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Week Jan 19, 1907

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 ntvipnnnmnfTsriTrsrttrriroisTr
Th^ancouver Office of      "*
THE WEEK
—IS—
Room 14, MacKinnon Block.
Phone 2769.
s3
CAMPAIGN ISSUE
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. C.
Vol. III.   No. 51
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
THE POOR MAN'S CHANCES.
In the present campaign, as in all others,
in the history of the Dominion, the Liberal party is profuse in its promises to
the workingman, unbounded in its assurances of the deepest sympathy for his
hard lot, and untrammelled in its denunciations of the Conservative party, who,
say the Liberal spell-binder, have done
nothing for the labouring classes. It may
be admitted at once that the Conservatives
have not made so many promises—either
to the workingmen or to anybody else—
as have the Liberals. The Liberals are
excellent at promises, until after election.
The way they treat their promises then
was scathingly illustrated by an indignant
Conservative on the floor of the Dominion
House at Ottawa, who stated that the Liberal party resembled a pawn-broker's shop,
"because it was full of unredeemed
pledges." This charge cannot with equal
justice be laid against the Conservatives.
But when it comes to actions, which
the proverb states have a louder voice
than words, the workingman, like the rest
of the community, finds a Conservative
Government more considerate of his needs
than a Liberal. A practical instance of
this is afforded by our timber regulations,
which put the poor man on an equality
with the rich man in the chance of profit
by the development of our natural resources. In all other parts of Canada
and the United States except British Columbia, the poor man's opportunity to profit by our vast timber resources is nonexistent. But in this Province—and
under a Conservative Government—if he
chooses to locate 640 acres of timber land
and can scrape together $140, he gets a
license to that acreage, renewable for 21
years, as long as he pays the same amount
each year. The richest man in the Province can do no more—and must do no
less. If the poor man cares to hold this
timber area and speculate with it, he is in
a position to do so just as much as is the
man of millions, and his ability to secure
as many such areas as he wishes is only
bounded by the limits of his pocket. If
he can find twenty claims, or a hundred
claims, he is just as much entitled to
them as the richest capitalist could be.
It is to be remembered that this right was
secured to him under the present administration, and nothing similar to it obtains in any other part of Canada or the
United States—a tolerably clear proof
that the Conservative Government is by
no means indifferent to the welfare of the
poor man.
OF WHICH THE OPPOSITION WOULD
ROB  HIM
But the gentlemen of His Majesty's
Loyal Opposition, the gentlemen who are
so tender in speech—before election—regarding the poor man's rights, they do'
not at all approve of this law. They urge
that the timber of the country should be
solely in the hands of the mill-man and
manufacturer. Here, for example, is an
extract from tlie election manifesto just
issued by the excellent Smith Curtis, who
is at present attempting to catch the votes
of the people of tho Similkameen as a
Liberal candidate:
" Publicly sell timber as needed by
mill-men, the idea being sale to offerer
of largest stumpage royalty, thus eliminating the speculator and obtaining millions of dollars lost, to the people by the
stupid system now in vogue."
Pretty, isn't it? So very Liberal, too
—in more senses than one. What a
beautiful chance the poor man would have
at that sort of auction sale, turning up
with his few hundred hundred dollars of
hard-earned savings in his pocket to buy
a bit of timber-land and finding himself
up against men who had a thousand dollars for every ten he had. How the Liberal party does love the poor working-
man!
CAREY IT TO A LOGICAL CONCLUSION.
Doubtless, these Liberal friends of the
poor man would not deal thus with timber-lands alone. Certainly not. Your
Liberal is a most logical man—Smith
Curtis is a most logical man. Naturally,
therefore, they would carry this excellent
policy to a logical conclusion, an! apply
it to the mineral areas of the Province.
Why not put all control of our minerals
in the hands of the smelter-men and big
mining companies, and do away with the
prospector, the small claim-owner and the
harmless person who leases a mine on a
royalty? Doubtless our Liberal friends
have this already under consideration. It
is a lovely policy and full of alluring possibilities. One might, for instance, extend
the principle of thus doing away with the
middleman by proceeding to abolish the
lawyers—how would Smith Curtis and J.
A. Macdonald like that?—and deal directly with the judges. Or one might
abolish the doctors—but what would King,
of Cranbrook, say ?—and deal direct with
the undertakers. And so on through every
walk of life. Be a Liberal and never give
the poor workingman a chance to climb.
. NOT SO BAD AFTER ALL.
The C.P.B. is now being accused by
the Liberals of owning the McBride Government. Well, if the thing were trqe—
whicli it is not—we don't know that it
would be any more shocking than the well-
established fact that the Grand Trunk
owns the Laurier Government. And certainly tho C.P.R. is away behind the
Grand Trunk Pacific in the matter of
subtle and delicate moves in political
strategy. For instance, the C.P.R. has
not yet seen fit to buy up red-hot anti-
Liberal labour papers and turn them
in one night, by the stroke of a golden
wand, into staunch supporters of Laurier,
Macdonald, Mclnnes and Hays, as has recently happened in Vancouver and North
Vancouver. The spectacle of the Vancouver Guardian, one morning denouncing
Bob Kelly and all his works in unchristian language, and the next morning-
praising tho said gentleman up to the skies,
was a pretty clumsy bit of campaign marketing. They should have made the
change more gradual. As it is—well,
people will talk, you know.
PROSPERITY NOT CONFINED TO
ONE CLASS.
There is probably no one tiling in the
present campaign which more annoys the
Liberals than the present high state of
prosperity throughout Britisli Columbia.
It is so very difficult to convince a well-
fed man, with money in his pocket, thnt
there can be anything wrong with the administration under which he and liis fellow-citizens arc prospering. And this
state of affairs, satisfactory though it is
to the community at large, makes the task
of the Liberal vote-seekers and office-
hunters a terribly hard one.   Consequent
ly, finding that the prosperity of the
country is too plainly evident a thing to
be denied, they are seeking to minimize
and belittle in every way the extent and
value of that prosperity. In doing so,
they manage to hit upon some very extraordinary arguments. For instance—by
way of an attempt, we presume, to _ influence the labour vote—the following
statement is being made by the Liberal
spell-binders: " Oh, yes! the country is
prosperous enough, but it is all going to
enrich the capitalists."
THE ARGUMENT OF IGNORANCE.
A more fallacious argument than this
could hardly have been conceived, or one
more lamentably illustrative of the deplorable ignorance of modern financial and
industrial conditions which has always
been a distinguishing hall-mark of the
Liberal party. To begin with, the day
when any man could, as in the old storybooks and fairy-tales, wring gold-piece
after gold-pi.ece from an oppressed people,
and pile his accumulated wealth in a stone
cellar with iron doors, and sit on it to
keep it warm—that day has gone by forever. Under modern commercial conditions a man who becomes rich can no more
help enriching other people than he can
help breathing. If the economic conditions of a country are prosperous, and its
development advancing, so that the mine-
owner, the lumberman, the capitalist, the
store-keeper, are adding to their businesses
and increasing their fields of operation—■
then it is a moral certainty that every man,
woman and child within the sphere of
their influence is also profiting by those
conditions. To argue otherwise, as the
Liberals do, is simply an unwarrantable
and wilful perversion of facts which are
perfectly susceptible of proof.
widespreading natuee of british
Columbia's prosperity.
No province in Canada today, probably
no other section of the North American
continent, affords a bettor proof of these
facts, and a stronger and more emphatic
contradiction of the assertions of ihe Liberals, than does British Columbia, under
the prosperity which has resulted from
three years and a half of good, stable,
businesslike government. It is true that
our big commercial houses—aye, and the
little ones, too—are increasing enormously
the volume of their business. But it is
equally true that they have had to heavily
increase the number of their assistants.
It is true that our lumber manufacturers,
mill men, mine owners, agriculturists and
fruit growers have vastly extended the
scope and quantity of their operations in
the past three years. But it is equally
true that they are hiring every man they
can get, paying wages of an amount unheard of in the previous history of the
Province, and are howling because they
cannot find more men to employ. It is
a safe thing to say that, if there is a man
unemployed in British Columbia today, it
is because lie is too crippled to work, too
lazy' to work, or has sufficient money to
live without work. And this demand for
labour at high figures, these increased
wages, have had their effect on the well-
being of all classes, and of all ages. A
striking example is found in tlie case of
the District Messenger and Telegraph
Companies, who find it almost impossible
to secure boys to do their work, 'in the
old days, especially in winter time, the
supply of this class of labour was invariably in great excess of thc demand—a
sure indication of tlie poverty of tlie parents, who were forced to send their children out thus early to do their share in
meeting the expenses of the home. But
today the case is changed. Tlie boys arc
at school, learning to become useful citi-
rt iriTrijTrinr j**nnnr»,*r»Ti 1 *
to   Stewart Williams K
**o**nnfjv
C. Janion   tt
«0N    J
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Si FOBT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
&AJUUUUAAJUtAi<OJtJU*JUUUUJ
One Dollar Per Annnm
zens, because their fathers are making
good wages and can keep the household
going without having to force their children at a tender age to go out in the world
and join in the fierce struggle for bread
which burdens the poor in less favoured
parts of the world. Does not this class —
the labourer, the artisan, the office-hand—
feel the reviving touch of our Provincial
prosperity ? The facts above stated—and
the Liberals know that they are facts—
prove that they do, and that the poorest
in our communities are better off today as
a result of the prudent administration of
Provincial affairs which has obtained for
the past three years and a half under the
McBride Government—British Colum-
bia's first Conservative Government.
OUR GREAT MINERAL OUTPUT.
It is really very hard lines on Mr. J.
A. Macdonald and Mr. W. W. B; Mclnnes
that, just at the very moment when, at the
bidding of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the
worthy Mr. Cox, and the equally worthy
Mr. Hays, they are straining every, nerve
to prove that the administration of British
Columbia by a Conservative Government
is a failure, evidence keeps on pouring in
to prove that it is a success. One of the
latest of these cruel checks to the patriotic
zeal of the Grand Trunk Pacific's faithful agents is contained in the mineral returns for the past year. Since 1903, when
the Government, of Mr. McBride, now
Minister of Mines, assumed the reins of
office, the yearly value of our mineral output has increased at the rate of about two
and a half million dollars per annum. In
1003 it, was some seventeen and a half
millions; in 1904 it had risen to a little
over twenty millions; in 1905 it was
close upon twenty-two and a half millions.
But tlie increase of thc year just closed
is a still more startling evidence of our
Province's enormous wealth and prosperity. It amounts to close on four millions
of dollars. According to the "gures of
Mr. W. Fleet Robertson, Pk . *ial Mineralogist—a man who, as all acquainted
with him will acknowledge, is little likely ■
to indulge in exaggeration—the value of
the mineral output of the Province for
190G reached the astonishing figure of
$2G,390,000, as compared with $22,4G1,-
325 in 1905.
WHAT IT MEANS.
Think of what these figures convey.
Tlie white population of this Province is
under 200,000—less than thc population
of the city of Seattle—yet the output for
one year of merely one of our great Provincial industries readies the figure of
twenty-six and a half million dollars! No
wonder that capital is flowing in to develop a country which, barely scratched
by the prospector and miner, can yet show
such magnificent returns. No wonder
that money is plentiful, that commerce and
industry are growing and flourishing in
our borders, that our people are prosperous
and happy.
NOT  VERY  SURPRISING.
No wonder, too, that the Grand Trunk
Pacific, seeing all this wealth and prosperity, is hungry and eager for those
15,000,000 acres of land which will be
theirs as a free gift as soon as they can
turn out tlie McBride Government. No
wonder, too, that their faithful lieutenants,
Macdonald, Mclnnes, Oliver & Co., are
being urged on to employ every means—no ^
matter what—to hasten the happy day.
And no wonder, either, that the said faithful lieutenants are finding it a hard job
to persuade a prosperous electorate to see
eye to eye with them and their masters.
Continued on page 4. r-fSBTTVIKl
ThviWancouver Office of
THE WEEK
Room  14, MacKinnon Block.
y, Phone 2769. ^
JtJUUULJUUUUUUU^
CAMPAIGN ISSUE
The Week
R British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. &.
Vol. III.   No. 51
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19,  1907
The Editor's Review
Of Current Topics.
THE POOR MAN'S CHANCES.
In the present campaign, as in all others,
in the history of the Dominion, the Liberal party is profuse in its promises to
the workingman, unbounded in its assurances of the deepest sympathy for his
hard lot, and untrammelled in its denunciations of the Conservative party, who,
say the Liberal spell-binder, have done
nothing for the labouring classes. It may
be admitted at once that the Conservatives
have not made so many promises—either
to the workingmen or to anybody else—
as have the Liberals. The Liberals are
excellent at promises, until after election.
The way they treat their promises then
was scathingly illustrated by an indignant
Conservative on the floor of the Dominion
House at Ottawa, who stated that the Liberal party resembled a pawn-broker's shop,
" because it was full of unredeemed
pledges." This charge cannot with equal
justice be laid against the Conservatives.
But Avhen it comes to actions, which
the proverb states have a louder voice
than words, tho workingman, like the rest
of the community, finds a Conservative
Government more considerate of his needs
than a Liberal. A practical instance of
this is afforded by our timber regulations,
which put the poor man on an equality
with the rich man in the chance of profit
by the development of our natural resources. In all other parts of Canada
and the United States except British Columbia, the poor man's opportunity to profit by our vast timber resources is nonexistent. But in this Province—and
under a Conservative Government—if he
chooses to locate 640 acres of timber land
and can scrape together $140, he gets a
license to that acreage, renewable for 21
years, as long as he pays tlie same amount
eacli year. The richest man in the Province can do no more—and must do no
less. If the poor man cares to hold this
timber area and speculate with it, he is in
a position to do so just as much as is the
man of millions, and his ability to secure
as many such areas as he wishes is only
bounded by the limits of his pocket. If
he can find twenty claims, or a hundred
claims, he is just as much entitled to
them as the richest capitalist could be.
It is to be remembered that this right was
secured to him under the present administration, and nothing similar to it obtains in any other part of Canada or the
United States—a tolerably clear proof
that the Conservative Government is by
no means indifferent to the welfare of the
poor man.
OF WHICH THE OPPOSITION WOULD
ROB  HIM
But the gentlemen of His Majesty's
Loyal Opposition, thc gentlemen who are
so tender in speech—before election—regarding the poor man's rights, they do'
not at all approve of this law. They urge
that the timber of the country should be
solely in the hands of the mill-man and
manufacturer. Here, for example, is an
extract from the election manifesto just
issued by the excellent Smith Curtis, who
is at present attempting to catch the votes
of the people of the Similkameen as a
[ Liberal candidate:
" Publicly sell timber as needed by
mill-men, the idea being sale to offerer
of largest stumpage royalty, thus elimin-
1 ating the speculator and obtaining millions of dollars lost to the people by the
stupid system now in vogue."
Pretty, isn't it? So very Liberal, too
—in more senses than one. What a.
beautiful chance the poor man would have
at that sort of auction sale, turning up
with his few hundred hundred dollars of
hard-earned savings in his pocket to buy
a bit of timber-land and finding himself
up against men who had a thousand dollars for every ten he had. How the Liberal party does love the poor working-
man!
CAREY IT TO A LOGICAL CONCLUSION.
Doubtless, these Liberal friends of the
poor man would not deal thus with timber-lands alone. Certainly not. Your
Liberal is a most logical man—Smith
Curtis is a most logical man. Naturally,
therefore, they would carry this excellent
policy to a logical conclusion, an*:! apply
it to the mineral areas of the Province.
Why not put all control of our minerals
in the hands of the smelter-men and big
mining companies, and do away with the
prospector, the small claim-owner and the
harmless person who leases a mine on a
royalty? Doubtless our Liberal friends
have this already under consideration. It
is a lovely policy and full of alluring possibilities. One might, for instance, extend
the principle of thus doing away with the
middleman by proceeding to abolish the
lawyers—how would Smith Curtis and J.
A. Macdonald like that?—and deal directly with the judges. Or one might
abolish the doctors—but what would King,
of Cranbrook, say ?—and deal direct with
the undertakers. And so on through every
walk of life. Be a Liberal and never give
the poor workingman a chance to climb.
NOT SO BAD AFTER ALL.
The C.P.B. is now being accused by
the Liberals of owning the McBride Government. Well, if the thing were trvje—
whicli it is not—we don't know that it
would be any more shocking than the well-
established fact that the Grand Trunk
owns the Laurier Government. And certainly tho C.P.R. is away behind the
Grand Trunk Pacific in the matter of
subtle and delicate moves in political
strategy. For instance, the C.P.R. has
not yet seen fit to buy up red-hot anti*
Liberal labour papers and turn them
in one night, by the stroke of a golden
wand, into staunch supporters of Laurier,
Macdonald, Mclnnes and Hays, as has recently happened in Vancouver and North
Vancouver. The spectacle of the Vancouver Guardian, ono morning denouncing
Bob Kelly and all his works in unchristian language, and the next morning
praising the said gentleman up to the skies,
was a pretty clumsy bit of campaign marketing. They should have made the
change more gradual. As it is—well,
people will talk, you know.
PROSPERITY NOT CONFINED TO
ONE CLASS.
There is probably no one thing in the
present campaign which more annoys thc
Liberals than the present high slate of
prosperity throughout British Columbia.
It is so very difficult to convince a well-
fed man, witli money in his pocket, that
there can be anything wrong with the administration under which he and liis fellow-citizens are prospering. And this
state of affairs, satisfactory though it is
to thc community at large, makes the task
of tlie Liberal vote-seekers and officc-
lmntcrs a terribly hard one.   Consequent
ly, finding that the prosperity of the
country is too plainly evident a thing to
be denied, they are seeking to minimize
and belittle in every way the extent and
value of that prosperity, ln doing so,
they manage to hit upon some very extraordinary arguments. For instauce—by
way of an attempt, we presume, to _ influence the labour vote—the following
statement is being made by the Liberal
spell-binders: " Oh, yes! the country is
prosperous enough, but it is all going to
enrich the capitalists."
THE ARGUMENT OF IGNORANCE.
A more fallacious argument than this
could hardly have been conceived, or one
more lamentably illustrative of the deplorable ignorance of modern financial and
industrial conditions which has always
been a distinguishing hall-mark of the
Liberal party. To begin with, the day
when any man could, as in the old storybooks and fairy-tales, wring gold-piece
after gold-pi.ece from an oppressed people,
and pile his accumulated wealth in a stone
cellar with iron doors, and sit on it to
keep it warm—that day has gone by forever. Under modern commercial conditions a man who becomes rich can no more
help enriching other people than he can
help breathing. If the economic conditions of a country are prosperous, and its
development advancing, so that the mine-
owner, the lumberman, the capitalist, the
score-keeper, are adding to their businesses
and increasing their fields of operation—■
then it is a moral certainty that every man,
woman and child within the sphere of
their influence is also profiting by those
conditions. To argue otherwise, as the
Liberals do, is simply an unwarrantable
and wilful perversion of facts which are
perfectly susceptible of proof.
widespreading  nature of british
Columbia's prosperity.
