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Week Aug 8, 1908

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Array j Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
■Commission and Real Estate Agents.
167 Cordova St.        Vancouver. 3
Victoria Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
&g mrmnr -5 _ mnrvmnr roi «•« tv?
f.  Stewart WUUams Hilton Keith
I
E STEWART WILLIAMS*Co
£ AUCTIONEERS
E COMMISSION ANS
£> REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
jo   11 FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
<TQ Phone 1324 ff
Q&tSULtSUUUUULMJUUUULUULtSLm
fOL.  V.    No   2
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908
Onk Dollar Put Annum
It requires no great stretch
The City 0f fa imagination to accept
)f Doom. fa superstitious  belief  of
the Kootenay Indians tliat
I Hie Elk Valley is the playground of de-
nons, and Fernie a City of Doom. Thrice
n six years has the progressive and prosperous capital of the coal country been
overwhelmed with disaster. In May, 1902,
a terrible mine explosion destroyed one
lundred and thirty lives and plunged the
.ommunity into the profoundest sorrow.
Fernie became the centre of interest and
uf sympathy throughout the mining world,
md has never ceased to occupy a place in
;he thoughts of those who intently watch
he progress of the hazardous industry of
;oal mining'. In March, 1903, nearly the
vhole of the business section was destroyed
>y tire, the losses aggregating three-quar-
ers of a million dollars. The heaviest
losers were the pioneers who had labor-
Iously built up their various trades and
msinesses and found everything swept
iway, with very inadequate insurance.
..ow in 1908 comes the greatest disaster
If all, from a material standpoint, for prae-
ically the whole of the town is destroyed,
mly a few private residences and ten or
dozen miners' cottages remain, if one
Ixcepts the cement block in which the Coal
Company's offices are established and
vhich stands in the centre of a large
quare. The gross loss in Fernie alone
annot be less than $2,000,000, and a con-
ervative estimate of the damage in the
urrounding country, chiefly to lumber,
laces it at $7,000,000. The latter is the
lore serious aspect of the case since it
leans the destruction of the raw material
ipon which a great industry depended, and
Perme is thus deprived of one of its chief
ources of revenue. No one who knows
fernie is surprised at what has happened,
ne pioneers always expected the city to
e wiped out and those who were accus-
omed to conditions in the West have always maintained that it would be subject
recurring fires until the surrounding
Iiountain slopes were stripped of timber,
'he configuration of the Elk Valley ren-
ers this almost a certainty. It is nar-
ow, throughout, the Elk Kiver has bur-
owed a course like a thread for nearly
hundred miles, and the Kanges of the
Iiockies rise precipitously almost from the
rater's edge. It is a known fact that the
alley forms a kind of funnel, and that
he wind invariably blows either up or
Jlown, rarely across; at times it blows
iercely, even in summer clays. Not a year
ias passed since the establishment of the
Jity in 1897 but there have been serious
iiish fires enveloping the valley in smoke,
nd always threatening to overwhelm the
■^habitants. Mr. William Fernie truly
ays that the only safety lay in surround-
ng the town with a broad cleared belt,
f this could have been done ten years
go it might have held all the bush fires
11 check, but it would have been an ex-
I'emery difficult and expensive operation.
•,'hen one remembers that the destructive-
ess of a bush fire depends upon the velo-
ity of the wind; and that when the fire
cached Fernie last week a tornado was
■aging it would be almost impossible to
efine the limits of a safe clearing. Sparks
lave been known to carry half a mile, and
fnyone who has watched the progress of
bush lire can testify to the fact that new
ires will start up hundreds of yards in
idvance of the main fire.   If -Mr. Fernie's
EDITORIAL
suggestion has any value it is for other
Western towns which have not been overtaken by the fire fiend.    Fernie at terrible cost is now protected by miles of
devastated country.    Three things stand
out conspicuously from the disheartening
record of Fernie's disaster.   The heroism
and resourcefulness of  its  citizens,  the
widespread  sympathy  aroused,   and  the
prompt and generous contributions for the
relief of the sufferers.    In all these respects Fernie comes very near to establishing a record.   It is much too early yet
to learn the details of that terrible clay,
but enough has leaked out to show that
the citizens of Fernie set an example to
the world in the courage, coolness ancl
energy which they displayed.    It is marvellous, when the circumstances are considered, that fewer than twenty lives were
lost out of at least six thousand threatened.
\\ ith flames of fire leaping from building
to building quicker than men could enter
and return, with a belt of fire feeding
upon dried bush ancl lumber surrounding
them, and with a raging wind to fan the
flames and carry on the work of destruction at lightening speed it is nothing short
of miraculous that fatalities have not to be
recorded   by   the   hundred.     That  such
would have been the case but for the
splendid qualities displayed by the citizens
is abundantly clear.    The railway men
who  assembled and manned  trains and
rushed their living freight between walls
of fire to a place of safety have earned
undying fame, and one cannot think without a thrill of admiration of the brave
telegraph operator who shouldered his instrument and tramped literally through
the fire from Hosmer to Fernie, cutting
in on a wire and reeling off his message
to the outside world ensuring prompt succor.    His name has not even leaked out
but he is a hero, and men have received
the Victoria Cross for less glorious deeds.
The telegraphic reports all unite in praising Mayor Tuttle, who rose to the occasion, and with Mr. AV. K. Koss simply
spent himself  in superhuman efforts to
protect life and relieve suffering.    When
the full story is told it will be found that
these men but represented hundreds of
others ancl illustrated what will ever hereafter be known as "the Fernie spirit"
which   within   forty-eight   hours  of   the
direst   catastrophe   commenced,   for   the
second time, to rebuild their city literally
upon the still burning and smoking ashes
of its ruins.    Fernie may have been unfortunate, if may be situated in a fatal
valley, it may be designated a City of
Doom, but as long as "the Fernie spirit"
survives it can never be destroyed.    Disaster instead of creating pessimism arouses
in its citizens the sublimest optimism, and
the world is the richer for the moral influence of a people who meet disaster with
a brave heart, and refuse to see anything
in the future but hopefulness ancl success.
The B, C. Contingent which
Picnicing at attended the Quebec Ter-
Quebec. centenary must have had a
veritable picnic, if one may
credit the accounts of those who have returned alive. As an illustration of "how
not to do it" it would be difficult to find
anything more enlightening than the conduct of those who had charge of the expedition. The Militia authorities at Ottawa have not been singularly happy in
their treatment of the Fifth Keginient for
some time past, but they evidently resolved
to make up for all shortcomings on the
Quebec trip. Thus, before the contingent
started the members were promised an allowance of $1.50 a day whilst en route,
instead of which when the contingent left
\\ innipeg the Militia authorities took the
catering into their own hands, aud in lieu
of the $1.50 a day supplied three very
inferior meals, for whicli the men had to
pay 50 cents each, whether they ate or not.
As some of these meals consisted of bread
and jam, the authorities did not err on the
side of extravagance. One day the bread
supply ran out and only by dint of their
superior knowledge of arithmetic did the
authorities manage to feed twenty-two men
on eighteen slices of bread. This bread
and jam school boy treatment aroused intense amusement among the other contingents and the B. C. Troup was dubbed
"Laurier's Own." The climax was reached
when the invitations for the military ball
aud other functions at Quebec were issued.
Unfortunately the B. C. Officers failed to
catch the Speakers' eye, ancl Col. Hail, in
spite of the fact that he was commander
of all the forces west of Winnipeg, as well
as Adjutant Stern and other B. C. Oihcers
were completely ignored. No wonder that
on the return journey the contingent was
a little downspirited and gave vent to its
feelings in a sign conspicuously displayed
on the outside of the Colonist car. It ran
as follows: "British Columbia boys returning from Quebec, weary, worn and
starved by the Laurier Government." This
is not the first time that the Militia authorities have proved their inability to cope
with the simplest demands of the Militia
service, but it is as discreditable to them
as many which have preceded it.
Mayor Hall has returned
The Water from j,is Eastern trip and
Question. has signalized his re-entry
into Municipal affairs by
excluding the press from the deliberations
of the Council on the water uestion, which
is by far the most important topic of discussion at the present time. Mayor Hall
is resentful of criticism and declares that
in the East it is not customary for citizens
to find fault with thc conduct of those who
are intrusted with the management of civic
affairs. He takes comfort from the fact
that other cities have tlieir water problems,
and apparently considers that because
Montreal or Toronto is prepared to put
up with bad water, A'ictoria should be
grateful that it may follow suit. Even if
Mayor Hall were correct in his facts it
does not follow that his deduction would
be accepted. But alas for Mayor Hall's
facts, in the Montreal Daily Star of
August the lst is a most critical and condemnatory letter by a well known citizen,
Mr. A. E. Alexander, in which he rakes
the Council over in good style, blames
thein for their supineness and neglect,
points tn the ease of Manchester which
neglected the same thing until its citizens
rose in arms against the continued use of
"dish-water" ancl compelled the Council to
carry out a project for bringing pure water
from lakes two hundred miles distant. So
that Mayor Hall is entirely in the wrong
in supposing that the citizens of Montreal
are any less critical of thc misdoings of
their Council than the citizens of Victoria.
No one wishes to hamper the Council or
obstruct the progress of any scheme which
will relieve the water situation, but it is
difficult to obstruct a thing which is not
moving, and public confidence will not he
strengthened by the decision of the Mayor
to keep it in the dark upou a matter which
will very soon demand independent action
on the part of the City, Whilst on this
subject it may be as well to point out that
the colonist is in error in stating that the
Water Commissioner has power to demand
a supply from the Esquimalt Waterworks
Co. on statutory ternis. If the Colonist
will study the charter it will find that such
a demand can only be made when the City
is in a position to prove that its present
source of supply is "inadequate for its
population." Everybody but the City
Council believes this to he a fact, but unfortunately that astute body backed up by
the expert opinion of Mr. Adams maintains that Elk Lake is adequate for a population of 45,000 to 50,000, a considerable
advance upon the present population of
\ ictoria. Fortified by this opinion it will
be difficult for the Council to make its
demand upon the Esquimalt Waterworks
Co. Perhaps the Colonist will look into
this, and as it is anxious to elucidate the
subject to the fullest let the public have
tne benefit of its researches.
On Thursday last thc
The Victoria Victoria Musical Society
Musical Society,    held its annual meeting.
The officers, aud in particular Mr. Geo. Phillips, the Director,
must be congratulated on the splendid report handed in. In spite of large fees
paid to such world renowned artists as
Paderewski and Kubelik, there is a surplus of nearly $1,000, which will enable
the Committee to make the most attractive
engagements for the ensuing season. The
Society has demonstrated its usefulness
and as it aims not only at furnishing enjoyment to the public but at promoting
musical taste and the teaching of music in
our schools it has a double claim for support upon all who value culture ancl art.
The membership is now upwards of six
hundred, ancl if it could be raised to a
thousand, as it should, there is no limit
to the possibilities of the very highest class
musical entertainment in Victoria.
When there are so many
Coming Back complaints from English
To Marry.        people   who   settle   in   the
Northwest, it is encouraging to run across the ease of at least one
girl who although gently nurtured enters
into the breezy spirit of the West and
learns to tackle the business of life in the
right spirit. After spending two years
with her brother on a ranch in the Cypress
Hills, she has gone home to buy her wedding trousseau, and will shortly return 'to
keep house for someone else." She winds
up a most interesting letter in the London
Daily Mail with the following paragraph
which cannot be too widely circulated for
the benefit of girls who are disappointed
because they came west for a perpetual
holiday:—"Many English girls go out as
wives to Canada with romantic ideas of
roughing it on the prairie with "dear
Harry.' But when they come lo the practical work of washing 'dear Harry's' shirts
and cooking his meals, the romance is apt
to fade, and only a disappointing commonplace is left! Every woman who goes out
to the Wesl must make up her mind to
hnd her sole happiness and joy in her home
surroundings, and she must be both able
and willing to lead a life of hard work
and self-sacrifice.' THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, i»o8.
At The Street   *
Corner a
p By THB LOUNOER _P
ty*J^/»t\r~*%n _ »ee)fr-fJ%/*p
I strongly deprecate the criticism
which has been levelled at the defenceless head of Aid. Richard Hall
in connection with the notorious dog
by-law. People of all sorts and conditions have seen fit to unburden
themselves in the columns of the daily
press all because the worthy Alderman, finding himself the proud possessor of a pet idea, clung to it with
the proverbial tenacity of the British
bull-dog. Surely the last person to
denounce him for exhibiting one of
the most characteristic traits of tlieir
favourite animal should be dog lovers.
Further, I am not sure -that all
who have written on the subject are
familiar with the genesis of the idea.
Consideration for the feelings of Aid.
Hall prevents me from elucidating
this point further than to say that on
a certain morning not many weeks
ago he might have been seen performing a decidedly humble but necessary chore at the entrance to his
office as a consequence of that degeneracy in the canine race so bitterly yet withal humourously decried
by one Launce of Shakespearean
memory.
No wonder that the ire of Alderman Hall was aroused, and yet it
was more in sorrow than in anger
that he vowed then and there to protect his fellow citizens and the business men of Government street from
a similar distressing contretemps. In
spite of the bitter criticism" with which
he has been assailed, he has proved
himself as good as his word, and
hereafter the faithful canine may only
decorously parade the business sections of the city in leash.
Have any of Aid. Hall's critics estimated how many thousands of dollars a year this precautionary by-law
will save the tradesmen of Victoria?
To say nothing of the added air of
respectability which our sidewalks will
gain now that dogs are no longer allowed to comport themselves as
lower animals.
But, I am in possession of a secret,
at least it has been a secret up to
now, and like many other secrets, of
which erotic novelists and perfervid
poets haye told us, it burns within
my breast and cannot longer be restrained. It is that the zeal of Aid.
Hall is by no means exhausted, and
that in the interest always of his suffering fellow citizens, he has cast his
eye upon the eater-wauling "tommy"
and nerve racking "rooster." No
longer will night be made hideous
and the early morning unrestful by
these "betes noirs" of drowsers. Every
member of the feline tribe when it
crosses the doorstep, and every rooster when he starts on his meander-
ings beyond the confines of the poultry yard, must have a string attached
to his leg and bc gently led hither
and thither wherever his sweet fancy
or that of his owner may lead. This
is one of the most comprehensive
philanthropic schemes ever evolved
from the brain of a Victoria alderman.
Those who thought that the ingenuity
of Aid. Hall was exhausted when he
had placed the dog on leading strings,
made a very great mistake. It is not
until they see the frolicsome tommy
being carefully piloted along Government street with a string or a ribbon
attached to his hind leg, and the flirtatious rooster similarly anchored to
the delicate wrist of a dainty dame,
in faint but burlesque reminiscence of
the days of falconry, that Victoria
will realize the stupendous services
of Aid. Hall and the wide possibilities which the municipal career offers
to a really fertile and practical brain.
I am very pleased to see that the
effect, of a letter printed in the last
issue of The Week has been so
prompt and satisfactory; it had reference to the provision of a public water
tap, or some other more euphonious
substitute. The idea immediately
commended itself to the minds of the
City Councillors, and according to a
report of the proceedings of the Coun-
Mumm's Champagne
Reigns Supreme at Every Famous Banquet,
It is the one Champagne used exclusively at the very
highest public functions throughout the world—the wine
of Kings and Connoisseurs, the Champagne by which other
champagnes are judged.
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Selected Brut is a brut Champagne of the very highest quality, made of selected cuvees
of vintage years specially adapted for brut wines. It is a
very dry and genuine Brut. Champagne of exceeding purity
without being heavy.
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry is conceded to be the
finest produced this decade; made from selected grapes of
the choicest vineyards in the Champagne District noted for
its  superb  quality, natural  dryness  and  absolute  purity.
Our series of Menus of Famous Dinners,
where Mumm's Champagne and White
Rock Water are invariably included, will
be continued next week.
PITHER   &   LEISER
"The B. C. Home of Mumm's Champagne,"
Cor. Fort & Wharf Sts., Victoria.
cil meeting of Wednesday night the
deficiency is to be supplied at once.
But why limit the accommodation to
one point? No doubt the James Bay
Boat-house is a very suitable location,
but surely another might be provided
near the post office, and another near
the corner of Yates and Government.
This is a small matter but a great
convenience.
I was very much amused at an
editorial which appeared in the Colonist on Sunday last, or to be more
accurate, I was amused at the title,
"National Bumptiousness." The article is a criticism of what is generally considered to be the "star"
failing of the great people who are
fortunate enough to live south of the
International Boundary line. There
may be some ground for the criticism,
but it would not have strained the
logic of the argument to have included
those who have temporarily resided
under the Stars and Stripes, nor
would it have been out of place if
the writer had apologised for treating
the subject in the columns of the Colonist. It does not detract from the
merits of the performance to recall
the fact that one who enjoys the reputation of being the wisest of men once
said, "there is a time for all things."
A complaint has reached me to
which I would respectfully call the
attention of the Hotel Managers of
the city, it is that the arrivals of
guests published in the newspapers
are often belated. To be of value
these lists should be published as
quickly as possible after the visitors
reach the city, especially as some of
them only remain for a day. Several
instances have been brought to my
notice where friends of well known
citizens had been and gone before
their names appeared in the paper.
This causes much disappointment and
largely defeats the object of publication. Whether the fault rests with
the management, or with the newspapers, or with both it should be
remedied. The system of piling up
the arrival list until it reaches formidable dimensions in order to make
a brave showing, as is done in some
cases, is altogether unjustifiable, and
should not be countenanced by the
press.
(fr.
A SKIN CREAM TEST.
Nothing teaches like experience. If
you have a scratch, slight cut, blackhead or pimple troubling you, you
will be in a position to test the virtues
of Dr. T. Felix Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, and to appreciate its healing
and purifying qualities. Then, with
all doubts quickly removed, a continued use will demonstrate its value
as a skin beautifier and purifier, and
how fully it carries out the high
claims made for it.   At Druggists and
Fancy Goods dealers. No.
~?
Boys' School \
Suits
at Reduced
Prices
This Week
ALLEN & CO.
Fit°Reform Wardrobe
i
C.H.TITE&C0.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from a-J^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
WANTED
WANTED—Young men for Firemen and
Brakemen, instruct you at home by
mail. For free Information send
stamp to National Railway Training
.School, Inc., 376 Robert St. (Room 67),
St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A.
Y. W. C. A.
iao8 Government Street
VICTORIA.
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast (Rivers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the B. C. Canning Co., Ltd., of London, Eng., occupation Canners and Sawmill owners, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described foreshore and
submerged land:
Commenolng ta a post marked B. C.
C. Co., S.E. Cor., planted at high water
mark on island forming part of Lot 3,
Range ,2 Coast District, about three
chains southwesterly from the church,
situated on the Wannuck River, Rivers
Inlet; thence due west 20 chains; thence
due north about 10 ohalns; thenoe about
25 chains to S.W. corner of Lot 3 on
north shore of Rivers Inlet; thence following the shore line at high-water mark
in a southeasterly direction to a point
about one and a half chains east of
north end of bridge; thence due south
to the island first mentioned; thenoe
following the western shore of the island
to point of commencement, and containing 50 acres, more or less.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  CANNING  CO.
26th June, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
•2Aug. 1 Clement A. Haynes, Agent.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE S93. VICTORIA
BEST
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following; brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
RADIGER & JANION, Sols Agnts fer B.C.
:
LAST CALL
You know the old saw about "Procrastination."
Are You the Man
Who early in the spring promised to
TREAT THE  HOUSE
To a new coast of paint?
Said you would, soon as the weather settled.
If the sale of paints and brushes is any kind of barometer, you
can "bank" on an almost unbroken spell of fine weather. Our
tremendous sales predict it.
It's just a little bit "strenuous" to apply color later on during
the hot days of July;  now it's a pleasure.
We have the PARTICULAR PAINT for the PARTICULAR
PURPOSE.
"
CI
S.&W." BRANDS
None other quite so good.
HOUSEPAINT,   ROOF PAINT,   FLOOR PAINT,
PORCH PAINT,   CARRIAGE PAINT,   ENAMELS.
PAINT AND VARNISH BRUSHES.    STEP LADDERS,
Everything for the Job.
e. g. prior & ee..
Corner Government and Johnson Streets    -     Victoria, B.C.
LTD.
LTV.
You can always      __      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cic*.r _\Y9   ]j«      than otner&
Union Made. C^\fl_tW
Havana Filler.       W1*|UI
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
MAPS
OP
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
COAL
J. KINGHAM ft CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington CoaL
The best household coal in the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone (47
VICTORIA, B.C.
	
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Ii Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
64S Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Leave Taur -Baggage Check* at the
Pacific Transfer Co'
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Flute 249.      A. E. KENT, Prepriete
LLOYD ft CO., practical chimnej
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chim
neys can be cleaned without malt
ing an ellova mess. Try us an
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SEI THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908
Socialism.
To
come to the conclusion he is not the
friend of humanity. Can you name a
place on this earth where those teachings are made the foundation of any
dealings between Master and man?
Can you point to any of His self ap-
and   say   they   are
White Horse, 15 July, 1908.
Bohemian," care The Week,
Victoria, B.C.
Dear Sir,—A letter over your sig-  pointed   leaders
lature appeared in The Week a short friendly   to   humanity—I   mean   the
ime ago,    criticizing    the "Western  Church?   In the late 50's of the last
larion" for what you termed bias- century, the churches both north and
phemous  remarks.    I have not read south  were  among  the   most  bitter
the Clarion's article referred to, but opponents  of the  abolition  of black
I am quite sure many readers of The slavery in the United States and quot-
Week would be glad to hear some-  ej much  scripture  to  support  their
thing from you regarding the other ciajmS| even ;ls tociay tiley are amollg
side- the most bitter opponents of the only
You speak about the Clarion's ut- movement ever conceived for the up-
terances as  being illustrative  of the  ijftjng 0f the human  race,  and that
true character of the men who are
responsible for Socialistic journalism.
