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Week Mar 28, 1908

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 Victoria Edition
iTTOTy^nryye-TeTTyYrryrrgTr
|: Kingsford Smith & Co. j
Stock and General
|> AUCTIONEERS
I,  tCommiasion and Real Estate Agents.
I*
860 Granville,
"Vancouver,
-i
I juuuxt-tg-UB»t juuuuuuuma i.
Public
t/Victoria and Vaacoaver B. 6.
IVol. V.   No. 9
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908
The Week is not going to
Etadyard join in the hue and cry
Upling. against   Kudyard  Kipling
because his first two letters
published in Colliers do not make satisfactory reading either for Englishmen or
Canadians.   Judged by them alone somewhat severe criticism might be justifiable,
but it is only fair to remember that they
are a part and not the whole of the series
They may record Kipling's impressions as
lie received them and not as they were possibly modified as the result of subsequent
experience.   When the series has appeared
Che Week will be prepared to deal with
|heir subject matter as a whole.    Mean-
vhile it would be well to remember that
Ilie equipment of a competent critic in-
jludes a capacity for viewing the subject
|nder discussion from every standpoint,
deluding that of the writer.   There is a
lery marked tendency among Canadian
Iriters in particular to praise a man as
|>ng as he pleases them and to declare
lat they have no use for him when he
|ives utterance to unpalatable truths.   No
ae ever received a greater ovation than
reeted Kipling on his recent tour through
?e Dominion.    It mattered not where
went all sorts and conditions of men
(rostrated themselves at his shrine.   This
las undoubtedly, due to a recognition of
pe great service he has rendered in arous-
Ig the Empire to active sympathy with
aperialistic sentiment.    His addresses
ere admirably conceived in the loftiest
■rain  of  loyalty   and  patriotism.    He
piced the Canadian aspiration for nation-
led, and he furnished an historic, if not
fcry elegant phrase, to point out the true
llution of the immigration difficulty.    In
le whole of his addresses there was hard-
a line to which exception could be
(ken, aud he left Canada holding a higher
Isition in the regard of the people than
ler before,    It was only to be expected
lat on such a tour he should confine him-
llf to suggestion, and to pointing out thc
road lines upon which a nation must be
lilt.    It is equally natural that on his
fturn, with the net result of his journey-
spread out before him he should for
|e first time assume the role of the candid
litic.   He may be mistaken, he may have
liled to understand the Canadian char-
fter and to grasp the true spirit of Ca-
adian sentiment on many leading ques-
lons, but to assume this at the present
lage is to discredit thc intelligence and
le judgment of a man who has proved
|rough a series of years that he is pheno-
enally gifted with both.    If the criti-
pns now being directed towards Kipling
justified then one of two things must
|ve happened, either he never had sound
dgment and correct observation or some-
ing has recently transpired to under-
|ne both.   Canadian papers have gone so
as to say that he has had an overdose
■(flattery, and that it has turned his head.
le Week cannot see the force of this ex-
pnation.    Kipling lias received quite as
(ich adulation from his own countrymen
■ years past without betraying any weak-
bs of this kind.   A man who has been
EDITORIAL
idolized in England is hardly likely to
experience much elation at the fact that
Canada has burnt insense before him. It
would be well to go easy in this matter,
and to remember the magnificent services
which Kipling has rendered the Empire.
He has not lost his reason in a day, and
however erroneous some of his impressions
may appear people will at least be in a
better position to appraise their value when
the argument is completed and all the
reasons have been assigned. It is, however, permissable for any Canadian and
indeed for that matter any British subject to express regret that Kipling should
have allowed his letters to appear in Colliers. There is only one possible explanation, which is, that he sold in the highest
market. It may be argued that a writer
has the same privilege in this regard as
any other producer, but a writer who has
received such marks of honour from his
own people and such lavish emoluments
that a few thousand dollars more or less
cannot affect him might reasonably have
been expected to appreciate the true sentiment of the people for whom he writes,
and have refrained from making' one of
the m©st unscrupulous and bitterest
enemies of the Empire the medium
through which to give his letters to the
W-orld. If this is to be taken as an indication of Kipling's true character it looks
as if even his most enthusiastic admirers
might have to revise some of their conclusions.
Woman
The article on Woman Suffrage from the facile pen
of Mr. C. H. Gibbons which
appeared in the last issue of
The Week has attracted widespread attention as an important contribution from
actual experience of a subject which at the
present time is attracting considerable attention. Several letters of comment have
reached this office and among them one
signed "Enquirer" which seeks further information. The questions propounded by
this correspondent are as follows: "If the
women have the franchise of voting do
they pay equal taxes with meu . Is thei"?
such a thing as Poll tax and who pays it.
Are the women allowed to sit in Parliament and if so how is that arranged ? Do
the women have to serve on juries, civil,
grand, petit, criminal, and coroner's ? Are
the women able to take all positions, judiciary, executive, ancl administrative . Are
the women found in the Militia and is this
matter regulated by women's, votes?
Finally, in .New Zealand, where women enjoy the advantage of the franchise, are
men and women equal in all things, and
are men as chivalrous to the women as
here ?" As practically all these questions
have to be answered in the negative or in
a sense unfavourable to the attitude of the
suffragists it may reasonably be concluded
that "Enquirer's" letter was intended to
be more suggestive than investigatory. The
points he touches on are well taken, and
open up a wide vista of possibilities.
Everyone wishes to do justice to women
and to any cause whicli they champion,
but if the leaders of the movement would
devote a little time to dealing with the
points suggested in "Enquirer's" letter
they would advance their cause far morn
decisively than by engaging in the hysterical    and   ill-advised   demonstrations
which have hitherto characterized their
campaign.
A Great
Movement
Not enough has been heard
in the West of the Moral
and Social Keform Council
of Canada. That its head
office is in Toronto is unfortunate for the
cause, but that cannot be helped. Apart
from that no criticism can be offered with
respect to the movement or those behind
it. The Secretary is the Eev. J. G.
Shearer, the practical founder of the
L. D. A., a man of high character and remarkable executive abilities who in eight
short years succeeded in making that organization the most powerful Moral
Agency in the Dominion. It is not to detract from the merits of Mr. Shearer's
colleagues and successors to say that he
made the L. D. A. He has now transferred his services to another organization,
still in the line of reform. The movement,
involved many sacrifices ^n Mr. Shearer's
part, not the least important being the severance of official ties with those who had
worked alongside him in the great cause of
Sunday Observance. But Mr. Shearer's
move is not all sacrifice, for he now finds
himself at the head of a splendid organization, which embraces nearly all the leading churches of the Dominion, and the
Trades and Labour Congress of Canada,
and which lias an executive consisting of
most influential and accomplished men.
These include the Primate of Canada,
the Venerable President of the Methodist
Church, Sir Thomas W. Taylor, Keverend
Canon Tucker, and many others equally
well known. The organization has branches
in every Province and will undoubtedly
be a power for good and a potent influence
in public affairs. Mr. Shearer is a broad-
minded man, he fights in the open, is the
avowed enemy of social abuses, and realizes thai, many reform projects have been
wrecked by their intolerance and unfairness. Xo one feels more strongly than
he the need of broad-mindedness and open-
mindedness in planning the reform efforts,
and the imperative necessity of promoting
reforms by moderate and rational means.
The Week's advice to the public is to watch
Mr. Shearer, he is a man to be reckoned
with, and one who will go far.
Future
Premiers
It is surely a little premature to discuss the subject
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier's
successor; it is surely superfluous at tliis stage to open 11 campaign
for the purpose of boosting Mr. Leniieiix.
The latter gentleman is one of the men
whom Tlie Week has long ago spotted for
the highest honours in the gift of the
Dominion. The West knows nothing of
him, which is a pity, for ho is in every
respect a good fellow. He is easily one
of the finest orators that Canada has produced ; lie is highly gifted intellectually,
is a distinguished graduate of Laval, a
man of high personal character, with
charm of maimer. Liberals and Conservatives alike concede that he is the legitimate successor of Sir Wilfrid Laurier as
the leader of French Canadian Sentiment,
but that he will succeed to the Premiership is very much more than doubtful.
To attempt to exhalt his claims above those
of Mr. Fielding is bolli unfair and ridiculous.    In point of years, brilliant service,
■^nnnnnnnfnni * * mmvram
Stew«it Williams K.CJutaa     "
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION ARD
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FORT ST. VICTORIA, R. C.
^JUUUUJ1tt M.tt tt 9 ,tt tiMJUUm
One Dollar Pe* Annum
and the possession of certain conservative
qualities so essential in a Prime Minister,
Mr. Fielding has proved his fitness; in
this arena Mr. Lemieux still has to win his
spurs. Sir Wilfrid Laurier is an exceptional man with exceptional gifts, but for
this it would have been impossible for him
to have held the reins of office for twelve
years, but signs are multiplying that his
Government has reached the end of its
tether, and it is certain that for many
years to come Canada will not tolerate
another French Canadian Premier. This
is not the time to discuss the effect upon
the future of this Dominion of the Laurier
regime although the time is near at hand,
but it would be very easy to demonstrate
that on the one hand it has infused as
much of the French element into the public
service as will last for a very long time,
and on the other that the excellencies of
the administration are due not so much
with tlie initiative of Sir Wilfrid Laurier
as to his less brilliant but more reliable
Britisli Colleagues.
Martin
Luther.
The Colonist with questionable wisdom inserted a
lengthy letter on the subject
of "Martin Luther and the
Bible," signed C. Caine. The Week understands that the wrtier is a priest of the
Koman Catholic Church, and notes with
regret that it was obliged to omit portions
of his letter upon grounds not at all complimentary to the writer. No good purpose can be served by opening the columns
of a newspaper to religious controversy,
it can only engender bitterness, especially
when one of the controversionalists is a
cleric. Some of the language used by
Father' Caine could hardly be justified
even in a Church Magazine; it is distinctly
out of place in the public press. The impulse which led the Colonist to insert the
letter in reply to one of its own contributions was more creditable to its sense of
fairness than to its regard for the public.
An  Eastern   despatch   re-
Applauding      rorts t]iat at ., -meeting 0f
Disloyalty. the Ancient order of Hibernians*, held in Toronto the
other night, the audience applauded contemptible reference to the Mother Country. For this truly despicable conduct the
Colonist very properly takes the Toronto
audience to task although if it knew Toronto it would spare itself the trouble; but
it went a little too far when it said that
the speaker would get a different sort of
reception if he undertook to express similar sentiments in British Columbia. Let
the tauth be told though the heavens fall;
it is only a few short months since 11
crowded meeting in the City Flail, Victoria, hissed and hooted at every suggestion that British interests should bc considered in connection with the Asiatic Immigration Question. AVhen during a temporary lull Canon Beanlands demanded of
the audience: "Do you say that Imperial
interests should be entirely disregarded in
this matter?" there was an almost unanimous yell of "yes," and the warmth and
excitement of the audience showed that
they meant it, or believed they did. Is
this a natural phenomenon ami therefore
exempt from ordinary judgment, or did it
mean the same in Victoria as the contemptible applause of the Toronto audience? The Week is not the only organ
whicli would like a straight answer to this
question. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
■^^^S^SJ?*-^*^^^^*^*^^
<r Short Story  *
ifififififfyfyifip ^^ # ^
COUSIN AMY.
By W. S. Maugham.
grand-
1 can-
Amy is the daughter of my
mother's nehew by marriage,
not imagine that she is any relative of
mine; but she insists tliat we are
cousins, ancl we call one another by
our Christian names. Her idea of the
corinect'on is that she should treat me
with all thc unpleasant frankness of a
close relation, while on my side there*
should be the extreme politeness, the
flattering attentiveness, of a distant
acquaintance. This was all very well
when 1 was eighteen and Cousin Amy
twenty-six; but now I am five-and-
thirty, and Cousin Amy has ceased to
count her birthdays. She does not
realize that this makes all the difference in the world; and 1 have never i
been able to lind the exact words in
which to frame so delicate a statement. Cousin Amy lives in the country, and J was much surprised to meet
her face to face in Piccadilly. She
shook me warmly by the hand.
"Row nice to see you after all these
ages! We must have a talk, mustn't
we?"
1 replied that it would be very
agreeable.
"Well, I'm only here for twenty-
four hours,' she pursued. "Are you
doing anything this evening?"
"No, I'm not," 1 replied with
alacrity.
1 thought it would be pleasant to
dine for once in a way at Cousin
Amy's expense. In years gone by she
had been apt to presume too far oil
the privilege (which her sex has never
shown any wish to dispute with mine)
of paying the bill.
"That's capital!" she said. "Then
you can take me out to dinner."
"The prospect fills me with enthusiasm," 1 retorted icily.
"You know I've become a food reformer?"
"This is nuts," I murmured softly
to myself, considering that the fruit
in question was reported to be not
only nutritious, but cheap. I went on
with more earnestness: "And where
does one eat reformed food?"
"Oh, anywhere," she answered,
airily. "I'm not a faddist, you know.
Now, I'm going to tell you something
very extraordinary: Iv'e never dined
at the Ritz."
There was a pause, during which
you might have heard a pin drop in
Piccadilly.   But Amy broke it gaily.
"Well, I'll meet you there at eight,
shall 1? And don't order anything
beforehand, since I eat next to nothing, you know."
This, at any rate, was consoling, for
I had been saving up my money in
order to spend a week in Paris and
improve my mind. Amy tripped
lightly away; and I, finding I had but
a couple of pounds in my pocket,
thought it would be wise in case of
emergency to change a cheque.
When wc sat down in thc evening,
Cousin Amy put her gloves on thc
table and looked round with a happy
smile. "I know we're going to have
a charming dinner," she said.
The waiter handed me the menu;
but Cousin Amy is a practical woman.
"Now, you'd far better let me order
my own dinner," she said. "I only
want a snack; and you see, as 1 can't
eat dead beasts, I'd better choose
what I can cat."
Thc proposal seemed eminently reasonable.
Amy cast her eye down the menu.
"At all events, wc can start with
some hors d'oeuvres," she said. "Oh!
and how delicious! There's potage
bisque."
I had observed in my glance at the
bill-of-farc that this was thc most expensive soup on the list; but Cousin
Amy never noticed these things. I
wondered acidly how she had reached
the quite mature age which I positively knew was hers, without acquiring
the elements of common sense. 1
ordered the hors d'oeuvres and the
potage bisque.
Cousin Amy frowned at thc menu.
"It seems very extraordinary that you '
have no salmon," she said, in the ar- *
rogant way in which women generally
address their inferiors,    "lt must bc
in season."
"Well, we have some, madam, but
we haven't put it on the card. This
is thc first weve had."
"There!" said Cousin Amy, in triumph. "You see, you can always
get things if you ask for them."
I shuddered to think of the i_rice I
should have to pay for salmon which
had only come on the London market
that morning. I made up my mind
that I should have to choose a cheaper
hotel in Paris than the one upon
which I had lixed. I pointed out to
Amy that no woman who respected
herself could eat a red lish after a
red soup.
"Yes, I know that. I do feci rather
a barbarian; but I must eat salmon, as
it's full of protcids."
"But surely," 1 protested, "you told
me that you never ate horrible dead
beasts."
Amy opened her eyes wide. "Oh!
that only applies to warm-blooded
creatures; otherwise I couldn't hava
eaten thc soup."
"It's lucky there's not whale on thc
menu," I murmured, as I meekly ordered the salmon.
I was beginning to think that oen
did oneself rather well on reformed
food.
The hors d'oeuvres wcre set on the
table; and Amy, explaining that sh<_
had to cat what she could, emptied the
entire contents of three dishes on her
plate. I thought they looked rather
nice myself, but I hadn't the face tc
ask the waiter for more.
Then another waiter brought me ;*.
list of wines. This was my opportunity, and I seized it like a man. Cousin Amy was certainly growing tin-
comonly stout; and it is well known
that obesity is best treated by abstention from liquid for two hours
after the repast.
"As a food reformer, I take it that
you only have a cup of coffee after
eating," I said. "I shall have a
whiskey-and-soda."
"How did you get such a ridiculous
idea into your head?" she answered
briskly. "On the contrary, my doctor
has ordered me to drink wine. You
see, I have to keep myself up."
"Ah! what will you have?" I said,
gloomily.
"Oh! I don't really mind, so long as
it's very dry."
I looked at Cousin Amy. "Do you
remember thc story of thc man who
was taking a pretty American out to
dinner? He asked her what she would
drink. 'I guess I'll have champagne,'
she said. 'Guess again,' he answered.'
"What a sell!" cried Amy, laughing merrily.
I have read somewhere that women
have a greater delicacy of perception
than men. I certainly never knew
any one slower than Cousin Amy to
take a hint.
She watched me turn over the
pages. "If you really have no preference," she said, "I think I would like
Veuve Cliquot. I always feel that we
women ought to stand together."
It appeared that Cousin Amy was
a suffragist as well as a food reformer; and after I had ordered thc champagne which accorded with her principles, she favoured mc with her views
on thc cause. Amy thoroughly enjoyed the potage bisque, and she positively gloated over the salmon. The
obsequious waiter came for further
orders.
"Now you see what an economical
person I am to havc to dinner," said
Amy. "Auy one else would ask for
entrees and roasts and all kinds of
abominations like that. But I only
want a couple of vegetables, and I've
done."
"I remember your saying you only
wanted a snack."
She turned to the waiter. She
thinks it is so nice to get on friendly
terms with a waiter, hc likes him
to take an intelligent interest in her
food.
"Now. I'll tell you what I want:
you know those great big asparagus,
as large round as your arm? Well, T
want some of them."
"Very good, madam," said hc.
"It's so lucky 1 came up to town
just when things I really like arc iu
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To Build?
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on  "Homes."
E. STANLEY MITT0N
Architect
VANCOUVEB, B.C.
The
Thermos
Bottle.
A great invention: keeps liquids hot for 24 hours. In cool
weather you can carry tea, coffee, broth, soup, boullion, etc.,
as Uot as you can drink for one
whole day. In hot weather you
can keep ice-cold liquids ice cold
for three days. Tourists, Motorists, Yachtsmen, Hunters, etc.,
find a Thermos Bottle really indispensable. Leading physicians
and nurses strongly recommend
tills wonderful bottle for the sick
room. The largest baby carriage manufacturers are now
making carriages with a special
compartment for the Thermos
Bottle.
Prices: Pint, $5.00. Quart, $7.50.
Call here and let me demonstrate
its many other merits.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
"I Want
Style "
And you're right.
It is style in Clothes that
shows the difference between the
Prince and  the Peasant.
A   Smart,   spic-and-span,   sty-' .
lish Suit is a business asset.
AU th*  striking-  new  features '
are  here,   as  well  as   the  more {
conservative outs—every  one in,
exactly   the    right    fashionable
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But best of all, this style and
shapeliness is tailored into each
garment—it will have that stylish appearance untu it is worn
out.
$15.00 to $30.00.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit-Reform Wardrobe J
1201   Government   St.,     Viotoria.
S
To your poor friend down with thc
grippe don't fail to recommend dry
champagne all day long.   It is a mic-
robe-and-gl n   dispeller,   but   one
must have the price.
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James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and  stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
RRADIQER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
Plows, Harrows, Seed Drills,
Etc.
Bain Wagons and Carts.
Brantford Carriages, Buggies,
Phaetons, Buckboards,
Spring Wagons and
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Petaluma Incubators.
Melotte Cream Separators.
e.g. prior &ee..
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Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria,
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotoii
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Stred
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You can always
It tastes different
iuu tan aiwa^s        -__•        ^-^     u utsics  umcr
tell an M. B. cigar [\\9    D#     tnan others-
eigar
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Union Made.
Havana Filler.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908
leason,' she reflected. "In the country we shall have to wait another
Jhree months for asparagus and green
Ifieas. You will order some peas, won't
IfOU?"
"Certainly, if you think you can eat
[.hem," I said, politely.
"Ah! now you see what a difference
It makes to eat in a rational manner.
It can eat anything, my dear boy—
[anything!"
"I'm quite willing to believe it," 1
Iretorted.
She looked at me and smiled
|braodly.
"But I don't want you to sacrifice
lyourself on my account. I'm not nar-
I row-minded, and if you want some
[flesh I have no objection to your
|having it."
A pile of asparagus and a great
Imany green peas were set before us,
land I knew they were worth their
Iweight in gold. I began to feel more
|than doubtful about my trip to Paris'
"It's very kind of you," I answered;
"but I seldom have more than a steak
Ifor dinner; and after devouring the
■meal you've ordered I shall feel like
|a boa-constrictor."
"You sec, one has to get the proper
lamount of proteids in," Amy replied
Icalmly, as she ate the giant aspara-
|gus.
I ate one or two myself, but I was
|no match for Amy. I no longer wondered that she was growing stout; and
thought that if anybody did marry
lier, he should be warned in time that
lo feed a food reformer is no joking
Inatter.
When there was one long monster
Ief on the dish, she seized it deliberately.
"1 must eat that one," she said.   "It
Jneans a handsome husband and five
|housand a year."
"He'll want it," I replied.
"I thought I should only spoil my
■inner if I had tea," she murmured
leflectively.
"That was very considerate of you,"
answered.
She leaned back with a sight and
ooked at me.
"How pleased I am to have caught
Jou before you went to Paris!"
"I very much doubt whether I shall
|e able to afford to go," I said.
Cousin Amy is an optimist.
"After   all,   there's   no   place   like
Dine,"  she  answered,  cheerily.    "If
du go to Paris you'll probably get
^phoid,   ancl  you'll  certainly   spend
buch more money than you can af-
jird."
Cousin Amy has often besought m<
be economical.   She takesa cousinly
[iterest in my finances.
At last she finished the peas; and I
felt that  I  could  eat nothing for a
(-eek.   Amy was in high spirits.
"Now, a little sweet and a little desert, and I'm done."
I began to admire Amy.    I should
ave liked to introduce the fat boy of
leckham to her.
"Poires a la  Melba," she  ordered,
(■ith one glance at the menu.
| With unerring instinct she had hit
pon the specialty of the house.   I deeded definitely not to go to Paris.
1 "Delicious, aren't they?" she said.
[ We reached the dessert, and I be-
lame weak and  silly when  she said
Tlie   had   not   had   strawberries   and
■ream that year.    Neither had many
Ithcr people,   trawberries and cream
vere brought,  mixed together  in  a
luge bowl,  and for a fixed  sum—a
lather large sum, it seemed to me—
foil could eat as many as you liked.
It was some consolation to me that
Wny certainly had her money's worth
[Vhen she had done, she leaned back.
"After all, one misses a great deal if
Ine if a food reformer; but one has
lie consciousness that one is advanc-
lig a good  cause.    And besides,  in
lent one has the advantage of killing
Ivo birds with one stone."
I We   had  coffee,  and  I   discovered
lat Amy had a fine taste in liqueur
hindy.    She   told   me   her   doctor
louldn't let her drink it unless it was
pry old.   When the bill came—I can-
■atulated   myself  on   the   fact   that
Imy had only wanted a snack, for if
pe had been  really hungry  I  don't
liow what I should havc done.
I When we parted, she shook hands
lith  me.    "I  have enjoyed myself,"
lie   said.    "I'm   so   sorry   I'm   not
come and lunch with me to-morrow,
y system is chop for chop, you know."
This was new in Cousin Amy, and I
put the change down to the advance
of years, which have a soft logic of
their own.
"I shall be delighted!" I answered,
promptly.   "Where shall we go?"
She looked at me with the utmost
effrontery.
"What do you say t othe Eustace
Miles Restaurant? I should so much
like to show you what a vegetarian
restaurant is really like."
I have no presence of mind in emergencies, and I accepted Cousin
Amy's invitation. But as I wandered
away in the rain (I really couldn't afford a hansom), a sadder, poorer,
wiser and much over-eaten man, I
murmured to myself:
"She may call it chop for chop, if
she likes. I call it carrot soup for
potage bisque."
Frank Danby's New Novel.
That the new novel by Frank Danby, "The Heart of a Child," should
be an interesting piece rof work, almost goes without saying. Critics
have often quarrelled with her choice
of subject, and resented her inclination to ,deal with forbidden themes
but they have never denied the power
and grip of her stories. A realist a:
to method, she has the imagination
that creates types of character, aud
the important personages in her
"Doctor Phillips" or "Pigs in Clover,"
will not soon be forgotten by those
who have once made their acquaintance. Her new book is at the same
time curiously like her earlier work.,
and curiously different. It shows the
same insight into character, the same
dramatic construction, but the tone
of the book is mellower, the painful
note is less insistently sounded, ancl
the story, while it approaches close
to tragedy, ends after all in a cheerful key.
The subjetc is one that might b<
expected to attract Frank Danby. It \
is nothing more nor less than the true ]
story of the life of a typical London j
"Gaiety Girl"—a girl who drifts on |
to the stage by accident, and without *:
training or any special gift beyond'
her beauty and an indefinable charm
of personality, becomes the reigning
stage favourite of the hour. Mrs.
Frankau has recorded the fact that
the story was originally planned by
her with her brother, thc late Owen
Hall (author of "Floradora" and
other musical comedies), and that it
was their intention to write it together. Mrs. Frankau supplying the fictional clement, and Mr. Hall thc "local colour" of the London stage.
Although they had discussed the
story together they had not actually
begun the writing 'when Mr. Hall
died. Nevertheless, there is no lack
of local colour in the book as it
stands. Not since George Moore
wrote "A Mummer's Wife," has there
been such a story of the real life of
stage people; ancl "Thc Heart of a
Child," dealing with a different section of thc theatrical world from that
of Mr. Moore's work, is vastly more
attractive than the Irishman's rather
dreary masterpiece. Sally Snape, the.
child of the London slum, who
reaches thc stage by way of thc dress-
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
Timber Limits
FOR QUICK SALE-A SNAP.
12 Sections in the neighborhood of Quatsino Sound—
Rupert District.
35,000 feet to the Acre Guaranteed.
No Cash Deposit.
Time allowed for inspection.   Located
of access.
on water and easy
Apply to W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government Street, Victoria,
aying in town longer, but you must  maker's show room, and has all the
Creston Clarke.
At the Victoria Theatre,  Monday,  March 30.
young bloods of London at her feet,
is in truth an altogether attractive as
well as original creature. Frank Danby has never clone anything better
than ihe chapters in which she shows
how this uneducated young girl keeps
her head ancl steers her way safelv
amid the dangers of her life, by virtue of a kind of instinctive purity.
Perhaps the most incredible character
in the book is Lady Dorothea, and
for her Mrs. Frankau is said to have
had a living model. The climax of
the story, indeed, revives a scandal
that is not yet forgotten in London
drawing rooms.
But this is, after all, not lhe most
interesting side of "Thc Heart of a
Child." It is as a picture of stage lif"
that it will bc most eagerly read, and
—it seems  safe  to predict—long  re
membered  as  a  true  document  con-
j cerning the life of our day.
Such  an  exchange  of  courtesy  as
was   chronicled   in  a   German   paper
not long ago would hardly suit the
I taste of brisk Americans.
Thc exchange was  in  the  form  of
I two advertisements.
"Thc gentlemen who found a purse
! with money in the Blumenstrasse is
requested to forward it to the address
: of the loser, ns hc is recognized."
A day or two later appeared thc
response, which, although so courteous, had an elusive air, to say the
least.
"The recognized gentleman who
picked up a purse in the Blumenstrasse requests the loser to call al
his house at a convenient day."
Co.
The Taylor
Limited.
AU kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS *
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victorin
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Residential aad Day School for Boys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg«
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
avery Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev.D.Bruce Macdonald, M. A., LL.D-
Principal
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 35 cents to $5.00, according to size. Write for seed and tree
catalog.
JAY A CO.
VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNI GHT'SBOOKSTORE
VICTORIA, B. 0.
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
THOMAS CATTERALL
Builder and General Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone and
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring, Office, Bank, Store and Saloon
Fittings.
Pile Driving,  Wharves and  Dock
Shed constructed and repaired.
VICTORIA. THB WBEK, SATURDAY MARCH 28, 1908
Incorporated 1906,
Capital, $500,000.00|
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00]
Subscribed
Capital,     $550,000]
Reserve . . $50,000
Surplus, Jan. 30
1907  .   .   $130,000|
J. B. MATHERS, Gen. Man.
IN CLOSING UF ESTATES
•lther as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION   TRUST CO.,
Limited.
328 Hasting Street, West,
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published it VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83H Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
526   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
On Spooks.
A well-known local journalist has
been severely criticized by an equally
well-known local resident for a series
of articles which he has recently contributed to an also well-known local
family newspaper on the subject oi
spooks. The incident is not without
features of interest and possibly of
importance.
For instance, if the startling occurrences narrated in these articles actually occurred as described, and it
could bc substantiated that they were
■not the result of trickery, then a
greater than Lodge is here. If, on
the other hand, the narration is strictly correct and the narrator sincere but
an easy mark for clever tricksters, thc
conclusion must inevitably be that thc
investigation of psychic phenomena
has not been materially advanced.
There is a third solution which
seems to have suggested itself to the
mind of the local critic, which is that
the articles are simply ingenious and
imaginative contributions to the Sunday supplement of the well-known
newspaper.
The critic raises the further point
that in any event the articles are in
questionable taste, since they profess
to report the utterances of spooks
supposed to represent citizens of respectability who in this astral plane
were not accustomed to use the vulgar slang attributed to them in the
articles.
On the nice ethical points raised by
the critic I havc nothing to say; there
will probably be only one opinion;
but the whole incident is of interest
at the present moment because of the
attention which is being directed to it
in consequence of the recent avowal
of Sir Oliver Lodge. I know that the
subject of psychic phenomena is one
of the most difficult upon which to
write wisely and logically. Mosl
writers string together a number of
incidents which appear marvellous because they are out of the ordinary
and bear no obvious explanation.
People gasp and say, "How wonderful!" and then someone comes along
with the remark, "Oh, yes, that is very
similar to an experience which I had,"
and so these strange occurrences gain
credence and because they perplex arc
classed with the supernatural.
It is hardly possible for half-a-
dozen people to sit round the tabl-j
and discuss this absorbing topic without bringing one incident after another of the class to which I am referring. If they have never seen or
heard of spooks, they are pretty certain to know someone who has, and in
any event they are quite certain to
relate some incident which no one can
account for upon natural lines, and
which it is, therefore, easy to relegate
to the supernatural.
I am not going to yield to the common weakness and give my own experience in these matters, because,
although I have been investigating
them for nearly thirty years, I have
not made the slightest progress.
Many things have puzzled me and experiences have been related by some
of my dearest friends, whose sincerity
it is impossible to doubt, which would
seem to be almost conclusive of super
natural interposition but not absolutely conclusive, especially in view oi
the great strides now being made in
understanding subconscious influence
telepathic influence, and other influences which are mysteriously exerted
by one person upon another, iu a
manner which cannot be explained by
any of the known laws of cause and
effect.
I am prepared to admit, and I think
it is only a fair concession to the enlightenment of the age on the subject
of psychic phenomena, that great progress has been maele, not so much ii
explaining as in demonstrating the
fact that persons can influence each
other without physical contact and
possibly without material presence. I
would not even conjecture how this is'
done, nor would I attempt to assign
the limits of its possibilities, although
any careful student of the subject
must realize that the investigations oi
sincere seekers after truth along scientific lines are bringing us within
reach of certain definite conclusions
on this phase of the subject.
It is indisputable that some people
are very highly gifted with natural
faculties for unusual and indeed mysterious communication and contro'
which are caviare to the vast majority. It is indisputable that perfect
strangers have been able to tell people many things about themselves
which no one else knew and which
could only have been learned through
channels unknown and unrecognized.
It is with respect to these matters
that there is a reasonable prospect of
enlightenment.
Where most people draw the line
is at the claims so freely made nowadays of communication between the
living and those who have passed be
hind the veil; and I am not surprised
that any man should bitterly resent
the intrusion of a sensational scribbler into matters which are held
sacred by all right-minded men.
I know that there are many perfectly honest people who believe that
they have received messages from the
dead, and that they can communicat
at will either directly or through some
recognized medium, but their belief
does not establish the fact, and t
my mind it has always been one of
the saddest of reflections that they
should be trifled with by tricksters
That this is the case has been demonstrated again and again. The mosl
ardent and reputable spiritualists
have from time to time been exposed
and their methods laid bare; indeed
it is not too much to say that nc
medium, of howsoever high a reputation, has been able to produce results
which have not been duplicated by a
professional conjurer.
One of the greatest difficulties
which presents itself to the mind of ;
reasonable thinking man and whicV
effectually prevents him from crediting the genuineness of so-cai'-d mes
sages from spirit-land, is the fact that
thc spirits are willing to lend themselves to such ridiculous performances and to give utterances to sucl
banaltics as are altogether inconsistent with their known character when
living. It is inconceivable that i
communication with departed friend:
were possible, they would not have
something far different, far more reassuring, and far more vital to impart
than the trashy nonsense which
passes muster for a "message."
I do not claim to have been able t
throw any new light on this very
old subject. I am willing to accept
the conclusions of leading sicentist
that the subject should be approached
with an open mind, and with that
reverence which is due to its serious
importance, but I have yet to gleai
the first conclusive evidence that there
is such a thing as a spook, and that
there is any possibility of penetrating the veil which nature, or Providence if you will, has with tender
considerateness hung between the
visible and the invisible.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908,
Mch 21
D. R. YOUNG.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
B. M. RICHARDSON.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
nortbwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated  February 24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Bllnklnsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for the purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Blinkinsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Bllnklnsop Bay, 50 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.'
