S. 22 cnains.
more or less, to tlie S. W. comer of
A. E. Price's purchase claim; thence
W. 40 chains to the S. E. corner of
Elizabeth Trice's purchase claim;
thence N. ,11 chains, more nr less, to
tho Skeena River, containing 100 aeres
more  or  leas.
F. PRICE.
A. W. Harvey, Agent.
Dec.   15.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2% miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, In the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked " R. S.
C," placed at the north-east corner of
lot 331; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thence astronomically east
SO chains; thence astronomically south
SO chains; thence astronomically west
SO cnains, and thence astronomically
north 40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT SENIOR,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August   24,   1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days 1,60) after date, 1 intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner ol
Lands and Works, Victoria, B.C., for
permission to purchase the south-west
quarter of Section Twenty-three (23),
Township Eight (8), Range Five (5.,
Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres,  more  or  less.
H. E. WILDMAN.
1st December, 1906. Dec. 15.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August sth, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a 1 ost planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Surrey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, igo6.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October.
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands*.
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the Indian Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the N. E
boi"-"'**n* no't of the Indian Reserve
a>id at the S. E. corner of No. t:
,i,.„,*-. "o chains N.; thence F. t^ W.
boundary of Lot 79: thence S. to shore
line: thence following the shore to E.
boundary of I. R.; tnence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1006.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. no29
Two locals were discussing the
Rugby match at Swansea, and one
remarked that the Taffies lost because most of their players were too
old.
"Look at the Springboks!" hc exclaimed. "Hardly a man of them
has reached the age of maternity."
"Waiter! What's the Gorgonzola
like? Good?" and he eyed it suspiciously from a distance.
"Unapproachable, sir."
Nothing doing.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on tbe southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chain: to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September 1st, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains.
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of ■ Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35,
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 9,
Township io, Range 5. Poudrier Survey, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement, and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being tiid Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Dark, .-\gent
.vugut 6th, 1906.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10, Range Si Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains: Mence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence -orth 60 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and beine said Section 5
of said stirvev.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1006.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section if,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; tiience
west 80 choins; thence soath 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section I**,
Township 10, Range 5. Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 1,
Township 11, Range S, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section J,
Township 10, Range S, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 7 ol
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted al
the south-east corner of Section 12
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur*
vey; thence north 80 chains; thena
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
tnence east 80 chains to point of com*
mencement, and being said Section li
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1006.
23. Commencing at a post planted a
the north-west corner of Section 11
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sur
vey; thence south 80chains; thence eat
80 chains; thence north 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of com
mencement, and being said Section 1:
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August ioth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixt;
days after date I intend to applv to thi
Chief Commissioner of Land am
Works for permission to purchase thi
following described land: Commencini
at a post planted on the left bank o
Skeena River, about four miles abov
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' north
west corner, and marked "N. M. J.s' N
W. Corner." thence running south 8
chains: thence east 80 chains: thenc
north 80 chains: thence west 80 chain
to point of commencement, containini
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Notice is hereby given that sixty daj
after date I intend to apply to th
Chief Commissioner of Lands an
Works for permission to purchase th
following described lands, Range V
Skeena River District, about 1 mil
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on th
South-west comer, marked A. O. Cut
ningham's S. W. Corner, thence Nort
40 (forty) chains( thence East 4
(forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty
chains to Little's Southwest cornei
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to poii
of commencement, and containing 16
(one hundred and sixty) acres more c
less.
Located October ist, 1906.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM. Locato
S. C WEEKS, Agent
NOTTCE is hereby given that sixl
days after date I intend to apply to tli
Chief Commissioner of Land an
Works for permission to purchase tl
following described Und: Commenciti
at a post planted on the left bank <
Skeena River, about 3V9 miles aboi
the Lakelse River, and joining Joli
Neidhart's northeast corner, and markc
"L W. S.'s Northwest Corner," ar
running south 80 chains; tnence east i
chains; therce north 80 chains, more <
less, to lefl bank of Skeena Rivei
thence westwardly along Skeena Rivi
to point of commencement, containir
640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
H-.-.--HI THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 12, 1907.
15
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half way between Pinchi
and Tac'ier Rivers and about 3l/i miles
inland in the Coast Distritc qf the
Province of British Columbia, viz.;
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.