This would appear to be the keynote
of your article. Such an opportunity
to discredit Socialism was too good
for its opponents to overlook. You
do not seem to be aware that Christ
or Christianity is not a question at
issue in any way with the Socialists,
movement is Socialism. You say
Christ identified himself—while on
earth—with the labouring man. Does
it not appear to you that at the last
he has left his chosen to shift for
themselves and allowed the earth and
all its fulness to fall into the hands
of a few? Anything the labouring
classes  have  today  they  can  thank
they believing in perfect freedom of thejr iab0ur unions for it, and the
individuals on such questions, history growjng Socialist movement. That is
is already overloaded with facts about the reai bugbear to those "Whom God
governments and parties forcing be- in His jnfjnjte wjsdom has given con-
liefs upon people at the sword point— troi of the coal mjnes» ("Divine
we do not seek any more Inquisi- R;ght» Baer) and other natural re-
tions. In the Socialistic party today sources 0f thjs earth, that is why
throughout the world there are truer there js a tendency to throw a legis-
nen and women working for the ad- iatjve sop to the labourers occasion-
.ancement of humanity than any of ally as instanced in the Conciliation
:he Christian churches have produced A.ct of Canada, you mention. You
lown through the ages. If a person, speak about the dignity of labour, ihe
socialistic or capitalistic, today is to spirit in wllich jt js performed and
earn of Christ through his socalled the true relation between capital and
representatives on earth, the church iabour.    Labour had no dignity and
vith  its  priests and ministers,  is  it
until the unions forced it there was
my wonder men doubt that Christ? no relation between Capital and La-
Have any of these churches done any- bour any more than that cap[tal would
:hing during the last 1900 years to get out of labour all the human mor.
strengthen one's faith in Christ?—and tal could produce at a starvation wage,
;he priest or minister individually, is <*a crust of bread a]]d a rag;. Labour
.ery rare who by example would lead waited lgoo years for the sermon on
nen to Him. True they occasionally the Mount t0 solvc its difficulties,
lole out charity—admonition sand- but as Christ's representatives seemed
viches—as it were but how many of to think these precepts were intended
hem raise   tlieir   voice   in   protest only for the dourer, there could be
igainst the causes that make charity
lecessary? I fear if a parson had
;he audacity to do such a thing we
no solution excepting for labour to
bow its head to the yoke and cease
to   ask   for   anything   but   a   slave's
vould be treated to another  heresy existence.   Slavery, you know, is quite
rial.    Take the foremost church  in  out of date in spite of the scriptUral
vealth and numbers—the Roman
Catholic. What has this political aggregation to its credit. Contemplat-
ng it past and present is it not
mough to create blasphemy. It is
■esponsible in Christ's name for noth-
ng but misery, degradation and ig-
support. "The Golden Rule still remains the corner stone of all progressive labour legislation and that
the vast improvement in labour conditions during the past fifty years is
mainly due to a recognition of that
principle." Previous to the past fifty
years the "common people" were so
lorance of the masses who are un*
ortunate enough to be in its clutches. priest-bound that they dared not think
i.et if we are to credit all Scrip- for themselves under penalty of hell's
;ure, this church is the only one hav- tortures—and in their endeavour to
ng direct Scriptural authority. (See live up t0 the Sermon on the Mount
Matthew's Gospel, chap. 16, 18 and awa|<ened oniy to discover that the
19.) This was originally no doubt a eart,, with jts inheritance had slipped
iriestly interpolation, but we are eau- ;lway {rom the meek ;nt0 the* hands
:ioned to accept all Scripture. This of tlie mighty—the ones who disre-
same authorized church no doubt also garded the Golden Rule and the Ser-
mterpolated; Acts 9: 5—"It is hard mon had it alI For any vjctory labour
for thee to kick against the goads." has had with its unions can you point
(I use the R. C. rendering—it reads to a time when Christ's church has
better than the King James version). ]ifted its voice in favour of or sjded
This was probably intended to ad- wtih the workers? When has the
monish those who might object to Goiden Rule been followed by em-
the goads of thc church, but as it has pioyers and conditions improved. Take
been entirely omitted from the re- the q p R__ probably Canada's
-ised version I suppose we must be- wealthiest corporation. When has
lieve the goads no longer exist. What that company enforced the Golden
has the church of England or any of Rule and bettered conditions volun-
the others ever done to remedy the Urily    The departments of that corn-
causes that lead to poverty? About
as much as "Trinity" of New York
has done —nothing —yet this last
named church owns close on to $100,-
000,000 worth of property, a great
deal  of it thc worst  slums in  New
pany that have secured decent wages
and living conditions to any extent
have only done so by means of their
unions. Not at any time has the C.
P. R. paid the employees decent living  wages   without   first   trying   to
York.   They represent Christ or claim starve them out through a strike. Was
to. Two years ago, Phelps Stokes
and wife, millionaire philanthropist,
wished to do a bit of housecleaning
in a slum district in New York, but
were immediately warned off by Trin
ity Church corporation, the Vicars
of "He who had not where to lay
his head." It may interest you to
know  that  Stokes  and his  wife  are
Lieutenant-Governor Dunsmuir practising the Golden Rule when he
threatened to close HIS mines for
ten years?
As long as Christ's church is permitted to offer such a travesty on
Christianity as we have had in the
past   and   at   present,   rather   attack
now  ardent  Socialists, have lectured them for blasphemy, not the ones who
at Hull house—a settlement house in begin   to   doubt.    Can  you  name   a
Chicago slums—said house now being church  uttering protests against  tne
under the ban of the Roman Clergy millions  of child  slaves in  England
being inimical to their church—as and America?    Do they consider the
anything is that would better human- mill and the mine the quickest route
ity.    Is it any wonder some are be- for the children to respond to Christ's
ginning to doubt the Man these
churches represent? You say it is inconceivable how any man who has
studied  the  teachings  of  Christ  can
call of "Suffer the little children to
come unto Me?" Has the church ever
tried to remedy the cause that forces
so   many  women   to   the   streets   in
large cities, on account of the mere
pittance they are offered  in wages?
Is it fear of offending the wealthy
Pharisees who occupy the church pews
that keeps them silent? Instead of
objecting in the name of their God,
they continue telling the unfortunates
to be content in that state of life to
which it has pleased God to call you."
(See Church of England Catechism;.
If God called the large majority to
poverty and dirt is that an incentive
for them to honour Him? The list
of what they, the churches,* regret,
twice each Sunday of having left undone is too great. In God's name
what have they done?
You think it will not be by Socialism that Christ's spirit will be derived. It is proven daily that it will
not be by His representatives and
churches and as Socialism is the only
movement that has ever had for its
goal, the Brotherhood of Man, if that
fails then we had better all join the
Boston Purgatorial Society, and by
means of a small monthly payment
before death, be assured of a safe
passage to heaven afterwards. The
church's—Christ's church—power for
good today is about as effective as
were the Ikons carried by priests at
the head of the Russian Army—into
battle against the poor heathen Japs.
When you were writing about the
beautiful Eastertide, magnificent
music and flowers, did it not seem
to you that such things would partake somewhat of the nature of Dead
Sea Fruit—to the thousands of unemployed in the different cities throughout the world, who have just dragged
through a winter of hardship and
want. Do you think the music and
flowers with probably a short address
by a sycophantic parson, would tend
to draw men to that Christ claimed
to be represented? Do not look for
faults among those whom you would
term blasphemers, why not try and
remove the causes that lead men to
blaspheme against those things the
very few upon earth have cause to
revere. I do not suppose you will
reply to any of my questions, in any
of your future letters to The Week,
but in all fairness you should. I
would have replied through the correspondence columns of the paper,
but I am well aware it is entirely
useless trying to get anything but one
side of a question into the columns
of the Conservative subsidized press
of this day and date. But I do wish
you would inform yourself a little
upon causes—do not worry about
effects.
As your articles appear over a nom
de plume you will allow me the same
privilege.
Yours most respectfully,
"YUKONER."
ROOFING SLATE
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Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her methods. Expert in Dermatology, Facial Massage, Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
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Hours 9 to 6.       - • - - Phone ifag
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OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS, CASH REGISTERS,
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—ask us.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caseltan, Manajer.
We make a specialty of Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District  of  Rivers  Inlet,  B.C.   (Coast).
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd., of London,
Eng., occupation canners and sawmill
owners, Intend to apply for permission
to lease the following described foreshore and submerged land:
Commencing at a post marked B. C.
C. Co., N.W. Cor., planted at high-water
mark about one and a half chains east
of tlle north end of bridge on Lot 3,
Range 2, Coast District, at head of
Rivers Inlet; thence following the shore
line In a south-easterly direction about
50 chains to S.E. corner of Lot 3; thence
about 40 chains in a south-westerly direction to a point ln the centre of the
river due south of Church on Lot 3;
thence about 10 chains north to the post
on Island placed about three chains
south of church, and forming the S.E.
boundary of the B.C. Canning Co.'s previous notice of application for foreshore lease; thence about 1!) cbalns ln
a north-easterly direction following tho
high-water mark to entrance to slough;
thence In a north-westerly direction following the north shore of said island
about 23 chains to a point due south
of point of commencement; thence north
about 10 chains to point of commencement, and containing <I0 acres, more or
26th June, 1,908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
Aug. 1 Clement A. Haynes, Agent.
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast (Rivers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the B.C. Canning
Company, Ltd., of London, England, occupation, Canners, etc., intends to apply
for permission to lease tho following
described lands, including the foreshore
to  the depth of one chain:
Commencing at a post planted at high
water mark on the wost boundary of
Lot 3, Range 2, Coast District, marked
"B.C.C. Co., S.E. C"; thence north 20
chains; thonce west 20 chains; thenoe
south 20 chains; thence following shore
line In an easterly direction to point
of commencement, containing forty acres
more or loss.
Date  13th  June,   1D08.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING COMPANY, LTD.
Aug.  1 C. A. Haynes, Agent.
St. Andrew's College
TORONTO
A  Canadian Residential ano Dav   School
row  Boys
Upper and Lower School!.   New BnUdlngi.  Separate Junior Reetdenee.
Boya prepared for (ha UaiverslUae and Business.
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD, M JL, U.D.. Principal
Calendar lent on application.       Autamn term commence* Sept 10,1908
"Elijah" and "Benjamin" Mineral Olaima I
Situate ln Port Renfrew District, Victoria Mining Division.
Where located—Immediately east of
Bugaboo Creek and Seven Mtlos from
San Juan Harbour.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrle G.
Ross, Free Miner's Certlflcate No.
B22830, Agent for The Bentley Iron
Mining Co., Ld., Free Miner's Certificate
No. B22821, intend 60 days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
Dated this 10th day of June. A.D. 1908.
June 20
HARRIE G. ROSS.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT \
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Ernest Victor
Bodwell, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Barrlster-at-Law, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of Blinkinsop Bay, about
100 feet south of the Wharf, thence
west 80 chains; thence north 60 chains:
thence east 60 chains; thenca south
along the shore back to place of beginning, and containing 480 acres, more
or less.
Dated June 2-4th, 1908.
ERNEST VICTOR  BODWELL.
^^H C.  (!.  Johnstone, Agent.
July
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room.
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction,
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
A Skin of Beauty li a Joy forever
DB. T. FELIX  OOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB KAOICAL BEAUTIFIES
Purifies as well as Beantlflu the Skin.
No other cosmetic will do it.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and ls so harmless—we taste It to be sure It is properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the haut-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' ai
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUB'B OBIENTAL TOILET
POWDEB
For Infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent complexion.
Price as oaati, by mall.
OOUBAUD'S POUDBE  SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price 91.00, by mall.
PEBD. T. HOPXIirB, Prop.,
37 Great Jobm St., Hew York OU7.
AT   HENDERSON   BROS.,
Wholesale Distributors.
Tanconvsr aad Victoria, B.O. THE WEEK, SATURDAY AUGUST 8, 1908
Many people have Important
documents, private papers and
other valuables, but few have
proper places ln hteir offices or
homes for safeguarding such possessions.
The practice of leaving valuables hidden away ln a house is
a risk not wise to take. Theft,
Are or even misplacement may
result in dire trouble.
Be safe—rent a Deposit Vault
Box.   Per year, $6.00 and up.
doiubiob TBUBT 00,
limited.
9. a. KATBSBB, Gen. III.
3tt Mastlar Street, Welt,
Tamoourei, a. 0.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published it VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
ISH Government Street...Victoria, B.C.
Ml   Hastings Street....Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE. .Manager and Editor
Through Other
Glasses.
An Australian visitor to Victoria, a
man of some importance in his own
country as evidenced by the fact that
he was a delegate to the Pan-Anglican Synod in London, has passed
through our city on his way home,
and has favoured the daily press with
his views on Canada and Canadians.
The paper which published the interview has dubbed him a pessimist; it
would be fairer, however, to regard
him as a friendly critic. Canadians
are too apt to fall into the error whicli
has made Americans so unpopular,
that of supposing that they possess
"the greatest country on earth." In
some respects this may be true, but
even Canada has its drawbacks and
they constitute such a handicap that
it is neither fair nor reasonable to
ignore them when speaking of the
Dominion as a whole.
It is not unnatural that the claims
put forward by Canadians should
arouse the ire of a good Australian.
If we were content to share with
other Colonies the many extravagant
praises which can truly be uttered of
greater Britain, our kinsmen across
the sea would have no ground of
quarrel with us, but when we appropriate all tiie superlatives and leave
them out in the cold, it is only natural that they should resent our claim
to superiority.
This good Australian declares that
he was disappointed in our forests,
in our wheat lands, in our crops and
in our fruit. He avers that the timber he saw was stunted, that the grain
yielded less to the acre than in Australia, that finer fruit, especially small
fruit, is produced in New Zealand, and
that the wealth of Australia is per
capita greater than that of Canada.
He says, moreover, that thc Canadian
climate must forever constitute a bar
to the perfect prosperity which the
country might otherwise enjoy.
The answer to this criticism is that
it contains that germ of a half truth
which to put it mildly is misleading.
The visitor admits that he only took a
bird's eye view of the country, that
with one exception all his impressions
were received as he passed through
on the main line of the C.P.R., the
exception being a short side trip into
the wheat fields of Manitoba. He
speaks most unfavourably of the
country lying between Montreal and
Toronto, but perhaps he is not aware
that in this area thousands of industrious farmers have eked out a living
for more than a century, and if tlie
luxury of Australia is not in evidence,
there is at any rate comfort, and an
assured livelihood.
The comment upon our wheat fields
is true as far as it goes, everyone
who has studied the subject knows
that the yield per acre in Manitoba
and the Northwest probably averages
not more than twenty bushels to the
acre, while Australian and English
wheat will average from thirty to
thrty-five to the acre, but this does not
touch the crux of the question which
is that wheat can be produced in the
Northwest at less than half the cost
of English wheat, and at three-fourths
the cost of Australian, whilst the
quality of No. i Hard is unapproached
by any other. I know something of
wheat growing both at home and
abroad, and I have yet to learn of the
country where the margin of profit is
as great as in the Canadian Northwest, and 1 am certain that there are
no wheat growers in the world who
have made anything like the money of
the settlers in the prairie provinces.
Then coming to fruit, I can quite
understand some criticism being directed by any competent critic at
Canadian fruit, but that is due entirely
to the lack of systematic storage and
transportation. In the orchard I am
convinced that there is no finer fruit
in the world, but lack of organized
handling, packing, and freighting
causes much of the Canadian fruit
to be placed on the market in an imperfect condition. The same cause explains why fruit is gathered before it
is ripe, and rushed to the consumer
in order if possible to make a high
figure. In the West there is probably only one section of the country
where the fruit crop is judiciously
handled; I refer to the Okanagan.
In Victoria the arrangements are
ridiculous, for instance, only this
week I was told by a rancher that he
has not gathered any of his cherries
this year, but has allowed them to
fall to the ground and rot. I asked
why. His reply was: "Because the
wholesalers will only pay me two
cents a pound picked, and it costs that
to pick them, even if I could get the
labour, which I cannot." These cherries were a splendid variety, and as
I write this there are hundreds of
baskets of the same kind displayed in
the Victoria fruit stores, marked 35c
a box, which is at the rate of practically 20c a pound. Very few of
these are being bought by the public,
because the price is prohibitive, and
they rot in the baskets instead of
rotting on the trees. I walked into
a fruit store today and found at least
70 per cent, of the stock decaying, all
because people would not buy at the
price fixed by the wholesalers.
Under these circumstances it is not
to be wondered that a visitor who
only sees our fruit in the hotels or
the dining cars, should find it inferior.
But there is a more serious aspect
to this question. Unless the matter
is dealt with intelligently the fruit industry will receive a severe blow.
What is the use of dilating on the
advantages of British Columbia as a
fruit growing country if when a man
has produced a good crop, he finds
that there is no market, or at any rate
no organization handling the produce
and he cannot even afford to pick it?
Depend upon it news of this kind
travels quickly and travels far, and
at the present moment in Victoria
and all round the suburbs, the condition of affairs which I have described can be duplicated. Even
wealthy citizens do not gather their
fruit crops, but just pick a little for
immediate use and allow the rest to
rot.
This leaves me space to say but a
word on the subject of climate. Our
Australian critic could have found
in Canada a replica of almost every
climate under heaven, and if he did
not find himself suited at one place he
could go to another with the certainty
of finding just what he was looking
for. The tendency of Canadians is to
move westward, especially from the
prairie country, I for one have done
with the East, and thc Middle West,
with those bitter winters which age
a man a year in a day. But British
Columbia has a climate which is unexcelled, and as the Province could
easily accommodate as many people
as the total population of Canada today, it will be many years before the
visiting Corn-stalk will have valid
ground for his criticism of the Canadian climate in such geneial terms as
he has applied it.
The decision of the J.B.A.A. to accept the terms offered by the 1m-
periad Trust Co. for their new building will be received by the true sports
of the city with great interest. It
will mark the introduction of Victoria
into sports on a much larger scale,
and with the co-operation of Victorians in general there is absolutely
no reason why the expense connected
with the erection and completion of
the building should not be wiped out
within a very few months. The situation is an ideal one, possessing as it
does the natural advantages for which
the association has in the past' made
a grand reputation. With the construction of the new building it will
be possible for the Club to have its
boathouses in connection which will
afford the members every opportunity
to get to the boats without difficulty.
Now that the management of the Club
has accepted the proposition I shall
await with interest the commencement of the work of construction.
A/^THEATRi
"A Good Play for Husbands and
Wives to See"—Arthur Brisbane's
Editorial in the N. Y. Journal.
CHARLES FROHMAN
Presents the Great Dramatic
Sensation
"THE   THIEF,"
By Henri Bernstein.
As  Played  for  Ten   Months  at  the
Lyceum Theatre, New York.
"Every Lover of the Drama Should
Go and See 'The Thief',"—Wm. Winter in the New York Tribune.
TELL US WHY
IT IS?
that we are to-day the largest British Columbia Diamond and
Jewelry. House?
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO we began in a very modest way and
with a limited stock. TO-DAY we stand unchallenged as the
leading Jewelers of the Province.
Would it be so if our prices and goods were not the best
obtainable?
Would it be so if we did not keep up-to-date and carry the
newest and most artistic goods?
Would it be so if we failed in consideration and courtesy
toward our customers?
ARE YOU GETTING THE VERY BEST FOR
YOUR MONEY?
If not, call on us and we will promise to make every effort to
please and satisfy you. That is the Policy that has placed us
where we are—and we're sticking to it.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATSIBO   SOUND,   BBDWB&S SOUND, BA0B BABBOWS.
-SUABABTEEB 20,000 PT. TO TBB AOBE.
PBIOB »3.5« TO 13.00.    ALL LICENSES ISSUES.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOKS 14 Md 10
HABOE   BUXUDIBO,   OOTEBBKENT   STBBET, TIOTOBIA.
T. O. BOZ 70S. PBOBB 13IS.
COPPER CITY
At the junction of Skeena and Copper Rivers.
On the routes of the G. T. P. and Kitimaat Railways,
i       The only outlet of the celebrated Copper Valley.
The townsite is intersected by the Railway and is on the
banks of Skeena River.
Railway construction is now proceeding in the vicinity and
the contractors' headquarters are in COPPER CITY.
There is a good wagon road from COPPER CITY to Kitimaat
and steamboat communication with Port Essington and Pacific
Coast points on the Skeena river.
COPPER CITY is the natural centre of a fine agricultural and
fruit growing country where early settlers have carried on farming
successfully for upwards of twenty years.
A saw-mill is being erected and the Dominion Government has
already installed a telegraph office.
The building of the city has commenced and hotels and stores
are in course of erection.
COPPER CITY is outside the Coast "wet belt."
A ferry is being established across the Skeena at COPPER CITY.
Lots are not yet for sale, but the owner, MR. WM. J.
SANDERS, VICTORIA, is open to negotiate with any business
firms desirous of securing a stand. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 , 1908
Distinctive Comfort.
For Den or Dining Room.
In addition to the regular items of furniture you aro
always on the lookout for those small additional pieces
without which no den nor dining-room is complete and
comfortable. We always keep a large and varied stock
of these extra pieces and draw particular attention to our
MAGAZINE BACKS, from $3.50 to $14.00
PLATE RACKS, at $4.00 and   $4.50
OCCASIONAL CHAIRS, at $8.50 and $10.50
For Hall or Library.
In both hall and library it is the little etceteras which
complete your comfort and your furnishing. We pay just
as much attention to these small details as we do to the
larger items, perhaps more, as it is frequently difficult
to keep pace with the ever changing fashions, but we
manage to do so and invite you to call in next time you
are wanting any item of Library or Hall Furnishing.
HOTEL AND
STEAMSHIP
FURNISHERS
THE
Most Comfortable Chairs.
For genuine comfort nothing' beats the English Willow
Chair, in addition to being strong and spacious the natural
elasticity of the willow supports the body without that
nasty feeling of rigidity. We have a splendid selection
just received from the Old Country:
22-INCH. SEAT CHAIR     $10.00
24-INCH. SEAT CHAIR $11.00
26-INCH. SEAT CHAIR $12.00
30-INCH. SEAT CHAIR  $14.00
Upholstering' extra iu accordance with material used.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
OFFICE    AND
SHOWROOM
FURNISHERS
Lawn Tennis.
The Belcher Street Courts pre-
nted an unusually gay scene last
eek, when the annual tournament
10k place, witnessed by a large num-
:r of Victorians and visitors.
Among the visitors at the Courts
,iring the week were noticed Mrs.
. B. Pemberton in a smart black
jwn, black hat, with black and white
nines; Mrs. Craig, white and black
lit, burnt merry widow trimmed with
.endar; Miss Davie, in a white lin-
rie null and cerise hat; Mrs. H.
ooley, in green cloth Princess gown,
k hat with plumes; Mrs. A. W.
_nes, in a white lingerie, white hat
ith pink roses; Mrs. St. George,
ice blue frock and toque of the
me tone; Miss O'Reilly, in pale
ey silk, white and black hat; Mrs.
inith, champagne coloured suit, black
it; Mrs. C. Rhodes, Miss Crease,
iss Norah Bell, Miss Florence Gil-
spie, pale blue linen suit, a blue
erry widow; Mrs. W. Langley, black
d white striped suit, burnt straw
t, with pink roses; Mrs. V. Eliot,
nk ladies' cloth and pale pink hat
mined with pink plumes and tulle;
iss Wasson, very pretty yellow
ick, transparent yoke of ecru lace,
lite hat with plumes; Miss Pooley,
old rose and toque of the same
ne; Miss Garret, smart white linen
it, white hat with cerise flowers; Miss
Keefer, in white, picture hat; Mrs.
urtney, white mull lingerie and
lite hat with plumes; Mrs. Lamp-
in, in brown, Mrs. Fordham, white
th Alice blue boa and white lace
t; Mrs. C. V. Spratt, Dresden
ick, with burnt straw hat trimmed
th pale pink roses; Mrs. Jacobs,
ey suit and green hat; Mrs. Jas.
irvey, in a cream frock and old rose
t; Mrs. H. Robertson in pale pink
Empire and hat of the same tone;
Mrs. Landes, in ecru coloured voile
trimmed with handsome lace and
white hat; Mrs. Cecil Roberts, dainty
pale blue Empire frock, pale blue hat
trimmed with tulle; Mrs. Troupe in
white gown trimmed with pale pink
and white hat; Mrs. Genge, white
frock with tan trimmings; Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. Furlonger, Miss Paula
Irving; Mrs Matthews, in grey
trimmed with white lace, burnt straw
hat and pink roses; Mrs. Stretlield, in
white; Miss Eberts, in navy blue, large
white hat with plume; Mrs. Schwengers, white and pale green; Miss
Hickey, white linen suit; Miss
Doris Mason, pale pink; Miss
Laura Jukes, white with black hat;
Miss Lorna Eberts, pale green muslin; Mrs. (Col.) Holmes, Miss
Holmes, Mrs. (Col.) Grant, in Alice
blue, and black hat; Mrs. Richardson,
Mrs. Kirkbride, in a white cloth gown;
Mrs. Cambell McCallum, Miss McCallum, Miss Hawthornthwaite, Mrs.
Rithet, Miss Macrae, Miss Frances
Drake, Mrs. Galletley, Miss F. Devereux, Mrs. Griffiths, in mauve; Mrs.
J. Irving, in black and white striped
muslin, black hat; Miss Butchart, in
white; Mrs. F. H. Todd, Mrs. Heb-
den Gillespie, in pale green, trimmed
with pastel shades, green hat; Mrs.
Alexis Martin, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs.
Baiss, Mrs. D. M. Rogers, Mrs. Wm.
Langley, Mrs. H. Barnard, Mrs. Al.
Gillespie, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. Gresley,
paisley silk, blue toque; and tiie
Messrs. Meredith, Newton, H. Davis,
B. Parker, C. Gibson, Dr. Craig,
Twigg, T. Foot, L. Genge, Keeter,
Goward, Kirkbride, H. Gillespie, Galletly, Dr. Robertson, Lampman, Heb-
den, J. Bridgeman, W. Newcombe, C.
Prior, Coombe, McCurdy, Bethune,
Hagerty, G. Gillespie, Eaton, Capt.
McDonald, D. M. Eberts, Col. Grant,
Crow Baker, Gore, Alexis Martin and
many others.
Victoria Theatre.
"The Thief," which Charles Frohman will bring to this city for the
first time at the Victoria Theatre, on
August ioth, is from the pen of Henri
Bernstein, one of the most ingenius
and successful of contemporary
French playwrights. Mr. Bernstein
is already known for several plays
similar in construction, very similar
in ingenuity and composition to "The
Thief," but it is probable that for
many a year to come he will be
known in this country, as he still is in
France, as the author of "The Thief,"
despite his more recent plays.
"The Thief" is in three acts. It
observes alt the unities of time, place
and incident. The action takes place
within twenty-four hours. i'"irst produced at tlie Renaissance Theatre,
Paris, in December, 1907, "The Thief"
made an immediate sensation. It ran
through thc entire season with M.
Guitry and Madam Le Bargy in the
chief roles. About the foibles, the
ambition, the cunning, the love as
deep as human passion and as wide
as human frailty, of a woman, "The
Thief" is a woman's play, ln Pans
Madam Le Bargy, in London, Irene
Vanbrugh, in New York Margaret
lllington—all attained positive personal triumphs in the role of Mane
Voysin.
Margaret lllington is sufficiently
well known to make superfluous any
extended introduction. Her advance
as an actress of great strength of
emotion and sure dramatic appeal, is
already generally recognized. Her
fine range of dramatic power she
amply demonstrated last season as
the young wife in the John Drew performance of Pinero's "His House in
Order."
The Voysins, husband and wife, arc
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Lagardes at
their country home. The Lagardes
have a son, Fernand, who is smitten
with Mrs. Voysin and writes her the
most ardent love-letters. Mrs. Voysin, who is young and charming and
who loves her husband with an unswerving devotion, treats the young
man's amatory attitude lightly as a
sort of romantic flutter that will soon
pass away. She is good-natured and
good-humoured towards him, but his
sensations have made no other impression upon her than that they are
the outbreak of a silly sentimentality
on his part. He writes her love-letters which he places under the pillow
of the hed in her boudoir, and leaves
them around in other places where
he knows she will find them. This
letter writing leads him into a serious
difficulty, upon which he had not at
all reckoned. For Mine. Lagardes has
had money stolen from her bureau
drawer and as a detective named
Zambault, who is in the house masquerading as a friend of Mr. La-
gardes', has seen Fernand quietly
creeping up the stairs to the bedroom and has also seen him take
something from the drawer in question, he openly accuses him of being
tlie thief. It is known that Fernand
has had an affair with a pretty actress
to whom he has made presents, and it
looks as if he had stolen the money
to meet the financial requirements of
the case. The Lagardes are astonished at the revelation. They refuse
to believe the detective. He unfolds
bit by bit, however, his evidence, and
the father at last is convinced. He
sends for his son. Fernand has gone
into the grounds to recover the letters
lie wrote to Mrs. Voysin, she having
told him where he would find them,
unopened and unread. Mrs. Voysin
volunteers to go after Fernand when
the father demands his presence. She
returns in a moment with him. To
the amazement of everybody but the
detective Fernand confesses his guilt.
His father, furious at the young man's
disgrace, decides to send him away
for a period to a distant country
where hc can earn and repay this
stolen money. Of course Fernand is
not the thief. The discovery of the
real culprit and the boy's exculpation
conies later ou. Meanwhile the preparations for Fernand's banishment
proceed. Mrs. Voysin's nice kindly
talk, in which she told him how futile
his passion for her was, has not had
the effect of quenching, or in any
way subduing, his love for her. The
relations between husband and wife
become painfully strained, and continue so until lhe moment set for
F,, Hand's departure. Here disclosures are made that put an astonishing
but satisfactory complexion upon all
the circumstances, and the dramatist
is permitted to carry his story to a
happy conclusion.
The tennis championship of British
Columbia still remains in Victoria, B.
P. Schwengers having successfully
defended his title against Mr. Bruce-
Smith of Vancouver at the Courts last
Saturday. The result of the week at
the Courts was highly satisfactory,
both from a financial standpoint and
from the class of tennis witnessed.
The attendance was better than last
year while the tennis was as good if
not better. Although thc only championship to remain in this city is
the men's singles, it is no disgrace to
the ladies or lo ihe men's doubles, for
they have the satisfaction of knowing that their opponents rank iu the
first class among the players on the
Pacific Coast.
-J THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908.
* Social and X
J Personal. *
IMllllltlMMSHtSli ____________ tt___L_S *____• ^___L_S ^__M ____M
V 'll 'JL' 'V 'V 'J.1 '1! TF v i' '*' '*■ tr
Mr. Kenneth Gillespie of Riverside,
Cowichan Lake, is staying with his
parents.
* *   *
Mr. F. C. Davidge spent a few days
in Victoria on his way east.
www
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Clark, Mr. and
Mrs. S. G. Clark, arrived by the Mont-
eagle on Monday from Nagasaki.
* *   *
Mr. A. W. Harvey arrived from the
north during the week, arriving in
Victoria on Thursday last.
Thursday was guest day at Work
Point Barracks, many guests taking
advantage of the splendid courts.
* *   *
Miss Jessie Garret of Seattle is
the guest of the Misses Pooley, Lamp-
son street.
* *   *
On Monday evening Miss Winona
Troupe was hostess at a five hundred party followed by an impromptu
dance. Among the guests were Misses
Blackwood, Miss V. Bolton, Miss L).
Day, Miss C. Gait, Miss Lorna Eberts,
Miss Doris Mason, Miss G. Irving,
Miss Phyllys Mason, Miss N. Grant,
Miss Gladys McCallum, Miss J. McKay, Miss Ross Arbuthnot and the
Messrs.  Arbuckle,  Eberts,  Monteith,
D. Gillespie, W. Arbuthnot, Eaton,
McCurdy, Percy and J. Keefer, J.
Cambie, VV. Rochfort, C. Pitts, T.
Mara, R. Wilmot, L. O. McKay, J.
Heyland, Jephson and others.
* *   *
Highwood, Moss' street, the cosy
residence of Mr. and Mrs. George
Gillespie, was the scene of a most
charming dance on Tuesday last. The
house was prettily decorated for the
occasion and the supper table with
pale pink carnations and dainty garlands of smilax and fern.
Among the invited guests were Mrs.
J. Irving, the Misses Irving, Miss
Pooley, Miss V. Pooley, Miss Garret, Miss C. Gait, Miss D. Day, Miss
Pitts, Miss M. Pitts, Miss D. Mason,
Miss Winona Troupe, Misses Eberts,
Miss Marguerite , Little, Miss Helen
Peters, Miss Norah Coombe, Miss
Phyllys Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Kirkbride, Miss Paula Irving, Misses Monteith, Mrs. Genge, and Colonel and
Mrs. A. VV. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Luxton, Miss Newcombe, Miss Nellie
Mara, Miss R. Arbuthnot, the Messrs.
Rithet, Eberts, Pitts, L. Mara, Heb-
den, T. Foot and L. Foot, J. Arbuckle, J. Cambie, W. Newcombe,
Holland, Todd, Hagerty, Capt. McDonald, Parker, Dewdney, McDougal,
Musgrave, Johnstone, Meredith, Wilmot.
* *   *
The beautiful residence of Mrs.
Henry Croft on Wednesday afternoon
presented a very pretty scene when
Mrs. Croft gave one of her famous
"Baby Parties." Down one side of
the lawn the long tea table was set,
which was artistically arranged with
arches of green; hanging from the
centre of each was a dainty basket
of pale pink roses. A very jolly afternoon was spent; games of all sorts
were indulged in which were in
charge of Captain Coombe, each child
receiving a fascinating souvenir of
this memorable day. A few grown
tips came in later to tea ancl to watch
the little ones enjoy themselves,
among whom were: Mrs. Fitzgib-
bons, in navy blue, Captain and Mrs.
Coombe, Mrs. D. M. Eberts in grey
with a black hat, Mrs. Dundas in
pale green muslin and white hat, Mrs.
Burton in a Dresden gown, Mrs. Gaudin and Miss K. Gaudin in white and
pale green, Mrs. J. Harvey in cream,
and an old rose hat, Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. McCurdy, Mrs. Hogg, Mrs. McKay, Mrs. Craig iu white cloth and
Irish crochet lavender hat,  Mrs.  VV.
E. Oliver, Mrs. Holland, navy blue
and white, Miss G. McKay, Miss
O'Reilly, Mrs. A. E. McPhillips, Mrs.
Roger Wilby in black and white silk,
burnt straw hat, with pink roses, Mrs.
Monteith, Mrs. Courtney, paisley muslin and black hat, Mrs. Bodwell in
white lingerie frock, Mrs. and Miss
Coombe, Mrs. Matthews and Mrs.
Stretfield, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Kirk,
Mr. John Bryden, Mrs. Matson, Mrs.
Shallcross in black and black hat and
pink roses, Mrs. C. Rhodes, Mrs.
Smith, Mrs. Lampman, Mr. Punnett.
Among the children were Mabel
Eberts, Vyvan Matson, J. and T. Mat-
son, Courtney, Harvey, Burns, McBride, Bodwell, Coombe, Dundas, McCurdy, McPhillips, Kirk, Stretfield,
Matthews, Hogg, Craig, Oliver,
Lampman, Day and others.
* *   *
Premier McBride came over from
the Mainland on Thursday.
Mr. R. L. Morse of Seattle spent a
few days in Victoria this week,
a   *   *
Lieut.-Governor and Mrs. Dunsinuir,
Miss Marion Dunsmuir, Miss Kathleen Dunsmuir, Mrs. Hope, Mrs.
Robin Dunsmuir, Mr. Bromley, returned from abroad early in the week.
I
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTBICT.
District of Coast (Elvers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd., of London,
Eng., occupation aenners and sawmill
owners, intend to apply for permission
to lease the following described foreshore, and submerged land:
Commencing at a post marked B. C.
C. Co., S.E. Cor., planted at high-water
mark at charcoal-house near N.E. end
of Victoria Sawmill wharf, Rivers Inlet, Lot 255, Range 2, Coast District;
thence following the shore-line in a
south-westerly direction 80 chains more
or less to a post marked B.C.C. Co., S.W.
Cor., planted at high-water mark on
Lot 14, Range 2, Coast District; thence
seawards 3 chains; thence eastwards,
parallel with the shore, a distance of
about 15 chains; thence northerly about
20 ehains to the omst southerly pile
showing last year's Dominion Government fishing boundary; thence about 28
chains in a northeasterly direction to a
point about 50 links north of the N.W.
corner of present Victoria Cannery
wharf; thence following aesterly the direction of the wharf at the same distance of about 50 links to a point opposite point of commencement and at a
right angle with the shore-line; thence
to the point of commencement, and
containing 50 acres, more or less.
June 26th, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
Aug. 1 D. McPhee, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that,' thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C—Commencing at a post planted at the northwest corner of section 88 and marked
S. B. Netherby and A. C. Klrby; thence
west 80 chains to northeast corner of
section 87; thence north 80 chains;
thence east to western boundary of E.
& N. R. R. Co. Lands; thence following
said boundary to point of commencement.
Dated July 20th,  1908.
S. B. NETHERBY,
A. C. KIRBY.
Aug. 1
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands on
Queen Charlotte Island:
Commencing at a post marked E.S.,
N.E., placed half a mile south from the
north-west corner of Lot 1; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 ehains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres.
july 4
ETHEL STEVENS,
Per S. V. Lasseter.
BONA FIDE OFFER
To  introduce throughout  B.C.
the
Charter Oak Steel Range
Of which there are over 400 in
Victoria alone.
We make the following offer,
viz.:—On receipt of following
prices we deliver, freight prepaid, to any point in B. C,
reached by direct transit, lake
or rail:
1-14  in.  oven,  4  hole,  high
closet    $42
1-15  in.  oven,  6  hole,  high
closet $46
1-18 in.  oven,  6  hole,  high
closet  $50
QUICK AND PERFECT
BAKERS.
If not as represented return
at our expense and get your
money.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
British Columbia's Premier Fair
SEPTEMBER
22,23, 24, 25 & 26
EVERYTHING  NEW,  MODERN,  AND UP
TO THE MINUTE.    NEW GROUNDS
NEW   BUILDINGS,   NEW   ATTRACTIONS
Horse Show Every Evening
Cash Tombola Prizes Every Day.
THREE DAYS GREAT
HORSE RACING
Trotting, Pacing, Running Steeplechasing.
Excursion Rates From Everywhere
For Prize Lists or information, address
^
J. E. SMART, Manager. „
WEEK AUGUST io
The New Grand
SULLIVAN ACSMIBINE,    Proarlatara.
Management at ROBT. JAMIESON.
DORSCH and RUSSELL
Those Musical Railroaders
Special Scenery and Electrical
Effects.
THE TWO DE COMAS
Ground and Lofty Tumbling.
MISS FLORENCE MODENA
&CO.
In the Latest Farcical Satire
"Bargain Mad."
MISS DOROTHY DAYNE
Comedienne,  in   Song  and  Story.
Miss Dayne will wear one of the
handsomest of the  New  Parisian
Directoire, or Sheath Gowns.
FRED. MORTON
Trick   Harmonica Player,   Finger
Whistler and Paper Mutilator.
NEW MOVING PICTURES.
"The White Squaw."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"Cupid's Pleading," Waltz,
Composed by Sam Goodacre.
Arranged by M. Nagel.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Government and Johnson Sts.
MOVING PICTURES
ILLUSTRATED SONGS
Program Changed  on  Monday and
Thursday and Always High Class.
WE CATER ESPECIALLY TO
LADIES AND CHILDREN.
A Cool, Pleasant Place to Spend an
Enjoyable Evening.
Daily, 2 to 5:30, 7 to 10:30.
TEN CENTS. TEN CENTS.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries,
Sa^  Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
Royal Dairy
1004 Broad Street
Ice Cream & Sweet Cream
Supplied in quantity.
Try our delicious
CREAM AND STRAWBERR
from   our   own   ranch,   fresh
every day.
We also carry a fresh supply of
Butter and Eggs.
Phone 188.
SADIES       MEDICAL   OBNTB
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
YIMATO*  TBSATHEjrT
MX.     BJOKWFEIT,      SWEDISH
MASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to t. Phone 1J29.
Key Fitting      Lock Repairing
Telephone 1718
H. M. WILSON
Mechanical Repairs and Saw
Filing
Up-to-date Machinery for Lawn
Mower Grinding and Tool
Sharpening. Tires put on Go-
Carts and Springs Replaced.
Prompt attention and work
guaranteed.
100a BROAD STREET
Opp. Transfer Stables,
VICTORIA, B.C.
F.W. Stevenson & Co
Brokers
14-16 MAHON BLDG.
1114 GOVERNMENT ST.
Private Wires to All Exchanges.
Correspondents
LOGAN & BRYAN
S. B. CHAPIN & CO.
Members of
New York Stock Exchange
New York Cotton Exchange
Boston Stock Exchange
Chicago Board of Trade	
During August a
25 Per Cent. Cut
on all our
Tennis Racquets
Strictly igo8 stock.
M. W. Waitt & Co.
Llmitrd
The House With the Goods
1004 Govt. St.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S B00KST0RI
TIOTOBIA, B. O.
P
|H 1 fcN 1 S  ind Trade Ma
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney an
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville
TO SMALL
INVESTORS
$2,260 on easy terms buys on*
acre on car line, high and dry,
main road, quite clear, eminently
suitable for sub-division into lots,
neighbouring lots $760 up. Apply
to owner, 12 Amelia Street, oft
Pandora. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
ITAKE NOTICE that John Gaffeney,
I St. Paul, Minn., occupation Gentle-
Ian, intends to apply for permission
I purchase the following described
lnds:
[Commencing at a post planted at the
lutheast corner of section 8, Town-
jiip north of township 12, range 6,
budrier survey, Nechaco Valley, thence
brth SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
hence south 80 chains; thence east 80
pains to place of beginning,
I Dated April rd, 1908.
line 20 JOHN GAFFENEY.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
| TAKE  NOTICE  that V.  J.  Swanson,
St. Paul, Minn., occupation Gentle-
ban, intends to apply for permission to
urchase the following described lands-.
I Commencing at a post planted at the
butheast corner of section 5, township
orth of township 12, range 5, Poudrier
[irvey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
hains; thence west 80 chains; thence
puth 80 chains; thence east 80 chainB
place of commencement.
[Dated   April   3rd,   1U08.
une 20 V. J. SWANSON.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
I TAKE NOTICE that E. W. MacKenzie,
If Winnipeg,  Man.,  occupation  Barris-
er, intends to apply for permission to
urchase the following described lands:
I Commencing at a post planted at the
puthwest  corner of section  18,  town-
nip north of township 12, range S, Fourier  survey,   Nechaco  Valley;   thence
brth 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
hence soulh 80 chains; thence west 80
hains to place of commencement.
IDated April lst, 1908.
line 20 E. W. MACKENZIE.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
[TAKE  NOTICE  that  R.   L.   Brackin,
| Chatham, Q*nt., occupation Barrister,
■tends to apply for permission to pur-
nase  the following described  lands:
ICommencing at a post planted at the
luthwest corner of section 7, township
prth of township 12, range 6, Poudrier
Irvey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
lains;   thence  east  80  chains;   thence
luth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
I point of commencement.
•Dated April lst, 1908.
Ine 20 R. L. BRACKIN.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
|TAKE  NOTICE  that  Ethel  Patmore,
Cranbrook, B.C., occupation Married
■oman, Intends to apply for permission
1   purchase   the   following   described
nds:
Commencing at a post planted at the
uthwest corner of section 6, township
Irth of township 12, range 5, Poudrier
Irvey, Nechaco Vailey, thence north
" chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
uth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
i place of commencement.
Dated March  31st,  1908.
Ine 20 ETHEL PATMORE.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Elizabeth
Itniore of Cranbrook, B.C., occupation
brried Woman, Intends to apply for
Irmission to purchase the following
pcribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
utheast corner of section 1, township
Irth of township 13, range 5, Pou-
ler survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
irth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
pnce south SO chains; thence east 80
lins to point of commencement.
Warch lst, 1908.
ETHEL  ELIZABETH  PATMORE.
ne 20
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Alex  Cochrane,
J Toronto,  Ont., occupation  Barrister,
lends to apply for permission to pur-
Tise the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
utheast corner of section 2, township
rth of township 13, range 6, Poudrier
rvey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
ains;  thence west  80 chains;  thence
nth 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
[point of commencement.
March 31st, 1908.
ne 20 ALEX COCHRANE.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Garrow
J Goderich, Ont., occupation Barrister,
lends to apply for permission to pur-
lise the following described lands:
■Commencing at a post planted at the
Titheast corner of section 3,  township
l-th of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
rvey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
bins;  thence west  80 chains;  thence
■ith 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
1 point of commencement,
larch 31st, 1908.
ne 20 CHARLES GARROW.
tifleate   of   the  Registration   of  an
Extra-Provincial   Company.
"Companies Act, 1897."
HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Tim-
Investment Company" Has this day
|mi registered as an Extra-Provincial
npany   under   the   "Companies   Act,
1)7," to carry out or effect all or any
Ithe objects of the Company to which
l_  legislative authority of the Legis-
lure of British Columbia extends.
ll'he   head   office   of   the   Company   ls
Luate   at   the  City   of   Seattle,   King
lunty, State of Washington.
■The   amount   of  the   capital   of   the
[mpany   ls   three   hundred   thousand
ljlars,    divided   into    three   thousand
lires of one hundred dollars each.
ll'he  head  offlce  of  the  Company  ln
Is Province is situate at Victoria, and
lomas Bamford, clerk, whose address
fVictoria, B.C., is the attorney for the
npany.   Not empowered to issue and
Insfer stock.
f'he time of the existence of the Com-
liy is fifty years, from the 8th day of
liruary, 1908.
The Company is limited.
[liven   under  my  hand  and   seal   of
pe  at  Victoria,  Province  of  British
umbia,   this  13th  day  of  May,  one
lusand nine hundred and eight.
Il.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
■Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
I been established and registered are:
fo manufacture, buy, and sell timber
timber products; to buy, lease, or
erwlse acquire and to hold real estate
timber ln the State of Washington
elsewhere,  and  the  same  to  sell,
i-tgage, lease and dispose of; to erect,
Irate, sell and dispose of water-works
lthe supply 6Twater-power and water
domestic   purposes,   electric   power
nts;   to buy, build, lease and other-
fe acquire and operate, if necessary
k desirable, tug-boats and freight and
J senger   steamers;   to   carry   on   the
illness of selling real estate on com-
\slon and doing a general real estate
timber brokerage business; to loan
money of the Corporation in  conation   with    Its   other   business    if
fmed advisable and  to the best  ln-
hsts of the Corporation;   to buy, sell
Id deal ln all kinds of merchandise,
lie 20
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that G. S. Hodgson
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Barrister, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 12, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
survey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
April lst, 1908.
June 20 G. S. HODGSON.
north 5 chains more or less to point of
commencement    and    containing    live
June 2nd, 1908.
june 27 ALBERT HAMMER,
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that R. W. Matheson
of Lucknow, Ont., occupation Commercial Traveller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 13, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
April  lst,  1908.
June 20 R. W. MATHESON.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that E. M. Plock of
London, Ont., occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 11, township north of township 13, range 6, Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
April lst, 1908.
June 20 E. M. PLOCK.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that H. T. Blackburn,
of London, Ont., occupation Barrister,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 14, township north of township 13, range 6,
Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
April lst, 1908.
June 20 H. T. BLACKBURN.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that A A. Magee of
Toronto, Ont., occupation Barrister, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 10, township
north of township 13, range 6, Poudrier
survey, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
April lst, 1908.
June 20 A. A. MAGEE.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Lizzie Plckeisen,
of St. Louis, Mo., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of the south half of
section 34, township 14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and being the south half
of said section 34 and the north half of
section 27, township 14, range 5.
March 29th, 1908.
June  20 LIZZIE  FICKEISEN.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ella Bamford,
of Berkeley, Cal., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 26, township
14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
June 20 ELLA BAMFORD.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Anton Olson, of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and 80 chains east
of Indian Reserve No. 4, on the south
shore of Fraser Lake; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains more or less to south
shore of Fraser Lake; thence following
said shore westward to place of beginning.
April 21st, 1908.
June 20 ANTON OLSON.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Henry
Snodgrass, of Francois Lake, occupation Rancher, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following >1t>-
scribed land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 212; thence W.
20 chains, more or less, to the Eastern
boundary of my Pre-emption; thence
south to shores of Francois Lake; thence
following shore in an Easternly direction to the West Boundary of Lot 212;
thence north following 40 acres, more
or less.
Dated   20th   May,   1908.
june 27    JAMES HENRY SNODGRASS.
ADDITIONAL   LICENCE   TO   AN   EX-
TBA-FBOVINCIAL   COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 417.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "New
Zealand Insurance Company, Limited,"
which, on the 28th day of November,
1907, was authorised and licensed to
carry on business within the Province
of British Columbia, is hereby authorised and licensed to carry out or effect
all or any of the additional objects of
the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company ls
situate at the Town of Auckland, in the
Province of Auckland, in the Colony
of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls one million flve hundred
thousand pounds, divided into one hundred and fifty thousand shares of ten
pounds each.
The head offlce of the Company ln
this Province is situate at Victoria,
and James Hill Lawson, merchant,
whose address is Victoria, B.C., is the
attorney for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this Uth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The additional objects for which this
Company has been established and licensed are:—
To carry on every kind of insurance
and re-insurance business not including
ordinary life insurance, but including
insurance against death by accident,
and to re-Insure or counter-insure every
kind of risk, and to do all such other
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of those objects. To
acquire and undertake the whole or any
part of the business property and liabilities of any company carrying on any
business which this Company is authorised to carry on.
June 27.
Province   ls   situate   at   Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address ls Victoria, B.C., ia the attorney
for  the  company.    Not  empowered  to
issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this fourth day of April, on*
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which  this companj
has been established and registered are:
Manufacturing and dealing in fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds,  and  all   things  Incident  thereto,
of  engaging  ln  a  general   contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and otherwise,  necessary and  convenient for the prosecution of its business.
section 3 of the township north of township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
July 11 MARTHA BAMFORD.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hill Law-
son, the younger, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Solicitor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of Blinkinsop Bay, three-
quarters of a mile from the entrance
of said Bay; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence easterly
to the Bay and along the shoro of
Bay inside of Jessie Island; thence
northerly along the shore of Blinkinsop
Bay to the place of commencement, and
containing 480 acres, more or less.
Dated June 24, 1908.
JAMES HILL LAWSON,  JR.,
july 4 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Graham
Lawson, of Victoria, B.C., occupation,
Solocitor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
head of Blinkinsop Bay, 50 feet north
of the creek running to the Bay, thence
west 60 chains; thence north 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains back to the place of beginning,
and containing 360 acres, more or less.
Dated June 24th, 1908.
HENRY GRAHAM LAWSON,
july 4 C. G.  Johnstone, Agent.
2-^f   ___W\
±*m
THE attention of the Lands and
Works Department having been directed
to the fact that town lots ln a town-
site named Prince Rupert, being a subdivision of Lot (42, Range 5, Coast District, situated on the mainland between
the mouth of the Skeena River and
Kaien Island, are being offered for sale,
It has been deemed necessary to warn
the public that the said townsite is not
situated at the terminus of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, and is not the
townsite which ls owned jointly by the
Government of British Columbia and
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
P. J. PULTON,
Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works,
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1908.
May 9
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In the matter of our application for a
Duplicate   Certlflcate   of   Title   to
Subdivision Lots 46 and 47 ot Lot
68, and part of Lot 73, Spring Ridge
(Map 395) Victoria City.
Notice is hereby given that it ls my
intention at the expiration of one month
from  the date of  the first publication
hereof  to  issue a Duplicate Certlflcate
of  Title  to   said  lands  Issued  to  William  Ralph  on  the  30th  day of June,
1892, and  numbered  13495 A.
Land   Registry   Offlce,   Victoria,   B.C.,
this 13th day of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 23 Registrar-General.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Land!
and Works for a license to proapect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C: Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
John Meston and W. H. Anderson;
thence west 80 chains to northeast corner of section 87; thence north 80
chains; thence east to western boundary
of the E. & N. Railway Company's
Lands; thence following said boundary
of Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway
Company's Lands; thence following said
boundary of Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Company's lands to point of
commencement.
Staked May 18th, 1908.
JOHN MESTON.
W. A. ANDERSON.
May 23
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Mammer, of
Bella Coola, occupation farmer, intends
to apply for permission tu purchase the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains south of the northwest corner
of Lot 24, Range 3, Coast District;
thence west 20 chains to shore of
Abuntlet Lake; thence in a southwesterly direction along shore line to
the  west  boundary  of  Lot  24;  thence
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
To  T.   J.   Graham,   registered  and  assessed   owner  of   Lot   291,  Mount
Tolmie  Park,  Victoria  District.
TAKE  NOTICE  that application  has
been made to Register William Flannery
as the owner ln fee simple of the above
lot  under a  Tax  Sale  Deed  from  the
Assessor   of  the   District   of  Victoria,
dated  the  16th  of  January,   1903,   and
you are required to contest the claim
of the said William Flannery within 30
days from the first publication hereof.
Dated  at Land  Registry  Office,  Victoria,   British  Columbia,  this   12th  day
of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 16 Registrar General.
Within sixty days from date I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80 acres of land at Kitsals
Canyon. The land ls situated within
lines commencing at a post about half
a mile south of Chas. Durham's Southwest corner and marked: Erlck Norlln,
80 acres, Purchase Claim, S. W. Corner,
May 19th, 1908; thence north 20 chains,
thence east 40 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement, containing 80 acres,
May 19th, 1908.
June 13 ERICK NORLIN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Gustave
Johnstone of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Master Mariner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the east shore of Bllnklnsop Bay, three-
quarters of a mile from the outlet of
the creek at the head of the Bay; thence
north along the shore 60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west 60 chains to the place of
commencement, and containing 360
acres, more or less.
Dated  June  25th,   1908.
july 4    CARL GUSTAVE JOHNSTONE.
"Companiea Aot, 1897."
NOTICE Is hereby given that Raymond Bellenger Punnett, of Victoria,
B.C., broker, has been appointed new
attorney of "The Timber Investment
Company" in the place of Thomas Bamford.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 8th day
of   June,   1908.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
June 20.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that William Mc-
Gowan of Chatham, Ont., occupation
Machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:—
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains south of tho southwest corner
of Lot 952 and in a southerly direction
from Fraser Lake; thence south 20
chains; thence east 20 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 60 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 10 chains to Lake Shore; tnence
following said South Shore of Dry Williams Lake east 60 chains; tnence east
10 chains more or leas to point of commencement.
May 2nd, 1908.
july 11 WILLIAM McGOWAN.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that William Proud-
foot of Goderich, Ont., occupation Barrister, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 4, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
Survey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement.
March 31st, 1908.
july 11 WILLIAM PROUDFOOT.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Wilson, of
Toronto, Ont., occupation Barrister, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 5, township
north of township 13, range 6, Poudrier
Survey, Nechaco Valley; thence west 80
chains; tiience north 80 chains more or
less to Nechaco River; thence following
said River easterly 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains more or less to place
of commencement.
April 2nd, 1908.
july 11 T. H. WILSON.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Emma Bamford,
of St. Louis, Mo., occupation Widow,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 44
chatns north of the southwest corner
of section 35, township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; tnence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chaina
to point of commencement and being the
south half and the northeast quarter of
said section 35, township 14, range 5.
March 29th, 1908.
July  11 EMMA BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Kershaw,
of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 16, township
14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains to place of beginning and
being the south half and the northeast
quarter of said section 16, township 14,
range 5.
March 30th, 1908.
July 11 CLARA KERSHAW.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that James Bamford,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of the north half or
section 4 ln the township north or
township 14, range 6, Nechaco Valley;
thence north 70 chains more or less to
the Nechaco River; thence following
said river easterly 60 chains more or
less; thence south 80 chains more or
less to Penrose northeast corner; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
March  29th,  1908.
july 11 JAMES BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Engen of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation, married
woman, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 21, township
14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; tnence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to point  of commencement.
March 28th, 1908.
july 11 LAURA ENGEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Owen
Townley, of Vancouver, barrister at law,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: ,
Commencing at a post planted on the
southwest shore of Defence Island,
Howe Sound, thence ln a northerly, easterly, southerly and westerly direction,
following high water mark to the point
of commencement, containing 30 acrea,
more or less, and being the whole of
the Island known as Defence Island.
Dated  8th April,  1908.
THOMAS OWEN TOWNLEY.
May  9
CEBTITICATE   OB   TBE   BEOISTBA-
TION OB AN EXTBA-PBOTZECIA-b
COKPANT.
"OompulM Aot, 1117."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" haa thi*
day been registered as an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companies Act,
1897," to carry out or effect ail or __•
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of th* Company I*
altuate at Cincinnati ln Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of th*
Company ls five hundred thousand dollars, divided into flve thousand share*
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of th* Company ln this
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ben Worden of
Fort Steele, B.C., occupation Clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted near
the southeast corner of section 7, or
the township north of township 14, range
5, Nechaco Valley; thence west 120
chains; thence north 40 chains more or
less to the south bank of Nechaco
River; thenee meandering river bank
easterly 120 chains; thence south 40
chains more or less to place of beginning.
March 29th, 1908.
july 11 BEN WORDEN.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that John Bamford,
of Berkeley, Cal., occupation Bookkeeper, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of section 8, of the
township north of township 14, range
6, Nechaco Valley; thence north 40
chains more or less to bank of Nechaco
River; thence following said river bank
westerly SO chains more or less; thence
south 30 chains more or less; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
March  29th, 1908.
july 11 JOHN BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Martha Bamrorfl,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Marrred
Woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of the north half or
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Edith J. Black,
of St. Thomas, Ont., occupation Spinster,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 6 of the
township north of township 14, range
6, Nechaco Valley; thence south so
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement and
containing 480 acres  more or less.
March 29th, 1908.
July 11 EDITH J. BLACK.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Lund, of
Danholm, Sask., occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase  the following  described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of section 31, township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east SO
chains  to  point  of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
July 11 HENRY LUND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Adolph Lund, of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 33, township 11, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence east 20
chnins; thence south SO chains; thence
eust 20 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement.
Mnrch   211th,   1908.
July 11 ADOLPH LUND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Laurltz Berklanct,
of Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase tho following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 32, township
14, range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
enst 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 480 acres, more or
less.
March  29th,  1908.
July 11 LAURITZ BERKLAND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineea,
TAKE NOTICE that John Isbester, of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast comer of section 28, township
14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chain*;
thence south 80 chains; thence east S»
chains to point of commencement.
March 28th, 1908.
July  11 JOHN ISBESTER. 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY AUGUST 8, 1908,
Victoria Lawn Tennis
Tournament.
By UMPIRE.
The tournament was a success from
every standpoint, and the prizes which
were of special designs were greatly
admired. Mrs. F. B. Pemberton distributed them at the end of the tournament.
Mention must be made of the unremitting labours of the Ladies' Com-
Tlie   most   successful   tournament
held  in  Victoria  for  many  years  is
over, and the victors have departed mittee, which took charge of the re-
with the spoils of war, at least most freshments at the grounds, and also
of them have, but the greatest victor of the very enjoyable tennis dance
ancl the most important spoils still gjven at RockWood on Thursday
remain in Victoria. B. P. Schwengers night The Committee consisted of
has once more demonstrated, what I Mrs< Burton, Mrs. Pemberton, Mrs.
have always maintained, that on a E_ Crow Bakerj Mrs Gillespie, Mrs.
grass court he has no equal in the Richards, Mrs. Genge, Miss Mara,
West, and I am not sure that the ver- MrS] Nelson, Mrs. Pooley, Mrs. C.
diet would be modihed on any couns. Tudd] MrS4 Toddj Mrs irvjng) Mrs.
Granted that Freeman is no longer w. Beaven, Mrs. Jones, Miss Pitts.,
as energetic as of yore, it must be Mrs jameS) Urs_ Henry, Mrs. Mar-
admitted that he is as clever or he till; Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Holmes, Mrs.
would not have scored sixteen games Kirkbride, Mrs. J. Gore and Miss
to Schwengers' fifteen in the first two  Loenholm.
sets  of  the   championship  match  at 	
Vancouver. To my mind this amply
demonstrates his skill, but after those
first two sets he was not in it for a
moment, and the last set was a whitewash; and Schwengers easily retained possession of the Mainland
Championship Cup.
The  Victoria  tournament
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responslbllltj
for the views expressed by its corres-
t'umients.
Communications     will     be     inserted
whether   signed   by   the   real   name   of
Lhe writer or a num Ue plume, but Ihu
waiter's   name   and   address   must   t>.
brought  E'ven to the editor as an evidence of
. bona   fides.    In    no    case    will    It
a great surprise to everybody in the   divulged without consent.
defeat of Freeman  by Bruce  Smith.
It is true that Bruce-Smith had been
be
playing a beautiful game and his long
cross-court drives were a marvel of
precision and endurance, but he altogether lacked the versatility of Freeman, and would hardly be placed in
the same class, yet he won in three
straight sets, the last one a love set.
I am making no excuses for Freeman,
and do not wish to detract from the
merits of Bruce-Smith's performance,
but certainly the former did not play
his usual game, and unless I am entirely mistaken the strain of singles is
too much for him in his present physical condition.
That the match between  Freeman
and Bruce-Smith was not a true cri-
Victoria, Aug. 6, 1908.
Editor Week.
Sir,—And so the Town Council has
"been and gone and done it." Well,
well, what next? Their capacity for
government can be guaged by a small
thing like the dog-lead section of the
amendments to the dog regulations as
effectively as by waterworks schemes
or fire protection, and the placing of
this section upon the city's statutes
is regrettable. It was unnecessary because the evil of too many large dogs
frequenting the sidewalks in the business portion of the city had visibly
abated and the appeal made in The
Week two Saturdays ago to thoughtless owners of offending dogs was
not made in vain.    The high-handed
terion of form is evidenced by the measure just passed will stamp the
absolute ease with which Schwengers Council as silver spoons were stamped
defeated Bruce-Smith in three straight by the Silver Smiths Company, the
sets, and for the se,cond time won Jthe mark, however though similar will
championship of B.C It is not.ue- have-an-«pposite meaning. We shall
cessary to comment on the chain- CXpect to see lovely little dogs "haul
pion's beautiful play, he was accurate, marked" and their necks excoriated
strong and resourceful, and displayed perhaps, by ships cables or some other
all the traits of a genuine champion, means of secure attachment or what-
1 shall never cease to regret that he ever the correct phrase is and what
was not able to go to the Olympic a time is now ahead for the push-
Games, where I am convinced that he jng sales-gentlemen in emporiums
would have worked his way into the where are purveyed green eatables
finals, as at the present moment I and fruit which hereafter may be
am satisfied that in a live-set match more safely displayed on the pavc-
with his wonderful powers of endur- ment. lt is to be hoped that our
ance, he is a decidedly stronger player butchers will show their gratitude to
than Powell. the  City  Fathers  by  also  spreading
The local players were at a disad- out on the sidewalks the succulent
vantage against the visitors, and Miss prime roast and the juicy chop. Why
Hotchkiss was so distinctly in a class not? Be thorough. Dog fanciers are
by herself that she had a practical and so are their dogs,
walk-over in every event, even Miss The Council did this thing with its
Violet Pooley, who distinguished her- eyes open and has ruthlessly trampled
self throughout the tournament, and  upol, the feelings of a section of the
community who deserved better treat-
HAIR COMBS
For Ladies, Gentlemen and Children.
Nowhere in Victoria will you find a
better or more up-to-date assortment
of Combs than here, from the handy
Man's Pocket Comb to the handsomest article of adornment for milady's hair. Durable Combs a specialty.
COMBS STRONG ENOUGH TO
SAW WOOD—EACH 25c.
All-coarse Combs from 35c up.
Ladies' back and Side Combs in great
variety. Very handsome, fashionable
Sets from 75c up. All the newest and
most exclusive designs, consisting of
Brilliant Tortoise-shell, inlaid gold
and silver Set Combs, Pearl, Turquoise and other stone-set Combs at
extremely reasonable prices.
.. Why not take home a Set of Combs,
as a Souvenir of your visit to Victoria?
Nothing more acceptable to the average woman of today.
CYRUS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
■QOVERNIV ENT STREET
NEAR YATES STREET
VICT( RIA, B.C.
Iron Master win ral Group, consisting
"Ironmaster," "Iron King," "Iron
Prince," "Iro matter'! Sob" and
"Grip On Iron' Mineral Claims,
Situate in Port Itenfrew District, Victoria Mining Llvlsion.
Where Located—(Extending East and
West from Be itley Creek.
TAKE NOTICI that I, Harrle G.
Ross, for myself. Free Miner's Certln
cate No. B22830, ind associate Trustees
of the above Mineral Group, viz., John
Bentley, Free Miner's Certificate No,
B'3050; John William Fisher, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 23101; John Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B2303S; and Thomas J. Plimley, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B23040, Intend
60 days from thtfida'te hereof, to apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate
of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action
under section 37, must be commenced
before the Issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 1908.
June 20 HARRIE G. ROSS.
LICENCE TO AN INTER-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
ment and the surprising thing about
it is that their own s.-'f-interest failed
to cause them to pay attention to the
warning hand which indicated that
they were riding for a fall.
No wonder Mr. Mayor went away
inst when lie did.
CANINE.
retained her best form in the finals,
could make no headway against the
athletic little player from California.
Although Miss Alice Bell did well In
the early stages of the tournament
her play fell off towards the end of
the week, and she did not figure in the
finals. Miss Marian Pitts would probably have reached the semi-finals
but she ran up against Miss Hotchkiss, and whilst playing a very creditable   game   was   of   course   defeated.
Mrs. Langley and  Mrs.  Heald made NOTICE Is hereby given that an or-
0   - ulnary  general  meeting of the Tsimp-
dccidcdly the strongest team of ladies, scan Light ami Power Company will be
11       1        .   * .    .1 .    .1,. ..„i „... bold  at  130*1  Government Street,  being
and played   consistently   throughout. ,.orner of Yates and Government streets
In  the  final  against   Miss   Hotchkiss  '" }he,clts'.oflvlcto/la,\°P Tuesday, the
,._.,, , ,    , ISth  day of August,  1908, at 4  o'clock
and  Miss  Beckett they scored three  in the afternoon, to consider the profit
tr-imp.;   in   o-u-h   «<>.    whirl,   wis   the   aml loss account and balance sheet, the
games   in   cacli   set,   winch   was   the  ..eports of the Directors and the Audi-
best record made by ladies through-  tors,  to elect Directors and other offl-
, ,    1 .,       eers   in  place of  those retiring,  to de-
out the tournament, and shows that  clare   dividends   and   to   transact   any
other business  which  under  the  "Com
TS1MPSKAN
LIGHT     AND
COMPANY.
POWER
no mistake was made in pairing them
for the doubles.
Of the other players Jordan did
extremely well part of the time, but
he does not possess the tennis temperament, and when things so against
him is apt t
a sportsmanlike manner. If he could
get rid of this habit he would become
a very formidable doubles player, in
singles lie is not as good. R. H.
Pooley and Miss Violet Pooley carried  all   before  them  until  they  met
panles Clauses Act, 1897," ought to be
transacted at a general ordinary meeting and further transacted at a general
or ordinary meeting and further to
confirm or rescind any or all previous
proceedings of the Directors and the
.shareholders and to confirm or rescind
any or all the minutes of previous Directors' and Shareholders' meetings and
chuck it, in anything but <■_ confirm or rescind any or all previous resolutions, to pay out of the
funds of the Company any or all expenses of or incidental to the formation and Incorporation of the Company
and in or about the promotion of the
Company, and the conduct of the business or the submission and passing of
a new resolution providing for the remuneration os aforesaid and such other
business as may he referred to in any
,  ,,.      ..      . , . ,   ,      Report   of   the   Directors   or   may   pro-
r'ceman and Miss Hotchkiss, and the  cprly be entered upon.
Dated this first day of August, A. D.
190S.
By order.
JOHN  DEAN,
Aug 1. Secretary.
Canada.
Province of British Columbia.
No. 446.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
Niagara Fire Insurance Company" ls
authorized and licensed to carry on
business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
Tbe head offlce of the Company is s'.t-
uate at the City of New York.
The amount of the capital of the Company is seven and fifty thousand dollars, divided into fifteen thousand
shares of fifty dollars each.
The head office of the Company in this
Province is situate at Victoria, and Ernest Victor Bodwell, Barrlster-at-law,
whose address ls Victoria aforesaid, ls
the attorney for the company.
The time of the existence of the Company Is thirty years from the 22nd day
of July, 1880.
GIVEN under my hand and seal of
offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 23rd day of July, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
(L.  S.) S.  Y.  WOOTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  been established and licensed are:
To make insurance on dwellings,
houses, stores and all kinds of buildings, and upon household furniture,
merchandise and other property against
loss and damage by fire, and the risks
of Inland navigation and transportation.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander W.
Young, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Timber Dealer, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
foreshore and submerged lands on Moss
Inlet:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner, being about one-half
mile south of the mouth of Clyak river;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 46
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 45 chains to point of commencement.
Staked July 3, 1908.
ALEXANDER W.  YOUNG.
July 25 George Young, Agent.
former with Rithet put up one or two
good games, but the latter was obviously out of practice.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Two of the Best
Dixi Coffee
t  blend  of  the   finest  old
Government   Java  and
Arabian Mocha at
Soc, 40c and 30c per lb.
Dixi Tea
Noted   throughout   Western
Canada for its rich syrupy
flavor and  fine  bouquet  at:
$1, 50c and 35c per lb.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
Where you get the best things to eat and drink.
"As much valor is to be found
in feasting as In fighting."
—Burton
The Poodle Dog
In the matter of ministering to the needs of the inner man is
most luxuriously equipped. A new chef direct from Paris. The
cosy grill room as a centre of good cheer takes a distinct place in
the business and social life of Victoria.
SPECIAL DINNER A LA CARTE
AT REASONABLE PRICE.
W. S. D. SMITH, Proprietor
YATES STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.
When Hearts Are Trumps
Housekeeping goods will
soon be needed. The first
essential towards good
housekeeping is a good
Gas Range
The benedict-to-be should
see that his bride experiences
the joy of a stove that's always ready and oven that's
always right, and a heat that
can bc regulated so that a
cool kitchen is apparent during hot weather. See our
splendid values in Gas
Ranges and Stoves.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Limited
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
.
Cockburn's Art Gallery
(Successors to WILL MARSDEN) PHONE 1933
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B.
_ yr_T_v_*rv_Y_i_Tnr-_T_TS_is-i
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
■Commission and Real Estate Agents.
167 Cordova St.        Vaacoaver. _\
JUUULSLSLSLSUL_L_UULSLSL_ULSUULSL^
Vancouver Edition
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. e.
&3mnnnr _ amnr_nint« a a. __ vv\
ni  Stewart William, Hilton Keith
e
STEWART WILLIAMS*Co
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AHB
REAL ESTATE SCENTS
e   ft FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
" "I Phone 1324 c
Imininimimino^lHjtj
/VQ
lou V.   No
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST «, I9o8
Ons Dollar Pm. Annum
The City
If Doom.
It requires no great stretch
of tlie imagination to accept
the superstitious belief of
the Kootenay Indians that
ilie Elk Valley is the playground of de-
nons, and Fernie a City of Doom. Thrice
u six years has the progressive and prosperous capital of the coal country been
iverwhelmed with disaster. In May, 1902,
i terrible mine explosion destroyed one
mndred and thirty lives and plunged the;
.onimunity into the profoundest sorrow.
Fernie became the centre of interest and
f sympathy throughout the mining world,
ind has never ceased to occupy a place in
he thoughts of those who intently watch
he progress of the hazardous industry of
oal mining. In March, 1903, nearly the
■.'hole of the business section was destroyed
it fire, the losses aggregating throe-quar-
ers of a million dollars. The heaviest
osers were the pioneers who had labor-
usly built up their various trades and
iiisinesses and found everything swept
way, with very inadequate insurance.
Vow in 1908 comes the greatest disaster
f all, from a material standpoint, for prae-
ically the whole of the town is destroyed,
illy a few private residences and ten or
dozen miners' cottages remain, if one
xcepts the cement block in which the Coal
Jompany's offices are established and
.'hich stands in the centre of a large
quare. The gross loss in Fernie alone
annot be less than $2,000,000, and a con-
ervative estimate of the damage in the
uiTounding country, chiefly to lumber,
laces it at $7,000,000. The latter is the
rore serious aspect of the case since it
leans the destruction of the raw material
pon which a great industry depended, and
"ernie is thus deprived of one of its chief
ources of revenue. No one who knows
'ernie is surprised at what has happened,
lie pioneers always expected the city to
e wiped out and those who were accus-
mied to conditions in the West have al-
ftys maintained that it would be subject
o recurring tires until the surrounding
lountain slopes were stripped of timber,
'he configuration of the Elk Valley ren-
ers this almost a certainty. It is nar-
ow, throughout, the Elk Kiver has bur-
owed a course like a thread for' nearly
. hundred miles, and the Ranges of the
Rockies rise precipitously almost from the
EDITORIAL
rater's edge. It is a known fact that tho
alley forms a kind of funnel, and that
he wind invariably blows either up or
lown, rarely across; at times it blows
iercely, even in summer clays. Not a year
ias passed since the establishment of the
)ity in 1897 but tliere have been serious
iush fires enveloping the valley in smoke,
nd always threatening to overwhelm the
nhabitants. Mr, William Fernie truly
ays that, the only safety lay in surround-
ig the town with a broad cleared belt,
f this could have been done ten years
go it might have held all the bush fires
i check, but it would have been an ex-
.■niely difficult and expensive operation.
Chen one remembers that the destructive-
ess of a bush tiro depends upon the velo-
ity of tho wind, and that when the fire
■■ached Fernie last week a tornado was
aging it would be almost impossible to
efine the limits of a safe clearing. Sparks
ave been known to carry half a mile, and
nyone who has watched the progress of
bush fire can testify to the fact that new
res will start up hundreds of yards in
dvance of the main fire.   If Mr. Fernie's
suggestion has any value it is for other
Western towns which have not been overtaken by the tire fiend.    Fernie at terrible cost is now protected by miles of
devastated country.    Three things stand
out conspicuously from the disheartening
record of Fernie's disaster.   The heroism
and resourcefulness  of  its  citizens,  the
widespread  sympathy  aroused,   and  the
prompt and generous contributions for the
relief of the sufferers.    In all these respects Fernie comes very near to establishing a record.   It is much too early yet
to learn the details of that terrible clay,
but enough has leaked out to show that
the citizens of Fernie set an example to
the world in the courage, coolness and
energy which they displayed.   It is marvellous, when the circumstances are considered, that fewer than twenty lives were
lost out of at least six thousand threatened.
With flames of tire leaping from building
to building quicker than men could enter
ancl return, with a belt of fire feeding
upon dried bush and lumber surrounding
them, and with a raging wind to fan the
flames and carry on the work of destruction at lightening speed it is nothing short
of miraculous that fatalities have not to be
recorded  by   the   hundred.     That   such
would have been the case but for the
splendid qualities displayed by the citizens
is abundantly clear.    The railway men
who assembled and manned trains and
rushed their living freight between walls
of fire to a place of safety have earned
undying fame, and one cannot think without a thrill of admiration of the brave
telegraph operator who shouldered his instrument and tramped literally through
the fire from Hosmer to Fernie, cutting
in on a wire and reeling off his message
to the outside world ensuring prompt succor.    His name has not even leaked out
but he is a hero, and men have received
the Victoria Cross for less glorious deeds.
The telegraphic reports all unite in praising Mayor Tuttle, who rose to the occasion, and with Mr. W. R. Ross simply
spent himself in superhuman efforts to
protect life and relieve suffering.    When
the full story is told it will be found that
these men but represented hundreds of
others and illustrated what will ever hereafter be known as "the Fernie spirit"
which   within  forty-eight   hours  of  the
direst   catastrophe   commenced,   for   the
second time, to rebuild their city literally
upon the still burning and smoking ashes
of its ruins.    Fernie may have been unfortunate, it may bc situated in a fatal
valley, it may be designated a City of
Doom, but as long as "the Fernie spirit"
survives it can never be destroyed.    Disaster instead of creating pessimism arouses
in its citizens the sublimest optimism, ancl
the world is the richer for the moral influence of a people who meet disaster with
a brave heart, and refuse to see anything
in the future but hopefulness and success.
The B. C. Contingent which
Picnicing at attended the Quebec Ter-
Quebec. centenary must have had a
veritable picnic, if one may
credit the accounts of those who have returned alive. As an illustration of "how
nut to do it" it would be difficult to find
anything more enlightening than the conduct of those who had charge of the expedition. The Militia authorities at Ottawa have not been singularly happy in
their treatment of the Fifth Regiment for
. some time past, but they evidently resolved
to make up for all shortcomings on the
Quebec trip. Thus, before the contingent
started the members were promised an allowance of $1.50 a day whilst en route,
instead of which when the contingent left
W innipeg the Militia authorities took the
catering into their own hands, and in lieu
of the $1.50 a day supplied three very
inferior meals, for whicli the men had to
pay 50 cents each, whether they ate or not.
xVs some of these meals consisted of bread
and jam, the authorities did not err on the
side of extravagance. One day the bread
supply ran out and only by dint of tlieir
superior knowledge of arithmetic did the
authorities manage to feed twenty-two men
on eighteen slices of bread. This bread
and jam school boy treatment aroused intense amusement among the other contingents and the B. C. Troup was clubbed
"Laurier's Own." The climax was reached
when the invitations for the military ball
and other functions at Quebec were issued.
Unfortunately the B. C. Officers failed to
catch the Speakers' eye, and Col. Hall, in
spite of the fact that he was commander
of all the forces west of Winnipeg, as well
as Adjutant Stern and other B. C. Officers
were completely ignored. No wonder that
on the return journey the contingent was
a little downspirited and gave vent to its
feelings in a sign conspicuously displayed
on the outside of the Colonist car. It ran
as follows: "British Columbia boys returning from Quebec, weary, worn and
starved by the Laurier Government." This
is not the first time that the Militia authorities have proved their inability to cope
with the simplest demands of the Militia
service, but it is as discreditable to them
as many which have preceded it.
Mayor Hall has returned
The Water from his Eastern trip and
Question. ]ias signalized his re-entry
into Municipal affairs by
excluding the press from the deliberations
of the Council on the water ucstion, which
is by far the most important topic of discussion at the present time. Mayor Hall
is resentful of criticism and declares that
in the East it is not customary for citizens
to find fault with the conduct of those who
are intrusted with the management of civic
affairs. He takes comfort from the fact
that other cities have their water problems,
and apparently considers that because
Montreal or Toronto is prepared to put
up with bad water, Victoria should be
grateful that it may follow suit. Even if
Mayor Hall were correct in his facts it
does not follow that his deduction would
be accepted. But alas for Mayor Hall's
facts, in the Montreal Daily Star of
August the lst is a most critical and condemnatory letter by a well known citizen,
Mr. A. E. Alexander, in which he rakes
the Council over in good style, blames
them for their supineness ancl neglect,
points to 4the case of Manchester which
neglected the same thing until its citizens
rose in arms against the continued use of
"dish-water" ancl compelled the Council to
carry out a project for bringing pure water
from lakes two hundred miles distant. So
that Mayor Hall is entirely in the wrong
in supposing that tho citizens of Montreal
are any less critical of the misdoings of
their Council than the citizens of Victoria.
Xo one wishes to hamper the Council or
obstruct the progress of any scheme which
will relieve the water situation, but it is
difficult to obstruct a thing' which is not
moving, and public confidence will not be
strengthened by the decision of the _Uayor
to keep it in the dark upon a matter which
will very soon demand independent action
on the part of the City, Whilst on this
subject it may be as well to point out that
the Colonist is in error in stating that the
Water Commissioner has power to demand
a supply from the Esquimalt Waterworks
Co. on statutory ternis. If the Colonist
will study the charter it will find that such
a demand can only be made when the City
is in a position to prove that its present
source of supply is "inadequate for its
population." Everybody but the City
Council believes this to be a fact, but unfortunately that astute body backed up by
the expert opinion of Mr. Adams maintains that Elk Lake is adequate for a population of 45,000 to 50,000, a considerable
advance upon the present population of
\ ictoria. Fortified by this opinion it will
be difficult for the Council to make its
demand upon the Esquimalt Waterworks
Co. Perhaps the Colonist will look into
this, and as it is anxious to elucidate the
subject to the fullest let the public have
the benefit of its researches.
On Thursday last the
The Victoria Victoria Musical Society
Musical Society,    held its annual meeting.
The officers, and in particular Mr. Geo. Phillips, the Director,
must be congratulated on the splendid report handed in. In spite of large fees
paid to such world renowned artists as
Paderewski and Xubelik, tliere is a surplus of nearly $1,000, which will enable
the Committee to make the most attractive
engagements for the ensuing season. The
Society has demonstrated its usefulness
and as it aims not only at furnishing enjoyment to the public but at promoting
musical taste and the teaching of music in
our schools it has a double claim for support upon all who value culture and art.
The membership is now upwards of six
hundred, and if it could be raised to a
thousand, as it should, there is no limit
to the possibilities of the very highest class
musical entertainment in Victoria.
When there are so many
Coming Back complaints from English
To Marry. people   who   settle   in   the
.Northwest, it is encouraging to run across the ease of at least one
girl who although gently nurtured enters
into the breezy spirit of the West and
learns to tackle the business of life in the
right spirit. After spending two years
with her brother on a ranch in the Cypress
Hills, she has gone home to buy her wedding trousseau, and will shortly return 'to
keep house for someone else." She winds
up a most interesting letter in the Loudon
Daily Mail with the following paragraph
which cannot be too widely circulated for
the benefit of girls who are disappointed
because they came west for a perpetual
holiday:—"Many English girls go out as
wives to Cannda with romantic ideas of
roughing it on the prairie with 'dear
Hurry.' But when they conic to the practical work of washing 'clear Harry's' shirts
and cooking his meals, the romance is apt
to fade, and only a disappointing commonplace is left! Every woman who goes out
to tlie West must make up her mind to
find her sole happiness and joy in her home
surroundings, and she must bc both able
and willing to lead a life of hard work
and self-sacrifice." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908.
I strongly deprecate the criticism
which has been levelled at the defenceless head of Aid. Richard Hall
in connection with the notorious dog
by-law. People of all sorts and conditions have seen fit to unburden
themselves in the columns of the daily
press all because the worthy Alderman, finding himself the proud possessor of a pet idea, clung to it with
the proverbial tenacity of the British
bull-dog. Surely the last person to
denounce him for exhibiting one of
the most characteristic traits of their
favourite animal should be dog lovers.
Further, I am not sure that all
who have written on the subject are
familiar with the genesis of the idea
Consideration for the feelings of Aid.
Hall prevents me from elucidating
this point further than to say that on
a certain morning not many weeks
ago he might have been seen performing a decidedly humble but necessary chore at the entrance to his
office as a consequence of that degeneracy in the canine race so bitterly yet withal humourously decried
by one Lauiice of Shakespearean
memory.
No wonder that the ire of Alderman Hall was aroused, and yet it
was more in sorrow than in anger
that he vowed then and there to protect his fellow citizens and the business men of Government street from
a similar distressing contretemps. In
spite of the bitter criticism with which
he has been assailed, he has proved
himself as good as his word, and
hereafter the faithful canine may only
decorously parade the business sections of the city in leash.
Have any of Aid. Hall's critics estimated how many thousands of dollars a year this precautionary by-law
will save the tradesmen of Victoiia?
To say nothing of the added air of
respectability which our sidewalks will
gain now that dogs are no longer allowed to comport themselves as
lower animals.
But, I am in possession of a secret,
at least it has been a secret up to
now, and like many other secrets, of
which erotic novelists and perfervid
poets have told us, it burns within
my breast and cannot longer be restrained. It is that the zeal of Aid.
Hall is by no means exhausted, and
that in the interest always of his suffering fellow citizens, he has cast his
eye upon the cater-wauling "tommy"
and nerve racking "rooster." No
longer will night be made hideous
and the early morning unrestful by
these "betes noirs" of drowsers. Every
member of the feline tribe when it
crosses thc doorstep, and every rooster when he starts on his meander-
ings beyond the confines of the poultry yard, must have a string attached
to his leg and be gently led hither
and thither wherever his sweet fancy
or that of his owner may lead. This
is one of the most comprehensive
philanthropic schemes ever evolved
from the brain of a Victoria alderman.
Those who thought that the ingenuity
of Aid. Hall was exhausted when hc
had placed the dog on leading strings,
made a very great mistake. It is not
until they see the frolicsome tommy
being carefully piloted along Government street with a string or a ribbon
attached to his hind leg, and thc flirtatious rooster similarly anchored to
the delicate wrist of a dainty dame,
in faint but burlesque reminiscence of
thc days of falconry, that Victoria
will realize the stupendous services
of Aid. Hall and the wide possibilities which the municipal career offers
to a really fertile and practical brain.
I am very pleased to see that the
effect of a letter printed in the last
issue of The Week has been so
prompt and satisfactory; it had reference to the provision of a public water
tap, or some other more euphonious
substitute. Thc idea immediately
commended itself to the minds of the
City Councillors, and according to a
report of the proceedings of the Coun-
Mumm's Champagne
Reigns Supreme at Every Famous Banquet,
It is the one Champagne used exclusively at the very
highest public functions throughout the world—the wine
of Kings and Connoisseurs, the Champagne by which other
champagnes are judged.
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Selected Brut is a brut Champagne of the very highest quality, made of selected cuvees
of vintage years specially adapted for brut wines. It is a
very dry and genuine Brut Champagne of exceeding purity
without being heavy.
G. H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry is conceded to be the
finest produced this decade; made from selected grapes of
the choicest vineyards in the Champagne District noted for
its  superb  quality,  natural  dryness  and  absolute  purity.
Our series of Menus of Famous Dinners,
where Mumm's Champagne and White
Rock Water are invariably included, will
be continued next week.
PITHER   &   LEISER
"The B. C. Home of Mumm's Champagne,"
Cor. Fort & Wharf Sts., Victoria.
cil meeting of Wednesday night the
deficiency is to be supplied at once.
But why limit the accommodation to
one point? No doubt the James Bay
Boat-house is a very suitable location,
but surely another might be provided
near the post office, and another near
the corner of Yates and Government.
This is a small matter but a great
convenience.
I was very much amused at an
editorial which appeared in the Colonist on Sunday last, or to be more
accurate, I was amused at the title,
"National Bumptiousness." The article is a criticism of what is generally considered to be the "star"
failing of the great people who are
fortunate enough to live south of the
International Boundary line. There
may be some ground for the criticism,
but it would not have strained the
logic of the argument to have included
those who have' temporarily resided
under the Stars and Stripes, nor
would it have been out of place if
the writer had apologised for treating
the subject in the columns of the Colonist. It does not detract from the
merits of the performance to recall
the fact that one who enjoys the reputation of being the wisest of men once
said, "there is a time for all things."
A complaint has reached me to
which I would respectfully call the
attention of the Hotel Managers of
the city, it is that the arrivals of
guests published in the newspapers
are often belated. To be of value
these lists should be published as
quickly as possible after the visitors
reach the city, especially as some of
them only remain for a day. Several
instances have been brought to my
notice where friends of well known
citizens had been and gone before
their names appeared in the paper.
This causes much disappointment and
largely defeats the object of publication. Whether the fault rests with
the management, or with the newspapers, or with both it should bc
remedied. The system of piling up
the arrival list until it reaches formidable dimensions in order to make
a brave showing, as is done in some
cases, is altogether unjustifiable, and
should not be countenanced by the
press.
Boys' School
Suits
at Reduced
Prices
This Week
;
:
':
Fit-Reform Wardrobe
1801   Government   St,     Victoria.,
ALLEN & CO.
t
■■^^«*<-»'^'*-*^'******^*-»*nQ
A SKIN CREAM TEST.
Nothing teaches like experience. If
you have a scratch, slight cut, blackhead or pimple troubling you, you
will be in a position to test the virtues
of Dr. T. Felix Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, and to appreciate its healing
and purifying qualities. Then, with
all doubts quickly removed, a continued use will demonstrate its value
as a skin beautifier and purifier, and
how fully it carries out the high
claims made for it. At Druggists and
Fancy Goods dealers. No. 2Ang. 1
C. H. TITE & CO.
PAINTERS, PAPER-HANGERS
Wall Paper from aj^c up.
No old stock. Estimates given.
Prices Cheaper than ever.
COR. YATES AND BROAD STS.
WANTED
WANTED—Young men for Firemen and
Brakemen, instruct you at home by
mail. For free information send
stamp to National Railway Training
School, Inc., 376 Robert St. (Room 67),
St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A
Y. W. C. A.
iao8 Government Street
VICTORIA.
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast (Rivers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the B. C. Canning Co., Ltd., of London, Eng., occupation Canners and Sawmill owners, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described foreshore and
submerged land:
Commencing ta a post marked B. C.
C. Co., S.E. Cor., planted at high water
mark on Island forming part of Lot 3,
Range ,2 Coast District, about three
chains southwesterly from the church,
situated on the Wannuck River, Rivers
Inlet; thence due west 20 chains; thence
due north about 10 chains; thence about
25 chains to S.W. corner of Lot 3 on
north shore of Rivers Inlet; thence following the shore line at high-water mark
ln a southeasterly direction to a point
about one and a half chains east of
north end of bridge; thence due south
to the Island first mentioned; thence
following the western shore of the island
to point of commencement, and containing 50 acres, more or less.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  CANNING  CO.
2Gth June, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
Clement A. Haynes, Agent.
?
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 1*3- VICTORIA
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
THE REPUTATION OP
James Buchanan & Co's SCOTCH WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and  stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
ROVAL HOUSEHOLD BLACK AND WHITE
RADIGER & JANION, Soto Agaats for B.C.
LAST CALL
You know the old saw about "Procrastination."
Are You the Man
Who early in the spring promised to
TREAT  THE  HOUSE
To a new coast of paint?
Said you would, soon as the weather settled.
If the sale of paints and brushes is any kind of barometer, you
can "bank" on an almost unbroken spell of fine weather. Our
tremendous sales predict it.
It's just a little bit "strenuous" to apply color later on during
the hot days of July; now it's a pleasure.
We have the PARTICULAR PAINT for the PARTICULAR
PURPOSE.
CI
S.&W." BRANDS
None other quite so good.
HOUSEPAINT,  ROOF PAINT,   FLOOR PAINT,
PORCH PAINT,  CARRIAGE PAINT,   ENAMELS.
PAINT AND VARNISH BRUSHES.    STEP LADDERS,
Everything for the Job.
E. G. PRIOR & CO..
Corner Government and Johnson Streets    -    Victoria, B.C.
LTD.
LTY.
You can always      --      ^   It tastes different
tell anM. B. u^r |V|t    D*     than others.
Union Made. fd lfl_\V
Havana Filler.       WII|C1I
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken  up  and  what's   vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
Electric  Blue  Print  and  Map  Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria. B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM ft CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo
Vollieries
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal  in the
market at current rates.
Anthracite Coal for sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA, B.C.
The days are getting Warm.
THE
WILSON BAR
Is Comfortable.
VISIT IT.
64S Yates St., Victoria, B. C.
Leave Yaur -Baggage Checks at thi
Pacific Transfer Co*
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
PkMe Ul.      A. E. KENT, Prapriet
LLOYD ft CO., practical chimm
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chit
neys can be cleaned without ma
ing an ellova mess, Try ui ai
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SE: THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908
Socialism.
White Horse, 15 July, 1908.
ro "Bohemian," care The Week,
Victoria, B.C.
come to the conclusion he is not the
friend of humanity. Can you name a
place on this earth where those teachings are made the foundation of any
dealings between Master and man?
Can you point to any of His self ap-
Dear Sir—A letter over your sig-  pointed   leaders   and   say   they   are
1'nature appeared in The Week a short friendly to humanity—I mean the
rime ago, criticizing the "Western Church? In the late 50's of the last
Clarion" for what you termed bias- century, the churches both north and
phemous remarks. I have not read south were among the most bitter
jthe Clarion's article referred to, but opponents of the abolition of black
|I am quite sure many readers of The slavery in the United States and quot-
I/eek would be glad to hear some- ed much scrjpture to support their
thing from you regarding the other clajmS| even as today they are among
s'('e' the most bitter opponents of the only
You speak about the Clarion's ut- movement ever conceived for the up-
terances as being illustrative of the iifting of thc human racej and that
true character of the men who are movement is Socialism. You say
responsible for Socialistic journalism. christ identified himself-while on
This would appear to be the keynote earth_with the labouring man. Does
of your article. Such an opportunity it not appear to you that at the last
to discredit Socialism was too good he has left his chosen t0 shift for
for its opponents to overlook. You themselves and allowed the earth and
do not seem to be aware that Christ all its fulness to fall h]to the hands
or Christianity is not a question at of a few? Anything the labouring
issue in any way with the Socialists, classes have today they can thank
they believing in perfect freedom of their labour unions for iti and the
individuals on such questions, history growjng Socialist movement. That is
is already overloaded with facts about the real bugbear to those "Whom God
governments and parties forcing be- in His infinite wisdom has given con-
liefs upon people at the sword point- troi of the coal mines» (--Djvine
we do not seek any more Inquisi- Right» Baer) and other natural re.
tions. In the Socialistic party today sources of this earth) that is why
|throughout the world there are truer therc is a tendency to throw a legis-
aen and women working for the ad- iative sop t0 the labourers occasion-
vancement of humanity than any of ally as instanced in the Conciliation
^he Christian churches have produced Act of Canada, you mention. You
down through the ages.   If a person, speak about the dignity of labourj lhe
Socialistic or capitalistic, today is to spirit in which it is perf01.med and
team of Christ through his socalled the true relation between capital and
Representatives  on earth, the church ,abour.    Labour had no dignity and
vith its  priests and.ministers,  is  it until the unions forced it tllerc was
Iany wonder men doubt that Christ? no relati0n between Capital and La-
Have any of these churches done any- bour any more than that capltal would
thing during the last 1900 years to get out of labour all the huma„ mor.
strengthen one's faith in Christ ?-and tal could produCe at a starvation wage,
the priest or minister individually, is «a crust of bread and a rag» Labour
very rare who by example would lead waited IQOO years for the sermon on
men to Him. True they occasionally the Mount t0 solve its difficultieS|
dole out charity-admonition sand- but as Christ's representatives seemed
viches-as it were but how many of t0 think these precepts were intended
I them raise their voice in protest only for the iabourer, there could be
against the causes that make charity no solution excepting for labour to
necessary? I fear if a parson had bow its head t0 the yoke and cease
the audacity to do such a thing we to ask for anything but a slave.s
would be treated to another heresy existence. slaveryi you know> is quite
trial. Take the foremost church in out of date in spite o{ the scriptural
vealth    and    numbers-the    Roman  support.    «The Golden Rule still re-
ICatholic. What has this political ag- mains the corner stone of al, pro.
gregation to its credit. Contemplat- gressiv£ ,abour legislatLon and that
ing it past and present is it not the vast impi.cvenlent in labour con-
enough to create blasphemy. It is ditions during the past fifty years is
responsible in Christ's name for noth- mainly due t0 a recognition of that
Jng but misery, degradation and ig- principle." Previous to the past fifty
Inorance of the masses who are un- yfiars the «common peopie» were so
Jfortunate enough to be in its clutches. priest.bound that thcy dared not think
Yet if we are to credit all Scrip- for themseives under penalty of hell's
ture, this church is the only one hav- t0rtures-and in their endeavour to
ing direct Scriptural authority. (See ,;ve up to the Sermon on the Mount
Matthew's Gospel, chap. 16, 18 and awakened only to discover that the
19.) This was originally no doubt a earth with its jnher;tance had slipped
priestly interpolation, but we are can- away {rom the meek into the han(]s
tioned to accept all Scripture. This of the raighty_the ones who disre-
same authorized church no doubt also garded the Golden Ruie and the Ser-
interpolated; Acts 9: 5—"It is hard mon had it all. For any victory labour
for thee to kick against the goads." has had with its unions can you point
(I use the R. C. rendering—it reads t0 a time when Christ's church has
better than the King James version). Hfted its voice in favour o{ or sided
This was probably intended to ad- wtih the workers? When has the
monish those who might object to Golden Rulc been f0n0Wed by em-
the goads of the church, but as it has pioyers and conditions improved. Take
been entirely omitted from the re- the c p R) probably Canada's
vised version I suppose we must be- wealthiest corporation. When has
lieve the goads no longer exist. What that company enforced the Golden
has the church of England or any of Rule and bettered conditions volun-
the others ever done to remedy the tari,y The departments of that corn-
causes that lead to poverty? About pany that have secured decent wages
as much as "Trinity" of New York and Uvjng conditions to any extent
has done —nothing-yet this last haye only done SQ by meam of their
named church owns close on to $100,- mions Not at any time has the c
000,000 worth of property, a great p R pajd the empioyees decent liv-
deal of it the worst slums in New -„g wages without first trying to
York. They represent Christ or claim starve them out thr0ugh a strike. Was
to. Two years ago, Phelps Stokes Lieutenant-Governor Dunsmuir prac-
and wife, millionaire philanthropist, tjsing the Goidell Ru]e when he
wished to do a bit of housecleaning threatened to ciose HIS mines for
a slum district in New York, but ten years?
large cities, on account of the mere
pittance they are offered in wages?
Is it fear of offending the wealthy
Pharisees who occupy the church pews
that keeps them silent? Instead of
objecting in the name of their God,
they continue telling the unfortunates
to be content in that state of life to
which it has pleased God to call you."
(See Church of England Catechism;.
If God called the large majority to
poverty and dirt is that an incentive
for them to honour Him? The list
of what they, the churches, regret,
twice each Sunday of having left undone is too great. In God's name
what have they done?
You think it will not be by Socialism that Christ's spirit will be derived. It is proven daily that it will
not be by His representatives and
churches and as Socialism is the only
movement that has ever had for its
goal, the Brotherhood of Man, if that
fails then we had better all join the
Boston Purgatorial Society, and by
means of a small monthly payment
before death, be assured of a safe
passage to heaven afterwards. The
church's—Christ's church—power for
good today is about as effective as
were the Ikons carried by priests at
the head of the Russian Army—into
battle against the poor heathen Japs.
When you were writing about the
beautiful Eastertide, magnificent
music and flowers, did it not seem
to you that such things would partake somewhat of the nature of Dead
Sea Fruit—to the thousands of unemployed in the different cities throughout the world, who have just dragged
through a winter of hardship and
want. Do you think the music and
flowers with probably a short address
by a sycophantic parson, would tend
to draw men to that Christ claimed
to be represented? Do not look for
faults among those whom you would
term blasphemers, why not try and
remove the causes that lead men to
blaspheme against those things the
very few upon earth have cause to
revere. I do not suppose you will
reply to any of my questions, in any
of your future letters to The Week,
but in all fairness you should. I
would have replied through the correspondence columns of the paper,
but I am well aware it is entirely
useless trying to get anything but one
side of a question into the columns
of the Conservative subsidized press
of this day and date. But I do wish
you would inform yourself a little
upon causes—do not worry about
effects.
As your articles appear over a 110m
de plume you will allow me the same
privilege.
Yours most respectfully,
"YUKONER."
were immediately warned off by Trin
ity Church corporation, the Vicars
of "He who had not where to lay
his head." It may interest you to
know that Stokes and his wife are
now ardent
at Hull hou
As long as Christ's church is permitted   to  offer  such  a  travesty  on
Christianity  as  we have had  in  the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^Ipast   and   at   present,   rather   attack
Socialists, have lectured them for blasphemy, not the ones who
1 settlement house in  begin   to   doubt.    Can  you  name   a
Chicago slums—said house now being church  uttering protests against the
under the ban of the Roman Clergy     ""' '    "--,---«
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District  of  Rivers  Inlet,  B.C.   (Coast).
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd., of London,
Eng., occupation canners and sawmill
owners, intend to apply for permission
to lease the following described foreshore and submerged land:
Commencing at a post marked B. C.
C. Co., N.W. Cor., planted at high-water
mark about one and a half chains east
of the north end of bridge on Lot 3,
Range 2, Coast District, at head of
Rivers Inlet; thence following the shore
line in a south-easterly direction about
50 chains to S.E. corner of Lot 3; thence
about 40 chains in a south-westerly direction to a point in the centre of the
river due south of Church on Lot 3;
thence about 10 chains north to the post
on island placed about three chains
south of church, and forming the S.E.
boundary of the B.C. Canning Co.'s previous notice of application for foreshore lease; thence about 11) cliains ln
a north-easterly direction following the
high-water mark to entrance to slough;
thence in a north-westerly direction following the north shore of said island
about 23 chains to a point due south
of point of commencement; thence north
about 10 chains to point of commencement, and containing 40 acres, more or
26th June, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
Aug. 1 Clement A. Haynes, Agent.
ROOFING SLATE
Pacific Slate Company, Ltd.
UNFADING BLUE BLACK
Non-Oxidizing
ALL STANDARD SIZES
HEAD  OFFICE-CHANCERY CHAMBERS
YARD-HUDSON'S BAY WHARF
For Prices and Particulars apply to
J. S. FLOYD, Secretary-Treasurer
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
o
Dermatologist
Institute
Mrs. Stanner (graduate of Mrs. Nettie Harrison, San Fran-
cosco), cordially invites the ladies of Victoria to call and investigate
her   methods.   Expert   in   Dermatology,   Facial   Massage,   Hair
Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp Treatment, Manicuring, etc.
CLAY PACK FOR THE COMPLEXION.
ELECTRICAL FACE MASSAGE.
Room 23, Vernon Block
Hours 9 to 6.       - - - - Phone x6ag
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000006
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
CASH REGISTERS,
FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—ask us.
TYPEWRITERS,
SAFES, DESKS,
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President F- Caseltsn, Manafer.
We make a specialty ot  Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
St. Andrew's College
TORONTO
A  Canadian Residential and Day   School
row Boys
Upper and Lower Schools.   New BolldiDgs.   8eparate Junior Reeldeooe.
Bon prepared (or tbo UalVKittlM and Business.
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD. MA. ILD.. Principal
Calendar sent on application.       Antamn term commence! Sept 10,1906
"Elijah" and "Benjamin" Mineral Olaimi I
Situate ln Port Renfrew District, Victoria Mining Division.
Where located—Immediately east ot
Bugaboo Creek and Seven Miles from
San Juan Harbour.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrle Q.
Ross, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B22830, Agent for The Bentley Iron
Mining Co., Ld., Free Miner's Certlflcate
No. B22821, Intend 60 days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
Dated this 10th day of June. A.D. 1908.
June 20 HARRIS O. ROSS.
ils heiiiK inimical to their church—as
anything is that would better humanity, ls it any wonder some arc be-
ginning to doubt the Man these
churches represent? You say it is inconceivable how any man who has
studied  the   teachings  of  Christ  can
millions of child slaves in England
and America? Do they consider the
mill and the mine the quickest route
for the children to respond to Christ's
call of "Suffer the little children to
come unto Me?" Has the church ever
tried to remedy the cause that forces
so   many  women   to   the   streets   in
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast (Rivers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the B.C. Canning
Company, Ltd., of London, England, occupation, Canners, etc., intends to apply
for permission to lease the following
described lands, including the foreshore
to the depth of one chain:
Commencing at a post planted at high
water mark on the west boundary of
Lot 3, Range 2, Coast District, marked
"B.C.C. Co., S.E. C."i thence north 20
chains; thence west 20 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence following shore
line in an easterly direction to point
of commencement, containing forty acres
more or less.
Date  13th  June,  1908.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING COMPANY. LTD.
Aug.  1 C. A. Haynes, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Ernest Victor
Bodwell, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Barrlster-at-Law, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
tho west shore of Bllnklnsop Bay, about
100 feet south of the Wharf, thence
west 80 chains; thence north 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south
along the shore back to place of beginning, and containing 480 acres, more
or less.
Dated June 24th, 1908.
ERNEST VICTOR BODWELL.
July 4 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room.
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction,
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET.
A Skin of Beauty la a Joy Forever
DB. T. FELIX OOUBAUD'S
Oriental Cream
OB MAGICAL BEAtmriSB
Purines as well as Beautifies tko Skin.
No other cosmetic will do lt.
Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth
Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and
every blemish on beauty, and defies detection. It has stood the test of 60
years; no other has, and ls so harmless—we taste it to be sure lt ls properly made. Accept no counterfeit of
similar name. The distinguished Dr. L.
A. Sayre said to a lady of the hem-ton
(a patient). "As you ladles will use
them, I recommend 'Gourand's Cream' ai
the least harmful of all the Skin preparations."
For sale by all druggists and Fancy
Goods Dealers.
OOUBAUB'B OMENTAL TOILET
FOWDEB
For infants and adults.   Exquisitely perfumed.   Relieves Skin Irritations, cures
Sunburn and renders an excellent com-
I plexion.
Price 25 cents, by mall.
GOUBAUD'S FOUDBE SUBTILE
Removes superfluous Hair.
Price 91.00, by mall.
FEBD. T. HOPKINS, prop.,
37 Oreat Jomes St.,        Hew York City.
AT   HENDERSON   BROS.,
Wholesale Distributors.
Tanconver ___ Tlctorla, B.O. THE WEEK, SATURDAY AUGUST 8, 1908
Many people have Important
documents, private papers and
other valuables, but few have
proper places ln htelr offices or
homes for safeguarding such possessions.
The practice of leaving valuables hidden away in a house is
a risk not wise to take. Theft,
Are or even misplacement may
result ln dire trouble.
Be safe—rent a Deposit Vault
Box.   Per year, $6.00 and up.
DOXXHXOB   TBOBT 00.
Limited.
J. S. KATHEBB, Gen. Hu.
38* Butter Street, west,
Tamoouver, a. 0.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
MM Qovernment Street...Victoria, B.C.
IX   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
VT. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Through Other
Glasses.
An Australian visitor to Victoria, a
man of some importance in his own
country as evidenced by the fact that
he was a delegate to the Pan-Anglican Synod in London, has passed
through our city on his way home,
and has favoured the daily press with
his views on Canada and Canadians.
The paper which published the interview has dubbed him a pessimist; it
would be fairer, however, to regard
him as a friendly critic. Canadians
are too apt to fall into the error which
has made Americans so unpopular,
that of supposing that they possess
"the greatest country on earth." In
some respects this may be true, but
even Canada has its drawbacks and
they constitute such a handicap that
it is neither fair nor reasonable to
ignore them when speaking of the
Dominion as a whole.
It is not unnatural that the claims
put forward by Canadians should
arouse the ire of a good Australian.
If we wcre content to share with
other Colonies the many extravagant
praises which can truly be uttered of
greater Britain, our kinsmen across
the sea would have no ground of
quarrel with us, but when we appropriate all the superlatives and leave
them out in the cold, it is only natural that they should resent our claim
to superiority.
This good Australian declares that
hc was disappointed in our forests,
in our wheat lands, in our crops and
in our fruit. He avers that the timber he saw was stunted, that the grain
yielded less to the acre than in Australia, that finer fruit, especially small
fruit, is produced in New Zealand, and
that the wealth of Australia is per
capita greater than that of Canada.
Hc says, moreover, that the Canadian
climate must forever constitute a bar
to the perfect prosperity which the
country might otherwise enjoy.
Thc answer to this criticism is that
it contains that germ of a half truth
which to put it mildly is misleading.
The visitor admits that he only took a
bird's eye view of the country, that
with one exception all his impressions
were received as he passed through
on the main line of the C.P.R., the
exception being a short side trip into
the wheat fields of Manitoba. He
speaks most unfavourably of the
country lying between Montreal and
Toronto, but perhaps he is not aware
that in this area thousands of industrious farmers have eked out a living
for more than a century, and if the
luxury of Australia is not in evidence,
there is at any rate comfort, and an
assured livelihood.
The comment upon our wheat fields
is true as far as it goes, everyone
who has studied the subject knows
that the yield per acre in Manitoba
and the Northwest probably averages
not more than twenty bushels to the
acre, while Australian and English
wheat will average from thirty to
th'rty-five to the acre, but this does not
touch the crux of the question which
is that wheat can be produced in the
Northwest at less than half the cost
of English wheat, and at three-fourths
the cost of Australian, whilst the
quality of No. i Hard is unapproached
by any other. I know something of
wheat growing both at home and
abroad, and I have yet to learn of the
country where the margin of profit is
as great as in the Canadian Northwest, and I am certain that tliere are
no wheat growers in the world who
have made anything like the money of
the settlers in the prairie provinces.
Then coming to fruit, I can quite
understand some criticism being directed by any competent critic at
Canadian fruit, but that is due entirely
to the lack of systematic storage and
transportation. In the orchard I am
convinced that there is no finer fruit
in the world, but lack of organized
handling, packing, and freighting
causes much of the Canadian fruit
to be placed on the market in an imperfect condition. The same cause explains why fruit is gathered before it
is ripe, and rushed to the consumer
in order if possible to make a high
figure. In the West there is probably only one section of the country
where the fruit crop is judiciously
handled; I refer to the Okanagan.
In Victoria the arrangements are
ridiculous, for instance, only this
week I was told by a rancher that he
has not gathered any of his cherries
this year, but has allowed them to
fall to the ground and rot. I asked
why. His reply was: "Because the
wholesalers will only pay me two
cents a pound picked, and it costs that
to pick them, even if I could get the
labour, which I cannot." These cherries were a splendid variety, and as
I write this there are hundreds of
baskets of the same kind displayed in
the Victoria fruit stores, marked 35c
a box, which is at the rate of practically 20c a pound. Very few of
these are being bought by the public,
because the price is prohibitive, and
they rot in the baskets instead of
rotting on the trees. I walked into
a fruit store today and found at least
70 per cent, of the stock decaying, all
because people would not buy at the
price fixed by the wholesalers.
Under these circumstances it is not
to be wondered that a visitor who
only sees our fruit in the hotels or
the dining cars, should find it inferior.
But there is a more serious aspect
to this question. Unless the matter
is dealt with intelligently the fruit industry will receive a severe blow.
What is the use of dilating on the
advantages of British Columbia as a
fruit growing country if when a man
has produced a good crop, he finds
that tliere is no market, or at any rate
no organization handling thc produce
and he cannot even afford to pick it?
Depend upon it news of this kind
travels quickly and travels far, and
at the present moment in Victoria
and all round the suburbs, the condition of affairs which I have described can be duplicated. Even
wealthy citizens do not gather their
fruit crops, but just pick a little for
immediate use and allow the rest to
rot.
This leaves me space to say but a
word on the subject of climate. Our
Australian critic could have found
in Canada a replica of almost every
climate under heaven, and if he did
not find himself suited at one place he
could go to another with the certainty
of finding just what he was looking
for. The tendency of Canadians is to
move westward, especially from the
prairie country, I for one have done
with the East, and the Middle West,
with those bitter winters which age
a man a year in a day. But British
Columbia has a climate which is unexcelled, and as the Province could
easily accommodate as many people
as the total population of Canada today, it will be many years before the
visiting Corn-stalk will have valid
ground for his criticism of the Canadian climate in such general terms as
he has applied it.
The decision of the J.B.A.A. to accept the terms offered by the 1m-
periad Trust Co. for their new building will be received by the true sports
of the city with great interest. It
will mark the introduction of Victoria
into sports on a much larger scale,
and with the co-operation of Victorians in general there is absolutely
no reason why the expense connected
with the erection and completion of
the building should not be wiped out'
within a very few months. The situation is an ideal one, possessing as it
does the natural advantages for which '
the association has in the past made ;
a grand reputation. With the construction of the new building 't will
be possible for the Club to have its j
boathouses in connection which will
afford the members every opportunity
to get to the boats without difficulty.
Now that the management of the Club
has accepted the proposition I shall
await with interest the commencement of the work of construction.
fa^THEATRi
,w_^<X^^V'l-	
*-i tCSIf CMANAr
"A Good Play for Husbands and
Wives to See"—Arthur Brisbane's
Editorial in the N. Y. Journal.
CHARLES FROHMAN
Presents the Great Dramatic
Sensation
"THE   THIEF,"
By Henri Bernstein.
As Played  for Ten  Months  at the
Lyceum Theatre, New York.
"Every Lover of the Drama Should
Go and See 'The Thief,"—Wm. Winter in the New York Tribune.
TELL US WHY
IT IS?
that we are to-day the largest British Columbia Diamond and
Jewelry House?
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO we began in a very modest way and
with a limited stock. TO-DAY we stand unchallenged as the
leading Jewelers of the Province.
Would it be so if our prices and goods were not the best
obtainable?
Would it be so if we did not keep up-to-date and carry the
newest and most artistic goods?
Would it be so if we failed in consideration and courtesy
toward our customers?
ARE YOU GETTING THE VERY BEST FOR
YOUR MONEY?
If not, call on us and we will promise to make every effort to
please and satisfy you. That is the Policy that has placed us
where we are—and we're sticking to it.
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street      -   Victoria, B. C.
TIMBER! TIMBER! TIMBER!
QUATBiiro sonrs, bedwell sotjkd, baoe babbows.
•UABAWTEEB  20,000 ST. TO TBE AOBE.
raxoa ia.s* to *3.tj.  all licenses issued.
ARTHUR BELL
BOOKS 14 ul 1«
Minor Bunsnro, ootebbkebt btbeet, yictobia.
P. O. BOX 7W. rXOBB 13M
Otnotos PropettdRaibmy*.
1»«il-?.'M,il"»
COPPER CITY
At the junction of Skeena and Copper Rivers.
On the routes of the G. T. P. and Kitimaat Railways.
The only outlet of the celebrated Copper Valley.
The townsite is intersected by the Railway and is on the
banks of Skeena River.
Railway construction is now proceeding in the vicinity and
the contractors' headquarters are in COPPER CITY.
There is a good wagon road from COPPER CITY to Kitimaat
and steamboat communication with Port Essington and Pacific
Coast points on the Skeena river.
COPPER CITY is the natural centre of a fine agricultural and
fruit growing country where early settlers have carried on farming
successfully for upwards of twenty years.
A saw-mill is being erected and the Dominion Government has
already installed a telegraph office.
The building of the city has commenced and hotels and stores
are in course of erection.
COPPER CITY is outside the Coast "wet belt."
A ferry is being established across the Skeena at COPPER CITY.
Lots are not yet for sale, but the owner, MR. WM. J.
SANDERS, VICTORIA, is open to negotiate with any business
firms desirous of securing a stand. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 , 1908
Distinctive Comfort.
For Den or Dining Room.
In addition to the regular items of furniture you are
always on the lookout for those small additional pieces
without which no den nor dining-room is complete and
comfortable. We always keep a large and varied stock
of these extra pieces and draw particular attention to our
MAGAZINE BACKS, from $3.50 to $14.00
PLATE BACKS, at $4.00 and   $4.50
OCCASIONAL CHAIRS, at  $8.50 and $10.50
For Hall or Library.
In both hall and library it is the little etceteras which
complete your comfort and your furnishing:. We pay just
as much attention to these small details as we do to the
larger items, perhaps more, as it is frequently difficult
to keep pace with the ever changing' fashions, but we
manage to do so and invite you to call in next time you
are wanting any item of Library or Hall Furnishing'.
HOTEL   AND
STEAMSHIP
FURNISHERS
THE
Most Comfortable Chairs.
For .genuine comfort nothing heats the English Willow
Chair, in addition to being strong and spacious the natural
elasticity of the willow supports the body without that
nasty feeling of rigidity. We have a splendid selection
just received from the Old Country:
22-INCH. SEAT CHAIR     $10.00
24-INCH. SEAT CHAIR $11.00
26-INCH. SEAT CHAIR $12.00
30-INCH. SEAT CHAIR  $14.00
Upholstering' extra in accordance with material used.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
OFFICE    AND
SHOWROOM
FURNISHERS
Lawn Tennis.
The Belcher Street Courts pre-
•nted an unusually gay scene last
eek, when the annual tournament
ok place, witnessed by a large num-
;r of Victorians and visitors.
Among the visitors at the Courts
iring the  week were  noticed  Mrs.
B.  Pemberton  in  a  smart  black
iwn, black hat, with black and white
nines;   Mrs. Craig, white and black
lit, burnt merry widow trimmed with
vendar; Miss Davie, in a white lin-
:rie  null  and  cerise  hat;   Mrs.  H.
ooley, in green cloth Princess gown,
ack hat with plumes;  Mrs.  A. W.
jnes, in a white lingerie, white hat
ith  pink  roses;   Mrs.  St.   George,
.lice   blue  frock  and  toque  of  the
nne  tone;   Miss   O'Reilly,  in  pale
rey silk, white and black hat; Mrs.
nith, champagne coloured suit, black
it;   Mrs.   C.   Rhodes,   Miss   Crease,
iss Norah Bell, Miss Florence Gil-
spie,  pale  blue  linen  suit,  a  blue
erry widow; Mrs. W. Langley, black
id white  striped  suit,  burnt  straw
t, with pink roses;  Mrs. V. Eliot,
11k ladies' cloth and pale pink hat
nimed with pink plumes and tulle;
iss   Wasson,    very    pretty   yellow
ick, transparent yoke of ecru lace,
lite hat with plumes; Miss Pooley,
old rose and toque of the same
ie; Miss Garret, smart white linen
it, white hat with cerise dowers; Miss
Keefer, in white, picture hat; Mrs.
urtney, white mull lingerie and
lite hat with plumes; Mrs. Lamp-
in, in brown, Mrs. Fordham, white
th Alice blue boa and white lace
t; Mrs. C. V, Spratt, Dresden
ick, with burnt straw hat trimmed
th pale pink roses; Mrs. Jacobs,
2y suit and green hat; Mrs. Jas.
irvey, in a cream frock and old rose
t; Mrs. H. Rjbertson in pale pink
Empire and hat of the same tone;
Mrs. Landes, in ecru coloured voile
trimmed with handsome lace and
white hat; Mrs. Cecil Roberts, dainty
pale blue Empire frock, pale blue hat
trimmed with tulle; Mrs. Troupe in
white gown trimmed with pale pink
and white hat; Mrs. Genge, white
frock with tan trimmings; Mrs. McCallum, Mrs. Furlonger, Miss Paula
Irving; Mrs Matthews, in grey
trimmed with white lace, burnt straw
hat and pink roses; Mrs. Stretlield, in
white; Miss Eberts, in navy blue, iarge
white hat with plume; Mrs. Schwengers, white and pale green; Miss
Hickey, white linen suit; Miss
Doris Mason, pale pink; Miss
Laura Jukes, white with black hat;
Miss Lorna Eberts, pale green muslin; Mrs. (Col.) Holmes, Miss
Holmes, Mrs. (Col.) Grant, in Alice
blue, and black hat; Mrs. Richardson,
Mrs. Kirkbride, in a white cloth gown;
Mrs. Cambell McCallum, Miss McCallum, Miss Hawthornthwaite, Mrs.
Rithet, Miss Macrae, Miss Frances
Drake, Mrs. Galletley, Miss F. Devereux, Mrs. Griffiths, in mauve; Mrs.
J. Irving, in black and white striped
muslin, black hat; Miss Butchart, in
white; Mrs. F. H. Todd, Mrs. Heb-
den Gillespie, in pale green, trimmed
witfi pastel shades, green hat; Mrs.
Alexis Martin, Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs.
Baiss, Mrs. D. M. Rogers, Mrs. Wm.
Langley, Mrs. H. Barnard, Mrs. Al.
Gillespie, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. Gresley,
paisley silk, blue toque; and the
Messrs. Meredith, Newton, H. Davis,
B. Parker, C. Gibson, Dr. Craig,
Twigg, T. Foot, L. Genge, Keeler,
Goward, Kirkbride, H. Gillespie, Galletly, Dr. Robertson, Lampman, Hcb-
den, J. Bridgeman, W. Newcombe, C.
Prior, Coombe, McCurdy, Bethune,
Hagerty, G. Gillespie, Eaton, Capt.
McDonald, D. M. Eberts, Col. Grant,
Crow h. ker, Gore, Alexis Martin and
many others.
Victoria Theatre.
"The Thief," which Charles Frohman will bring to this city for the
first time at the Victoria Theatre, on
August ioth, is from the pen of Henri
Bernstein, one of the most ingenius
and succe sful of contemporary
French playwrights. Mr. Benisicin
is already known for several plays
similar in construction, very similar
in ingenuity and composition to "Tlie
Thief," but it is probable that for
many a year to come lie will be
known in this country, as he still is in
France, as the author of "The Thief,"
despite his more recent plays.
"The Thief" is in three acts. It
observes all the unities of time, place
and incident. The action takes place
within twenty-four hours. First produced at the Renaissance Theatre,
Paris, in December, 1907, "The Thief"
made an immediate sensation. It ran
through the entire season with M.
Guitry and Madam Le Bargy in the
chief roles. About the foibles, the
ambition, the cunning, the love as
deep as human passion and as wide
as human frailty, of a woman, "The
Thief" is a woman's play, ln Pans
-Madam Le Bargy, in London, Irene
Vanbrugli, in New York Margaret
lllington—all attained positive personal triumphs in the role of Marie
Voysin.
Margaret lllington is sufficiently
well known to make superfluous any
extended introduction. Her advance
as an actress of great strength of
emotion and sure dramatic appeal, is
already generally recognized. Her
fine range of dramatic power she
amply demonstrated last season as
the young wife in the John Drew performance of Pinero's "His House in
Order."
The Voysins, husband and wife, arc
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Lagardes at
their country home. The Lagardes
have a son, Fernand, who is smitten
with Mrs. Voysin and writes her the
most ardent love-letters. Mrs. Voysin, who is young and charming and
who loves her husband with an unswerving devotion, treats the young
man's amatory attitude lightly as a
sort of romantic Hutter that will soon
pass away. She is good-natured and
good-humoured towards him, but his
sensations have made no other impression upon her than that they are
the outbreak of a silly sentimentality
on his part. He writes her love-letters whicli he places under the pillow
of the bed in her boudoir, and leaves
them around in other places where
he knows she will find them. This
letter writing leads him into a serious
difficulty, upon which he had not at
all reckoned. For Mme. Lagardes has
had money stolen from her bureau
drawer and as a detective named
Zambault, who is in the house masquerading as a friend of Mr. La-
gardes', lias seen Fernand quietly
creeping up the stairs to the bedroom and has also seen him take
something from the drawer in question, he openly accuses him of being
the thief. It is known that Fernand
has had an affair with a pretty actress
to whom lie has made presents, and it
looks as if he had stolen tiie money
to meet the financial requirements of
the case. The Lagardes are astonished at the revelation. They refuse
to believe the detective, lie unfolds
hit by bit. however, his evidence, and
the father at last is convinced. Ile
sends for his son. Fernand has gone
into the grounds to recover the letters
he wrote to Mrs. Voysin, she having
told him where he would find them,
unopened aud unread. Mrs. Voysin
volunteers to go after Fernand when
the father demands his presence. She
returns in a moment with him. To
the amazement of everybody but the
detective Fernand confesses his guilt.
His father, furious at the young man's
disgrace, decides to send him away
lor a period to a distant country
where he can earn and repay this
stolen money. Of course Fernand is
not the thief. The discovery of the
real culprit and the boy's exculpation
ciHues later on. Meanwhile the preparations for Fernand's banishment
proceed. Mrs. Voysin's nice kindly
talk, in whicli she told him how futile
his passion for her was, has not had
the effect of quenching, or in any
way subduing, his love for her. The
relations between husband and wife
become painfully strained, and continue so until the moment set for
F. 1 nand's departure. Here disclosures arc made that put an astonishing
but satisfactory complexion upon all
the circumstances, and the dramatist
is permitted to carry his story to a
happy conclusion.
The tennis championship of Britisli
Columbia still remains in Victoria, B.
I'. Schwengers having successfully
defended his title against Mr. Bruce-
Smitli of Vancouver at the Courts last
Saturday. The result of the week at
the Courts was highly satisfactory,
both from a financial standpoint and
from the class of tennis witnessed.
The attendance was better than last
year while the tennis was as good if
not better. Although Ihe only championship to remain in tllis city is
the men's singles, it is no disgrace to
the ladies or to the men's doubles, for
they have the satisfaction of knowing that tlieir opponents rank in the
first class among the players on the
Pacific Coast. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908.
j:*
X Social and X
$ Personal. *
Mr. Kenneth Gillespie of Riverside,
Cowichan Lake, is staying with his
parents.
* *   *
Mr. F. C. Davidge spent a few days
in Victoria on his way east.
* *   *
* Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Clark, Mr. and
Mrs. S. G. Clark, arrived by the Mont-
eagle on Monday from Nagasaki.
* *   *
Mr. A. W. Harvey arrived from the
north   during  the  week,   arriving  in
Victoria on Thursday last.
* *   *
Thursday was guest day at Work
Point Barracks, many guests taking
advantage of the splendid courts.
* *   *
Miss Jessie Garret of Seattle is
the guest of the Misses Pooley, Lamp-
son street.
A   •*.    *
On Monday evening Miss Winona
Troupe was hostess at a five hundred party followed by an impromptu
dance. Among the guests were Misses
Blackwood, Miss V. Bolton, Miss D.
Day, Miss C. Gait, Miss Lorna Eberts,
Miss Doris Mason, Miss G. Irving,
Miss Phyllys Mason, Miss N. Grant,
Miss Gladys McCallum, Miss J. McKay, Miss Ross Arbuthnot and the
Messrs.  Arbuckle,  Eberts,  Monteith,
D. Gillespie, W. Arbuthnot, Eaton,
McCurdy, Percy and J. Keefer, J.
Cambie, W. Rochfort, C. Pitts, T.
Mara, R. Wilmot, L. 0. McKay, J.
Heyland, Jephson and others.
* *   *
Highwood, Moss street, the cosy
residence of Mr. and Mrs. George
Gillespie, was the scene of a most
charming dance on Tuesday last. The
house was prettily decorated for the
occasion and the supper table with
pale pink carnations and dainty garlands of smilax and fern.
Among the invited guests were Mrs.
J. Irving, the Misses Irving, Miss
Pooley, Miss V. Pooley, Miss Garret, Miss C. Gait, Miss D. Day, Miss
Pitts, Miss M. Pitts, Miss D. Mason,
Miss Winona Troupe, Misses Eberts,
Miss Marguerite Little, Miss Helen
Peters, Miss Norah Coombe, Miss
Phyllys Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Kirkbride, Miss Paula Irving, Misses Monteith, Mrs. Genge, and Colonel and
Mrs. A. VV. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Luxton, Miss Newcombe, Miss Nellie
Mara, Miss R. Arbuthnot, the Messrs.
Rithet, Eberts, Pitts, L. Mara, Heb-
den, T. Foot and L. Foot, J. Arbuckle, J. Cambie, W. Newcombe,
Holland, Todd, Hagerty, Capt. McDonald, Parker, Dewdney, McDougal,
Musgrave, Johnstone, Meredith, Wilmot.
* *   *
The beautiful residence of Mrs.
Henry Croft on Wednesday afternoon
presented a very pretty scene when
Mrs. Croft gave one of her famous
"Baby Parties." Down oiie side of
the lawn the long tea table was set,
which was artistically arranged with
arches of green; hanging from the
centre of each was a dainty basket
of pale pink roses. A very jolly afternoon was spent; games of all sorts
were indulged in which were in
charge of Captain Coombe, each child
receiving a fascinating souvenir of
this memorable day. A few grown
ups came in later to tea and to watch
the little ones enjoy themselves,
among whom were; Mrs. Fitzgib-
bons, in navy blue, Captain and Mrs.
Coombe, Mrs. D. M. Eberts in grey
with a black hat, Mrs. Dundas in
pale green muslin and white hat, Mrs.
Burton in a Dresden gown, Mrs. Gaudin and Miss K. Gaudin in white and
pale green, Mrs. J. Harvey in cream,
and an old rose hat, Mrs. McBride,
Mrs. McCurdy, Mrs. Hogg, Mrs. McKay, Mrs. Craig in white cloth and
Irish  crochet lavender hat,  Mrs. W.
E. Oliver, Mrs. Holland, navy blue
and white, Miss G. McKay, Miss
O'Reilly, Mrs. A. E. McPhillips, Mrs.
Roger Wilby in black and white silk,
burnt straw hat, with pink roses, Mrs.
Monteith, Mrs. Courtney, paisley muslin and black hat, Mrs. Bodwell in
white lingerie frock, Mrs. and Miss
Coombe, Mrs. Matthews and Mrs.
Stretfield, Mr. ancl Mrs. G. A. Kirk,
Mr. John Bryden, Mrs. Matson, Mrs.
Shallcross in black and black hat and
pink roses, Mrs. C. Rhodes, Mrs.
Smith, Mrs. Lampman, Mr. Punnett.
Among the children were Mabel
Eberts, Vyvan Matson, J. and T. Mat-
son, Courtney, Harvey, Burns, McBride, Bodweil, Coombe, Dundas, McCurdy, McPhillips, Kirk, Stretfield,
Matthews, Hogg, Craig, Oliver,
Lampman, Day and others.
www
Premier McBride came over from
the Mainland on Thursday.
Mr. R. L. Morse of Seattle spent a
few days in Victoria this week.
*   *   *
Lieut.-Governor ancl Mrs. Dunsmuir,
Miss Marion Dunsmuir, Miss Kathleen Dunsmuir, Mrs. Hope, Mrs.
Robin Dunsmuir, Mr. Bromley, returned from abroad early in thc week.
I
VICTORIA, B.C., LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast (Rivers Inlet).
TAKE NOTICE that the British Columbia Canning Co., Ltd., of London,
Eng., occupation aenners and sawmill
owners, intend to apply for permission
to lease the following described foreshore and submerged land:
Commencing at a post marked B. C.
C. Co., S.E. Cor., planted at high-water
mark at charcoal-house near N.E. end
of Victoria Sawmll' wharf, Rivers Inlet, Lot 255, Range 2, Coast District;
thence following the shore-line in a
south-westerly direction 80 chains more
or less to a post marked B.C.C. Co., S.W.
Cor., planted at high-water mark on
Lot 14, Range 2, Coast District; thence
seawards 3 chains; thence eastwards,
parallel with the shore, a distance of
about 15 chains; thence northerly about
20 chains to the omst southerly pile
showing last year's Dominion Government Ashing boundary; thence about 28
chains in a northeasterly direction to a
point about 50 links north of the N.W.
corner of present Victoria Cannery
wharf; thence following aesterly the direction of the wharf at the same distance of about 50 links to a point opposite point of commencement and at a
right angle with the shore-line; thence
to the point of commencement, and
containing 50 acres, more or less.
June 26th, 1908.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CANNING CO., LTD.,
Aug. 1 D. McPhee, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a licence to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C—Commencing at a post planted at the northwest corner of section 88 and marked
S. B. Netherby and A. C. Kirby; thence
west 80 chains to northeast corner of
section 87; thence north SO chains;
thence east to western boundary of E.
& N. R. R. Co. Lands; thence following
said boundary to point of commencement.
Dated July 20th,  1908.
S. B. NETHERBY,
A. C. KIRBY.
Aug. 1
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a license to prospect for coal
on the following described lands on
Queen Charlotte Island:
Commencing at a post marked E.S.,
N.E., placed half a mile south from the
north-west corner of Lot 1; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 ohalns;
thence east 80 chains; thence north to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres.
july 4
ETHEL STEVENS,
Per S. V. Lasseter.
BONA FIDE OFFER
To  introduce  throughout  B.C.
the
Charter Oak Steel Range
Of which there are over 400 in
Victoria alone.
We make the following offer,
viz.:—On receipt of following
prices we deliver, freight prepaid, to any point in B. C,
reached by direct transit, lake
or rail:
1-14  in.   oven,  4  hole,   high
closet    $43
1-15  in.   oven,  6  hole,   high
closet   $46
1-18  in.   oven,  6 hole,   high
closet   $50
QUICK AND PERFECT
BAKERS.
If not as represented return
at our expense and get your
money.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
EXHIBITION
VICTORIA, B. C.
British Columbia's Premier Fair
SEPTEMBER
22,23, 24, 25 & 26
EVERYTHING  NEW,  MODERN,  AND  UP
TO THE MINUTE.    NEW GROUNDS
NEW   BUILDINGS,   NEW   ATTRACTIONS
Horse Show Every Evening
Cash Tombola Prizes Every Day.
THREE DAYS GREAT
HORSE RACING
Trotting, Pacing, Running Steerlechasing.
Excursion Rates From Everywhere
For Prize Lists or information, address
^
J. E. SMART, Manager.
WEEK AUGUST io
The New Grand
SULLIVAN * CBMIDINE,    Proprietors.
M«na|«m*nt .f ROBT. JAMIESON.
DORSCH and RUSSELL
Those Musical Railroaders
Special Scenery and Electrical
Effects.
THE TWO DE COMAS
Ground and Lofty Tumbling.
MISS FLORENCE MODENA
&CO.
In the Latest Farcical Satire
"Bargain Mad."
MISS DOROTHY DAYNE
Comedienne,  in   Song  and  Story.
Miss Dayne will wear one of the
handsomest  of the  New  Parisian
Directoire, or Sheath Gowns.
FRED. MORTON
Trick   Harmonica Player,   Finger
Whistler and Paper Mutilator.
NEW MOVING PICTURES.
"The White Squaw."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
"Cupid's Pleading," Waltz,
Composed by Sam Goodacre.
Arranged by M. Nagel.
EMPRESS
THEATRE
Government and Johnson Sts.
MOVING PICTURES
ILLUSTRATED SONGS
Program  Changed on  Monday and
Thursday and Always High Class.
WE CATER ESPECIALLY TO
LADIES AND CHILDREN.
A Cool, Pleasant Place to Spend an
Enjoyable Evening.
Daily, 2 to 5:30, 7 to 10:30.
TEN CENTS. TEN CENTS.
J
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
3*5?   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 345
Royal Dairy
1004 Broad Street
Ice Cream & Sweet Cream
Supplied in quantity.
Try our delicious
CREAM AND STRAWBERR
from   our   own   ranch,   fresh
every day.
We also carry a fresh supply of
Butter and Eggs.
Phone 188.
SADIES       MEDICAL   OSKTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
YIBBATOB  TBEATKEltr
KB.     BJOBHFEI.T,      SWEDISB
XASSEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douflas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to (. Phone 1(29.
Key Fitting      Lock Repairing
Telephone 1718
H. M. WILSON
Mechanical Repairs and Saw
Filing
Up-to-date Machinery for Lawn
Mower Grinding and Tool
Sharpening. Tires put on Go-
Carts and Springs Replaced.
Prompt attention and work
guaranteed.
1002 BROAD STREET
Opp. Transfer Stables,
VICTORIA, B.C.
F. W. Stevenson &C(
Brokers
14-16 MAHON  BLDG.
1114 GOVERNMENT ST.
Private Wires to All Exchanges,
Correspondents
LOGAN & BRYAN
S. B. CHAPIN & CO.
Members of
New York Stock Exchange
New York Cotton Exchange
Boston Stock Exchange
Chicago Board of Trade	
During August a
25 Per Cent. Cut
on all our
Tennis Racquets
Strictly 1908 stock.
M. W. Waitt & Co.l
Limited
The House With the Goodi
1004 Govt. St.
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'S BOOKSTORll
TIOTOBIA, B. O.
P
HTEIVT5   ami Trade Hi.I
obtained in all countries.;
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney an|
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville'
TO SMALL
INVESTORS
$2,250 on easy terms buys on*'
acre on car line, high and dryf
main road, quite clear, eminentl;!
suitable for sub-dlvlslon Into lots
neighbouring lots $760 up. Appl;;
to owner, 12 Amelia Street, of]
Pandora. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1908.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca..
TAKE  NOTICE  that  John   Gaffeney,
St. Paul, Minn., occupation  Gentle-
an,  Intends  to  apply  for  permission
purchase   the   following   described
nds:
Commencing at a post planted at the
utheast eorner of section 8, Town-
lip north of township 12, range 6,
Dudrier survey, Nechaco Valley, thence
irth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
ience south 80 chains; thence east 80
lains to place of beginning.
Dated April rd, 1908.
ine 20 JOHN GAFFENEY.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
I TAKE NOTICE that V. J.  Swanson,
!St. Paul, Minn., occupation Gentle-
in, intends to apply for permission to
rchase the following described lands-,
Commencing at a post planted at the
utheast corner of section 5, township
rth of township 12, range 5, Poudrier
rvey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
lains; thence west 80 chains; thence
>uth 80 chains; thence east 80 chalna
) place of commencement.
Dated April 3rd, ' 1908.
|une 20 V. J. SWANSON.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
| TAKE NOTICE that E. W. MacKenzie,
Winnipeg,   Man.,   occupation  Barris-
ir, Intends to apply for permission to
irehase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
luthwest corner of section  18,  town-
lip north of township 12, range 5, Fourier   survey,   Nechaco   Valley;   thence
irth 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
ience south 80 chains; thence west 80
lains to place of commencement.
Dated April lst, 1908.
ine 20 E. W. MACKENZIE.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
| TAKE  NOTICE   that  R.   L.   Brackln,
Chatham, Ont., occupation Barrister,
tends to apply for permission to pur-
tase the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
uthwest corner of section 7, township
irth of township 12, range 5, Poudrier
irvey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
lains;   thence  east  80  chains;   thence
uth 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
point of commencement.
Dated April lst, 1908.
ine 20 R. L. BRACKIN.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
|TAKE NOTICE  that Ethel Patmore,
Cranbrook, B.C., occupation Married
Ioman, intends to apply for permission
purchase   the   following   described
(ids:
Commencing at a post planted at the
uthwest corner of section 6, township
Irth of township 12, range B, Poudrier
Irvey, Nechaco Valley, thence north
" chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
iith 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
[place of commencement,
bated March 31st, 1908.
|ne 20 ETHEL PATMORE.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Elizabeth
Itmore of Cranbrook, B.C., occupation
Irried Woman, intends to apply for
Amission to purchase the following
[scribed lands:
(Commencing _' a post planted at the
Jitheast corner of section 1, township
Irth of township 13, range 6, Pouter survey,    Nechaco   Valley; thence
-th 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
mce south 80 chains; thence east 80
lins to point of commencement.
Harch lst, 1908.
ETHEL  ELIZABETH  PATMORE.
ie 20
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
tAKE  NOTICE  that  Alex  Cochrane,
Toronto,  Ont., occupation Barrister,
ends to apply for permission to purine the following described  lands:
tommenelng at a post planted at the
theast corner of section 2, township
th of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
vey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
tins;  thence west  80 chains;  thence
ith 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
point of commencement,
-larch 31st, 1908.
fie 20 ALEX COCHRANE.
NECHACO  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that G. S. Hodgson
of Toronto, Ontario, occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 12, township
north, of township 13, range 6, Poudrier
survey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
April lst, 1908.
June 20 G. S. HODGSON.
north 5 chains more or less to point ot
commencement    and     containing    five
June 2nd, 1908.
June 27 ALBERT HAMMER.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that R. W. Matheson
of Lucknow, Ont., occupation Commercial Traveller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 13, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
April  lst,  1908.
June 20 R. W. MATHESON.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca,
TAKE NOTICE that E. M. Flock of
London, Ont., occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 11, township north of township 13, range 6, Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chatns to point of commencement.
April lst,  1908.
June 20 E. M. FLOCK.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that H. T. Blackburn,
of* London, Ont., occupation Barrister,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 14, township north of township 13, range 5,
Poudrier survey, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
April 1st, 1908.
June 20 H. T. BLACKBURN.
NECHACO   LAND   DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that A. A. Magee ot
Toronto, Ont, occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 10, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
survey, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
April lst, 1908.
June 20 A. A MAGEE.
NBCHACO  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Lizzie Fickeisen,
of St. Louis, Mo., occupation Married
Woman, Intends to apply for permijsion
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of the south half of
section 34, township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and being the aouth half
of said section 34 and the north half of
section 27, township 14, range 5.
March 29th, 1908.
June  20 LIZZIE  FICKEISEN.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that I, James Henry
Snodgrass, of Francois Lake, occupation Rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner of Lot 212; thence W.
20 chains, more or less, to the Eastern
boundary of my Pre-emption; thence
south to shores of Francois Lake; thencs
following shore in an Easternly direction to the West Boundary of Lot 212;
thence north following 40 acres, more
or less.
Dated   20th  May,   1908.
june 27    JAMES HENRY SNODGRASS.
ADDITIONAL   LICENCE   TO   AN   EX-
TBA-PBOVINCIAX.   COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 417.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the "New
Zealand Insurance Company, Limited,"
which, on the 28th day of November,
1907, was authorised and licensed to
carry on business within the Province
of British Columbia, is hereby authorised and licensed to carry out or effect
all or any of the additional objects of
the Company to which the legislative
authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head ofllce of the Company ls
situate at the Town of Auckland, in the
Province of Auckland, in the Colony
of New Zealand.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is one million flve hundred
thousand pounds, divided into one hundred and fifty thousand shares of ten
pounds each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province ls situate at Victoria,
and James Hill Lawson, merchant,
whose address ls Victoria, B.C., ls the
attorney for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 14th day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The additional objects for which this
Company has been established and licensed are:—
To carry on every kind of insurance
and re-insurance business not including
ordinary life Insurance, but Including
insurance against death by accident,
and to re-insure or counter-insure every
kind of risk, and to do all such other
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of those objects. To
acquire and undertake the whole or any
part of the business property and liabilities of any company carrying on any
business which this Company ls authorised to carry on.
June 27.
Province   is   situate   at   Victoria,   and
Henry Graham Lawson, Solicitor, whose
address is Victoria, B.C., is the attorney
for  the company.    Not  empowered  to
Issue and transfer stock.
Given under my hand and Seal of Offlce
at Victoria, Province of Britlah Columbia, this fourth day of April, one
thousand nine hundred and eight.
S. Y. WOOTTON.
Registrar of Joint Stock Companiea.
The objects for which   this companj
has been established and registered arc
Manufacturing and dealing ln fire-proofing and building material of all kinds,
and constructing, equipping and owning
buildings, bridges and structures of all
kinds,  and all  things  incident thereto,
of  engaging  ln  a  general   contracting
business; and of acquiring, holding, owning and disposing of all rights, patent
and  otherwise,   necessary  and  convent*
ent for the prosecution of Its buslnesa.
section 3 of the townahip north of township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
july 11 MARTHA BAMFORD.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hill Law-
son, the younger, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Solicitor, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of Blinkinsop Bay, three-
quarters of a mile from the entrance
of said Bay; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 60 chains; thence easterly
to the Bay and along the shoro of
Bay Inside of Jessie Island; tVience
northerly along the shore of Bllnklnsop
Bay to the place of commencement, and
containing 480 acres, more or less.
Dated June 24, 1908.
JAMES HILL LAWSON, JR.,
july 4 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coaat, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Graham
Lawson, of Victoria, B.C., occupation,
Solocitor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
head of Blinkinsop Bay, SO feet north
of the creek running to the Bay, thence
west 60 chains; thence north 60 chains;
thence east 60 chains; thence south 60
chains back to the place of beginning,
and containing 360 acres, more or less.
Dated June 24th, 1908.
HENRY GRAHAM LAWSON,
july 4 C. G. Johnstone, Agent.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
.AKE NOTICE that Charles Garrow
Goderich, Ont., occupation Barrister,
ends to apply for permission to pur-
-se the following described lands:
lommencing at a post planted at the
theast corner of section 3, township
th of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
vey, Nechaco Valley, thence north 80
ilns; thence west 80 chains; thence
th 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
point of commencement,
-larch 31st, 1908.
|ie 20 CHARLES GARROW.
I'tincate   of   the  Registration   of  an
Extra-Provincial   Company.
"Companies Act, 1897."
HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Tim-
Investment Company" has this day
In registered as an Extra-Provincial
Inpany   under   the   "Companies   Act,
17," to carry out or effect all or any
|the objects of the Company to which
legislative authority of the Legis-
|ure of British Columbia extends.
rhe  head  offlce  of  the  Company  ls
uate   at   the   City  of   Seattle,   King
unty, State of Washington,
■rhe  amount   of  the   capital   of   the
pipany   ls   three   hundred   thousand
liars,   divided   into   three   thousand
Tires of one hundred dollars each,
[.'he head  offlce  of  the  Company  ln
Province Is situate at Victoria, and
omas Bamford, clerk, whose address
/Ictoria, B.C., ls the attorney for the
npany.   Not empowered to issue and
nsfer stock.
'he time of the existence of the Com-
y ls fifty years, from the 8th day of
iruary, 1908.
'he Company ls limited,
■iven   under  my  hand  and   seal   of
ie  at Victoria,   Province  of  British
umbia,  this   13th  day  of  May,  one
usand nine hundred and eight.
L.S.) S.  Y. WOOTTON,
(Registrar of Joint Stock Companies,
he objects for which this Company
been established and registered are:
o manufacture, buy, and sell timber
timber products; to buy, lease, or
irwise acquire and to hold real estate
timber in the State of Washington
elsewhere,  and  the  same   to  sell,
(tgage, lease and dispose of;  to erect,
•ate, sell and dispose of water-works
the supply 6Twater-power and water
domestic   purposes,   electric   power
its;   to buy, build, lease and other-
acquire and operate,  if necessary
| desirable, tug-boats and freight and
Jsenger   steamers;   to   carry   on   the
llness of selling real estate on com-
|sion and doing a general real estate
timber brokerage business; to loan
money of  the  Corporation   in  con-
klon   with    its    other   business    If
lined  advisable  and  to  the  best  in-
fsts of the Corporation;   to buy, sell
deal ln all kinds of merchandise.
|e 20
NECHACO  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ella Bamford,
of Berkeley, Cal., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 26, township
14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chaina;
thence north 80 chalna; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
June 20 ELLA BAMFORD.
NECHACO   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Anton Olson, of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner and 80 chains east
of Indian Reserve No. 4, on the south
shore of Fraser Lake; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains more or less to south
shore of Fraser Lake; thence following
said shore westward to place of beginning.
April 21st, 1908.
June 20 ANTON OLSON.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
In thc matter of our application for a
Duplicate   Certificate   of   Title   to
Subdivision Lots 46 and 47 of Lot
68, and part of Lot 73, Spring Ridge
(Map 396) Victoria City.
Notice is hereby given that lt ls my
Intention at the expiration of one month
from  the date of the first publication
hereof to Issue a Duplicate Certificate
of  Title  to  said  lands  Issued  to  William  Ralph  on the 30th  day of June,
1892, and numbered  13496 A.
Land  Registry  Offlce,   Victoria,  B.C.,
this 13th day of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 23 Registrar-General.
NOTICE is hereby given that 30 days
after date we Intend to apply to the
Hon. the Chief Commissioner of Landa
and Works for a license to prospect
for coal and petroleum on the following
described lands, situated near Coal
Creek, Renfrew District, B. C.i Commencing at a post planted at the northeast corner of section 88, and marked
John Meston and W. H. Anderson;
thence west 80 chains to northeast corner of section 87; thence north 80
chains; thence east to western boundary
of the E. & N. Railway Company'*
Lands; thence following said boundary
of Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway
Company's Lands; thence following said
boundary of Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Company's lands to point of
commencement.
Staked May 18th, 1908.
JOHN MESTON.
W. A. ANDERSON.
May 23
COAST LAND DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Mammer, of
Bella Coola, occupation farmer, intends
to apply for permission tu purchase the
following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains south of the northwest corner
of Lot 24, Range 3, Coast District;
thence west 20 chains to shore of
Abuntlet Lake; thence in a southwesterly direction along shore line to
the  west  boundary  of  Lot  24;  thenca
THE attention of the Lands and
Works Department having been directed
to the fact that town lots ln a town-
site named Prince Rupert, being a subdivision of Lot 642, Range 6, Coast Diatrlct, aituated on the mainland between
the mouth of the Skeena River and
Kaien Island, are being offered for sale,
it has been deemed necessary to warn
the public that the aald townsite ls not
situated at the terminus ot the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway, and ls not the
townsite which is owned jointly by the
Government of British Columbia and
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Com*
pany.
F. J. FULTON,
Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works,
Landa and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., May lst, 1908.
May 9
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
To  T.  J.  Graham,   registered  and  assessed   owner   of   Lot   291,   Mount
Tolmie  Park,  Victoria District.
TAKE NOTICE  that application  has
been made to Register William Flannery
as the owner In fee simple of the above
lot  under a  Tax  Sale Deed  from  the
Assessor   of  the  District  of  Victoria,
dated  the  16th  of  January,   1903,  and
you are required  to  contest the claim
of the said William Flannery within 30
days from the first publication hereof.
Dated  at  Land  Registry Offlce,  Victoria,  British Columbia, this  12th day
of May, 1908.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
May 16 Registrar General.
Within sixty daya from date I intend
to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase 80 acres of land at Kltsals
Canyon. The land Is situated within
lines commencing at a post about half
a mile south of Chas. Durham's Southwest corner and marked: Erlck Norlln,
80 acres, Purchase Claim, S. W. Corner,
May 19th, 1908; thence north 20 chains,
thence east 40 chains; thence south 20
chains; thence west 40 chains to point
of commencement,  containing 80 acres,
May 19th, 1908.
June 13 ERICK NORLIN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range One.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Gustave
Johnstone of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Master Mariner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the east shore of Blinkinsop Bay, three-
quarters of a mile from the outlet of
the creek at the head of the Bay; thence
north along the shore,60 chains; thence
east 60 chains; thence south 60 chainB;
thence west 60 chains to the place of
commencement, and containing 360
acres, more or less.
Dated  June  26th,   1908.
july 4    CARL GUSTAVE JOHNSTONE.
"Companiea Aet, 1897."
NOTICE is hereby given that Raymond Bellenger Funnett, of Victoria,
B.C., broker, has been appointed new
attorney of "The Timber Investment
Company" ln the place of Thomas Bam*
ford.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 8th day
of   June,   1908.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
June 20.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that William Mc-
Gowan of Chatham, Ont., occupation
Machinist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de*
scribed land:—
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains south of the southwest corner
of Lot 962 and in a southerly direction
from Fraser Lake; thence south 20
chains; thence east 20 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 60 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 10 chains to Lake Shore; thence
following said South Shore of Dry Williams Lake east 60 chains; tnence east
10 chains more or less to point of commencement.
May 2nd, 1908.
july 11 WILLIAM McGOWAN.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Engen of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation, married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 21, township
14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; tnence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains  to point of commencement.
March 28th, 1908.
july 11 LAURA ENGEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Owen
Townley, of Vancouver, barrister at law,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: ,
Commencing at a post planted on the
southwest shore of Defence Island,
Howe Sound, thence ln a northerly, easterly, southerly and westerly direction,
following high water mark to the point
of commencement, containing 30 acros,
more or leas, and being the whole of
the Island known as Defence Island.
Dated  8th April,  1908.
THOMAS OWEN TOWNLEY.
May 9
CEBTXKOATE   Or   TBE   BEOISTBA-
TIOW Or AH EZTBA-FBOVntCIAL
COUP ANT.
"Companiea Aot, 18*7."
I hereby certify that "The Ferro-Con-
crete Construction Company" haa thli
day been regiatered aa an Extra-Provincial Company under the "Companiea Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or an»
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extenda.
The head offlce of the Company la
situate at Cincinnati ln Hamilton County, Ohio.
The amount of the capital of the
Company ls flve hundred thousand dollars, divided Into flve thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head ofllce of the Company In thla
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Ben Worden of
Fort Steele, B.C., occupation Clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted near
the southeast corner of section 7, or
the township north of township 14, range
6, Nechaco Valley; thence west 120
chains; thence north 40 chains more or
less to the soutli bank of Nechaco
River; thence meandering river bank
easterly 120 chains', thence south 40
chains more or less to place of beginning.
March 29th, 1908.
july 11 BEN WORDEN.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that John Bamford,
of Berkeley, Cal., occupation Bookkeeper, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commonclng at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of section 8, of the
township north of township 14, range
6, Nechaco Valley, thence north 40
chains more or less to bank of Nechaco
River; thence following said river bank
westerly 80 chains more or less; thence
south 30 chains more or less; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement.
March  29th, 1908.
July 11 JOHN BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Martha Bamrord,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Marrrea
Woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of  the  north  half or
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that William Proud-
foot of Goderich, Ont., occupation Barrister, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 4, township
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
Survey, Nechaco Valley; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south chains; thence east 80 chalna to
point of commencement.
March 31st, 1908.
July 11 WILLIAM PROUDFOOT.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Wilson, of
Toronto, Ont., occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 6, townahip
north of township 13, range 5, Poudrier
Survey, Nechaco Valley; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains more or
less to Nechaco River; thence followin,-
said River easterly 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains more or less to place
of commencement.
April 2nd, 1908.
July 11 T. H. WILSON.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
Diatrlct of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Emma Bamford,
of St. Louis, Mo., occupation Widow,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 44
chatns north of the southwest corner
of section 35, township ll, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence eaat 40
chaina; thence aouth 80 chalna; tnence
west 80 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement and being the
south half and the northeast quarter of
said section 36, townahip 14, range 5.
March 29th, 1908.
july 11 EMMA BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
DIatrict of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Kershaw,
of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation Married Woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeaat corner of section 16, township
14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
east 40 chains to place of beginning and
being the south half and the northeast
quarter of said section 16, township 14,
range 5.
March 30th, 1908.
july 11 CLARA KERSHAW.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that James Bamford,
of Toronto, Ont., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of the north half or
section 4 in the township north or
township 14, range 6, Nechaco Valley;
thence north 70 chains more or less to
the Nechaco River; thence following
said river easterly 60 chains more or
less; thence south 80 chains more or
less to Penrose northeast corner; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
March  29th,  1908.
July 11 JAMES BAMFORD.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Edith J. Black,
of St. Thomas, Ont., occupation Spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 6 of the
township north of township 14, range
5, Nechaco Valley; thence south so
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 40 chatns; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement and
containing 480 acres more or less.
March 29th, 1908.
july 11 EDITH J. BLACK.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Lund, of
Danholm, Sask., occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 31, township 14, range 5, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
March 29th, 1908.
July 11 HENRY LUND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Adolph Lund, of
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described   lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 33, township 14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
Ihence north 80 chains; thenco east 20
chains; thenco south SO chains; thence
east -0 chains; thonce south 40 chains;
thence west SO chains to point of commencement.
March   29th,   1908.
July  11 ADOLPH LUND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that Laurltz Berklano,
of Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of section 32, township
14, range 4, Nechaco Valley; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
tiience north 40 chains; thence west 40
chains; thenco south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less.
March  29th,  1908.
July 11 LAURITZ BERKLAND.
NECHACO LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that John Isbester, or
Saskatoon, Sask., occupation Merchant,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at tne
southeast corner of section 28, township
14, range 6, Nechaco Valley; thence
north SO chains; thenco west 80 chalna;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 8»
-lialns  to point of commencement.
March 2Sth, 190S.
July  11 JOHN ISBESTER. THB WEJSK, SATURDAY AUGUST 8, 1908,
Victoria Lawn Tennis
Tournament.
By UMPIRE.
The tournament was a success from
every standpoint, and the prizes which
were of special designs were greatly
admired. Mrs. F. B. Pemberton distributed them at the end of the tournament.
Mention must be made of the unremitting labours of the Ladies' Committee, which took charge of the re-
at the grounds, and also
The most successful tournament
held in Victoria for many years is
over, and the victors have departed
with the spoils of war, at least most  freshments
of them have, but the greatest victor 0f the very enjoyable tennis dance
and the most important spoils still gjven ;lt Rockwood on Thursday
remain in Victoria. B. P. Schwengers njght- -fhe Committee consisted of
has once more demonstrated, what I Mrs. Burton, Mrs. Pemberton, Mrs.
have always maintained, that on a E Crow Bakeri ]\,IrSt Gillespie, Mrs.
grass court he has no equal in the Richards, Mrs. Genge, Miss Mara,
West, and 1 am not sure that the ver- _y_vs_ Nelson, Mrs. Pooley, Mrs. C.
diet would be modified on any courts. Todd, Mrs. Todd, Mrs. Irving, Mrs.
Granted that Freeman is no longer w. Beaven, Mrs. Jones, Miss Pitts.,
as energetic as of yore, it must be Mrs j;imeS) Mrs. Henry, Mrs. Mar-
admitted that he is as clever or he t;n> Mrs. Bodwell, Mrs. Holmes, Mrs.
would not have scored sixteen games Kirkbride, Airs. J. Gore and Miss
to Schwengers' fifteen in the first two   Loenholm.
sets  of  the  championship  match  at 	
Vancouver. To my mind this amply
demonstrates his skill, but after those
first two sets he was not in it for a
moment, and the last set was a whitewash; and Schwengers easily retained possession of the Mainland
Championship Cup.
The   Victoria   tournament  brought
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responslbilltj
for the views expressed by Its corres-
I'-jiiuenLs.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name ot
the writer or a nom de plume, but thc
welter's name and address must ue
given to the editor as an evidence ot
bona titles. In no case will it be
a great surprise to everybody in the   divulged without consent.
defeat of Freeman by  Bruce Smith.
It is true that Bruce-Smith had been
playing a beautiful game and his long
cross-court drives were a marvel of
precision and endurance, but he altogether lacked the versatility of Freeman, and would hardly be placed in
the same class, yet he won in three
straight sets, the last, one a love set.
I am making no excuses for Freeman,
and do not wish to detract from the
merits of Bruce-Smith's performance,
but certainly the former did not play
his usual game, ancl unless I am entirely mistaken the strain of singles is
too much for him in his present physical condition.
Victoria, Aug. 6, 1908.
Editor Week.
Sir,—And so the Town Council has
"been and gone and done it." Well,
well, what next? Their capacity for
government can be guaged by a small
thing like the dog-lead section of the
amendments to the dog regulations as
effectively as by waterworks schemes
or fire protection, and the placing of
this section upon the city's statutes
is regrettable. It was unnecessary because the evil of too many large dogs
frequenting the sidewalks in the business portion of the city had visibly
abated and the appeal made in The
HAIR COMBS
For Ladies, Gentlemen and Children.
Nowhere in Victoria will you find a
better or more up-to-date assortment
of Combs than here, from the handy
Man's Pocket Comb to the handsomest article of adornment for milady's hair. Durable Combs a specialty.
COMBS STRONG ENOUGH TO
SAW WOOD—EACH 25c.
All-coarse Combs from 35c up.
Ladies' back and Side Combs in great
variety. Very handsome, fashionable
Sets from 75c up. All the newest and
most exclusive designs, consisting of
Brilliant Tortoise-shell, inlaid gold
and silver Set Combs, Pearl, Turquoise and other stone-set Combs at
extremely reasonable prices.
.. Why not take home a Set of Combs,
as a Souvenir of your visit to Victoria?
Nothing more acceptable to the average woman of today.
CYRDS H BOWES.
CHEMIST
GOVERNMENT STREET
NEAR YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Week two Saturdays ago to thought-
That the match between Freeman iess owners of offending dogs was
and Bruce-Smith was not a true cri- not made in vain. The high-handed
terion of form is evidenced by the measure just passed will stamp the
absolute ease with which Schwengers Council as silver spoons were stamped
defeated Bruce-Smith in three straight by the Silver Smiths Company, the
sets, and for the second time won the mark, however though similar wiil
championship of B. C. It is not ne- have an opposite meaning. We shall
cessary to comment on the cham- expect to see lovely little dogs "haul
pion's beautiful play, he was accurate, marked" and their necks excoriated
strong and resourceful, and displayed perhaps, by ships cables or some other
all the traits of a genuine champion, means of secure attachment or what-
1 shall never cease to regret that he ever the correct phrase is and what
was not able to go to the Olympic a time is now ahead for the push-
Games, where I am convinced that he jng sales-gentlemen in emporiums
would have worked his way into the where are purveyed green eatables
finals, as at the present moment I and fruit which hereafter may be
am satisfied that in a iive-set match m0re safely displayed on the pave-
with his wonderful powers of endur- ment. It is to be hoped that our
ance, he is a decidedly stronger player butchers will show their gratitude to
than Powell; the  City  Fathers  by  also  spreading
The local, players were at a disad-  out  on  the   sidewalks  the  succulent
vantage against the visitors, and Miss
Hotchkiss was so distinctly in a class
by herself that she had a practical
walk-over in every event, even Miss
Violet Pooley, who distinguished herself throughout the tournament, and
retained her best form in the finals,
could make no headway against the
athletic little player from California.
Although Miss Alice Bell did well in
the early stages of the tournament
her play fell off towards the end of
the week, and she did not figure in the
finals. Miss Marian Pitts would probably have reached the semi-finals
but she ran up against Miss Hotchkiss, and whilst playing a very creditable   game   was   of  course   defeated.
Mrs.  Langley and  Mrs.  Heald made   , NOTICB Is hereby given that an or-
dinary  general   meeting  of  the Tslmp-
decidedly the strongest team of ladies,  sean Light and Power Company will be
held at  130*1  Government Street,  being
prime roast and the juicy chop. Why
not? Be thorough. Dog fanciers are
and so are their dogs.
The Council did this thing with its
eyes open and has ruthlessly trampled
upon the feelings of a section of the
community who deserved better treatment and the surprising thing about
it is that their own s.'f-iiitcrest failed
to cause them to pay attention to the
warning hand which indicated that
they were riding for a fall.
Xo wonder Mr. Mayor went away
just when hc did.
CANINE.
Iron Master Mineral Group, consisting*
"Ironmaster," "Iron King," "Iron
Prince," "Ironmaster'! Boa" and
"Grip On Iron" Mineral Claims.
Situate ln Port Renfrew District, Victoria Mining Division.
Where Located—Extending East and
West from Bentley Creek.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Harrle G.
Ross, for myself, Free Miner's Certificate No. B22830, and associate Trustees
of the above Mineral Group, viz., John
Bentley, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B'_3060; John William Fisher, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 23101; John Berryman, Free Miner's Certificate No.
B2303S; and Thomas J. Plimley, Free
Miner's Certlflcate No. B23040, Intend
60 days from the date hereof, to apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certlflcate
of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 10th day of June, A.D. 1908.
June 20 HARRIE G. ROSS.
LICENCE TO AN INTER-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
"Companies Act, 1897."
TSIMPSEAN
LIGHT     AND
COMPANY.
POWER
and played consistently throughout.
In the final against Miss Hotchkiss
and Miss Beckett they scored three
games in each set, which was the
best record made by ladies throughout the tournament, and shows that
no mistake was made in pairing them
for thc doubles.
Of the other players Jordan did
extremely well part of the time, but
he does not possess the tennis temperament, and when things so against
him is apt to chuck it, in anything but
a sportsmanlike manner, if he could
get rid of this habit he would become
a very formidable doubles player, in
singles he is not as good. R. H.
Pooley and Miss Violet Pooley carried all before them until they met
Freeman and Miss Hotchkiss, and the
former with Rithet put up one or two
good games, but thc latter was obviously out of practice.
corner ot Yates ancl Government Streets
in the City of Victoria, on Tuesday, the
ISth day of August, 1908, at 4 o'clock
in the afternoon, to consider the profit
and loss account and balance sheet, the
reports of the Directors and the Auditors, to elect Directors and other officers in place of those retiring, to declare dividends and to transact any
other business which under the "Companies Clauses Act, 1897," ought to be
transacted at a general ordinary meeting and further transacted at a general
or ordinary meeting and further to
confirm or rescind any or all previous
proceedings of the Directors and the
shareholders and to confirm or rescind
any or all the minutes of previous Directors' and Shareholders' meetings and
to confirm or rescind any or all previous resolutions, to pay out of the
funds of the Company any or all expenses of or incidental to the formation and incorporation of the Company
and In or about the promotion of the
Company, and the conduct of the business or the submission and passing of
a new resolution providing for the remuneration as aforesaid and such other
business as may be referred to In any
Report of the Directors or may pro-
eprly be entered upon.
Dated this first day of August, A. D.
19ns.
By order.
JOHN DEAN,
Aug 1. Secretary.
Canada.
Province of British Columbia.
No. 446.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that "The
Niagara Fire Insurance Company" Is
authorized and licensed to carry on
business within the Province of British
Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to
which the legislative authority of the
Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company Is situate at the City of New York.
The amount of the capital of the Company ls seven and fifty thousand dollars, divided into fifteen thousand
shares of fifty dollars each.
The head office of the Company in this
Province is situate at Victoria, and Ernest Victor Bodwell, Barrister-at-law,
whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is
the attorney for the company.
The time of the existence of the Company is thirty years from the 22nd day
of July, 1880.
GIVEN under my hand and seal of
office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this 23rd day of July, one
thousand  nine hundred and eight.
(L.  S.) S.  Y.  WOOTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has  been established  and  licensed are:
To make Insurance on dwellings,
houses, stores and all kinds of buildings, and upon household furniture,
merchandise and other property against
loss and damage by fire, and the risks
of Inland navigation and transportation.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander W.
Young, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Timber Dealer, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
foreshore and submerged lands on Moss
Inlet:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner, being about one-half
mile south of the mouth of Clyak river;
thence north 40 chains; thence west 46
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
east 46 chains to point of commencement.
Staked July 3, 1908.
ALEXANDER W.  YOUNG.
July 25 George Young, Agent.
Two of the Best
Dixi Coffee
A  blend  of  the  finest  old
Government  Java  and
Arabian Mocha at
Soc, 40c and 30c per lb.
Dixi Tea
Noted   throughout   Western
Canada  for  its   rich  syrupy
flavor and   fine  bouquet  at;
$1, soc and 35c per lb.
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
Up-to-Date Grocers.
1317 Government Street. Tels. 52, 1052, 1590
Where you get the best things to eat and drink.
"As much valor is to be found
in feasting as in fighting."
—Burton
The Poodle Dog
In the matter of ministering to the needs of the inner man is
most luxuriously equipped. A new chef direct from Paris. The
cosy grill room as a centre of good cheer takes a distinct place in
the business and social life of Victoria.
SPECIAL DINNER A LA CARTE
AT REASONABLE PRICE.
W. S. D. SMITH, Proprietor
YATES STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.
When Hearts Are Trumps
Housekeeping goods will
soon be needed. The first
essential towards, good
housekeeping is a good
Gas Range
The benedict-to-be should
see that his bride experiences
the joy of a stove that's always ready and oven that's
always right, and a heat that
can be regulated so that a
cool kitchen is apparent during hot weather. See our
splendid values in Gas
Ranges and Stoves.
VICTORIA GAS CpMPANY, Limited
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
DAYS
ARE
AT
HAND
Write me for 1908
Catalogue
Cockburn's Art Gallery
(Successors to WILL MARSDEN) PHONE 1933
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B.

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