Combs to Suit
Any Coiffure
This season the Comb plays a very important part in the tasteful
and stylish arrangement of a lady's hair. Some women possess
a natural gift of doing their hair prettily; a simple turn of the
wrist, one twist of the long coil at the back, a little puffing out of
the pompadour or curls, a handsome Comb stuck in to complete
and c'est fini. But the Comb is always necessary nowadays. Just
now we are showing a most charming assortment of Back Combs
and Sets; Parisian Brilliant-Set Combs, Gold and Silver Filligree
Combs, Fancy Stone-Set Combs, Steel-Mounted Combs, Jet Combs,
Mourning Combs, etc., etc.,—a Comb for every style of coiffure.
Very wide choice in Evening Dress Ornaments, Aigrettes,
Barettes, etc.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
foil orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance! How you could
dance to such  music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone  in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.   No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
m___________________mm___mm_____m entertainment oi" every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
K The world's foremost   -layers and singers make Victor
**g\ Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone
y^, plays them as no other instrument can.
'VV«
\_\
Gc. to any Victor or Berliner dealer's and hear
'   these wonderful instruments.    Ask him to
__ °*Sa explain th- easy-paymentplan.
%k. -A>\Write us on  the coupon for
'* ^ X aud full information.
catalogue
- <%»x--*\!	
.     \ "^eS_\ The Beriiner Grim-o-phone
\ \\ \ \\°_\ Company ol Canada, Ui
, \ \ \ v**,x      mmiL m
v\\W
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, RACE NARROWS.
GUARANTEED 2,000 7T. TO THE ACRE.
PRICE $2.50 TO 93.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVERNMENT   STREET, VICTOBIA.
P. 0. BOZ 765. PHONE 1386. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
'OOOOOOOOOO-OOOOOOO-^^
!-0*-0*0000<>00000*0000000000000^
Some New Styles
in Extension
Tables.
Extension Table—An excellent
low-priced style in surface
oak. Top is 44x44 in. and
table extends to 6 ft. Finely finished.  Each    $8.50
Extension Table—Another neat
design in surface oak table.
Top of this style measures
44x44 in., and table extends
to 6 ft.    Price   $11.50
Same style in 8 ft. length $13.00
Extension Table—A very neat
and pleasing table style in
solid oak. Top measures 44X
44 in., and table extends to
6 ft.   Price only $15.00
Extension Table—This is a
splendid table value. It is
made of solid oak. Top measures 40x40 in. and extends to
6 ft   Price, only $10.00
Same style in 8 ft. length, $12.00
Extension Table—A very stylish table, made in surface oak
and finely finished throughout. Top is 42x42 in., 6 ft.
length.    Price, each $14.00
Extension Table—This is another pleasing style in surface oak. Top measures 42X
42 in., and extends to 8 ft.
Finely finished. Price.. .$16.00
See Our Spring Furniture
Styles.
The frequent arrivals in Furniture during the last few weeks have combined to make a splendid showing of
Furniture for the Spring season, when old, rickety pieces are cast away, giving place to new ideas, and spaces
are found to require the addition of some dainty piece to round out your "scheme." It is a timely and splendid
showing—a worthy exhibit of new furniture ideas you should see. Just now the whole store has taken on an
air of brightness and freshness, and. like the Springtime, the almost daily additions mean a growing goodness
—every day being better and brighter and nearer perfect than the one just left behind. The curtains, the draperies, the carpets, the furniture—all breathe this freshness and newness—and we issue to you a very special
invitation to visit this store, assuring you that you may spend just as much time as you wish in looking, and are
under absolutely no obligation to invest a penny.   Come any day—today, if you can.
The Morris Chair Stock is Unusually Complete Just Now.
In those most used of all easy chairs—the Morris—we show an unusual assortment. Just now the choice
is an extensive one indeed, and between the prices quoted here you will find a range that will surprise you.
There is a great choice as to design, as to trimmings and as to price. Some are wholly the product of our own
factory, some frames are imported and the upholstering done in our own factory, and some we import complete.
For upholstering these or any chairs we stock a most complete range of coverings, and it is possible to
choose from this assortment coverings to harmonize with most any furnishings. Come up to our Third Floor
and see these chair styles.   You're welcome.   Many styles in Morris Chairs, at, each, $9.00 to $35.00.
M«ke New Curtains
From These Dainty
New Materials.
There isn't any reason why
you shouldn't treat at least
some of your rooms to new
curtains and drapes this Spring.
We have an immense stock of
new Cretonnes and Chintzes,
and we are offering them at
very low prices. Come to our
Curtain Department and discuss
this important question.
British Cretonne—A specially
nice line in a variety of pretty tapestry and floral effects.
Splendid value at the price
marked.   Per yard aoc
British Chintz—Artistic designs
on jaspar ground. This style
is suitable for long curtains,
48 inches wide and sold at,
per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and
conventional designs, that are
bright and cheerful. We show
a splendid range. Priced at,
per yard, 35c, 30c and....25c
British Chintz—A fine range of
pretty and attractive designs
in green and yellow, rose and
green, pink and green, with
blue   ribbon.    Per  yard,  40c
British Chintz—A very pretty
and serviceable chintz with
artistic designs, in various colorings on a jaspar ground,
has a softening influence on
the whole effect. It makes it
the less liable to soil, yet does
not detract from the daintiness.   Price, per yard 40c
SECON FLOOR.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,      VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
^OOOOOOOOOOOOOgOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^^
At The Street   f
Corner        h
f ByTI
THB LOUNGER
*r\t_t___»J^Hff
Evidently some people cannot see
a joke. When I bewailed my sad
experience in last week's issue anent
subdivisions, I was simply giving vent
to my feelings and indulging in a little
harmless reverie; judge of my surprise, therefore, when several admirers of the Lounger's column took me
severely to task on the charge of
boosting Cuthbcrt's building lots. I
must confess I never saw it in that
light and had no idea that anyone else
would, but when I met Cuthbert on
Wednesday afternoon of the present
week and he told me that he had had
a most successful sale of Carey Castle
lots, and all on account of the "write
up" in Lounger's colmun, I began to
think that I was too simple-minded
for this wicked world. Never again
shall I venture to indulge in a reverie
on paper without first submitting it to
some kind friend who will inform me
whether it is purely an emanation of
a poet's brain or whether it possesses
some commercial value. I must confess that atfer Kipling's latcs exploit
in selling his Canadian Letters to Colliers I should hardly feel called upon
to apologize if I became a little bit
mercenary myself.
A lady of my acquaintance, who is
also a valued subscriber, wishes me
to say something about the all-too-
frequent carelessness of some of the
motormen on the B. C. E. R, She
drew my attention to an accident
which has not been reported in the
daily press, but which in fairness to
the public, and for their reassurance
should be both reported and explained. On Sunday night, when the last
cars started from the corner of Yates
and Government streets, the Outer
Wharf car followed too closely behind the Beacon Hill car. Naturally
everyone is in a hurry at 11 p.m., and
motormen are but human. These two
cars rushed along Government street
at about the speed limit. Near the
post office the leader pulled up rathet
quickly to take on a passenger, when
the hind car crashed into it. Result
one motorman seriously injured, still
in the Jubilee Hospital; several passengers badly shaken up, and one boy
cut about the legs. My object in referring to the incident is to call attention to the fact that the rules of the
company forbid a motorman to drive
his car within two hundred feet of
another car preceding him on tin
same track. If this rule were observed, such accidents as the above
would be impossible, as no matter
what thc rate of speed is, any car
could pull up within two hundred feet.
This is distinctly a warning to motor-
men. As a class they are very obliging and discharge their duties in a
manner thoroughly satisfactory to the
public, but in this respect there is
some laxity and it is not fair to the
company nor to the public that it
should continue.
Whilst on this point, I want to say
a word about conductors. Several
times lately I have seen passengers
miss a car and have to wait ten minutes for the next, because the conductor seemed to have his eyes glued
towards the front of the car instead
of looking to the side when he approached a crossing. In each case
the intended passenger was running
towards the stopping point along the
cross street and was only a few yard*-
away. I am not aware whether the
company has any rule on this point
but in the interests of business as well
as the convenience of the public, a
conductor should certainly keep his
eyes open and take a glance along side
streets.
I have recently made several strictures in this column on thc abuse of
bridge playing—none on the game it
self, of which I am an enthusiastic
admirer. The abuses complained of
are such as are absolutely indefensible. In her calmer moments no lady
would attempt to excuse her conduct
for lowering the blinds and locking
the door against callers on her usual
day, in order to indulge in bridge.
Neither would any lady defend
"scraps" across the bridge table,
though if she did allow her temper tt
overcome her she would undoubtedly
go next morning, pocket her pride
and apologize. So far so good, li
any lady is prepared to combat these
propositions, or to argue that I am
not justified in giving thc incidents
publicity, whilst carefully screenin*.
the parties, I am authorized by the
editor to say that anything they may
have to say on the subject shall be
published in the correspondence column without revision. What I dc
want to say, however, is this, that if
the ladies indicated think they know
who gave the information to The
Week, they are entirely mistaken; in
fact, thc young lady whose name has
been mentioned iu this connection not
only knows nothing about it, but has
been most persistent in her efforts to
find out for herself. A critic alway.
makes some difficulty for himself;
people at once begin to ask themselves: "Who could have told him?"
"Let us scc, who was there?
•It
must have been So-and-so." Now, in
order to prevent an injustice bein;,'
done to any lady, I may say that my
information came from a gentleman
and a married man at that, and thai
his object in telling me was in the
hope that the publication of the facts
might be instrumental in checking the
abuse. That, too, is my only object.
Women always tell their men friend:-
of these occurrences; they would
never tell an edtior or an inconsequent lounger.
The appointment of Mr. Htimbel to
the management of the Empress Hotel is a guod "men fur its future conduct and a guarantee that the public
will receive proper treatment. His
appointment also docs away with the
necessity of saying anything further
abuut some of the regrettable incidents which havc occurred at the
Empress since its opening. As secretary of the Vancouver Club and before that of the St. James Club, Mont
real, Mr. Humbel has left behind him
a splendid record, and if he is not
interfered with will make the Empress
what it was designed to be—the most
popular hotel in the West.
People are in a bad case when they
have to plead poverty as an excuse
for neglect. In this case thc city
fathers of Victoria seem to be at the
present time. I know nothing ol
finance, of estimates, of assessments,
or of taxation; but 1 do know that
winter is over, that spring is here, ant!
that thc city needs a spring cleaning—
which it is not getting. There are still
many horridly unsightly vacant lots,
strewn with refuse and debris of every
kind, from cans to carcasses. There
are still a number of disreputable and
abandoned shacks, one of the worst
being on Fort street, near Vancouver.
I say nothing of the number of streets
with mud piled up, which so badly
need scraping, but why, oh, why, is
that vacant corner of James Bay
causeway, fronting on Government
and Belleville streets, still in thc same
uncultivated and neglected condition
as it was three years ago? I am neither a gardener nor a contractor, but
I am so ashamed of that corner that,
for the  sum  of sixty dollars,  I  will
contract to spread soil, supply and
plant twenty good shrubs, seed for
lawn and put a galvanized wire fence
all round the lot to protect it until
the grass is grown. In a week it wil'
be too late to do this until another
year, the shrubs will have developed
beyond the safety point for transplanting; but it is about the worst advertisement Victoria can have to leave
that wretched corner in its present
condition.
ayi
The   New  Grand.
Next week's bill is a most promising looking one which will have
as its leading feature a comedy sketch
entitled "The Man from Macey's,"
presented by Walter E. Perkins, assisted hy Mr. Charles Maynard and
Miss Marcia Mitchell. Mr. I'erkm..
has only lately forsaken the legitimate
stage fur vaudeville and will be remembered as having appeared at the
Victoria Theatre as the star in "My
Friend   From  India."
Another comedy playlet entitled
"Election Bets," will be presented by
thc Mallcn and Fuller Company. The
Two Roses are a team of dainty
young misses who have a clever
musical act which includes solos and
duets un violin and 'cello. Cantor
and Curtis (Marry and Alice) are
billed as "The Nifty Little Dancing
Kids." Mile Andrietta is a vocalist
with an original method of singing
original songs. Thos J. Price will
sing "When It's Moonlight, Mary
Darling." A splendid set of Moving
Pictures will illustrate lhe great play,
"Hen lltir," and the Orchestra will
play the descriptive overture, "The
Chapel in the Mountains." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
▼vvvv^v,i?,i',i''_h^,!j_f
* Social and        %
t Personal. *
if 4*
~-\__m_m.m__m_m.m__m_^ A- ____>_. — A__._^A- ■_.■—____t—i- -1 — A--*.
Mr. Morton Mason left for Frisco
last week.
* *   *
Mr. Savage left on Tuesday for
Winnipeg.
* *   *
Mrs. McGill of Shawnigan Lake
came down Wednesday alst.
Mr. Gordon Mason left for Vancouver Saturday.
* *   *
Mr. B. Pinder left on Monday for
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. Arthur Newcombe spent a few-
days in Victoria during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Merritt, Vancouver, was
a visitor in town during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Martin and
Miss Phyllys Mason leave shortly for
Kamloops.
* *   *
Miss Winona Troupe is the guest
of   Mr.   and   Mrs.   Roy   Troupe   in
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. H. P. Hickey ancl Mrs. Thos.
Hickey left for the North on Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. James Girdwood, who spent
the winter in Kamloops, has returned to Victoria.
+     ♦     •¥
Mrs. Stewart Robertson was hostess at a small card party on Wednesday  evening last.
Mrs. Gerald Pike after a short visit
spent with her sister, Mrs. Le Sueur,
in the Upper Country has returned
to Victoria.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. R. Nelson, Blanchard
street, have returned from a very enjoyable holiday spent in Kamloops.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Powell are expected
to arrive shortly from the Old Country, where they have been for the
past eighteen months.
* *   *
The Lieutenant-Governor, Mrs.
Dunsnnrr, Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir,
Miss Dola Dunsmuir, ancl Mr. Bromley left on Tuesday, 25th, en route
to England.
* *   *
Mrs. Burton, Mrs. Walter Langley
and the Misses E. Tilton, V. Pooley,
N. Combe ancl Reade have gone ovc
to Portland for the Golf tournament.
The engagement is announced of
Annie Catherine, eldest daughter of
Thos. Anthony Wood, of Pardshaw,
Duncans, to Harold Wishart Mainguy, eldest son of the late Darrich
W. Mainguy, of Chemainus, V.I.
* *   *
The many friends of Miss Dorothy
Bulwer, only daughter of Mr. ancl
Mrs. H. Bulwer, of Esquimalt, will
bc interested to hear of her engagement, which has just been announced
to Lieutenant Cecil P. Charmley of
H.M.S. Egeria.
Mrs. H. Tye gave a farewell tea
for Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir last Monday. Among those present were Mrs.
Spratt, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. Eliot, Miss
Heyland, Miss B. Irving, Mrs. Heb-
den Gillespie, Mrs, Alex. Gillespie,
Miss Alice Pooley, Dr. Fagan, Mrs.
Faydn, Miss Savage, Miss Little, Miss
Mason, Miss D. Clute, Msis W. Johnston and many  others.
* *   *
Thc Bridge Club met at Mrs. H.
Tye's on Friday and a very enjoyable
afternoon was spent. Among the
competitors were Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Heyland, Mrs. Dalton, Mrs. Hermann Robertson, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. Coles
Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Flummerfelt, Mrs. Freeman Mrs. Little, Mrs. A. Robertson, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Matson.
* *   *
Mrs. Matson's pretty residence on
Head street, was thc scene of thc
gathering of thc Fivc Hundred Club.
The first prize was won by Mrs. C.
Todd ancl a dainty little souvenir was
presented to Mrs. Stewart Robertson
who kindly acted as scorer. The
house and tea table were massed with
beautiful yellow daffodils and sprays
of fern.
Among those  present  were:    Mrs.
IP
The Most Artistic and the Most Exclusive Sub-division
Ever Placed on the Market.
^
We are favored with  instructions
to offer
FOR   SALE
commanding building sites in
CAREY CASTLE
GARDENS
Rockland Avenue, Running Through to Richardson Street
This magnificent property is situated on Rockland Ave., between Government House and the charming residence of John Arbuthnot, Esq,, while across
the avenue is "Craigdarroch," the home of Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir.
There is no other property in Victoria in any such situation surrounded
by such palatial homes in which building sites can be obtained by the person
who does not wish to buy acreage.
THE PURCHASER OF THESE LOTS KNOWS BEFOREHAND THAT
HE IS IN THE CENTRE OF THE MOST VALUABLE
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN VICTORIA.
And that he has no anxiety as to the character of the homes that will for
all time surround him.
It would be a pity to spoil such a beautiful property by cutting it up in the
usual way, therefore a great deal of time and trouble has been taken in planning
this subdivision so as to conserve as much as possible its original characteristics.
Therefore it has been decided to make the top portion of it into
A PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL PARK ON THE SAME LINES AS SOME
OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLACES AROUND LIVERPOOL AND
OTHER CITIES IN ENGLAND AND MANY CITIES
IN THE UNITED STATES.
Provision will be made to complete a system of sewerage and private roads
that will connect with a 66-foot public street to be made and boulevarded, with
concrete sidewalks, by the city, on the lower portion, which has a splendid
frontage on the best part of that fine new street, Richardson Street.
The property has been named " CAREY CASTLE GARDENS," because
it has a frontage on its entire length upon Government House, formerly Carey
Castle. The main avenue is named Lotbiniere Ave., in memory of the most
beloved of all our Governors, because he planted with his own hands along a
portion of this avenue two rows of Butternut trees, which will always be
interesting to residents and visitors.
In order that purchasers of these sites may be protected from having
inferior buildings erected on any of the lots now offered for sale,
BUILDING RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IMPOSED UPON
EACH PURCHASER.
The property has been surveyed and the plans, together with a detailed
description of each lot, are now being prepared. These will be ready in a few
days, when the exact date of sale and terms will be announced.
The owners realize that it is necessary to sell every lot, almost, in order to
carry out their ideas of making this a unique subdivision, therefore the prices
will be much lower than the lots are actually worth and within the reach of
every one who wishes to build a nice home.
It is unnecessary to say that these sites cannot be equalled in Victoria for
health, beauty and view.    They are high and dry.
WATCH OUR ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS.
As the owners preferred that where possible two lots should be sold
together the sale will open at the offices of the undersigned for all people who
wish to buy two or more lots adjoining at 9.30 a.m. Wednesday morning,
March 25th, 1907, and at 11 a.m. for those who wish to buy single lots.
Terms—10 per cent, deposit, 25 per cent, on May lst, 25 per cent, on
November lst, 20 per cent, on May lst, 1909, and 20 per cent, on November
lst, 1909, with interest at 6 per cent, from May 1st, 1908.
Herbert Cuthbert & Company
616 Fort St., Victoria, B. C.
^
PHONE  610
Gibb, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. W. S. Gore, I
Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. J
C.  Roberts,  Mrs.  C. Todd,  Mrs.  H.
Tye,   Mrs.   H.   Robertson,   Mrs.   C. I
Baker, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Matthews,]
Mrs.   McBride,   Mrs.   Savage,   Mrs.
Hunter,   Mrs.   Ker,   Mrs.   Courtney,
Mrs.   Blackwood,   Mrs.  J.   Raymour, |
Mrs.  Troupe,   Mrs.   Fagan,   Mrs.   B. I
Tye, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. S. Robertson,
Miss Lottie Wark and others.
* Hi *
Miss Adelaide King, Rae street,
entertained a few friends at Five
Hundred on Monday evening. At the
conclusion of the game a dainty supper was served. The table was attractively decorated with lillies of the
valley, pink and white roses and the
new shade of China blue violets.
The competitors were Miss V.
Blackwood, Miss Wootten, Miss King,
Miss Newcombe, and the Messrs.
Jeplison, T. and H. King, Holmes,
Parker, C. Newcombe and Holden.
The Message of the Far East.
In the New York Tribune there appeared, the other day, a review of Mr.
Fielding Hall's "The Inward Light,"
which was so evidently written by
someone who knew his Burma and
the East, that his opinion of the book
is significant. Mr. Hall, he said, "approaches his subject with the understanding born of sympathy, knowledge and appreciation. He writes
with enthusiasm as one who love:
the people he knows so well—he has
penetrated their mysteries, he has
absorbed their spirit, he has divined
their heart. . . . Mr. Hall has placed
his admirers under renewed obligation by this beautiful exposition of
world old truths." Such wholesouled
appreciation is in refreshing contrast
to the attitude of a religious paper
which dismissed this remarkable book
with the cavalier remark that "we are
so well satisfied with the superiority
and sufficiency of Christianity that we
are not attracted by such works. We
do not look to Burma for light on the
problems of life and death."
Gertrude Atherton's Trilogy.
The vitality of Gertrude Atherton's
best work is attested by the fact that,
in response to a persistent demand, a
new edition of "The Californians" has
just been published by the Macmillan
Company.   This story, which some of
Mrs.   Atherton's  admirers  have  held
to be the best she has ever written,
forms an important link in the chain
of books in which she has depicted
thc complete social ancl political history of California.    It occupies   thel
middle  place  in  the  series  of three [
books, of which "Rezanov" is the first.
and  the   recently  published  "Alices-1
tors" the last.
The Japanese Are Human.
We have not yet given up hope thatl
the time will come when the Japanese [
will bc regarded by the white man a:
only human, after all. When their
government signs an unsatisfactory
treaty, they riot; when they take possession of a conquered country like
Korea, they play the bully; when
their crops fail, they starve, and often
emigrate. Best proof of all concerning their susceptibility to human
weakness: when wc slapped them on
the back two years ago and told them
they were the greatest people on
earth, they believed us.—New York
Evening Post.
Stranger—My friend, why are you |
swearing so?
Cussity—Why? Because of a blank
fool of a doctor. I got some pills for
a pain in my back ancl the directions
read, "Take one a half hour before
you feel thc pain coming on."
Harper's Weekly.
J
Right Out With It.
She—Say,    Jimmy,   youse   needn't|
tell me about de poor condition of cle
country  ancl  de  depression  in  Walll
Street.   If yer ain't got de price of af
soda, just say so.—New York Mail.
Somewhat Different.
Cuttem (the tailor)—I have callecl
to see why you haven't paid any at-[
tention to my repeated duns.
Slopay—Silence is golden, yoij
know.
Cuttem—Well, in this case it seemsj
more like brass. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
[Notes on
Provincial News
Another Railway in the Kootenay.
The Great Northern completed lay-
| ing their steel into Michel on Monday
I last, and the first train passed over
the line from Fernie to Michel that
day.    Passenger service will  not   be
I supplied  until after the  Government
inspection.    It  will  be   a   couple   of
[ weeks yet before the road is properly
ballasted.    It was found necessary to
construct a temporary line for about
a mile and a half near Michel, and thc
construction crews are now hard al
work making that part permanent, but
a month or six weeks will no doubt
see the completion of the work.
surrounding district if operations are
not resumed; it will also be a heavy
blow to the long-cherished project for
further exploitation and railway construction up the St. Mary's River. The
situation is thus succintly described
in the last issue of the Moyie Leader:
"The affairs at the Sullivan mine are
said to be in bad shape. The men
have not been paid their last month'r
wages, and the liabilities of the company are said to be very large. Thc
directors will have a meeting at Spokane on the 18th, when it is believed
matters will be satisfactorily adjusted.
Sullivan stock is now quoted at i'/_
cents a share."
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.
What Others Think.
The Slocan Mining Review has the
following to say with reference to a
Government-owned smelter and some
recent remarks on the subject which
appeared in the B. C. Mining Record.
The Week's comment is that there is
as much likelihood of a Government-
owned smelter as of pigs flying:
"The B. C. Mining Record for the
current month reprints in full our recent remarks anent a Government-
owned smelter. It has grave doubts
as to its successful application, however, but it does not begin to enlighten us, or argue against ust. It simply
confines itself to some vague remarks
as a preliminary, from which we
gather such a project would not have
the approval of its editor. That settles it! But we venture to suggest
that it's a matter of dollars and dimes
with the B. C. Record. Had they been
first in the field with the suggestion
and had somebody suggested the
coast as the ONLY location for it, 't
would have been 'Rah for a government-owned smelter."
The Sullivan Mine.
It is a matter of general regret
that the affairs of the Sullivan Mining
Company are in such a disastrous
condition. With a large mine, a modern smelter, and the successful installation of the best known system of
lead smelting, the people of the Root
enay expected the Sullivan to establish a record for permanent and prosperous work. Its early career was
chequered, but it got fairly on its feet
three years ago, and since then has
jogged along steadily. It will be a
serious thing for Marysville and the
Praise, Indeed.
By common consent the Provincial
Government has made a good bargain
with the G. T. P., so good that the
leader of the opposition refrained
from dividing the House on the debate, and so good that the provincial
press, both Liberal and Conservative,
is showering praises upon Premier
McBride. This must be as gratifying
to the Government as it is creditable
to .the press. No one will accuse the
Cranbrook Herald of being anything
but a dyed-in-the-wool Grit organ, yet
this is what it has to say on the subject:
"The Herald desires at this time to
compliment the McBride Government
on the most satisfactory arrangement
made with the Grand Trunk people. If
the report received at this office is
correct, we are free to say that Mr,
McBride has made the best arrangement with the Grand Trunk that was
ever made by any province with any
transcontinental railway. The Herald
believes in giving credit where credit
is due, and it is pleased at this time
to congratulate Mr. McBride on tht
success that hc has attained in his negotiations with the Grand Trunk people. Matters of this kind arise above
petty politics, and any government
that does as much for the people as
has apparently the McBride Govern
ment, are entitled to the thanks of the
whole Province, regardless of political
affiliations."
AGENTS WANTED 1-16x20 crayon
portraits 40 cents, frames id cents
and up, sheet pictures one cent
each. You can make 400 per cent,
profit or $36.00 per week. Catalogue and Samples free. Frank W,
Williams Company, 1208 W. Taylor
St., Chicago, 111.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Philippi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. IB A. Olson, Agent.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored  clothing;  wore  dark
cap.   Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and   wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be  given  for  information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell
Vancouver Opera House, April 14 and 15.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chatns;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No, 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains', thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A.  GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 25,  1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 25.  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;  640  acres,  more or less.
Located January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIOOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W.  corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chnins north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains: thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains: thenco
west 80 chains t. point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement;  640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25,  1908.
WELLINGTON  McALPINE,
Feb. 22       Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
WEEK 23RD MARCH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN * CONSIDINE,    Proprietors.
Management of ROBT. JAMIESON.
NAOMI ETHARDO
European Equilibrist.
MAUD SUTTON & CO.
Presenting the Natural Playlet
"Cinderel."
LOPEZ & I_OPEZ
Spanish Instrumentalists and
Vocalists.
DORIA OPERA TRIO
Operatic Vocalists,
GOLDEN & HUGHES
Thc Comedy Boomers.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Yankee Rose."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Uncle By Marriage."
"Doings of a Poodle."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel Director.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....lte
Evenings, Balcony  lee
Lower Floor JOe
Boxes    tOe
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
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8 and 9.15
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to suit.   Box 162, Victoria.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE ls hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence wost 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement,
Located January 26, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
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Phone A476. NUF SED.
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list it with us
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BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
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THE
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COAL
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VICTORIA, B.C.
Leave Your Baggage Checks at the
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No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
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Experience little or no difficulty
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Phone 345 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 28, 1908,
% riusic and $
J   The Drama. J
$ifi?tyi?i?i?i?>i?isii?'fyif
Creston Clarke.,
With reference to the appearance
of   Creston   Clarke   at   the   Victoria
Theatre on Wednesday evening next
the following from as conservative
,. paper as the Portland Oregonian
will be read with interest:
Creston Clarke returns to Portland
this season in one of the best constructed dramas of recent years, "The
Power that Rules." He was most
favourably received here two seasons
ago in "Monsieur Beaucaire," and
will have added greatly to his popularity when he closes this wek's en-
gament.
The first act, if presented by inferior people, could be made broadly
melodramatic—with its surroundings
of a rough mountain cabin occupied
by rough miners in a Mexican gold
camp. The touch of higher civilization is given upon the advent of a
girl of refinement seeking assistance
having lost her way. Then begins the
unfolding of the story, in which this
girl and one of the miners are the
central figures.
The girl's uncle, who had acted the
craven in his early life, has the secret
wrung from him, which brings deferred peace and happiness, but before
that is accomplished the "side" characters have opportunities to fill in and
round out a story that is ful of interest from start to close, and which has
the merit of being plausible.
Mr. Clarke played with excellent
results. In his quieter scenes he gave
evidence of the repression and intelligence inherited from his illustrious
forbears, and won the audience completely. He is of the school made
famous in the older days in his father's playhouse in Philadelphia, the old
Walnut Street theatre, and without
apparent effort presents a finished
and convincing performance.
Miss Irene Oshier in the character
of Janet Wilson, and Miss Virginia
Lawrence, as the daughter of the old
capitalist living under an assumed
name, are quite capable.
It is good to see Atkins Lawrence
again. This sterling actor, who
blushes not when talking of the days
when he supported Mary Anderson,
the elder Sothern and others of like
fame, plays the uncle in this production, and as the character calls for a
strong personality to portray it properly, it is most fortunate that Mr.
Lawrence was secured for the cast.
Harold De Becker, as the weak,
foppish son, does a clever bit of work,
and Jay Mansfield and Henry Dorn-
ton make the American and Mexican
mining partners picturesque and sufficiently bloodthirsty. The minor
parts are cast acceptably.
The Marquam will present Mr.
Clarke all week in "The Power that
Governs," and before the engagement
ends Portland doubtless will repeat
the welcome given the company since
starting on the road from thc East
and fill the house as the character of
the performance becomes known.
Robert Mantell Coming.
Thc most noted Shakespearian
scholars in the East have declared
Mr. Mantell's company the best
Shakespearian organization ever seen
on the American stage. True, some
years ago there were combinations of
noted stars who appeared in a number of Shakespeare's tragedies, but
for general all-round excellence, intelligence and harmonious concert of
action, Mr. Mantell's company has
never been surpassed. There are
quite a number of young actors in
Mr. Mantell's company who have
been with him for several seasons, tc
whom several critics have referred
as "thc most promising young Shakespearian actors on the American
stage."
them were so much impressed that
they declared they were going to
have another bath some time. It will
be seen from this simple narrative
that there is still hope for New York.
Civilization in New York.
A number of New York women
were invited to take a bath as something novel. After the dip their hostess handed them kimonas and a talk
on the delights of the bath.    Most of
Kept His Word.
Johnnie—I was all day in town
with pap to-day, mamma, and he
kept his word about drinking whiskey.
Mamma—That is good. I am very
glad to hear it. And what did he
have?
Johnnie—A little brown drink called ditto. Mr. Hinkley took Scotch.—
Tit-Bits.
rm_.-[\\im\
~__*<\\:jw'l
Monday, March, 30
THE NEW BLACK CROOK
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Wednesday, April 1,
Creston Clarke
in
"The  Power That  Governs."
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Saturday, April 4,
SIS  IN  NEW   YORK
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00.
6ETO
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Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
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AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
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PACIFIC COAST  GROWN
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Bee   Supplies,   Spray   Pumps,
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Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Weitmlnited   Boad
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains:
thence south 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd,  1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
P
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obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
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FEBD. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
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AT HENDERSON BROS., Distributors.
Vancouver ana Victoria, B.O.
MAPS
OF
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The   kind   that   show   what's
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1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
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Davies' Potted Tongue—Per tin, 15c; 2 tins for 25c
Australian Sheeps' Tongue—Per tin  40c
C. & B. Ox Tongue—Per 3-lb. tin $1.25
C. & B. Chicken and Tongue Gelatine—Glass jar 75c
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The Poodle Dog Hotel
A centre of good cheer is the Cosy Grill-room where the business and professional men of Victoria meet to exchange good
stories and gossip over things in general. The atmosphere here
is that of Bohemia in the best sense of the word; a Bohemia
governed by up-to-date and genial surroundings.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
A   Victorian    "Bach"    named
Chevasse
Has   just   married   a   pretty
young lass,
Who said "Hubby, it's strange,
But I hate a coal range,
I   just   won't   cook   unless   I
have Gas."
If all Victorian brides would
insist upon being supplied with
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of time, trouble, work and
worry they would save and
what nice, digestible dinners
would be the pleasurable result.
See the grand values just
now in Gas Ranges and Heaters in our showroom.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
THE SUMMER
DAYS ARE
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Now is the Time
to prepare for
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Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C. yv__*__T_Yt__T_T_Tmr_vrn
\ Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
ICommiagion and Real Estate Agents.
MOOraariUe, ^Vancouver. '
_iX_tXXXXSX_9_»X_t%XXXXAt9ltS_
Vancouver Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vaacoaver B. C.
Vol. V.   No. 9
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908
George Meredith
The Dean of English Novelists
■''Brains will beat grim death if we have
lenough of them!"
This was a saying of the old buccaneer
iKirby, a character in one of George Meredith's novels, and it is an apt opening
phrase for a sketch of the famous English novelist and his career. Brain, sheer
Jirain, has carried him well beyond grim
lleath so far as this world's immortality
Is concerned. When the twenty-second or
lwenty-third century sums up the tale
|f intellectual activity in the nineteenth,
I name of George Meredith must surely
in the list.    His mind is too biting,
be foundation of his work too deeply
poted in human experience, his sym-
athies too wide, and his battle for the
Jeedom of women too chivalrous, to admit
oblivion which will then have closed
pon names now equally famous. For
jeer mentality he is one of our highest;
pique in that he seems apart from all
intellectual currents of his time.
(When we think of the novelists of the
lid-Victorian em we think of Dickens,
liackeray, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins,
lithony Trollope. As one of this com-
|ny, George Meredith's name seems a
eligible quantity. Yet he was the con-
Inporary of the rest, reviewing their
liks and praising them, while they were-
libably careless of his, and certainly
lorant that their most powerful rival
lasting fame was the young man whose
Jrels, in their green and purple dresses
II orthodox three-volume bulk, lay un-
larded   on   the   shelves   of   Mudie's
irary.
3ut it was even so.    Today we begin
Isee him in his relative size.    As we
|w away from this intellectual moun-
|i-range, the peak we call George Mere-
towers and towers, and will not be
len by mist or tempest,
lereditk's life of fourscore years now
Ins to have been passed in the gradual
luring and development of his mind,
|ittle of striking incident does it re-
J, but it has been filled with deep and
Itiuous, though quiet, toil.   He was born
■Hampshire in the year 1828, and is
pd to the peasantry of that fruitful
tlish county.    His parents died when
Ivas a boy, and he grew up as a ward
Chancery.    His guardian sent him to
imany, and there he received his early
cation.    Seekers after personal data in
Knovels will find much of it in "Hammond."    Reading the first quarter
lhe book—surely the raciest, the most
jihic of narratives—they will discover
sort of a lad George Meredith was,
; his surroundings wcre, and what im-
|jjion his sojourn in Germany left on
lind.
returned to England at fifteen, and
fe long began the study of law;   but
[legal  profession  did   not  call   him
»ly.    Visions and dreams came be-
hitn and the pages of forms and
dents, and he saw shining a brighter
llian the law of evidence.    It was soon
|sary, if he was to develop in his own
to face the world alone, and for
his life  in London was  a brave
|»le against poverty.
(cumbered with financial burdens, but
]nined to master his destiny, he main-
hinisclf as best he could.    It is
Ihat he lived for one whole year upon
pal—a diet upon whicli heroes have
Inurturcd.    Hack-work for the press
and literary odd jobs of reviewing and
paragraphing kept life in him, and the
hard school developed his courage.
In 1851 he published his first book of
poems, and in 1856 his fantastic prose
tale, the marvelous "Shaving of Shagpat."
As the years wore on, his work and his
force of character began to tell, and when
he was nearing the end of his third decade he was a journalist of standing, editing the Ipswich Journal, a weekly paper,
and writing social and literary articles for
the Morning Post. Both these sheets were
Tory in their political affinities, and Mr.
Meredith must have found it an irksome
task to laud Disraeli and to find weak
spots in the armor of Lord John Russell
and Mr. Gladstone. But the former
statesman must have attracted him, for
lately he remarked that Disraeli was one
of the most baffling personalities of
modern England, and regretted that he
could not have discovered his meaning by
study at close range.
His editorial work was done from his
cottage in Surrey, but he had friends and
a foothold in London. As might have
been foretold, his acquaintances were of
the brightest. In October, 1862, Dante
Gabriel Rossetti had rented _No. 16 Cheync
Walk, Chelsea, and his tor-other, W. M.
Rossetti, and several of his friends took
rooms in the house. Swinburne and
Meredith were of the eompany, but the
latter made but little use of his rooms.
Indeed, it is said that lie never slept one
night under the roof, and that the Pre-
raphaelite cookery did not agree with his
somewhat Spartan taste. In a year or less
he gave up his tenancy, but it is probable
that parts of "Modern Love" and "Sandra
Belloni" were written there.
In 1866 he went to the scene of Italy'::
final struggle for independence as correspondent for the Morning Post. His sojourn in Venice at this time, in the very
heart of the intrigues and the desperate
heroism which made up the closing scene
in the drama, gave him material ■ for
"Vittoria," in which novel Mazzini, Garibaldi, Cavour, and the nobles and peasants
of that exalted time play tlieir natural
parts.
His marriage with the daughter of
Thomas Love Peacock, the author of
"Headlong Hall" and "Crotchet Castle,"
tbe friend to whom Shelley addressed his
fine descriptive letters from Italy, did not.
bring him happiness. His wife was a
brilliant creature, but wit and singular
gifts do not always consort with the qualities necessary to make a home for an
imaginative writer. A breach ensued, and
only at her death, after twelve years of a
somewhat tragic union, was the chapter
closed. Later, Mr. Meredith married
happily a lady of Irish birth, who died in
1886, leaving him two children.
At this time, while he had not achieved
fame, he was constantly gaining ground.
His masterpiece, "The Ordeal of Richard
Fevcrel," published in 1850, had won its
way and was already nn unforgetable book.
Between 185!) and 186" he had published
four novels and one book of poems, nm!
now he often regrets the difficulties which
forced him to produce too rapidly for serial
and even for simultaneous publication.
The decade of the '70's gave us "Harry
Richmond, "eBauchamp's Career," and
"The Egoist." The next ten years added
"The Tragic Comedians'' and "Diana of
the Crossways" to the list, nnd ibis gen
eration can remember the publication of
"One of Our Conquerors," "Lord Ormont
and His Aminta," and "The Amazing
Marriage."
The American interest in Meredith's
work gave an impetus to his circulation,
and now his books are with us wherever
culture is. His sympathy with woman in
her individual life, as well as in her sex
relation, had much to do with this transatlantic cult. Here women have greater
liberty than elsewhere, and it was natural
that the thoughtful American woman
should find in his creations echoes of her
owii spirit. There is no doubt that Meredith's women are freer than the women of
other great novelists. They have charm,
and his great characters among them have
intellect as well.
"Intellect is a pearl," he writes. "A
woman of intellect is as good as a Greek
statue; she is divinely wrought, and she
is divinely rare."
It has been his habit to write for three
or four hours daily, in the morning, and
his output was about twelve hundred words
a day, but he allowed himself frequent
holidays. His work-room is situated in
a chalet separate from his cottage at Box
Hill, on a higher level, from which tliere
is a long vista of the rolling meads of
Surrey. The cottage itself is hidden in
a garden, circled with hedges and embowered in trees, and behind it rises the
sheltering hill. Here he lives simply, as
he has always done, judges his wine as a
connoisseur, smokes a fine Italian cigar
reflectively, and is surrounded with the
sort of comfort which suits him and which
be suits.
The Meredith of our day is white-haired
and physically somewhat burdened with
his years of intellectual toil and the abrasions of life. His visitors now oftener see
him seated in his armchair than afoot and
alert as of old. He is tall, well proportioned, and slender. The wonderful lines
of his head at once fix the attention. They
are most delicate, sensitive lines, and the
head somehow seems to suggest the penetrative power of his intellect. His expression is not introspective, but rather that
of a man of the world, as in the widest
sense he is; and this idea gathers force
when he speaks. His voice is deep, mellow, and freighted with a perfect choice
of words.
What talk it is!—informed, fiery., full
of dash, grave with import, the lightest
thistle-down of wit, the barbed but never
poisoned dart of satire, all literature put
under contribution, and all experience, so
tliat the listener needs to be worthy of the
speaker lo follow him in his wide circling
flights. He might pour forth from his
knowledge of Napoleonic literature for
days, it would seem, so vast is bis erudition on the subject. He has unearthed and
read every known thing on this subject,
and with the literary result of but a few
noble odes. But then reading has always
been a habit with Mr. Meredith, and his
knowledge of French literature alone is
amazing'.
His knowledge is not exclusively literary. His fund of information regarding
I be arts and sciences is full, and he has
stored up the results of accurate observations at lirst band. A memory active and
tenacious enough to retain the contributions of bis many-sided interest in life
is one of the gifts of bis good gods.
His advisory connection with a great
publishing-house has kept him in touch
with contemporary English literature, and
genial and kindly is his treatment of young
writers. To him the present absence of
great writers is not a reason for discouragement. He says we are in the trough
of a wave, that is all;   the crest is rearing
«r-ronnnr i«11 awnr-raw
Stewart WilLUaw
■!#_■______
LCJaatoa  •
■
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION «IB
REAL ESTATE ACEHTS
e   Si POIT ST. VICTOIIA, ■. C.
Onb Dolla* Pm Annum
up its head behind. If he speaks of his
own work it is but a remark that he esteems "The Shaving Shagpat," or he
seems pleased with his treatment of Victor
Radnor's character in "One of Our Conquerors," showing the creeping progress
and effect of his insanity; or he remarks
that the obscurity of the opening chapter
of "The Egoist" was occasioned by a single
attempt on his part to write like Carlyle.
When we study this man, and think of
his books, we think of a very treasure-
house of human impulse, frailty, heroism,
sordidness, indifference, affection, humour,
and hate—in short, of human character.
Character, that is the point—a great
novelist of character! Meredith's aim has
been to render events as consequent as a
piece of logic through an exposure of
character. Other novelists have rendered
the progress of events by other means, and
character has slipped in as it mighty often
with tottering and bloodless result; but
Meredith has first thought of character,
and triumphs by his characters.
If, after dreaming "The Shaving of
Shagpat," he had invented, or rather discovered, the form of expression which was
germane to his genius, he would have been
absolutely one of our great originals. But
he was forced to think of writing novels
and poems in the conventional way.
While he has great wealth of poetic ideas,
clear expression, even in the simplest form
of verse, he finds difficult; and while he
has a supersensitive feeling of character,
and a virile philosophy of life, he never
completely masters the development of his
story.
His age did not supply him a form for
expression, as the ages of Rabelais, Cervantes, Dante, Moliere, and Shakespeare
supplied them; so that he does not express his time as they have done theirs,
and we place him beneath them. But his
endowment, differing in kind, was but
little, if at all, inferior to theirs, and another age may value him still more highly
than ours.
It is not often that The
The Truth Week finds itself in accord
For Once.        with the Vancouver World,
but for once it is willing to
admit that somewhat sensational sheet hns
hit thc nail on thc head. Commenting upon the refusal of the unemployed in Vancouver to accept a temporary job at a low
rate of wage the World very properly
points out that in a country where the
ordinary unskilled labourer has to lie idle
every winter he is obliged with the opening of spring to hunt for a job where he
can earn enough money in six or eight
months to keep him the whole year. The
AVeek has repeatedly pointed out that the
whole trouble with the labour market in
Canada is the uncertainty of employment
aud the World is right in saying that when
the farmer engages his help by the year he
will always have it. This evil exists all
over Canada it is not only on the prairies
tbat hoards of men are engaged for a few
weeks harvesting and then discharged, but
even in settled Ontario, the farmers offer
very low wages for very hard work aud
"let out" their help in the Fall. It: is easy
enough to fulminate against labouring men
from the easy chair of the editorial sanctum, but the labour question is a big one;
il is many sided and for its right understanding requires not only an intelligent
mind but a sympathetic heart. After all
the problem of life is the bread and cheese
problem, and the man who looks into an
empty cupboard can hardly be expected to
appreciate fine distinctions in political
economy. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
ij» if
if Short Story  *
COUSIN AMY.
By W. S. Maugham.
Amy is the daughter of my grandmother's nehew by marriage. I cannot imagine that she is any relative of
mine; but she insists that we are
cousins, and we call one another by
our Christian names. Her idea of the
connect-on is that she should treat me
with all the unpleasant frankness of a'
close relation, while on my side there
should be the extreme politeness, the
flattering attentiveness, of a distant
acquaintance. This was all very well
when I was eighteen and Cousin Amy
twenty-six; but now I am five-and-
thirty, and Cousin Amy has ceased to
count her birthdays. She does not
realize that this makes all the difference in the world; and I have never
been able to find the exact words in
which to frame so delicate a statement. Cousin Amy lives in the country, and I was much surprised to meet
her face to face in Piccadilly. She
shook me warmly by the hand.
"How nice to see you after all these
ages! We must have a talk, mustn'r
we?"
I replied that it would be very
agreeable.
"Well, I'm only here for twenty-
four hours,' she pursued. "Are you
doing anything this evening?"
"No, I'm not," I replied with
alacrity.
I thought it would be pleasant to
dine for once in a way at Cousin
Amy's expense. In years gone by she
had been apt to presume too far oil
the privilege (which her sex has never
shown any wish to dispute with mine)
of paying the bill.
"That's capital!" she said. "Then
you can take me out to dinner."
"The prospect fills me with enthusiasm," I retorted icily.
"You know I've become a food reformer?"
. "This is nuts," I murmured softly
to myself, considering that the fruit
in question was reported to be not
only nutritious, but cheap. I went on
with more earnestness; "And where
does one eat reformed food?"
"Oh, anywhere," she answered,
airily. "I'm not a faddist, you know.
Now, I'm going to tell you something
very extraordinary: Iv'e never dined
at the Ritz."
There was a pause, during which
yoii might have heard a pin drop in
Piccadilly.   But Amy broke it gaily.
"Well, I'll meet you there at eight,
shall I? And don't order anything
beforehand, 'since I eat next to nothing, you know."
This, at any rate, was consoling, for
I had been saving up my money in
order to spend a week in Paris and
improve my mind. Amy tripped
lightly away; and I, finding I had but
a couple of pounds in my pocket,
thought it would be wise in case of
emergency to change a cheque.
When we sat down in the evening,
Cousin Amy put her gloves on thc
table and looked round with a happy
smile. "I know we're going to have
a charming dinner," she said.
The waiter handed me the menu;
but Cousin Amy is a practical woman.
"Now, you'd far better let me order
my own dinner," she said. "I only
want a snack; and you see, as I can't
eat dead beasts, I'd better choose
what I can eat."
The proposal seemed eminently reasonable.
Amy cast her eye down the menu.
"At all events, we can start with
some hors d'oeuvrcs," she said. "Oh!
and how delicious! There's potage
bisque."
I had observed in my glance at the
bill-of-fare that this was the most expensive soup on the list; but Cousin
Amy never noticed these things. I
wondered acidly how she had reached
the quite mature age which I positive
ly knew was hers, without acquiring
the elements of common sense. I
ordered the hors d'oeuvres and the
potage bisque.
Cousin Amy frowned at the menu.
"It seems very extraordinary that you
have no salmon," she said, in the arrogant way in which women generally
address their inferiors. "It must be
in season."
"Well, we have some, madam, but
we haven't put it on the card. This
is the first weve had."
"There!" said Cousin Amy, in triumph. "You see, you can always
get things if you ask for them." ■
I shuddered to think of the price I
should have to pay for salmon which
had only come on the London market
that morning. I made up my mind
that I should have to choose a cheaper
hotel in Paris than the one upon
which I had fixed. I pointed out to
Amy that no1 woman who respected
herself could eat a red fish after a
red soup.
"Yes, I know that. I do feel rather
a barbarian; but I must eat salmon, as
it's full of proteids."
"But surely," I protested, "you told
me that you never ate horrible dead
beasts."
Amy opened her eyes wide. "Oh!
that only applies to warm-blooded
creatures; otherwise I couldn't have
eaten the soup."
"It's lucky there's not whale on the
menu," I murmured, as I meekly ordered the salmon.
I was beginning to think that pen
did oneself rather well on reformed
food.
The hors d'oeuvres were set on the
table; and Amy, explaining that slit
had to eat what she could, emptied the
entire contents of three dishes on her
plate. I thought they looked rather
nice myself, but I hadn't the face to
ask the waiter for more.
Then another waiter brought me a
list of wines. This was my opportunity, and I seized it like a man. Cousin Amy was certainly growing un-
comonly stout; and it is well known
that obesity is best treated by abstention from liquid for two hours
after the repast.
"As a food reformer, I take it that
you only have a cup of coffee after
eating," I said. "I shall have a
whiskey-and-soda."
"How did you get such a ridiculous
idea into your head?" she answered
briskly. "On the contrary, my doctor
has ordered me to drink wine. You
see, I have to keep myself up."
"Ah! what will you have?" I said,
gloomily.
"Oh! I don't really mind, so long as
it's very dry."
I looked at Cousin Amy. "Do you
remember the story of the man who
was taking a pretty American out to
dinner? He asked her what she would
drink. 'I guess I'll have champagne,'
she said. 'Guess again,' he answered.'
"What a sell!" cried Amy, laughing merrily.
I have read somewhere that women
have a greater delicacy of perception
than men. I certainly never knew
any one slower than Cousin Amy to
take a hint.
She watched me turn over the
pages. "If you really have no preference," she said, "I think I would like
Veuve Cliquot. I always feel that we
women ought to stand together."
It appeared that Cousin Amy was
a suffragist as well as a food reformer; and after I had ordered thc champagne which accorded with her principles, she favoured me with her views
on the cause. Amy thoroughly enjoyed the potage bisque, and she positively gloated over the salmon. The
obsequious waiter came for further
orders.
"Now you see what an economical
person I am to havc to dinner," said
Amy. "Any one else would ask for
entrees and roasts and all kinds of
abominations like that. But I only
want a couple of vegetables, and I've
done."
"I remember your saying you only
wanted a snack."
She turned to the waiter. She
thinks it is so nice to get on friendly
terms with a waiter, he likes him
to take an intelligent interest in her
food.
"Now, I'll tell you what I want:
you know those great big asparagus,
as large round as your arm? Well, I
want some of them."
"Very good, madam," said he.
"It's so lucky I came up to town
just when things I really like are in
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season,' she reflected. "In the coun
try we shall have to wait another
three months for asparagus and green
peas. You will order some peas, won't
you?"
"Certainly, if you think you can eat
them," I said, politely.
"Ah! now you see what a difference
it makes to eat in a rational manner.
I can eat anything, my dear boy—
anything!"
"I'm quite willing to believe it," I
retorted.
She looked at me and smiled
braodly.
"But I don't want you to sacrifice
yourself on my account. I'm not nar
row-minded, and if you want some
flesh I have no objection to your
having it."
A pile of asparagus and a great
many green peas were set before us,
and I knew they were worth their
weight in gold. I began to feel more
than doubtful about my trip to Paris
"It's very kind of you," I answered;
"but I seldom have more than a steak
for dinner; and after devouring thc
meal you've ordered I shall feel like
a boa-constrictor."
"You see, one has to get the proper
amount of proteids in," Amy replied
calmly, as she ate the giant asparagus.
I ate One or two myself, but I was
no match for Amy. I no longer wondered that she was growing stout; and
I thought that if anybody did marry
her, he should be warned in time that
j to feed a food reformer is no joking
I matter.
When there was one long monster
I Ief on the dish, she seized it deliber-
I ately.
"I must eat that one," she said. "It
(means a handsome husband and five
[thousand a year."
"He'll want it," I replied.
"I thought I should only spoil my
I dinner if I had tea," she murmured.
I reflectively.
"That was very considerate of you,"
II answered.
She leaned back with a sight and
I looked at me.
"How pleased I am to have caught
|you before you went to Paris!"
"I very much doubt whether I shall
|be able to afford to go," I said.
Cousin Amy is an optimist.
"After all, there's no place like
dome," she answered, cheerily. "If
you go to Paris you'll probably get
[typhoid, and you'll certainly spend
nuch more money than you can afford."
Cousin Amy has often besought mc
lo be economical. She takesa cousinly
Interest in my finances.
At last she finished the peas; and I
|elt that I could eat nothing for a
veek.   Amy was in high spirits.
"Now, a little sweet and a little dessert, and I'm done."
I began to admire Amy. I should
[lave liked to introduce the fat boy of
Peckham to her.
"Poires a la Melba," she ordered,
rith one glance at the menu.
With unerring instinct she had hit
Itpon the specialty of the house. I decided definitely not to go to Paris.
"Delicious, aren't they?" she said.
We reached the dessert, and I be-
bame weak and silly when she said
(she had not had strawberries and
cream that year. Neither had many
other people, trawberries and cream
vere brought, mixed together in a
|huge bowl, and for a fixed sum—a
father large sum, it seemed to me—
you could eat as many as you liked.
It was some consolation to me that
^my certainly had her money's worth,
/hen she had done, she leaned back.
"After all, one misses a great deal if
bne if a food reformer; but one has
|he consciousness that one is advanc-
ng a good cause. And besides, in
Lent one has the advantage of killing
|wo birds with one stone."
We had coffee, and I discovered
!iat Amy had a fine taste in liqueur
Irandy. She told me her doctor
louldn't let her drink it unless it was
lery old. When the bill came—I can-
lratulated myself on the fact that
Lmy had only wanted a snack, for if
lie had been really hungry I don't
|now what I should have done.
When we parted, she shook hands
|dth me. "I have enjoyed myself,"
he   said.    "I'm   so   sorry   I'm   not
come and lunch with me to-morrow,
y system is chop for chop, you know."
This was new in Cousin Amy, and I
put the change down to the advance
of years, which have a soft logic of
their own.
"I shall be delighted!" I answered,
promptly.   "Where shall we go?"
She looked at me with the utmost
effrontery,
"What -do you say t othe Eustace
Miles Restaurant? I should so much
like to show you what a vegetarian
restaurant is really like."
I have no presence of mind in emergencies, and I accepted Cousin
Amy's invitation. But as I wandered
away in the rain (I really couldn't afford a hansom), a sadder, poorer,
wiser and much over-eaten man, I
murmured to myself:
"She may call it chop for chop, if
she likes. I call it carrot soup for
potage bisque."
Frank Danby's New Novel.
That the new novel by Frank Dauby, "The Heart of a Child," should
be an interesting piece of work, almost goes without saying. Critics
have often quarrelled with her choice
of subject, and resented her inclination to deal with forbidden themes
but they have never denied the power
and grip of her stories. A realist a:
to method, she has the imagination
that creates types of character, and
the important personages in her
"Doctor Phillips" or "Pigs in Clover,"
will not soon be forgotten by those
who have once made their acquaintance. Her new book is at the same
time curiously like her earlier work,
and curiously different. It shows the
same insight into character, the same
dramatic construction, but the tone
of the book is mellower, the painful
note is less insistently sounded, and
the story, while it approaches close
to tragedy, ends after all in a cheerful key.
The subjetc is one that might bi
expected to attract Frank Danby. It
is nothing more nor less than the true
story of the life of a typical London
"Gaiety Girl"—a girl who drifts on
to the stage by accident, and without
training or any special gift beyond
her beauty and an indefinable charm
of personality, becomes thc reigning
stage favourite of the hour. Mrs.
Frankau has recorded the fact that
the story was originally planned by
her with her brother, thc late Owen
Hall (author of "Floradora" and
other musical comedies), and that it
was their intention to write it together, Mrs. Frankau supplying the fictional element, and Mr. Hall the "local colour" of thc London stage.
Although they had discussed the
story together they had not actually
begun the writing when Mr. Hall
died. Nevertheless, there is no lack
of local colour in the book as it
stands. Not since George Moore
wrote "A Mummer's Wife," has there
been such a story of the real life of
stage people; and "The Heart of a
Child," dealing with a different section of thc theatrical world from that
of Mr. Moore's work, is vastly more
attractive than the Irishman's rather
dreary masterpiece. Sally Snape, the
child of the London slum, who
reaches the stage by way of thc dress-
'taying in town longer, but you must  maker's show room, and has al! the
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At the Victoria Theatre,  Monday,  March 30.
young bloods of London at her feet,  membered as a true  document
is in truth an altogether attractive as! cerning thc life of our day.
well as original creature.   Frank Dan-1 ___
by has never done anything better
than the chapters in which she shows
hnw this uneducated young girl keeps
her head and steers her way safelv
amid tlie dangers of her life, by vir-,
tue of a kind of instinctive purity, j
Perhaps the most incredible character
Such an exchange of courtesy as
was chronicled in a German paper
not long ago would hardly suit the
taste of brisk Americans.
The exchange was in the form of
two advertisements.
"The gentlemen who found a purse
111
the
bunk
is   1
ad j
Dorothea, <
ind
for
her
Mrs.
Frai
kai
is said
to h
ive
had
a
living
model.
The cl
unax
of
the
story,  indeed
revives   a
scan
dal
tha
is
not >
et fi
*rg<
tU'll   III
l.otK
on
drawing rooms.
But this is. after all, not the most
interesting side of "The Heart of a
Child." It is as a picture of stage life
that it will be most eagerly read, and
—it  seems  safe  to predict—long  re*
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his house at a convenient day."
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VICTORIA. THB WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 28, 1908
Incorporated 1905.
Capital, $500,000.00
Capital increased
in 1907
to ...$2,000,000.00
Subscribed
Capital,     $650,000
Reserve . . $50,000
Surplns. Jan. 30,
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The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
•THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83-14 Government Street...Victoria, B.C.
526   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
On Spooks.
A well-known local journalist has
bceii severely criticized by an equally
well-known local resident for a series
of articles which he has recently contributed to an also well-known local
family newspaper on the subject ol
spooks. The incident is not without
features of interest and possibly of
importance,
For instance, if the startling Occurrences narrated in these articles actually   occurred   as   described,   and it
could be substantiated that they were
jiiot   thc   result   of   trickery, then   i
Igreater than Lodge is here.    If,  on
"the other hand, the narration is strictly correct and the narrator sincere but
Ian easy mark for clever tricksters, the
■conclusion must inevitably be that thi
' investigation  of   psychic  phenomena
•j has not been materially advanced.
There   is   a   third   solution   which
* seems to have suggested itself to the
• mind of thc local critic, which is that
thc articles arc simply ingenious  and
: imaginative contributions to the Sunday supplement of the well-known
newspaper.
The critic raises the further point
that in any event thc articles are in
questionable taste, since they profess
to report the utterances of spooks
supposed to represent citizens of respectability who in this astral plane
wcre not accustomed to use the vulgar slang attributed to them in the
articles.
On the nice ethical points raised by
the critic I havc nothing to say; there
will probably be only one opinion;
but the whole incident is of interest
at thc present moment because of thc
attention whieh is being directed to it
in consequence of the recent avowal
of Sir Oliver Lodge. 1 know that the
subject of psychic phenomena is one
of the most difficult upon which to
write wisely and logically. Mosl
writers string together a number of
incidents which appear marvellous because they are out of thc ordinary
and bear no obvious explanation.
People gasp and say, "How wonderful!" and then someone comes along
with the remark, "Oh, yes, that is very
similar to an experience which I had,"
and so these strange occurrences gain
credence and because they perplex are
classed with thc supernatural.
It is hardly possible for half-a-
dozen people to sit round the table
and discuss this absorbing topic without bringing one incident after another of the class to which I am referring. If they have never seen or
heard of spooks, they are pretty certain to know someone who has, and in
any event they are quite certain to
relate some incident which no one can
account for upon natural lines, and
which it is, therefore, easy to relegate
to the supernatural.
I am not going to yield to the common weakness and give my own experience in these matters, because,
although I have been investigating
them for nearly thirty years, I have
not made the slightest progress.
Many things have puzzled me and experiences have been related by some
of my dearest friends, whose sincerity
it is impossible to doubt, which would
seem to be almost conclusive of super
natural interposition but not absolutely conclusive, especially in view oi
the great strides now being made in
understanding subconscious influence
telepathic influence, and other influences which are mysteriously exerted
by one person upon another, in a
manner which cannot be explained by
any of the known laws of cause and
effect.
I ani prepared to admit, and I think
it is only a fair concession to the enlightenment of the age on the subject
of psychic phenomena, that great progress has been maue, not so much ii
explaining as in demonstrating the
fact that persons can influence each
other without physical contact and
possibly without material presence. I
would not even conjecture how this is
done, nor would I attempt to assign
the limits of its possibilities, although
any careful student of the subject
must realize that the investigations of
sincere seekers after truth along scientific lines are bringing us within
reach of certain definite conclusions
on this phase of the subject.
It is indisputable that some people
are very highly gifted with natural
faculties for unusual and indeed mysterious communication and contro'
which are caviare to the vast majority. It is indisputable that perfect
strangers have been able to tell people many things about themselves
which no one else knew and which
could only have been learned through
channels unknown and unrecognized.
It is with respect to these matters
that there is a reasonable prospect of
enlightenment.
Where most people draw the line
is at the claims so freely made nowadays of communication between the
living and those who have passed be
hind the veil; and I am not surprised
that any man should bitterly resent
the intrusion of a sensational scribbler into matters which are held
sacred by all right-minded men.
I know that there are many perfectly honest people who believe that
they have received messages from the
dead, and that they can communicat
at will either directly or through some
recognized medium, but their belief
does not establish the fact, and t
my mind it has always been one of
the saddest of reflections that they
should be trifled with by tricksters
That this is the case has been demonstrated again and again. The mosl
ardent and reputable spiritualists
have from time to time been exposed
and their methods laid bare; indeed
it is not too much to say that tic
medium, of howsoever high a reputation, has been able to produce results
which have not been duplicated by a
professional conjurer.
One of thc greatest difficulties
which presents itself to the mind of ,"
reasonable thinking man and which
effectually prevents him from crediting the genuineness of so-called mes
sages from spirit-land, is the fact thai
the spirits are willing to lend themselves to such ridiculous performances and to give utterances to such'
banalties as are altogether inconsistent with their known character when
living. It is inconceivable that i
communication with departed friend:
were possible, they would not havi
something far different, far more reassuring, and far more vital to impart
than the trashy nonsense which
passes muster for a "message."
I do not claim to have been able t*
throw any new light on this very
old subject. I am willing to accept
the conclusions of leading sicentist
that the subject should be approached
with an open mind, and with that
reverence which is due to its serious
importance, but I have yet to gleai
the first conclusive evidence that there
is such a thing as a spook, and that
there is any possibility of penetrating the veil which nature, or Providence if you will, has with tender
considerateness hung between the
visible and the invisible.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a license to prospect for coal, on
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty ohains;
thence east eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence west eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
AD. 1908.
Mch 21
D. R. YOUNG.
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the B. M. Richardson Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence north eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence south
eighty chains; thence east eighty chains
back to place of commencement, containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
Mch 21
C. A. YOUNG,
William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a license to prospect for
coal, on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile and a quarter north of Skidegate Inlet and mouth of the Honna
River, Graham Island, Queen Charlotte
Islands Group; thence south eighty
chains; thence east eighty chains; thence
north eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains bank to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
B. M. RICHARDSON.
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
(30) days after date, I intend to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of B. M. Richardson
Claim, being about one mile and a
quarter northwest of Skidegate Inlet,
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands
Group; thence south eighty chains;
thence east eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains; thence west eighty
chains; back to place of commencement,
containing six hundred and forty (640)
acres.
Located this   day of March,
A.D. 1908.
R. W. RAYSAY,
Mch 21 William Woods, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
about 100 feet west of the wharf; running west 60 chains; thence north 60
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south along the shore back to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 24th,  1908.
March 14 C. G. JOHNSTONE.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay,
three-quarters of a mile from the entrance of said bay, running west 80
chains; thence south 60 chains; thence
east along the shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island; thence northerly along the
shore of Blinkinsop Bay to the place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
O. C. BASS.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for tho purchase of the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay, three-quarters of a mile from the
outlet of the creek at the head of bay,
running north along the shore 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains; thence west 60 chains back to
the place of commencement.
Dated February 24th, 1908.
L. P. LOCKE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, Intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
at the head of Blinkinsop Bay, 60 feet
north of the creek running to the bay;
running west 60 chains; thence north
60 chains; thence east 60 chains; thence
south 60 chains back to the place of
commencement.
Dated February  24th,  1908.
M. J. G. WHITE.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
Combs to Suit
Any Coiffure
This season the Comb plays a very important part in the tasteful
and stylish arrangement of a lady's hair. Some women possess
a natural gift of doing their hair prettily; a simple turn of the
wrist, one twist of the long coil at the back, a little puffing out of
the pompadour or curls, a handsome Comb stuck in to complete
and c'est fini. But the Comb is always necessary nowadays. Just
now we are showing a most charming assortment of Back Combs
and Sets; Parisian Brilliant-Set Combs, Gold and Silver Filligree
Combs, Fancy Stone-Set Combs, Steel-Mounted Combs, Jet Combs,
Mourning Combs, etc., etc.,—a Comb for every style of coiffure.
Very wide choice in Evening Dress Ornaments, Aigrettes,
Barettes, etc.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
Government Street Victoria, B. C.
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
full orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance! How you could
dance to such  music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.   No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
■.^^^■■■■i^^^^*.......™***********"********'*'-' entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
„\ The world's foremost   .layers and singers make Victor
%x\ Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone
V«^\ plays them as no other instrument can.
3oC Go to any Victor or Berliner dealer's and hear
V>\ these wonderful instruments.    t___ him to
V»/> aX explain th.* easy-payment plan.
Xj,t?.<«>\Write ua on the coupon for   catalogue
\  e \_\ aud full information.
\\Y\W
The Berliner Grim+pbene
.   v Company of Canada, Ui
>\*\      M«™».   606
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSINO   SOUND,   BEDWELL SOUND, RACE NARROWS.
GUARANTEED 2,000 FT. TO THE ACRE.
PRIOR $2.50 TO $3.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUED.
ARTHUR BELL
ROOMS 14 and 16
MAHON   BUILDING,   GOVERNMENT  STREET, VICTORIA.
P. O. BOZ 70S. PHONE 1385. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
^ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-ooooooooooooo-oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooO'Ooo'Ooo
^ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-o-^^
Some New Styles
in Extension
Tables.
Extension Table—An excellent
low-priced style in surface
oak. Top is 44x44 in. and
table extends to 6 ft. Finely  finished.   Each    $8.50
Extension Table—Another neat
design in surface oak table.
Top of this style measures
44x44 in., and table extends
to 6 ft.   Price  $11.50
Same style in 8 ft. length $13.00
Extension Table—A very neat
and pleasing table style in
solid oak. Top measures 44X
44 in., and table extends to
6 ft.   Price only  $15.00
Extension Table—This is a
splendid table value. It is
made of solid oak. Top measures 40x40 in. and extends to
6 ft.   Price, only $10.00
Same style in 8 ft. length, $12.00
Extension Table—A very stylish table, made in surface oak
and finely finished throughout. Top is 42x42 in., 6 ft.
length.    Price, each $14.00
Extension Table—This is another pleasing style in surface oak. Top measures 42*
42 in., and extends to 8 ft.
Finely finished. Price.. .$16.00
See Our Spring Furniture
Styles.
The frequent arrivals in Furniture during the last few weeks have combined to make a splendid showing of
Furniture for the Spring season, when old, rickety pieces are cast away, giving place to new ideas, and spaces
are found to require the addition of some dainty piece to round out your "scheme." It is a timely and splendid
showing—a worthy exhibit of new furniture ideas you should see. Just now the whole store has taken on an
air of brightness and freshness, and. like the Springtime, the almost daily additions mean a growing goodness
—every day being better and brighter and nearer perfect than the one just left behind. The curtains, the draperies, the carpets, the furniture—all breathe this freshness and newness—and we issue to you a very special
invitation to visit this store, assuring you that you may spend just as much time as you wish in looking, and are
under absolutely no obligation to invest a penny.   Come any day—today, if you can.
The Morris Chair Stock is Unusually Complete Just Now.
In those most used of all easy chairs—the Morris—we show an unusual assortment. Just now the choice
is an extensive one indeed, and between the prices quoted here you will find a range that will surprise you.
There is a great choice as to design, as to trimmings and as to price. Some are wholly the product of our own
factory, some frames are imported and the upholstering done in our own factory, and some we import complete.
For upholstering these or any chairs we stock a most complete range of coverings, and it is possible to
choose from this assortment coverings to harmonize with most any furnishings. Come up to our Third Floor
and see these chair styles.   You're welcome.   Many styles in Morris Chairs, at, each, $9.00 to $35.00.
Moke New Curtains
From These Dainty
New Materials.
There isn't any reason why
you shouldn't treat at least
some of your rooms to new
curtains and drapes this Spring.
We have an immense stock of
new Cretonnes and Chintzes,
and we are offering them at
very low prices. Come to our
Curtain Department and discuss
this important question.
British Cretonne—A specially
nice line in a variety of pretty tapestry and floral effects.
Splendid value at the price
marked.   Per yard aoc
British Chintz—Artistic designs
on jaspar ground. This style
is suitable for long curtains,
48 inches wide and sold at,
per yard  65c
British Cretonne—In floral and
conventional designs, that are
bright and cheerful. We show
a splendid range. Priced at,
per yard, 35c, 30c and....25c
British Chintz—A fine range of
pretty and attractive designs
in green and yellow, rose and
green, pink and green, with
blue   ribbon.    Per  yard,   40c
British Chintz—A very pretty
and serviceable chintz with
artistic designs, in various colorings on a jaspar ground,
has a softening influence on
the whole effect. It makes it
the less liable to soil, yet does
not detract from the daintiness.   Price, per yard 40c
SECON FLOOR.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
kssssssssssssssssssssss^^
i.
j""*-*/■ ■■» "—^r~eo
At The Street   ^
Corner        k
VHQBU. P
By THB LOUNOBR
Evidently some people cannot see
joke. When I bewailed my sad
experience in last week's issue anent
subdivisions, I was simply giving vent
to my feelings and indulging in a little
Harmless reverie; judge of my surprise, therefore, when several admir-
rs of the Lounger's column took me
evercly to task on the. charge of
boosting Cuthbert's building lots. I
must confess I never saw it in that
ght and had no idea that anyone else
would, but when I met Cuthbert on
Wednesday afternoon of the present
week and he told me that he had had
most successful sale of Carey Castle
ots, and all on account of the "write
ip" in Lounger's column, I began to
hink that I was too simple-minded
or this wicked world. Never again
hall I venture to indulge in a reverie
n paper without first submitting it to
me kind friend who will inform me
hether it is purely an emanation of
poet's brain or whether it possesses
.me commercial value. I must con-
ss that atfer Kipling's lates exploit
selling his Canadian Letters to Coirs I should hardly feel called upon
apologize if I became a little bit
lercenary myself.
A lady of my acquaintance, who is
0 a valued subscriber, wishes me
say something about the all-too-
quent carelessness of some of the
tormen on the B.  C.  E.  R.    She
ew   my   attention   to   an   accident
ich has not been reported in the
ily press, but which in fairness to
e public, and for their reassurance
should be both reported and explained. On Sunday night, when the last
cars started from the corner of Yates
and Government streets, the Outer
Wharf car followed too closely behind the Beacon Hill car. Naturally
everyone is in a hurry at 11 p.m., and
motormen are but human. These two
cars rushed along Government street
at about the speed limit. Near the
post office the leader pulled up rathei
quickly to take on a passenger, when
the hind car crashed into it. Result
one motorman seriously injured, still
in the Jubilee Hospital; several passengers badly shaken up, and one boy
cut about the legs. My object in referring to the incident is to call attention to the fact that the rules of the
company forbid a motorman to drive
his car within two hundred feet of
another car preceding him on the
same track. If this rule were observed, such accidents as the above
would be impossible, as no matter
what the rate of speed is, any car
could pull up within two hundred feet.
This is distinctly a warning to motor-
men. As a class they are very obliging and discharge their duties in a
manner thoroughly satisfactory to the
public, but in this respect there is
some laxity and it is not fair to the
company nor to the public that it
should continue.
Whilst on this point, I want to say
a word about conductors. Several
times lately I have seen passengers
miss a car and have to wait ten minutes for the next, because the conductor seemed to have his eyes glued
towards the front of the car instead
of looking to the side when he approached a crossing. In each case
the intended passenger was running
towards the stopping point along the
cross street and was only a few yards
away. I am not aware whether the
company has any rule on this point
but in the interests of business as well
as the convenience of the public, a
conductor should certainly keep his
eyes open and take a glance along side
streets.
I have recently made several strictures in this column on the abuse of
bridge playing—none on the game it
self, of which I am an enthusiastic
admirer. The abuses complained of
are such as are absolutely indefensible. In her calmer moments no lady
would attempt to excuse her conduct
for lowering the blinds and locking
the door against callers on her usual
day, in order to indulge in bridge.
Neither would any lady defend
"scraps" across the bridge table,
though if she did allow her temper t<
overcome her she would undoubtedly
go next morning, pocket her pride
and apologize. So far so good. Ii
any lady is prepared to combat these
propositions, or to argue that I am
not justified in giving thc incidents
publicity, whilst carefully screeniii*.
tiie parties, I am authorized by the
editor to say that anything they may
have to say on the subject shall be
published in the correspondence column without revision. What I dc
want to say, however, is this, that .f
the ladies indicated think they know
who gave the information to The
Week, they arc entirely mistaken; in
fact, the young lady whose name has
been mentioned in this connection not
only knows nothing about it, but has
been most persistent in her efforts to
find out for herself. A critic always*
makes some difficulty for himself;
people at once begin to ask themselves: "Who could have told him?"
"Let us see, who was there?" or, "It
must have been So-and-so." Now, in
order to prevent an injustice being
done to any lady, I may say that my
information came from a gentleman
and a married man at that, and that
his object in telling me was in the
hope that the publication of the facts
might be instrumental in checking the
abuse. That, too, is my only object.
Women always tell their men friends
of these occurrences; they would
never tell an edtior or an inconsequent lounger.
The appointment of Mr. Humbel to
the management of the Empress Hotel is a good omen for its future conduct and a guarantee that the public
will receive proper treatment. His
appointment also does away with the
necessity of saying anything further
about some of the regrettable incidents which have occurred at the
Empress since its opening. As secretary of the Vancouver Club and before that of the St. James Club, Mont
real, Mr. Humbel has left behind him
a splendid record, and if he is not
interfered with will make the Empress
what it was designed to be—the most
popular hotel in the West.
People arc in a bad case when they
have to plead poverty as an excuse
for neglect. In this case the city
fathers of Victoria seem to be at the
present time. I kn iw nothing of
finance, of estimates, of assessments,
or of taxation; but I do know that
winter is over, that spring is here, and
that the city needs a spring cleaning—
which it is not getting. There are still
many horridly unsightly vacant lots,
strewn with refuse and debris of every
kind, from cans to carcasses. Tliere
are still a number of disreputable and
abandoned shucks, one of the worst
being on Fort street, near Vancouver.
I say nothing of thc number of streets
with mud piled up, which so badly
need scraping, but why, oh, why, is
that vacant corner of James Bay
causeway, fronting on Government
and Belleville streets, still in tlie same
uncultivated and neglected condition
as it was three years ago? I am neither a gardener nor a contractor, but
I am so ashamed of that corner that,
for the  sum  of sixty dollars,  I  will
contract to spread soil, supply and
plant twenty good shrubs, seed for
lawn and put a galvanized wire fence
all round thc lot to protect it until
the grass is grown. In a week it wil'
be too late to do this until another
year, .the shrubs will have developed
beyond the safety point for transplanting; but it is about the worst advertisement Victoria can havc to leave
that wretched corner in its present
condition.
cfa
The  New  Grand.
Next week's bill is a most promising looking one which will have
as its leading feature a comedy sketch
entitled "The .Man from Maccy's,"
presented by Walter E, Perkins, assisted by Mr. Charles Maynard and
Miss Marcia Mitchell. Mr. Perkiiu
has only lately forsaken the legitimate
stage for vaudeville and will be remembered as having appeared at the
Victoria Theatre as the star in "My
Friend  From India."
Another comedy playlet entitled
"Election Bets," will be presented by
the llallen and Fuller Company. The
Two Roses are a team of dainty
young misses who have a clever
musical act which includes solos and
duets on violin and 'cello. Cantor
and Curtis (Marry and Alice) are
billed as "The Nifty Little Dancing
Kids." Mlle Andrictta is a vocalist
with an original method of singing
original songs. Thos J. Price will
sing "When It's Moonlight, . Mary
Darling." A splendid set of Moving
Pictures will illustrate Ihe great play,
"Ben Hur," and the Orchestra will
play the descriptive overture, "Thc
Chapel  in the Mountains." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
__B_t*_L«_L_i__iU_ii_fl_a__i_i-_^_»_J_i4L>_L %________. -_-___.
*$ V 'it1 *y *_%* v fji! v 'v 'ji! tit *r '+1
^ Social and        *
$ Personal, *
Mr. Morton Mason left for Frisco
last week.
* *   *
Mr.  Savage  left on  Tuesday  for
Winnipeg.
* *   *
Mrs. McGill of Shawnigan Lake
came down Wednesday alst.
* *   *
Mr. Gordon Mason left for Vancouver Saturday.
* *   *
Mr. B. Pinder left on Monday for
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. Arthur Newcombe spent a few
days in Victoria during the week.
* *   *
Mr. Jack Merritt, Vancouver, was
a visitor in town during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Martin and
Miss Phyllys Mason leave shortly for
Kamloops.
* *   *
Miss Winona Troupe is the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Troupe in
Seattle.
* *   *
Mr. H. P. Hickey and Mrs. Thos.
Hickey left for the North on Tuesday.
* *   *
Mr. James Girdwood, who spent
the winter in Kamloops, has returned to Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Stewart Robertson was hostess at a small card party on Wednesday evening last.
* *   *
Mrs. Gerald Pike after a short visit
spent with her sister, Mrs. Le Sueur,
in the Upper Country has returned
to Victoria.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. R. Nelson, Blanchard
street, have returned from a very enjoyable holiday spent in Kamloops.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Powell are expected
to arrive shortly from the Old Country, where they have been for the
past eighteen months.
* *   *
The Lieutenant-Governor, Mrs.
Dunsmu'r, Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir,
Miss Dola Dunsmuir, and Mr. Bromley left on Tuesday, 25th, en route
to England.
* *   *
Mrs. Burton, Mrs. Walter Langley
and the Misses E. Tilton, V. Pooley,
N. Combe and Reade have gone over
to Portland for thc Golf tournament.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
Annie Catherine, eldest daughter of
Thos. Anthony Wood, of Pardshaw,
Duncans, to Harold Wishart Mainguy, eldest son of the late Darrich
W. Mainguy, of Chemainus, V.I.
* *   *
The many friends of Miss Dorothy
Bulwer, only daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. H. Bulwer, of Esquimalt, will
be interested to hear of her engagement, which has just been announced
to Lieutenant Cecil P. Charmley of
H.M.S. Egeria.
* *   *
Mrs. H. Tye gave a farewell tea
for Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir last Monday. Among those present were Mrs.
Spratt, Mrs. R. Dunsmuir, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. Eliot, Miss
Heyland, Miss B. Irving, Mrs. Heb-
den Gillespie, Mrs. Alex. Gillespie,
Miss Alice Pooley, Dr. Fagan, Mrs.
Faydn, Miss Savage, Miss Little, Miss
Mason, Miss D. Clute, Msis W. Johnston and many others.
* *   *
The Bridge Club met at Mrs. H.
Tye's on Friday and a very enjoyable
afternoon was spent. Among thc
competitors wcre Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Heyland, Mrs. Dalton, Mrs. Hermann Robertson, Mrs.
H, Tye, Mrs. J. H. Todd, Mrs. Coles
Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs.
Matson, Mrs. Flummerfelt, Mrs. Freeman, Mrs. Little, Mrs. A. Robertson, Mrs. A. Gillespie, Mrs. Matson.
* *   *
Mrs. Matson's pretty residence oh
Head street, was the scene of thc
gathering of the Five Hundred Club.
Thc first prize was won by Mrs. C
Todd and a dainty little souvenir was
presented to Mrs. Stewart Robertson
who kindly acted as scorer. The
house and tea table were massed with
beautiful yellow daffodils and sprays
of fern.
Among those present  were:    Mrs.
t
The Most Artistic and the Most Exclusive Sub-division
Ever Placed on the Market.
^
We are favored with
to offer
instructions
FOR  SALE
commanding building sites in
CAREY CASTLE
GARDENS
Rockland Avenue, Running Through to Richardson Street
This magnificent property is situated on Eockland Ave., between Government House and the charming residence of John Arbuthnot, Esq., while across
the avenue is "Craigdarroch," the home of Mrs. Joan Dunsmuir.
There is no other property in Victoria in any such situation surrounded
by such palatial homes in which building sites can be obtained by the persou
who does not wish to buy acreage.
THE PUKCHASEE OP THESE LOTS KNOWS BEFOREHAND THAT
HE IS IN THE CENTRE OP THE MOST VALUABLE
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN VICTORIA.
And that he has no anxiety as to the character of the homes that will for
all time surround him.
It would be a pity to spoil such a beautiful property by cutting it up in the
usual way, therefore a great deal of time and trouble has been taken in planning
this subdivision so as to conserve as much as possible its original characteristics.
Therefore it has been decided to make the top portion of it into
A PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL PARK ON THE SAME LINES AS SOME
OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLACES AROUND LIVERPOOL AND
OTHER CITIES IN ENGLAND AND MANY CITIES
IN THE UNITED STATES.
Provision will be made to complete a system of sewerage and private roads
that will connect with a 66-foot public street to be made and boulevarded, with
concrete sidewalks, by the city, on the lower portion, which has a splendid
frontage on the best part of that fine new street, Richardson Street.
The property has been named " CAREY CASTLE GARDENS," because
it has a frontage on its entire length upon Government House, formerly Carey
Castle. The main avenue is named Lotbiniere Ave., in memory of the most
beloved of all our Governors, because he planted with his own hands along a
portion of this avenue two rows of Butternut trees, which will always be
interesting to residents and visitors.
In order that purchasers of these sites may be protected from having
inferior buildings erected on any of the lots now offered for sale,
BUILDING RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IMPOSED UPON
EACH PURCHASER.
The property has been surveyed and the plans, together, with a detailed
description of each lot, are now being prepared. These will be ready in a few
days, when the exact date of sale and terms will be announced.
The owners realize that it is necessary to sell every lot, almost, in order to
carry out their ideas of making this a unique subdivision, therefore the prices
will be much lower than the lots are actually worth and within the reach of
every one who wishes to build a nice home.
It is unnecessary to say that these sites cannot be equalled in Victoria for
health, beauty and view.   They are high and dry.
WATCH OUR ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS.
As the owners preferred that where possible two lots should be sold
together the sale will open at the offices of the undersigned for all people who
wish to buy two or more lots adjoining at 9.30 a.m. Wednesday morning,
March 25th, 1907, and at 11 a.m. for those who wish to buy single lots.
Terms—10 per cent, deposit, 25 per cent, on May lst, 25 per cent, on
November lst, 20 per cent, on May lst, 1909, and 20 per cent, on November
lst, 1909, with interest at 6 per cent, from May lst, 1908.
Herbert Cuthbert & Company
616 Fort St., Victoria, B. C.
PHONE  610 „
Gibb, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. T. S. Gore, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs.
C Roberts, Mrs. C Todd, Mrs. H.
Tye, Mrs. H. Robertson, Mrs. C.
Baker, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Matthews,
Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Savage, Mrs.
Hunter, Mrs. Ker, Mrs. Courtney,
Mrs. Blackwood, Mrs. J. Raymour,
Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Fagan, Mrs. B.
Tye, Mrs. Coles, Mrs. S. Robertson,
Miss Lottie Wark and others.
Miss Adelaide King, Rae street,
entertained a few friends at Five
Hundred on Monday evening. At the
conclusion of the game a dainty supper was served. The table was attractively decorated with lillies of the
valley, pink and white roses and the
new shade of China blue violets.
The competitors were Miss V.
Blackwood, Miss Wootten, Miss King,
Miss Newcombe, and the Messrs.
Jephson, T. and H. King, Holmes,
Parker, C. Newcombe and Holden.
The Message of the Par East.
In the New York Tribune there appeared, the other day, a review of Mr.
Fielding Hall's "The Inward Light,"
which was so evidently written by
someone who knew his Burma and ]
the East, that his opinion of the book j
is significant.   Mr. Hall, he said, "approaches his subject with the under-J
standing born of sympathy, knowledge   and   appreciation.    He   writes |
with  enthusiasm as one who love
the people he knows so well—he has|
penetrated  their   mysteries,   he  has
absorbed their spirit, he has divined
their heart. ...  Mr. Hall has placed!
his admirers under renewed  obliga-j
tion by this beautiful   exposition   oil
world old truths."   Such wholesoule(j
appreciation is in refreshing contrast
to the attitude of a religious papel
which dismissed this remarkable booU
with the cavalier remark that "we arl
so well satisfied with the superiority
and sufficiency of Christianity that wl
are not attracted by such works. Wl
do not look to Burma for light on th|
problems of life and death."
Gertrude Atherton's Trilogy.
The vitality of Gertrude Atherton!
best work is attested by the fact thsf
in response to a persistent demand,
new edition of "The Californians" hrj
just been published by the Macmillai
Company,   This story, which some
Mrs.  Atherton's admirers have hel
to be the best she has ever writtel
forms an important link in the chai
of books in which she has depict!
the complete social and political hi
tory of California.    It occupies   tl
middle place in the series of thr|
books, of which "Rezanov" is the :
and  the  recently  published  "AncJ
tors" the last.
The Japanese Are Human.
We have not yet given up hope i
the time will come when the JapaneJ
will bc regarded by the white man]
only human, after all.    When thi
government signs   an   unsatisfactcT
treaty, they riot; when they take pi
session of a conquered country   11
Korea,  they  play  the  bully;   wif
their crops fail, they starve, and i
emigrate.   Best proof of all concel
ing   their   susceptibility    to    huitf
weakness:  when we slapped thein|
the back two years ago and told th|
they   were   the   greatest   people
earth, they believed us.—New  Y<|
Evening Post.
Stranger—My friend, why are
swearing so?
Cussity—Why? Because of a blJ
fool of a doctor. I got some pills I
a pain in my back and the directil
read, "Take one a half hour bef
you feel the pain coming
Harper's Weekly.
Right Out With It.
She—Say,    Jimmy,   youse   nee;
tell me about de poor condition
country and de depression in
Street.   If yer ain't got de price I
soda, just say so.—New York Mi
Somewhat Different.
Cuttem (the tailor)—I have cl
to see why you haven't paid an|
tention to my repeated duns.
Slopay—Silence     is     golden, |
know.
Cuttem—Well, in this case it s|
more like brass. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 1908.
Mrs. Patrick Campbell
Vancouver Opera House, April 14 and 15.
Notes on
Provincial News
Another Railway in the Kootenay.
The Great Northern completed laying their steel into Michel on Monday
last, and the first train passed over
the line from Fernie to Michel that
day. Passenger service will not be
supplied until after the Government
inspection. It will be a couple of
weeks yet before the road is properly
ballasted. It was found necessary to
construct a temporary line for aboul
a mile and a half near Michel, and the
construction crews are now hard at
work making that part permanent, but
a month or six weeks will no doubt
see the completion of the work.
surrounding district if operations are
not resumed; it will also be a heavy
blow to the long-cherished project for
further exploitation and railway con
struction up the St. Mary's River. Thei
situation is thus succintly described
in the last issue of the Moyie Leader
"The affairs at the Sullivan mine are
said to be in bad shape. The men
have not been paid their last month'r
wages, and the liabilities of the company are said to be very large. The
directors will have a meeting at Spo
kane on the 18th, when it is believed
matters will be satisfactorily adjusted.
Sullivan stock is now quoted at il/_
cents a share."
What Others Think.
The Slocan Mining Review has the
following to say with reference to a
Government-owned smelter and some
recent remarks on the subject which
appeared in the B. C. Mining Record.
The Week's comment is that there is
as much likelihood of a Government-
owned smelter as of pigs flying:
"The B. C. Mining Record for the
current month reprints in full our recent remarks  anent a  Government-
owned smelter.   It has grave doubts
as to its successful application, how-
j ever, but it does not begin to enlight-
I en us, or argue against ust.   It simply
I confines itself to some vague remarks.
las   a  preliminary,   from   which   we
gather such a project would not have
lthe approval of its editor.   That set-
hies itl   But we venture  to  suggest
Ithat it's a matter of dollars and dimes
Iwith the Uf. C. Record. Had they been
|first in the field with the suggestion
and   had   somebody   suggested   the
coast as the ONLY location for it, it
vould have been 'Rah for a govern-
aent-owned smelter."
The Sullivan Mine.
It is a matter  of  general  regret
|hat the affairs of the Sullivan Mining
tompany  are  in  such  a  disastrous
londition.   With a large mine, a mod-
|rn smelter, and the successful instal-
^tion of the best known system of
bad smelting, the people of the Koot
Inay expected the Sullivan to estab-
Ish a record for permanent and prosperous work.    Its early career   was
(hequered, but it got fairly on its feet
hree years ago, and since then has
ogged along steadily.    It will be a
lerious thing for Marysville and the
Praise, Indeed.
By common consent the Provincial
Government has made a good bargain
with the G. T. P., so good that the
leader of the opposition refrained
from dividing the House on the debate, and so good that the provincial
press, both Liberal and Conservative,
is showering praises upon Premier
McBride. This must be as gratifying
to the Government as it is creditable
to the press. No one will accuse the
Cranbrook Herald of being anything
but a dyed-in-the-wool Grit organ, yet
this is what it has to say on the sub
ject:
"The Herald desires at this time to
compliment the McBride Government
on the most satisfactory arrangement
made with the Grand Trunk people. If
the report received at this office is
correct, we are free to say that Mr.
McBride has made the best arrangement with the Grand Trunk that was
ever made by any province with any
transcontinental railway. The Herald
believes in giving credit where credit
is due, and it is pleased at this time
to congratulate Mr. McBride on tht
success that he has attained in his negotiations with the Grand Trunk people. Matters of this kind.arise above
petty politics, and any government
that does as much for the people as
has apparently the McBride Government, are entitled to the thanks of the
whole Province, regardless of political
affiliations."
AGENTS WANTED!—16x20 crayon
portraits 40 cents, frames 10 cents
and up, sheet pictures one cent
each. You can make 400 per cent,
profit or $36.00 per week. Catalogue and Samples free. Frank W.
Williams Company, 1208 W. Taylor.
St., Chicago, 111.
n_%
mm
NOTICE
The bridge at Craigflower over Victoria Arm is closed to vehicular traffic
until further notice.
P. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Lands and Works Department, Victoria,
B.C., 9th March, 1908.	
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Philippi-
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 16th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A Olson, Agent.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, I0o8, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap.   Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and  wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be  given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at thu S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 2., 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence cast 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chi I , hence west 80 chains to
point 01' . ninifincemenl, 640 acres, more
or less.
1 ..IS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Pt   Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thercc north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chai . thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS ./. A.  UREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at s post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 i.iains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; C10 acres, more or
less.
Located January _7i.  11108.
WILLIAM  EDWABD  NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 0—Commencing at a post
planted  at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chalus; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chatns to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January  25,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. co'rner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;   640   acres,   more  or  less.
Located  January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29. 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
WEEK 30TH MARCH
The New Grand
SULLIVAN » CaMIIIM,    PraprUtera.
WALTER E. PERKINS & CO.
Presenting
"The Man From Macey's.
HALLEN and FULLER
One-Act Comedy by Geo. M. Cohan
"Election Bets.
THE TWO ROSES
Dainty Musical Act.
MLLE. ANDRIETTA
Sings Her Own Original Songs in
Her Own Original Way.
HARRY ALICE
CANTOR and CURTIS
The Nifty Little Dancing Kids.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"When It's Moonlight, Mary
Darling."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Ben Hur."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"The  Chapel in the  Mountains."
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....10c
Evenings, Balcony  lOo
Lower Floor 10c
Boxes    tto
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
LADIEB        MEDICAL  O-EHTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBBATOB  TBEATKEKT
HB.     BJOBHFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas .St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
TO HOME SEEKERS.
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by excellent road. About 20
acres fenced, 10 acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft.
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale, $2,000, terms
to suit.   Box 162, Victoria.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The -days are getting Cold.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Warm and Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal  in the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA, B.C.
Leave Your Baggage Cheek* at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Will You Take
$500 a Year
ee •
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
The Army
and Navy
Cigar Store.
Richardson
Phone 345 THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 28, 1908,
ififififi>ififif$_>i!>ifi>ii
$ llusic and %
J   The Drama. J
Creston Clarke.
With reference to the appearance
of   Creston   Clarke   at  the   Victoria
Theatre on Wednesday evening next
the following from as conservative
a paper as the Portland Oregonian
will be read with interest:
Creston Clarke returns to Portland
this season in one of the best constructed dramas of recent years, "The
Power that Rules." He was most
favourably received here two seasons
ago in "Monsieur Beaucaire," and
will have added greatly to his popularity when he closes this wek's en-
gament.
The first act, if presented by inferior people, could be made broadly
melodramatic—with its surroundings
of a rough mountain cabin occupied
by rough miners in a Mexican gold
camp. The touch of higher civilization is given upon the advent of a
girl of refinement seeking assistance
having lost her way. Then begins the
unfolding of the story, in which this
girl and one of the miners are the
central figures.
The girl's uncle, who had acted thc
craven in his early life, has the secret
wrung from him, which brings de
ferred peace and happiness, but before
that is accomplished the "side" characters have opportunities to fill in and
round out a story that is ful of interest from start to close, and which has
the merit of being plausible.
Mr. Clarke played with excellent
results. In his quieter scenes he gave
evidence of the repression and intef
ligence inherited from his illustrious
forbears, and won the audience com
pletely. He is of the school made
famous in the older days in his father's playhouse in Philadelphia, the old
Walnut Street theatre, and without
apparent effort presents a finished
and convincing performance.
Miss Irene Oshier in the character
of Janet Wilson, and Miss Virginia
Lawrence, as the daughter of the old
capitalist living under an assumed
name, are quite capable.
It is good to see Atkins Lawrence
again. This sterling actor, who
blushes not when talking of the days
when he supported Mary Anderson,
the elder Sothern and others of like
fame, plays the uncle in this production, and as the character calls for a
strong personality to portray it properly, it is most fortunate that Mr.
Lawrence was secured for the cast.
Harold Dc Becker, as the weak,
foppish son, does a clever bit of work.
and Jay Mansfield and Henry Dorn-
ton make the American and Mexican
mining partners picturesque and sufficiently bloodthirsty. The minor
parts are cast acceptably.
The Marquam will present Mr.
Clarke all week in "The Power that
Governs," ancl hefore the engagement
ends Portland doubtless will repeat
the welcome given the cnmpany since
starting on the road from the East
and fill the house as the character of
thc performance becomes known.
Robert Mantell Coming.
The most noted Shakespearian
scholars in thc East havc declared
Mr. Mantell's company the best
Shakespearian organization ever seen
on the American stage. True, some
years ago there were combinations of
noted stars who appeared in a number of Shakespeare's tragedies, but
for general all-round excellence, intelligence and harmonious concert of
action, Mr. Mantell's company has
never been surpassed. There are
quite a number of young actors in
Mr, Mantell's company who have
been with him for several seasons, tc
whom several critics have referred
as "the most promising young Shakespearian actors on thc American
stage."
Civilization in New York.
A number of New York women
were invited to take a bath as something novel. After the dip their hostess handed them kimonos and a talk
on the delights of the bath.    Most of
them were so much impressed that
they declared they were going to
have another bath some time. It will
be seen from this simple narrative
that there is still hope for New York.
Kept His Word.
Johnnie—I was all day in town
with pap to-day, mamma, and he
kept his word about drinking whiskey.
Mamma—That is good. I am very
glad to hear it. And what did he
have?
Johnnie—A little brown drink called ditto. Mr. Hinkley took Scotch.—
Tit-Bits.
THEATRi
Monday, March, 30
THE NEW BLACK CROOK
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Wednesday, April i,
Creston Clarke
"The Power That Governs."
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Saturday, April 4,
SIS  IN  NEW  YORK
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00.
fttFOi
vtfiT
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
_ Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
PACIFIC  COAST  OBOWN
SEEDS, TREES
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable,   approved   varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.    No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy   direct   and   get   trees   and
seeds   that  GROW.
Bee   Supplios:   Spray   Pumps,
Spraying Material  and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue  Free.
M. J. HENRY
3010   Weitmimted   Hoad
VANCOUVEB, B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
one mile west-north-west from Jesse
Island, running west 60 chains; thence
north 60 chains; thence east 60 chains;
thence soutli 60 chains back to place
of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
G. E. GIBSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
518 Hastings St.W.
VANCOUVER.BC.
P
|HTENTS   in* Trade Mirk
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.,
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that I, the undersigned, intend to apply to the Hon. Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
the purchase of the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of bay Inside of
Jesse Island, one quarter of a mile
north of Jesse Island, running west 60
chains; thence north 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains
back to the place of commencement.
Dated February 22nd, 1908.
H. G. ANDERSON.
March 14 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
A Skin of Beauty U _ Joy Forever
SB. T. FELIX OOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAOICAL BEAUTIFIES
Purifies as well as Beautifies tbe Skin.
No other cosmetic will do It.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and is so harmless—we taste It to be sure lt ls properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladies will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' as
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET
FOWDEB
For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price 36 centi, by mall.
OOUBAUD'S POUDBE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Prloe 91.00, by mall.
PEBD. T. HOPKINS, Prop.,
37 Oreat Jones St.,        New York City,
AT KENDEBSON BROS., Distributors,
Vancouver ana Viotoria, B.O.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric Blue  Print and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C.
Valuable
Timber Sections
For quick sale, 15 licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20,000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre.
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
"Silence is only commendable in a neat's tongue dried."
—Merchant of Venice, 1., 1.
TONGUE
Armour's Lunch Tongue—'/^-lb. tin 25c
i-lb. tin  40c
2-lb. tin  75c
Armour's Ox Tongue—1 #-lb. tin  90c
Davies' Lunch Tongue—Per tin  35c
Davies' Potted Tongue—Per tin, 15c; 2 tins for  25c
Australian Sheeps' Tongue—Per tin  40c
C. & B. Ox Tongue—Per 3-lb. tin  $1.25
C. & B. Chicken and Tongue Gelatine—Glass jar 75c
Jellied Lambs' Tongue—Our own make and excellent. Per lb..6oc
Jellied Ox Tongue—Very fine.   Per lb 60c
Pickled Ox Tongue—Extra fine and large.   Each  75c and 85c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
00OO0OOOO00O0O0O0OO0O0000OO0O0O0O0O0O00O000000O000O<
The Poodle Dog Hotel
A centre of good cheer is the Cosy Grill-room where the business and professional men of Victoria meet to exchange good
stories and gossip over things in general. The atmosphere here
is that of Bohemia in the best sense of the word; a Bohemia
governed by up-to-date and genial surroundings.
Smith & Shaughnessy, Proprietors
VATES ST., Victoria, B. C.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'
A   Victorian    "Bach"    named
Chevasse
Has   just    married   a   pretty
young lass,
Who said "Hubby, it's strange,
But I hate a coal range,
I   just   won't   cook   unless   I
have Gas."
If all Victorian brides would
insist upon being supplied with
a good Gas Range what a lot
of time, trouble, work and
worry they would save and
what nice, digestible dinners
would be the pleasurable result.
See the grand values just
now in Gas Ranges and Heaters In our showroom.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
THE SUMMER
DAYS ARE
COMING
Now is the Time
to prepare for
Kodaking.
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. (

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