No province in Canada today, probably
no other section of the North American
continent, affords a better proof of these
facts, and a stronger and more emphatic;
contradiction of the assertions of die Liberals, than does British Columbia, under
the prosperity which has resulted from
three years and a half of good, stable,
businesslike government. It is true that
our big commercial houses—aye, and the
little ones, too—are increasing enormously
the volume of their business. But it is
equally true that they have had to heavily
increase the number of their assistants.
It is true that our lumber manufacturers,
mill men, mine owners, agriculturists and
fruit growers have vastly extended the
scope and quantity of their operations in
the past three years. But it is equally
true that they arc hiring every man they
can get, paying wages of an amount unheard of in the previous history of the
Province, and aro howling because they
cannot find more men to employ. It is
a safe thing to say that, if there is a man
unemployed in British Columbia today, it
is because he is too crippled to work, too
lazy to work, or has sufficient money to
live without work. And this demand for
labour at high figures, these increased
wages, have had their effect on the well-
being of all classes, and of all ages. A
striking example is found in the case of
the District Messenger and Telegraph
Companies, who find it almost impossible
to secure boys to do their work, in the
old days, especially in winter time, the
supply of this class of labour was invariably in great excess of the demand—a
sure indication of the poverty of the parents, who were forced to send their children out thus early to do their share in
meeting the expenses of tlie home. But
today thc ease is changed. The boys aro
at school, learning to become useful citi-
rs STSTrrmfSTnrir« rr» »r»r*r*r
Je   Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE A6ENTS
:
51 FOBT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.   ■
jWtUUU AJUUU*. i -W*J1J*J*J*JUJI.*L
One Dollar Per Annnm
zens, because their fathers are making
good wages and can keep the household
going without having to force their children at a tender age to go out in the world
and join in the fierce struggle for bread
which burdens the poor in less favoured
parts of the world. Does not this class —
the labourer, the artisan, the office-hand—
feel the reviving touch of our Provincial
prosperity ? The facts above stated—and
the Liberals know that they are facts—
prove that they do, and that the poorest
in our communities are better off today as
a result of the prudent administration of
Provincial affairs which has obtained for
the past three years and a half under the
McBride Government—Britisli Columbia's first Conservative Government.
OUR GREAT MINERAL OUTPUT.
It is really very hard lines on Mr. J.
A. Macdonald and Mr. W. W. B; Mclnnes
that, just at the very moment when, at the
bidding of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the
worthy Mr. Cox, and the equally worthy
Mr. Hays, they are straining every nerve
to prove that thc administration of British
Columbia by a Conservative Government
is a failure, evidence keeps on pouring in
to prove that it is a success. One of the
latest of these cruel checks to the patriotic
zeal of the Grand Trunk Pacific's faithful agents is contained in the mineral returns for the past year. Since 1903, Avhen
the Government of Mr. McBride, now
Minister of Mines, assumed the reins of
office, the yearly value of our mineral output has increased at, the rate of about two
and a half million dollars per annum. In
1903 it, was some seventeen and a half
millions; in 1904 it had risen to a little
over twenty millions; in 1905 it was
close upon twenty-two and a half millions.
But the increase of the year just closed
is a still more startling evidence of our
Province's enormous wealth and prosperity. It amounts to close on four millions
of dollars. According to the figures of
Mr. AY. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist—a man who, as all acquainted
with him will acknowledge, is little likely
to indulge in exaggeration—the value of
the mineral output of the Province for
190G reached the astonishing figure of
$2G,390,000, as compared with $22,461,-
325 in 1905.
WHAT IT MEANS.
Think of what these figures convey.
The white population of this Province is
under 200,000—less than the population
of the city of Seattle—yet the output for
one year of merely one of our great Provincial industries reaches the figure of
twenty-six and a half million dollars! No
wonder that capital is flowing in to develop a country which, barely scratched
by the prospector and miner, can yet show
such magnificent returns. No wonder
that money is plentiful, that commerce and
industry are growing and flourishing in
our borders, tliat our people arc prosperous
and happy.
NOT  VERY  SURPRISING.
No wonder, too, that the Grand Trunk
Pacilic, seeing all this wealth aud prosperity, is hungry and eager for those
15,000,000 acres of land which will be
theirs as a free gift as soon as they can
turn out the McBride Government, No
wonder, too, that their faithful lieutenants,
Macdonald, McTnncs, Oliver & Co., are
being urged on to employ every means—no
matter what—to hasten the happy day.
And no wonder, either, that the said faithful lieutenants are finding it a hard job
to persuade a prosperous electorate to see
eye to eye with them and their masters.
Continued on page 4. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY i9) 1907.
i? i>
if A Lady's Letter f
if By  BABETTE. Y
if if
fyiffyifififififififififif
Dear Madge:
The masculine readers of papers
are a very neglected race so far as
their clothes are concerned. Perhaps some day they will invade Government street in an enormous body
with banners and the usual adjuncts
of people claiming their rights and
insist that their clothes shall be described and their tastes guided. At
any rate, I am going to take pity on
them and show them the way to be
really comfortable now that the winter has descended upon us. The constant going in and out of often overheated offices, restaurants and clubs
makes it really imperative that men
should have thc warmest of overcoats, and I have just been admiring
some of the most desirable kind. The
B. C. Fur Store has turned out some
smart coats of this description. There
is, of course, not much variety in the
shape of fur-lined coats, as it is an
accepted fact that the best are thc
straight sac shape with a large roll
collar of fur and fur cuffs, but the
variety of furs employed are almost
endless, and though richly lined with
fur they are perfect masterpieces of
cut and quite free from the clumsiness which' is seen sometimes in the
inferior make of fur-lined coats.
A lady once in an address to the
conference of the "Parents' Union"
warned her hearers against the entanglements and fascinations of shop
windows. "As for the shopping habit," she said, "the best remedy is to
go into the country where there are
no shops." This advice, coming from
so brilliant a lady as the lady in
question is, has set women wondering. "Why," asks a writer in the
ladies' column of a leading paper,
"should we deprive ourselves of an
innocent pleasure by remedying the
shopping habit?" And the echo answers, why shopping, although it is
certainly a very great pleasure to the
average housewife, entails considerable responsibility and much fatigue.
Only after years of apprenticeship
does a woman become a really clever
shopper. When that end is attained
she has reason to be prour" of the
accomplishment. In the matter of
domestic shopping the capable housewife's mind is fixed upon procuring
absolutely the best value for her
money.
Of course, the principal event* in
January, as far as shopping is concerned, are the sales, and although I
am aware that there are superior
people who scoff at these timely and
most helpful happenings, there are
very few women who can afford to
ignore them or who would do so if
they could.
Quite thc most fascinating detail
of dress at thc moment is the blouse.
Thc newest models point to an absolute mania for confections in linen,
lawn, batiste and washing silk; in
other words, thc washing blouse has
come to its own. An exquisite example has a deep yoke cut in three
graduated scallops, the deepest coming in thc centre, and each outlined
with rather fat button-holing. The
exquisite needle point in the wonderful way that Irish peasant fingers are
capable of achiving. Very fine frills
with three pin tucks and an edging
of Valenciennes accentuate the graceful dip of thc yoke, and are carried
over in the form of epaulettes, giving
that airy and fluffy aspect which I
always insisted upon as the only possible character in a corselet blouse.
But there is such endless variety in
these lingerie blouses, the trimmings
consisting of thc finest of tucks and
thc most exquisite hand embroideries.
In Paris women arc wearing the old
snake bracelet of thirty years ago
as a means of holding the long glove
of-custom in its place. Some of these
flexible serpents arc in filigree, others
made with realistic scales arc popular. With grey and black g'oves,
silver and steel snakes arc correct,
while gold ones adorn thc tans and
fawn shades.
Every season brings its fad, and
the  season  of  thc  present  year  of
grace seems likely to be known as
the year of the brown tulle craze.
Just as some women never feel
dressed without a touch of their pet
colour applied somewhere, the milliner seems inconsolable unless she
can introduce a "chou" a twist of
brown tulle somewhere. That it has
a very softening effect on floral millinery and on certain shades of cerise
and violet cannot be denied. A great
study is made just now of the veils
to be worn with our head-gear, and
in Paris two or three are almost invariably worn at once. The face
veils are lighter and more becoming
than ever and arc very constantly
worn in the same colour as the hat
or toque. A great improvement has
been suggested in the shape of a
very fine inner tulle veil of white or
the palest pink to be worn with a
brown or grey veil; the effect will
be found to be most becoming to the
skin. With the full and much waved
hair that is almost imperative with
the picturesque millinery of this winter, it is most necessary that veils
should be entirely pinned into place;
no Frenchwoman would ever dream
of tying her veil on with the almost
brutal determination which an Englishwoman will expend upon it, with
results that are not always becoming.
The exigencies of political warfare
curtail my space, so I must say au
revoir.
BABETTE.
BRITISH AMERICAN TRUST CO., Limited
Wrecked Afterward.
I was once summoned as a witness
in a case where an old darkey was
charged with chicken stealing. The
old darkey was on hand early and before the case was called the Judge,
observing his presence, asked his
name.
"My name is Johnsing, yo' honah,"
said the darkey.
"Are you the defendant in this
case?" inquired the Judge.
"No, sah," replied the darkey, "I'se
got a lawyer to do my defencin'. I'se
de gentleman what stole de chicken."
Just then a small, insignificant
Irishman hobbled in on crutches accompanied by his wife, a big, brawny
woman.
"Judge," said she, "I want you to
give this man six months for giving
me this black eye."
"What!" exclaimed the Judge, in
astonishment, "do you mean to say
that this physical wreck gave you
that black eye?"
"Your honour," said the woman, "I
want you to understand that he was
not a physical wreck until after he
gave me this black eye."
THE DRAMMEB.
They sell the dear old farm for debt;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
The heroine has much regret;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
They sell her pig, her dearest pet;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
The hero cries, "I'll kill him yet!"
The villain smokes a cigarette.
Thus ends Act I with all eyes wet.
The villain smokes a cigarette.
The curtain's up.   Act II is set;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
The hero's  comrades fume and fret;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
Detectives  spread a crafty net;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
He flirts a bit with the soubrette,
The while  he rolls a cigarette.
This is his scene to hisses get;
He lights another cigarette.
Act III.    The gyurl has locks of jet;
The villain smokes a cigarette.
She's hls'n now, as he would bet.
And so be smokes a cigarette.
But, hist!   The hero yells,  "Well met!"
The villain drops his cigarette.
B-b-bang!    As down his corpse they let,
He reaches for his cigarette.
Though dying, be does not forget
To gamely puff his cigarette.
—Philadelphia Bulletin.
VICTORIA OFFICES
Cor. Broad and View   Sts.
J
A. C. McCALLUM.
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
NOTICE is hereby givsg. that, sixty
days after date, I lntend*to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
the following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Eugene Wacker, northwest corner; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 20 chains
to McKay's northeast corner; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
one hundred and sixty acres.
EUGENE WACKER, Locater.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE ls hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Arthur McKay, southwest corner; thenee
running north 20 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
west SO chains to point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres.
ARTHUR McKAY, Locator.
F. A. HUDSON, Agent.
Located Nov. 17, 1906. Dec.22
Gloves
Ladies', Gentlemen's
and Children's
Fowne's Dogskin (Ladies),
$1.25 and $1.50.
Silk Lined Antelope  (Men's, $2.00.
Men's Suede, $1.50.
Ladies' Silk Lined Mocca, $2.00.
Dent's   Chevrette   Gloves,
$1.50 and $1.75.
Fowne's Driving Patent Grip, $2.25.
Men's Reindeer, $3.00 and $4.00.
Cadette Gloves, sizes 00 to 7.
$1.00 and $1.25.
Foxe's Patent Puttees, $1.50, $2.25.
E. Chapman
Davis Chambers, Vancouver, B.C.
Sole Agents in B.C. for R. A. Hin-
son's Royal Irish Poplin Ties.
r
We Want Mines
The B. C. Assay &
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers in
Assayers' and
Chemists' Supplies
513 Pender St.
VANCOUVER,  B.  C.
Palmistry.
"Listen!" said the man of middle
age.
He was bending over thc palmist,
whispering excitedly in her car.
"Listen!" he said again. "My wife
is coming to you this afternoon to
have her fortune told, and if you
want to make some money on the
side "
He laid a bank note on thc stuffed
owl's head.
"Tell her on no account to buy a
motor car, because you read in her
palm that she is doomed to bc killed
in an automobile accident."
EMPIRE
TYPEWRITER
The Perfect Typewriter should have
as few parts as possible. In this age
we avoid complicated machinery, and
simplicity is the rule in mechanical
engineering if we wish to avoid after
trouble.
The straight from the shoulder direct stroke of the typebar in the
Empire is absolutely covered by patents, and just here is the great advantage this machine has over all
others.
The Empire is the only
perfect visible writing
machine. It is the only
one made in Canada as
well as in the United
States. The price is
only   	
In buying an Empire you not only
secure a stronger and better machine
but you save in the first instance $65
cash, plus 6 per cent interest on this
for five to ten years, plus the cost of
repairs required by the more complicated construction of other machines.
$60
General B. C. Agents, the—
THOMSON
STATIONERY CO
325 Hastings St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
or Prospects.
Copper Preferred
In forwarding us particulars
stick to facts.
We will send our expert anywhere.
A. ERSKINE SMITH & CO.
GRAND FORKS,   B. C.
Reference : Eastern Townships Bank.
LJLUJLMJULUJ^^
Tragedy Without the T
A man from the Prairie,
In a coat somewhat hairy;
Concluded a real estate deal.
In the midst of a blizzard,
He exclaimed;  Oh! my gizzard,
It's the fault of that sumptuous meal.—A.D.
MORAL
A cup of the famous DIXI TEA, sold only by The Independent Grocers, DIXI H. ROSS & CO., at 35c and
50c per lb., will speedily digest the most sumptuous
Banquet, the hero of the above lyric had omitted this
precaution.
Underwood Visible Typewriter
THE WORLD'S BEST TYPEWRITER.
Office Equipment of all kinds. Phone 730
BAXTER & JOHNSON, Metropolitan Building, gSEftJSJ
If you love your wife
BUY   HER  A  GAS  STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Roast, Do Not Roast Your Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 19 1907.
A GRAND SHOWING OF ANTIQUE COPPER
AND BRASS
FIRE GOODS
FIRE SETS,
Consisting of shovel, tongs and poker, in polished
brass, from $2.00 up.
Fire Sets, in polished copper and brass, consisting of kerb, fire irons and stops, at $10.00 each.
Hearth Brushes, with nice brass handles, at
50c each.
Circular Brass Spark Guards, in sizes of 20, 22
and 24 inches, at $2.00, $2.25 and $3.00 each.
We also have Circular Spark Guards, in blue
wire, at 75c, 90c, $1.00 and $1.25 each.
COAL VASES.
Coal Boxes, nicely decorated, hand painted and
with polished brass trimmings, from $2.50 to $4.00.
Coal Vases, in Antique Copper and old Brass,
in very unique shapes, from $6.50 to $30.00 each.
Coal Scoops, in polished copper, very artistic
and unique shapes, at $14.00.
Coal Boxes in oak, polished brass handles and
nicely stenciled, at $15.00 each.
We show a splendid line of new and artistic
Fire Goods. Everything in this line are of the
very highest class, and are direct from the leading English manufacturers.
Our line comprises a very large variety of
styles, sizes and finishes, and arc all of graceful
and unique shapes.
Our screens are particularly good, being very
highly decorated, with hand-painted flowers, and
are indeed very artistic.
Do not fail to send for our large and beautiful Catalogue. It contains many hints, and will
help you greatly in selecting anything you need.
ARTISTIC  FIRE  SCREENS.
utiftilly beaten copper screens, with he;
iron frames, and very artistic designs,
:ach.
screens, with heavy
■••••■"■■•-• •'■■-■ -   at
Beautifully beaten copper
black   iron   f*"*"*iP5    *inrl   verv
$7.50 each
Fire Screens, with bevel plate mirror centre;
beautifully hand-painted, and polished brass
frames, at $8.00 each.
Cloisonne Screens, very artistic, unique and
artistic designs, at $15.00, $16.00 and $18.00 each.
POLISHED BRASS KERBS.
In many beautiful shapes and designs and in
sizes, 42x12 in., 45x12m., and 54x12 in., at $8.00,
$8.50, $12.50 and $20.00 each.
Iron Fenders, with polished brass trimmings,
in sizes 39 in. and 42 in., at $3.50 and $3.75 each.
We also have some very nice Wrought Iron
Kerbs, in different shapes and designs, in sizes
of 36x12 in., 42x12 in. and 48x12 in., at $7.00, $8.oo,,
$9.50 and $10.00 each.
WEILER BROS.,
Complete Home, Hotel and Club Furnishers, Victoria
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
News From the Motherland
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
GIFT'S EVIL EFFECTS.
Scottish   Universities   and Mr. Carnegie's £2,000,000.
Bitter complaints have been made
for some time past of the evil effect
upon the Scottish universities of Mr.
Carnegie's gift of £2,000,000. Sir
William Sinclair, speaking at Aberdeen, declared that he had never met
an Aberdeen graduate who had not
denounced the influence of the Carnegie money.
Mr. Carnegie, it will be remembered, deposited in 1901 the sum of
£2,000,000 for the formation of a
"Carnegie Trust," the donor's wish
being that "no student should be debarred from attending the Scottish
Universities on account of the payment of fees." Students of either sex
who are Scottish born, or whose parents or grandparents were Scottish,
have the right to apply to the Trust
for the payment of their fees.
"The practical effect of the gift,"
writes a well-informed correspondent, "is that most of the students at
all the Scottish universities have
drawn upon the money for the payment of their fees." In very many
cases the students have thus been enabled to squander the sums sent by
their parents for fees, concealing the
fact that they had received help from
the Carnegie funds.
The most serious problem of the
Carnegie Trust is the increase of fees
made by the universities. Thc university authorities, acting on the principle of making hay while the sun
shines, have raised their fees since the
Trust began its work very considerably.
Another disastrous effect of the
gift is the starving of the extra-university schools, in which poor students have hitherto been coached. By
the aid of Carnegie money most stu
dents are now able to go to the universities, and the schools which produced Livingstone and scores of
other famous Scots are in serious
stiaits.
The moral damage of thc £2,000,-
000 gift is considered to be incalculable. The Scottish student is losing
his self-reliance, his sturdy independence, and his capacity for study under difficulties, and the whole nature
of Scottish university training is undergoing a change for the worse.
shown to Mr. Zancig, who did thc
same. When Mrs. Zancig gave the
sentence without hesitation, his Majesty expressed his utter astonishment, as did the rest of the guests.
At the conclusion of the demonstration the King said to Mr. and Mrs.
Zancig: "You must come down to
Buckingham Palace; the Queen is
most anxious to see you herself, and
we shall be delighted to see those
feats again. I never saw anything
like them."
French View of Germany.
Germany's motto might well be:
Development towards the West; development towards the East; development towards — universal dominion.
The latter development has another
name—dizziness, which ends in a fall.
—"France Militarie," Paris.
Amazing Thought-Reading.
"You have amazed and delighted
me. I assure you both it is the most
marvellous exhibition of psychical
powers I have ever witnessed."
The King cordially shook hands
with Mr. and Mrs. Zancig as he said
these words at the conclusion of the
wonderful exhibition of their powers
at Mr. Cavendish-Bentinck's house in
Richmond terrace, Whitehall, on
Tuesday.
It will be remembered that the
Zancigs were subjected to severe tests
at the Daily Mail office.
His Majesty was the very life and
soul of the party, and entered into
the spirit of the thing with the greatest zest. He himself put the Zancigs
through a series of tests, including
words whispered into Mr. Zancig's
ear and then uttered by Mrs. Zancig
from a distant corner of the great
salon.
The King then took a book at random from a shelf, selected a sentence,
and  memorised   it.    This  was   then
Christian Science Mystery.
The Earl of Dunmore, thc leader
of the Christian Scientists in Great
Britain, has had an interview with
Mrs. Eddy, the founder of the sect,
at Concord, New Hampshire.
Lord Dunmore denies that Mrs.
Eddy is suffering from an incurable
disease or that she showed the slightest trace of illness.
A few weeks ago Mrs. Eddy was
declared to bc dying from cancer,
and thc correspondents who were permitted to have a fleeting glimpse f
her at her Concord home described
her as a "slight, withered old lady,
tottering pitifully, a rouged skeleton
in the last stage of mental and physical decrepitude." It is stated that
a "substitute" Mrs. Eddy has been
provided. It would be interesting to
know if Lord Dunmore saw the substitute.
Unblushing Readers.
A booK has only to outrage the
conventions, and it is sought for by
feminine readers. There is a roundabout method of procuring it. Librarians will bc asked for it by young
girls and elderly spinsters without
the semblance of a blush.—"The
Crown."
Problem of Cancer.
Everywhere cancer specialists are
discussing, testing, and theorising
over the latest agent in thc light
against cancer—trypsin. This is thc
most powerful digestive ferment secreted in thc human body.   The the
ory of its application is, in part, this:
Its injection into the cancerous tissues results in the growth being "digested" in the body of the patient.
Trypsin is immensely more powerful
than pepsin, and so, runs thc theory,
the cancerous growth is eaten away
and dissolved by trypsin when it is
injected by the hypodermic needle
into the malignant growth.
Though the present "boom" in
trypsin started in America, it was
first recommended on this side of thc
water. Dr. Beard, of Edinburgh, noticed that when the pancreas, which
manufactures trypsin, first apepared
in the human body, another body,
structurally akin to a growth composed of cancer cells, was checked in
its development and ultimately disappeared. Arguing from analogy, hc
suggested the use of the chief product of the pancreas — trypsin — in
cases of cancer. Professor W. J.
Morton, of thc New York Post
Graduate Medical School and Hospital, has taken up this theory.
Professor Morton tried trypsin on
incurable cases; i. c, where the can-
ccr had become so extensive, or had
so involved vital organs, that the use
of the knife was impossible. After
eight months' trial, Dr. Morton announces that out of twenty-nine cases,
two hopelessly inoperable cases were
"cured to date," in "several" the progress of thc disease has been arrested,
and in all pain has been alleviated.
Among thc London experimenters,
it must bc honestly admitted, a much
less sanguine state of mind exists.
Half a dozen cases have been treated
at the Cancer Hospital, Fulham road,
without result. At Guy's Hospital,
though one case was reported as
having distinctly improved for thc
time being, there is a tendency to
question whether trypsin is responsible for this. At thc Middlesex no
good results were obtainable. The
London Hospital has also tried trypsin, but with no conclusive results.—
"Daily Mail."
hear actors abused.   It likes to spend
its  days  buying  their  picture   postcards, its evenings hearing how they
beat their wives.—"The Globe."
Channel Tunnel.
We print today some interesting
statements regarding a scheme to
connect England and France by
means of a railway tunnel, constructed, at a cost of £16,000,000, beneath
the. Straits of Dover. The scheme
is receiving an increasing amount of
public attention, and will shortly
come before Parliament in the form
of a bill, deposited at the House of
Commons on Monday.
The very influential body of directors composing the board of the new
Tunnel Company are convinced that
the old sentiment against thc scheme
has so far died out that thc time is
ripe for a fresh attempt to secure
parliamentary powers to continue the
borings which wer* stopped over 20
years ago.
Six members of thc present Cabinet have previously voted in favour
of thc scheme, and it is well known
that many other memoers of thc
Government, now in office for the
first time, arc taking favourable
views.
The fear of invasion is ridiculed
by Sir Alfred Turner, formerly Inspector-General of thc Auxiliary
Forces, who declares that thc military danger exists only in thc imagination  of pessimists.
Lord Wolsclcy's opinion, given before a Parliamentary Committee, is
that, "if a foreign Power were able
to get possession of a Channel tunnel wc would never bc able to raise
our heads again as an independent
Power."—Daily -4.....
The   public   is   always   anxious   to
"Blimy!" ejaculated Bill Boshter,
"but 'Armsworth's have fairly missed
thc 'bus this time, they're bringin' out
a 'Daily Mail' for thc blind—as can't
see to read it!"
"Don't show yer ignorance, Bill,
the 'Armsworth's know what they're
a doin'," sneered Charles, his chum,
"it's a-goin' to bc printed in Dcaf-an'-
Dumbl" THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907.
Continued from Page i.
HOW TO DO IT.
Thanks to the persistent support of the Colonist and the
Times, Mr. A. J. Morley has been
elected Mayor of Victoria for the
ensuing year. Probably by this
time the respected editors of these
two papers realize that the surest
way to elect a non-entity to office
is to persecute him until the tide
of popular opinion flows in his
favour.
servative Secretaries throughout the
Province: "Copies of out 'Campaign
Issue' containing four splendid cartoons can be obtained from The
Week Office at $5 per hundred, for
Cash."
IN A GOOD CAUSE.
Mr. W. Blakemore, editor of
The Week, left yesterday for a
tour through the constituencies of
Alberni and Comox. He will be
accompanied in the former district
by Mr. W. Manson, and in that
of Comox by Mr. K. Grant, and
will return to Victoria in time for
the election.
Mrs. George L. Courtney entertained at bridge on Saturday afternoon last, two tables being filled by
the guests.
* *   *
Mrs. T. S. Gore was hostess at a
bridge party on Saturday afternoon
last in honour of Mrs. Campbell. The
guests were Mrs. Hickman Tye, Mrs.
Laing, Mrs. Bullen, Mrs. Irving and
Mrs. Gibb.
* *   *
Miss Wack returned on Monday
from a visit to Shawnigan Lake.
* *   *
Miss Violet Brae has returned from
visiting Mrs. J. S. Harvey at Crofton.
* *   *
The Hockey Ball given last evening in the A.O.U.W. Hall was a great
success, a most delightful time being spent by those present. A free
account will appear in next week's
issue.
BY WIRELESS FROM
THE C0A5T.
Dispatch from Ottawa states that
Ralph Smith and Klondike Sloan left
yesterday with cask of oil and chest
of gold. Destination and purpose unknown.
* *   *
Associated Press from Fernie states
Mclnnes met with rousing receptions,
Toronto gang having wired local
management of coal company: "Sparc
no expense in boosting Mclnnes,
Ross must he downed; if hc wins out
will bc the Dickens to pay."
* *   *
Hon. William Templeman telegraphed Victoria Times as follows:
"Bad boy to continue slandering
Green now he has resigned; ease off;
have arranged with Vancouver World
to keep it up; save you the odium
and travels farther."
* *   *
Special wire from R. L. Drury, Victoria, to Sir Wilfrid Laurier: "For
God's sake keep Duncan Ross away;
campaign of blackguardism play out;
if you have any gentleman in party
send them."
* *   *
From R. L. Borden, Ottawa, to
Colonist, Victoria: "Suggest during
Provincial campaign your editor discusses political issues, in view of
science, philosophy and New Brunswick. Might also give Seymour Narrows a rest. Could with advantage
study Gosnell's of last federal campaign. Advise him, take his gloves
off; this is a bare knuckle fight."
* *   *
From The Week, Victoria, to Con-
Wanted—Position as lumber
salesman; capable of giving estimates on all classes of work; good
references. Alberta trade preferred. Apply The Week, MacKinnon Bldg., Vancouver, B.C.
INSOMNIA
British Columbia
Permanent Loan
and Savings Co.
DIVIDEND
NO. 17.
Notice is hereby given
that a dividend of Nine Per
Cent, per annum has this
day been declared on the
permanent stock of the company for the half-year ending December 31st, 1906,
and a bonus at the rate of
One Per Cent, for the year
1906. The same will be payable at the head office of the
company, No. 321 Cambie
street, Vancouver, B.C., on
and after January 15, 1907.
By order of the board,
THOS. T. LANGLOIS,
President.
Vancouver, Jan. 11, 1907.
Some people allege that insomnia is practically unknown in Victoria; that the
atmosphere carries such a
balmy restfulness as to make
it impossible to spend a
sleepless night, and some
critics even go further and
hint that the climate is so
restful that many men never
wake up at all. Needless to
say these critics hail from
Vancouver and Seattle, and
envy us our enjoyable night's
rest, an enjoyment which is
intensified if you are wearing
the exquisitely soft and restful flannel, silk, or flannelette
London pyjamas which Sea
& Gowen, the Gentlemen's
Store at 64 Government St.,
are now displaying and selling at London economical
prices, where mail orders get
such prompt attention.
IF
CARLTON SALOON
AND LOUNGE
(Late Vernon Hotel.)
THE FIRST-CLASS BAR
R  P. CLARK, Proprietor,
*I,nte of Dawson City and Soutli Africa)
Cor. Douglas and View Sts.
BOND SIGN  CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles,  Estimates and
designs furnished.
,Let "Well Enough" Alone....
Why did Mclnnes give up the Governorship of the Yukon at $12,000 a year?
Why did Henderson give up the County Court Judgeship at $3,500 a year for life?
As an honest citizen mark your disapproval of these "Ottawa machine" tactics by voting for
THE SOLID FIVE
BOWSER
McGUIRE
MACGOWAN
GARDEN
TATLOW
EVERY  ONE  A   CITIZEN  OF  VANCOUVER
Meetings===
WEDNESDAY, 23rd JANUARY, AT CITY HALL.
SATURDAY, 26th JANUARY, AT CENTRAL ROOMS.
WEDNESDAY, 30th JANUARY, AT CITY HALL.
THURSDAY, 31st JANUARY, AT CENTRAL ROOMS.
VANCOUVER COMMITTEE ROOMS:
Central—410  Hastings  Street  West,   Phone 2806.
Fairview—2147 Granville Street.
Wards III and IV—546 Westminster Ave.
Mount Pleasant—Three Doors south of
Seventh on Westminster Ave.
A VOTE FOR THE
"SOLID FIVE" IS A VOTE FOR HONESTY,
MORE PROSPERITY.
POLITICAL   PEACE   AND
Presbyopia
PRESBYOPIA, or long sightedness is one of
the commonest defects in the human eye.
Whilst the sufferer can readily see at a
distance, he or she has great difficulty in
deciphering small type at the usual distance.
The first indication of the advent of Presbyopia is the seeking of a very bright light for
reading, which is done because the print cannot
be brought near enough to the eyes to see in
dim light.
Another very common indication is the attempt
made to hold a newspaper or book at arm's
length from the body—a most tiresome and tiring
position to adopt when reading. Another symptom is when print suddenly becomes blurred
when reading, owing to the tension becoming too
great to maintain.
Our qualified optician has made a very special
study of this defect, and can readily give relief
to those so offlicted by the fitting of perfectly
adjusted glasses.
■*"**
CHALLONER & MITCHELL
Jewelers and Opticians,
47-49 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
YOUR GROCER SBLLS
HUNTLEY
AND
PALMER'S
BISCUITS
TO HOUSEKEEPERS.
. WHEN YOU BUY FOOD,
naturally you desire pure
food, especially in jams, marmalades, pickles and flavouring essences.    The name of
CROSSE & BLACKWELL
on a jar, bottle or tin of jams,
jellies, marmalade, pickles or
flavouring essences is a guarantee of the ABSOLUTE
purity of the contents; all respectable grocers sell Crosse
&    Blackwell's    productions.
r
Solid Comfort
■\
Is what the ONE seeks when driving in Winter
Hid this may be easily attained by using a
celebrated
LEHflAN HEATER
They are universally known and recognized as
the STANDARD carriage, wagon, sleigh and automobile Heater. 350,000 LEHMAN HEATERS
are in actual use; they burn Lehman Coal, from
which there is no smoke, smell or danger of fire,
and they can be operated at the cost of 2 cents
per day.
LEHMAN HEATERS are in use by FARMERS, Motorists and the medical profession
everywhere.   Have you one?
Write for booklet telling more about them,
mentioning The Week, to
E.G. PRIOR & e©., Ld.
Hardware, Iron and Steel Merchants,
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. (2.
Also at Vancouver, Kamloops aud Vernon.
Subscribe for the Week THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907.
Vancouver
Notes.
The above telegram from the Premier was received by President C. M.
Woodworth, of the Vancouver Conservative Association, and speaks for
itself. Press reports of the meetings
held in Rossland and other important southern points tell of the splendid success being achieved by Mr.
McBride and Mr. Bowser on their
tour. In Vancouver the Conservative
campaign opened on Wednesday evening at the committee rooms at Fair-
view, the electors being addressed by
Candidates Macgowan, McGuire and
Tatlow and Lambert Bond. Thursday residents of the East End listened to the candidates and last night
a meeting was held at Cedar Cove.
The audiences were enthusiastic and
the speakers received close attention.
Tonight a rally will be held down
town in the Central Committee rooms.
In the Richmond constituency Stuart
Livingston has withdrawn from the
campaign and the running is between
Hon. Carter Cotton and Mr. Weart.
The Government side has been ably
presented by Capt. Tatlow at Steves-
ton and Mr. Carter cotton is now
making a hard canvass. S. A. Caw-
ley, the Conservative candidate in
Chilliwack, is touring the riding and
meeting with success, his addresses
being warmly received. In the Delta
John Oliver has given up the idea of
speaking elsewhere, being too busily
engaged at home fighting for his political existence against the inroads
of F. J. Mackenzie, the Tory candidate. Coming back to the Terminal
City the perfect organization of the
Conservatives in the several wards;
the strong feeling among non-political business men to leave " well
enough alone" and the outspoken resentment of such life-long Liberals as
W. H. Malkin, thc wholesale grocer,
and Mr. Woodward, of thc departmental stores, against the "Ottawa
machine" lend every reason to the
belief of the election of the "Solid
Five" by handsome majorities. The
vote of the labouring man, which may
be split by the Socialists, it is true,
will for thc larger part go to the Conservative for a bitter feeling is in thc
air against those in thc ring who
turned off the local stonecutters on
the new post office building and supplied their places with aliens. Two
big rallies are scheduled for the coming week, the first on Wednesday at
the City Hall, and the other at the
Central Committee rooms next Saturday.
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
m
VICTOBIA
"Nelson, B. C, Jan. 12th.
"In closing the first week of the
campaign in the Interior can confidently report victory all along the
line. Audiences the largest and most
enthusiastic ever assembled in the
Kootenays; candidates thoroughly
popular; organization perfect, and
party presents a solid front.
(Sgd.)   "RICHARD McBRIDE."
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol nil theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, aboof
other kindred boheniians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
"THE SOLID FIVE."
Hon. R. G. Tatlow,
A. H. B. Macgowan,
J. F. Garden,
Dr. G. A. McGuire,
W. J. Bowser.
*   *   *
VANCOUVER   CONSERVATIVE CAMPAIGN
HEADQUARTERS.
Central Committee Rooms—
Montelius Piano Company
Premises, 419 Hastings Street.
East End—546 Westminster
Avenue.
Mount Pleasant—2247 Westminster Avenue.
Fairview—2147 Granville St.
Conservative Club Rooms-
O'Brien Hall, Homer Street.
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining meu and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters for miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUGHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.   The miners' home.
'• DANNY" DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hotel
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SHITH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel of the Kootennys.
J. FRED HUME,
Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home nf the Industrial Workers
ofthe Kootenays.
W. B. HcCandlish,
Proprietor
Royal  Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Holel in the City.
(1 u day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.R,
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Proprietors.
The  Englishmen   who denounce the
Education Bill are not nearly so nume-
*   *   * rous as the Germans who disapprove of
THE WEEK'S CONSERVA- their Hohcnzollern Bill.
TIVE MEETINGS. The vigorous hand-shake is inevi-
  table in Great Britain.    If you don't
Wednesday—At City Hall. shake  hands  with  your  host  every
Saturday—At   Central   Com- morning in  Britain    he  thinks you
mittee   Rooms,   410   Hastings don't care for him any more."—"Sun,"
Street. New York.
RECORD
REDUCTIONS
Campbells
GREATEST
WHITEWEAR
SALE
HAS JUST
COMMENCED.
WE INTEND THAT the great reputation already gained by our whitewear shall be considerably enhanced by the beautiful lingerie to be sold at this, our greatest Whitewear
Sale;   no troublle nor expense have been spared in order to secure the very finest
creations in white skirts, night dresses and white underwear.   In durability, the very
latest and most recherche trimmings, the exquisite   goods we are   now offering   will be found
away ahead of anything ever offered in this Province heretofore.   The prices are cut so low as to
easily compete with the London and Paris sale prices;  we fear no comparison nor competition.
1
WHITE SKIRTS.
Fine White Skirts, deep flounce, hemstitched and
tucked;  regular price, 90c;  Sale Price 75c
Another lot of beautiful White Skirts, trimmed
with fine tucking and embroidery; regular
price, $1.00;   Sale price 85c
White Skirts with very pretty tucking an ' embroidery, flounces; regular price, $1.25; Sale
price  90c
Very dainty White Skirts with deep flounce,
tucked and hemstitched and very heavy lace
insertion;  regular, $1.25;  Sale price goc
A line of White Skirts trimmed with the very
latest tucking and embroidery on deep flounces;
regular price, $1.50;   Sale price $1.25
White Skirts with very deep tucks and very
beautifully embroidered flounces; regular price,
$1.75;  Sale price   $1.40
White Skirts with deep insertion and dainty embroidered flounce; regular price, $1.75; Sale
price  $1.40
Special White Skirts, two rows of insertion, embroidered flounce and dust frill; regular price
$2.00;   Sale price  $1.50
Very beautiful White Skirts with deep flounces,
two rows of insertion, heavy lace edging;
regular price, $2.25;  Sale price $1.90
Extra fine Skirts, embroidered flounces or if preferred with lace insertion and plain flounce.;
regular price, $2.50; Sale price. $2.15
CORSET COVERS.
Very prettily trimmed with embroidery; regular
price, 35c;   Sale price  20c
With lace insertion and lace edging; regular
price, 40c;  Sale price  25c
With very handsome embroidery and trimming:
regular price, 40c;   Sale price  25c
Corset Covers, very prettily trimmed with shell
embroidery;  regular price, 50c; Sale price.35c
Another lot of Corset Covers trimmed with fine
eyelet embroidery; regular price, 75c; Sale
price 5°c
Thc very latest Corset Covers, trimmed with
Torchon insertion and lace edging; regular
price, 80c;   Sale price  60c
Beautiful Corset Covers, trimmed with Valenciennes lace and very deep insertion; regular
price, 90c;   Sale price  7SC
Corset Covers iu Nainsook, trimmed with extremely pretty Valenciennes lace and ribbon;
regular price, $1.00;   Sale price 85c
Handsome Corset Covers with insertion and very
charming embroidered edge; regular price,
$1.25;  Sale price  90C
Extremely beautiful Corset Covers in Nainsook
with two rows of Valenciennes insertion, lace
edging and ribbon trimmed; regular price, $r.5o;
Sale price   $1.25
NIGHT DRESSES.
With tucked yoke and cambric rufllcs, makes a
very charming gown; regular price, 90c; Sale
price  75c
With cambric yoke, very prettily trimmed with
lace;   regular price, $1.00;   Sale price 75c
Nightdresses with tucked and hemstitched yoke,
trimmed with insertion and embroidery; regular price, $1.25;  Sale price 85c
Empire Nightdresses with yoke of insertion and
embroidery; regular price, $1.25; Sale price, 90c
Beautiful Nightdresses with Torchon lace insertion, low neck, elbow sleeves; regular price,
$1.25;  Sale price  90c
Very pretty Nightdresses with square yoke, hemstitched tucks and Torchon lace trimming;
regular price $1.50; Sale price $1.15
Special Nightdresses with very handsome embroidered yoke, long sleeves, V-shaped neck;
regular price. $1.50;  Sale price $1.15
Nightdresses with square neck, all-over embroidered yoke, ribbon trimmed, short sleeves;
regular price, $1.75; Sale price $1.50
Most fashionable Nightdresses with square yoke,
very prettily tucked charming rows of insertion,
embroidery and ribbon trimmed; regular price,
$2.00; Sale price  $1.65
LADIES' DRAWERS.
Very pretty hemstitched effect, trimmed with
line tucking;  regular price, 35c; Sale price, 25c
With Torchon lace edging and small rows Of
tucking;   regular price, 50c;   Sale price 35c
With very beautiful embroidery and narrow
tucks;   regular price, 60c;   Sale price 40c
With fine embroidery and tucking; regular price,
65c;   Sale price  50c
With Torchon lace trimming and insertion;
regular price, 75c;   Sale price  60c
With fine embroidery, tucked and hemstitched;
regular price, 90c;   Sale price   75c
With Torchon insertion and hemstitching and
lace trimming; regular price, $1.00; Sale
price   85c
With wide insertion and lace edging; regular
price $1.25;   Sale price    90c
With very deep Torchon trimming and hemstitched; regular price, $1.50;  Sale price..$1.25
With extremely fine insertion, embroidery trimming and tucked; regular price, $1.75; Sale
price    $1.50
MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE VERY PROMPT ATTENTION.
Angus Campbell & Qo.
THE LADIES STORE.
Promis Block, Government St., Victoria. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 19, 1907.
VANCOUVER
—AND-
British Columbia
For 1906
A wonderful year of growth and prosperity that
"The Daily Province"
of today, January 19, 1907, will show in detail facts and figures.
Send in your orders. There will be at least 56 pages. Every
page will be bright and well illustrated, showing why 1906 was
a record-breaker, and what may bc expected from 1907.
This special edition will cost FIVE CENTS the copy.
Send one to your relative or friend.
Fill out the following blank and send it to or bring it to the
office of The  Daily Province, Vancouver.
The Daily Province, Vancouver, B. C:
Please send a copy of your special edition of The Daily Province, January 19, 1907, to the following names and addresses for
which   I  enclose cents.
Names. Addresses.
Signed	
Address	
Uiinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO!
UNION-MADE.
RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
The Last Word. , Bachelors and Babies.
Little Boy—Are not all the words j Herbert, a bachelor friend of the
used to bc found in thc dictionary, 1 Smiths, was permitted to inspect the
papa? three-months-old baby that had but
"No,  my  cnild,    new    words  are | a few straggling locks of hair,
coined ever yday." "Isn't he the perfect image of his
"And what is thc last word, papa?"; father, though!    He is so precocious
"I •Iciu't know, dear. Ask your too; why, he is nearly as bald as his
in* she    always    has   thc  last , father already," was the embarrassed
v i comment he made.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierlt**,
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the marke   ot
current rates.   Anthracite coal for sale
34 Broad Street.
VICTORIA
Phone 647
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Pur Dresser
Mounting Large flame Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Mult and Hops Used in Manufacture.
I'HONfi 893. VICTORIA
The True Test of Merit
Is proved by lhe constantly increasing demand for
BUCHANAN'S Scotch Whiskies
Due entirely to their purity, old nge and line flavor.
Ask your win" mei chant lor Red Seal, at tl per bottle; Black & White,
at $1.25 per bottle; Royal Household at $1.50 per bottle;
Liqueur Scotch, at $1,75 per bottle.
JAMES BUCHAMAN & CO., by Royal Warradt Purveyors to Royal family
mm
FIVE HUNDRED NEW SUITS AND OVERCOATS
AT THE SEMI-READY WARDROBE
Suits, Overcoats,
and Raincoats,
from $12.00 to $30.00
Trousers
from $4.00 to $7.00
B. WILLIAMS & CO.,
and "Salem" Shirts
Sole Agents for Semi-Ready Tailoring
Yates Street, VICTORIA. CAMPAIGN ISSUE
rsrirtroTriTSVvzTiriroimroinn^
The Vancouver O^e of
THE WEEK
—is—
Room( 14,  MacKinnon Block.
Phone 2769.
tJLlULSUJUJUJUUAJtAAiLlUL^
¥■
The Week
TL British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. 6.
Q o~Va~a^To--o-o-a-ViniTSXX*X%*To~\
to   Stewart Williams R, C. Janion   o*
t    WILLIAMS & JANION     1
£ AUCTIONEERS °j
£ COMMISSION AND |j
to REAL ESTATE AGENTS 3
je   s< FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.   3
yiM3LSLSL&&SLSLXkX*?LXSL3L*SASLXX&
Vol. III.   No.
>T/T
JANUARY    19, 1907
One Dollar Per Annum
The Conservative
Platform.
According to the manifesto of
Messrs. Macdonald and Mclnnes the
Government has no record, no policy
and no platform. According to the
same manifesto the Liberals would
appear to have no policy and a platform of two planks, irrigation and
immigration. It is for the electors
to decide .whether this constitutes a
large enough platform on which to
erect the fabric of a Government and
whether a promise to institute an immigration and labour bureau, and to
flood an area of dry land in the interior, is more like a provincial or
a parochial policy, and whether it is,
however, important in itself, of sufficient calibre to determine the choice
of a government.
Mr. McBride appeals to the country on altogether different grounds.
His policy is broad, statesmanlike,
and adapted to the requirements of
the most important interests affected
by good government. His administration has a record upon which he
can confidently appeal to the electorate.
He can point to a financial policy
which has achieved all it was designed to accomplish and which has
been the chief instrument in restoring activity and prosperity. This has
been done honestly and speedily and
without any permanent addition to
the provincial debt. It is difficult to
see what more could be asked of a
financial policy or upon what grounds
it can reasonably be criticized. The
McBride ministration has solved the
problem of stimulating and encouraging native industries and in particular of securing the establishment
of the lumber industry within our
own borders and the consequent development of many new centres of
population.
The McBride administration has
earned and will receive permanent
credit for a railway policy which has
made it impossible for any future
government to bonus railway construction with land grants.
The McBride administration has
restored confidence in the stability
of British Columbia with the result
that outside capital has been attracted to such an extent that the Finance
Minister is able to state that there
is no limit to the amount of money
available for the prosecution of legitimate enterprises.
The McBride administration has
placed the affairs of the Mines Department on a more businesslike and
equitable basis than they have ever
been. The agitation against the mineral tax has disappeared, the contest
between placer and mineral rights
has been stayed by the just appreciation of both. The industry is
flourishing and expanding. Mr. McBride does not require to seek kudos
from the administration of the Departments presided over by his colleagues—his own is probably better
administered and in better order than
Bride has raised thc subject of "Better Terms" from the arena of discussion and debate to the platform
of a great provincial issue. He has
aroused the public sentiment of the
Province to a realization of its importance; he has forced the Premier
of Canada to admit its justice, and
so effectively has he waged the battle
that the Opposition is straining every
nerve to put so doughty a champion
out of the fight. For this purpose
the Ottawa Government has detailed
I     any.
may be gathered from thc fact that
Mr. McBride has been condemned for
not accepting $1,000,000, payable over
ten years with the possibility of an
additional $30,000 a year if Mr. Fielding was successful in inducing his
colleagues to endorse the recommendation. It stands upon the record of Mr. McBride that he refused
this offer, and in the opinion of all
loyal British Columbians the refusal
is "imputed to him for righteousness."   Messrs.  Macdonald and  Mc-
appeal to the electorate, a record, a
policy, and a platform. His position
is definite and positive; he does not
seek to becloud the real issues of
the contest by the reiteration of
meaningless phrases as a substitute
for definite pronouncements. He is
neither the tool nor the slave of any
powerful corporation or any special
interest. He is not charged witli the
task of pre-empting a transcontinental right-of-way for the benefit of
a horde of political  heelers,  nor  is
It is difficult to see what more
could have been effected by any government in the short space of three
and a half years. It is remarkable
that so much should have been done
when the handicap with which Mr.
McBride's administration assumed
office is taken into account, but something more has been done, and that
something looms on the horizon with
portentous    significance.     Mr.    Mc-
H00T, M©N!
.-^ar"? *     J'' -'    -' # >./ ■
J. H. Macdonald—"Stop for peety's sake, Mclnnes, that is sic a puir toon I canna' dance ta it.
W. W. B. Mclnnes—" Hoot mon, VE must !    Besides, 'tis the only toon that 1 can play.''
its heavy and light artillery. It has
secured the resignation of a Governor and a Judge and by the lips
of the former has had the audacity
to declare that the condition precedent to the granting of " Better
Terms" is the removal of the McBride administration from James
Bay. Just what the Province might
expect if the Liberals had their way
Innes declare on the contrary that
hc should bc condemned, and that
thc Province should be placed at the
mercy of the men who regard the
offer of the Ottawa conference as a
fair settlement of thc question.
It will thus be seen that Mr. McBride's manifesto, unlike that of thc
leader of the Opposition, possesses
all   thc   requisites   which   justify   an
he under any obligation to direct
the currents of settlement into a
channel which will strengthen the
monopoly of party bosses. His return to power will mean freedom of
access to thc fertile valleys of northern British Columbia for every settler who desires to enter. It will
mean the death-blow to a policy
which aims by every means to con
vert a provincial domain into a private preserve for the enrichment of
the friends of the Ottawa Government.
When Messrs. Macdonald and Mclnnes can convince the electorate that
Mr. McBride's policy, thus briefly
outlined, is not in the best interests
of the Province, and that irrigation
and immigration transcend in importance the issues he has raised they
may be returned to power, but not
before; and when that day arrives
the public Institution which is so prominent a feature in New Westminster
will need considerable enlargement.
The Liberal
Platform.
(Reprinted   from   " The   Week"   of
January 12th.)
On Monday last thc Liberal campaign was opened in the Victoria
Theatre by W. W. B. Mclnnes, ex-
Governor of thc Yukon, Special Commissioner for thc Federal Government, the Grand Trunk Pacific and
Senator Cox, and J. A. Macdonald,
the titular Leader of the Opposition.
Thc electors now know the grounds
upon which thc Liberal leaders impeach the McBride Administration,
and also the platform upon whicli
th y seek office. The most noticeable feature of the carefully prepared
address delivered by the Leader of
the Opposition is the abandonment
uf thc policy of scandal and abuse
whicli hc and his followers have
w; ed for more than a year. It is
not necessary to pursue the subject
further than to note the fact, and to
emphasize the inference that by this
time Mr. Macdonald has realised that
the position that he has hitherto
maintained with reference to thc late
Commissioner of Lands and Works
and his conduct of departmental business is untenable and has been virtually repudiated by thc sober judgment of the Province. It is gratifying to bc able to record that so far
not only the Liberal leaders but thc
Liberal press has conducted the campaign without indulging in indecent
personalities, and with some conception of the importance of the conflict. In thc interests of a fair consideration of the issues and the arriving at a wise decision it is to bc
hoped that this attitude will be maintained by both parlies throughout
thc campaign.
Mr. Macdonald's Address.
Turning to the address of Mr. Macdonald, whicli must bc taken as the
manifesto of his party, it may fairly
bc characterised as ineffective in its
destructive and meagre in its constructive features. It contains nothing new, nothing which has not been
argued threadbare cither on thc floor
of the House or in the columns of
the Provincial press. The public are
thoroughly familiar with all the .~eas
to which Mr. Macdonald gave utterance, and whatever other claim hc
may make, he is at least unable to
say, "Here is a new and a better policy." It is hardly to bc wondered at
that Mr. Macdonald found himself in
this difficult position, because he was
face to face with the one condition
of affairs which always redounds to
the credit of a Government, is thc
most difficult against whicli to make
headway, and which appeals most
strongly to an electorate — general
prosperity. Mr. Macdonald did not
attempt to deny or to minimise this, THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907.
and he had to admit that it presented
the greatest possible contrast with
the condition of affairs when the McBride Administration assumed office.
That being the case the utmost that
Mr. Macdonald could urge was that
the Government did not deserve credit for the improved conditons. He
merely made this assertion, and such
assertions require no great amount of
intelligence or skill to put forward,
but the assertion would have been
more convincing if he had analysed
the work of the Administration and
shown in what respects it could have
been strengthened in the direction of
aiding prosperity, or in what respects
it was weak where it should have
been strong.
Financial Conditions.
For instance, he admitted that the
financial position of the Province was
bad in 1903, but he did not claim that
the methods adopted by the Government to remedy the condition were
wrong in principle, although he denounced them with respect to method.
He admitted that borrowing was necessary, this was what the Government did, but instead of arranging
for the repayment of the one million
dollars borrowed within ten years, as
Mr. Tatlow had the courage to do in
order that as far as possible the Province should pay the cost of Administration as it went along, Mr. Macdonald offers the carping criticism that
the repayment of the loan should
have been extended over fifty years.
There is nothing new or original
about this; it is simply a continuance
of the policy which has built up the
enormous debt under which the Province is struggling. Indeed Mr. Macdonald's criticism on this point is already discounted by the improved
condition of affairs which enables the
Province to carry out the terms of
Mr. Tatlow's arrangement without
feeling any financial strain.
Assessment Act.
Mr. Macdonald's next objection was
to the Assessment Act, and here he
was upon even more treacherous
ground. He did not for a moment
contend that in principle it was
wrong to increase taxation; his only
objection was that instead of "raising
money by increasing the taxes of the
poor, of the struggling mechanic, or
of the business man," he should have
"taxed a railway, which for years had
escaped paying its taxes on subsidy
land." This criticism is neither "candid nor sincere." Mr. Macdonald
knows perfectly well that the Government has not merely demanded
but actually collected from the railway company in question all the
taxes which it could legally demand,
and if he was willing to be perfectly
frank in his criticism, he would surely have pointed out that the assessment of the railways had been increased at thc same time as the other
assessments of which he complains,
and as a matter of fact they had contributed the lion's share of the increased revenue. Can Mr. Macdonald be acquitted of disingenuousness
in ignoring this very important fact?
Thc best testimony to the wisdom of
thc financial policy of the Government is that it effected every purpose
for which it was framed, and that it
attained its end much more quickly
than was anticipated by its most sanguine supporters.
Industrial Conditions.
In less than four years every financial and industrial condition of the
Province has been reversed. There
is no discontent, one never hears a
murmur against the Assessment Act
now, and the poor, struggling mechanics, etc., for whom Mr. Macdonald is so anxious to show his sympathy, have neither constituted him
their mouth-piece, nor have they endorsed his statements. But is it a
fact that the Government has done
nothing to stimulate, to encourage
and to develop thc prosperity which
is so much in evidence? To this
question, Mr. Macdonald registered
an emphatic affirmative. They had
done nothing, absolutely nothing.
They had performed the hitherto impossible feat of holding office for four
years without influencing the business
of the Province. Surely a remarkable state of affairs. Is it nothing to
Mr. Macdonald and his party that thc
exportation of logs has been prohibited and  numbers  of large  saw
mills erected for the manufacture of
lumber on this side of the line? Is
it nothing to Mr. Macdonald and his
party that by the exercise of an enlightened policy persistently carried
on, a steady influx of settlers has
been attracted to British Columbia,
and thousands of acres of agricultural land settled and brought under
cultivation? Is it nothing to Mr.
Macdonald and his party that a similar policy has resulted in making
known to the outside world the splendid possibilieies of this Province for
fruit cultivation, and that in consequence capital is daily coming in to
develop what will yet be one of our
greatest and most profitable industries. It would be too much to expect that Mr. Macdonald should give
any credit to the Government for
these things, even though they are
actual achievements, the results of
legislative action and of departmental administration. But their accomplishment   surely   deprives  the   bald
be interesting to see just what value
there is in Mr. Macdonald's contention. It would be very surprising if
the Premier of any Government were
indifferent to the subject of railway
construction. It is the one thing
which the Province needs; the one
thing without which our great natural resources cannot even be tapped,
still less developed. The Premier
who did not regard railway construction as a vital necessity demanding all
the encouragement and assistance
which his Government could legitimately give, would be a political phenomenon with thc mind of an infant.
But if there is one thing which entitles the Hon. Richard McBride to
the respect and confidence of the
Province it is the clear-cut, definite
policy, which he has enunciated and
to which he has unflinchingly adhered
on this important subject. Public
opinion has definitely and finally decided against land grants for future
railway construction in  British  Co-
battle of its life in order to secure
that grant. Mr. Macdonald cannot
dissociate himself from the policy of
those whose assistance he has accepted in this campaign, and the importance of whose advent he has himself
emphasized; and if his condemnation
of Mr. McBride's railway policy
means anything, it means that the
Premier should have made a land
grant to the G. T. P. in the interests
of speedy railway construction in the
Province.
