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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Sep 1, 1906

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 ivrinnnnnnro" tfTnroTnrmvinn> ir
Bank of Hamilton
Capital $2,500,000
Reserve $2,500,000
Total Assets, $29,000,000'•
Interest paid half-yearly on deposits of
$1 and upwards in Savings Department.
Drafts and Money Orders on all parts of
the world.   Vancouver Branches, cor.
of Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
■ Cedar Grove.
lUAJUlJUUllULilJUUl^
The Week
TL Provincial Review and Magazine.
(^TroTroTnro'o'oTroTnr)foTroT(T|fo>TQ
£ Pacific Coast Realty Co, Ld g
£ Telephone 1086       • 3
Offices, 12 MacGregor Block.
Lands City Lots, Timber.
P.O. Drawer762, Victoria,B.C.
UJUUUUUi
I Vol. III.   No. 3*2. ')'-•
VICTORIA AND   VANCOUVER    B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 1906.
One Dollar Per Annum
he Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
ill The career of The Colon-
fiessing. ist during the   last    two
months has been not un-
|e the knight's move in chess—er-
Bic and involved.   First came tbe
Inouncement that Mr. James Duns-
liir had sold his stock because it
jfs infra, dig. and inconvenient for
ILieutenant-Governor to have an in-
test in a newspaper.   Sticklers for
[iquette applauded the delicacy of
lis movement,  and    credited    Mr.
[insmuir with possessing a degree of
jnsitiveness which was a revelation
his nearest friends.   It would be
|nk heresy, especially in the light
subsequent events, even to hint at
Eiy connection between this prelim-
lary move and the series of intri-
j,te   and   involved gyrations   which
J>ve landed tlie Colonist where it is
■day.      Everyone who knows    Mr.
Hunsmuir will  acquit  him  of    the
jfghtest knowledge of the fact that
stock was merely being used as
(pawn in the game.   In less than a
[inth  the announcement was made
the editorial columns of the Col-
list that the paper had been sold,
[l the old directors and managers
Ire out, a new manager was in.  A
[w board of directors was formed,
the old editor was "temporar-
[j'' promoted.   It was not, however,
.a internal management of the pa-
f.r which  interested  the  public  so
lich  as  the    emphatic  pronouiice-
|uil, made by the new management
wt it would continue to be Conser-
|,live, and support the Conservative
[Hy.   Nobly has it lived up to its
"iidge.   True, there have been little
ps, such as are inevitable when in-
tperience  grapples    with  problems
Itich have baffled experience.   Still,
|ngs nave gone pretty well; some
Ijead  wood" has been  cast aside,
gluding  imported   "boiler plate."
extravagant   telegraphic   service
Is been reduced to modest dimen-
liis, and with due regard to the
Ifves of its readers care has been
|;en that the dispatches shall not be
new.    The financial column has
Iln excised in the interests of the
helopment of commercial business;
'  staff has been depleted by the
oval of some of its highest salar-
$ officials; there has been an econ-
y in the preparation of stereotype,
I by a prcess well known in the
ipositors' room   it would appear
In some of  the recent editorials
it the same forms, with slight al-
jition, have been made to do duty
he office of the Colonist and the
fees.   Especially is this true when
Iters like the Grand Trunk Paci-
ja national railway policy, or the
gramme  of    the    Hon.  William'
pieman have been under consid-'
on.   Latterly, or to be more pre-
during the  present  week,  the j
ir seems to have been afflicted!
the peculiarity which charac-1
ed Mr. Dick, of fragrant mem-
who was never   able to    keep
'r Charles' head out of his pro-
lions, only in the case of the Col-
it  is  the   perfume  of    New
iswick  with  which  its  editorial
(ins are now redolent.
p  forbear  to  comment  on  one
B  of  the  Colonist's  experience
1 bas furnished food for consid-
fi merriment both  to the Pro-
il   and  Amcriran  press  in  the
suspicion that at the present moment the Colonist is endeavoring to
illustrate the immortal dictum of St.
Paul that whilst there are bodies
terrestrial, there are also bodies "celestial." Finally, in order more
fully to demonstrate the transparent
sincerity of its proclamation in favor
of Conservatism and the Conservative party the Colonist has placed
its editorial control in the hands of
a gentleman who, throughout the
Province, is known and respected as
one of the most intelligent, uncompromising, and aggressive of Liber-
Coast would be built in five minutes,
more or less. He brought the late
Mr. Prefontaine down to endorse the
promise, to say nothing of Mr.
Charles Hays, Mr. F. W. Morse, and
last, but by no means least, Senator
Cox. All this occurred two years ago,
and is now a matter of ancient history. Yet in this year of grace, 1906,
no a blow has been struck, and the
latest promise which still rings in
our ears is the threat of Mr. F. W.
Morse that the line through this provinee would not be constructed until
the latest possible moment. Meanwhile the Hon. Mr. Templeman,
within a week of date, has actually
declared that the time is approaching when construction work must
commence.   In view of what occurr-
ber of the Baptist Church for 21
years, and a highly respected citizen.
His comment was that the portion
of our editorial referring to the Rev.
Tapscott's action in disrupting his
own flock and driving eighty members out of the Church was fully justified, and might have been made
stronger. He stated that as a matter of fact over eighty members of
the congregation had seceded, these
eighty comprising almost all of those
who have been connected with the
Church for the last twenty years. He
further stated that in order to justify his action in getting rid of old
committeemen so that he might
form a new committee of his own
nominees, the Rev. Tapscott had played the role of an amateur Sherlock
ftbe 3>ail$ Colonist
ESTABLISHED 1852
was the language of one of the clergymen that at the request of other
clergymen all reference to the subject was suppressed." If the phrase
we used in connection wilh this incident "ignominiously ejected from
a usurped position" was stronger
than the circumstances justified, we
are willing to eliminate the adjective.
Having given this explanation we are
perfectly willing, also, to print the protest of Mr. Tapscott and his friends,
which appears in our news columjns.
In doing so we need hardly point out
that these gentlemen must take the
full responsibility of contradicting
facts which have been testified to by
responsible citizens, and their statement is tantamount to a declaration
that there has been no disruption in
the Baptist Church, that the old members have not left the fold, and that
our information on this point was
incorrect.
als. To the conscientious discharge
of his Conservative duties he brings
the further equipment of strong personal friendship for the Hon. William Templeman, and official mouthpiece in Victoria for the Laurier
Government. What further hostages
could the Colonist be expected to
give for the due fulfillment of its
obligations to the Conservative party?
Yet, as if half conscious that its
clientele might have a lingering
doubt on lhe subject, the staff has
been strongly enjoined to declare on
every available occasion that its editorial arrangement is purely temporary, an assurance which will, no
doubt, be perfectly satisfactory to
all loval Conservatives.
Then The public utterances of
and Now. the Hon. William Templeman at the last general
election and now furnish a remarkable contrast, and incidentally an interesting study in tbe phraseology
peculiar to professional politicians
at election times. Then, as everyone
knows, the honorable gentleman promised that if the Province of British
Columbia would only support the
Liberal Government, and send a solid
seven to Ottawa, the Grand Trunk
Pacific between the Rockies and tbe
ed two years ago '"approaching" is
decidedly a good word. The Hon.
William, Templeman's lieutenant,
who now controls the editorial destiny of the Colonist, opines that
"possibly everything is being done
that can at present be done to secure
proper rail connection with the mainland, but the time is drawing near
when a very active campaign must be
inaugurated. It ought to be begun
as soon as the Hon. Mr. Tampleman
gets home. Doubtless he fully appreciates the great importance of the
proposed undertaking, and there is
not the least doubt that he favors
it." The confidence thus reposed
by the editor of the Colonist in the
Hon. William Templeman's ability
to expedite railway construction is
refreshing in this degenerate age, especially in view of his past performances and his present attitude in
connection with the construction of
the Grand Trunk Pacific.
Tapscott As promised in our last,
and Others, we have made a careful
investigation of the circumstances upon which we based our
editorial remarks three weeks ago
in this matter. Our article was submitted to onr original informant,
who is an old committeeman, a mem-
Holmes, going round the city of Victoria, prying into the private affairs
of his flock, and into matters whicli
did not concern him. These statements were also confirmed by a lady
of high position in the city, who has
been a member of the Church for
many years, but bas now left it for
the reasons above stated. The Rev.
Tapscott's connection with the celebrated Temperance meeting in the
Institute Hall, when he appeared on
the platform as a supporter of the
charitable (?) ministers who said
that the licensed vintners of Victoria
were worse than thieves und murderers is a sufficient justification for
anything we said as to his connection
with that notorious campaign. His
connection with the Orphanage question is too recent and well known
to need comment beyond the reminder that the Rev. Tapscott, in common with other ministers, voted il- i
legally, not having paid the small
contribution of .$2.50 which was ne- \
cessary to legalize the vote, and af-!
ter endless wrangling and litigation
they had to abandon their position |
and resign. The Colonist, in its cdi- j
torial of April 20th, referring to the
Rev. Tapscott at one of the meetings j
referred to, makes the following re- j
mark:   "So violent   and   unseemly
Still During the last week mat-
Thirsty, ters in connection with
the water question have
mpved rapidly, and whilst we are no.
nearer the solution of the difficulty
it is satisfactory to be able to record the fact that the hare-brained
schemes of the Mayor and the ill-
digested projects of some members
of the Council have received their
quietus. Woodeu pipe has gone by
the board, having been emphatically
condemned by Expert Adams. Elk
Lake as a permanent source of supply has been condemned, not only by
the same expert, but by the members
of the Council, who have clung to it
so long, but who, after visiting it
this week, were obliged to turn it
down. Each position set out by The
Week at the commencement, of the
controversy and contested with inexplicable fatuity by the Mayor, is
now conceded, whicli involves the
abandonment of Elk Lake ns a source
of permanent supply, and the securing for the city of "water, pure water, and plenty of water." It has
been amply demonstrated that Gold-
stream is the only source of supply
which satisfies all these requirements; and the very important factor which thc Mayor has persisted in
ignoring, viz., that there would be a
revenue from the Goldstream wnter
for power purposes, of a very large-
amount, is likely to weigh with the
ratepayers sufficiently to indued
them to endorse a purchase from the
Esquimau Water Company, if tba
supply does not come to them as the
result of the appeal. Only one thing
remains to be done, and that is to
make the cheapest possible arrangement to increase the supply for next
summer, and meanwhile go abend
and acquire the property of the Esquimalt. Water Company with as little delay as possible. In this connection it should not be forgotten
that in his latest report Expert
Adams condemns Elk Lake upon the
ground that its elevation is such that
it could never afford fire procction,
one of tbe points which we have insisted upon all along.
A Bishop's Pessimism.
"The enemies of thc Empire do not
conic from without," said Bishop Wcll-
don at Stroud-green. "They come
from within. There arc signs that the
British character is losing its nobility
and stability, and even its piety. I do
not think that this falling off is going
to continue, but if it docs I fear for
the Empire." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 1906.
"couveYI
On The Trail.
By The Traveller.
(Percy F. Godenrath.)
Men as Tress Walking.
The Vancouver  Press these days is
nothing if not sensational and hysterical.    One would hardly expect that so
prosperous and populous a city would
be scared at the advent of a few harmless  Hindus.    In  face, we do not believe that tlle people are in the least
put out, but it is good business on the
part of those papers which are catering
for trades unionism to raise the cry of
Wolf every time  an alien  steps  upon
our  shores.    In  this,  as  in  all  other
matters which touch political questions,
exaggeration and misrepresentation are
the order of the day, and the editors
of these yellow journals are not merely
seeing double but treble and quadruple.
They see men as trees walking, and the
streets   of   Vancouver   are   lined   with
trees.    All  this  because some  fifty or
sixty Hindus recently landed in Vancouver.    The World came as near the
truth as it ever does when it assessed
them   at  240,   and   declared   that   live
hundred  are    expected    by   the   next
steamer.   Why cannot we have a little
common sense brought to    bear upon
this labor question?   We do not want
an '^invasion'' either of Mongolians or
Hindus, but we do want a large addition of suitable men in the ranks of unskilled laborers.   If Canada cannot, and
obviously she cannot at present, produce
this class of labor in anything like a
sufficient quantity,  either  the  development of the Dominion will have to call
a halt, or the labor will have to be imported.   From Cape Breton to Vancouver Island there is a scarcity of labor.
Apart  from  the carrying on    of    the
settled industries of the country, thousands of men are required for railway
construction.    All  that  is necessary is
that such  immigration  shall  be supervised in thc interests of settled labor,
that only suitable men from the standpoint both of efficiency and sanitariness
are brought in and if necessary legislation might be invoked to ensure their
deportation when the specific work for
which  they  are  imported    is  finished.
The present     Federal   Administration
may not be conspicuous for intelligence
or skill but they are surely ingenious
enough to devise some means of compassing this  end  and  so  enabling the
expanding industries of the country to
continue in their career of development.
Usury.
Vancouver is up in arms against the
extortions of usurers. A sensational
article in the yellow journal declares
that 200 per cent is the average rate of
interest charged by some money lenders
in this city, notwithstanding the fact
that the legal rate of interest is only
12 per cent per annum. A case is cited
of one victim who only received $125
in return for a note for $300. This
class of business is as old as the hills,
and extortion is the rule of life, not
only in connection with usury, but
every other branch of business, where
one man has another at his mercy.
There is a law governing these matters,
and it should be enforced, but as long
as there are hard-up fools in the world
they will prefer to pay the big percentage rather than publish their folly. For
such there is no protection and the
only consolation Vancouver has is that
matters are no worse here in this respect than in any other city in Canada,
and probably on the continent.
1
Dr. Pagan's Good Work.
.After reading Dr. Fagan's address on
consumption our readers need no word
from us as to the urgency of the need
of making some effort to combat this
terrible disease—aptly called "The
White Plague." It attacks high and
low, rich and poor, alike, without discrimination, and it is high time that
some steps were taken by the province,
in common with the rest of the world,
to make an effort to stamp it out. Enderby cannot do much financially, but
our citizens can help in other ways,
along the lines suggested by Dr. Fagan. Il is up to each one personally,
if we wish lo see the course of this
terrible scourge stayed.—Enderby Progress. , „
Growing at the rate of five hundred
a year, Revelstoke is steadily forging
ahead, and is today one of the most
prosperous cities of the interior. Building operations are barely keeping pace
with population, but at a Conservative
estimate the increase in number of residences, and many of the new ones, are
both modern and artistic in design, is
fully 20 per cent over previous years.
There is not a vacant house in the city.
Among the new big buildings is a hand
some three-story block, costing $10,000,
the home of the C.P.R, Young Men's
Christian Association. At the corner
of McKenzie avenue and First street
P. Burns & Co., the enterprising meat
merchant, is erecting a fine $20,000
business block. The building will be
two stories and basement, 50x100 feet
in size, and, besides offices and meat
market, it will house an 8-ton cold
storage plant. As an indication of the
material growth of the city one can
turn to some interesting figures supplied by William Cowan, manager of
the Revelstoke, Trout Lake, and Big
Bend Telephone Co. Id 1902 the number of telephone calls were 27,000, in
1904, 61,000, and last year 160,000. This
company, besides running an up-to-date
city plant, has a long distance service
to the towns of the Lardeau, and is
now connecting the gap between Revelstoke and Arrowhead, a distance of 28
miles.
Within the past few months attention
has been directed to lhe possibility of
the neighboring bench lands for fruit
growing. With good soil, an equable
climate, and an abundance of water,
the bench lands adjacent lo the city are
now commanding good prices. Acreage
plots, partially cleared, may be had adjoining the city limits at around $80
per acre, and many sales have been
consummated this summer. Besides
small fruits, apples, pears, plums, and
cherries do remarkably well here.
Peaches, apricots, and other less hardy
fruits have not been experimented with.
The local market consumes all the
fruit so far raised, and there are abundant opportunities for practical men
to go into the industry on a commercial
basis.
With $2,000 hung up in prizes for
horse races, athletic contests, lacrosse
matches and band competitions, the
Labor Day (September 3rd and 4th)
celebration here promises to attract a
large crowd from surrounding points.
Horses are coming from Spokane, Calgary, Golden, Kamloops, the Coast and
the Okanagan, and the new half mile
track built by the Revelstoke Turf Association at a cost of $6,500 will be the
scene of some smart going. The Association expects to be in on the circuit
next summer, and as the city can boast
of a goodly bunch of talent the sport of
kings will receive an impetus here that
is much to be desired.
Revelstoke has not neglected to keep
in touch with the tourist travel, and
though only a small outlay was made
in its initial publicity campaign—devoted principally to the issuing of an attractively illustrated booklet—signs are
not wanting that the experiment to interest tourists and sportsmen through
this channel will prove profitable. The
work should be persistently carried on.
Good, snappy literature, with clear pictures, carries conviction to the would-
be seeker of new fields of exploration,
and there are an abundance of such
places in this section. One of the most
delightful "one-day trips" is that up the
sinuous and majestically turbulent Columbia river on the S.S. Revelstoke, a
staunch craft that is amply provided
with accomodation, and this season
numerous visitors have taken advantage
of tbis means of seeing one of the most
picturesque parts of the district. When
one learns that over 20,000 tourists are
annually carried through this city by
the C.P.R. it does appear that a very
considerable trade could be derived by
securing a share of the tourist business
—and a pleased tourist is a city or district's very best advertiser. Within a
few hours of the city excellent sport is
obtainable, and there is some fair
mountain climbing.
Riding
Breeches
A new shipment just arrived
of English Riding Breeches in
Scotch aud Donegal Tweeds,
$3.50, $4.50, $5.50.
''THE DRINK FOR HOT WEATHER."
HALL'S
SPARKLING ENGLISH ALE—BOAR'S HEAD BRAND
10c. PER BOTTLE
Bottled in Bond in Liverpool.
The Grocers.
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS  CHA11BERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
/^flTHEATRl
Charles Frobman presents
William Collier
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Ill Government St., Viotoria.
Where Mall Orders are specially cared for. R. 1515
TELEPHONE 606
Johnston's Transfer
135 Douglas St.    VICTORIA.
RATES CUT IN TWO.
HACKS FOR HIRE.
Driving Loads 75c. per hour.
G J. JOHNSTON,
Proprietor,
IN
"On The Quiet,"
(Augustus Thoinas' Comedy.)
Wednesday, Sept. 5th
Richards and Pringles
GEORGIA
MINSTRELS
Friday, September 7th.
Week September 3
     The New
Grand
SULLIVAN * COHSIDINE.    Proprietor*.
Manat«mint of ROBT. JAMIESON.
THE NORTHERN BANK
HEAD OFFICE WINNIPEG
Authorized Capital $2,000,000.   Subscribed Capital $1,200,000
A General Banking business transacted.   Drafts issued.   Sterling and
Foreign Exchange bought and sold.
SAVINGS BANK DEPT.—Deposits of$t and upwards received and
interest allowed.
Business by mail receives special attention.
Godfrey Booth/Manager Victoria Branch.
V
The Grand Opera Trio
Walter Beemer, ad his Juggling Girl
Adams and Edwards
Comedy Sketch
Lawrence and Sheridan    '
in Black art.
Frederic Roberts,
Illustrated Song,
"We're Growing Old."
New Moving Pictures,
"The Terrible Kids."
| The Home
j Seekers
Goal!
Special   Bargains  to
Wind Up An Estate.
6 J. acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
SPECIAL OFFER 0|
SEASONABLE
GOODS.
BEE  SUPPLIES.-Buckwheat,
Rye,  Clover,  Timothy,    Lawn  G
Ensilage  Corn,  Mangel, Turnip,  Ejj
cial quotations in quantity.
Spray Pumps, Whale Oil Soap, Va[
etable Plants.
Large Stock   of   HOME   GRO\
Fruit and Ornamental Trees now
tured for the fall trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumia
tion or inspection.
Let me price your list before placl
your order.
We do business on our own grouij
—no rent to pay, and am prepared!
meet all competition.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Foad,
Vancouver,
Real Hair
Switches
Pompadours, Curls
all of the latest
style, at
MADAME
KOSOHE'S
Hair Dressing
Parlors
58 Douglas
Street
VICTORIA.
Old Fashioned
Furniture,
Old China,
Brass and Copper
46 Douglas Street, Victoria
Mr*. M. E. MacLeod,
Oppositt
Thos. R. Cusack
FOR FINE PRINTINGI
The Taylor Mill CJ
Limited. ,
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
sasH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victc
JOHN  COOP
Taxidermist and Fur Dressd
Mounting Large Game Head|
a Specialty,
826 PENDER  STREET^
VANCOUVER THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 1906.
At The Street   ^
Corner
[P By THB LOUNOER
An old writer tells us that "the fasb
ton of this world changeth," a circum-
jtance which my esteemed colleague
Babette impresses upon her readers
with commendable regularity. Loung-
rs, however, have souls above the care
sr raiment and the vagaries of style
nd fashion, Rarely are they found in
ie show-rooms of the mart, where gay
mfections and dainty specimens of the
ressmaker's and milliner's art are lav-
Ihly displayed.   They prefer the street
irner, the dusty highway, or mayhap
e deserted park.   Especially the de-
irted park.     On the warm summer
tghts Beacon Hill Park has become a
psitive blessing   to    the impecunious
fayfarer, and even in the daytime there
■re now few spots so conducive to philosophic meditation and somnolence.
Every lounger is at heart a vagabond,
fid to preserve his faith in humanity
e must occasionally get away from the
treets and the steady stream of pas-
ers-by to some quiet spot, where, far
rom the madding crowd he can chew
he  cud  of  reflection,  and  renew  his
onfidence in the innate purity of the
lace.   For such a purpose Beacon Hill
'ark   is   unsurpassed.      The    crowds
1 ihich thronged thither even three and
pur years ago have gone elsewhere,
in occasional nursemaid, with her intuit charge and the inevitable pram,
fiay sometimes be seen. The distant
yhirr of the electric car, or the far-.
jKvay toot of. the tally-ho horn, are the
July sounds which break the stillness,
wretched on the sward the Lounger
[ears no sound and sees no moving
hject but thc ships that pass down the
traits. Where are the people? Has
ie Gorge bas swallowed them all? Or
as this fashion changed also, and the
!ark as a rendezvous or a place of relation become a thing of the past?
Whilst   indulging   in reminiscence   I
!tn lad to comment upon the fact that
je number of private citizens owning
nd. driving their own horses is com-
aratively few, and is obviously dim-
nishing. Why is this? It cannot be
Because of the encroachment of the
Jotor-car, seeing ihat so few are in
Use. It may be lo some extent the relit of an excellent service by tbe livery
|)mpanies. In any event it is a matter
ir keen regret. Horse keep in and
found Victoria should not be expen-
Jve, and surely one of thc first luxur-
s even of comparative wealth is to
ive a horse of one's own. The livery
[orse is all very well for some pur-
)ses, but though useful he is rarely
Irnamental.   He wears .the badge of all
is tribe, and there is no mistaking the
ired hack.   Victoria, of all cities, can
afford to abandon a custom so Eng-
|;h and so honorable as that which
is established tlle cult of the noblest
animals, and although my chance of
Iding will only come when the old
,overb is realized that if wishes were
iirses beggars would ride, I cannot help
gretting that for some unexplained
(ason the horse is disappearing from
'r midst. As a matter of fact I have
[it seen half a dozen lady riders in as
lany months.
[Three or four months ago I took oc-
Ision to criticize the condition of the
lass in front of the Parliament Build-
;s,  and to suggest that it was well
against the excessive charges made by
a well known Boniface for the drinks
and cigars supplied at the cricket
smoker. This is the second instance
of apparent lack of sport where one
would have expected to find it, and in
the end I very much doubt if a policy
of this kind is a paying one. There
are some people in Victoria who have
much to learn from the cities of the
Kootenay in the dispensing of hospitality.
Can any local authority on boating
tell me why it is impossible to find a
single Rob Roy canoe in Victorian waters? I have asked many people, and
the only person who seemed to know
anything about it, informed me that
years ago there were any number, but
that the young ladies bribed the boat-
house people to get rid of them, and
since then not one has appeared. The
result may have been 'Successful from
the ladies' standpoint, but what about
the flannelled oaf who still appreciates
exercise in his canoe, and who is not
always content to drift? I do not think]
that it is selfish to express the hope
that there may yet be a revival of interest in the best form of canoeing.
I wonder if any of my readers have
thought of the opportunity which is
afforded for the study of human nature when travelling in a tram car.
Personally I find it one of the most interesting of occupations. When going
down town early in the morning, say
at a quarter to seven, I find the car
invariably filled with working men
hurrying to their daily occupation.
Without exception they look healthy,
hearty and happy under a regime of
fair wages and steady work. They have
a cheery good-morning for each other,
and seem to be on excellent terms with
the conductors, who treat them with
more courtesy than later in the day
they extend to the ''higher"classes. Towards 8 o'clock a new element is introduced, as numbers of well-dressed
girls saunter forth to factory or store.
Then towards 9 o'clock the balance of
the female labour of Victoria which rejoices in the snug berths which the
cily offices afford leisurely travels down
town. There is a marked improvement
in the style of dress, which betokens
larger earning power, and as a rule an
added air of independence, as who
should say, "We are a step higher on
the social ladder." Ten o'clock brings
the professional man and the merchant.
Eleven o'clock the English-trained gentleman lounger, who goes down town
because it is the thing to do, appears,
and consumes much of the valuable
time of his acquaintances by favoring
them with a call, and talking airy
nothings. On the stroke of twelve
there is the rush of early lunchers, who
are going up to their midday meal just
when the dilettante breakfaster is coming down. Most of the professional
men lunch down town, and the I
o'clock car brings the workers back to
their afternoon duties, and there is a
slack interval until 3 o'clock. Then
for the first time in the day the dainty
dames of fashion begin to crowd the
cars, and fairly monopolise the space
until half-past five. This is the time
when mere man, clad in the sober habiliments of business, avoids the tram or
with its precious freight of millinery
and lingerie. The fashionable shopping
and teaing hour having passed, the 6
o'clock car carries home the crowd of
everybody except the late diner. At
8 o'clock the most cosmopolitan crowd
of the day is found in the cars, because
people of all classes patronize the various places of amusement, whether il be
the theatre, the elegantly-appointed
skating-rink or the Gorge Park. Between  eight  and   eleven    this    mixed
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Violet Toilet Water is a delightfu
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the fragrant sensation it leaves is highly pleasing.
Try anointing the skin with a generous amount of
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Price 50c. per bottle.
CYRUS H. BOWES,
CHEMIST
98 Government St., near Yates Street
If you love your wife
BUY   HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Roast, Do Not Roast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
lirth  a  little  extra  attention.    Since
en a great improvement has taken i throng is coming and going, and practice, and now, in spite of the excessive   tically this is the only time when silk
ought which has prevailed fori so j and satin brush against cotton and fus-
Iig, the grass and flower beds are in j tian. Of the late cars I shall say little.
Illy splendid condition.    Those who j They  tell   their  own    story, .  one  of
ve contributed to this are deserving! mingled joy and sadness.   However, it
I praise, and are entitled to the warm
:oniums passed upon them by the
msands of visitors who admire the
tely beauty of the Parliament Build-
s and the excellent condition of the
mnds. There are few, if any, finer
ja in the Dominion, and with the
proaching completion of the Empress
Jtel it is possible to conjecture some-
at of the impressive appearance
lich James Bay will present in a
I'r from date.
hear numerous complaints, and have
_ti requested to register    a   "kick"
is only fair to say that the former predominates, since for those who miss
the last car there is always the hack or
the auto. I need hardly say that for
obvious reasons the last car is not often missed by       THE LOUNGER.
A Corroborated Theory.
Dr. Emil Reich's theory of baldness is
that it is due to the stifling of the imagination. Use your imagination, and you
need never use hair-restorer. It is
certainly significant that no one ever
saw a bald policeman giving evidence in
a speed limit case. The Globe.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo^Collieries.
; New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the market at
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale.!
Dealers^n Cord and Cut Wood.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
I JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
I LONDON AND GLASGOW
U ^Purveyors tojthe Royal Family,
I    DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES!
H Buchanan's Royal Household at »l.50[per bottle
£0 Buchanan's Black and White at $1.25 per bottle
K Buchanan's Red Seal at (1.00 per^bottle
I ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
I    , For sale by all dealers,                      VICTOR!*, I. C.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893- VICTORIA
Fashionable Pastime of the Day
ROLLER
SKATING
AT ASSEMBLY HALL,
Afternoons 2 to 5, evenings 7.30 to 10.30
Saturday mornings 10 to 12.
Courteous and competent instrnctors
free for ladies.
Boys under 16 not allowed on floor at
evening sessions.
Excellent orchestra.
Only first-class patronage solicited.
Tzouhalem Hotel
Duncan Station.
Lakeside Hotel
Cowichan Lake"
PRieBBKOS.. Proprietor*.
LAKESIDE HOTEL, COWICHAN LAKE
The Popular Tourist Resort of Vanoouver Islnnd.   Excellent Ply Fishing,
Boating, Lawn Tennis.
Special Return Tickets Issued by the C. P. R., $2-Good for  IS Daya.
I/pi CT'Q QT A fl PQ meiM' l'tt'n daily at Duncan's for the above
lvC/\oI O O 1 niULu popular resort. Return tickets for sale a
E. A N. Railway Office good for 15 days, $5.00. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 1906
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Offices:
88% Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
Annual Subscription  W in Advance
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Readers, per line   6c. to 10c.
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Lost and
Found and other small advertisements, per insertion, from...26c. to $1.00
NOTICE.
Contributors are hereby notified
that all copy for The Week should be
deliveted to the office, 88i/2 Government
Street, not later than Thursday morning.
ANNOUNCEflENT.
The Week Publishing Company has
pleasure in announcing that Mr. Percy
F. Godenrath, who for a year has been
employed on the Colonist staff, has been
retained by The Week, and started out
last Saturday on a three months' tour
of the Province in the interests of this
publication. Whilst on the. journey Mr.
Godenrath will not only attend to the
financial business of the paper, but wil
contribute sketches and articles on matters of interest to every locality which
he visits. The Week Publishing Company will be glad to hear of an experienced energetic man who is prepared
lo take a similar trip through the
Island.
BADINAGE
By BOHEMIAN
_**4^**jMi********4#*****v.=,
IlllllllHiiiiiiaiiiaoailiHi]
Wild horses could not drag me to the
ink fount for the purpose of writing
another word on the subject of platonic friendship. My discursive dissertation on that time honored, but unsatisfactory topic has earned for me the
soubriquet of the "heart critic," in quar-
lers where I at least expected toleration, if not appreciation. The result of
my well intended effort has only deepened the conviction that, as with Mrs.
Harris so with the platonic friend, "I
don't believe there ain't no sich person."
There is, however, another subject
upon which it is legitimate and maybe
profitable to say a few words. There
used to be in this hoary world such a
thing as friendship, a friendship decidedly not platonic. Once on a time,
so the old folks say, it existed between
men, and one would grasp another by
tlie hand and say, "My friend," and the
grip would be heartening. Sometimes
it would come in thc day of adversity
and sorrow, and with it there would
be no accompanying words, for the
heart was too full; but the grip would
be very strenuous, and the eye dim.
Then at any rate the burden would be
lightened because it was shared.
At other times it would come in the
bey-day of prosperity, with a smile on
the cheek, and a word of congratulation on the lips; and between true
friends this greeting meant good cheer,
for the one could help the other and
was glad of it.
In those days friends stood together.
If a good name was assailed, or a
wroug attempted, a dozen loyal men
made the quarrel their own; and even
if llieir friend had fallen into error, as
all men do at one time or another,
friendship showed itself in its true colors by neither condemning nor deserting.
This spirit of loyalty and considerat-
itcss made itself felt beyond the pale of
soci;il relationships. It imparled an element of fairness and reliability to busi
ness transactions, and of honor to the
discharge of public duties. Tt was the
origin of the saying, "His word is as
good as his bond."   Out of this spirit
have been evolved the most praiseworthy traits of the English character,
which with all its defects, is still the
standard for fair dealing throughout
the civilized world. One is led to wonder whether at all, and if so to what
extent, this conception of friendship is
recognized in that Greater Britain,
which is separated from the Motherland
by ocean and sea. Why is it so difficult, even in highly favored and prosperous Canada, to find a man whose
word can be relied upon? Why is it,
generally speaking, impossible to count
upon the fulfillment of an engagement,
unless it is in writing and under seal?
Why are men so ready to attack each
other, and even to invade the precincts
cf home and family life in order to cast
discredit upon their fellows in business
and public life? Why is it a rare thing
to find a man standing up valiantly for
his friend and cramming the malicious
lie down the slanderer's throat? I wonder if men ever think that even if the
object of their assault has become thick-
skinned as the result of persistent attack, there may be those about him who
know his better side and love him, and
who suffer tortures whenever he is assailed. • I wonder, also, how many
slanderers are themselves, I will not
say faultless, but even worthy to criticise the conduct of another. I wonder also if men generally realize how
much of all that is best and sweetest
and most strengthening in human intercourse they deprive themselves of,
when they allow the milk of human
kindness to be soured by envy; hatred,
malice and all uncharitableness. Surely
this is a defect in Canadian life. It
would be an interesting study to trace
its origin and its evolution. There may
be something in it, at any rate, semi-
racial, for Canada contains comparatively little English blood. It may be
due partly to the festering .corruption
of politics, and the universal demand
for the slaughter of one's opponents. It
is undoubtedly due to some extent to
the inherent weakness of human nature,
which is naturally averse to the success of others. But whatever the cause
may be,, the fact is as true as it is deplorable, and is a source of weakness,
which is developing and which is calculated to demoralise the younger generation, and to weaken their confidence
in those whom they should obey and
ought to reverence. It is generally admitted that lack of reverence is one of
the most marked features among Canadian youth. We have illustrations of
it every day, in fact from Nova Scotia
to British Columbia no one feature of
Canadian boyhood is so strongly marked as this, and there is little doubt that
it is directly due to the lack of respect
with which men and women speak of
each other, and their readiness to believe and to publish the worst.
It is impossible to believe that ultimately higher ideals will not be instilled into our people, and loftier standards be erected. Meanwhile we are distinctly the losers, social and public life
are the poorer, intercourse is impoverished, the fire-side is but a simulacrum
and the substance of friendship has
been exchanged for the shadow of acquaintance.
There are a few who have not defiled their garments, and who still cherish the ideals of their youth, and the
traditions of their fathers. They are
the leaven whose splendid example of
loyalty, and whose conception of absolute justice furnish the nucleus upon
which it is not too much to hope that
the national character of the Dominion
will yet be based, and among those who
have most reason to be grateful for the
survival of this type of friendship you
may please reckon that there are none
more appreciative than
BOHEMIAN.
Coal to Burn.
The C.P.R. development work at Hosmer, near Fernie, has now assumed im
portance. Nearly one hundred men are
at work, a saw-mill has been erected,
and before the winter the workmen
will he comfortably housed. Mr. J.
Brown is in charge of the operations,
and will be prepared to ship conl next
season. When this auspicious event
occurs the coal and coke monopoly of
tbe Crow's Nest Pass will be a thing
of the past, and the C.P.R. will thereafter supply their own requirements of
fuel   for  transportation   purposes.
Notes on
Provincial News
Visiting Nelson.
The Hon. R. F. Green has just returned to the Coast from a short trip
to Nelson, where he made arrangements for the early erection of the
court-house for which an appropriation
was made at the last session of the
Provincial Parliament. Whilst in Nel
son Mr. Green chatted with most of
the leading members of the party and
found a condition of affairs which has
not existed in the capital of the Kootenays for several years past. There is
no longer dissension in the Conservative ranks; the party is united and is a
unit for the McBride administration.
A Notable Demise.
There are many people at the Coast
who will deeply regret to hear of the
death of Mr. John Boultbee of Rossland, who for some time has been in
ill health. Mr. Boultbee has lived an
active and useful life, rising to a position of some importance in the Province, and always discharging his duties
with conscientious fairness. He dies
at a comparatively early age, and with
his work unfinished, but what he has
done has been well done. His numerous relatives and friends may rest assured that their grief at his loss will
be shared by many who cannot claim
relationship.
Godenrath to the Front.
The souvenir booklet on Banff and
the National Park, prepared by Percy
F. Godenrath, will shortly be published. From advance proofs we have received, this booklet promises to furnish
a useful and beautiful memento for
visitors to the Park.
Congratulations.
The Vernon News, a well conducted
paper, devoted to the interests of the
Okanagan, and always to be counted
on for moderation and fairness, is to be
congratulated on having attained the
success which is invariably won by the
exercise of these qualities. Increased
circulation and a larger general business has necessitated the installation of
a Mergenthaler Linotype, and our esteemed contemporary will be in a better position than ever to cater for the
requirements of its supporters.
Simpson Not Satisfied.
It is very hard to please some people. If the ministers stay in Victoria
and discharge the duties of their office
in the Parliament Buildings the Liberal
Press says that they are neglecting the
Province. If they go out and work hard
in visiting every constituency, as the
Premier and Minister of Lands and
Works have done recently, they get
this kind of criticism:
"It is difficult for ministers of the
crown in travelling over the Province
to get an idea of the real feeling of the
people. There are too many political
sycophants who are readly to kiss the
hem of the garment worn by the man
in power and thus prevent a minister
from getting at the true facts. It has
ever been thus and probably will ever
remain so."
—Cranbrook Journal.
A Better Way.
The Phoenix Pioneer has an interesting editorial on the shortage of labor.
Representing public opinion in an important industrial centre the remarks
of the Pioneer are entitled to weight.
The large mining and smelting industries of the country require a large
amount of skilled labor, and recently
there has been the same difficulty as in
other parts of Canada in obtaining suf
ficient. In spite of this difficulty the
Pioneer is averse from any tinkering
with the Chinese head tax or any retrogressive movement in connection with
lhe importation of Mongolian labor. In
place of this it favors the policy adopted by the C.P.R. in establishing a low
emigrant rate from points in the Old
Country to Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, and urges that an appeal be
made for the same rate to British Columbia. This is a practical suggestion
which may or may not solve the problem, but in any event it will be free
from the numerous objections which
crop up every time the proposal to bring
in more Chinese is mentioned.
Field Glasses
Marine Glasses
Opera Glasses
and Eye Glasses
Our optical Department provides the means whereby you can purchase
the finest and most powerful glasses at the lowest possible prices, bearing in mind our Field, Marine, and Oprea Glasses are from the finest
Parisian houses. We make the following special offers to readers of
The Week:
THE NEW WAISTCOAT POCKET FIELD AND OPERA GLASS;
small in size but mighty in power; size, when closed, ll/2 in. by 3 in.;
in neat undressed doeskin case; invaluable for sportsmen and tourists      $2.75
—ALSO—
DAINTY OPERA GLASSES, mounted with pearl and gold, a most
sutiable present for a lady      $8.oo
N.B.—Although the above opera glasses are very dainty and artistic
in appearance they are also powerful and accurately adjusted.
REMEMBER—The above are mailed free to any address on receipt of
order accompanied with   postal   note.
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
^_
JEWELERS AI^D SILVERSMITHS
47 and 40 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
C M. 1555j
csap
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owyoto^o(owo(oWraWa
5fc«5rei»oAHo«wofflM^
NO CHARGE
We shall be glad to forward, ENTIRELY
FREE, our sample book containing samples
of the largest and most fashionable stock
of wall papers and wall coverings in Western Canada. We can also offer you many
great bargains in this season's wall papers.
We give a special discount of 10 per cent,
to all those who cut out this ad. and use it
as an introduction to
MELROSE CO.w
40 Fort St., Next to Five Sisters Block, Viotoria, B. C.
"IF IT'S CORRECT WE HAVE IT."
M. 1497
THE
MELOTTE
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SEPARATOR
IS BEST
BY TEST
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ALL SIZES
SOLE AGENTS FOB B. C.
E. 6. PRIOR & CO., Ld.
(THE BIRMINGHAM OF B. C.)
Who carry a large stock at their various depots.   Write for
price list and bedrock prices to
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. Q.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
P.R. 1550 1 THE WEEK, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER i   1906.
British Columbia
THE AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE.
AGRICULTURE.
To form a just estimate of the extent and importance of the agricultural areas of British Columbia one
must make many excursions to the
north and south of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway—over
its branches and steamboat connections—and even then, if he trusts to
what he may be able to see from the
car window or the deck of a lake
steamer, his knowledge will be far
from complete. In tbe Shuswap and
Okanagan Valleys, for instance, for
every acre of arable land within sight
of tbe railway or lake there are
thousands hidden away behind the
beautiful grass covered hills which
border the highway of travel, and the
same may be said of Kootenay,
Boundary, Arrow Lakes, Similkameen
and other districts. The agricultural
capabilities of the many sections of
Southern British Columbia are, as a
matter of fact, only beginning to be
realized. So far they have been
practically ignored for the mineral
seeking prospectors who first invaded the country had uo eye for aught
save the object of their quest. Now,
however, branch lines of railway and
lake steamers are enabling a new
class of men to enter and explore tbis
land of promise and many have embarked in fruit growing, mixed farm-
nig aud dairying.
The agricultural and pastoral lands
are not restricted to a small proportion of tbe total acreage, for Professor Macoun, after personal investigation on the ground, says: "The
whole of British Columbia, south of
52 degrees and east of the Coast
Range, is a grazing country up to
3,500 feet, and a farming country up
to 2,500 feet, where irrigation is possible." This is a most important
statement and its truth is being confirmed by the practical experience of
settlers who have established themselves in the country. Within the
boundaries thus roughly defined by
Professor Macoun tbe capabilities
of the soil are practically unlimited.
All of it tbat is not too elevated to
serve only for grazing purposes will
produce all the ordinary vegetables
and roots, much of it will grow cereals to perfection, while everywhere
the hardier varieties of fruits can be
successfully cultivated. As far north
as the 52nd degree it has been practically demonstrated that apples will
flourish, wbile in the southern belt
the more delicate fruits, peaches,
grapes, apricots, etc., are an assured
crop. Roughly estimated, the extent
of these fertile lands may be set
down at one million acres, but this
figure will probably be found far below the actual quantity capable of
cultivation when the country has
been thoroughly explored. The anticipation of such a result is justified
from the fact that at several points
in the mountains even in the most
unpromising looking localities, where
clearing and cultivation has been
attempted it has proved successful.
A Sheep Ranch Near Kamloops.
In several instances also, bench land,
pronounced only fit for pasturage by
"old timers," has been broken and
cropped with very satisfactory results. The agricultural lands just
mentioned are located as follows:
Acres.
Okanagan    250,000
North and  South Thompson
Valleys     75,000
Nicola,    Similkameen    and
Kettle River Valleys ....   350,000
Lillooet and Cariboo    200,000
East and West Kootenay ..   125,000
West of the Coast Range are several extensive tracts of arable land
of the richest quality, notably  the
Cattle Grazing on Vancouver Island.
Lower Fraser Valley, Wesminster
District, Vancouver Island and adjacent islands in the Gulf of
Georgia. These sections of tbe province are recognized as agricultural
districts and are fairly well settled,
but much of the land is still wild and
untilled. North of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, on the
Pacific slope, and but partially explored, are vast areas of agricultural
and grazing lands, which will be turned to profitable account when the
country is a few years older. Much
of this northern region is fit for
wheat growing, and all of it will produce   crops  of  the  coarser  cereals,
roots and vegetables, except the
higher plateaux, which will afford
pasturage to countless herds of cat-
lie, horses and sheep. Some of these
districts, best known and in which
settlements have been established, are
Chileotin, Neechaco, Blackwater,
Bulkley, Oostn, Kispyox, Skeena and
Peace River Valleys, and they are
estimated to include some 6,500,000
acres. That this is a conservative
estimate is clear from the fact that
the late Dr. Dawson and Professor
Macoun credited that portion of
Peace River Vnlley lying within British Columbia with 10,000,000 acres of
wheat land. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 1966.
t Short Story *
Chispa,*The Torera.
By  Marguerite  Stabler.
(Written for The Week.)
' "The senor ees from Boston," the fat
Josefa always declared with an ex-
, punitory shrug of her shoulders.
Which fact accounted to her primitive
mind for his singularity in not making
love, as her other boarders did, to a
man, to the willing Josefita, his insisting upon having a bath every saints
day, his persistent pegging away at a
pile of dingy old books, and his relist
of her frijoles.
To Josefita, however, this explanation
did not explain. Even though the
senor did hail from Boston, she opined,
he had eyes in his head, and for what
purpose are eyes put into a man's head
if not to do homage to trim ankles and
ripe lips?
But all in vain did she bedeck herself in clinking glass-bead chains and
cotton roses. The senor's eyes were
blind to everything but the black-hided
books always under his arm.
This trim little Josefita did not guess
that the American senor bore with
him a weight of dignity that forbade
his glances wandering toward her
blooming charms, and his feet straying
to the sunny side of the patio where
she held her court. For he, Homer
Malachi Cobb, D.D., was a graduate of
the Boston Presbyterian Seminary of
Theology, and had just finished a. postgraduate course in the doctrines of
Foreordination and Predestination, had
published a convincing and harrowing
tract on the subject of eternal damnation, and was, as soon as he recovered
from an attack of nervous prostration
consequent thereon, to receive a charge.
He was to be installed as pastor of the
Zion Hill church of Knoxville, Calvin
County, Massachusetts.
Thus it was that while the pretty
Josefita pouted in her sunny corner,
the Reverend Cobb, while grasping the
benefits of the genial Mexican climate,
meditated upon the degeneracy of the
native character. Another tract was
planned on the subject of the baneful
influence of the religion of Romanism,
which should be entitled, "The Perils
of the Papacy."
To this end, while the boarders of
the fat Jose fa followed the sun around
the patio and drew like flies to the
sweets of Josefita's corner, young Cobb
made notes on the sloth and unrighteousness of the life around him, elaborating, the while, the syllabus of his
tract. ■ ' •';!;..!■"•"' '"   '
Sometimes when these southern
suns poured down upon him in their
sweet, seductive insistency, it was only
by a conscious and vigorous effort he
saved himself from falling under the
spell of the langorous life around him.
When he sat in the plaza in the long
bright afternoons and watched the
cherub-faced children playing their
;i«-go de bollilla in the dirt, the men
basking in the, sun, the women gossiping and smoking as if they had all eternity in which to cook their suppers, he
sternly reminded himself of the gospel
injunction to be "not slothful in bus-
ness, fervent in spirit, serving the
Lord."
As he sat one day in the plaza, his
"Evidences of Christianity" open on his
knee, bis eyes like good St. Anthony's,
glued to his book, a subdued stir of
excitement among the people around
him made him look up from his printed
page and turn his eyes with the others
toward the opening of a narrow little
lane.
Coming toward him, serenely unconscious of the gaze of the rabble, a vision
of loveliness burst upon his startled
senses. Dropping his book he watched
her until she mas out of sight, following every detail of her erect carriage,
her free, springing step, the slope of
her shoulders, the poise of her head,
and  the curves of her waist.
At the end of the crooked little
street the church of Nuestra Senora de
los Augelos faced the plaza in which
the good young parson sat. When the
vision   reached   the   little   church   she
disappeared within its portal, but still
the near-sighted eyes strained through
their glasses as if they would penetrate
the thick adobe walls.
The "Evidences of Christianity"
were read no more that day. Even the
tract treating upon Spanish degeneracy
progressed no farther, some passages
.were erased, in fact, and several
sweeping assertions modified. Hell-
fire and damnation, for the nonce, lost
their charm in contemplation, and by
the time the evening shadows were beginning to thicken upon the red-tiled
roofs of the little pueblo young Parson Cobb was searching the Psalms
for that apostrophe that most nearly
voiced his sentiments: "Thou art fairer
than the children of men," and for the
first time in his straight-laced experience, he tilted his heels upon the fat
Josefa's balcony rail and gave free rein
to his fancy. The gospel injunction.
"It is not good for man to be alone,"
assumed a more imperative meaning in
his newly awakened consciousness.
The next day, at the same hour, by
a fortuituos concurrence of circumstances the prospective pastor of the
Zion Hill church was again in the
plaza, his book upon his knee. His
eyes, however, seemed wont to wander
from his "Evidences," and sure enough,
at the same hour, the vision of loveliness reappeared in all her radiance. As
she passed, this time, by the grace of
God, choosing the plaza avenue, and
brushing so close be could almost have
touched the hem of her garment with
his unworthy hand, he dropped his eyes
quickly let she might read his perturbation therein. But the stately senorita
was as serenely unconscious of the presence of the Reverend Cobb of Boston
as of the gaping rabble.
Again she crossed the pavement and
disappeared ino the church. A moment
the near-sighted eyes blinked with indecision. Never had his righteous
footesteps strayed within tbe stronghold of Romanism, but arguing with
himself for the cause of empiricism, he
reached the decision that, in duty to
his tract, he must know his ground
from both sides.
Laying his "Evidences" face downward on the bench, be arose resolutely,
crossed the pavement, and the next
moment the Reverend Homer Malachi
Cobb had disappeared within the open
portal too.
The insufficient light of the tapers
left him an instant lost in semi-darkness. The air had that damp, sepulchral odor that induces a feeling of awe
in tbe supersititous mind, but brings
chills to the spine of the cold-blooded
Northerner.
Straining his eyes toward the end of
the nave he discerned the stately senorita kneeling under the full light of a
candellabrum. Fearing to intrude upon her devotions he slipped into the
shadow of a pillar and watched her.
After a few moments of bowed silence
she arose, and, following the custom of
the Church, lighted a tapeir jto the
Blessed Virgin. Young Cobb's fascinated stare followed every movement,
while, her lips still moving in prayer,
she shaded the spark with her slender
little hand until sure the flame would
burn up brightly. Then moving along
to the high altar and dropping again on
her knees, her hands fell listlessly to
her sides, as her lissome figure poured
itself out in an attitude of supplication.
Then raising her head and turning her
glorious eyes towards the great Crucifix,
all her soul seemed to leap into h -r
countenance as she made her petition.
The near-sighted eyes behind her
still followed in rapt wonder. In all his
life he had never seen such an expression on a human face. During a'l his
four years in the Seminary he had
never known the most eloquent sermons of the president of that institution produce  anything like  this  effect.
Again, in the intensity of her earnestness, the beautiful, stately head unit
low over her folded hands and the profile, turned toward tbe man behind her,
showed clear and pure like a cameo
aiiainst the dingy hangings of the'
shrine. As the light from the tapers
cast an aureole her hair seemed to
crinkle and wimple in tiny dancing
wavelets all over her head, while the
few stray ringlets tbat escaped from
tbe coil seemed to cling to the curves
of her neck as if they knew and appreciated their blessed privilege. Then,
sinking ber head still lower, the heavy
lids drooped over the glorious beeseech-
ing eyes and the long, sweeping lash°s
fell as in a clinging caress upon tin
pure, pale cheek. Thus was the pictu \:
burned in fire upon the newly awakened soul of the Reverend Homer Mala-hi
Cobb.
Day after day the same thing happened ; the man in the plaza; the senorita crossing the pavement; then both
man and senorita rapt in adoration in the
adobe church. For, while the man looked at the beautiful creature before him
his countenance took on an expression
as worshipful as her own. That cloud
of dusky hair that shimmered through
the gloom had enmestied his heart beyond recall, but, he mused, in self-jusu
fication of his sudden capitulation, even
the great apostle Paul has said: "If a
woman have long hair it is a glory to
her."
To be sure, this gorgeous creature
was not exactly in accord with his
homespun ideal of what a poor young
minister's wife should be. There were
moments when his thoughts were rest
less. The wife of the minister, ihe
elders of Zion Hill had told him would
be expected to be capable of conducting
the societies of the church; the Ladies'
Aid Society, the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, the Local Temperance
band, the Saturday sewing school, be
the principal of the Sunday school and
superintend the infant department, beside whatever incidental demands
might be made upon her time. Tbfve
were several godly-minded young women in the neighborhood of his home
whom he had considered in this c;.i'.y
city; women whose qualities of patience
and amiability commended them >'j the
exalted position of wife to Malachi
Cobb. Now, however, their claims and
qualifications faded away before this
resplendent creature like dew before
the sun.
There were times when he repeated,
almost sadly, to himself, the text, "Let
the women adorn themselves not with
broidered hair, or cold, or pearls, or
costly array."
But even this troubled doubt vanished when, one lucky day, upon leaving
the church, the senorita dropped her
glove, which gave the parson an opportunity to spring to her feet and pick it
up.
Clearing his throat with a pastoral
importance and raising his hat with a
hand that might have been steadier, he
asked:
"Is this your glove, .Madam—Miss?"
a bit unsure as to the correct form of
address when his heart cried out "Princess, Angel, Queen of Light."
Receiving no answer from his divinity, and suspecting his tongue unintelligible to her Castilian ears, he touched
her tentatively, reverently, upon the
flowing end of her mantilla.
Turning in wonder, the great burning
eyes sought his in explanation of his
action.
"Is this your glove?" he repeated in
some embarrassment.
Still not understanding his Northern
tongue the wondering eyes fixed his
near-sighted gray ones queslioningly.
"Is this your glove? Does this glove
belong to you? Is it the property of
yourself?" the parson reiterated in his
endeavor to make himself understood.
Then, holding it up to her, he brought
the great deep orbs down to the little
silk thing that lay curled in his palm,
and their glances met over the glove.
Whereupon the gates of Heaven opened
upon him. Her eyes beamed, her lips
opened in a gentle smile, and, reaching
for the glove, her hand, by accident,
touched his. The rest of that day the
Reverend Cobb wandered around in the
seventh realm of bliss.
Thereafter the whole scheme was
rolled out before him plainly and practically. He understood now why he
had come to Thesis, nay, more, why,
in the wisdom of Providence, his health
bad failed, thus making this long vacation necessary. Here wa a field ripe
for missionary work. This beautiful
woman must be turned from her idolatrous papacy, converted to Presbyter-
ianism, transported to Knoxville, Calvin County. Massachussets, and her
soul gloriously saved.
Sometimes the neutral-tinted congregation of Zion Hill church arose in
painful contrast with the gay rebozo,
striped stockings, spangled chinelas,
clanking jewelry of this animated rain-
how of his dreams, but with her con
version to Calvinism, he told himself,
she would be glad enough to put off
her gaudy finery for the "adornment
of a meek and quiet spirit," as laid
down in the precepts of St. Paul.
Then one day she did not come to
the church, nor the next. She must be
ill. The ardent soul of the parson
could offer no less serious explanation
of her absence. That she might have
gone away or have relaxed her vigor
he could not believe. Perhaps she was
even now dying, his ovCr-wrpught
fancy cried. Dying and yet still in
ignorance of the true'faith. Possibly it
was for the light of Calvinism she had
been praying and he had been sent, like
Elijah, to save her from spiritual death.
But after the first few days a reactionary hope assured him she was still
alive. He banished, then, the thought
of her untimely dissolution. Such lux
uriant health and youth could not be
so easily vanquished by the gray
Reaper, he decided.
He would find her yet, he vowed.
The plaza and streets were always full
of people, he sought through- the
crowds daily. The world turned suddenly black and empty, as, early and
late, his "Evidences" and tract wilfully neglected, he followed the gay
throngs, peering into every face for
that one radiant countenance that had
first illumined his soul.
The boarders of the fat Josefa become coarser and more distasteful than
ever, living for the animal joys of life
with never a thought about the great
verities of death and eternal damnation.
The coquetries of the wily Josefita
were worse than vulgar and silly in the
light of the serenity and dignity of his
ideal. And now, to cap the enormity of
the gross life around him, the world
rose up in excited anticipation of a
coming bull-fight.
In a hazy way young Parson Cobb
had been conscious of the fact that
there had been, possibly were now, in
dark comers of the earth, bear-baitings
and bull-fights, as he was conscious of
the ancient custom of throwing the
Christian martyrs to the wild beasts in
the arena for the edification of a barbarous multitude. But that a bullfight could happen here and now in this
region of law and reason was almost
beyond the belief of his stern New-
England mind. That on the same continent that boasted a Boston with her
public-school system, public libraries,
organized charities, enlightened standards of moral rectitude and rigid Blue
laws, such a custom a'S bull-fighting
could exist sent him back to work with
redoubled zeal at the syllabus of his
tract on "The Perils of the Papacy."
But it was in vain that the devoted
Cobb sought day after day for thatt
clear pale profile, the glorious dark
eyes gleaming under the dusk of her
hair. Into places bis own taste would
never have guided him his wandering
footsteps strayed; the dance platforms
in the plaza, the band concerts on Sunday afternoons, even on the outskirts
of the crowd that surrounded a cockfight, and into the shadow of many
forms of diversion of this godless land
the parson strayed, hoping, yet fearing,
he might find the object of his search
there. More and more did the need for
her conversion to Calvinism force itself upon his mind as he saw the pitfalls for unwary feet in the unhallowed
pueblo of The Angels-save the mark!
On the day of the great celebration
the parson searched the crowds with
untiring energy, feeling, in some mysterious manner, that he would surely
find ber. At last it became clear to
him that he would have to go within
the gates of the arena if he hoped to
find her. Yes, there was nothing he
would not do for her, but his soul
shrank with horror at the thought of
being one of tbe barbarous crowd that
would clamor to see the spectacle. Still,
this was his best chance, and he would
leave no stone unturned, he vowed, to
find this precious pearl that some mad
freak of fortune had cast before these
swine of "greasers."
Also, he argued within himself, he
might be enabled to do fuller justice to
the subject of the age of degeneracy after he bad seen something of the Pala-
bo de Toros.
Accordingly, long before the hour
appointed for the beginning of the barbarous sport, the Reverend Cobb found
himself    ensconced   between    the    fat
Josefa and the coy Josefita, a part of
the. riotous  scene.
From Sol to sombre the glittering
audience stretched, holiday-minded and
happy in anticipation of the scene, and
no one suspected the thin-visaged, narrow-chested little man shrinking behind the ample proportions of Josefa
was the author of a tract on "Eternal
Damnation.1'
Suddenly the mental note he had
been taking on the degeneracy of his
neighbors was interrupted by a great
fanfare of trumpets as a dazzling procession wound into the bull-ring below.
Banderillos shaming the sun with
their spangles and fringes, and stepping
high in brocades of gorgeous hue led
off the blazing cavalcade. Next cape-
adoros, whose brilliancy of coloring
might have put Joseph's coat of many
colors to the blush, reining their gaily
caparisoned chargers in with a tight
hand as the music blared up afresh.
Last the first torero, strutting with
lordly indifference to the admiring eyes
upon him.
The crowds went wild at their approach. Rising in their seats stamping,
shouting, calling the torero's popular
nick-name, "El Gallito! El Gallito*"
until every throat was dry; the whole
arena rocked with the enthusiasm of
the populace
"El Gallito" after deigning them a
haughty recognition of their homage,
in his capacity of hero of the moment,
advanced to the centre of the ring.
Then there was more music, more
shouting, more of everything that there
had been before, but the near-sighted
eyes of the Reverend Cobb were closed
upon the spectacle itself. Gladly would
he have stopped his ears to the sounds
that assailed him, for never in his wildest imaginings he had ever conceived
the thrill of this moment.
From the shouts and groans around
him he gathered the information that
several horses had been injured by the
bull, and that, at last exhausted, but
victorious, "El Gallito" had killed his
bull and been borne from the arena on
the shoulders of excited ones of the
mob who had leaped over the walls, to
be covered with medals by the judges
of the fiesta.
The dry throats, in the intermission
that followed here, were copiously liquidated with pulque at the impromptu
little wine-stalls that had sprung up
within the past night, until by the time
the next entrance was called the spirits
of the crowd were more hilarious, the
voices thicker and louder, the epithets
cried down to the ring coarser, and the
excitement at its height.
With the first call of the trumpeter
there was a general scramble back into
seats and settling of the audience, that
not one trick might be lost.
New horses were brought into the
ring, fresh sand was scattered over the
arena to deaden the odors of fresh blood
that steamed up from pools here and
there, and with a louder out-burst of
drums, trumpets and throats the next
entrance was  heralded.
"Ah, here comes the torera," the fat
Josefa' whispered breathlessly to the
young parson, fearing from his disinterested manner the preceding feat had
bored him.
"What!" Cobb gasped in horror, "a
woman in the bull-ring?"
"But yes," the coy Josefita gurgled
joyously, "bh, look, look!" as the senor
from Boston covered hiS> eyes. She
killed six bulls last year."
"And, added old Josefa, "breaking in
with her information, "she is sure going
to kill this one, too. The saints are
on her side, for she gives them new
tapers when  she wins."
But here' the music roared, the
crowds went mad, the people rose in
their seats and shouted themselves
dumb, waving their gaudy fans, flying
long rebozos, throwing flowers and
confetti into the rincr. stamping, cheering, calling until poor young Cobb felt
himself caught up in a sun-set, a rainbow, a thunder-storm and an earthquake combined.
Involuntarily the prospective pastor
of the Zion Hill churMi of Knoxville,
Calvin County, opened his eyes, but
closed them suddenly upon what he
saw.
(To Be Continued.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, iqo6.
THE   HOME   BEAUTIFUL.
The above is a picture of The Art Ware, China, Silver Ware and Cut Glass Department at Weiler Bros., 33 Government Street, Victoria, B.C., which
is always an attraction to visitors and residents, as it contains large stocks of Sutherland Art Ware, Bretby Art Wa<-e, Wedgwood, Doulton Royal Bonn,
Imperial Vienna, Limoges Dinner and Tea Services; Rodgers' famous Sheffield Cutlery; Libbey Cut Glass, and numerous other world renowned useful
and artistic commodities. N.B.—Since the above photograph was taken large alterations have been made, including the building of a special "Cut Glass
room."
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This illustration is from a photograph showing a small portion of the Drapery Department at Weiler Bros., which is probably unique ;iinong all the
stores of Western America, from the fact that it alone contains all those beautiful and artistic decorative material's from England, France and Austria, so
essential in making "The Home Beautiful," such as Liberty Art Goods, Rich Tapestries, Linen Taffetas, Arras Cloth, beautiful French Brocades and oilier
Silks, Belfast Linen Sheetings, Table Cloths, etc. Art Linen Goods, Impression de Chine, Damasks, Challis Cloths, Nottingham, Swiss and Connemara
Lace Curtains, Dainty Muslins, and every other class of European, American, and Oriental Draperies; this is one of llic sights which visitors to Victoria
make a point of seeing, as they can inspect, and, if thought desirable, purchase Art and other Draperies impossible toprocuce elsewhere in Western America.
A post-card addressed lo The Mail Order Department, Weiler Bros., 33 Government St.. will put yon into touch with this department, THE WEEK| SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER i, 190b.
if A Lady's Letter *
^ By  BABETTE. y
Dear Madge:
During the month of September,
which, by the way, is upon us, the housewife generally finds the luscious, sun-
kissed peach in all its pcrfectness, and
sufficiently plentiful to permit of its being served in all the ways known to
good cooks, not to mention the jars of
preserves that are placed on the shelves
against the cold wintry days when
fruits of any sort are apt to be rather
scarce and nig- in price. There is no
other fruit that so well retains its flavor and coloring through the process
of preserving, and in nearly all the delicious desserts tbat are made of the
fresh peaches, the preserved fruit may
be used instead.
By the way, it was the Japanese who
first discovered this fruit, or at least
who first utilized it as a food, and this
very charming story (with the moral
attached)  is told of its origin:
"Once upon a time, a good old man
and his wife were obliged, in their old
old age, to beg upon the highway, in
order   to  obtain  the  very   little   upon
which they could live.    Then one day
by  the  side  of the  road,  the  woman
found a large and luscious peach, beautiful in its juicy ripeness, with the amber down on one side ami the rich red
on the other, where the sun had kissed
its cheek.    The poor old woman  was
starving, and the temptation to eat the
beautiful fruit at once was most severe,
However,  controlling  her  hunger,  she
hastened home to her husband with the
peach, and proceeded to divide it with
him.   As she pressed the knife into the
side of the peach it opened, and from
the centre sprang forth a beautiful infant,   who  immediately  reassured    the
tearful,   frightened  beggars,  'I  am  the
god  Shin  To,'  said  he,  'and  one  day
while I  was at play with some other
gods and'goddesses, I accidentally dropped from tbe orchard in lhe Japanese
heaven.'    He then went on lo explain
that for releasing him from the peach
he would allow them to plant the seed,
and  that     the  produce  from this  one
seed would make them wealthy.    And
this, the Japanese claim,  is the origin
of this much prized fruit.
Tastes and fashions, as wc all know
vary  with   the  times,  and  history  re- j
have a more delightful decoration.
Masses of flowers, with their gorgeous
Mendings of color and their sweet perfume, are the rarest and most beautiful
of all ornaments in a room, and atone
ior many decorative sins and shortcomings. From them the decorator
lirst drew his inspiration, for almost all
conventional designs, whether in wall
papers or textile fabrics—can be traced
back to a flower or some part of a
flower; but the most glorious achievements of the decorator's art cannot
compare in beauty and decorative value
with real blossoms, which outstripped
the glory of Solomon himself.
BABETTE.
SPORTING COMMENT.
At a meeting of members of the
Y.M.C.A. interested in football, which
was held at the rooms last evening, arrangements were made for a match at
Ganges Harbor, Salt Spring Island. As
already announced, the association has
arranged an excursion to that point
on Labor Day, next Monday, and it is
intended to bring the contest off then.
It will be between the intermediates
and the "war-scarred veterans" (as
they have been dubbed) of the organization. An interesting match is expected.
The Victoria and Vancouver cricket
teams will try conclusions next Saturday afternoon on the Brockton Point
grounds. The home players will leave
on Friday, taking with them as strong
an eleven as it is possible to gather
together. Owing to the fact that quite
a number obtained leave of absence for
practically all last week it is doubtful
if some of the best will be able to get
off for this occasion. A splendid match
is promised.
From present indications the Corinthians will return to the Old Country
with an unbroken record. So far they
have not met witli a single defeat, although having played one drawn match.
The last contest in which they are reported to have participated was against
Cincinnati which resulted in a victory
for the Corinthians by a score of 19
goals to 9. They still have quite a
number of games to play and it is understood that some of the teams which
they are scheduled to meet are training
hard in the hope of turning' the tables.
"J. H. Vidal has returned from attending the cricket tournament in Victoria," says the New Westminster Col
umbian.    "In  despite of the  fact thai
peats itself with variations, but the art | there  was not a  full team  from  New >
of the Louis XV. period is without pre- j Westminster the players from here had 1
cedent   or   parallel   and   will   probably 1 some good games on the scratch teams j
have no repetition in the future.   It will | that  were arranged.    Mr. Vidal  states ;
that the week was a most interesting 1
influence the art of all time, and can
teach us many lessons. With certain
modifications the furniture of that period is eminently suitable to the requirements of the present day; the subtle
charm of it remains and creates an
ever-increasing demand for its reproduction. It is eminently suitable for
drawing-rooms and boudoirs of today.
Its good lines, its delicate carving and
one for cricketers. The feature was
the batting of young Cobbett, of the
Victorias. He is not quite nineteen
years of age, but he batted an average
of over 100 in four games. On Saturday he made 152. The Victoria team
will play New Westminster on Labor
Day, and Cobbett will be with it. It
wil be well worth while to see him, as
beautiful proportions   have   an indes- (Jie is a wonder."
cribablc air of exquisite refinement and
stateliness which belongs to no other
style. It the taste of a queen, the brilliant and unfortunate Marie Antoinette,
who did more to effect the transition
between  the  styles of Louis XV.  and
During the approaching fall there
wil be more horse racing, judging by
present indications, than has been the
case for many years past. News
comes from all points of the arrangement of meets, every  fair of any im-
his  successor than anyone  else  in  the   portance   having   provided    for   races,
contemporary art history of the tunc.
No more perfect framework for lhe
charms of "lively woman" could he imagined than a Louis Seize room. Here
she may sit iu a dignified fautcuil upholstered in Beauvaise or Auboisson,
surrounded by beautiful relics of that
splendid and fastidious age, and dream
dreams of a future, better, perhaps, but
not the same.
while a number of independent programmes are in course of preparation.
On September ist the season will
open at Vancouver, lhe usual races taking place under the auspices of the
Vancouver Jockey Club. It will take
place at the Hastings track and will
last two days. The dates for other
meets have been announced ns follows:
Vernon, September 20th and 2st; Chilliwack   September  21st;   Ladner,   Sep-
A   fascinating  new  idea,   a  thing  so
happy in its simplicity that one wonders   (ember     2nd:     Kamloops,     September
why it lias not been ill common use in   27th   and   28th;   Victoria.    September
every household  for generations.    This   -'•"th. 28th,  and  29th;  New  Westmins-
is  nothing more nor less  than  an  in- ! ter, October 3rd, 4th, and 5th.
door conservatory,    It is a tall cabinet j     It  is predicted that the exceptionally
made of glass and fitted with shelves
and brackets for flower-pots, to be set
in a window—a sunny window, if possible—where the plants can get plenty
of light, and yet, being inside a room,
lhey can be kept in a more or less even
temperature and out of draughts; which
arc so ruinous to their frail lives. Here
it could be possible to keep flowering
plants and even exotic specimens (if
tbe room were sufficiently warm) all
the   year   round,   and   no   room   could
large number of events will attract
more outside horses than has been the
case heretofore. And, indeed, this
should prove correct if any reliance can
be placed upon the numerous inquiries
being received from thc Sound and
other points. With large entries, all
the meets should prove successful, and
what is more, British Columbians
should be given an opportunity to witness some real fast running and trotting.
Grass Culture
As we are now selling large and increasing quantities of
SUTTON'S FAMOUS LAWN GRASS SEEDS
for Grass Lawns, Croquet Lawns, Tennis Courts, Golf Links, and Bowling
Greens, it would seem advisable to give publicity to recent opinions of experts
on Grass Culture.
In climates where there is no liability to sharp October frost, FALL
seeding is preferable to spring seeding. The young grass roots get the fall
and winter moisture, and your lawn is ready  for use in summer.
Do not seed at all unless your lawn   is   PROPERLY   prepared   and   all
weed seeds germinated  and destroyed.       Excessive watering at any time is
a mistake; in the late summer months it is a fatal blunder.    Water carries v
ery little plant food; it acts as a dis-solvent for the foods on which the p
hints feed.
$i's worth of good fertilizer is worth $s's worth of water. You save
money and save the lawn if you give it a dressing of our
B.   &   K.   NO.   1   FERTILIZER
in the spring and fall. There are many good reliable fertilizers. We are not
so foolish as to say ours is better than the best, but we do say it is the outcome of many years' experience and experiment on the soils of British Columbia, and that every lawn in B. C. on which this fertilizer has been used has
kept bright and green all through the present dry summer by merely watering
REASONABLY once a week. The price is $2.25 per ioo-lb. sack, and the
official  analysis  is  as   follows:
ANALYSIS OF B. & K. No. 1 FERTILIZER
Extract from Bulletin No. 105 as Issued   by   the Laboratory of the  Inland
Revenue Department at Ottawa.
Nitrogen  stated  as  ammonia 11.22 per cent.
Soluble Phosphoric Acid  0.8    per cent.
Citric Soluble  7.1   per cent.
Insoluble    0.2   per cent.
Total     8.1   per cent.
Potash     0.4   per cent.
Moisture     7.96 per cent.
J. FAGAN, Analyst.
Our Expert will be glad to answer   any  inquiries  on  Grass  Culture  and
Fertilizers.   Kindly address all inquiries on this subject to
SEED   AND   FERTILIZER   DEPARTMENT,
BRACKMAN-KER MILLING CO.
125 Government St. 36 Hastings St. Front St, Front St.
Victoria. Vancouver. New Westminster. Nelson.
             B-K 118
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE.
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
Modern Refrigerated Meats
MEANS
Finer Quality, Greater Cleanliness and
Sweeter Meats.
Let us have a Trial Order to Convince You
of the advantages.
B.C. MARKET COMPANY, Ltd.
Corner Yates and Government Street. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER x 1906.
In this world there are only two
:agedies—one is not getting what one
ant, and the other is getting it. The
1st is much the worst—the last is a
feal tragedy.
Stewart Williams
IaUOTIONEEE and   COMMISSION AGENT
Cattle Sales a Specialty.
STEWAKT WILLIAMS
|The Auctioneer.      51 FORT STREET
Two Doors From Fell & Co.
British American
Trust Company,
Limited
OFFICES : Vancouver, B. C.
Grand Forks, B. C.
Victoria, B. C.
Transacts a General Financial and
Fiduciary Business. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Trustee, etc.
Buys and Sells High Grade Investment Securities. Manages, buys,
sells, rents and appraises real estate. Collects Rents and Places
Insurance. Negotiates Loans on
Real Estate. Makes Loans on
High Grade Securities.
Correspondence Solicited.
HAROLD M. DALY, Manager |
VICTORIA,   B. C.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice is hereby given that thirty days
Irter date I intend to apply to the Hon.
pe Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Vorks for a special license to cut and carry
)way timber from the following described
ind, situated In Port Renfrew District
n the north side of San Juan river, and
djolulng John Young on his north bouud-
fy: Commencing at a post mairked
fAlexr. Young," thence 40 chains west,
hence 80 chains north, thence 80 chains
^st, thence 80 chains south, thence 40
halns west to place of commencement, eon.
lining 640 acres.
1 Dated at Port Renfrew this 20th day of
lugust, 1906.
ALEXR.  YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
■ Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
fter date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
lie Chief Commissioner of Lands and
7orks for a special license to cut and
tvrry away timber from the following de-
cribed land, situated on the San Juan
(ver, Renfrew District, and adjoining
phn Young east boundary: Commencing
c a post marked "Alexr. Young," thence
) chains south, thence 80 chains east,
neuce 80 chains north, thence 80 chnins
rest, thence 40 chains south to place of
ommencement,   containing  640 acres.
J Dated at Port Renfrew, Renfrew District,
ais 10th day of August, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
TIMBER LICENSE.
Notice Is hereby given that thirty days
Ifter date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
he Chief Commissioner of Lands and
yorks for a special license to cut and
arry away timber from the following de-
bribed land, situated lu Port Renfrew,
.enfrew District: Commencing at a post
lanted 40 chains north of Alexr. Young
puthenst corner, marked "John Young"
juthwest comer," thence 80 chains north,
leuce 80 ohains east, thence 80 chains
juth, thence 80 chains west to place of
ommencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 16th day of
:ugust,  1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
, TIMBER LICENSE.
.»Notice is ihereby given that thirty days
titer date I intend to apply to the Hon.
lie Chief Commissioner of Lands and
j/orks for a special license to cut and
irry away timber from the following de-
Jrlbed lnnd, situated on the San Juan
per, Renfrew District, and adjoining E.
1 Palmer on hls enst boundary: Com-
jenclng at a post marked "John Young,"
)ence 40 chains north, thence 80 ohains
est, thence SO chains south, thence 80
Jains east, thence 40 chains north to
ace of commencement, containing 640
ires.
Dated nt Port Renfrew this 18th day of
Jgust,   1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaliuui and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner on the bank of a stream
running Into Yakoun river and marked
"Initial post No. 1, H. W. Treat's N. W.
corner," and running east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 ehnlns to place of commencement,  containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
H. W. TREAT.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum aud petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about ten miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, J. D. Sleenach's S. W. corner," and
running north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to the place of commencement,
containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
J. D. MEENACH.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof aud described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner and marked "Initial post
No. 1, Walter Oakes's S. B. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, contain.
ing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
WALTER OAKES.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. A. Brown's N. W. comer" and
running south 80 chains; thenee east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thenee west
80 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. A.  BROWN.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on 'Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, S. U. Williams's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
S. U. WILLIAMS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. E. Beardslee's N. E. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. E. BEARDSLEE.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner oi Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout nine miles from the west const
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southenst corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, D. H. Jnrvls's S. E. corner" nnd running north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
D. H. JARVIS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about six miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at the
southwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, G. J. Hodge's S. W. corner" and
mnnlng north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to plnce of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
G. J. HODGE.
■Notice Is hereby given that, ilO days
ter date, I intend to apply to I lie Hon.
lief Commissioner of Lands and Works
t permission to purchase the following
Scribed land, situated on the head ol
e Bulkly River: Commencing at a post
'irked R. B., N. W. oorner, thence run-
)g west 60 chains; thenee south 60
pins; thenee east 60 chains; thenee
frth 60 chains to point of commence-
[nt, and containing 480 acres, more or
W. N. CLARK, Locator.
ftulkly Valley, July 3rd, 1906.	
Jottce is hereby given that, 5) days
fer date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
>1ef Commissioner of Lands and Works
J permission to purchase the following
Scribed land on the Skeena River,
jjige V., Const District: Commencing at
Bost located at lhe S. W. corner ot E.
■^McGeachle's land and marked "J. M.
•Geacnie's N. W. corner"; tiience
4th 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
Jnce north 40 chains; thence west 40
bins to point of commencement, con-
'ning ICO acres, more or less.
J.   M.   McGEACHIE.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to npply to the
Hon. Ohlof Commissioner of Lands nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout six miles from the west coast
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at thc
southwest corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, F. M. Monger's S. W. corner" nnd
running north 80 chnins; thence enst 80
chnins; thence south 80 chnins; thence west
SO chnins to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1006.
P. M. MUNGER.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum nnd petroleum on lands located
on Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west const
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post planted at th"
northenst oorner and marked "Initlnl Tost
No. 1, II. r. Fogh's N. R. corner" nnd run-
nini; south SO ehnlns; tiience west 80
chnins; thenco nortli SO chains; tiience enst
80 ohains to place of commencement, con-
tnining 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H.  P.  FOGH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Edgar C. Fogh's S. E. corner" and
running north 80 chnins; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence enst
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
EDGAR C. FOGH.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing nt n post planted at the
southwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, H. L. Emmons's S. W. corner" and
running north 80 chnins; thence east 80
chains; thenee south 80 chnins; thence west
80 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing  640  acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
H. L. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys nfter date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post plnnted nt the
northwest corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, Victor Vlgelius'B N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 ehnlns to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
VICTOR VIGELIUS.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
dnys after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum aud petroleum on lands located
on Graham Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about flve miles from the west coast
thereof and described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner and marked "Initial Post
No. 1, M. G. Munley'S. N. E. corner" nnd
running south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
M. G. M'UNLEY.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
nsphaltum and petroleum ou lands located
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Charlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west const
thereof and described us follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
sonthenst corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, E. H. Gule's S. E. corner" and running north SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chnins; thence east
SO chains to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 2nd, 1906.
E.   H.  GUIE.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds and
Woirks for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lnnds located
on Grahnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from the west coast
thereof nnd described as follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted at the
southenst corner nnd mnrked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. Lnngllle's S. E. corner" and running north 80 chains; thence west 80
ehnlns; thence south 80 ehnlns; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
W. LANGILLE.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Ohlef Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grahnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout flve miles from the west const
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing at a post plnnted nt the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, W. P. Flint's N. W. corner" and
running south 80 chnins; thenee enst 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence
west 80 chains to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres..
Located August 2nd,  1906.
W. F.  FLINT.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
dnys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for a licence to prospeet for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grnhnm Islnnd, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout six miles from thc west const
thereof nnd described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted nt the
northwest corner nnd marked "Initlnl Post
No. 1, F. W. Crnry's N. W. corner" nnd
running south 80 chains; thence cast 80
chains; thence north SO chnins; thence west
80 chnins to plnce of commencement, containing 640 ncres.
Loented August 2nd, 1006.
F, W. CRARY.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt Thirty (30)
ilnys nfter dnte I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nnd
Works for n licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum nnd petroleum on lnnds loented
on Grahnm Islnnd, Queen Charlotte group,
about seven miles from tbe west const
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt a post plnnted at the
northeast corner nnd mnrked "Initlnl Tost
No. 1, J. Albert Johnson's N. E. corner"
nnd running south SO chains; tbence enst
80 chains; tbence north 80 chnins; tbence
west 80 chains to plnce of commencement,
containing 010 ncres.
Located August 2nd,  10O0.
J.  ALBERT ,TOIINSO.>.
NOTICE is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for n licence to prospect for coal,
asphaltum and petroleum on lands located
on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte group,
about eight miles from the west coast
thereof und described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted' at the
northeast corner nnd marked "Initial Post
No. 1, R. S. Eskridge's N. E. corner," and
running south 80 ehnlns; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thence east
SO chnins to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1900.
R.  S.  ESKRIDGE.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
nfter dnte I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchuse the following land,
situated on Works Channel: Commencing
at a post marked "Initlnl Post T. H. W.,"
thence east 20 chains, thence north 20
chnins, thence west 20 chnins, thence north
20 ohains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 40 chnins, more or less, to shore
line; thence following shore line to point
of commencement, contuining 240 acres
more or less.
8t T. H. WATSON.
Port Simpson, B. C„ Aug. 16, 1900.
NOTICE Is hereby given that Thirty (30)
days after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a licence to prospect for conl,
nsphaltum and petroleum on lauds located
on Grnhnm Island, Queen Chnrlotte group,
nbout seven miles from the west coast
thereof and described ns follows:
Commencing nt n post planted at the
northwest corner and mnrked "Initial Poat
No. 1, C. D. Emmons's.N. W. corner" and
running south SO chnins; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chnins; thenee west
SO chains to plnce of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Located August 1st, 1906.
C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the west half
of southeast quarter and west half of
northeast quarter, all In Section 8, Township 6, Coast Range 5, Bulkley Valley;
containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres, more or less.
Dated July 25th,  1906.
aull ERNEST MORIN.
No. 27.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend lo apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to out and oarry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted near the
iniiial post of Application No. 26, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutn 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 28.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to out and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  Distriot:
Beginning at a post planted on the
west side of Union Island about 20 chains
south of a group of small islands in Blind
Entrance, thence 80 chains east, thence 60
cnains north, thence 40 chains west,
thence 40 chains north, thence west about
20 chains to the shore of Blind Entrance,
ihence southerly along said shore to
point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
53 and 54, Metchosin District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
nfter date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the southwest
quarter section 17, Township 6, Const
Range 5, Bulkley Valley; containing (160)
one hundred and sixty ncres, more or less.
JOS.  BOURGON.
Aldermere, July 25,  1906. null
NOTICE.
Claim No. 1.
Further take notice that 30 days after
date 1 intend to apply to the Honorable
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
lands, commencing at post planted at the
N. E. corner of T. L. 7197, or on the line
at corner of said claim, thence W. 80
ohains, N, 80 chains, E. 80 chains, S. 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald.
Claim No. 2.
Take notice that 30 days after date I
iniend to apply to the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for a
special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described
lands: Commencing at post planted 30
chains from S. W. corner on the line of
T. L. 7197, thence N. 80 ohains, thence W.
80 chains, S. 80 chains, E. 80 chains to
point of commencement.
Dated this 18th day of July, 1906.
p. Mcdonald.
No. 20.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Tahsish Arm, Kyuquot Sound, Rupert
District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east boundary of Application No. 13,
about 60 chains south of the northeast
corner thereof, thence east 160 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west 160
chains, thence south along said boundary
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound. June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 24.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
soutl. shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence north 40 chain.., thence east 80
chains, thence about 40 chains north to
the shore of Narrow Gut Inlet, thence
following the shore in a westerly direction to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 25.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to apply to the Chiet Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
lo cut and carry away timber from the
following described lan<L situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Application No. 1, on
Kokshittle Arm, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
No. 26.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut und carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
east side of a river unnamed entering into Clan nlnlck Harbor about 1% miles
from the mouth, thence east 60 chains,
north 80 chains, wesl 80 chains, south 80
chain3, east 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH,
TIMBER   LICENSE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, thirty
(30) days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
nnd enrry nwuy timber from the following
described lands, situated ln Port Renfrew,
Renfrew District: Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner of Section
Eighteen (18), Township Ten (10), marked
"Alexr. Young, S. E. Corner," thence
eighty chains west; thence eighty chains
north; thence eighty chains east; thence
eighty chains south to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at  Port  Renfrew  this 11th day
of August, 1906.
nulS ALEX.  YOUNG.
No. 21.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
Intend lo apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
southeast corner of No. 8 Application on
Tahsish Arm, thence north along the east
boundary of No. 8 40 chains, thence east
SO chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
enst SO chnins, thence south about 20
chains to the shore, thence following the
shore southwesterly to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt, 60 days
after dnte, I, the undersigned, will apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to lease or purchase
the following described land, namely, ln
Hesnlt Hnrbor, Tlupana Arm, Nootka
Sound, commencing at a post marked J.
Mortimer, Southenst Corner, running 40
chains west, tbence north to shore line,
thence following the shore line to the
point of commencement, containing 80
acres, more or less.
Victoria, B.  C, July 11th, 1906.
nulS JOHN   MORTIMER.
No. 22.
Take notice that, 30 days after date, I
intend to npply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for n special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described land, situate on
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert  District:
Beginning at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on
Kokshittle Arm, tiience east 40 chains,
north 89 chains, west Co chains, south to
the shore of Kokshittle Arm, thence
southeasterly nlong said shore to get one
mile of southing, ihence cast about 40
chains to a point north of the Initial
stake, thence south 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 1900.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Notice Is hereby given that, CO days
after date, I Intend to npply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a lease of the foreshore opposite Lots
45, 46 and 47, Esquimalt District.
ALBERT A. ARGYLE.
Vancouver, B. C, July 4th, 1906.
No. 23.
Take notice that, 30 dnys after date, I
intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works tor a special license
to cut and carry away timber from tlle
following described bind, situate on
the Ka-o-winch River, Kokshittle Arm,
Kyuquot  Sound,   Rupert   District:
Beginning at a post planted on the
nortli boundary about 20 chains west of
the northeast corner of Application No.
7. on the east bank of the Ka-o-winch
Rivor, thence cast 20 chains, north 160
chains, cast 20 chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more or
less.
Kyuquot Sound, June 14, 190C.
JOHN  HIRSCH.
Notice is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply lo the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license to eul and curry away
timber from the following described lnnd
ln Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, on the wesl side of the GorJon
River, adjoining A. Wheeler's claim on
the southeast corner. Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked J.
Young's northeast corner, ihence soulh
SO chains, west 80 chains, norih 80 chains,
and enst 80 chains to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres. Located June 9th, 1906.
J. YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 Intend to apply lo tbe Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special license lo cut and carry e.way
Umber from ihe following described land
In Port Renfrew District, Vancouver Island, adjoining A. E. Manncll's claims on
the southeast corner: Commencing at a
post on the northeast corner marked A.
Wheeler's (jr.) northeast corner, thence
south 80 chains, west SO chains, north FO
chnins, and east 80 chains to lhe place
of  commencement,  containing  040  acres.
Located June 9th, 1906.
A. WHEELER, Ji
Notice is hereby given thnt, 60 cloys
after chile, I intend to apply to the Hon,
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for Mormlsslon to purchase, lhe following
described land on the Skeena River,
Range V., Coast District: Starting from a
post located at llic nortlieosl corner of
the Kitsilas Indian Reserve, and marked
"E. J. McOioachle, S. W. corner"; ihence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 4n chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
0. ,1. McGEACHIE.
Kitsilas, May 2Sth, 1906. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1.  1906.
$ Social and        %
t Personal. *
Dr. and Mrs. Fagan returned on
Tuesday from a trip to Alberni.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gore and Miss
Arbuckle have returned from camping.
* *   *
Miss Violet Hickey is confined to
the house through illness.
* *   *
Mrs. J. S. Harvey returned on
Thursday   from  a   few   days'  visit   at
Crofton,
* *   *
Miss Wark, Mrs. Rattenburg, and
the Misses Gaudin spent Thursday at
Shawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir gave a
dinner party on Wednesday evening
last at Government House.
* *   *
Mrs. Marpole is the guest of her
father, Colonel Holmes, "Wollaston"
Esquimalt road.
* *   *
Miss Phyllis Eberts returned on Friday   from   Koksila,    having  been   the
guest of Mrs. Prior.
* *   *
Miss Marion Martin (Rossland) is
the guest of Miss Cecily Gait, 'The
Firs," Lampson street.
* *   *
Mrs. C. C. Worsfold (New Westminster) is the guest of her mother,
Mrs. Charles, Fort street.
* *   *
Mrs. Eberts entertained at the tea
hour on Sunday afternoon last in honor
of Mrs. C. C. Worsfold.
* * ■ *
Mr. and Mrs. Roper gave a smart
luncheon on Wednesday last at the Dallas, covers being laid for twelve.
* *   *
Mrs. Henderson, who has been visiting here for some time, leaves for her
home in Vernon on Monday.
* *   *
Mrs. Carruthers, who has been visiting in Victoria for several weeks, returns home thc first of the week.
* *   *
Misses Alice Wadingham and Marion
Campbell, of Lima, Peru, left for home
yesterday, after spending a month with
their friend, Miss Edna Dack.
* »   *
Miss Doris Clute, who has been the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Beauchamp
Tye, has returned this morning to her
home in Westminster.
* *   *
Miss Dorothy Beanlands left on Wednesday last for the East, being accompanied as far as Vancouver by her
father.   Rev.   Canon   Beanlands.
* *   ♦
Mrs. Fred Pemberton was hostess at
a large and most delightful garden
party at ''Mount Joy" on Thursday afternoon last, from four to seven.
* *   *
Senator and Mrs. Macdonald entertained at the tea hour on Wednesday
afternoon last at "Armadale" a large
number  of   friends   being  present.
* *   *
Mrs. Crow-Baker was hostess at a
small afternon tea given on Tuesday
afternoon at "Sissinghurst," Gorge
road. The affair was in honor of Mrs.
Ogilvle,
* *  *
Mrs. Hickman Tye entertained at
luncheon on Wednesday last in honor
of Mrs. C. C. Worsfold (New Westminster).    Covers were laid  for eight.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Malins spent a
few days in town this week returning
to Westminster on Wednesday morning.
* *   *
The Misses Blackwood leave during
thc coming week for "Brunot Hall."
Spokane, Wash., to continue their
studies  for a vear or more.
* *   *
Mrs. Prior and Miss Perry returned
this week from their summer home at
Koksila, accompanied hy Miss Olive
Bryden  and  Miss Phyllis Eberts.  who
have been their guests.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gait, who have
been occupying tbe "Firs," Lampson
street, the residence of Mr. G. F. Mathews, expect to lc:ivc for Winnipeg
about tbe middle of September, to take
up their  residence there.
* *   *
"Cricket week" is over, and will lone
be remembered by Victorians ns being
a mo«t enjoyable affair. Ten was
served each afternoon by different
ladies, Mrs. Amberry. Mrs. Cobbett.
Mrs. Irving, tbe Misses Mason, Mrs.
Beauchamp Tye and Mrs. Arthur Coles.
On Saturday afternoon a particularly
large crowd assembled on the grounds
the Governor and Mrs. Dunsmuir and
party being among the number. The
cup was oresented to the Victoria team
bv Mrs. Dunsmuir.
The flannel and calico dance given on
Friday evening last by the Cricket Club
was an unqualified success from every
point of view. The ladies' hockey club
assisted thc cricketers and deserve a
great deal of credit for their efforts.
The music provided by Miss Thain's
orchestra was all that could be desired,
and was evidently appreciated, judging
by the number of encores demanded by
the dancers. Some of the prettiest
costumes worn were:
Mrs. Lampman's gown of cream silk
and lace.
Miss Hickey wore a dainty pink
frock.
Mrs. Beauchamp Tye wore a painted
rose-bud organdie which looked very
dainty.
Miss Violet Hickey wore a pretty
white gown.
Miss Alice Beel appeared to advantage in black.
Miss Beanlands wore a simple white
frock.
Miss Beatrice Gaudin's gown was a
dainty white.
Miss Vera Gosnell looked pretty in
a white dress.
Miss W. Mainwaring-Johnson looked
sweet in blue mull, trimmed with lace
and blue shoulder knots.
Miss Doris Clue looked sweet and
girlish in pale blue organdie and lace,
Miss Viva Blackwood wore a pretty
white frock.
Mrs. Norton looked well in a pink
gown.
Miss Heyland wore a pretty cream
frock.
Miss Brown's dress was pale pink
mull.
Miss Violet Sweet appeared to advantage in white.
Miss Dolly Sehl looked very handsome in a red gown.
Mrs. Harvey wore a pretty cream
costume.
Miss E. Eaton wore pale blue muslin.
Among the guests were: Judge and
Mrs. Lampman, Mr. and Mrs. Bean
champ Tye, Rev. Canon Beanlands,
Miss Reanlands, Mrs. E. M. Johnson,
Miss Johnson, Mrs. Norton, Mr. and
Miss Heyland, the Misses Bell, the
Misses Hickey, Miss Brown, Messrs.
Brown, Mrs. Sweet, Miss Sweet, Miss
Mackintosh, Col. Heclhermer, Mr. J.
Slillwell Clute. Miss Gosnell, Miss
Raymond, Miss Nichollen, Mrs. Nich-
ollen. Mrs. Watkin, Miss Hardie, Miss
Nash, Mrs. Carr Hilton, Mr. Lyon, the
Misses Lyon, Mr. Greening, Mr. Coles,
Mr. L. S. V. York, Mr. Austin Goward,
Mr. W. York. Mrs. Eaton, Miss Eaton,
Mr. H. Taylor, Mr. Rocheforr, Mr. J.
Bridegman, Mr. J. Cambie, Mr. J. G.
Brown, Mr. Walter Brown, Mr. Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Garnett, Mr. Barnacle, Miss Fletcher, .Mrs. Simpson,
Miss White, Mrs. Sheldon (Portland),
Mr. Bullen, Mr. Bell. Mr. Raymur, Mr.
Lawrence, and many others.
The Corner Of a Heart.
By Roy Farrell Greene.
One  corner   of  her  girlish   heart   she
yielded first to me,
And balled there, because the rest was
occupied, you see,
By tenants  who were kin to her, and
who, as you'll divine,
Through having dwelt there many years
had  stronger claims than  mine.
As slight concession e'en as this most
proud was I to win,
And   with   affection   closely   packed,   I
managed to move in;
But soon I found the quarters cramped,
and with a wooer's art
I coaxed an added portion to that corner of her heart.
I
I quite forget which one it was my
spread of love displaced—
If Cousin John's or Uncle Will's heart-
lodgings were effaced
By this designing move of mine. But
someone, it is plain,
Lost out while I was winning the expansion  of  domain.
And yet. the corner thus enlarged had
held mc but ii day
When, "Someone's got to move!" I
vowed, "we're in each other's way!
Of tenants here you might transfer to
Memory a part!
I'll have to have more room than just
one corner of your heart!"   .
The transfer was arranged, and oh, lhe
ripple of ber laugh.
When   she   avowed,     "Your     corner's
grown   till   now   much   more   than
half
My heart you're occupying, dear.   You
well  know  what that means—
That  all   the  other  tenants,  now,  arc
crowded liko sardines!"
"Well, more    of    them    will  have    to
move!" with candor 1 avowed,
"While those whom you select to stay
must still more closely crowd!"
And move they did (clear out al last),
which  shows the greedy part
A  man   will  play  if he's  allowed  one
corner in a heart!
START RIGHT AT
SCHOOL
WITH A PAIR OF OUR NEW  STOCK   OF
BOOTS AND SHOES
£__££ JUST RECEIVED FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
30 Pairs Boys' Calf, Good value at  $2.00
30 Pairs  Youths'  Box  Calf Lace  Boots, at  1.50
60 Pairs Misses' Box Calf Lace Blue!, er  1.75
30 Pairs Children's Box Calf Lace Bluiber  1.25
60 Pairs Low Heel Lace Boots of La dies' Sizes, 2y2 to 6  2.00
60 Pairs Spring Heels for Ladies, 2i/2 to 6  2.50
35 Pairs Men's Box Calf Goodyear Welt  3.00
60 Pairs Men's Blucher Box Calf  3.00
24 Pairs Ladies' Fine Lace Boots  2.50
40 Pairs Ladies' Goodyear Welt  2.50
School Bags in Great Variety.
JAMES MAYNARD,
85 DOUGLAS STREET
Phone 1232 Odd Fellows' Block
A
FEATURE of the
Semi-ready trousers—one found no place
else than high grade
custom tailoring—is the
high waist.
The waist is made to
fit perfectly and yet give
comfort—plenty of cloth
— as you can see for
yourself.
There are straps on
the back of each pair to
tighten—but you won't
need them; these trousers fit.
The legs are neatly
shaped — conventional
in width and "set" beautifully.
Delivered two hours after trying on.
Bo WILLIAM
8-70 Yates Street,   SOLE AGENTS.
RAINCOATS, OVERCOATS AND SUITS
At $io, $12, $15, $18, $20, $22 and $25.
TROUSERS—At $3, $4, $5, and $b.
TWO THOUSAND GARMENTS CARRIED IN STOOK AT THE
SEllI-READY WARDROBE

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