S. W.," placed near the north boundary
of Walter J. Friedlander's purchase,
about 40 chains from the northeast corner; thence astronomically north (Jo
chains] thence astronomically east 80
chains; thence astronomically south 80
chains, and thence astronomically west
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situate on the
southwest shore of Stuart Lake, about
nine miles from Fort St. Jmes, in the
Coast District of the Province of British Columbia, viz.: Commencing at a
post marked "E. J. M. N. E.," and
placed about 10 chains west from the
lake shore, thence astronomically west
80 chains; thence astronomically soutli
40 chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains, thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically west 40
chains; thence astronomically south 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomiclly north 40
chains; thence astronomically east 40
chains; thence astronomically north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
J. A. Hickey, Agent
August 30, 1906. December 8
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Timber Licence No. 8661, at the north end of
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminster
District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to the shore; thence following the shore to the point of commencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post planted
near the shore on the east side of
Agamennon Channel, New Westminster
District, thence E. about 60 chains;
thence N. to the S. boundary of No. 2
claim, at the N. end of Sechelt Peninsula ; thence E. about 60 chains to shore
of Long Lake; thence following the
shore southerly about ioo chains; thence
W. to shore; thence following the shore
to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a post at N.W.
corner of Lot 672, N. end of Sechelt
Peninsula, New Westminster District;
thence N. 40 chains; W. 80 chains to the
shore; thence S. following the east
boundary of T. L. 8661 to S.E. corner
thereof; thence E. 40 chains to S.W.
corner of Lot 672; thence N. 40 chains
to lake; thence following the lake shore
easterly and northerly to point of commencement.
M. GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
vv. to point oi commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th. iqo6.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
W.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, IQ06.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
tnence 80 E.; thence 80 N.; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st. 1006.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
thence oo chains west; thence 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 sout.i, theiue
east to the waterfront, thence following
tlie shore line to point of commencement.
C. LUTKIN,
W. B. C-UUIARD. Agent
Oct. 27th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the nortli shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
40 chains west; thence south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
east side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
outlet into Effingham Inlet, Clayoquot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; tiience 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence 160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about too chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
|8o W., along boundary No. 2; thence
|6o  S.;  thence  40  E.;  thence  40  S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4.   Commencing at a post on Coeur
[d'Alene River, near and south of tin*
S.  E.  corner  of  No. 3;  thence  100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. bound
ary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'li,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east cotner of Section tj.
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 27 of said
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T, Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cat
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement; excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 39th, 190&
bo. Commencing at a post planted at
uie north-west coiner ot J. A xiarvey s
laud, tnence norm 60 (mains; li.cuee
west 80 chains; tiience south 60 chains;
lUeiice east 60 chains lo point ot com-
uieiicuneut
HARRIET NLLSUN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 190b.
Oi. Commencing at a ; )st planted at
the nortli-west corner of J. A. mrvey s
mud; thence north So chains; thence
east 80 chains; tiience south 80 chains;
mmce west 80 chains to point of commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
laud; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
6c. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Knignts leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E L Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; tiience following bank of
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or less.
MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, i*igent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor.
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watsoq, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE
JOHN DORSEY, Agent
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cat and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence So south; thence 80 east thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains: thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given* that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissi f Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chains
west and 20 south ofsoutheast boundary
post of Lot 658: thence 80 chains west:
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to point of commencement.
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15.
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey,
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is herehy given that thirty j
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and j
Works for a special license to cut and j
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:   3.1
Commencing at a post by the shore of j
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boun- I
dary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
69: thence east to Alberni Canal; ihence
following the shore line to point of commencement.
W. C. RALEIGH.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is herehy given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner nf Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry awav timber from t'*e followirg
described lands, in Alberni Distrirt:   5.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north So chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547!
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to ooint of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September loth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So tl.Miis; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence uorth 80 ci.au s; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1006.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range S> Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshio 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains j
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement ; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
58, Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tiience south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY.
A .T .Clark. Arcm.
September ioth, 1906.
73. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
ithe Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey: thence south 80 chains; thence cut
So chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906?
Located Jul; litll.  11)06.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chain*;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, .-"igent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
ihe Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 9,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
December I, 1906.
E. F. G. McGREGOR.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9. Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 9, ihence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains more or less to
the Haswilphet River, thence following
the river in a westerly direction tn ihe
point of commencement, con'aini-g To
acres more or less.
Decemher I, ioofi.
G. P. RORERTS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
thc Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lnnd on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Rnnge V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," nt the N.E. corner of the New
Town Indian Reserve; thence west,
nlong thc Indian Reserve line, 40
chnins; thence north 40 chains; thence
enst 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeenn River to point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1906. Dec.15
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite trie south-west
corner nf Lot 545: thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chain';, mnrc or less, to the bank
nf the Nechaco River: 'hence followine
hank nf said river to point of com-
mencement; 640 acres. p?ore nr less.
EDGAR L. BLAKE.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE thnt, 60 dnys from
date, I intend to apply to thc Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described lnnds. situated on
tlie left bank of thc Skeenn River,
about one mile below the Little
Cnnon and commencing nt Ed. Midland's N.E. corner post on the bnnk
of thc Skeenn. Thence S. 40 chnins;
thence I'? 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to Sousic's S.
boundary; thence W. 38 chains, more
or less, to thc Skeenn River; thence
N. 3 chnins, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N, GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent.
Dcc.15 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 1907
Vancouver
Notes.
Held in the icy grasp of the North
King, Vancouver has suffered a veritable fuel famine, that even at this
■ writing, shows little signs of amel-
oration after ten days. The dealers
in the " black diamond" commodity
claim to have an abundance of coal
—but the vexed question the sufferers face is delivery. The coal offices
at the week end are still declining
orders and will only sell the precious heat producing carbon conditional upon the purchaser doing his
own hauling, and as a consequence
every form of vehicle from a motor
car to a sled is being requisitioned.
The dealers in wood admit a scarcity, and the various saw-mills are
daily besieged by anxious pater fami-
lias for any old kind of material that
will bring warmth and cheer to the
home. And this state of affairs, unfortunately, will be little relieved until the weather moderates, permitting
a more prompt delivery, which, in
the present state of the slippery,
frozen streets, is impossible.
The Provincial Campaign.
Even the hot air poured out by
thc Liberal "spell-binders," Mclnnes,
Macdonald, et al., at the opening of
the Grit campaign on Tuesday evening, whereat R. P. McLennan, A.
Henderson and J. W. de B. Farris
also spoke, has failed to add materially to a change of climatic conditions, though a large crowd thronged
the city hall to benefit by the heated
political atmosphere and gave the
speakers a cordial greeting. The
campaign is now fairly under way.
Both Conservatives and Liberals have
opened committee rooms on Granville, Hastings and Westminster
streets and the gathering places of
the faithfully are rendolent with "doings"—to capture votes. So far the
Conservatives have made no announcement of their proposed meetings, but the executive and various
ward committees are doing faithful
work to perfect organization. Notwithstanding what the Grit press
(and this includes the Guardian, the
new morning paper which has at
last come out in its true colors editorially), has to say about the split
in the Conservative ranks. The Week
has it on the best of authority
that the Vancouver Conservative Association, and President Williamson
of the Canadian Conservative Club,
are working in perfect harmony, and
if there are any disgruntled Tories
they have seen fit to go away back—
and forget their personal ambitions.
The Conservatives as a party have
left nothing undone to strengthen
themselves, and from President
Woodworth down to the humblest
voter are working with enthusiasm
that bodes success for Messrs. MacGowan, Bowser, Tatlow, Golden and
McGuire. That the Liberals realize
they have the fight of their lives in
The Terminal City, and the bitter
lack of suitable timber to offer the
electorate is shown by their importing ex-Governor Mclnnes of the Yukon to lead the fight with the assistance of the late County Court Judge,
Mr. A. Henderson, who did not relinquish his judicial duties or accept
the nomination conferred on him by
the Liberals, until the last moment
when the aforesaid ex-Governor arrived hot from Ottawa with instructions and "promises"—only then did
Mr. Henderson acquiesce in the mandate of the Federal machine. Mr.
Henderson has somewhat of a political record when in 1898 he represented New Westminster in the local
house, being elected as a supporter of
the Turner Government, which he
ignored completely and associated
himself with Joe Martin during the
latter's brief tenure of office as Premier. Incidentally it was the same
gentleman, when on the bench, who
released the notorious Brothier after his recapture at Seattle, where he
had gone on his release from the
"pen" by the Ottawa Minister of Justice. Of Mr. J. W. deB. Farris, the
capable prosecutor, and nominee of
the Young Liberals, and one of the
most popular men in the city, it
might come with better grace that
he should relinquish his public duties, at least during the campaign,
while seeking the votes of the electorate.
Local Amusements.
The Vancouver Poultry and Pet
Stock Association's annual show this
week brought out a goodly number
during the three days, notwithstand-
DID YOU HEAR
MADAME
SCHUMANN-
HCIlVri/ at WEDNESDAY'S
nClWL/iV CONCERT ?
Wouid you like to hear her again when you please and
in whatever selections you like best ?   If so
Buy a
Gramophone
and the Famous Red Seal Records,   reproducing faithfully the voices of Caruso,  Melba,  Patti,
Schumann-Heiuck, Tamagno, &c.
FLETCHER BROS.
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
Sole Agents Vancouver Island.
Mail orders and inquiries receive  prompt and careful
attention.
ing the inclement weather, to see the
exhibits which were more numerous
in every class than last year.
At the Opera House the big event
was the appearance of Mme. Schumann-Heink on Thursday, when the
Granville Street play-house was packed from gallery to the stalls with
an enthusiastic gathering of music-
lovers, who greeted every number
with rounds of applause. The out-
of-town contingent was in evidence
to a large degree and the evening's
entertainment was one that will long
live in memory, so wonderful was the
voice of the sweet singer.
Mr. E. E. Erisman, who has for
the past two years been one of the
leading teachers of dancing and physical culture in Vancouver, has taken
over the big hall on Pender street,
formerly occupied by Prof. Meyers;
and intends opening it as a first class
dancing establishment next week.
General regret is expressed in the
announcement made Thursday of the
resignation by George Dyke of the
office of secretary of the Vancouver
Kennel Club, which he has acceptably
filled for the past four years. A special meeting will be called sometime
the coming week by the executive to
fill the vacancy and also to fix dates
for the forthcoming bench show,
which will likely be held from March
27th to the 31st.
Civic Elections.
At the time of writing citizens are
voting for the municipal election.
Running for the mayoralty are Alderman Alexander Bethune and former
City Clerk T. F. McGuigan. The former was supported by the Electoral
Union. Thomas Duke, C. N. Haney,
W. E. Flumerfelt, J. J. Dugaro and
R. P. McLennan were nominated for
school trustees, and William Hunt,
E. J. Clark, H. C. Clark and H. A.
Edgett for license commissioners.
Three school trustees and two license commissioners are to be elec-
ed. There was no contest for aldermanic honors in Wards One and
Three, James Ramsay, Walter Hepburn, Aid. E. H. Heaps and W. A.
Cavanagh being the only candidates.
A feature of the municipal campaign
was the work of the Tourist Association in influencing public opinion
to record its approval of two by-laws
for the improvement of English Bay,
a seaside resort, and Fairview Park.
Social and
Personal.
VICTORIA.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilson (nee
Sehl) have returned from their honeymoon trip and have taken up their
residence on Heywood avenue.
* *   *
Mr. Jim Gaudin and Mr. Cecil
Grant are spending a few days at
Duncans enjoying the shooting.
* *   *
Miss Marjorie Rome leaves tomorrow night for Vancouver, where she
will attend Miss Gordon's school for
the ensuing year.
* *   *
Mr. Fred Rome has been moved to
Vancouver and left Tuesday last.
It is rumoured the bachelors intend
giving a ball early in February.
* *   *
Rehearsals for the vaudeville performance to take place at the Grand
Theatre on the 26th are going on
apace. The different numbers promise to be something quite out of the
ordinary and Mrs. Pooley anticipates
a great success.
* *   *
The Misses King are the guests of
their sister, Mrs. Keith Wilson, at
Salt Spring Island, where they have
spent a fortnight.
* *   *
Mrs. W. F. Langton was hostess at
a most delightful dance given on
Monday last at her home on Cook
street. About sixty young people
were present and greatly enjoyed
Mrs. Langton's hospitality.
* *   #
Mrs. W. S. Gore entertained at
bridge 011 Thursday afternoon.
* *   *
Mrs. F. S. Barnard was hostess at
thc ever popular bridge on Monday
afternoon last.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Fagan left for the
Mainland last Mondav morning.
* *   *
The bridge tournament which was
held at "Aloha," the residence of
Mrs. Hickman Tye, last week resulted in the first prizes being won by
Mrs. White Fraser and Miss Miles,
and second Mrs. Bullen and Mrs. Irving.    The  proceeds  of the  tourna-
The             \
Poodle Dog i *
Grill,          ;;
Yates St.,              ,
Victoria, B. C, is   < >
the only real        < -
"grill" in British     J ■
Columbia—the
only place where ,
1- UgHM                                            ■
you can               {
•\CTUALLV           \
obtain your           < ►
choice of meats   {
and all the deli-    ,,
cacies of the        1 ►
season.                -y
j
1
A Cosy Corner at the Poodle Dog,
1    W. S. D. SMITH,             -            Proprietor   j >
It Is Evident
from the large crowds at the Bismark each day that the
people of Vancouver appreciate a strictly first-class Restaurant.
For a thoroughly enjoyable meal, upper-country visitors should patronise
The Bismark
CORNER ABBOTT AND HASTINGS STREETS
VANCOUVER.
(N.   B.—Three-piece orchestra every afternoon and
evening.)
<£.
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
Electrical Machinery and Supplies
^
MARINE  GASOLINE MOTORS, ETC.
^
VICTORIA,
20 Qovernment Street.
VANCOUVER
606 Granville Street.
"Picadilly Brand"
IS THE
Best  Fitting Clothing
in Canada
When buying ask for the Brand.   For
sale in all leading   clothing  stores.
MANUFACTURED
BY 	
H. E. BOND & CO., Ltd.
TORONTO,       -       ONTARIO.
ment amounted to $71, which will go
towards the Sanitorium fund.
Invitations are issued for a ball at
Government House, to take place on
Thursday, the 31st inst.
Mrs. Loewen was hostess at bridge
on Monday afternoon last.
Invitations are issued for a five
hundred party for Friday evening,
given by Mr. and Mrs. Tuck, "Roccahella."
*   *   *
The chief amusement during the
week has been the skating at Colwood, large numbers going out daily
by train and automobile to enjoy the
pastime.

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