Land Grants.
The last word to be said on this
subject of railway policy is that never
again will a B. C. Government make
a land grant for railway construction.
Where owing to exceptional local
conditions it may be necessary to
render aid to branch lines this aid
must take the form of a cash bonus,
or the guarantee of bonds: such a
policy might be justified in the case
of a railway like the Kootenay Central, but the day of land grants to
mwiiiun'iinn'UKiuiiiiiiau
nnniviiiimmiini^'^v~:''inmimrmiinmmiinmniiiumimMium\miW}mmnmntn
THE PUPPET.
assertion of Mr. Macdonald that the
Government has done nothing to
help on general prosperity of the
slightest value. Mr. Macdonald has
been credited, and rightly, with keen
intelligence and acumen; his criticism of the Government on these
points evinces neither; the occasion
demands incisive criticism and not
merely that the critic should assert
that thc Government has done wrong,
but that he should show in what respect they were wrong aud how they
should have acted otherwise. Mr.
Macdonald has done neither, and to
that extent his criticism is both pointless and ineffective.
Railway Policy.
Hc then turns his attention to the
railway policy and his principal complaint seems to be that thc Government did not hold a special session
in 1903 to deal exclusively with thc
subject of railway legislation. Leaving for a moment the consideration
of thc Columbia & Western and thc
Midway  & Vernon  matters,  it  may
lumbia. Mr. McBride as a public servant correctly interpreted this decision and nailed his colours to the
mast. Up to this day he has not deviated one hair's breadth from the position he took up.
G. T. P. Demands.
In spite of the threats of the G.
T. P. he has resolutely refused, and
will to the end refuse to make any
concession on this point. Their modest demand for a land grant valued
today at $15,000,000 but probably running into at least four times that
value before they would have disposed of the whole of thc land, has
been strenuously resisted, a circumstance which accounts for W. W. B.
Mclnnes' resignation of the Governorship of thc Yukon, and the importation of the Ottawa-Toronto machine into Provincial politics. Mr.
Macdonald has not dared to say that
Mr. McBride should have encouraged
railway construction by conceding
this grant, but hc is allying himself
with the party which is putting up the
trunk lines and wealthy corporations
has gone by. Mr. Macdonald's attack upon the Columbia & Western
land grant was a simple reiteration of
his arguments on the floor of the
House last session. Mr. Macdonald
with a noticeable lack of fairness ignores the fact that this grant was
not originally made by the McBride
Government, but that they found
themselves saddled with an obligation
imposed by the legislative acts of
their predecessors. The Government
had to choose between taking advantage of a technicality and fulfilling a
moral obligation. In the interests of
fair play and the credit of the Province they chose the honourable course,
and in so doing gave Mr. Macdonald
and his friends an opportunity to
make what political capital they could
out of the transaction. They arc now
availing themselves of that opportunity to the fullest extent, but it is a
little singular that thc men who could
be so denunciatory because Mr. McBride discharged an honourable  ob
ligation by confirming the land grant
already made to the Columbia &
Western, should have nothing but
blame for him because he steadfastly
refused to initiate a grant to the Midway & Vernon. Just what it cost the
Premier to stand by his guns in this
matter will never be known, but few
men, even among premiers, would
have carried the courage of their convictions to the point he did.
Consistency.
Whatever else may be charged
against Mr. McBride, consistency is
the one thing which has characterised the railway policy of his Government, and if the pursuance of that
policy has engendered some sectional
dissatisfaction, and has retarded the
construction of railways in some parts
of the Province it is at least the result of a well-conceived plan, which
has once received the endorsation of
the electorate, and which in a very
short time they will again either endorse or turn down. Mr. Macdonald
is asking them to turn it down, but
he has not said one word on the subject of what he would substitute, or
how he would expedite railway construction. Some silences are eloquent.
Better Terms.
The only other subject of importance upon which Mr. Macdonald
touched was that of "better terms."
It is unnecessary to say that he condemned Mr. McBride's attitude on
this question. But his condemnation
was practically confined to one point,
Mr. McBride when turned down by
the Conference should have gone to
Sir Wilfrid, presumably cap in hand,
and begged for something which the
Conference had denied him. Is this
the attitude which the people of British Columbia wish their representative to assume towards the Dominion
Government? If so, The Week has
no hesitation in saying at once that
Mr. Macdonald is much better fitted
for the role than Mr. McBride. There
are men who, when kicked in the rear,
humbly beg pardon for being in the
way. But Mr. McBride is not a man
of that type. Before he went to Ottawa he received no information that
he would have to lay his case for "better terms" before a Conference of
Provincial Premiers. He expected
that he would have to treat with the
Dominion Government and that if he
succeeded in convincing them of the
justice of the claims of British Columbia they would negotiate for their
acceptance or approval by the other
Provinces. Mr. McBride did convince
the Dominion Government, not only
that B. C. had a claim for "better
terms," but for "special terms" beyond any of the other Provinces; and
he secured what was surely no mean
concession in Sir Wilfrid Laurier's
emphatic endorsation of that principle. That fact alone redeemed Mr.
McBride's mission from any suspicion
of failure or ineffectiveness. If any
mistake was committed, if any weakness was displayed, it was not on the
part of Mr. McBride, who won the
principle he went to fight for, but on
the part of Sir Wilfrid Laurier and
his ministers, who having conceded
the justice of Mr. McBride's claims
left him to the tender mercies of thc
other Provinces with competing
claims. Neither Mr. Macdonald nor
Mr. Mclnnes nor any Liberal leader
has dared to say that Mr. McBride
should have accepted the offer of the
Conference as a final settlement, and
yet this was the only condition on
which it was made. If they will undertake to say so it is an absolute
certainty that their supporters at the
polls on Feb. 2nd will not be sufficiently numerous to constitute a corporal's guard, and yet if they do riot
mean this there is no force in their
contention that Mr. McBride did
wrong in refusing. "But," urges Mr.
Macdonald, "he should have gone to
the Government again." "What for?"
one would like to know. He went to
them first, he was referred to the
Conference; it is true that Mr. Fielding, anticipating the seriousness of
the cleavage in the ranks of his party
if the Conference proved a fiasco, '
promised to support a further grant;
but unfortunately Mr. Fielding indicated the extent of his generosity,
and it amounted to the adding of one
pepper-corn to another. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907
Mr. McBride's Attitude.
No, Mr. McBride's action was characterised by all the dignity which
should be associated with negotiations conducted by the Premier of a
Canadian Province, and with all the
consideration for the interests of that
Province which the ablest ambassador could show. The firmness as well
as the justice of his attitude has created something like consternation in
the ranks of the Opposition. British
Columbia is represented at Ottawa by
a "solid seven." If the Province
whose claims have been derided by
the Dominion Government returns thc
McBride Administration to power
upon a platform in which "better
terms" as interpreted by Mr. McBride is one of the principal issues,
the consequences to the "solid seven"
and the party they represent will be
disastrous.
Th Ottawa Machine.
Nobody knows this better than the
men who control the Ottawa machine, and it is a moot question
whether the greater desperation exists in the ranks of the political party
which is anxious to postpone its
Waterloo in British Columbia, or in
the ranks of the Toronto boodlers
who are determined to grab a land
^grant in the north of the Province of
greater value than that which ten
years ago they secured in the south.
ince and probably, what will be more
appreciated than all, a moderate reduction in taxation. The whole Administration shares in the honour of
this achievement, but by universal
consent the Finance Minister is entitled to a special meed of praise.
There is a time-honoured warning for
the man of whom all speak well, and
if Mr. Tatlow were not the most modest of men it might have some application to him in view of the fact that
even the Opposition organs agree that
he is an excellent minister. In the
face of this testimony, to say nothing
of the highest opinion of his colleagues, it is difficult to see how the
Province could fail to suffer by his
removal from Cabinet rank.
financial liabilities under the system of
government thus provided not only has
the taxation per capita risen to a startling figure, namely 12.61 per head during the last five years, but the gross debt
of the Province has mounted up to the
appalling sum of more than ten million
dollars. When the McBride administration took over the reins of government
three and a half years ago the finances
of the Province were disorganized; it
was impossible to borrow except at exorbitant rates, and in order to carry on
the business of the government special
legislation was necessary which involved the imposition of additional burdens
upon the communities. Since that time
the development of the various industries of British Columbia has been ac-
and placed the case before the Federal
ministry. In January, 1903, the Hon.
Chas. Wilson, and the Hon. R. F. Green
went to Ottawa and interviewed the
Federal Government on the same subject. It was on this occasion that Mr.
Wilson suggested that the Province
might be willing to accept a re-adjustment of the lands in the Peace River
district in lieu of some of the demands
upon the Dominion treasury. During
the legislative session of 1005 a resolution was moved by Mr. J. A. MacDonald, leader of the Opposition ,as follows: "That in the opinion of this
house the Province is entitled to such
distinct and separate relief from the
Dominion of Canada based upon an equitable consideration of the conditions of
When the Hon. R. G. Tatlow delivered his first budget speech on March
28th, 1905, he pointed out that for a
period of twelve years the finances
of the Province had been falling into
arrears at the average rate of $750,000
per annum. For the financial year
preceding thc advent of the McBride
Administration the deficit reached the
enormous sum of $1,510,000. He stated further that at that date the excess
of current liabilities over all current
assets was $820,129. On March 3rd,
1906, completing the second full year
of his financial control, Mr. Tatlow
was able to announce a surplus of
$268,265. He did not attempt to take
credit to himself or the Government
to which he belonged for this phenomenal change, but wisely and safely left the inference to the intelligent
and fair judgment of the electors. He
did, however, point out that the excess of revenue was due to the growth
and improved conditions of our industries, and to the natural expansion of receipts through gratifying
Provincial development. He also
pointed out that the surplus did not
result from any curtailment of necessary expenditure below that estimated; and these statements make it perfectly clear that the policy of the
Finance Minister was as judicious as
it was successful. He might have
added to the already overbearing debt
of the Province by further mortgaging its splendid natural resources, but
he had the courage to adopt what was
at the moment an unpopular course,
but one which was based upon correct business principles, practically
"the cutting of one's coat according
to the cloth"; in other words, increasing taxation in order to pay operating
expenses. It is not too much to say
that those who were loudest in their
denunciation of this policy, when it
was announced, have long ceased to
criticise, and are today amongst the
most loyal supporters of the Government. The end has amply justified
the means. The Finance Minister had
thc prevision to recognise that if he
was giving hostages to fortune, they
would be redeemed at an early (late.
He rightly judged that the Province
was on the eve of widespread devcl-
opmnt, and of an era of prosperity
with the advent of which taxpayers
would speedily forget the extra impost they had carried to ensure the
winning of the race. The result is
that instead of having to face thc electors today with a depleted treasury
and an augmented Provincial debt,
the Finance Minister will shortly be
able to announce to the country a surplus exceeding $500,000 for the last
financial year, a reduction of the Provincial debt, a vastly increased contribution to much-needed public
works in  new districts of the Prov-
From Deficit to Surplus.
(Reprinted   from   "The   Week"   of
January 5th.)
<£> <rA 3B H i?3"®3s^
g^^^^^^^^^^m-.^oKu
THE MflGieiftN.
Hon. R. G. Tatlow, Loquitur:
Gentlemen, as I raise the cone and wave my magic wand you see that the large black ball marked
" deficit'' has disappeared from the table, and in its place, hey, presto I this bag of gold.
With apologies to Sir John Tenniel.
Better Terms
The Most riomentous Question
Affecting British Columbia—A
Vital Issue—The Future of the
Province Demands Its Settlement,
WHAT  IS  MEANT  BY BETTER
TERMS.
The great question which is agitating
the public mind today from one end of
the Province to the other is that of
"Better Terms." By this phrase is
meant the re-adjustment of the financial
relations which were established between the Provincial and Federal Governments at Confederation, and embodied in the British North America Act.
The principle underlying this question
of financial relations is that a province
has a certain population and contributes
a certain revenue. What it pays as imposts to the treasury is per capita its
impost or burden of government. Computations on that basis, arrived at in
various ways, show as a general and
almost invariable result that for a
whole period of years the burden has
been for the Province of British Columbia about three times that of the rest
of Canada together as a whole. The
burden thus imposed has become almost
intolerable,  and in struggling with  its
celerated to an extent undreamed of,
with the result that expenditure on public works has become necessary for the
opening of new districts and the accommodation of new settlers. These conditions cannot be grappled with satisfactorily and effectively unless there is
some amelioration in the financial contributions to the Province, and it is
the betterment of this financial condition
which constituter the aim and purpose
of that policy, which is known as "Better Terms."
The History of the Case.
In the '70's Mr. Justice Walkem went
to London to plead for a re-adjustment
of the terms of the British North
America Act, as they affected British
Columbia, and his visit resulted in what
is known as the Carnarvon Terms, and
expedited, if it did not secure, the construction of the C. P. R. tfirough this
province. But it is of late years that
the question has become a pressing one,
and while for many years great dissatisfaction was expressed with the treatment received by the Province from the
Dominion, thc first occasion when thc
case was formally stated was in 1897,
when Mr. R. P. Rither aroused public
interest in the subject. In 1900 the present Lieutenant-Governor brought the
subject under the notice of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and in January, 1901, he went
to Ottawa, accompanied by Mr. D. M.
Eberts, who was then Attorney-General,
the Province, the large contributions
made by the Province to the Dominion
by way of customs and otherwise, and
the exceptional high cost of government
in thc Province, and the*development of
our natural resources."
This resolution was accepted by both
sides of the house, and carried unanimously. The sequel to this was the recent visit of Premier McBride to Ottawa, witli thc result well known to our
readers.
The Necessity of Special Recognition.
On no occasion has the claim of British Columbia to special recognition been
disputed by the Federal authorities. On
the occasions already mentioned, from
1S97 to date, when the various representatives of this Province journeyed to
Ottawa, although they were not successful in obtaining any redress of the
grievances complained of, it is a noteworthy fact that thc principle for which
they contended, viz., special treatment,
was not once controverted. At the Quebec Conference of 1002 the subject for
consideration was the settlement of certain increased allowances from thc federal to the provincial governments.
These allowances were finally agreed upon, but
the representative of British Columbia
entered a demurrer of our case upon the
same footing as that of the other provinces, and contended that our conditions entitled us to special treatment
That his contention was justifiable is
now demonstrated by fhe fact that at
the recent conference at Ottawa, not
only did Sir Wilfrid Laurier make a
positive statement endorsing the principle, but the conference unanimously
supported the resolution embodying it
This once for all settles the question
of the justice of the claim of British
Columbia in demanding something more
than the ordinary scheduled subsidy,
which has been conceded to all the
provinces.
Concessions to Other Provinces.
In further justification of the claim
that what British Columbia is now demanding is a right and not a favor it
is only necessary to point out that since
Confederation important and extensive
concessions have been made to all the
provinces of the Dominion, involving a
variation of the terms of the Act of
Confederation. Incidentally these figures throw an interesting light upon the
manner in which British Columbia has
been treated in comparison with the
other provinces. At Confederation the
following debts were assumed by the
Dominion:
Canada (Province) $62,500,000
Nova Scotia    8,000,000
New Brunswick    7,000,000
Subsequently the following provincial
debts have been assumed by the Dominion :
Nova Scotia (1869) $   1,186,756
Province of Canada (1873)   10,506,080
Ontario     2,848,289
Quebec      2,549,214
Nova Scotia     2,343.059
New Brunswick      1,807,720
Manitoba      3.775>&»
British Columbia       2,029,392
Prince Edward Island     4.884,023
Total Provincial Debts   assumed  $109430,148
Taking the population from the Dominion census of 1901, the provincial
debt's assumed by the Dominion for British Columbia and the other provinces
are:
British Columbia—Population, 4,881,-
000; debts assumed, $107,400,726;
amount per head, $22.50.
The other Provinces — Population,
178,657. debts assumed, $2,029,392;
amount per head, $11.35.
Thus, British Columbia pays for local
services 4:1 of the other provinces, and,
we shall see, contributes to the Dominion treasury 3:1 of the other provinces;
but, when we come to the provincial
debts assumed by the Dominion, we
find the inverse ratio of 1:2 of the other
provinces.
Under the arrangement sanctioned at
the recent Ottawa conference the following increases in provincial subsidies
are provided for:
British Columbia $ 80,000
Nova Scotia    130,000
New Brunswick    130,000
Quebec    170,000
Ontario     160,000
Manitoba      130,000
Prince Edward Island       70,000
Saskatchewan      140,000
Alberta       140,000
This clearly establishes the right of
the Federal Government to vary the
financial conditions of the Act of Confederation.
The Changed Conditions in This
Province.
In 1867 the prevailing conditions in
British Columbia were entirely different
•from what they arc today. At that time
the important industries which are now
so extensive and prosperous had not
even entered upon their infancy. Lode
mining had not commenced; coal mining
was conducted on a very small scale;
lumbering and fishing were in embryo,
and agriculture was confined to a small
area at thc Coast. The total amount of
revenue contributed by the Province to
thc Dominion in 1874, six years after
Confederation, was only $386,599. In
1005 it was $3,717,507. At Confederation
there was practically no settlement of
population, except at the Coast. Since
then the great Kootenay mining district
has been opened up, and hundreds of
miles of trails and roads have been constructed. The Okanagan has been developed and the Lower Fraser Valley
has become a rich agricultural district. 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 19, 1907.
All this, however, important as we
know it to be, is probably a mere trifle
compared with the development which
has only just commenced in the northern part of the province. Since the certainty of other transcontinental railways
reaching the Pacific coast has become a
fact, milions of acres of hitherto unknown territory in the Bulkley, the
Skeena and other northern valleys have
been explored. Lumber mills are TTeing
erected; mines are being developed;
cplieries are being established; docks
and warehouses are being built and communities are being settled. All this
marvellous and unforeseen progress in
the opening up of the natural resources
of the Province makes enormous demands upon the provincial exchequer.
Roads and bridges are in demand everywhere ; schools must be built and maintained and civil government must be
administered, and all this in a country
the most difficult of access and the most
costly to administer. If the burden of
taxation is to be rendered so moderate
as not to handicap the development of
the Province, special subsidies of no
trivial amount will have to be granted
by the Federal Government. If this is
not done the burden upon the individual
tax-payer will bc so great that immigration will be restricted and most desirable settlers will be prevented from
coining in, because it will mean putting
their neck into a yoke too heavy to bear.
These are the conditions in British Columbia today as compared with the prevailing state of affairs in 1867, and they
constitute an unanswerable argument
for "Better Terms."
Our Account With the Dominion.
From 1872 to the end of the last financial year British Columbia had contributed to the revenues of the Dominion
no less a sum than $56,717,544, whereas
she had only received in return the sum
of $38,037,332. In 1872 the amount received under the heading "subsidies"
was $336,000, which gradually fell to
$207,996 in 1884 and slowly rose to
$307,077 in 1905, or actually $59,000 less
than thirty-four years ago.
As a tribute to the development of
the Province and the energy and enterprise displayed by the inhabitants under such discouraging financial conditions, it is only necessary to point out
that under the heading of customs the
contribution of the Province to the Dominion revenue increased from $660,302
in 1872 to $2,788,175 in 1905.
The Case as Presented py Premier
McBride.
The basis of the claim for "Better
Terms" may thus be set forth:
The relief sought is from an insufficiency of revenue arising out of causes
constant in operation and peculiar to
British Columbia.
These causes render it impossible to
provide for the responsibilities of local
administration imposed under the Terms
of Union, without creating intolerable
bu.-dens of taxation or exhausting the
resources of Provincial credit.
It was intended by the framers of the
B. N. A. Act, as will be shown, that
the amount of revenue left to the Province after Confederation should be
adequate for the performance of all local services, and, therefore, the Government submit as a basis of their claims,
that it is constitutionally incumbent upon the Dominion authorities to increase
the allowance wherever and whenever it
can be shown that such circumstances
do not exist.
The special reasons assigned for asking for exceptional treatment are as follows:
1. The cost of administration, owing
to the physical character of the country.
2. The distance from the commercial,
industrial and administrative centres of
Eastern Canada.
"3. The non-industrial character of
the Province, as compared with Eastern
Canada, whereby a larger percentage of
goods are imported and consumed, increasing thc contributions to thc Federal
Treasury, in the way of taxes, in a ratio
of three to one.
4. The disadvantage of thc Province
in relation to the markets for its special
products.
The responsibilities of population involved in the increase of population in
British Columbia, as will be shown, are
several times greater than elsewhere in
Canada by reason of a combination of
disadvantageous conditions, mainly physical in their nature.
Commenting upon thc physical condi-
tons of the Province and its mountain
ous surface the following tabulated
statement shows that the average cost
per head of its population for roads,
streets and bridges is over twenty times
as much in the average as the same services cost in the other provinces for the
five years ending 1902.
Annual Expenditure per Head for
Roads, Streets and Bridges.
Provinces. Average.
British Columbia  $2 91
New Brunswick  61
Nova  Scotia  20 7-10
Prince Edward Island ... 38 1-2
Manitoba  19 3-10
Quebec , . . 08 4-5
Ontario  06 3-10
Average  22 7-10
Averages of all the Provinces other than British Columbia  13 2-5
Over the same period the annual per
capita expenditure for civil government
is over nine times as much as the average of the other provinces.
Manitoba         07 7-10
Prince Edward Island ...       06 9-10
New Brunswick         02
And taking these four services together and averaging them it will be
found that the cost to British Columbia
per capita is over nine times that of the
average of all the other provinces:
Average Expenditure per Head for
Five Years, 1898 to 1902.
Provinces. Total.
British Columbia $5 18
New Brunswick  78
Prince Edward Island ... 63 1-10
Quebec  60 3-10
Manitoba  S.4 :"2
Ontario  47 l-M
Nova Scotia  42
Average  69 3-10
Average of all the Provinces other than British Columbia  53 9-io
Extending the argument, it will be
found that if the total expenditure for
all services    for the last five years be
Average
per head per
Provinces. year.
British Columbia       $11 86
Manitoba  4 31
Prince Edward Island . . 2 94
Quebec  2 44
■New Brunswick ..... 2 16
Ontario  1 79
Nova Scotia  1 65
$ 2 32
The striking inequaliy in expenditures
disclosed by a comparison between British Columbia and the other Provinces,
and the similarity, amounting almost to
uniformity, shown to exist among the
latter, point unmistakeably to some
cause permanently operating in this Province to account for the difference in results.
It is impossible, having in view all the
facts, to escape the conclusion that this
permanent cause is the vast area of
mountainous surface in British Columbia, which enters as a controlling factor
The Modern Perseus.
Mr. McBride's Stand for " Better Terms."
bia is employed in mining, lumbering,
and fishing, and relatively to what limited degree it is engaged in agricultural
pursuits and manufacturing, with corresponding results in the nature of their
respective products.
And, lastly, as a consequence of the
limited market for special products of
British Columbia in the East from which
its people buy so extensively, a market
has to be found for these in Great Britain and foreign lands, where they come
in competition with the cheap labor products of the world. Adopting the language of a former memorial, "We have
had to pay long distance freights on
both what we bought and sold; we have
been obliged to reverse the order of
successful business principles and buy
in the dearest market and sell in the
cheapest." Under this handicap have
our present industries been created, and
in regard to others, such as the manufacture of iron and steel and of pulp and
paper, the natural conditions for which
are so favorable, and whose development is nationally so important, the securing of profitable markets so far from
the centres of population is by far the
most serious of the problems to solve in
their undertaking.
The foregoing are the grounds, mainly, upon which the Government of British Columbia appeal for special consideration to the Dominion authorities,
in connection with the proposed readjustment of fjnancial relations as between the Provinces and the Dominion.
They indicate In themselves the nature
of the relief sought as compensation for
a combination of disadvantageous conditions, incident to physical characteristics and geographical situation.
The first render it impossible for the
Provincial administration to carry on
its ordinary expenditures necessary under the Terms of Union and provide for
the further adequate development of an
immense area still largely unpeopled. In
an experience of thirty-three yeors the
Province has but once in its history produced a surplus of revenue over expenditure, and has in the same time ac- itni-
ulated deficits amounting to about $10,-
000,000, during which its financial requirements have been insufficiently met
even by the aid of loans.
The second has resulted in the execs'.
sive contribution of $17,000,000 to the
Federal treasury for which no benefits
have been received, and placed iii: Province at a serious disadvantage n". respect to its share of inter-provincial trade,
foreign commerce and the development
of native industries.
Annual Expenditure per Head for
Civil Government.
Provinces. Average.
British Columbia $1 06
Quebec         16 9-10
Manitoba         IS I"2
Ontario         12 1-5
New Brunswick         08 4-5
Prince Edward Island ...        06
Nova Scotia         04 3-5
For the administration of justice the
per capita cost is four times as much.
Annual Expenditure per Head for
Administration of Justice.
Provinces. Average.
British Columbia $0 83
Quebec        32 1-2
Ontario         19 2-2
Prince Edward Island ...        16 7-10
Manitoba         12
New Brunswick         06 I-5
Nova Scotia        03
For hospitals and charities    the per
capita cost is five times as much:
Annual Expenditure per Head for
Hospitals and Carities.
Provinces. Average.
British Columbia  $0 38
Nova Scotia  13 7-to
Ontario  09 1-5
taken into account the average is nearly
five to one against British Columbia,
and that it would require the yearly sum
of $1,706,222 to place it on a equality
with the rest of the provinces.
Total Expenditure for all Services
in all Provinces for Five Years.
Amount
per head per
Provinces. year.
British Columbia  $12 61
Manitoba  4 18
Prince Edward Island ... 2 94 1-2
Quebec  2 69 1-2
New Brunswick  2 44
Nova Scotia  2 10
Ontario  1 37 J"2
$ 2 66
But lest it should be said that the last
five years does not present a fair average we will take the total expenditure
for all services in the provinces for
thirty years, when it will be found that
British Columbia's per capita expenditure is over five times the average of
all the provinces.
Total Expenditure for all Services
in all Provinces for Thirty Years.
into every branch of Provincial administration.
The second cause which operates dis-
advantageously towards British Columbia is its position in relation to other
Provinces and other countries, which
adds, as additional imposts, long-distance freights to the first cost of articles imported for use and for local
manufactures; and also minimises to an
unusual degree the advantages to be derived from inter-provincial trade, which
was the commercial object of Confederation.
The third head under which our disadvantages in Confederation are as compared with the other Provinces is the
non-industrial character of the population, which arises out of conditions unfavorable to maufacturing as developed
in Eastern Canada. The special products of Britisli Columbia—mineral, fish,
and lumber,—are not the raw materials
which enter into the manufacture of
dutiable goods most largely consumed in
the Province This condition accounts
for the larger percentage of goods imported, which increases the contributions to the Federal Treasury so disproportionately. An analysis of the census
returns of 1001 show to what unusual
extent the population of British Colum-
Consistency.
It has been said by a wise man
that consistency is a jewel. The
Okanagan begs to differ, and in a
recent issue proceeds to illustrate in
the most forcible manner its acceptance of the very reverse. While Mr.
Price Ellison was supposed to have
been more or less disaffected towards
the Government, the Okanagan was
never tired of laying stress upon his
independence and integrity of character, and the many natural qualifications which rendered him a heaven-sent statesman. Unfortunately for
the reputation of the Okanagan, Mr.
Ellison refused to be seduced into
thc Opposition camp, and worse than
all, has actually been tendered and
has accepted the nomination of the
party which hc has served so well in
the past. Now the Okanagan discovers that Mr. Ellison is a candidate
of another colour; he has made "an
unholy alliance" with Mr. McBride.
He has been "smoothed over" in some
way by "the wily pettifogger." In a
final burst of righteous indignation
the tailender exclaims: " Independence indeed! Weak bluff and bluster
is a better term for it." But for the
heading one would have thought that
the editor of the Okanagan was communing with himself.
The tiresome preacher finally finished his almost interminable sermon. The congregation had slowly
filed out, save one man, who lagged
behind to speak with the pastor.
"Do you know, minister," he said,
in a confidential tone, "that your sermon this morning reminded me more
of a wheel than anything else that I
could think of?"
"A wheel!" said the startled divine.   "How could it do that?"
"Oh, merely that in a wheel the
longer the spoke is, the longer is the
tire." ^.iSX^L,     SATURDAY,  JANUARY 19,  1907.
11
x-x.xiX'X.x.x.x.x.x.x-x.x.
Ladies and
Gentlemen
"We give you au opportunity
■fcc* buy *a nice Xmas Gift at a
low oost. See onr line of English. Oc>*wiiicle Travelling Bags,
Rugs, etc., Fancy Vests. We
can jn«,lce tlie vests from an
old  one    and.   guarantee a fit.
"VV43 are? making special reductions in all these lines,
Peden's
TAILORING
31       FORT
PARLORS
STREET
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots,
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.    Write for literature and maps
J.  E*  ANNABLE,
The Laud Man,
NELSON, B.C.
FRUIT
LANDS
On Kootenay Lake and Vest Arm.
Lake and River frontage. We
have large and imall traoti of
good land anl prices to suit all.
Alio several partly improved
ranches. Full particulars willingly given.
H. E. CROASDAILE & CO.
Nelson, B.C.
!%
Phoenix
—   Trust = and  =  Investment
«aj- strictly on commission for the sale and pur-
of city arid suburban real estate, agricultural,
xt ^irici mineral lands, the promotion of indus-
nc^rr-jet-orations, aud all business of a fiduciary
c: t 4& r-_
9   and   11
Macgregor   Block, corner Vfew and
Broad   Streets,
Agents throughout
Canada, United States
& Great  Britain.
RIA,   B. C.
ellent      list    of   exclusive   properties
ing     the    finest   residential   sites in
ss     Blocks,    Fruit   and   Agricultural
— r-o-ck:   prices.     If you are interested
Victoria  and  Vancouver Island, or
ir-iv-est   you  should write for this list.
transactions  we save you money,
excellent investments in
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of nil kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Etc.
R. W*. Hinton      NelSOII, B. C.
J
Ahead In
*^^/"e a.re ahead of all competitors in
our service to customers. Ask anybody who knows and then come'
3. r-rci experience what we mean by
•»*u.r drug store service. We have
the pleasantest store in town to
-tr-acle     in.
"   IVTake    us    prove    it."
•CYRUS    H.  BOWES
Chilliwack
$1,000 will buy 25 acres, i'A miles
from town and close to Ferry;
land easily cleared; birch, alder
and cedar; $300 cash, balance on
long terms.
Westminster Avenue
and Dufferin Street
88 by 132 feet; brick block on
corner; store and 17 rooms; 8-
room house to south and o-room
house in rear of brick block;
$31,000; half cash; will arrange
for balance.
C HErilST
■•• <3*3      G-overnmerit   St.
Near  Yates.
VICTORIA.
A. 0. P. Francis & Co
510 Pender Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
AMATEUR CHAHPIONSHIP
Boxing
I   Tournament
;     VANCOUVER ATHLETIC CLUB
; VANCOUVER, B. C.
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY  24
The championship and medals will be
presented in each of the following
classes:
Bantam, 105 lbs and under. Feather,
115 lbs. and under. Light, 133 lbs. and
under. Welter, 145 lbs. and under.
Middle, 158 lbs. and under. Heavy, 158
]bs. and over.
General admission 50c, reserved seats
jjl.oo, Ringside $1.50.
To Club members 50c, 75c. and $1.00.
! HOLLY TREES
Prices from 25 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
ASSAY CHARGES.
Gold      -ji.00
Silver       1.00
Copper       1.35
Lead       1.25
Iron       1.50
Zinc       2.00
Gold and Silver      1,50
Gold and Copper      2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper     2.50
Gold. Silver and Lead      2.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customers.
-^BV^' MIR    i«» fl   'hriviiiE   minintr
m io-wii.  sitiiftt.-'l    IS   miles
s<nitb   of    ^elscm    in    the   rich
minerrtl distriet of Wen   Kon-
tenay It       is      essentially    a
ff r-<_-*3-TVii llinuciimii, and   there*
*».r*3   **ix KtHinp-millsoiiprRtiii)'
i t»   the    vieinitv—one   of ihcm
CnirxG   Ymir)   being   tlie   largest
i i-»   <~; a.i» a-clfl..  witli  itsSOsiamps
c-onsianily    dri'i'P'ng-     Tliere
».re   uuinerousniinesinai'tive
« > ^>«»r» t ion    in     trie   eamp.   and
reliable       information     is   nl-
4*4*4**' 1*4*1 ji 4*1   available in   Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, B.C.
G. S   eOLEMHIV.
Proprietor.
YMIR enjoys every facility
inr mining operations.
Timber ami Water are abtirid-
nnt, 1 lie road- and trails nre
in Rood condition In the
main, and new ones are being opened up. There Is direct railway communication
with three smellers, ell within fifty miles ol Ihe town
Thc climate is congenial nnd
everv necessary and luxury
of life can be seen cd In tbe
cnmp ami at prices that compare fnvourribly with those
of any other district. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907
mm
MONDAY, JAN. 21st.
Countess Olga von Hatzfeldt
And a big Feminine Array in Anna
Held's New York Casino success
"The Little Duchess"
The most Lavish, Musical, Girlical
Comedy Production seen in years,
with a cast of Clever Comedians including Robert Lett and a Dashing
Beauty Chorus.
50—People in the Ensemble—50
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
Box Office opens 10 a. m. Friday,
January iSth.
post," planted about 10 chains northwest ot the northwest corner post of
Lot 203; thence south 40 chains; thence
west 1G0 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east ItiO chains to point of commencement.
Located on the 26th day of Dec, 1906.
B. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Rupert District, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the south shore of the West Arm:
Claim 2. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, northeast corner
post," planted on shore about 2 miles
northwest of the northeast corner post
of No. 1 Claim; thenee south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west SO chains to point
of commencement.
Located on the 26th day of Dec, 1900.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
WEEK JANUARY 21
The New Grand
SULLIVAN A CONSIDINE,    Proprietor*.
Management of HOST. JAMIESON.
ROLAND TRAVERS
Illusionist.
DEAN EDSALL and ARTHUR
FORBES
I-Act Comedy, "The Two Rubies."
MILLS AND BEECHER
Travesty Artists.
CHARLES DUNCAN
"London Vocal Comedian."
DOROTHY GOLDEN
Vocalist.
GEORGE F. KEANE
Song Illustrator.
"Star of My Life."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Mons Beaucaire, or a Gentleman
of France."
PROF. NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, 1 intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on Limestone
Island, Rupert District, Quatsino Sound,
Vancouver  Island:
Claim 3. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, northwest corner
post," planted at the northeast point
of the entrance to Quiet Cove, Limestone Island, adjoining Fregon's Preemption, thence running south SO
chains; thence E. SO chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west SO chains
to point of commencement.
Located on the 20th day of Dec, 1906.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate in Rupert District, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the north shore of the southeast arm:
Claim 4. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, S. west corner
post," planted at the northwest corner
post of Lot ISS; thence east 40 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located on the 30th day of Dec, 1906.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on Hecate Channel, adjacent to Zebalos Arm, Nootka
Sound:
(a) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northwest post"; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
south 40 chains; thence 110 chains to
shore line; thenee northwest to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
(b) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence SO
chains west; SO chains south; 80 chains
east, and SO chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(y) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thenco
40 chains south; 40 chains west; 40
chains south; 80 chains west; 40 chains
north; 40 chains east; 40 chains north,
and SO chains east to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
(x) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post"; thenco
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thenco east to shore; thence south along
shore line to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres,-more or less.
(z) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
80 chains south; thence SO chains west;
thence 40 chains north; thence 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
(r) Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's northeast post"; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thenee south 40
chains; thenee east SO chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 10 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
November 27, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for speclat timber licenses to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate In Renfrew District, in the Province of British Columbia.
1. Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles southeast of Snn Juan River,
marked "G. Young's southwest corner";
thence south SO chains; thence east SO
chains; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 1; thence
south SO (-bains; thence east SO chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west SO
chains to point of commencement.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 2; thonce
south SO chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
4. Commencing nt a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 3; thence
south SO chains; thence east SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thenee west SO
chains to point of commencement.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
the southeast corner of No. 4; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 168 chains;
thence soutli 10 chnins; thence east 100
chains to point of commencement,
6. Commencing at a post plnnted nt
the northwest corner of No. 6; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 160
chains to point of commencement.
Each   containing  040  acres,   more  or
Dated December 10. 1906.
Jan.19        GEORGE YOUNG, Locator.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate ln Rupert District, Quatsino Sound, Vancouver Island,
on the south shore of the West Arm:
Claim 1, Commencing at a post marked   "E.   J.   Mathews,   northeast   corner
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on the north
shore of the southeast Arm of Quatsino
Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
Claim 5. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, southwest corner
stake," planted 40 chains south of southeast corner of Pre-emption 1S9; thence
running north 160 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence south 160 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located on the 4th day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situate on the north
shore of the southeast Arm of Quatsino Sound, Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
Claim 6. Commencing at a post marked "E. J. Mathews, southwest corner
post," planted at tho northwest corner
post of Paul Cramers' Pre-emption;
thence running east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains, to point of
commencement.
Located on the 1st day of Jan., 1907.
E. J. MATHEWS,
Jan. 19 J. McNeill, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated in Nootka Sound,
West Coast District of Vancouver
Island:
1. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest corner post,"
situated at the head of Zebalos Arm or
Inlet, and 1% miles from the mouth of
the river, east bank; thence east 40
chains; thence 160 chains north; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 160 chains
to place of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
2. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 1 Section west; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thenee east SO chains; thence south SO
chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
3. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
and adjoining No. 4 on west; thence 40
chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thonce 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence SO chains east; thence SO
chains south to place of commencement; containing 040 acres, more or
less.
4. Commensing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 3 on east; thence SO chains
north; thence SO chains east; thence SO
chains south; thence SO chains west to
place of commencement; containing 040
acres, more or less.
5. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A, Ferguson's southeast corner post,"
neat- the northwest corner of No. 4;
thence SO chains west; thence SO chains
north; thence SO chains east, and SO
chains south to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
0. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southeast post," and adjoining No. 5 on southenst; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; and SO chains
south, tn place of commencement, containing 640  acres,  more  or less.
7. Commencing at a post marked "J.
A. Ferguson's southwest post," and adjoining No. 6 on north; thence 80 chains
east; thence 40 chains north and 40
chains east, 40 chains north, SO chains
west, 40 chains south, 40 chains west,
and 40 chains south to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December 1, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to make application
to tho Honourable Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Wrorks for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands, situated on Esperanza Inlet, lying east of
the Ehatezat Indian village: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's
1
Henry Young & Co.
WHITEWEAR Sale
NOW ON
At Prices Which Defy
Competition.
"Truly an Exquisite Display."
"A Very Marvel of Finest Lace and Embroidery."
"Every Garment a Masterpiece in the Art of Fine Trimming.
Mail Orders Filled Promptly.
HENRY YOUNG & CO.
DRESS GOODS, MILLINERS, DRESSMAKING, ETC., ETC.
Government Street, Victoria.
J
MARK THE DISTINCTION
ail Rolled ©ats Are Not
R -ft K Rolled flats
WITHIN RESENT YEARS many brands of Rolled Oats have been introduced
to the public notice, all attempting to emulate the popolarity of B. & K.
ROLLED OATS ;  all have signally failed in their object owing to three
distinct points of difference between B. & K. ROLLED OATS and all other Rolled
Oats.
FIRST    DISTINCTION     The finest white oats in the world are grown right
here in Western Canada. By their widespread
distribution of Elevators and Mills throughout Western Canada from Edmonton to the
Pacific Coast The Brackman.Ker Milling Company annually secure the VERY
PICK of these finest white oats.
SECOND
DISTINCTION   The B. & K. Milling Process is EN'
    TIRELY distinct and SUPERIOR to any
other process.
THIRD     DISTINCTION   Ancl -l -s a ***'eat 0Ile*     Owing to their unique
system of mills, elevators and depots all over
Western Canada, coupled with their system of DAILY DELIVERIES to the Grocery
Stores, B. & K. Rolled Oats are FRESH and SWEET every day, whereas all
oaher oats are often MANY months old before they reach the consumer.
W° REMEMBER Every
Grocer Sells B.&.K.
ROLLED ©HTS.
J
southwest post"; thence 40 chains east;
thence 40 chains north; thence 40 chains
east; thence 40 chains north; thence 80
chains west; thence SO chains south to
place of commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
The above is exclusive of the Indian
Reserve
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
November 25, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
nfter date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on south side of
Tahsls Narrows, Nootka Sound: Commencing at a post marked "J. A. Ferguson's northeast corner"; thence south
40 chains; thence west 120 chains; thence
north 40 chains to shore line; thence
east alongside shore to place of commencement.
J. A. FERGUSON, Locator.
December IB, 1906. Jan.19
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands situated on the west side
of the Homltah Lake, Nlt-1-nat District:
No. 1. Commencing at a post marked
"Edward E. Hardwlck's northeast corner," adjoining the Indian Reserve and
one chain west from the bank of the
Homltah River; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres.
No. 2. Commencing at a post situatec
on the north bank of the Homltah Lake
marked "Edward E. Hardwlck's south j
east corner"; thence north 40 chains)
thence west 160 chains; thence south 41
chains; thence east 160 chains alonf
shore of lake to point of commencement!
containing 640 acres.
No. 3. Commencing at the southeas
corner of No. 2 and thence 40 chaim
north; thence 100 chains west; thenee 40
chains south; thence 160 chains east
along shore of lake to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Clo-oose this 16th day o*
December, 1906.
Jan.19
EDWARD E. HARDWICK.
   ~—* THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 1907.
*3
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
I after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase Section 33, Township 8, Range 5, Coast
District, Bulkley Valley.
S. S. ROGERS, Looator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 00 days
[after date, I intend to apply to the
[Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
I Works for permission to purchase Sec-
Ition 2, Township 7, Range 5, Coast
[District, Bulkley Valley.
G. A. ROGERS, Locator.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1907.
Jan. 12.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
I after  date,  I  intend  to  apply  to  the
■ Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
I described lands:
(1) Starting  from  a post  on  the  S.
I boundary ofSec.  70 on the S.  shore of
Great Central Lake; thence 40 chains S.;
| thence 230 chains E.; thence N. to lake
I shore;  thence following the shore  line
W.  to E.  boundary of Sec.  70;   thence
following  the  boundary  S.  and  W.   to
[point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 3, 1000.
(2) Starting at a post on the S. shore
l of Great Central Lake, about 2 miles
1W. of Thunder Mountain; thence S.
Ito the N. boundary of Sec. 70; thence
lW., following the N. boundary line of
[Sec.  70,  100  chains;  thence N.  to  lake
■ shore;   thence  to  point  of  commence-
I ment.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 4, 1906.
(3) Comme-.icing at a post about 1V4
|miles from Great Central Lake, on the
shore of river, entering at the head
lof   lake   on   the   W.   side;   thence   80
■chains W.; thence 80 chains S.; thenee
|80  E.;   thenee   to  point  of  comrnenee-
nent.    N
x C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 5, 1906.
(4) Commencing on the S. shore of
biver entering at head of Central Lake
tin the W. at a post by N. E. corner of
|*o.   (3);  thence  100  chains E.;   thence
110  N.J   thenee   100   W.;   thence   40   S.;
thence to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 0, 1900.
(5) Commencing at post on the E.
phore of Central Lake, about 1% miles
(from the head; thence 40 chains N.;
Ithence 40 E.; thence SO N.; thenco W.
fco E. boundary of Sec. 73; thence S. to
lake shore; thence following the shore
Bine to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dee. 0, 1900.
(6) Commencing at a post about 1 "£
■miles from the head of Central Lake,
IE. shore, by the initial post of No. (5);
Ithence 00 chains E.; thence 40 chains
IN.; thence 40 E.; thenee S. to shore
■line; thence following shore .line to
■point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 0, 1906.
(7) Commencing at a post on the W.
■boundary of Sec. 73, on Central Lake,
■Clayoquot District; thence SO chains
|W.; thence SO N.; thence SO E. to point
■of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 0, 1900.
(8) Commencing at a post by the S.
|,<j. corner of No.   (7)  on Central Lake,
Clayoquot District; thence SO chains
thence SO S.; thence E. to lake
Ishore; thenee following shore line to
IW. boundary of Sec. 73; thence N. to
■ooint of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(9) Commencing at a post on the E.
Iihore of the river entering the head of
pentral Lake, Clayoquot District, about
I) miles from the head of the lake;
(.hence 40 chains W.; thonce SO S.;
I.hence 80 E,;  thence SO N.;  thence W.
10 point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
December 6, 1906.
(10) Commencing at a post on the N.
I'lde of the E. Fork of the river entering
lhe head of Central Lake from the N„
l'.bout 194 miles from the main river;
Ihence 80 chains N.; thenco SO W.;
Ihence 80 S.; thence E. to point of eom-
Inencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1900.
! (11) Commencing at a post by S. E.
lorner of No. (10), on the E. fork of
the river entering the head of Central
l.ake; thence SO chains S.; thence SOW.;
Ifience 80 N.; thence E. to point of com-
lliencement.
! C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
i Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
J (12) Commencing at a post by S. E.
lorner of No. (10) on the E. fork of
lhe river entering the head of Central
Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence 40 N.;
Ihence 40 E.; thence 40 N; thence 100
I'V.; thence S. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
' Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
,. (13) Commencing at a post by the
II. E. corner of No. (10), on the E. fork
I'f the river entering the head of Central Lake; thence 60 chains E.; thence
110 S.; thence 40 E.; thence 40 S.; thence
1,00 W.; thenee N. to point of com-
Ihencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
[■ Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
J (14) Situated on the E. fork of the
liver entering the head of Central Lake,
tommencing at a post about 60 chains
Easterly of S. E. corner of No. (10);
pence 100 chains E.; thence SO N,
Ihence 00 W.; thence 40 S.; thence 40
Iv.; thence S. to point of commenee-
lient.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
! Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, lum*.
t (15) Commencing at a post by ii'e
1. W. corner of No. (II), on the IS.
J;ork of the river entering the head of
Central Lake; thence 100 chains E.;
Thence SO S.; thence 00 W.; thence 10
v.; thence 40 W.i thence N. to point of
Commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
AV. B. GARRARD, Agent.
I; Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1900.
li (16) Commencing at a post near the
t>.  boundary  of  No.   (7),  on  the  river
fntering the head of Central Lnke, about
11 miles from the lake; thence 10 chains
If,; thence 140 E.; thence 60 S.; thence
ly. to E. boundary of Sec. 73; theme
|j.  and W.,  following  boundary  of  73;
iience W. to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
I* Clayoquot District, Dec. 7, 1906.
(17) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Central Lake, about 3 miles
from the head; thence 100 chains W.;
thence 80 N.; thence E. to shore line;
thence S. following the shore line to
point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, laOO.
(IS) Commencing at a post on the S.
shore of Great Central Lake, and lying
S. of Lot S3, about 1% miles E. of S. E.
corner of No. U7); thence 100 chains
S.; thence SO W.i thence 60 N.; tnence
40 E.; thence N. to shore line; thence
following shore line to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.
(19) Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of No. US) on Great Central
Lake S. shore, and lying S. of Lot 83,
Clayoquot District; thence 100 chains
S.; thonce 40 E.; thence 40 N.; thence
40 E.; thence N. to. shore line; thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1900.
(20) Commencing about 1 mile W. of
Lot 82, Clayoquot District, at a post on
the S. shore of Great Central Lake,
about 2M, miles E. of N. W. corner post
of No. (19); thence 40 chains S.; thence
120 chains W.; thenee N. to shore line;
thence following shore line to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Clayoquot District, Dec. 9, 1906.    Jan.12
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated neai
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, commencing at a post marked G. B. Wadham's N.
W. corner adjoining C. Takada's purchase claim; thence running east -.0
chains; thence south 40 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
100 acres, more or leas.
Dated  2nd November.  1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS. Loeator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated on the
south bank of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked
O. Takada's N. W. corner; thence running east 80 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west SO chains to shore;
thence north along shore to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated 2nd November, 1900.
C. TAKADA. Locator.
Jan. 5.
NOTICE is hereuy given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert  District,  Vancouver Island:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post placed
at the north-east corner of Section 28,
Township 18; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
Jan.  5. P. H. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing at a post situated at the S.
W. corner of Sectiin 34, Township 18;
thenee E. 80 chains; thenee N. 80
chains; thence W. SO chains; thence S.
SO  chains. ,
Jan.  5 C. W. MCDONALD.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to
cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands, situated in
Rupert   District,   Vancouver   Island:
No. 2—Commencing at a post placed
at the N. W. corner of Section 27,
Township IS; thence east SO chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence along
shore line SO chains, more or less;
thence north SO chains to place of beginning.
Jan.   5 W.  F.  BEST.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
No. 3.—Commencing at the N. E. corner of Section 29, Township 18; thence
west SO chains; thence south SO chains;
tiience east SO chains; thence north SO
chains to place of beginning.
Jan. 5 L. S. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date. I intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in Rupert District,  Vancouver  Island:
No. 4.—Commencing at the N. B.
coiner of Section 19. Township 18;
tbence south to shore line; tnence following the coast line 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains to place of beginning.
Jan.  5 „ R. W. EATON.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District. Vancouver Island:
0. Commencing at a post placed at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 27; thence S. SO chains;
tbence W. SO chains; thence N. 80
chains; thence E. SO chains.
Jan. 5. E. A. HALL.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
clays after date, I intend io apply to
tlio Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
timber on the following described lands,
situated in Rupert District, Vancouver
Island:
7. Commencing at a post situated nt
the north-west corner of Section 14.
Township 27; thence east SO chains;
thonce south SO chains; thenco west SO
chains; thence north SO chains.
Jan. 5. AV. G. DICKINSON.
NOTICE-is~liereby given that, thirty
clays after date. I intend to apply to
tho Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
ami carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Ru-
port   District.   Vancouver  Island:
S. Commencing at a post at the northwest corner of Section 13, Township
27; thence north 40 chains; thenco east
SO chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains; tiience north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Jan.  5. R.  McNAUQHTON.
DEPARTMENT OF MIKES.
COAL MINES REGULATION ACT.
BOARDS OF EXAMINERS.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following constitute the Boards of Examiners for the various Collieries during
the year 1907:—
CUMBERLAND  COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners — Charles
Matthews.
Alternates—David Walker, David Nel-
list.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—John Kesley.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Ripley.
Alternates — John Horbury, Daniel
Stewart.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John Kesley, of
Cumberland, B. C.
EXTENSION  COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—James
Sharp.
Alternates—Alex. Bryden, Alex. Shaw.
Appointed by the Lieut-Governor in
Council—W. G. Simpson.
Elected by the Miners—Thomas Do-
herty.
Alternates—William Anderson, Benjamin Berto.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. W. G. Simpson,
of Ladysmith, B. C.
NANAIMO COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—Thomas
Mills.
Alternates—George Wilkinson, Charles
Graham.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—Thomas Budge.
Elected by the Miners—John Carr.
Alternates—Thomas C. Piper, George
Moore.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. Thomas Budge,
of Nanaimo, B. C.
MICHEL  COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—Robert
Straehan.
Alternates—John John, James Derbyshire.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—Evan Evans.
Elected by the Miners—Sidney Blrt.
Alternates — Joseph Thomas, John
Laurenson.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. Evan Evans, of
Michel, B. C.
COAL CREEK COLLIERY.
Appointed by the Owners—David Martin.
Alternates—John Hunt, Henry Miard.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor in
Council—John McCliment.
Elected by the Miners—W. H. Moore.
Alternates—Charles Webber, Abraham
Brown.
All persons interested may obtain full
information by applying to the Secretary of the Board, Mr. John McCliment,
of Fernie, B. C.
Note.—Alternates act as members of
the Board in the absence of those regularly appointed or elected to act thereon.
Dated this 20th day of December, 190b.
RICHARD McBRIDE,
Dec.22 Minister of Mines.
64. Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner of Hubert
Haines' land, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
ELIZABETH KNIGHT.
G. B. Watson, Agent.
Sept. ioth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative assembly of the Province of British Columbia at its next Session by the Securities Corporation of British Columbia,
Limited, for an Act empowering any
Court of Law or Equity to appoint the
Company, without security, to exercise
the office of executor, or trustee, or
guardian of the estate of any minor, or
committee of tho estate of any lunatic
or liquidator of any company or corporation, or Official Administrator under
the "Official Administrators Act," for
any one or more counties in the sold
Province, and conferring power on the
said company to accept and execute the
duties of any of the said offices, and
giving the company the right to be
appointed a sole trustee notwithstanding
that but for sueh Act it would be necessary to appoint more than one trustee,
and enabling the said Courts to direct
that monoys brought or paid Into Court
shall be deposited with the Company,
and giving the Company power to
guarantee, by means of policies of insurance or otherwise, the payment of
money secured by or payable under or
In respect of debenture bonds, debenture stock, contracts, mortgages,
charges, obligations and securities of
any Company or of any authority, su-
pi'ome, municipal, local or otherwise, or
of nny persons whomsoever, whether
corporate or  unincorporate.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day
of December, 1906.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
Solicitors for the said Company.
Jan, 3,	
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
dnvs after dale. 1 intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lnnds nml
Works for permission to purchase in
the Coast District tho following described land, sltunted on the north side
nf tho Bulkley River: Commencing at
n post located nbout 60 chains cast of
I lie N. E. corner of Lot 9, and marked
"Geo. A. Petty, initial post"; thenco
soutli SO chains; thence west 80 chains:
tiience north 80 chains; tbence 80
chains east to point of commencement;
containing 610 acres.
Jan.   5. GEO.  A.   PETTY.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island: Commencing
at a post situated at the south-east
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains. ,
Jan. 5. M. A. MACDONALD.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert District, Vancouver Island:
5. Commencing at a post placed at
the south-east corner of Section 22,
Township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains.
Jan. 6. A. B. EATON.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, sixty
days after date. I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase in
the Coast District the following described land, situated on the south side
of the Bulkley River: Commencing at a
post located at the N. E. corner of Geo.
A. Petty's land, and marked "D. Petty,
initial post"; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Jan.  6. D.  PETTY.
LICENSE  TO  AN  EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
Canada,
Province of British Columbia.
No. 370.
THIS is to certify that the "National Drug and Chemical Company
of Canada, Limited," is authorised
and licensed to carry on business
within the Province of British Columbia, and to carry out or effect all
or any of the objects of the Company to which the Legislative authority of the Legislature of British
Columbia extends.
The head office of the Company is
situate in the City of Montreal, in
the Province of Quebec.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is six million dollars, divided into sixty thousand shares of
one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company in
this Province is situate at Vancouver,
and William Henderson, Druggist,
whose address is Vancouver, is the
attorney for the Company.
Given under my hand and seal of
office, at Victoria, Province of British Columbia, this third day of January, one thousand nine hundred and
seven.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which the Company has been established and licensed are:
To manufacture, import, purchase,
sell and deal in drugs, chemicals,
medicines, alcohol, paints, oils, dye
stuffs, glassware, toilet articles, tobaccos, liquors, cigars, stationery,
fancy goods, perfumeries, surgical
apparatus, physicians' and hospital
supplies, bottles, jars, cans, boxes,
containers, labels and other similar or
kindred articles and druggists' and
general store sundries and supplies
and articles entering into the composition thereof; and for the said
purposes to acquire and take over as
going concerns the undertakings of
any persons, firms or corporations
engaged in any such business and all
or any portion or portions of thc
assets and liabilities of said persons,
firms or corporations; and to acquire
and hold stock in any other corporations carrying on any such business
or operations and to use the funds
of this Corporation in thc purchase
thereof, and to assume and pay thc
whole or any portion or portions of
the liabilities of such other corporation, and if deemed advisable, to take
Oo to
FRASER'S
Drug Store
and see the latest
Perfumes
Phone 542
30=32 Government St
on assignment or assignments all or
any of such liabilities.
NOTICE) la hereby given that 00 da-patter date, I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner ot Lands and Worka for
permission to purchase the following land,
adjoining Lot 487 on Portland Canal:
Starting from a post marked "W. P. «"'•.
N. W. Corner"; thence 20 chalna south;
thence 40 chalna eaat; thence 40 chalna
north; thence 40 chalna, more or less, weat
to shore Une; thence southerly along short
line to point of commencement, containing
120 acres, more or less.
W. P. FLBW1N.
November 17, 1006.
NOTICB ls hereby given that 60 day*
after date, I lutend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands aud Worka for
permission to purchase the following land,
situate on Observatory Inlet, adjolulig
Lot 479: Starting from a post marked
"W. G. P's. S. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chalna; thence east 20 chains; thenct
south 20 chalna, more or leaa, to short
line; thence along the shore line westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
acres, more or less.
W. fl. PINDER.
November 17, 1008.
NOTICE) ls hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date we Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Worka
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated near Graveyard
Point, commencing at a post on the North
bank of the Skeena river, thence In •
westerly direction 40 ohains; thence northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40 chalna:
thence southerly 40 chains aloug bauk or
river to point of commencement, containing 180 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1908.
E.   EBY   AND   S.   McKENZIE,
Locators.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICB la hereby given that sixty (60)
nays after date 1 fntend to apply to tht
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lauds and
Works for permission to purchase tht
following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a posi ol
the North bauk of the Skeena river; thence
ln a westerly direction 40 chains: thenct
aoutherly 40 chains; theuce easterly 40
chains; tbence northerly 40 chains along
bank of river to point of commencement,
containing 100 acres, more or less.
Located  October  10,  11)06.
U. McKENZIE.  Locator.
S.   McKENZIE,     Agent.
November 17, 1900.
NOTICB Is hereby given that slity (60)
days after date I Intend to apply to tht
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
the North bank of the Skeena river; thenct
ln a westerly direction 40 ohaina; thenct
northerly 40 chalus; thence easterly 40
ohains; thence southerly 40 chains following bank of river to polut of commencement, containing lfiu acres, more or less.
Located October 16,  1906.
G.  II. BAILLIB,  Locator.
B. BBY,   Agent.
November 17, 19U6.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, situate on Hastings Arm
of Observatory Inlet: Commencing at
a post planted on east shore of Hastings Arm, marked "E. D.'s S. W. Corner," thence east 40 chains, thence north
160 chains, thence west 40 chains to
shore line, thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement.
E. DONEHUE.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from "the following described land, situated at Kum-ea-lon Inlet, Skeena District: Commencing at
a stake marked "W. R. F.'s Initial
Post," planted near shore of Inlet,
thence north 40 chains, thence east 60
chains, thence south 100 chains, thence
west 40 chains to shore line, thence
westerly alon gshore line to point of
commencement.
WALTER R. FLEWIN.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following lands:
Commencing at a stake marked "G. A.
B. No. 1," planted on the east bank of
Mammon River, thence north ito
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands, situated on the east bank
of Marmon River, Graham Island:
Commencing at a post marked "G A.
B.'s No. 2 Claim;" thence south 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
10 point of commencement.
GEO. A. BIGELOW.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to cut and carry
away timber from the following described land, beginning at a post situate
at the mouth of Kitsonschtiltz River, on
lhe north bank of the Skeena River,
marked "S. W. Cor. Wilfred Loiselle's
Timber Claim;" thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 160 chains to point
of beginning.
Dated Nover 17th. tooCv
WTT '•'•!Irl> I.01SELLE, Locator.
December 8. H
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1907.
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thenee south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to a point of commencement; 640 acres.
J. J. TEETZEL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 18,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 40 chains; thence east 80
chains; thenee north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of Section 8, Township 12, Range 5, of said
survey.
BENJAMIN  WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th,  1906.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 17 of said
survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitssumkalum Valley commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck. S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 1G0 acres more or less.
Located 20th October,  1906.
C. W. PECK. Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after da.te I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
land situated on the south bank of the
Skeena River adjoining H. A. Draper's
preemption claim, south boundary line,
at a post marked M. V. Wadham's N.
W. corner post, thence east 40 chains,
thence south 40 chains, thenee west to
bank of river, following the river bank
north to post of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres,
more or less.
Located 26th October. 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS, Locator.
H. DRAPER. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at tie N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M. Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October  26th.  1906.
D. M. MOORE, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in
the Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing
at a post planted at the S. W. corner
of D. Menard's purchase claim marked
D. Curther's S. E. corner, thence running 40 chains west, thence 40 chains
north, thence 40 chains east, thence 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acre3 more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J. CURTHERS.  Locator.
D. MENARD. Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to iue
Honorable the Chief Comnilssloner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber from the
following described lands,
No. 23. Beginning at a post planted
on the north boundary, about 20 chains
west of the northeast corner of application No. 7, on the east bank of the
Kaowinch River; thenee east 20 chains;
north 160 chains; west 40 chains; south
160 chains; east 20 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN HIRSCH,
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29, 1900.
Jan. 5
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Honorable Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special license
to cut and carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following
described  lands:
No. 16. Commencing at a post planted
at the west side of lake at the crossing of the south line of lease 33, thence
following the shore o... nine south;
thence SO chains west; thence 80 chain:!
north; thence SO chains, more or less,
to point of commencement. .
CHARLES WATKINS,
J. DORSEY. Agent.
Jan. 5
office at Victoria. Province of British
Columbia, this 20th day of December,
one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  six.
(L.S.) S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
To buy. manufacture and sell logs,
timber, lumber and all kinds of forest
products and for that purpose to improve streams, obtain franchises thereon for the floating of logs, lumber and
other forest products, and owning and
maintaining logging railroads, sawmills, machine shops, docks, wharves,
tugs, boats, vessels and other plants
necessary and convenient for the purpose of carrying on the logging and
timber operations of said corporation;
to iwn, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
timber lands, mining lands, farm lands,
buildings and real estate in general;
to mine, smelt, quarry and prospect for
minerals and mineral products and to
purchase, produce, manufacture, sell
and distribute the same; to purchase
and sell and deal generally at wholesale or retail in all goods, wares and
merchandise and lumbermen's and
miners' supplies, tools, implements and
other outfits and equipments; to generally do, carry on and conduct any
and all matters and things connected
with or incidental and appurtenant to
tho foregoing business and purposes,
or any part thereof.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Honorable Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special llcenso to cut
and carry awny timber from the following described lands;
No. 34. Commencing at a post at lhe
of the north fork of the Managuam
northwest corner of claim No. 25, north
River, New Westminster district; thence
west 40 chains; north 160 chains, east
40 chains; south 160 chains to point of
commencement.
C. T. DUNBAR.
J. McShane, Agent.
Jan. 5
No. 2S9.
CERTIFICATE    OF    THE   BSOISTBA-
TION OF AN EXTRA-PROVINCIAL
COMPANY.
" Companies Act, 1897."
I hereby certify that the "Henry
Swart Lumber Company " bas this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies Act,
1S97." to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legls.
lature of British Columbia extends.
The head ofllce of tho Company Is
situate In the City of Marinette. County
of Marinette and State of Wisconsin.
The amount of the capital of the
Company Is one hundred thousand dollars, divided Into one thousand shares
of one hundred dollars each.
The head office of the Company ln
this Province Is situate at 34 1-2 Government Street. Victoria, and James
Hill Lawson, Junior, barrister-at-law,
whose address Is the same. Is the attorney for the Company. Not empowered to Issue and transfer stock.
Given   under   my   hand   and   seal  ot
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I Intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake about 2% miles inland and about
half way between Pinchi and Tacher
Rivers, in the Coast District of the
Provinco of British Columbia, viz.:
Commencing at a post marked " R. S.
C," placed at the north-east corner of
lot 331; thence astronomically north
40 chains; thenee astronomically east
80 chains; thence astronomically south
80 chains; thence astronomically west
80 chains, and thence astronomically
north 40 chains to the point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ROBERT SENIOR,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August   24,   1906.
December S.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, 1 intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands, situated on Graham island, Queen Charlotte Group:
Commenging at a post planted ln the
northeast corner, and marked "C. D. E„
N. E. corner"; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to place
of commencement; containing 640 acres.
Dated  November  7th,  1906.
Dec.22 C. D. EMMONS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on Porcher
Island, about flve miles east of Refuge
Bay, commencing at a post marked Mrs.
Mary Odgers, northwest corner; thenoe
running south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains to McKay's southwest
corner and point of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres.
MRS. MARY ODGERS, Locater.
R. BRAUN, Agent.
Located Nov. 9, 1906. Dec.22
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands, and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains nortli, thence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more
or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
W. BRUCE, Locator.
D. MENARD, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
the Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
L    Located  Oct.  1st,  1906.
L. S. HUTCHESON, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
tho Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L. L. Watson, thence running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham's purchase claim, thence nortli
40 chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON, Locator.
F. W, liOHLEIt, Agent.
Dec.  22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated In the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 20th Oct., woo.
E. A. WADHAMS, Locator.
F. W.  BOHLER, Agent.
Dec. 22.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days from date we Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
tho following described lands in the
Nechaco Valley,  Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thenee south SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
oast SO chains, to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. II. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4 P.oudrler Survey;
thence east 80 chains, thenee south 80
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
EDWARD E. HARVEY,
A.  T.  Clark,  Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that, sixty
days (til)) after date, I intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works, Victoria, B.C., for
permission to purchase the south-west
quarter of Section Twenty-three 123),
Township Eight (8), Range Five (6.,
Coast District, Bulkley Valley, containing one hundred and sixty (160)
acres,  more  or  less.
H. E.  WILDMAN.
1st December, 1906. Dec. 15.
thence north 8o chains; thence weit So
chains; thence south 8o chains: tiience
east 8o chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence -orth 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 5
of said survey.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; tbence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. 4*4. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth, 1906.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
7. Commencing at a tost planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township I, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August Sth, 1906.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thtnee south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains fo point of commencement; 640
acres.
C. A. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement; 640 acres.
G. M. BIRKETT.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survey.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 16,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WEiR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on the north shore of Stuart
Lake, about half wy between Pinchi
and Tacher Rivers and about 2}4 miles
inlands in the Coast District of the
Province of British Columbia, viz.
Commencing at a post marked "W. J.
F. S. E.," and placed at the northeast
corner of lot 331; thence astronomically
west 80 chains; thence astronomically
north 80 chains; thence astronomically
east 80 chains; thence astronomically
south 80 chains to the point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
WALTER J.  FRIEDLANDER,
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
18. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 15,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence routh 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th ,1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 6,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 of
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 1,
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section Jf,
Township 10, Range S, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 7 oi
said survey.
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 12,
Township 11, Range S, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tnence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section ia
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
TAKE NOTICE that, sixty days from
date, I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following
described land, commencing at a post
planted on thc bank of the Skeena River
two and a half miles below Kltwangat.
at the N. W. corner of A. E. Price's
purchase claim; thence S. 22 chains,
more or less, to the S. W. corner of
A. E. Price's purchase claim; thenct
W. 40 chains to the S. E. corner of
Elizabeth Price's purchase claim;
thence N. 31 chains, more or loss, tn
the Skeena River, containing 100 acres
more or  less.
F. PRICE.
A. W. Harvey,  Agent.
Dec.   15.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 9,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Snr-
vev. thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement and being Section 9 of Mid
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 6th, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent
4-ittput 6th, 1906.
II. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10,    Range 5,  Poudrier Survey;
23. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 11,
Township n, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
tnence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 11
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August ioth, 1006.
Notice is hereby given that there
will bc offered for sale at public auction at the Lands and Works Department, Victoria, on Tuesday, the 22nd
day of January, 1907, at eleven o'clock
in the forenoon, all that piece or parcel of land situated in the City of
Victoria, Victoria District, containing fifty-six one-hundredths of an
acre, more or less, and forming part
of section numbered sixty-eight (68)
on thc official map of thc said Victoria District—said parcel being more
particularly described on a plan thereof filed in thc Lands and Works Department.
Thc said land will be offered for
sale subject to a right of way over
the western portion thereof, as shown
on thc said plan, and subject also to
a reserve bid,   Terms of sale, cash.
Dated at thc Lands and Works Department, Victoria, B. C, this ninth
day of January, T907.
NEIL  F. MacKAY,
Deputy Commissioner of L. & W.
PRIVATE BILLS NOTICE.
The time limited by the Rules of
the House for receiving petitions for
Private Bills will expire on Saturday,
the 16th day of March, 1907.
Bills must be presented to the
House not later than the 28th day of
March, 1907.
Reports from Committees on Private Bills will not be received after
the 4th day of April, 1907.
Dated this 2nd day of January, 1907. j
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands  and  Works  for  permission  to
purchase the following described lands,
situate on  the north  shore of  Stuart
Lake,  about  half way between Pinchi
and Tac'ier Rivers and about 3A miles
inland   in  the   Coast  Distritc   af  the
Province   of   British   Columbia,   viz.
Commencing at a post marked "E. F.I
S. W.," placed near the north boundaryl
of   Walter   J.   Friedlander's  purchase,]
about 40 chains from the northeast cor-l
ner;   thence   astronomically   north   80]
chains;   thence  astronomically  east 80I
chains; thence astronomically south 80J
chains,  and thence astronomically west!
80 chains to  point of commencement,"
and containing 640 acres more or less.
EDGAR FRIEDLANDER.
J. A. Hickey, Agent.
August 24, 1906.
December 8.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:
No. 2. Commencing at a post planted|
at the northwest corner of Timber Li-,
cence No. 8661, at the north end ofl
Sechelt Peninsula, New Westminsterl
District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to the shore; thence fol-j
lowing the shore to the point of com-j
mencement.
No. 3. Commencing at a post plantedj
near the shore on the east side
Agamennon Channel, New Westminsteil
District, thence E. about 60 chains j
thence N. to the S. boundary of No.
claim, at the N. end of Sechelt Penin
sula; thence E. about 60 chains to shon
of Long Lake; thence following thi
shore southerly about 100 chains; thenci
W. to shore; thence following the shon
to point of commencement.
No. 5. Commencing at a post at N.Wl
corner of Lot 672, N. end of Sechel
Peninsula, New Westminster District
thence N. 40 chains; W. 80 chains to th
shore; thence S. following the eas
boundary of T. L. 8661 to S.E. corne
thereof; thence E. 40 chains to S.'WaB
corner of Lot 672; thence N. 40 chain
to lake; thence following the lake shorl
easterly and northerly to point of comh
mencement.
M. GREEN.
JOHN WEST, Agent.
44. Commencing at a post planted aj
the south-east corner of Section _,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey
thence north 80 chains; thence west .
chains; thence south 80 chads; thenq
east 80 chains to point of eommene<
ment, and being said Section 27 of sai
survey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thir
days after date I intend to apply to th
Hon. Chief Commissi! f Lands anl
Works for a special license to cut anl
carry away timber from the followinl
described lands in Alberni District:   -H
Commencing at a post situate 80 chain
west and 20 south ofsoutheast boundar
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west]
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thenq
80 south, to point of commencement
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD, Agenti
Oct. 19th, 1906. THE WEEK, SATURDAY JANUARY 19, 1907.
15
A Spall Boy's Piety.
* I met Rev. Charley crossing his
mother's grounds one morning, and
ie told me this little tale. He had
iriven out to Chicago to attend a
■onvention of Congregational clergymen and had taken his little boy
[Harriett Beecher Stowe's grandson)
ivith him. During the trip he remind-
;d the little chap every now and then
that he must be on his very best behaviour there in Chicago. He said:
'We shall be the guests of a clergyman, there will be' other guests—
clergymen and their wives—and you
must be careful to let those people
see by your walk and conversation
that you are of a godly household.
Be very careful about this." The
idmonition bore fruit. At the first
breakfast at which they ate in the
Chicago clergyman's house he heard
liis little son say in the meekest and
most reverent way to the lady opposite him: "Please won't you for
Christ's sake pass the butter?"—Mark
Twain in North American Review.
Forbidden Fruit.
Madison C. Peters, clergyman and
author, was talking to a group of
young men.
"Half the wrong things you chaps
do," he "Said, "you do only because
they are forbidden, if you didn't
know they were wrong, they would
only seem to you disgusting and repugnant.
"I strolled one spring morning in
a beautiful park.
" 'Look here,' I said to one of the
guards, 'why do you have "Keep Off
the Grass" signs all over the park?
You don't seem to enforce the rule.'
" 'No, sir,' said the guard. 'The object of the signs is to cause the people to enjoy more thoroughly being
on the grass.'"
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissionet* of Lands and Works
for pet-mission to purchase Section 5,
Township 9, Range 6, Coast District,
Buckley Valley.
Jan. 19 T. D. SHORTS.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described lands in Bulkley Valley, viz.:
South half of Section five (5), Township
six (0), containing 320 acres.
Jan. 19 SYDNEY COOPER.
' NOTICE is hereby given that, 60 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following described land, situated in Skeena
District: Commencing at a post on left
bank of Skeena River about 4 miles
from Port Esslngton, marked "J. C.'s
N. W. Cor."; thence S. 20 chains; thence
;E. 20 chains; thence N. 20 chains to
[bank of Skeena River; thence westerly
along the bank to point of commencement, containing 40 acres, more or less.
JOHN CUNNINGHAM.
Port Esslngton, B. C, Dec. 10, 1906.
Jan. 19.
f NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to cut and carry away
timber from the following land: Commencing at a post on W. shore of Lar-
com Islnad, Observatory Inlet, adjoining G. W. Morrow's timber claim, marked "E. D.'s N. W. Corner"; thence E.
100 chains, more or less, to E. shore of
.Larcom Island; thence southerly, westerly and northerly along shore line of
(said Island to point of commencement,
;ontaining 640 aeres, more or less.
Jan.19 E. DONEHUE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
■[Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
[for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described lands situated in Rupert District:
[ 1. Commencing at a stake planted at
ihe S. W. corner of J. A. Coates' claim
marked "W. Bulman's N, W. Corner";
|;thence S. 80 chains; thence E. SO chains;
.thence N. SO chains; thence W. SO chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres. Located 1st January, 1907.
- 2. Commencing at a stake planted
about one-half mile in a southerly direction from Duval Point, on the west
pshore of Hardy Bay and marked "W.
Bulman's N. E, Corner"; thence running
W. 40 chains; thence S. 100 chains;
thence E. 40 chains; thence N. 160 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.   Located 7th January, 1907.
W. BULMAN, Locator.
,.   Jan.19 Per J. A. Coates:
I    NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
Batter date, I Intend to apply to the Hon.
("Chief Commissions rof Lands and Works
for a special  license to cut  and  carry
fiway timber from the following described lands, situated in Rupert Disirlet:
Commencing at a post planted about
me and one-half miles from the mouth
,jf tho Tsulquate River and about 400
i*ards from tlie north bank of said river
marked "J. A. Coates' N. E. Corner";
{hence W. SO chains; thence S. 80
:hains; thonce E. SO chlan**; thence N.
SO   chains   to   point   of  commencement,
Containing (140 acres. Located 29th De-
•ebmer, 1900.
J. A. COATES, Locator.
Jan.19 Pet* B. