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Week Jan 27, 1912

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 * r«»ti*»SB
Mona Cafe
J. J. BRADFORD, Pn.rtllir
Home Cooking at
ReasonablePrices
1307 Broad St.
.■*•■■*'
A British Columbia Newspaper aad Review*
Pabllshtd at Victoria, B. 6.
HALL & WALKER
4geots
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gm't St.
Telephone 83
Vol. X.   No. 4.
Tenth Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
Tenth Year
One Dollar Per Annum
REDISTRIBUTION—The Vancouver
"World," after a  fortnight's rest,
has returned to the attack, ancl in a
recent issue asks whether Vancouver is "going to take it lying down," a query, the
(pertinency of which is rather overshadowed
fey the phraseology.   Because neither of the
■Government organs, meaning presumably
■The Colonist ancl The News Advertiser, has
Keen fit to repudiate the suggestions of The
■Week, The World concludes that it was
■wuite correct in its inference that "the vot-
Jng power of the Vancouver elector was to
[emain about half what it ought to be";
iitirely a not very obvious deduction, for
leither The Colonist nor The News-Adver-
iser is in the habit of denying anything
hat The Week says, nor does it follow that
f the representation of Vancouver remains
/hat it is that it will be only about half
hat it ought to be. The fact of the mat-
Jer is, that The World, which has been
Considerably discredited of late in its rela-
ions both to Dominion and Municipal poli-
ics, is casting about for some method of
^habilitating itself, and apparently con-
lers that if it can raise the ghost of a
|real grievance, it may once more attract
public attention ancl secure a following. Its
[whole argument is based upon the fallacious
supposition that representation should be
iroportionate to population, ancl on this
basis it asks for a minimum of eleven and
maximum of fourteen members. The
Week has several times pointed out that
[there i§ no precedent for making representation proportionate to population. It is
mot so in England, it is not so in Canada,
flf The World will take the trouble to
figure out the population of the various pro-
incial constituencies, it will see that in
every instance, populous cities have a much
lower ratio of representation than scattered districts. In fact, the bigger the city,
the lower the ratio. If this statement is
incorrect, it is very easy for The World
to dispute it, but as a matter of fact, it is
absolutely correct. A very simple test
could be applied in this way: How many
members.would London, England,, have in
the British House of Commons with its
seven millions of population, out of, say,
forty-five millions? Apply the same test
to Montreal, Toronto, or Winnipeg, and it
is seen that the claim of The World that
Vancouver should have a representation
oqual to the proportion its population bears
v. the total population of the Province is
', ntenable. The Week is not concerned as
to whether Vancouver would gain so many
new members, or Victoria should lose one.
.The question is much simpler. First of
|'all, is a total representation of forty-two
adequate-for a Province with a population
of under half a million? Few people will
answer this otherwise than affirmatively.
Indeed on this basis British Columbia is
over-represented already, when compared
with the other provinces. There would bc
no reasonable excuse for appreciably increasing the total liumber vi members. It
would be an unwarranted addition to the
cost of legislation and administration, and
one which no government could defend.
The World ignores the fact that in all cases
of Redistribution, the process is rather one
of rearrangement than of increase If this
is so it is quite clear that the portions of
the Province to be affected by any arrangement should be those which have little or
no representation under the present system, ancl which havc become increasingly
important by reason of recent developments.
Viewed from this standpoint, any close observer would conclude that the straggling
and populous constituency of Richmond
should be divided ancl get an additional
member; that the Okanagan and Nicola
should be dealt with in some equitable
manner;   that  the  Fort  George  District
should get representation, possibly by annexing one of the Cariboo members, and
that a new district should be formed with
Prince Rupert and the Skeena as its centre
and Atlin to be attached. The Week is not
inspired to say this, but it appears to be
a common-sense arrangement and one which
would satisfy the requirements of all, without doing injustice lo Vancouver or any
other section of the Province. As to
whether Vancouver is "going to take this
lying down " or whether "its public bodies
of one kind and another are going to protest," will depend largely on the success
which The World meets with in its campaign of rehabilitation. As far as The
Week can see, the only chance which The
World has of remedying the "disadvantage" under which Vancouver labours at
present, "in having five representatives, all
of one political party," is to evince a little
more of the spirit of consistency and disinterestedness in its own political campaigns.
KEEPING ORDER—The strictures
- on the laxity of certain members of
the Police Department which appeared in Ilns column last week have been
resented by those whom they presumably
affect. They have gone so far as to state
that the charges are untrue. They have
not, however, gone so far as to ask The
Week to furnish information which would
lead to proof, and the reason is obvious—
they know that the charges are true. Any
member of the Police Force who meets
them with a flat denial is either culpably
ignorant or culpably mendacious. The conditions complained of are matters of common knowledge. They can be verified by
respectable citizens, many of whom have
complained to The Week. The fault rested
principally with the late Mayor, who was
in a position to enforce authority and suppress wi'ong-doing. If the conditions are
not remedied the fault will lie with the
present Mayor, and it is to him that the
public will look, and they will not look in
vain, because Mr. Beckwith is a man who
can be trusted to keep his word, and if he
says he will put down vice as far as the
law permits, there will be no question of
enforcement. The Week is not clamouring
for fanatical administration or fanatical
legislation, but in the name of decency and
justice is simply demanding that the law
shall be enforced. It is enforced against
far less evils than those complained of, ancl
enforced with a rigour ancl exactness
worthy of all praise, but when it touches
certain forms of vice and wrong-doing its
arm becomes unaccountably paralysed. It
is the business of tlje Mayor to find out
what produces this paralysis, and in the
search he will be assisted by every right-
minded, law-abiding citizen. The opinion
of The Week is that in the course of his
investigation he will find it necessary to
weed out some members of the Police
Force, in order to stop the disease, ancl he
may be trusted to do this. The Week is
gratified to know that the stand it has
taken is generally endorsed, and it is a
striking comment on the necessity for some
drastic measures to find that at the moment when the various organizations of the
city are strengthening the hands of the
Mayor in this matter, a notorious house in
the old red-light district should have been
reopened. Evidently the motto of some of
the most obstreperous law-breakers in the
city is "Defiance."
not, however, but regret that the Convention has fallen into the hands of the Socialists, who have degraded its sessions with
fanatical resolutions and inflammatory
speeches, which in any other country
would not improbably have led to some
action on the part of the authorities. The
Week makes this statement advisedly, after
reading the incendiary address of Air. Pet-
tipiece, who seemed determined to do his
best to justify the statement of "Toronto
Saturday Night," that "the Labour Unions
of the Coast were controlled by crooks,
blacklegs and dynamiters." The Week has
always stood for the principle of Trades
Unionism ancl has always supported the
just demands of Labour; it therefore regrets all the more a development which is
as discreditable to Trades Unionism as it
is detrimental to the true interests of
Labour. No self-respecting workman
wants to be associated with an organization
that is dominated by a Pettipiece, or that
will even tolerate his vagaries. The B. C.
Federation of Labour does not today include in its membership the best element
of the class which it claims to represent.
It has alienated them by extravagance and
is no longer entitled to be regarded by the
public as voicing their opinions. .
sympathy with the abortion which at present does duty as a library, but that is not
because they are opposed to one on principle. It is simply because they are disgusted with certain features of its administration. It is to be hoped that the new
Commissioners will have the courage to face
the situation and to remedy defects of
which everyone who visits the library is
cognizant. If they do this, they will have
public sympathy and support. If they are
not prepared to do it, it would be far
better to close the Institution.
FORESTRY CONSERVATION—It
would be a pity if The Week should
refrain from uttering a word of commendation on the splendid deliverance of
the Minister of Lands, because Mr. P. Williams considers this a Government organ,
maintained to indulge in adulation of the
Premier and to publish his portrait every
few weeks. As a matter of fact, because
Mr. P. Williams likes nothing so muafi /•
accuracy, The Week has published tl$ |* [?.
trait of the Premier exactly six times c. / *
ing its life of ten years, and as for adulation, The Week has long ago left th3|t'to
the electors, who never seem to tire. Ai
to the Minister of Lands and the Conservation of our Forests, even Mr. P. Williams
cannot deny that no more comprehensive,
enlightened, and statesmanlike deliverance
has ever been made on the subject. Mr.
Ross' speech will stand as a classic for
many years to come. It exhausts every
phase of the subject, and enables the reader
to realize so clearly the importance of Conservation and the completeness of the system which he has devised, that jihere will be
nothing but praise for so excellent a pi'.ce
of legislation. It is not necessary to enlarge on the topic. Everyone should read
Mr. Ross' speech. It deals with the gre?test
asset of the Province, an asset in whicii
every inhabitant has a share. It lifts the
subject to the level of National importance,
and it demonstrates that Mr. Ross is a
Minister of very great capacity, ancl a debater of the highest order.
THE OPPOSITION —The Week
considers that it is only bare justice
to pay a tribute to the very able and
conscientious manner in which Mr. H. C.
Brewster is discharging his duties as the
sole representative of the Liberal Party in
the Local Legislature. His position is both
a difficult ancl a delicate one. The whole
burden rests upon his own shoulders, and
he is showing himself well able to bear it.
His speech on the Address was moderate,
well informed ancl well reasoned; that on
the introduction of his Navy Resolution was
a model of conciseness and care, and could
hardly have been improved. The skill
shown in drafting the Resolution was of a
very high order, ancl while it would have
been impossible for the Government to accept it in the form in which it was submitted, it must be conceded that Mr.
Brewster scored a tactical victory and left
the Government no alternative but to endorse the principle in some form of amendment. It is only simple truth to say that
with a far larger representation, the
Liberal Party has been far less effective in
opposition than it is today.
H
FEDERATION OF LABOUR—The
B. C. Federation of Labour has just
had its annual convention in Victoria.
It was addressed in very suitable terms by
Premier McBride. and the way was left
open for an interesting and profitable series
of sessions.   The best friend of Labour can-
PUBLIC LIBRARY—The City Solicitor, acting on the instructions of the
Council, has given notice of his intention to apply for the insertion of a new
clause in the Municipal Clauses Act which
would enable the City to levy a rate of
one-quarter of a mill on the assessed property of the City for library purposes. The
Week is entirely in accord with the proposal, because it furnishes the only rational
means of meeting the necessary expenditure to equip and maintain a public library.
It is far better that provision should be
made in this manner than that the Library
Commissioners should have to make application year after year for a special grant,
and even then fail to secure a sufficient sum
to enable them to conduct the Institution
in a proper manner. There is no question
as to the necessity, ancl there should be no
question as to the utility of a public library.
Unfortunately, the rate-payers are out of
OME RULE—The Colonist con*?
fesses its inability to understand
why the Unionists, and especially
the men of Ulster, are so determined arid
excited in their opposition to Home Rule.
It also confesses its inability to understand
why they should be resolved to prevent Mr.
Winston Churchill from holding a Home
Rule meeting in Ulster Hall, Belfast. The
Colonist will never understand the correct
answer to either of these questions, because
it is unable to put itself, even editorially,
in the place of a Unionist. The fact that
so audacious and intrepid a campaigner as
Mr. Churchill has already climbed clown
and abandoned his intention of speaking, in
Ulster Hall should convince the Colonist
that there was a goocl deal more in the objections of the Unionists than it had any
conception of. Similarly, it will learn later
that the idea of Home Rule for Ireland, in
any such sense as is contemplated by thc
Nationalists, is as fantastic and unattainable as the moon.
K
, VEN STATESMANLIKE - The
Victoria Times is a little puzzled at
the phraseology used by The Colonist in describing the eloquence of thc Minister of Lands. It professes to see something funny in the following excerpt from
a recent Colonist editorial: "A masterly,
"even statesmanlike, address was made in
"the Legislature yesterday by Hon. \V. R.
"Ross, the Minister of Lands." Now if The
Times wants an illustration of something
which may be "masterly," without being
"even statesmanlike," it has an illustration
close to hand in the political career of the
Hon. William Templeman, who during all
the years that hc represented Victoria pursued a policy of "masterly inactivity''
which was not "even statesmanlike." 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1912
tt
99
Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
That in the new council there is
only one alderman who carries a
"chip" on his shoulder, and it is apt
to get knocked off pretty soon.
That the Mayor has made a good
start, and those who know him believe he:is a stayer.
That if Alderman Gleason knew
what people thought of his management of the .Streets Committee last
year hc would cease to wonder at his
deposition.
* *   *
That no one doubts he did his best,
but as a chairman his name is "Mud."
* *   #
That it would take a great many
new broom** to sweep the streets of
Victoria  cle"an.
* *   *
That it was very considerate of
Mr. Goward not to write his letter
to the papers before the civic elections.
*   *   *
That his defense of the B. C. E. R.
does not cover those cases in which
work trains block the cars, obsolete
cars break down, and overloaded
cars leave disappointed passengers at
the street corners.
That the B. C. E. R. has found
another use for its cars, which might
be extended with advantage,—mud
sucking.
and should be removed. He is said
to be a good Conservative, which
leaves him the less excuse for being
a poor inspector.
* ' *   *
That none are so blind, as those
who won't see.
* *   *
That the easiest way to obtain
liquor in Victoria is to become an
"interdict."
That this is not what was contemplated by the Provincial act, and the
Attorney-General's attention is respectfully  directed   to  it.
That if it is intended to abolish
road-houses a start should be made
in  the vicinity  of Victoria—and  the
sooner the better.
* *   *■<
That an enterprising city official is
making an innovation by docking the
salaries of his department on public
holidays.
* *   *
Ihat there are better ways, if none
easier, of achieving fame.
That the new management at the
Westholme Hotel is making a goocl
clean-up.
* *   *
That Mr. Sword comes from the
St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco with
a first-class record.
* *   *
That Smith's Hill Reservoir is still
undergoing repairs, and Chief Davis
has barred fires until the work is
completed.
* *   *
That the scare about increased telephone rates was all worked up by the
naughty newspapers; the company
has no intention of raising the
charges.
. *   *   *
Ihat it is a question which was the
That  there  is   only  one   street   ihriiore startled, the Board of Trade or
Victoria which should havc its hameMr.  McMicking, when the  facts be-
changed—Superior, came known.
*   *   * *   *   *
That the City is supposed to have    That the V. A. D. C. does not want
a license inspector, but he is a farce any  more   free  advertising,  and  thc
committee would do well to notify
the press that all authentic reports
are sent through the secretary.
* *   *
That Major Taylor is making good
progress with* the rehearsing of
"Lady Winterton's Experiment,"
which will play at the Victoria Theatre on February 8th and 9th.
* *   *
That the ice hockey match at the
Arena yesterday was a "teaser," and
kept  2,500  people   on   the  tiptoe   of
excitement.
* *   *
That the large increase in attendance must have been very gratifying
to the management.
* *   *
That the match was easily the best
yet played in the series, and showed
that thc Victoria team is an all-star
aggregation.
* *   *
That the fastest and cleverest man
on the ice was Rowe.
* #   *
That there will be 3,000 at the next
match on Tuesday, and they will all
be rooters.
* *   *
That the Minister of Justice acted
promptly in the Bullock case, granting his release immediately he had
reviewed the evidence.    ■ :/
* *   *
That there was no influence used
on Bullock's behalf. He made his
own statement in writing and secured
his release off his own bat.
* *   *
That the last has not been heard of
the navy cases, but there will not be
another miscarriage of justice.
* *   *
That Parker Williams' attack on
the Premier discredits his intelligence
antl his manhood.
* *   *
That no one suspected him of such
an intimate acquaintance with "Saskatchewan Indians."
* *   *
That he has read extensively in Socialist literature, but has never heard
of Lord Chesterfield.
That his manners are not unlike the
morals of Marcus Ordeyne—loose.
* *   *
That Ulster is getting excited, but
there will be no hurry until after
Winston Churchill's tour and then we
shall see—what we shall see.
* *   *
That the scion of the house of
Marlborough is a strange champion
of "Home Rule."
* *   *
That if the provincial police could
hold up American vagrants at the international boundary line there would
be no hold-ups in Vancouver.
* *   *
That living on an island is not without some advantages.
That most of the undesirable immigrants who land here come on the
Seattle boat, and should be detected
easily.
* *   *
That if Victoria does not raise the
school teachers' stipend, they will all
gravitate to Vancouver.
* *   *
That in this prosperous province
the most important work is the worst
paid.
That post-office and customs clerks
do not get even a living wage.
* *   #
That nearly one-half of the provincial government employees have to
supplement their salaries with remittances.
* *   *
That this is one way in which a
public servant becomes a public benefactor.
That latest advices indicate that the
Women's Council of Vancouver was
stampeded into that notorious resolution against allowing Hindoo wives
to join their husbands.
That the exploitation was as usual
for political purposes.
* *   *
That only a pin-head would have
failed  to   see  that this  has   nothing
to  do  with  the  subject, of  Oriental
immigration.        *   *   *
That if Mr. Stevens, the member
for Vancouver, has the courage of his
convictions he will shoulder the
blame  for  a  regrettable  "faux  pas."
* *   *
That British films manufactured in
London will shortly be exhibited in
British picture house in Victoria,
* *   *
That these films will form the besl
antidote   to  the  American   atrocities
which sometimes find their way here
* *   *
That no smart dramatic critic has
mentioned that at the last performance of "Madame Butterfly" in Victoria the American Embassy in Ja*
pan floated the Union Jack—no doub
out of consideration for the suscep
tibilities of Victorians.
That an incident like thc abov
shows how obliging American man
agers can be when they try.
* *   *
That  it  is  not  recorded  that  th
box office receipts were swelled b
this timely concession.
* *   *
That    a local divine    has anothe
guess coming when he says, "Th
humanitarian side will be reached b
women alone." He seems to forgt
that woman has always been "a sic
issue," and then, he has not rea
about the women of Vancouver an
the Hindoos.
* *   *
That Malini, the magician, may b
"a short man," but conjuring is hi
"long suit," and he is a top-notcher j
that.
That the Board of Trade fell mt<
a trap, very cleverly baited, whet
they endorsed P. H. Scullin.
That the resolution was railroadei
through without proper consideration
or it would never have passed.
* *   +
That "Industrial Peace Association" sounds well, but in actual prac
tise it means strife and strikes.
Here is a List of the Articles
in each Room
THE DINING-ROOM
China Cabinet—\_ar\y English finish. Four shelves
and mirror back.   Glass door and sides
Buffet—Early English finish. Top 22x52. British
bevel mirror 12x42. Two drawers at top. Large
linen drawers.   Two doors to cupboard
Extension Table—Early English finish. Six-foot
extension.   Round top.
Five Dining Chairs—Upholstered, leather seats.
Arm Diner, upholstered, leather seat.
Brussels Square—Size 9x9, pretty pattern.
This is the LAST Day
to Furnish Your Home Complete for
$300. Come and See these Beautifully
Furnished Rooms at this Special Price.
THE PARLOR
Three-Piece Parlor Suite—In mahogany finish. Upholstered seats.   Set consists of Settee, Parlor
Chair and Arm Chair.
. Tivo Parlor Chairs—With upholstered seats. Frame
in mahogany finish.
Parlor Table—Mahogany finish.
Parlor Cabinet—Mahogany finish.
Velvet Square—Size 9 x 12ft. 6 in., floral design.
THE BEDROOM
Dresser—Golden finish.    Top 20 x 36.    British
bevel mirror 18 x 36.   Two large drawers. Oval
shaped mirror.
Chiffonier—57in. high, 30in. wide, 18in. deep. Five
large drawers.
Wool Square—Size 9 x 10ft. 6 in.
White Enamel Bed—Full size, 4ft. 6in., with brass
trimmings.
One Pair Wool Blankets
One Pair Flannelette Blankets
One Pair Pillows, complete
Bedspread
A Famous McLintock Doivn Quilt
Spring for Bed
Excelsior.Wool Top Mattress
Bedroom Table
Dressing Table
Arm Rocker—Cane seat
Bedroom Chair
THE KITCHEN
Four Kitchen Chairs—Golden finish
Kitchen Table—With drawer
Kitchen Cabinet
Linioleum—Size 9 x 11
The More You
Spend, The
More You
Save v
.'.'.; .■"».•
a^^v^s-gg;
VICTORIA'S
Popular
t\0K
RJRNISflERS
r&_TMk__,&_s_
The Severest
Critics can find
no Fault with
our Goods «*x**
Mona Cafe
I. J. BRADFORD. PrnfrUttr
Home Cooking at
ReasonablePrices
1307 Broad St.
A British Columbia Newspaper and Review,
Pabllahtd at Victoria. B. e.
HALL ftf WALKER
4g«qts
Wellington Colliery
Company's Coal
1232 Gov't St.
Telephone 83
Vol. X.   No. 4.
Tenth* Year
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
Tenth Year One Dollar Per Annum
REDISTRIBUTION-The Vancouver
"World," after a fortnight's rest,
has returned to the attack, and in a
recent issue asks whether Vancouver is "going to take it lying down," a query, the
pertinency of which is rather overshadowed
by the phraseology.   Because neither of the
government organs, meaning presumably
■The Colonist and The News Advertiser, has
peen fit to repudiate the suggestions of The
■/eek, The World concludes that it was
buite correct in its inference that "the vot-
ng power of the Vancouver elector was to
emain about half what it ought to be";
urely a not very obvious deduction, for
leither The Colonist nor The News-Adver-
iser is in the habit of denying anything
hat The Week says, nor does it follow that
the representation of Vancouver remains
vhat it is that it will be only about half
vhat it ought to be.   The fact of the mat-
Ier is, that The World, which has been
onsiderably discredited of late in its rela-
ions both to Dominion and Municipal politics, is casting about for some method of
•(■•habilitating itself,  and  apparently  considers that if it can raise the ghost of a
real grievance, it may once more attract
bi iblic attention and secure a following.   Its
■whole argument is based upo'n the fallacious
pupposition that representation should be
proportionate to population, and on this
basis it asks for a minimum of eleven and
maximum of fourteen members.    The
■Week has several times pointed out that
Ithere i§ no precedent for making representation proportionate to population.   It is
Jnot so in England, it is not so in Canada,
tf  The World will take the trouble to
■figure out the population of the various pro-
jvincial constituencies, it will see that in
Icvery instance, populous cities have a much
lower ratio of representation than scattered districts.   In fact, the bigger the city,
the lower the ratio.    If this statement is
incorrect, it is very easy for The World
to dispute it, but as a matter of fact, it is
absolutely  correct.    A  very  simple  test
could be applied in this way:   How many
members would London, England,, have in
the British House of Commons with its
seven millions of population, out of, say,
forty-five millions ?   Apply the same test
| to Montreal, Toronto, or Winnipeg,* and it
I is seen that the claim of The World that
Vancouver should have a representation
;qual to the proportion its population bears
[to the total population of the Province is
ntenable.   The Week is not concerned as
to whether Vancouver would gain so many
new members, or Victoria should lose one.
The question is much simpler.    First of
all, is a total representation of forty-two
adequate-for a Province with a population
of under half a million?   Few people will
i answer this otherwise than affirmatively.
,' Indeed on this basis British Columbia is
i over-represented already, when compared
j with the other provinces.   There would be
[no reasonable excuse for appreciably in-
[ creasing the total number of members.   It
would be an unwarranted addition to the
j cost of legislation and administration, and
[ one which no government could defend.
i The World ignores the fact that in all cases
j of Redistribution, the process is rather one
i of rearrangement than of increase    If this
1 is so it is quite clear that the portions of
1 the Province to be affected by any arrange-
I ment should be those which have little or
no representation under the present system, and which have become increasingly
important by reason of recent developments.
Viewed from this standpoint, any close observer would conclude that the straggling
and   populous constituency   of Richmond
should be divided and get an additional
member;   that the Okanagan and Nicola
should  be  dealt with  in  some  equitable
I manner;   that  the  Fort  George  District
should get representation, possibly by annexing one of the Cariboo members, and
that a new district should be formed with
Prince Rupert and the Skeena as its centre
and Atlin to be attached. The Week is not
inspired to say this, but it appears to be
a common-sense arrangement and one which
would satisfy the requirements of all, without doing injustice to Vancouver or any
other section of the Province. As to
whether Vancouver is "going to take this
lying down," or whether "its public bodies
of one kind and another are going to protest," will depend largely on the success
which The World meets with in its campaign of rehabilitation. As far as The
Week can see, the only chance which The
World has of remedying the "disadvantage" under whicii Vancouver labours at
present, "in having five representatives, all
of one political party," is to evince a little
more of the spirit of consistency and disinterestedness in its own political campaigns.
KEEPING ORDER—The strictures
on the laxity of certain members of
the Police Department which appeared in this column last week have been
resented by those whom they presumably
affect. They have gone so far as to state
that the charges are untrue. They have
not, however, gone so far as to ask The
Week to furnish information which would
lead to proof, and the reason is obvious—
they know that the charges are true. Any
member of the Police Force who meets
them with a flat denial is either culpably
ignorant or culpably mendacious. The conditions complained of are matters of common knowledge. They can be verified by
respectable citizens, many of whom have
complained to The Week. The fault rested
principally with the late Mayor, who was
in a position to enforce authority and suppress wr*ong-doing. If fhe conditions are
not remedied the fault will lie with the
present Mayor, and it is to him that the
public will look, and they will not look in
vain, because Mr. Beckwith is a man who
can be trusted to keep his word, and if he
says he will put down vice as far as the
law permits, there will be no question of
enforcement. The Week is not clamouring
for fanatical administration or fanatical
legislation, but in the name of decency and
justice is simply demanding that, the law
shall be enforced. It is enforced against
far less evils than tljose complained of, and
enforced with a rigour and exactness
worthy of all praise, but when it touches
certain forms of vice and wrong-doing its
arm becomes unaccountably paralysed. It
is the business of the Mayor to find out
what produces this paralysis, and in the
search he will be assisted by every right-
minded, law-abiding citizen. The opinion
of The Week is that in the course of his
investigation he will find it necessary to
weed out some members of the Police
Force, in order to stop the disease, and he
may be trusted to do this. The Week is
gratified to know that the stand it has
taken is generally endorsed, and it is a
striking comment on the necessity for some
drastic measures to find that at the moment when the various organizations of the
city are strengthening the hands of the
Mayor in this matter, a notorious house in
the old red-light district should have been
reopened. Evidently the motto of some of
the most obstreperous law-breakers in the
city is "Defiance."
not, however, but regret that the Convention has fallen into the hands of the Socialists, who have degraded its sessions with
fanatical resolutions and inflammatory
speeches, which in any other country
would not improbably have led to some
action on the part of the authorities. The
Week makes this statement advisedly, after
reading the incendiary address of Mr. Pet-
tipiece, who seemed determined to do his
best to justify the statement of "Toronto
Saturday Night," that "the Labour Unions
of the Coast were controlled by crooks,
blacklegs and dynamiters." The Week has
always stood for the principle of Trades
Unionism and has always supported the
just demands of Labour; it therefore regrets all the more a development which is
as discreditable to Trades Unionism as it
is detrimental to the true interests of
Labour. No self-respecting workman
wants to be associated with an organization
that is dominated by a Pettipiece, or that
will even tolerate his vagaries. The B. C.
Federation of Labour does not today include in its membership the best element
of the class which it claims to represent.
It has alienated them by extravagance a"d
is no longer entitled to be regarded by the
public as voicing their opinions.
FORESTRY CONSERVATION—It
would be a pity if The Week should
refrain from uttering a word of commendation on the splendid deliverance of
the Minister of Lands, because Mr. P. Williams considers this a Government organ,
maintained to indulge in adulation of the
Premier and to publish his portrait every
few weeks. As a matter of fact, becwg'
Mr. P. Williams likes nothing so mwjfi$ .
accuracy, The Week has published tlj£j/.x>r-
trait of the Premier exactly six times during its life of ten years, and as for adulation, The Week has long ago left th$-to
the electors, who never seem to tire. Ai
to the Minister of Lands and the Conservation of our Forests, even Mr. P. Williams
cannot deny that no more comprehensive,
enlightened, and statesmanlike deliverance
has ever been made on the subject. Mr.
Ross' speech will stand as a classic for
many years to come. It exhausts every
phase of the subject, and enables the reader
to realize so clearly the importance of Conservation and the completeness of the system which he has devised, that there will be
nothing but praise for so excellent a pi.ce
of legislation. It is not necessary to enlarge on the topic. Everyone should read
Mr. Ross' speech. It deals with the gre?le»t
asset of the Province, an asset in which
every inhabitant has a share. It lifts tlie
subject to the level of National importance,
and it demonstrates that Mr. Ross is a
Minister of very great capacity, and a debater of the highest order.
FEDERATION OF LABOUR—The
B. C. Federation of Labour has just
had its annual convention in Victoria.
It was addressed in very suitable terms by
Premier McBride. and the way was left
open for an interesting and profitable series
of sessions.   The best friend of Labour can-
PUBLIC LIBRARY—The City Solicitor, acting on the instructions of the
Council, has given notice of his intention to apply for the insertion of a new
clause in the Municipal Clauses Act which
would enable the City to levy a rate of
one-quarter of a mill on the assessed property of the City for library purposes. The
Week is entirely in accord with the proposal, because it furnishes the only rational
means of meeting the necessary expenditure to equip and maintain a public library.
It is far better that provision should be
made in this manner than that the Library
Commissioners should have to make application year after year for a special grant,
and even then fail to secure a sufficient sum
to enable them to conduct the Institution
in a proper manner. There is no question
as to the necessity, and there should be no
question as to the utility of a public library.
Unfortunately, the rate-payers are out of
sympathy with the abortion which at present does duty as a library, but that is not
because they are opposed to one on principle. It is simply because they are disgusted with certain features of its administration. It is to be hoped that the new
Commissioners will have the courage to face
the situation and to remedy defects of
which everyone who visits the library is
cognizant. If they do this, they will have
public sympathy and support. If they are
not prepared to do it, it would be far
better to close the Institution.
THE OPPOSITION —The Week
considers that it is only bare justice
to pay a tribute to the very able and
conscientious manner in which Mr. H. C.
Brewster is discharging his duties as the
sole representative of the Liberal Party in
the Local Legislature. His position is both
a difficult and a delicate one. The whole
burden rests upon his own shoulders, and
he is shovying himself well able to bear it.
His speech on the Address was moderate,
well informed and well reasoned; that on
the introduction of his Navy Resolution was
a model of conciseness and care, and could
hardly have been improved. The skill
shown in drafting the Resolution was of a
very high order, and while it would have
been impossible for the Government to accept it in the form in which it was submitted, it must be conceded that Mr.
Brewster scored a tactical victory and left
the Government no alternative but to endorse the principle in some form of amendment. It is only simple truth to say that
with a far larger representation, the
Liberal Party has been far less effective in
opposition than it is today.
HOME RULE—The Colonist con^
fesses its inability to understand
why the Unionists, and especially
the men of Ulster, are so determined arid
excited in their opposition to Home Rule.
It also confesses its inability to understand
why they should be resolved to prevent Mr.
Winston Churchill from holding a Home
Rule meeting in Ulster Hall, Belfast. The
Colonist will never understand the correct
answer to either of these questions, because
it is unable to put itself, even editorially,
in the place of a Unionist. The fact that
so audacious and intrepid a campaigner as
Mr. Churchill has already climbed down
and abandoned his intention of speaking, in
Ulster Hall should convince the Colonist
that there was a good deal more in the objections of the Unionists than it liad any
conception of. Similarly, it will learn later
that the idea of Home Rule for Ireland, in
any such sense as is contemplated by the
Nationalists, is as fantastic and unattainable as the moon.
EVEN STATESMANLIKE — The
Victoria Times is a little puzzled at
the phraseology used by The Colonist in describing the eloquence of the Minister of Lands. It professes to see something funny in the following excerpt from
a recent Colonist editorial: "A masterly,
"even statesmanlike, address was made in
"the Legislature yesterday by Hon. W. R.
"Ross, the Minister of Lands." Now if The
Times wants an illustration of something
which may be "masterly," without being
"even statesmanlike," it has an illustration
close to hand in the political career of the
Hon. William Templeman, who during all
the years that he represented Victoria pursued a policy of "masterly inactivity''
which was not "even statesmanlike." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
In common with many of my pals,
1 read The Week editorial of last
issue dealing with the subject of interdicts, and as 1 know something about
it, 1 want to add my quota to the discussion. I think that an otherwise
excellent Act has a very glaring defect. The Attorney-General has made
himself famous by the best Temperance Act in the Dominion, but even
his omniscience has overlooked a
weak point. It is this: The interdict
is admitted to be a helpless creature,
altogether unable to take care of himself, and the State assumes the position of a parent to watch over and
guard him from temptation, but it
fails because while it refuses him a
drink, it allows him to go freely
where drink is sold. He may go into
a saloon and stay there all day, and
the license inspector may stay there
all day too and not catch him drinking. I think for the proper protection
of interdicts, the law should be altered, and it should be an offense for
an interdict to enter any place where
liquor is sold, ancl an offense for the
proprietor or bartender to allow him
to be there. Until this is done there
is no chance of making the law
effective.
1 suppose the subject of Victoria
weather is stale, even if it is not flat
and unprofitable, but I cannot help
chuckling to myself as I have read
the papers during the last few weeks.
Zero weather in Winnipeg for two
months at a stretch; snow and slush
constantly in Portland, Tacoma,
Seattle, Vancouver and New Westminster; zero weather as near as
Kamloops; six feet of snow in Rossland, only four hundred miles away
as the crow flies; snow staring at mc
from thc top of the Olympic Mountains and the Sooke Hills, and on
clear days a peak of snow visible on
Mt. Baker; and all this time the daily
record of thc Victoria Meteorological
Oflice showing a range of 40 degrees
to SS degrees, with practically no
frost at nights, no snow, and very
little wind. I walked down the street
this morning with a man who had
lived in Winnipeg for thirty years and
he said it was incredible that we
should have such lovely summer
weather here. He has made himself
an old man before his time in the
struggle for wealth. He has the
money but no longer the capacity to
enjoy it. I suppose it is no part of
the business of a Lounger to moralize,
so let it go at that. I had rather live
thirty years in Victoria and die penniless. I should at least have lived.
*   *   *
On Wednesday there was a nice,
fresh, south-east gale blowing into
Ross Bay. I donned my raincoat and
took a walk on the top of the new
sea-wall, which is rapidly approaching completion. It was a glorious
sight as the breakers came rolling in.
The wall stood the onslaught and only
spray dashed over the top. There
have been fiercer gales and will be
again, but this one was fierce enough
for a fair test, and the result was
more than satisfactory. 1 know that
the City Engineering Department is
very sensitive and ill brooks suggestion or criticism. All the same, I
want to go on record in this matter,
because I consider myself to some
extent the father of the Ross Bay seawall, and I want to sec a good job
properly finished, Mow let me beg
of thc City Engineer to put a concrete parapet wall, about four feet
high as a fence along the top of the
sea-wall, instead of an ornamental
iron rail, as suggested. Yesterday's
storm demonstrates the wisdom of
this suggestion. Such a wall would
catch all the spray and protect the
roadway from the highest waves.
Without it high seas would continually wash over and would reach the
embankment on the far side. I also
want to make another suggestion. 1
understand that the roadway will pass
from the Dallas Road to the sea-wall
at the corner where the unloading
dock is erected. Now from this point
westward towards Clover Point, instead of sloping the embankment
right down to the sea-wall, I should
like to sec a concrete sidewalk, about
nine feet wide to form a promenade
and the slope of the embankment
started from the edge of this sidewalk.
One more suggestion and I have done.
Why not put a flight of steps from
Dallas Road down to the sea-wall and
beach at the extreme westerly end
near Clover Point. The embankment
here is fifty feet high, and it would
bc a great convenience to provide a
safe approach to the beach.
* *   *
About a fortnight ago, while the
Editor was in Seattle, I tried to hold
down the oflice, but at the very first
attempt I was nearly put to flight. It
occurred in this wise: On Monday
morning a deputation, fourteen strong
—strong in several senses—appeared
at the office, and demanded blood.
It had to be blood, nothing else would
satisfy, and they wanted it quickly,
right on the spot. I asked them if it
was my blood that they were after,
and they promptly demanded to know
if I was the Editor. I saw that the
way of safety lay in denying the soft
impeachment, which my native modesty made an easy task. The next
demand was to know where the Editor
was. I lost no time in telling them
he was in Seattle, and as I thought,
turned the tables rather neatly by
asking how many of them could
swim. A rather superfluous question,
judging from their general appearance. They left me with the very
emphatic assurance that unless certain charges which had appeared in
the editorial columns of the previous
issue of The Week wcre promptly
withdraw!) _|$_d apologized for, the
biggest law|ijr^iii town had already
been instnictijiyi|b spend anything up
to a million dollars in getting the
Editor's scalp. Their deficiency in a
sense of humo*jj failed to show them
the futility of such a quest, in more
senses than one. With many mutter-
ings and cursings the disappointed
delegation filed out of the office and
down the staircase, much to my relief; whicii was increased 'after the
windows had been opened for a few
minutes. So far, the only outcome of
this terrifying interview has been a
marked abatement in midnight rushes
to the roadside inns, a substantial increase in the takings at several barber shops, and a fixed determination
on thc part of Lounger that in future
the Editor shall do his own interviewing; one narrow escape is enough for
a nervous mortal.
* *   *
Everyone agrees that' Malini is a
prince of conjurers. 1 think he is one
of the neatest prestidigitateurs I ever
saw. In sleight of hand everything
depends on the finish, or neatness,
with which the trick is performed.
The slightest clumsiness gives the
show away. 1 am a fiend on entertainments of this kind, and never miss
a chance to see them. I have seen
all the best in the last twenty-five
years, including Heller, Herman, Kellar, and Devant, but I have never
seen a better than Malini. I want,
however, to register tlle fact that like
all men and all performers, he is
fallible, and during the week he made
just one slip in his card tricks, which
gave the show away. I am not going
to expose the mistake, and only mention it in order to strengthen one's
feelings that so clever a man is after
all only human, and docs not derive
any real assistance from the homed
gentleman, represented by his gold
pin, There is one thing, however,
that I did not find out. I have studied it for more than twenty years
on every occasion possible, and am as
far from getting the first inkling of
the truth as 1 was when I started.
I refer to the "ring" trick, in which
the performer passes one ring into another at will. I first saw this trick
performed by Heller. He has had
many imitators, but none quite as
good as himself. Malini is not the
best of them, but he is good enough
to puzzle the audience and to cover
his tracks. Sometimes I feel old age
stealing on, but 1 do not intend to
pass in my checks until I have found
out how this trick is done, and I have
a notion that the first time I can get
the bunch of rings all to myself, with
the door locked, I shall be able to do
it. I have bribed one of the bellboys at the Empress to steal Malini's
rings when he goes away, and will let
my readers know the result next
week.
There is one subject on which
opinions do not differ; that is as to
the merits of Fire Chief Davis. He
is admittedly in a class by himself,
both as a fire chief and as a chauffeur.
I got a photograph of him on Monday
last, which I should like to reproduce,
but he has refused his consent, and
while a cat may look at a king, no
one may snap a fire chief with impunity. However, this is what the
negative shows: Item one, red painted automobile, containing a fire chief
and his assistant, flying down Government Street to the south, at the rate
of 120 miles an hour. Opposite the
post-office the machine skids, turns to
the east, slides sideways down the
street to Humboldt, turns around
three times very rapidly, stops with
the head of the machine facing the
north, starts uphill and runs for a half
a block, finally coming to a stand-still
against a telegraph post opposite
Burns' store. The whole thing was
very neatly done. No one was killed,
and the smile that the chief wears
never came off, at least this is how it
all appeared to
(frl
<rzt«-fZ*t
A Battle Royal
At Last Victoria Wakes Up
I paid my third visit to the Arena
on Tuesday night and saw the battle
royal between Victoria and Westminster—and a battle royal it was—a contest of breathless excitement from
start to finish, with the issue in doubt
until the last five minutes of the game,
and with nearly three thousand people
on the tiptoe of expectancy. To say
that Victoria has gone hockey-mad
is to put it mildly. No one would
have believed it possible that the staid
and venerable capital city could have
so awakened from the lethargy of
sixty years, and learned to shout and
cheer and yell and ring cow-bells and
blow whistles like any ordinary
people. But so it is, and the charm
has been worked by Lester Patrick,
and his half-dozen companions who
bid fair to bring the Stanley Cup to
Victoria in the Spring. I make bold
to say that there are no two teams
in Eastern Canada today, capable:of
playing as brilliant, as scientific and
as strenuous a game as that witnessed
on Tuesday night. The speed was
marvellous and it never flagged. The
men must have been in splendid condition or they could not have stood
the pace, and if only the means of
transportation were adequate there
would not be a vacant seat in the
Arena when Victoria and New Westminster meet again. I want to congratulate Lester Patrick in particular
on the splendid enterprise which he
and his associates have shown. He is
one of those quiet men who never
talk, but who do big things. Nothing
could have been done better than this
Arena enterprise. The appointments,
the ice rink are perfect. The players
are the best in thc world, and Victoria
gets through its Arena the finest advertisement it has ever had or is ever
likely to have. Ice hockey at the
Coast, where there is practically no
frost, with a championship team capable of winning the blue ribbon of
the hockey world, is something so
unique as to be startling, and something whicii Victoria people cannot
sufficiently appreciate, however well
they may rally to its support.
UMPIRE.
Merit is a Magnet
That never fails to draw. Kilmarnock Extra Special
is the "King of all Scotch Whiskies" which never fails
to draw a greater and greater number of friends, who
acknowledge there is no other Whiskey quite so good,
in fact for quality and maturity, it heads the list of
popular Whiskies. Call for Kilmarnock—the square
bottle—at any first-class hotel, bar, cafe or club.
Handled by the leading dealers who can supply you
for home use.
PITHER & LEISER
Victoria
Wholesale Agents for B. C.
Vancouver
Nelson
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appointment
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Royal Household.
Distillers of the popular
"Black & White" Scotch Whisky
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor
All Dealers
Do You Want a Flour
That makes the lightest, daintiest, most delicious bread imaginable?
Then select a brand of established quality.    Here is a selection, at
prices too, THAT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY.
ADVENT WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, the flour for making the
famous Health Bread, 50-lb. sack  $2.00
Small quantities, per lb  5c
California Rye Flour, 10-lb. sack, 65c, per pkt 20c
Albers Bros.' Graham Flour, per 10-lb. sack 45c
Swedish Potato Flour, per pkt 20c
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
741, 743, 745 Fort Street
Grocery Store Butcher Shop Liquor Store
Tels. 178, 179 Tel. 2678 Tel. 2677
GIFT
A SENSIBLE
A Pair of Daniel Green & Co's
Felt Footwear
for the Man,
Woman or
Child
H. B. Hammond Shoe Company
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street, Victoria, B. C.
Holly
Trees
4000 well cultivated, repeatedly transplanted Trees
to choose from, large and small, some varigated
leaved, many full of fine, red berries.
Plant Hollies for Ornament _ Profit
Layritz Nurseries
Care" Road
Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
.
COMING    ATTRACTIONS    AT   THE
VICTORIA THEATRE
he Barrier   Jan. ag
ocal Choral Society Jan. 31
he Arion Club Concert  Feb. 5
bse Melville in "Sis Hopkins" Feb. 6
ictoria Choral  Society Jan. 31
py Scouts in Amateur Play Feb. 7
A. D. C in Lady Winterton's Experiment    Feb. 8, 9
.dies' Musical with Mr. McCormick. .Feb. 12
Rosary    Feb. 14
"The Barrier"
"The   Barrier"  is   looked  upon  as
ie  of the  strongest,  most  realistic
d most holding plays of a decade.
is a dramatization hy Eugene Pres-
ry of Rex Beach's virile ancl true
vel of the real Alaska, and in its
iking, author and playright worked
th the single purpose of preserving
the stage all the atmosphere and
ightful  realism  so  evident  in  the
vel  itself.    Not  a  thing has  been
t   in   thc   dramatization,   which   is
Canadian, who sings his way into all
hearts. Thus each part is especially
fitted to the player, ancl a company
that as a whole is well nigh perfection is the result. A strong, even
and virile performance is assured, as
should be the case in interpreting
this very stirring story, written by
Mr. Beach out of the fullness of his
heart after six of his early years of
manhood spent in this little known
and much colored region—the "last
west," of which Kipling declared:
"There's never a law. of God or man
runs North of 53." "The Barrier"
will appear at the Victoria Theatre
Tuesday, January 30th.
Majestic Theatre
The Young Men's Christian Association (Silver Bay, Lake George,
N. Y., August 1911—Nov. 15.—Probably 110 organization in the world
has developed during the past ten
years more tl an    the    Young Men's
SCENE FROM      THE BARRIER," VICTORIA THEATRE. TUESDAY, JANUARY 30
tnusually faithful to the story—a tale
io widely read and so thoroughly
_opular that its plot even is super-
luous here;
In company, too, "The Barrier" is
.specially fortunate. The organiza-
:ion coming here is thc same cspe-
:ially selected to present it in the
New Amsterdam Theatre, for its
New York premier, where it ran a
ong season to capacity. Each player
was especially chosen, and all are typical to the last degree. The scenery,
effects and costumes of the New York
season come intact. Heading the cast
is Norval MacGregor, an actor and
stage director of wide experience,
who interprets the role of John Gale.
Eleanor Haber was chosen for the
difficult and sympathetic part of
Necis, the girl whose supposed Indian blood makes the "Barrier" between here and Capt. (Lee Miller)
which is the motive of the love story;
she has beauty, talent and skill, and
is a superb incarnation of the lovable
girl of the story. Max Steinle, the
well known comedian, has the comedy
role of Go Creek Lee, which he
handles as usual, to the last notch;
Mattie Hyde is Alluna, the squaw
wife of Gale, and the two villians,
Stark and Runnion, are in thc hands
of Byrce Howatson and Geo. Byron
respectively, with George Cleveland
as Poleen,   the   light-hearted French
Christian Association, and during that
time fifty million dollars has been
secured for new buildings and equipment. Men and women have been
found who thoroughly believe in the
association, large sums have' been
given freely. The demand for trained
leaders iu the Young Men's Christian
Associations has been so great that
the Twining Schools in Chicago and
Springfield have been unable to supply the demand, and Summer Schools
have been established in various parts
of the country. The one at Silver
Bay on Lake George, N. Y., is the
subject of this sketch, and this represents a typical day at the Summer
School. The first scene shows the
men going to breakfast, a scene from
the kitchen, then their leaving the
chapel exercises, then classes in gymnastics, an exhibition of life-saving
hy Mr. George H. Corsan, then the
sports in the afternoon and the parade  of the men.
During the month of August five
hundred and ninety-six different men
spent from two to four weeks at Silver Bay, equipping themselves for
positions as employed officers.
The best instructors are secured
to teach methods, principles and technical work. After three years in this
Summer School those who are graduated receive diplomas.
The Young Men's Christian Associations have more than live hundred
thousand members, seven hundred
and thirteen buildings on the North
American continent, three thousand
employed officers, so that these Summer Schools are absolutely necessary.
Through the assistance of E. M.
Willis, general secretary International
Committee, Y. M. C. A., this film
was made. We need only add that
the various actions are finely photo-
graaphed, the whole making an exceedingly interesting subject. It will
be given a prominent place on the
programme at the Majestic Theatre
Friday and Saturday, January 26 and
27.
Mr. Cadwaladr Roberts
Mr. C. Roberts began his career as
a choir conductor about thirty-live
years ago, before he was twenty
years of age. In the first ten years
of his career he won many prizes at
important choral contests in Wales.
About twenty-live years ago he
founded the famous Moelwyn Male
Choir, and almost immediately took
his place with his choir among the
most important organizations of the
kind in England and Wales. This
choir since its foundation has won
more than twenty-five thousand dollars in prizes alone, without counting the large sums paid them for
services, at concerts, etc., over thc
greater part of Great Britain. The
choir has sung and won important
prizes under the adjudication of such
important music critics as Laurent De
Rille, Sir Joseph Bennett, Dr. Cowen
Dr. Coward, Dr. Rowland Rogers
Signor Randegger, Dr. Parry, Sir Hubert Parry, Dr. Coleridge Taylor,
Prof. D. Jenkins, Mus. Baa, Harry
Evans, Dr. David Niomas, Prof. D
Evans, etc.
A few months before the death of
King Edward VII the Moelwyn
Choir received a Royal Command to
attend the King on board the Royal
Yacht at Holyhead, and give an evening concert before thc King and his
entourage. The venerable conductor
was introduced to the King, who
chatted with him for some time,
speaking very heartily of the pleasure
the singing of the choir had given
him. The choir was a great favourite
with his late Majesty.
When King George V visited Wales
last summer to lay the foundation
stone of the National Library of
Wales, out of all the choirs of music-
loving Wales, the Moelwyn Male
Choir was the one selected to sing
before His Majesty there, and at the
luncheon after thc ceremony.
Mr. Roberts has given most successful concerts in almost every large
town in England and Wales. Two
years ago he took the Moelwyn Male
Choir over to America, aud toured
in the United States with great success for five months returning to
England at the end of the tour, The
press opinions obtained in America
are flattering in thc extreme and show
what an enthusiastic reception the
choir received.
Mr. Cadwaladr Roberts started life
as a slate quarryman, utilizing his
leisure hours for the study of the fine
art he so intensely loves. He thus
gained a mastery of music which is
quite unique considering the disadvantages under whicii lie laboured.
He gained such distinction as a conductor that all the learned men of
music have remarked upon his ability
in this direction.
At home in Wales he is held in
universal respect. He is an elder in
the church, and has been professor
or inside conductor in his church for
the last 30 years. He is also a Justice of the Peace in Wales and his
opinion on the bench is always respected. He has always insisted upon
a rigorous rule of moral discipline in
the Moelwyn Male Choir, and none
but men of sterling character are admitted members of the choir.    Every
The Crystal Theatre
Broad Street ^
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
Watch for Constant Improvements in Appointments and Service.
The Young Men's
Christian Ass'n
Silver Bay, Lake George, N. Y.
August, 1911
By all means do not miss it, the
way will be clear to all
at
Majestic
Theatre
Fri.&Sat.,Jan.26&27
The Bijou
Theatre
One of the largest Picture Theatres in Western Canada. The House
has been thoroughly remodelled with sitting capacity increased to 700
seats. The Bijou is the first theatre opened with a 5c admission,
giving a show equal to any of the ioc shows in town. Our daily
performance consists of 4,000 ft. of film (4 reels), illustrated song and
a 3-pieced orchestra. We are running 24 reels weekly, almost everything that is produced. REMEMBER, we change our program
each and every day and admission only 5c.
Watch for our Next Sensation
Johnson Street
Victoria, B. C.
Victoria Theatre
TUESDAY, JANUARY 30
First Transcontinental Tour of
"The Barrier"
Dramatization   by   Eugene   Presbury
of   Rex   Beach's  great  story  of
the  last frontier—Alaska
Complete    Scenic    Production,    full
New York cast
Direct from the long run at the New
Amsterdam Theatre, with
ELEANER   HABER
as
NECIA
Prices—$1.00,   75c,   50c,   25c.
Seats now on Sale.
JEHipressi
WEEK JANUARY 29
member of the choir at present touring Canada is also a communicant in
one of the Christian churches at
home.
When the Colonial Premiers were
on a visit to England and were being entertained by Karl Carrington
at Gazdir Castle, Mr. Codwaladr
Roberts  and  his  choir  were  invited
(Continued on Page 9)
World's Most Daring Wirist
CADIEUX
The  Man   Who  Somersaults  on  the
Wire
The Fascinating Firefly of Vaudeville
KITTY ROSS
In Breezy Vocal Hits and Sparkling
Humour
PRINCESS LUBA MIROFF
Novelty   Act,   consisting  of   Singing
and Russian Dancing
(Late   of   Lew   Fields'   "llenpecks")
Making a  Special  Tour of  S.  &  C.
Circuit—The Inimitable Tar of
Minstrelsy
HARRY  VON  FOSSEN
"Thc Real Minstrel Man—That's All"
New York Declared Him the Peer
of 'Em All"
Extra Announcement
THE (4) BALL PLAYERS
Who will be seen in a Realistic Incident Interspersed with Musical
Numbers, called
"Twenty Minutes in the Club House"
THE EMPRESSCOPE THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
The Week
A   Provincial   Newspaper   and   Revi-w
published every Saturday by
"The Week" Publishing
■ i    Company, Limited
Published  at  1208  Government  St.,
Victoria, B.C., Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Edii
LIMERICK CONTEST
Owing to the sickness of our
Limerick Editor, who is in St.
Joseph's Hospital, we are unable to
make the award this week, but it will
be made in next week's issue.
DRAMATIC
CRITICISM
By Bohemian
The visit of Forbes-Robertson has
furnished a good opportunity for an
old theatre-goer to say a few words
on the subject of criticism, and dramatic criticism—which are two very different things.
Few people are able to criticize according to rule, or with any due recognition of the recognized canons of
criticism, such for instance as those
laid down by Matthew Arnold, Mill
or Greg. For most people it suffices
that they have had experience of
theatre-going and know what they
like and what they dislike. They will
also measure the play by the standard
of other plays, and the actors by other
actors.
In this country, happy are those
who can draw on the experience of
Old Country theatre-going, because
here atieast is a foundation on which
to build, and a test which is at least
better than any furnished by experience in the New World.
It is this fact which makes Victoria
audiences so hard to please, and it
accounts for the cool reception which
so-called American "successes" often
receive. Before I have done I hope
to show that the lower standard accepted in the States is not due to lack
of appreciation on the part of our
American cousins, but to lack of opportunity to become acquainted with
better-class plays and the better-class
companies.
Of course this observation has less
pertinency in the large Eastern cities,
but I am afraid that after leaving New
York and Boston it must be admitted
that the standard continually lowers.
In plays, as everything else, fashion
has a lot to do with success. As a
rule nil that is necessary to crowd
the theatres in Western American
cities is to advertise a New York
"success." If a play has had a long
run there it is taken for granted that
it must be good, or at any rate worth
seeing. I am proud to relate that
sonic of the greatest of New York
"successes" have played to empty
benches in Victoria, although the
same "plays have .filled theatres as near
as Seattle. This is a tribute both to
the' intelligence and the discrimination of Victoria audiences.
1 have often been amused at llic*
surprise .depicted on the face nf an
American manager when he found
that the Victoria sale had been,poor.
"Why," he would often say, "we have
p!w<* to capacity all through the
States." I can only hope that this
discrimination will continue until the
happy day,..predicted by Mr. Forbes-
Robertson arrives, when English companies will come straight from London to Canada and play all across the
Dominion until they reach Victoria.
When that day oomes not only will
Canadian standards be raised but
American theatricals will be revolutionized.
Speaking of this subject, Mr. Robertson told me that in his opinion the
fault lay not with the American
people, but with the syndicates who
control the playhouses. The stage
had become commercialized to such
an extent that art was a secondary
consideration. Thc tendency was to
furnish spectacle with sensational
effects, rather than plays. He considered that at the present time the leading actors in the States were very
much inferior to the actresses, large
ly because they were drawn from a
less educated class, whilst in England
it was otherwise, since the English
stage is recruited entirely from well
educated men, and very largely from
University men.
The application of this remark will
instantly occur to those Victorians
who have seen so-called "leading"
men in American plays during the
present season.
With respect to actresses, Mr.
Robertson thought that the best American actresses compare favourably
with and possibly are as a class better
than the English, and he did not hesitate to say that he considered Mrs.
Fiske easily the most brilliant of them
all. He qualified the remark, however, by reminding me that during
the last generation the English stage
possessed a coterie of exceptionally
brilliant women with whom those of
the present generation could hardly
be compared.
The mention of Mr. Robertson naturally calls for some comment on
his recent visit and on the remarkable
play which he presented. I know
that many people were disappointed.
For instance, I heard one lady who
sat behind me remark, that it was
a "mean" play, which had only one
scene for the three acts. I heard another complain that she couldn't bear
plays in which there was nothing but
middle-class people. I heard a third
say that shabby furniture and carpets always depressed her. A fourth
remarked, so that quite a number of
people heard her, that the change (in
the character of the people) was too
sudden to be natural. One man objected that Mr. Robertson spoilt the
play with his eyes, because he aped
Svengali. And a great many people
said that if it hadn't been for Mr.
Robertson the play wouldn't have
been worth  seeing.
Now there may be some truth in
all these objections, although I fear
it would be a difficult task for any
dramatist to satisfy some of the objectors. I make bold to say that the
play, especially of a serious type,
which has had a run of over two
thousand nights, practically always to
capacity houses, must both be a first-
class play and be presented by first-
class people. Yl think all the critics
will find it difficult to deny that.
I think in the next place that nothing is more hopeful for the future of
the stage and nothing more amply
justifies Mr. Robertson's own remarks
at the Canadian Club luncheon, that
the stage has advanced, than that such
a play should have been received with
acclamation wherever it has been presented for several years. To my mind
it is a complete answer to the disingenuous contention of American
managers that the people are responsible for low standards. It is not the
people but the mercenary managers
who perpetuate dramatic atrocities.
When the purest and loftiest drama
of modern times, interpreted by the
greatest English actor comes along
all International standards are levelled
and the heart of the people responds
to a great .work and a great representation.
At thc first performance of "The
Passing of the Third Floor Back" in
Seattle last Monday week, there were
half a dozen rows of empty seats in
the parquet and 1 don't know how
many in the balcony, but for the five
succeeding nights, after Seattle knew
how good a thing it had, the house
was packed at every performance;
and it has been so everywhere.
I sympathize with those who would
havc liked to see Mr. Robertson in
another part. 1 admit that the play
is not exciting; I also admit that it
does not rise to the heights of Hamlet, and what play does? But having
seen Mr. Robertson scores of times
and compared him with all the great
actors of the last forty years, I say
without hesitation that I would rather
the Victoria people should have seen
him as "The Passer-by" than in any
other character he has played, assuming that they could only see him once.
In his repertoire there are greater
parts. There are parts which rise to
the sublime heights of tragedy, and
which are classic, but there is no
part so absolutely unique, and no part
of which it can be said with truth
that Mr. Robertson is the only actor
of the last half  century who  could I
have played it acceptably. It is his
intellectuality, his ineffable charm, his
ascetic and refined appearance, and
the semi-ethereal atmosphere which
naturally surrounds him, which impart a distinction to the character of
"The Passer-by" indispensable to its
success, and not found in combination in any one actor more than once
or twice in a century.
"The Passer-by" will bear thinking
about. It ranks in the drama with
Morrison's "Tales of Mean Streets,"
and Richard Whiting's "No. 5 John
Street," in contemporary literature. If
it is not absolutely great, it is as Tom
Dillon of Seattle says, "Good."
Sir James Douglas
K. C. B.
The Early History of Vancouver
Island
Written Specially for the Week
by Gilbert Malcolm Sproat
The value of the article, which you
published last week, from the Thames
City's "Emigrant Soldiers' Gazette,"
is, that it reflects, unconsciously, the
then Home-country's opinion as to a
through railway, long before the
Eastern Provinces in America appreciated the proposal. The subject was
part of a general, improved Colonial
policy, favoured, in the "fifties," by
the two Derby administrations, of
both of which Disraeli was a member, a statesman of rare insight and
foresight. Colonial self-government,
he considered, should have been conceded as part of a great policy of
"consolidation," accomplished by an
Imperial Tariff, and by securities for
the enjoyment of the unappropriated
lands, vested in the sovereign as
trustee, and, further, by a military
Code, precisely defining the means
ancl responsibilities by which the Colonies should be defended, and,
through which, if necessary, the
Mother-country should call, for aid
from them. Representation in the
Home Parliament was left open, for
discussion. Disraeli's opinion, in
short, was, that relations were unsatisfactory, and that the "Colonial Empire" should be reconstructed, as far
as possible. In North America, for
instance, after settling with the Hudson's Bay Company, the Crown, as
part of a general policy, should practically "take to" what land remained,
as an Imperial asset, and, inter alia,
open the "illimitable wilderness," (as
he termed it), by a national through-
railway to the Pacific Coast, where,
already, there was a colony, with
which the Crown was more connected, constitutionally, than with any
other part of North America. In
some such Colonial policy, as the
above, we must admit, there were,
to say the least, great possibilities,
but, as I have narrated, an opposite
policy favouring Colonial "separation" from the Motherland, instead
of consolidation with it, grew, effectively strong, in the mid 19th century,
for about a generation, after which
it faded, leaving the Colonial Empire
Organization question in its present
unhopeful condition, without, so far
as 1 can see, any prospect of betterment, except, perhaps, as the issue of
a world-wide war. But this is a digression from my present subject, a
digression, perhaps pardonable on my
part, as Second-Corporal Sinnett's
article, above referred to, reminds me
of the apposite utterances of certain
statesmen in the Home Land, to
which it was my privilege to listen,
in the fifties. (There is, to my mind,
some internal evidence, in the Thames
City article, that it may have been
written by Lieutenant H. S. Palmer,
R. E., who assisted Editor Sinnett,
occasionally, in preparing the Gazette).
It was a little foible of Douglas,
though, individually, self-confident, to
like association with the "Services,"
Military ancl Naval, particularly after
becoming Governor. His school days
in  Scotland included a war-time; he
was an observant boy of 12, when
Waterloo was fought, and, probably,
with his schoolfellows, helped, later,
to welcome returning troops. Leaving Scotland, however, in his sixteenth year (1819) he did not see
British soldiers, again, until the Royal
Engineers arrived here, in 1858-9. The
Navy he knew a little more about,
for Naval officers, occasionally got
leave to visit Fort Vancouver on the
Columbia river, and, he himself, on
coast trips, prior to becoming head
of the "Western H. B. Co. Department in 1846," and more particularly,
afterwards, when headquarters were
removed to Victoria in 1849, had opportunities of visiting any Naval ships
at Esquimalt. When made Governor
of the Island in 1851, he was entitled
to a salute on such visits. This,
honour was not unfamiliar to him, for
the Fort at Victoria, always, saluted
the Company's steamboat "Beaver,"
with five guns, when the Chief Factor in charge was aboard, herself being like a small man-of-war (109
tons), with her four brass cannons,
muskets and cutlasses in racks round
the main mast, and boarding nettings
along her sides. The usual form of a
Governor's commission, for territory
with a sea frontier, includes the words
"Vice Admiral of the same," whicii
mean little when a commissioned Service officer is present. I think, in a
retrospect, that the chief blemish, in
Douglas' whole governorship, was in
his requisitions to the Navy for detachments of bluejackets and marines
to arrest alleged Indian criminals,
and in his rough trials, and summary
executions of the persons arrested,
though a regular Court of Justice
existed in Victoria. Were 1 writing
a biography, I would state my reasons for this opinion, formed from
knowledge of the people concerned,
and after rather large experience in
dealing with both wild Indians and
wild whites. At present, in connection with other early events here, I
may state that Douglas, on 19th
August, 1858, had suggested to Secretary Lytton, that a "single company
of infantry" might enable the affairs
of government to be carried on
smoothly. Like others who knew no
better, Douglas apparently, then,
thought that "gold diggers" were turbulent, bad men, the very dregs of
society, and (what included all iniquity) decidedly anti-British. An
amazing instance of the prevalence of
this opinion occurs in the "Thames
City's" little Gazette, 29 January,
1859, wherein, the Editor, who had
never seen a mining camp, referring
to settlers who might be expected to
come from England to British Columbia, says, that their "bright and
happy faces" will form a delightful
contrast to the "careworn, dissipated
"and scoundrelly physiognomies" of
gold diggers in general. The fact, as
everyone now knows, and as the conduct of the incomers proved, was that
the general standard of intelligence
and conduct, ill the mining population
of the whole Xorth Pacific Coast,
was, to say the least, as high as in
any other industry, or indeed, in any
populous town, even of the present
day. Those who remained here, after
the exodus, were a sample of the
whole, diverse to a large extent, in
nationality and in experiences. Familiar as I was with English public
meetings, characterised by some
roughness, I remember being struck
by the quietness and good order of
such meetings here. The same was
noticeable on the mainland, where
the population included more actual
gold miners, but in neither colony,
did the fact indicate apathy. Some
of your readers may remember the
Report of Mr. J. D. Edgar, afterwards Speaker of the Canadian House
of Commons, to the Secretary of
State for Canada, 17 June, 1874. lie
states, therein, that the circumstances
of the early settlement of the Province gave Victoria "a population of
"peculiar intelligence" * * * "their
"keen intelligence, and zeal in public
"affairs," he adds, "suggest a parallel
"in the history of some of the minor
"states of ancient Greece, and Italy.''
What Douglas meant 10 do with a
"single company of British infantry"
among such a population, has always
puzzled me. Probably he did not,
then, know, what, as a quick learner,
he soon realized, namely, that, even,
without his lifting a finger, the
miners, in any camp, would repress
disorder, sternly. The British-borr
Californian "rowdy," Ned McGowan
and others of his class, who came
here, made no mistake as to this
Apart from Indian troubles, whicl
were serious enough, along the Fra
ser, the biggest botheration there, it
those days, was caused by two o
Douglas' Justices of the Peace, whosi
commissions he had to cancel.
The Right Honourable Secretary o
State, Lytton's conception (entirelj
his own, f think,) of the value, t<
the Colony, of a detachment of th
Royal Engineers, chiefly for scientifi
and practical purposes, will now com
up, naturally, for specific mention, i:
my next.
Annual Convention o|
B. C. Dairyman's
Association
The following agenda was carria
out at the recent convention in th
city of Victoria and a great succe|
was achieved:
Wednesday Morning, Jan. 24
9.00—Opening address. Hon. Pril
Ellison, Minister of Agriculture; al
dress by W. E. Buckingham, pre|
dent; minutes of last meeting;
rectors' report; Secretary'Treasurerj
report; unfinished business; electic
of officers; new business.
10.00—Address, Hon. Richard _l\
Bride,  K.C,  Premier.
10.30—Address, "Building up thi
Dairy Herd," J. W. Mitchell, B.aI
Professor of Dairy Husbandry, Man!
toba Agricultural College; discussioi|
"Co-operation among Dairymen,"
troduced by J. W. Berry, Langley.
Wednesday Afternoon
2.00—Address,    Dr.    Jas.    Withy
combe, Director, Oregon Experimen|
Station, U.S.A.
3.30—Discussion, "Production anJ
the Show Ring," introduced by Hi
Rive, Dairy Inspector; presentation
of Dairy Competition Trophies anf
Medals, and British Columbia RecoriJ
of Performance Cup.
Wednesday Evening
8.00—Address,  "City  Milk-Supply,'|
J. W. Mitchell, B.A.
9.00—Discussion, "Our Cow-testing
Associations," introduced by H. RiveJ
V. Bojesen, ancl Dr. Tolmie.
Nelson Wants Bridge
Over 200 met in the Eagle hall lastl
evening and voiced their hearty approval of a resolution urging upon
the provincial government to erect a
bridge across the west arm of Kootenay lake opposite Nelson. Mayor
Amiable took the chair and Aid.
Gleazer acted as secretary. The former spoke at length on the great
necessity of having a bridge at this
point ancl of the steps already taken
to estimate the probable cost. A deputation is now at the Coast pressing
this matter with every probability of
success.
BOOK NOTES
At the Standard Stationery
Co., Ltd., 1220 Government St.,
Victoria, B.C.:
"From Tenderfoot to Scout,"
by A. C. Ruddy.   $1.50.
"The Apple of Happiness," by
Ethel Turner.   $1.50.
"My Rag Picker," by Mary
E. Waller.   $1.50.
"The Window at the White
Cat," by Mary Rinehart.   $1.50.
At the Victoria Book &
Stationery Co., 1004 Government St., Victoria, B.C.:
"The Havoc," by E. Phillips
Oppenheim.    $1.50.
"A Prairie Courtship," by
Blindloss.   $1.50.
"Members of the Family," by
Owen Wister.   $1.50. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
BUILDING PERMITS
January 18—
Ward Investment Co.—Oscar St.—Dwelling  $2,200
Ward Investment Co.—Cambridge St.—Dwelling   2,200
E. J. Parker—Prior St.—Dwelling  2,500
H. D. D. Lawson, North Park—Addition   475
Jas. Leigh & Sons—David ancl Turner—Office and Warehse 4,900
■January 19—
Brett & Sewall—First St.—Three Dwellings, each  1,500
W. T. White—Second Ave.—Dwelling  1,000
W. W. Warwick—Shakespeare St.—Dwelling  1,900
H. M. Cowper—May St.—Dwelling  1,800
Geo. Patterson—Fisguard St.—Addition   200
|anuary 20—
C. J. Walsh and F. S. Bonnell—Clover St.—Dwelling...... 2,200
F. T. Pengelly—Blackwood St.—Dwelling  2,500
J. P. Merriman—Caledonia Ave.—Alt. and Add _  350
anuary 22—
Grant & Lineham—Cormorant & Douglas—Stores & Apts.. 63,000
G. A. D. Flitton—St. Charles St.—Storehouse  750
Turner & Perry—Wilmer St.—Dwelling  1,950
W. H. Stranix—Shelbourne St.—Dwelling  450
Victcoria School Board—Yates St.—Class Room  1,500
G. S. Hunt—Bank St.—Dwelling  2,200
January 23—
Wm. Boddy—Wilson St.—Addition   300
John Taylor—Bushby St.—Temp. Dwelling   200
P. R. Brown & Co.—Douglas St.—Store   1,434
W. J. Dandridge—Oak Bay Ave.—Stores  1,500
A. Wheeler, Sr.—Richmond Ave.—Dwelling   2,500
E. Tuck—Bay St.—Dwelling  3,000
A  WIDE  BANKING  SURVEY
A spirit of optimism, tempered by a cautionary note here and there
characterized the addresses at the annual meeting of the Canadian Bank
if Commerce recently. As already mentioned the year's business
Ibrought notable net profits of $2,305,409 on an average paid-up capital
lof $10,591,405—an increase in profits of $467,344, as compared with
the preceding year's. During the year deposits were increased by
$19,131,480—and it is interesting to note that Western branches are
credited with having contributed a handsome addition to this amount.
On the other side of the balance sheet, current loans and discounts
show an increase of $19,757,171, as compared with previous year's
report. Investments in government bonds, municipal and other securities were increased by $2,616,826, and cash resources by $8,390,979.
Branch expansion continued during the year, while the taking over of
the Eastern Townships Bank will practically mean a chain of offices
from coast to coast. The reference made by the general manager, Mr.
Alexander Laird, to the matter of bank note circulation, is of much
interest to business circles generally. At the close of November the
bank had notes in circulation of over $12,000,000—well on to $2,000,-
000 more than a year earlier, ancl some $300,000 more than could have
been issued but for the "emergency" provision of the Bank Act. Mr.
Laird expressed the view that the provision for such excess issue
should be extended by a month at each end of the period now allowed
for taking care of crop-moving and other special needs—so as to extend
from September to February.
The annual address of the president, Sir Edmund Walker, has
been printed. It is encyclopedic in scope, and affords a veritable mine
of information. Commenting upon the fact that the Dominion's last
fiscal year showed an excess of imports over exports amounting to
$175,000,000, Sir Edmund pointed out that conditions of rapid development warrant Canada's buying more than it sells for some years to
come. At present we are preparing for the settlement of about
400,000 immigrants in one year—an addition of five per cent, to our
population. "To provide everything for these people, from transportation to housing, is a huge task." Nor is it to be overlooked that the
immigrants themselves immediately contribute to the country's wealth
an amount for 1911 at $160,000,000 (covering effects and cash).
Nevertheless, as Sir Edmund is careful to point out, while Canada's
progress makes some "mortgaging of the future," a good policy, its
power to carry this out successfully depends upon sustaining its credit,
and it would be foolish to deny the fact that overseas investors are
beginning to scrtinize Canadian offerings more closely than ever before.
Real estate speculation, East and West, in flamboyantly advertised
subdivisions and townsites is strongly deprecated by the bank's president, who refers also to the money drawn from investors by mergers
formed "not so much to improve the conditions of a particular business,
as to create bonds and shares on an imaginary basis of profits for
stock-jobbing purposes."
While recognizing the attractiveness and general safety of Western
municipal debentures for conservative investors, Sir Edmund points
out certain particulars in which municipal authorities might exercise
Residence  Phone F1693
Business Phone 1804
W.D'0.Rochfort
Architect
Plans and Specifications on
Application
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
Zhe
Taylor Mill Co.
Limited
All kinds of Building Material
Lumber   .'   Sash   .'   Dooi
Telephone 564
North Government Street, Victoria
TELEPHONES
248 AND 249
A. E. KENT
PROPRIETOR
Pacific Transfer
Co.
Trucking and Expressing
Bagiagi Chicttd and Furniturt
Rimtvtd to any fart tf City
504 (sf 506 FORT STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
Give Your
Typist Good
Stationery
and She'll Give
You Bettr
Work
Baxter & Johnson Co.
Llmlttd
721 Yates St. Phone 730
Royal Bank Chambers
Victoria, B. C.
Thomas Hooper
Jlrchitect
522 Winch Building
Vancouver, B. C.
List Your  Properties with   Us
Stuart & Reeves
Members Victoria RcalEstate Exchange
Cor. Fort & Douglas Sts.,   Victoria
Telephone 2612      P. 0. Box 1519
Clover Hill
All Good High Lots-The
best buy in the City for a
Home.   Prices, $500 to $900
Terms: io per cent Cash and io per cent Quarterly
Green & Burdick Bros.
Phone 1518
Cor. Broughton & Langley St.
Half Acres
in the Fairfield Estate, suitable for
subdivision, $2100 to
$2500
Quarter Acres
in Alexandra
Park
$1050 to $1250
Pemberton & Son
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREETS
UPTON'S TEA
SOLD IN AIRTIGHT PACKAGES ONLY
Phone F 209
P. 0. Box 417
Morris &
Edwards
General Contractors
Homes built by Contract or
on F.asy Payments
Colville Rd.
Victoria, B. C.
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors'  Instruments and
Drawing   Office   Supplies
Electric Blue Print & Map
Company
1218 Langley Street, Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
li.
greater care. Naturally the increase of population and wealth in the
centres has created a desire for the best class of pavements, roadways,
sewers, etc. But the authorities in providing such improvements are
sometimes inclined to load the future to too great an extent. Debentures which are drawn for 5, 10, 15, 25 and 30 years would, in the
opinion of Sir Edmund, be more sound if drawn for 2, 5, 7, 10 and
15 years, the shorter periods of time more nearly representing the life
of the improvement.
The faith of the bank's shareholders in the continued progress of
Canadian -business generally is evidenced in practical fashion by the
adoption of a motion to increase the authorized capital from $15,000,-
000 to $25,000,000.
IMMIGRATION IN 1911
In keeping with the increase in other Canadian statistics, the num
ber of immigrants during 1911 is larger than in any other year. A
report from Ottawa two days before the end of December said that
with the records for the year practically complete, the number of new
arrivals since the lst of January reached 351,593, compared with 311,-
089 in the previous year. The British immigration shows a particularly
large increase, reaching 141,835, compared with 123,013 for 1910.
The immigration from the United States increased about 4,000, the
figures up to December lst having been 125,399. The Continental
immigration advanced about 6,000, the number being 72,478.
An important feature in connection with the new-comers from
the Old Country during the year under review is that on the average
they were better supplied with money than those who came in former
years. It is very gratifying to note that the people of the Motherland
are coming in larger numbers and of a better class generally. While
we welcome heartily the settlers from the United States, who usually
have plenty of money to start with in this new country, we can be
pardoned for desiring that our fellow Britishers come over to hedp us.
Western Canada is today the greatest field for immigration in the
world, and while we are proud of the way each year's arrivals are
increasing, the number coming in annually now is but small, we believe,
in comparison with the number that will be arriving yearly, say, ten
years hence. It is to be noted that the farther the country advances
the greater are the inducements for outsiders to come here. Those who
have been here for some time write to their old homes and tell of their
experiences. The result is that one man who makes good here may
persuade several others to come.
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
NEW BANK IN B. C.
Once more The Royal Bank of Canada is able to report in its
forty-second annual statement all previous records broken. Net profits
for the year amounted to 18.58 per cent, on stock, while liquid assets
now stand at 49j_ per cent, of total liabilities to the public. Deposits
increased over $16,000,000, which brings the total up to $88,294,000.
Liquid assets amount to $47,738,000, being 49^ per cent, of the total
liabilities to the public Actual cash on hand, balances on deposit with
other banks, and call loans in New York and London, England, exceed
32 per cent, of the total liabilities to the public. Total assets increased
during the year from $92,510,000 to $110,528,000. Net profits amounted to $1,152,249, showing an increase of $200,913 over the previous
year—equal to 18.58 per cent, on the capital stock of $6,200,000. Commercial loans amount to $59,646,000, being 67.55 per cent, of the deposits. As will be seen from these comparisons, the bank experienced
a wonderfully prosperous year.
HOME LIFE ASSOCIATION
ft OP flpTEl
SEATTLE
Cms. Pair, tim
TiffiBESTormmBiRe
IN THE HEART Or TH£011T
135R0QHSWlTllBATt1-505AMPllR00H3
The financial statement of the Home Life Association of Canada,
shows invested assets to have increased by $135,000 from a year ago,
the net total being now over $1,330,000. The interest income during
the year increased by about $1,000 and the rate earned on the mean
assets amounted to 6.15 per cent. The directors' report states that
provision has been made for any possible depreciation on securities,
so as to assure the standing of the company's assets. The year brought
an increase in insurance in force and a growth in premium income—
the latter item amounting to $217,000 for 1911.'
TWO NEW BOND FIRMS
The Bank of British North America has opened a branch at
Lytton, B. C.
Two new bond firms, viz.:—Messrs. N. B. Stark & Company,
in Montreal, and Messrs. Murray, Mather & Company in Toronto,
have been organized. Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Smart, president of the
Smart Bag Company, Limited, and director of the Banque Hoche-
laga; Mr. Norman B. Stark, late managing director of the Investment Trust Company, Montreal, and Mr. Harrison Durant of the
same firm, are general partners in Messrs. N. B. Stark & Company
and special partners in Messrs. Murray, Mather & Company. The
Montreal firm will cover Montreal and the whole of Eastern Canada.
Messrs. H. W. Murray and N. L. C. Mather, for many years
with the Dominion Securities Corporation, Toronto, are the general
partners of the Toronto firm and special partners of the Montreal
one, and will be more directly identified with business in Ontario
and Western Canada.
Just Arrived
A fine  line  of Ladies' Silk
Waist Patterns,  Fancy Silk
Scarfs, Shaws, etc., which
we have marked at
bargain prices.
So Kee & Co.
1029 Cook St.
Cor. Cook & Fort
Mrs. D. B. McLaren
Teacher of Singing and
Voice Production
Terms on Application   Phone X2308
P. O. Box 449
F. KROEGER
ARTISTIC  UPHOLSTERY
" Windowphanie"
Ma..cs Stained Glass out of Plain Glass
Has Removed to 721 Courtney Street
Opposite Alexandra Clnb Telephone 1148
Todd Inlet
The Portland Cement Contracting
company are erecting a million dollar plant at Todd Inlet.
■   ■
Start the New Year Right
Victoria merchants have now closed their books for 1911 and are laying their plans
for an increase of their business during 1912. In laying these plans, we would suggest the consideration of several items, each of which is admitted to be of great
importance in the gaining and holding of trade, as follows:
/.  An Electric Sign
2.   Well lighted show windows
j.  Adequate and properly arranged Lighting for the salesroom.
Merchants who made provision for up-to-date lighting during 1911 report that the
investment has paid handsome returns. Our services are at your command, without charge, to advise you concerning lighting systems.
B. C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd.
Light and Power Dept.
Telephone 1609 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
m
ADVANCED
m
Northern Anthracite Collieries
LIMITED
WILSON  ROBERTSON
COAL  FIELDS
GRAHAM    /SLAND
•"8&
Wr#/?AC/TE
S*e_TCH Map
SMowina
Coal Licenses
en
Bearskin Bay. Q.C.I.
ALFRED BAY COAL FIELDS
Capital - - $1,500,000
Divided into $1,500,000 Shares, $1.00 each
President  T. S. Gore, Capitalist
Vice-President  J. C. Keith
Directors A. Scot Innis, A. E. Hepburn, Christian F. J. Galloway
Solicitors  Burns & Walkem
Consulting Engineers A. E. Hepburn, Christian F. J. Galloway
Chartered Accountants  Kenah & Nesbit, Vancouver and London, Eng.
Secretary     F. H. Hepburn, 317 Winch Building
D. R. Young has contracted for purchase of
two blocks of shares of 100,000 each, and
are being sold by A. E. Kealy for purchaser
The entire proceeds of which are to be
used for development purposes only
Latest Information from Queen Charlotte by wireless is to the
effect that the diamond drill is already down over 500 feet
and making fifteen feet each day,jn coalfformation,
and is expected to cut^through seam of^coal at  any  hour
Stock Now Advanced to 25 cents per share and| will surely advance
to 50 cents per share as soon asfthe COAL SEAM is cut by the drill
Get In Now, Don't Wait until Too Late-Opportunity Only Knocks Once
APPLICATION FOR SHARES
H. J. HEAL, Victoria, Agent for Arnold E. Kealy, Vancouver, B. C.
I hereby request you to obtain for me shares in the  NORTHERN  ANTHRACITE  COLLIERIES,  LIMITED,  of  par value  of  $1.00
each at the net price to me of 15c per share, and I now hand you the sum of $ , being the first payment of five cents per share now applied
for; the balance I agree to pay as follows: Five cents on each share in thirty days from date hereof; five cents on each share in sixty days from date hereof;
being payment in full, and I hereby agree to accept the said shares or any less number of shares that may be allotted to me, and also pay for same; and I
hereby authorize you to obtain registration of me as the holder of the shares so obtained for me.
This application is made by me subject to (50,000)  shares being subscribed for and purchased.
A. L KEALY, Offlce: 506 Pacific Bldg. 744 Hastings St, W., Vancouver
H. J. HEAL, 125 Pemberton Block, Victoria, B. C
■j-
=ii THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
Genius, Fame, Poverty
Charles Dickens made $200,000 on
one lecturing tour; but his descendants, it is said, are now in want. His
eldest* son,* Alfred Tennyson, whose
sudden death was recently recorded,
had been travelling through the
States delivering lectures in an endeavour to keep the family pot boiling.
Tragic incidents of this kind are of
daily occurence, and yet they make
as little impression upon us as the
rain on the duck's back. One of our
newspapers in commenting on the
pathetic facts asked the significant
question: "What is to become of us
when wc are old?" There is but
one answer: A man must save in
his youth if he will have a "nest egg"
in the days when his locks are hoary
and his earning powers have departed. But that is not all. He must
adopt a system of saving which will
not fail him iri the hour of trial. This
system has been provided under the
Canadian Government Annuities Act,
in regard to which you may obtain
literature of your Postmaster, or on
application to the Superintendent of
Annuities, Ottawa.
City of Victoria
Private Bill
Public Library
Public notice is hereby given that
the Corporation of the City of Victoria intend to apply at present sitting of the Legislature, for the insertion, in the Private Bill, promoted by
the Corporation, of a clause for the
following:
"Notwithstanding anything contained in the Municipal Clauses Act or in
any by-law of the Corporation, it shall
be lawful for the Municipal Council to
expend for the maintenance and upkeep of the Public Library, such sum
as the Municipal Council may direct,
not exceeding in any one year, one-
quarter of one mill on the dollar of
the assessed value of real property in
the Corporation."
And further notice will be given of
the time and place of the sitting of
the Private Bills Committee when the
said clause will be sought to be inserted in the said Private Bill.
Dated this 24th day of January,
1912.
F. A. McDIARMID,
City Solicitor.
DEPARTMENT  OF  LANDS
Water Branch.
South Valley  Creek.
Skaokum - River. -
Summit or Alta Lake.
Soo  River or  Eight-mile  Creek.
Sunshine Creek.
Silver  Falls.
Sisters Creek.
Sqyamjsh or Elaha River.
South  Squamish  River.
Swift Creek.
Shovelnosc  Creek.
Shannon  Creek.
Straamus or Stroamus River.
Trafalgar   Creek.
Tenderfoot   Creek.
Thames Stream. ■
Unnamed creek flowing into Lynn Creek.
Nnnamed creek flowing into Nelson Creek.
Unnamed creek flowing into Seymour
Creek. '
Unnamed creek flowing into Squamisn
Rivtr through  District i^ot 977.
Unnamed stream in District Lot 549.
Stream running through District Lot 600,
Group  1.
Stream on Block 43 of Subdivision of District Lots 771 and 54;, Group 1.
Unnamed stream running in on north
boundary of District  Lot  626.
Stream on District Lot 271.
Small creek running through Lot 775 in
southerly direction.
Small stream running into North Arm,
Burrard Inlet, opposite works of tne
Vancouver Power Company.
Unnamed mountain stream coming in on
the north boundary-line of Lot 25, in
Municipality of North Vancouver.
Small stream running, in a southerly direction into Burrard Inlet, about one
mile and a half east of Seymour Creek.
Unnamed stream flowing through E- \_
of District Lot 1240, Group 1.
Unnamed stream running east and west
through Lot 950, southern portion.
Creek running through District Lots 979
and 812, Group 1.
Unnamed stream flowing through eastern
portion of District Lot 2028.
Unnamed stream close to eastern boundary of same.
Unnamed stream rising in Lot 1494,
North Vancouver District.
Unnamed stream on west shore of Mainland emptying into Howe Sound opposite east shore  Bowen Island.
Unnamed stream having its source north
of District Lot 559, and running in a
southerly direction through the said lot
into Burrard Inlet.
Unnamed stream which runs through Lot
2049  and  Lot  2048.
Unnamed stream which runs southerly
through subdivision of north-easterly
part of District Lot  871.
Unnamed creek on Lot 230, about 12
chains from south-west corner.
Unnamed stream running from Lot 1406
through Lots 1360 and 2048 into Burrard   Inlet.
Unnamed stream which passes through
District Lot 881, flowing south-westwards into District Lot 785,- and
through  District  Lot 880.
Unnamed stream passing through District
Lot 785 westwards.
Unnamed creek flowing through District
Lots   1301, 869, 803,  and 862.
Unnamed stream on north boundary of
District Lot S82.
Unnamed stream flowing south-easterly
through District Lots 2003 and 2004.
Unnamed creek entering North Arm of
Burrard Inlet on west side, between
Brighton Beach and Point  Beautiful.
First gulch south of Schooner Harbour,
and running through Lot 2076, Group
1.
Unnamed creek running through easterly
part of District Lot 801, North Vancouver.
Unnamed creek running westerly from
Snow Flat, on Lots 1001, 1002, 1003,
1004, Group 1, and all unnamed springs,
streams, creeks, ponds, gulcheSj and
lakes tributary to or in the vicinity
of  the  above-named   streams.
Take notice that each and every person,
partnership, company, or municipality who,
on the said 12th day of March, 1909, had
water rijjhtst on any of the above-mentioned
creeks, is directed to forward on or before
the 29th day of February, 1912, to the Chief
Water Commissioner at the Parliament Buildings at Victoria, a memorandum of claim in
writing as required by section 27 of the sa;d
Act as amended. Printed forms for sueh
memorandum (Form No. 19) can be obtained
from any of the Water Commissioners in the
Province;
And take notice that the said Board of
Investigation intends to proceed to tabulate
such claims on or about the 30th day of
March,   1912.
After thc claims have been tabulated by the
Board, notice will be given of the places and
days on which evidence and argument will
be heard at local points.
Dated at Victoria this 13th day of January,
1912.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Gymnasium Normal School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Gymnasium Normal School," will be
received by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to 12 o'clock noon of Wednesday,
the 31st day of January, 1912, for the erec
tion and completion of a gymnasium for the
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms
of tender may be seen on and after the 17th
day of January, 1912, at the offices of the
Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.; tbe Government Agent, New Westminster, B.C.; and
the Department of Public Works, Parliament
Buildings,  Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works,
for the sum of $300, which shall be forfeited if
the party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or if he
fail to complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tentier not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., January 15th, 1912.
jan. 20
jan. 27
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over the lands described as Lot No,
2130, Group One, New Westminster District,
by reason of a notice bearing date of the 26th
day of June, igoTj and published in the
British Columbia Gazette on August 29th,
1007, is cancelled so as to permit of a lease
of the lands being given to Albert Scott.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
January 5th, 1912.
jan 13 apl 13
J. F. ARMSTRONG,
Chairman.
In thc matter of the Hoard of Investigation
created by Part'111, of the "Water Act" for
thc determination of water rights existing on
the 12th day of March, 1909; aud in the
matter of tlie following creeks in the New
Westminster   Water   District:—
Alta or Summit Lake.
Alpha  Lake.
Allan Creek.
Britannia  Creek.
Boulder  Creek.
Clementine  Creek.
Capilano River.
East  Branch of Capilano River.
Chee-kee   Creek.
Cheakamus River.
Cheakumus  River,   North   Nranch.
Cheakamus River, South-east Fork.
Cold  Creek.
Caldwell   Creek.
Cathedral   Canyon.
Crocker Creek.
Cypress Creek.
Daisy Lake.
Deer Creek.
Eight-mile Creek or Soo River.
Elaha or  Squamish River.
Furry  Creek.
Fitzsimmons Creek.
Green Lake.
Houlgate Creek.
Holmden  Creek.
High Falls Creek.
Lynn Creek.
Lewis   Creek.
Mineral Creek,
Mamquam River.
Little Mamquam River.
McCartney   Creek.
Mosquito   Creek.
Mislilooet   River.
Mackay Creek.
Mud    Creek,
Martin Creek.
McDonald   Creek.
Nita Lake.
Nelson   Creek.
Olsen Creek.
Rice  Lake.
Shone  Creek.
Seymour   Creek.
Stoney Creek.
Upper  Stoney  Creek.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice  that  Herbert  Sutherland,  of
Bella Coola, occupation  Engineer, intends to
apply  for permission  to purchase the  following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted   20   chains   east   from   the   north-west
eorner of Section 23, Township 6, Bella Coola,
thence south 20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 20 chains; tbence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated January Sth,   1912.
HERBERT SUTHERLAND.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve
existing over the lands described as Lot No.
2130, Group One, New Westminster District,
by reason of a notice bearing date of the 26th
of June, 1907, and published in the British
Columbia Gazette on August 29th, 1907, is
cancelled so to permit of a lease of the lands
being given to Albert Scott.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
January 5th, igi2.
jan 13 apl 13
"WATER  ACT,   1909/
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, holder of
Water Licences Nos. 1519 and 1.920, granted
by the Water Commissioner for the Victoria
Water District, for the diversion of 1,000
cubic feet per second of water from the
Puntledge River, a tributary of Courtenay
River, has submitted to the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council a map or plan of the
works by which it inunds to divert the said
water and conduct it to the place where it
shall be used for generating electric power as
described in  the said  Licences.
That the undertaking of the said Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, as set out
in the said plans is hereby approved, and
the said Company is hereby authorized to
construct and execute the following works in
accordance with the plans and specifications
submitted and filed in the office of the Chief
Water Commissioner at Victoria, viz. :—
A. An impounding dam near the outlet of
Comox Lake.
B. Lowering   the   bed   of   Puntledge   River
and the hereinafter described diversion
dam to an increased depth of five feet
or less.
C. A   diversion   dam   on   Puntledge   River
about 2,800 feet below the impounding
dam above described.
D. Tbe works necessary  for tho transmis
sion of the power generated under the
above Licences on and in the vicinity
of lands belonging to the said Company.
That the Company may exercise its powers
within the Comox and Nelson Land Districts.
That no capital be required beyond that
already subscribed and paid up.
That thc works shall be begun on or
before the first day of May next, and shall
be completed and in actual operation on or
before the 31st  December,   1913.
With the proviso that during the construction of the said works any engineer
appointed by the Minister of Lands for that
purpose shall have free access to all parts
of the works for the purpose of inspecting
the same and of ascertaining tnat the construction thereof is in accordance with thc
plans and specifications herein referred to,
and that the cost of such inspection shall be
paid by the  Company.
Dated this 27th day of November,  iqii.
A. CAMPBELL REDDIE,
• Deputy Clerk of the Executive Council.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
jan. 27
mar. 23
"LAND REGISTRY ACT"
In the Matter of an Application for a Fresh
Certificate of Title to Lot  1727, Victoria
City,  British  Columbia.
NOTICE is hereby given of my intention,
at   the   expiration   of   one   calendar   month
from   the   first   publication   hereof,   to   issue
a   fresh   Certificate   of   Title   in   lieu   of   the
Certificate   of  Title  issued   to   Charles   Cameron on the   12th of   November,   1882,   and
numbered   4165A,   which   has   been   lost   or
destroyed.
Dated_ at   Land   Registry   Office,   Victoria,
B.C., this nth day of Tanuary, A.D.,  1912.
S.  Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar-General   of  Titles,
jan. 13 feb. 10
RENFREW LAND DISTRICT
District of Jordan River
TAKE notice that I,  Netta  B.  Moore, of
Victoria, occupation Married Woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the following   described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
post planted sixty chains distant in a westerly
direction from the north-east corner of Lot 3,
Renfrew District, being Netta B. Moore, S. L.
Corner; thence north 40 chains: thence west
34 chains;  thence south   18.6 cnains;  thence
east   10   chains;   thence   south   21.4   chains;
thence cast 24 chains to place of commencement, and containing one hundred and fourteen and six-tenths acres, more or less.
Dated November 28th,  iqii.
NETTA B. MOORE.
By William W. Steinmetz, Agent,
dec. 3 feb. 3
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Quathiaski Cove Lock-up.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for Lock-up and Constable's Quarters,
Suathiaski Cove," will be received by thc
on. the Minister of Public Works up to
12 o'clock noon of Wednesday, the 7th day
of February, 1912, for the erection and completion of a five-room two-cell Lock-up and
Constable's Quarters at Quathiaski Cove,
Valdes Island^ in the Comox Electoral District, B.C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 18th
dav of January, 1912, at the offices of the
Government Agents, Cumberland and Nanaimo; the Constable in charge, Quathiaski
Cove; and the Department of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works,
for the sum of $350, whioh shall be forfeited if
the party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or if he
fail to complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon thc execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., January 16th,  1912.
jan. 20 feb. 3
Port Alberni School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed "Tender for School-house, Port Alberni," will be
received by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to 12 o'clock noon of Wednesday,
the 14th day of February, 1912, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame
school-house at Port Alberni, in thc Alberni
Electoral District,  B. C.
Plans, specifications, contract, and forms of
tender may be seen on and after the 22nd
day of January, 1912, at the offices of A. D.
Cooper, Esq., Secretary of the School Board,
Port Alberni, B.C.; the Government Agents,
Alberni and Nanaimo, and thc Department of
Public Works, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an
accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit
on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public Works,
for the sum of $500, which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline to enter into
contract when called upon to do so, or if he
fail to complete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made
out on the forms supplied, signed with the
actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., January 19th, 1912.
jan. 20 * feb. 10
NOTICE
PRIVATE BILLS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petil
tions for Private Hills must be presented til
tlie Legislative Assembly not later than Mon(
day, the 22nd day of January, 1912,
Private Bills must be presented and introl
duced to the House not later than the isfl
day of February,  1912.
Private Bills must be reported to the Housl
by the Committee considering same not latc|
than the 8th day of February, 1912.
Dated this 8th day of December,  1911.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk Legislative Assembly,
dec. 9 feb. |
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserl
established by notice published in the Briti
Columbia Gazette of the 14th August, 181
and dated the 13th August, 1884, is cancel!
in so far as the same relates to Fractiol
Sections 2 and 11, Township 12, and ti
portion of Section 35, Township 10, Kooterl
District, lying North of the C. P. R. ril
of way and West of the E. & N. Railu|
right of way in order that a sale of the
lands may be made to Henry L. Simons.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands|
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
January 5th, 1912.
jan 13 apll
COAST LAND DISTRICT
Range   I
TAKE notice tliat Archibald Dunbar Tal
lor, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Barristl
intends to apply for permission to purchal
the following described lands:—Commcncif
at a post planted on the east shore of Cl
dero Channel and about thirty chains norl
of Henry Point; thence cast 45 chains; thenl
north 30 chains to the south-west corner f
Lot -ji; thence north 40 chains along the li
of Limit 91 and thence west 45 chains mcj
or less to the shore of Cardero Gianni
thence south along the shore of Cardcl
Channel to point of commencement. J
Dated November 17th,  1911. 1
ARCHIBALD DUNBAR TAYLOR.]
Geo. Y. Hibberd, Agent,
jan.
dec. 2
VICTORIA  LAND DISTRICT
Districi of Sayward 1
TAKE notice that Frank H. Sager of Vk
toria, occupation Labourer, intends to appl
for permission to purchase the following of
scribed lands;—Conimencing at a post plant]
at the north-east corner of Section 23, J
Gorge Harbour, Cortes Island, Sayward Dj
trict, B. C., thence 40 chains soutl
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chaii
north; thence 40 chains cast to point ■
commencement, containing 160 acres, mo
01  less.
Dated   6th   December,   1911.
FRANK  H.  SAGER.I
dec. 30 mchl
NOTICE
MAIL CONTRACT
Rural Mail Delivery
Sealed Tenders, addressed to the Postmaster
General, will be received at Ottawa until noon,
on Friday, the 23rd February next, for the
conveyance of His Majesty's mails, on a proposed contract for four years, six times per
week, for Rural Mail Delivery on a circular
route starting at and ending at Victoria via
the Cadboro Bay and Mount Tolmie Roads,
commencing from the Postmaster General's
pleasure.
A map showing in detail the route to be
travelled can be seen at the office of the
undersigned.
Printed notices containing further information as to conditions of proposed contract
may be seen, and blank forms of tender
may be obtained from the Post Offices of
Victoria, Willow Park, Mount Tolmie and at
the office of the undersigned.
E. H. FLETCHER,
P. O. Inspector.   *
Post Office Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., 5th January,  1912.
Jan. 20 feb. 3
NOTICE is hereby given that an applicl
tion will be made to the Legislative Asscmbl
of  the   Province  of   British   Columbia  at  il
next   session   for   an   Act   granting   to   tim
Right  Reverend  the  Lord  Bishop of Colunl
bia,   the  Venerable  the  Archdeacon  of  Vaff
couver,  the Honourable  Paulus  Emilius  Iri
inft. Alfred Cornelius Flumerfelt, George . __
Kirk   and   Cuyler   Armstrong   Holland,   conl
monly  known as the  Trustees of the Chrisl
Church Trust Estate more ample and dclinitl
powers of dealing with the lands and propertl
vested in  or  held by them  as such  truste<|
and   in   particular   power   to   sell,   exchang;
lease and mortgage and otherwise dispose 1'
all the said lands and property and to app!
and use all monies produced thereby and a
lands  received  by exchange  to  aud  for  ar
of the purposes of the trusts without rcspet
to the source from which the same may ha\|
been obtained or tp the particular trust upcj
whicii lands given in exchange may havc bet
held but that such powers shall only be e:
erciscd   respectively   upon   the   written   co:
sents  of parties  interested  therein and  upc
the   conditions   to_ be   more   particularly   si
forth in the petition to bc presented to tl]
said Legislative Assembly upon the said appl
cation   and   in   particular   that   none   of   tl
powers  of  the  Trustees  shall  be  exercisabl
by less than three Trustees acting togethel
and further that the Trustees may be at litien
to invest the trust funds upon lirst mnrtgag'
of   realty   situate   in   British   Columbia,   ai
that   all   lands  of  which   thc   Trustees   sha
be registered as owners or entitled to be regi
tered as such at the time vested.
Dated the 28th day of December,  1911.
CREASE & CREASE,
Solicitors for the Applicants.*
Jan. 20 feb.
NAVAL SERVICE OF CANADA
Schooner for Pacific Coast Survey
SEALED TENDERS, for thc design arl
construction of the above Schooner delivers
as early as practicable free of all chargl
at Esquimalt Dockyard, B.C., will be rcceivil
hy the undersigned up to noon on 15J
February.
General _ particulars and outline prints fj
guidance in tendering may be obtained frof
the Officer in Charge, H.M.C. Dockyard, E|
quimalt.
Tenders should be accompanied by a cerl
tied cheque for $500 payable to the Dcparl
ment of the Naval Service as a guarantif
that work wiwll be undertaken if the contra|
is awarded,
G. J. DESBARATS,
Deputy Minister the Naval Service.
Department of Naval Service, Ottawa.
Jan. 27 feb.I THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
Character by Handwriting
The Editor of The Week wishes
:o call special attention to this Department, which is conducted by an
English gentleman, a 'Varsity man of
ligh attainments. Character reading
rom hand-writing is a scientific
itudy, entirely devoid of charlatanism
md is possibly the most reliable in-
iex of all, because hand-writing re-
ords the development of character,
nd its index is not confined to na-
ural traits. It is an interesting
tudy, not merely in enabling us to
ee ourselves as others see us, but
lay be turned to important account
submitting the hand-writing of per-
ons with whom we have business returns. Indeed, viewed in this aspect,
is only a reasonable precaution to
am all that the chirographist can
11 us. Before deciding to institute
is Department the Editor of The
leek imposed the severest tests, sub-
itting the hand-writing of well-
lown persons entirely unknown to
gentleman conducting this De-
rtment, who is a stranger to Vic-
ria and a recent arrival. He is pre-
red to guarantee absolute accuracy
d hopes that the readers of The
eek will avail themselves of what
a genuine privilege.
RULES
i. All persons wishing to consult
rau" must enclose a specimen of
nd-writing, consisting of not less
an six lines written in ink on lined paper. A portion of a letter is
uch better than copied matter. It
ay be signed with their own name
• not, but there must be an initial
■ nom-de-plume to identify the
lswer, which will appear in the next
sue of The Week.
2. Each specimen of hand-writing
ust be accompanied by a P. O. for
)  cents.    Stamps   will  not  be  ac*
:pted, and the outside of the en-
:lope should be indited "Hand-writ-
g."   Absolute privacy is guaranteed.
REPLIES
B. W.—I do not consider you to have a
ell developed artistic sense. Vou are im*
ilsive, erratic and a trifle inconsistent. Very
.nerous and kind-hear,ted, you arc inclined
i extravagance. Acquisitiveness is indicated,
Lit coupled with lavish expenditure. You
ave a clear head, you are a good and fluent
jeaker, with imagination, and should write
jly. A clever advocate, you make your
aints well. Although well read and fond
[ literature you arc fond of sport, hunting
it' shooting. A tactful critic, and at times
.onomical with truth. Energetic, an organ-
ier, bright, cheerful, and fond of a good jest,
loral sense is not high, but you are not
lean in any way.
MOSES—Your artistic sense is fairly de-
eloped, more musical than with brush and
ten. You are on the whole sanguine, but
able to fits of depression; sense of humour
good. You are critical, sometimes caustic,
id inclined to be cynical. Your mathema-
c.il sense is poor, but there is a leaning
(Wards some other views, possibly chemistry,
'ill-power is weak, ambition is poor and I
ate a lack of steady effort. I judge you
i be capable of hard work, but not steady
ork. You are observant, imaginative and
lould tell a good tale. You are not stingy
.tt rather inclined to the opposite.
ANONYMOUS.—An interesting study,
lie writer, though no longer young, has still
keen and vivid interest in life. With fair
icrgy, she is a good and capable housewife,
is i\ good clear head, ample common sense,
areful yet not mean, she is precise and
ethodical. Deeply affectionate, fond of
Jung people, hospitable, a bright, cheery
jstess. Moral and religious feeling are both
:ry high; she is candid and straightforward
:t tactful and sparing of her indignation, un-
I fish and self-sacrificing.    Jealousy, a vague
nse of justice and some lack of charily
ar an otherwise noble character. Sorrow
id trials have nearly effaced the minor human
aits describable in hand-writing. Tlie spe-
men is that of one who has suffered,
POLONIAS—Thank you for your letter
id quotation. Here is your character. You
ive decided latent artistic talent, cultivate
You are persevering *nd plodding. Al-
ough you havc lead an outdoor life you
e fond of reading and study. You are
ireful, neither mean nor extravagant. Not
.ry affectionate, you are withal a good
iend. You have a distinct athletic tend-
icy for gymnastics; running or boxing you
ould be good at. You are sincere, hon-
irable,  upright  and  just.     Thc  approbation
others is desired, your will-power is good,
id your moral sense is extremely high.
NOTA BENE—You have a pretty good
union of yourself and you arc inclined to
>se at times; will-power is good, you are
eady and consistent, neat and methodical,
ou are honourable and open, and very
dependent, Distinct mathematical power is
dieated,  it  requires  cultivating.    You  have
nice taste in dress and manners. Moral
nse  is  high  and  religious  feeling well  de
veloped.    No  sign  of  jealousy but  you  are
inclined to  be selfish.
L. D.—I hope you will not be disappointed;
this is what I see: Very little artistic sense,
you are somewhat careless and inclined to
inaccuracy; self-esteem is quite marked, also
egotism. You are narrow in your views, and
apt to judge other people severely. Willpower is good, temper is strong but controlled by caution. You are not rash, weighing the consequences before you act. On
the whole you are optimistic. You are
capable of a strong affection. Yours is by
no means a weak character. You should be
mathematical and your moral sense is fair.
B. E.—I'm so glad you like skating, so do
I. I judge you have a broad mind, somewhat hampered by petty and sordid details.
You are upright and conscientious, fond of
home life, affectionate and well disposed towards others. ' You have a good business
head and a clear mind, but you are apt
to allow others to control your better judgment. Will power is fair but you are weak
at times. You are not averse to the opposite
sex, yet you are retiring and quiet. You
are fond of society and possess imagination,
and originality. Town life appeals to you
more than country, you like travelling.
W. J. K.—You are careful and precise, your
artistic sense is good, but without executive
ability of any degree. You are energetic
with a fair amount of ambition. You have
good self control and you are reliable and
consistent. Narrow in your views, you are
inclined to be dogmatic and intolerant. Logic
is not your strong point. You are faithful
and loyal to your friends and to those who
employ you. Justice is marked but not cultivated.
T. B. E.—You are quite right. Age has a
good deal to do with handwriting, so that
I can give more accurate results if I have
roughly the age of the writer. You are
not very artistic, but you possess good taste
in most things. Although you have a strong,
hasty temper, you soon control it. You are
generous yet careful and not extravagant.
Energy is good, ambition not strong. Justice
and honour are clearly marked. You have
an eye for detail, you are observant and
imagination. You are fond of good literature,
appreciate a funny tale, and you are interested
in outdoor sports.
PSI, VICTORIA—Unfortunately "Sigma"
has not sent his specimen to me, and I
cannot hold your character back. I hope you
recognize your new nom-de-plume. I should
say that you are distinctly artistic with latent
possibilities in that direction. You are energetic and ambitious. Bright, cheerful and
fond of society, you are popular and make
many friends. You are accurate and methodical, a good business man and should do well
in life. Affectionate and attracted to the
opposite sex. Your will power is fairly
strong, temper moderat \ sense of justice is
good. You arc inclined to spend, yet you
make ' money.
PARASITE.—What a pleasant nom-de-
plume! Correspondents have suggested
"Sphinx" and "Sibyl," and now you happen
along, with "Tauler! Why not? Simply because I'm just "Tau," Isn't Ihat good enough?
My respect for the "ag^d" prevents me from
echoing your remarks anent yourself, and
now, after this preamble, here's your character: You are cynical, sarcastic, and a wee
bit pessimistic; these traits, however, covering a warm heart. You are impulsive, apt to
be inaccurate and you are no schemer. Though
you have tact, you often discard it, thereby
wounding thc feelings of others; perceiving
this you make amends at once. There is a
queer vein of cruelty or hardness in your
character; this enables you to appreciate
practical jokes on others. You are a person
of moods and give way to them. You have
a good idea of your own importance and
how to emphasize it. You are energetic and
capable of life-long affection and love, and
also of life-long hatred, hi a word you are
a staunch friend, loyal to thc last, and a hitter
enemy.
CHIEF—You have a fair artistic sense, and
you should be able to draw, having an excellent idea of form and value. Somewhat
egotistical, your will is not over strong, and
I consider you lack ambition. You are both
patient and persevering, tactful and capable
of finesse, distinctly a worker and you are
capable of taking a good deal of trouble
with your attempt. Honourable, straightforward and consistent, you are not extravagant
nor are you likely to give way to excess in
any form. You arc anxious to be popular,
and stand well with other people. You are
sensitive and somewhat given to worry, I
must congratulate you on your excellent copperplate writing. I hope I have not been
"severe" with you, but just.
H. M. H.—Certainly, you appreciate artistic beauty, whether animal or still life, you
should draw or paint a little. Impulsive and
a bit thoughtless you are affectionate and
kind-hearted. Not very observant, you are
apt to bc a little slipshod and inaccurate.
Your energy and ambition are both weak.
You are inclined to dream. Religion and
moral sense is distinctly high. Rather careless about money, yet you are not extravagant in any way. You are sensitive and self-
conscious, and apt to be guided too much
by others, Be more independent but not
obstinate. Temper is equable. Some jealousy,
much charity, and a fair "sense of justice make
up what is a fine, if somewhat lethargic,
character.
TAU.
Gossip from ithe Stalls
(Continued from Page 3)
to the banquet and delighted all present with their magnificent voices.
Mr. Roberts was introduced to many
of the distinguished guests and among
others the former Premier of Canada.
The Choir will be at the Victoria
Theatre Thursday, February 8th.
Bluebell Will Resume
As a result of the visit to Nelson
last week of French capitalists heavily interested in the big Bluebell mine
at Riondel, that noted property will
resume operations tomorrow with a
considerable force of men.
Who is McCormick
Although the life stories of Jenny
Lind, Christine Wilson, Adelina Patti and in our day, Nellis Helba,
aboirtid with many elements of the
unexpected, the sensational and the
romantic, there is no other instance
of a man singer having so suddenly
sprung from the musical unknown to
edward Mccormick in   martha"
universal fame within so brief a
space as the rise of John McCormick.
Athlone in the County Westmeath,
a quaint old Irish town overlooking
the Shannon and not so many miles
from Tara, the scene of Erin's ancient
story of which young McCormick so
feelingly sings, was the place of his
birth and the date was June 14th,
1884.
No member of his family had
shown any marked predilection for
the science of music, though after the
fashion of the average Celt they arc
deeply touched by its .soul, and when
John early began to make use of
his melodic gifts, he received ample
encouragement in the praise and sympathy of his kindred and his friends.
His early education was followed
under the direction of the Narist Brothers at Athlone, and his aptitude for
edward Mccormick
modern languages, the classics and
especially the ology, led to the belief
that the priesthood would be his
chosen vocation. With this possibility under serious consideration, he
eventually proceeded to Sligo College
where his love for music grew apace,
and where in 1893, he delighted his
master, Professor Delany, by winning
a music exhibition valued at $100.
Thence on the ideal of an ecclesiastical career lessened its appeal and in
1900 when he again won a scholarship
al his college, this time worth $300,
his dreams of future activities centred themselves in the realm of music,
and took definite shape when he made
his first public appearance at thc
Town Hall, Sligo, during that year.
In 1901 further music scholarship
valued   at   $100,   fell   to   young   Mc-
Every Woman Will Eventually
Vote for GOLD DUST
Every woman in this broad laid should have her rights
—should do less work—should use more GOLD DUST.
The woman who now uses GOLD DUST perhaps
limits its use to one or two things—washing dishes or
cleaning floors. She should extend its aid to every form
of household cleaning. (See package for the hundred and
one things it's good for.)
The woman who doesn't use GOLD DUST is in a sad
way. She is doing more work, and making it harder far,
than is necessary. GOLD DUST will relieve her of all
the hard part of rubbing and scrubbing because it will do
that part of the task itself, and leave her time for other of
her manifold duties.
Buy a package of
GOLD DUST today,
and learn why every
woman will eventually
vote for it.
GOLD DUST is sold in
Wo size and large packages. The large package
offers greater economy.
V;*^i*X^5l«iWVs=-
'•Lit the GOLD DUST TWINS
do sour work"
Made by THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY,   -   -
Makers of FAIRY SOAP, the oval cake.
Montreal
What you want, the way you want it
Afternoon Tea, Dainty Luncheons,
Special Teas for parties by arrangement.    Do not forget—We always
keep on hand guaranteed
New Laid Eggs.
The TEA KETTLE   1119 douglas st.
MISS M. WOOLDRIDGE, Proprietress        Opposite the Victoria Theatre
Cormick, who had become intensely
interested in the "Feis Cocil" competition at Dublin, for whicii he was
prepared and encouraged by Vincent
O'Brien of that city. After the public
appearance at the Sligo concert, at
which thc old cook of Symmerhill
College was among the audience and
plainly reprimanded him for "singing
Trish songs in English," his popularity rapidly extended and there was
abundant praise for his voice and his
manner of singing the ancient national
airs.
A patriot, loving his country vvith
tenderness and pride, his dearest ambition is to see Ireland take her place
among the nations of the earth and
it is because of this patriotism that
he can infuse into, his rendering of
Irish songs, a spirit, an undefinable
something that baffles the effort of
all other artists, and places this
young opera star on a pinacle by himself.
Meanwhile young McCormick
worked on with great industry, perfecting himself in French and Italian
and doing everything possible to improve his vocal technique and broaden
his conception of the art.
Before completing his twentieth
year, the young minstrel was invited
to visit the St. Louis Exposition as
a representative Irish musician and
it was there he became engaged to
the lady who is now his wife, Miss
Lillian Foley, a charming colleen, to
whom he had been introduced by the
veteran baritone, William Ludwig,
and who in many respects suggests
Mrs. McCormick is herself an accom-
Mrs. McCormack is herself an accomplished musician and their two little
children, Cyril and Gwendoline, already give indications of musical
heritage.
New Ferry for Kootenay River
The petition which the residents of
the valley sent to the government
authorities requesting that the ferry
across the Kootenay river to be kept
in operation has brought more than
was requested, says the Creston Review.    The  ferry  will  not  only  be
Rubber
Brushes
as Complexion
Beautifiers
Made of the purest Para
Rubber, and highly recommended by skin specialists.
Used daily on the skin, they
produce a normal GLOW OF
YOUTH, stimulating the
pores to proper activity, whicii
is the secret of clear, bright
and elastic skin.
Thick 35c
Cyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450
Roy'i   Art   Glial   Workl   and   Start
915 Pandora St.,   Victoria, B. C.
Albert F. Roy
Over   thirty   yeari'  experience  in
Art  Clan
LEADED   LIGHTS
Sole manufacturer oi Steel-Cored Lead
for   Churchei,  Schools,   Public   Building! and private Dwelling!.   Plain and
Fancy Clan Sold.   Saihei dated by
Contract.    Estimate!   free.    Phone 394
kept running throughout the winter,
but a new one to take the place of
the old scow now in use will soon be
constructed at Nelson. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
Mrs. M. Dudley, from Seattle, is a
guest at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. H. A. Ross is visiting friends
in Vancouver and Comox.
•t*      Ht      *
Mr. A. A. Cox, of Vancouver, was
a guest in  town  this week.
* *      *!*
Mr. J. R. Hull of Kamloops is the
guest of friends in the city.
* *   *
Colonel R. E. Montgomery, of
Quatsino, was registered at the Empress  duritife the  week.
* *   *
Mrs. E. E. Welsh and Miss Welsh
from Vancouver, were staying at the
Empress during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Gregory, of
Princeton are making a brief visit to
Victoria.
* *   *
Mr. David Haugh from Calgary is
stopping at the Dominion hotel for a
few days.
*-**   *   $
.Mrs. Rebbeck from Vancouver, is
thc guest of Airs. O. M. Jones, Oak
Bay' *    *    *
* -I*     *
Mr. A. T. Parry from Duncan, B.C.,
was in town for a few days during
the week.
* *    'M
Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Mather of Vancouver, have been staying at the Empress Hotel.
* *   *
Mr. F. L. King, from Seattle, was
a   guest   recently   at   the    Empress
Hotel.
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
Mr.   Sidney   Terise   and   Miss   Lena
Morrison, both of Victoria, B.C.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. T. W. B. London, of
Vancouver,   are  visiting  in   Victoria,
and are staying at the Empress Hotel.
* #   *
Mrs. James Raymur and- Miss Ne-
veda Raymur* are enjoying a short
visit to Southern California.
Miss L. A. Hall of Vancouver-was
registered at the Dominion Hotel during the ■week.'***. *    ''*.-*..    _ .   .   .
* *   *
• Mr. and Mrs. Harry Davis have returned from their honeymoon and are.
leaving shortly for their hortie in the
Okanagan.
Miss'Bridgiiian has returned from
a pleasant visit with friends in Kamloops.       .       • ■*
* *   *
The engagement is announced of
MisS Beatrice Spalding and Mr.
Bruce Irving, son of Mr. Justice Irv-'
ing, of this city. ■**.!
•  *   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Nixon of Thetis Island were in the city during the
week and were registered at the Empress Hotel.
■ ■* • *'   *
The engagement is announced in
Vancouver of Mr. Hugo Turner, second son of the.late Major and Mrs.
Turner, and Miss Hyde, both of Vancouver, B.C.
* *   *
On January i(itli the marriage was
celebrated of Mi99 Mary Alice
Meagher, second daughter of the late
Mr. John Meagher and of Mrs.
Meagher, Smith's Falls, Ontario, and
Mr. Robert Francis Fitzpatrick, of
Victoria, B. C, formerly of Lindsay,
Ont.
■ *   *   *
Mrs. Charles Meek was hostess last
week of a tnost enjoyable bridge
party, given at- her charming residence on Beach Avenue, in honour of
Mrs. Love, who is the guest of Mrs.
Ernest Henderson.'at Shaughnessy
Heights. The drawing room was
tastefully decorated for the occasion
with hot-house   flowers   and trailing
greenery.
...   * .*   *   •   •
Mrs. Curtis Sampson, at her charming residence on Newport Avenue
entertained a number of her friends
at a most enjoyable bridge party dur
ing the week. The house was charni
ingly adorned for the occasion with
dainty flowers and among those present were; Mrs. Patterson, Mrs. Rebbeck, the Misses Pitts, Mrs. Cecil
Cookson, Mrs. Gavin Hamilton Burns
Mrs. Hugo Beaven, Mrs. Robert Beaven, Mrs. E. Cross, Mrs. Combe, Mrs.
Crawford, Miss Drake, Mrs. Doull,
Mrs. Little, Mrs. Gillespie, Mrs. A
W. Jones, Miss Paula Irving, Mrs. 0
M. Jones, Mrs. W. E. Oliver, Mrs
Powell, Mrs. C. E. Pooley, Miss Pooley, Mrs. Loewen, Mrs. Rithet. Mrs.
Charles   Rhodes,   Mrs.   J.   H.   Todd,
Mrs. Tilton, Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. F.
Pemberton, Mrs. Punnett and others.
*   *   *
The following Canadian visitors
have registered their names at the
Canadian -High Commissioner's Office, 17 Victoria Street, London, S.
W.: R. Wilson Smith, Toronto; W. F.
Gibson, R. Jening, Jr., Vancouver)
Dr. J. and Mrs. Douglas Maclean,
Edmonton; Thos. C. Welton, Winnipeg; Charles Gore, Vancouver; T. T.
and Mrs. Chambers, Indian Head;
Mrs. A. Whitson, H. B. Brown, Toronto; J. D. and Mrs. Bell, Vancouver; Thos. J. and Mrs. White, Toronto; Dr. R. A. Turcot, Quebec; H.
D. Robinson, Prince Rupert; Mrs. W.
King, Truro, N.'S.; Mr. J. B. and Miss
Hamilton, formerly of Nova Scotia;
Mrs. Chandler, W. W." Fairall, St.
John; E. M. Parker, Toronto; Mrs.
O. N. Parker, Saskatoon; Miss E.
Aldous, Madge M. McCullough, W.
A. Cameron, Winnipeg; Mrs. F. J.
Boswell, Banff; P. and Mrs. Stowing,
Peterboro; G. H. Corringham, Vernon, B, C.
— - *'"   *   *    *
Mrs. E. E. Blackwood, Linden
Avenue, was hostess on Tuesday, January 3rd, of a charming bridge party.
Those present were: Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. Crowe Baker, Mrs. Brett, Mrs.
Herbert Carmichael, Mrs. Freeman,
Mrs. W. S. Gore, Mrs. Alexander Gillespie* Mrs. A. Griffiths, Mrs. J. E.
GriIfith, Mrs. Griffin, Mrs. James Gaudin, Mrs. J. Hunter, Mrs. R. Heyland, Mrs. Harris, Miss Paula Irving,
Mrs. Kerr, Mrs. King, Mrs. Pearse,
Mrs. Phipps, Mrs. Peters, Mrs. Poo-
~ey, Mrs. Fleet Robertson, Mrs. Rismuller, Mrs. J. Rithet, Mrs. Charles
Rhodes, Mrs. Rithet, Mrs. J. Savage,
Mrs. J. II. Todd, Mrs. Tye, Mrs.
Tuck, Mrs. Lawson, Mrs. Charles
Todd. Mrs. Keith Wilson, Mrs. Rome.
Mrs. McCallum, Mfs. Campbell McCallum, 'and others. Mrs. Rismuller
was successful in winning the first
prize arid Mrs. Heyland the second.
A marriage of interest to Victorians was celebrated in St. John's
Church, Vancouver, B.C., on the evening, of Monday, January 22nd, when
Miss Ellen May Findlay, daughter of
Major and Mrs. James Findlay, was
married to Mr. Matthew Leonard Virtue, al.so of. Vancouver, formerly of
Woodstock, Ont. The bride who was
given away by her father, wore her
travelling costume, a smart brown
cloth tailored suit, with a smart
rench toque of brown velvet
trimmed with mink and a handsome
set of mink furs. She carried a beautiful bouquet of violets. Mr. James
Findlay, brother.of the bride, acted
as' best man. At the conclusion of
t.he ceremony which -was performed
by Rev. Leslie Pidgeon, the bridal
party adjourned to the home of the
bride's parents, 1428 .Robson Street,
where the intimate friends and relatives of the young couple gathered
to wish them all good cheer for their
future happiness. Later in the evening the bride and groom left on their
honeymoon trip to Seattle and Portland.
A NOTABLE FUNCTION
One of the most successful social
events of the season was the United
Charity Ball held at the Alexandra
Club last Wednesday evening, under
the direction of the Knights of
Columbus.
The following are the various committees responsible for the success of
this ball, and who deserve to be most
heartily congratulated in arranging
such a delightful fete; St. Joseph's
Hospital:—Mrs. Stuart Robertson,
Mrs. C. E. Wilson, Mrs. F. J. Fell.
Tuberculosis Society:—Mrs. G. L.
Foulkes, Mrs. H. A. Munn, Mrs. C.
J. Fagan. Jubilee Hospital:—Mrs. C.
W. Rhodes, Mrs/Hasell. Knights of.
Columbus:—Messrs. F. J. Sehl, J.
Hart, H. J. O'Leary, J. D. O'Connell,
A. B. Stewart, F. I. Doherty, M. B.
Cody, and L. J. Shanahan. Tile latter gentlemen were responsible for
the  commendable floor management.
The Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs.
Paterson, who attended, were officially received in the ballroom amid the
strains of the National Anthem, by
Hon. A. E. and Mrs. McPhillips. The
Lieut.-Governor and Mrs. Paterson
led off the honour set in the Lancers,
the first dance on the programme, after whicii followed a list of twenty-
three dances with encores. Supper
was served on the upper and lower
floors at small tables charmingly
decorated with narcissis ancl carnations.
The musical programme for thc
evening was under the management of
Mr. Bantley and was everything that
could be wished for. The floor was
also in perfect condition and the beautiful ballroom was thronged with
guests, amongst whom were: The
Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Paterson, who was gowned in a charming
costume of pale blue satin with an
overdress of gold net, fringed in
gold; Mrs. A. E. McPhillips, who
wore a graceful gown of soft white;
Mrs. C. S. Wilson, in an exquisite
gown of emerald green with touches
of crimson;' Mrs. Charles Geiger
wore a dainty shell pink dancing
dress; Mrs. C._ W. Rhodes in handsome toilette of black; Mrs. Sheridan
Bickers in an artistic gown of pale
blue with gold trimmings; Miss Doris
Mason wore a charming costume of
old rose; Miss Mason in dainty dress
of pale blue with trimmings of silver; Aliss Monteith looked smart in
black satin; Airs. Harry Pooley wore
a charming silver and black braided
costume with smart head dress; Miss
Rome in a dainty pink and white
dress; Miss Haggerty looked very
well in a pale pink costume; Airs.
Gus Gowen wore a striking gown of
pale pink with an overdress with bugle
trimmings; Miss. Sutton looked
smart in amber yellow; Mrs. B. J.
Perry in a pink chiffon costume
caught in with., dainty pink roses
round the knees, with this she wore
a Juliet cap. Among others present
were:*^lessrs. Kidgell, Taylor, Holt,
Fitz-W'illiams, Morfon Mason,? Roger
Monteith, Bromley, Darcy Martin,
Carewe Martin; Rothe, Arnold Raymur, E. Bolton, J. Bolton, and Aliss
Lillian* Holden , the Misses Angus,
Miss Wilkenson, Miss Gallagher, Airs.
Stelly, Aliss Mesher, Mr. Webb, Mr.
and Mrs. T. Monk,. Air. Charles Wilson, Mrs. Simpson, Aliss Thain and
others.  .
Canada's Farm Peers
Exodus from England of Many Members  of Well-known  Families
Canada is now awaiting an "Emi-
gation de Luxe," whicii is to take
place in the coming year. Several
members of the Peerage intend taking
up farming in Canada, in the Spring
and a large number of Peers will
make their annual tour of inspection
of their Canadian estates.
"The Daily Mirror" made enquiries yesterday and was supplied
with a long list of what are known
as "gilt-edged settlers" and "emigrants de luxe."
"We have enough titled people living in Canada or interested in the
country, to open up a House of Peers
of our own," said one of the leading
railway authorities, "and with a
Prince of the Royal Blood, the Duke
of Connaught, as Governor-General,
we have all the material to go ahead
and start a Colonial Kingdom.
The Duke and Duchess of Sutherland will take up their residence for
the coming autumn in their bungalow at Brooks, Alberta. It is a very
cosy little weather-board house in the
middle of his prairie holdings, and is
the first overseas ducal mansion ever
built. »
: Earl Grey keeps on his hunting
lodge in the Columbia Valley, B. C,
and Lord Aberdeen owns one of the
finest and most profitable fruit farms
of the Pacific slope—the Coldstream
Estate.
Loose Covers and Boat
Cushions
Leather Work and Special Designs
Made-to-order
E. S. STILES
AUCTIONEER tf VALUATOR
UPHOLSTERING, PACKING
& REMOVING
French Polishing
1109 Fort Street       Phone 2149
Chas. Hayward
President
Reginald Hayward
Sec'y-Treas.
F. Caselton
Manager
Phones 2235,   2236,   2237, 2238,   2239
The B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
(Successors to Charles Hayward)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
1016 Govt. St. Established 1867 Victoria, B. C.
Courts of Revision
VICTORIA ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
Revision, 1912, Assessment Roll
NOTICE is hereby given that a Court of Revision and
Appeal, under the provisions of the "Assessment Act, 1903," for
Esquimalt District, will be held at Price's Hotel, Parsons Bridge,
on Monday, January 29th, 1912, at 11 o'clock in the forenoon.
For Victoria City, of the above district, will be held at the
Assessor's Office, Parliament Buildings, on Tuesday, January
30th, 1912, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon.
Dated at Victoria, 10th January, 1912.
Thos. S. Futcher,
jan. 13 Judge of the Court of Revision and Appeal.
FOR SALE
SIXTY-THREE ACRES WATERFRONT on beautiful Salt Spring
Island, 14 acres cleared facing Pier Island; ordinary buildings; small
orchard; line spring; road right to gate; most magnificent view, and
vegetation two to three weeks earlier than elsewhere on Island;
splendid shooting and fishing on Island.    For full particulars apply to
JOHN C. MALLET
South Salt Spring
Lord Clanwilliam is one of our big
landlords, and, with the Hon. William
Cole, is interested in the Saskatchewan Investment and Land Company,
whicii owns thc leading hotel in Saskatoon. Both spend a lot of time ill
Canada.
Lord Hindlip is the landlord of a
wide extent of prairie and British
Columbia land, and Lord Beaborough
is interested in timber and lumber
trade.
Lord Sholto Douglas is, or was
until quite recently, fruit farming in
British Columbia, and the Earl of
Stanhope frequently visits the Dominion.
Amongst other members of the
Peerage who are interested in the
Dominion of Canada and the Province of British Columbia, either for
hunting or commercial opportunities,
are:—Lord Strathcona, Lord Lovat,
Lord Bruce, Lord Mostyn, Lord Vivian, Marquis of Graham, Lord Wen-
lock, Earl of Macclesfield, Lord Clinton, Earl of Dunmore, Earl of Har-
rowby, and Viscount Fort
The New Seed Store
Don't Delay. If you have not yet planted
your bulba, do so now. See us for Seeds
of All Kinds, Hardy Perennials, Rose Trees
Shrubs, Etc. TELEPHONE 2278
854 Yates St., Near Carnegie Library
due to modern legislation in Englam
and partly to the fact that Canad;
affords freedom and natural life un
obtainable in England.—"The Dail;
Mirror," London England, Decembe
28th, 191.1.
Dissatisfaction
It is rumoured that some dissatis
fied shareholders will begin sui:
against the Dominion Power c
Transmission company to force thj
company to pay passed dividends o:
preferred stock.
NOTICE
In thc Matter o( thc Victoria Canning Conl
pany  of  British  Columhia,   Limited  Eiij
1 •• - ■ bility.
Among  the   hew   settlers  is   Lor(h|***AKE* NOTICE that  a_ Meeting of tW
Soniers, who recently left the Life
Guards to go farming near Toronto,
and he is returning to England to
take out Lord and Lady Hyde, his
sister and brother-in-law, who are to
join him there.
Lord Leconfield's brother, Mr. Reginald Wyndham, is another settler.
The explanation of this titled exodus to Canada is explained as partly
Creditors of the above Company will h
held on Tuesday, fhe 9th day of Fcbruarj
1Q12, at the registered office of tlie compan*!
No. 1117 Wharf Street, in the City of Victoria
at the hour of eleven o'clock in the forenooi
AND TAKE NOTICE that the Crcditoi,
of the above Company arc required on
before thc 9th day of February, 1912, tj
send their names and addresses and tn
particulars of their debts or claims to th
Liquidator of the said Company, or in di|
fault thereof they will be excluded from thj
benefit of any distribution made before sue
debts are proved.
Dated this 25th day of January, A.D. 191
J. if. LAWSON,        j
Jan. 27 Liquidatoi THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27. 1912
11
Lecture on Robert Burns
By Dr. Scott
On Tuesday, January 23rd, the Rev.
Dr. Scott, of Vancouver, B.C., gave
m admirable and most delightful lec-
,ure on Robert Burns. After a few
yords of introduction from the Chair-
nan, Mr. Lindridge, Dr. Scott spoke
fs follows:
The great force of Burns is not a
[uestion of Charactcer, it is a gift of
lind and heart, because the poet is
essentially a man. He deals with
uman- life just as it is, and breathes
ito this life of ours his personal
enius.
The great poet becomes a vision,
voice   that   thrills   the   strings   of
motion.
It was George Meredith who said:
is we humans are to the brutes so
e  we  to  the  poets."    The  poets
e yourselves but expressed in your
eal, a mystical torch through time
he pours his soul out to all men's
uls, that and no more.   There is
e  whole  magic  of the  poet,  and
lien he sees visions we see them
o, the truths that all men pass by
d which we do not see or remem-
r are with poets the link of Time.
Now all this is essentially true of
bert Burns.   He had the heart of
arts,  he had the  scorn of scorn,
d above all he had the life of life,
e love of love.   His theology is the
sapproval of the unco-guid."   Right
ross the memorial page of his letter
written:   "Write  me  as  one  that
ves his fellow men."
Shelley   ancl   Keats   turned   away
om  man   to  the  ideals  of  ancient
reece.    They  were   disgusted  with
umanity.   Burns deals with men and
iman interests with fervour.   Here
once we have the great poet, the
al human individual soul that does
Dt wander   away   from    men.    He
irows himself into  the very hearts
men.
Burns moved men not because he
as a ploughman, but because of that
ire gift of expression. The reason
lat Burns is able to speak to other
len with such overwhelming power
because he is ten times more a
ian than they. He was a Scotch-
ian, but because he was so intensely
nd passionately human, his poems
re found in the library of the Stu-
ent ancl in the cottages of the peas-
nts. Now to me it is the question
if supreme interest, and I am sure
t will interest those here tonight to
:now what is the attitude of Bums to
eligion?
It has been defined as an attitude
f antagonism.    The songs he sang
0 not present a word, not one bitter
r   biting  word.     Did   he   ever   say
word or sing a verse against reli-
ion? It is against men who made
heir professions a cloak for hypo-
risy ancl wickedness that he declaims,
t is the very inmost spirit of reli-
ion that inspires Burns to write his
oem to the "Unco Guid" or the
ligidly Righteous.
He had no sympathy with the
/Titer who was so tremendously
rthodox and so uncommonly "guid"
hat even the doctrine of predestina-
ion was acceptable to him, and the
Drtures of those predestined to eter-
al misery called forth no other sen-
iment but "all for thy glory God"!
t was simply impossible for any man
nth a touch of humour to accept the
octrine after that, and you will re-
lember how the poem goes on too.
"he writer prays that his enemies
lay be crushed that he may reap his
emark from God, to whom he prays
Lord remember me and my ain folk."
fe is so good that if he gets the tem-
oral benefits for which he prays
e is willing to give the Almighty
11 the glory. That irony, that cle*
cious irony of it. The lack of re
gion  is not a lack  of religion  but
lack of humour.
The critics tell us "The Cotter's
aturday Night" is the religion of the
rthodox, not the religion of Burns
t all, but the religion of Burns'
ither. Had Burns been hostile to
eligion that poem would never have
een written at all. Were he an en-
my of religion how could he have al-
_red that note of personal conviction
1 "The Cotter's Saturday Night."
The   secret   of   Burns'   power   to
mch the hearts of men was his love
of reality. He sang of no fictitious
men ancl women but of realities, of
living men and women. Burns has
not merely touched the hearts of men
but he has set them afire with the
torch of his genius.
But tonight, I am here to deal with
Burns' attitude on religion. What
does Burns give as the key to joy, to
happiness to power? What does he
tell us: "It is no in wealth to purchase weel."
What is that but religion itself talking in its own native tongue?
But passing to another phase of the
subject altogether passing from man
to animals, it was left to Robert
Burns to sing. I would not say of
animals as other poets have done that
—with infinite pity and compassion
of the lowest animals of all. "The
Skylark, the skylark, is my little
brother, another poet has sung, losing
nothing indeed by allying himself
with the skylark, but what shall we
say of the man who could claim intimate fellowship with an ordinary common field-mouse?
He is not merely the intellectual
attitude of mind, his is the very soul
of man throbbing with more than
human feeling for the animals. You
will remember his famous description
of a snowy winter night when the
thoughts of men are turning to the
warmth of home and their own firesides, but where on such a night are
the thoughts of Burns. His pitying
thoughts turn to the field-mouse:
"Wee, slcekit, cowrin, tim'rous beastie,
Oh, what a panic 's in thy breastie!"
Is it not clear, is it not a'moral and
a spiritual law:
"He prayeth best, who ioveth best,
All things, both great and small, etc."
Nothing could have staggered
Burns more than to see the modern
Englishman's idea of sport, the cruel
hunting clown of the fox, pitiless torturing of a hare.
Burns has gone right to the heart
of wrong doing, and has shown us
the hardening process. Other people
may or may not find us out, he tells
us, but the deed itself finds us out
in the weakness of will that succeeds
the first downward step, in the hardening and petrifying of all noble feelings.
A critic has pointed out that in
these modern clays we are getting beyond Robert Burns. Well, frankly,
that is news to me! Burns' idea was
that the animal ought not to run from
man, but is it any wonder they do?
Why far from getting beyond Burns
we have not yet got to the level of
his spirit of reverence. There is a
reverence for that which is above us;
there is a reverence for that whicii
is beneath us. We. have reverence
for things above and on an equality
with us, but we are far from yet having a reverence for the things beneath
us.
How dare we speak of tllis century as being so highly civilized. We
may afford to do without fashion, we
can afford to do without sport, but
as long as we are made in the image
of God, we cannot afford to do without pity and sympathy. If the average animal could speak I think he
would look almost anywhere than to
man to realize his idea of God.
Many monuments have been raised
to the memory of Robert Burns, and
yet his detractors are many. Yes,
his faults were manyhe himself confessed them. I wish he had not done
so, that he had not bared his bosom
to the world. Had he not done so
he would have been spared the ruthless attacks of his detractors,
I am surprised at the want of charity, at the pitilessness of their judgments: "Oh, they say, Burns was not
a good man. Burns drank whisky."
But what if he did? Is Bums thc
only man who drank whisky. The
real Burns is the sincere poet. His
head ancl his heart were of the purest
gold. I have recently received from
the Old Country a paper dealing with
Burns, and that paper said that wc
were getting so civilized that soon
no one would understand Burns.
"How," it asks, "is it to be supposed
for one moment that Burns can endure?"   Burns answered that question
long ago in his poem: "The Brigs of
Ayr"   (Bridges of Ayr).    ,
One—the new bridge spick and
span and up-to-date, looks contemptuously at the old one and asks with
a sneer how it can hope to tide the
storms of the coming years.
The Auld Brig replies with spirit:
"Conceited gowk! puff'd up wi' windy pride!
This mony a year I've stood the flood an' tide;
And tho' wi' crazy *«ild I'm sair forfairn,
I'll be a Brig when ye're a shapeless cairn!
And so it will be with Burns. His
verses will remain living poems in the
hearts of men when many a new
poet's rhymes will have sung into
oblivion.
THE   CHORAL   SOCIETY
The fourth concert of the Choral
Society will be given in the Victoria
Theatre on Wednesday evening next,
the 31st inst., under the direction of
Mr. Gideon Hicks, the honorary-conductor of the Society.
For this, the first concert of the
present season, the society has been
fortunate enough to secure the distinguished patronage of His Honour
the Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs.
Paterson, the Hon. Richard McBride
and Mrs. McBride and His Worship
the  Mayor and Mrs.  Beckwith.
The society has practiced assiduously for over four months and judging from the finish displayed at the
two last rehearsals this concert promises to be thoroughly up to the very
high standard attained by the society
in previous ventures.
No long works will be given, the
concert will consist of a series of very
choice four-part compositions by
Mendelssohn, Charles Gounod, Sir
Edward Elgar, Sir C. H. H. Parry and
Lloyd.
The society will be assisted by-
Mrs. D. C. Reid, solo soprano, Mrs.
Gideon Hicks, solo contralto, Mr. A.
T. Goward, solo tenor, Dr. Nash,
violin, Mr. Bennett, violiucello, and
Miss M. Miles, A.R.C.M., piano.
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1216 Douglas Street, opposite
Sayward Blk.
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1912 Announcement
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Telephone 695
Victoria, B. C.
Phone 1366
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ST. FRANCIS HOTEL
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THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1912
it
Sotto Voce
The Week's Rumours and
Humours
(By The Hornet)
99
That it would bc a mighty convenient thing to have a public clock
near  the    Parliament    Buildings,  in
view of the harbour.
* *   *
That, as there are two very excellent  road   scrapers,   why  not   use
them?
* *   *
That the vacant escutcheons on the
facade of the Empress might have
some appropriate carving.
* *   *
That the scholar who spells
"Grocery" "Grocry" on a store in
Janies  Bay  is  not ashamed  to  sign
his work.
* *   #
That the artist (?) who has desecrated several acres of vacant wall
space in the city with the name of
a local paint might take a few lessons
in perspective;.
* *   *
That it is a mystery why the glass
doors on the B. C. E. R. cars are
painted over.
* *   *
a
That this  is  not  needed  in  other
countries.
That a city asphalt plant plus the
Canadian Mineral Rubber Co., plus
the Worswick Paving Co., will indeed
make things hum.
* *   *
That before the city incurs the expense of an Asphalt plant the Council
should investigate the state of the
Westrumite paving laid in Vancouver
street.
That it is claimed that this material
needs no plant and is nd plant.
* *   *
That Providence looks after fools
and children.
That the highly respectable merchant who gaily road a cycle round an
unlighted block the other night as
a proof of his liquor carrying capacity is an example of the fact.
* *   *
That in these days of building
when houses galore are rising on
every side, an eye should be kept on
the quality of material used.
* *   *
That apparently anything is good
enough to use as the skeleton of a
house providing a skin of shingle
and plaster is slapped on over it.
* *   *
That although Mr. Morley had a
Commission to report on the cost of
living, prices are going steadily up.
* *   *
That wages and salaries don't increase in proportion.
* *   *
That the visit of Forbes-Robertson
was an unqualified success in every respect.
* *   *
That hereafter he will be remembered as much for his personality as
his work.
That the Canadian Club honoured
itself by honouring such a man, and
did it in excellent style.
* *   *
That at the next joint luncheon, the
Lady President is going to give permission td smoke.
That the "Slavey" is responsible for
several broken hearts.
* *   *.
That Percy Burton is a "prince" of
managers, and a "peach" of a banker.
That if Mr. Robertson' does not
save a competency, it will not be Burton's fault. i
* *   *    .,
That after "The PasSer-by" it will
take several weeks to settle down to
the usual thing.
$   . # •--* _4c
That when the "Slavey" said that
they wvere "a rotten lot," she might
have been thinking of the average
play;
That Calve always was capricious,
but what can you expect of a Carmen? *   *   *
That she is said to be cavorting
at Monte Carlo with a well known
Victoria millionaire.
* *   *
That the Ladies'. Musical Society
did not bargain for this when they
booked the engagement, which shows
how little they know their own sex.
* *   *
That they have a splendid substitute in McCormick, who is said to resemble Caruso—in some respects.
* *   *
That the belligerent mood has
passed from the Council Chamber to
the Engineering Department.
* *   *
That it does not follow as a natural bourse that "might is right."
* #   *
That while a fighting parson is always popular, a fighting engineer
seems an anomaly.
* *   *
That in the present instance it may
turn out that he has been hoist by
his own petard.
%     >y     _)_
That even the worm will turn.
* *   *
That the trade pf the roadhouses
has fallen off fifty per cent since the
searchlight was turned on.
That if they were wiped out altogether none of them would be missed.
* *   *
That Smith's Hill Reservoir has
been empty for a month, and the repairs on the floor are not yet commenced. *   *   *
That meanwhile the water pressure
is not bursting any of the pipes.
* #   #
That the Water Commissioner is
taking a holiday, but the business of
the Department still goes on.
* *   *
That some recently appointed
heads of departments at the City Hall
have got "swelled head."
* *   *
That they would be well advised
to go easy for a little while, lest something worse befall them.
That a "swelled head" is better than
no head at all.
* *   *
That some people do not know
their friends when they meet them,
especially if the friend brings a word
of censure.
* *   *
That wc all kiss the hand that
throws us bouquets.
* *   *
That some members of the City
Police Force would do well to lay
this to heart.
* *   *
That the ex-Mayor would be a hornet in the nest if he told all he knew.
* *   *
That a Herald Street house, which
was built under his regime, was reopened this week.
* *   *
That what the police do not know
about this, and several other things,
would fill the shelves of the Carnegie
Library.
* *   *
That when they say The Week exaggerates they—exaggerate.
* *   *
That if there is a traitor in the
camp; the sooner the Chief turns him
out, the better.
* *   *
That if he wants to know his name,
he had better ask Ex-Ma3ror Morley,
who can probably inform him.
* *   *
That the City Police in Winnipeg
and Toronto have pensions. Why
not those in Victoria?
* *   *
That nine-tenths of them are deserving, and the black sheep could
be weeded out.
' *   *   *
That the City Medical Officer needs
an assistant, and ought to have one.
* *   *
That the frequent delays in securing medical attendance are not due to
his fault, but to the increase of work.
That the City Police are well drilled in ambulance work, but have not
been furnished with any equipment.
* *   *
That this is an omission which it is
difficult to account for.
That their instruction runneth no
to the . making   of bricks    withou
straw.
* *   *
That  Bobby  Burns was _.  Scot
man, and yet he was "a man for
that."
* *   *
That a large section of the com
munity toasted his memory on Thurs
day night.
* *   *
That so venerable a custom is n
likely to die out in our day.
* *   *
That the "wise virgins" of Vi<
toria are doing their best to aton
for the conduct of the "foolish vii
vins" of Vancouver.
* *   *
That it is hard to believe that tf
Sikh could look so different at a di
tance of only sixty miles.
* *   *
That the Imperial Authorities ha'
been asked to take a hand in tl
matter, and developments may short
be expected.
* *   *
That if Mr. Brewster's resoluti
on the Nivy Bill had been le
"adroit" it might have been accept
without amendment.
That in vain does the fowler spre
the net in  sight  of the  dickey-bi
That some candy-stores in town
business   under   the   title   of   "T
Palace of Delights."
.*   *   *
That the pseudonym has an Orient
flavour.
* *   *
That the new management of tl
Westholme Hotel is making good
"Hornet" anticipated.
* *   *
That as conducted now, the Son
hees Grill is the best supper rende
vous in town, but there is still roo
for improvement in the roller-tow
department.
THIS GREAT REMNANT CLEAR-
ANCE SALE is a CORKING EVENT
It is the House-Furnishing Event of the Season-An Event of the Greatest
Importance to  Every Single House-Furnisher in the City of Victoria
It's our house-cleaning event and your buying event. If your home needs things—if you've a home of your own in mind—here, friends, is the
opportunity for providing the furnishings. Just think of it—Remnants of Cretonne, Chintz and Denim .Prints! Lengths from 3 to 25 yards.
Remnants of Madras and All-over Curtain Nets from 2 to 9 yards. All-Lace Curtains, of which there are only one pair, at a sacrifice. These
Curtains are all grades, represent the best selling lines for the season. All odd lines of Table Covers, Doylies and Frilled Pillow Cases. All
reduced to ridiculously small prices to clear quickly. The savings thus offered are immense—they are truly remarkable. Add to this big inducement the  high  quality  of  our  goods,  and  you  will   appreciate  the importance of your early visit to this store.   We are expecting you today.
Best Assortment of Pots and Jugs
BIG SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED
By far the largest and best selection of Teapots and Jugs we have ever had the
pleasure of offering the public of Victoria or vicinity. Dozens of different
decorations and as many different shapes and sizes are offered, and it would be
an odd homekeeper indeed who could not be satisfied from this collection. We
have the smallest individual Teapots to the largest family Teapot. Coffee Pots,
Teapots and Hot Water Jugs. Dainty and big choice is about all we can say.
Come in and inspect them at your leisure.
This Store Open
till 9.30 To-night
The More You
Spend, The
More You
Save
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VICTORIA'S
Popular
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The Severest
Critics can find
no Fault with
our Goods

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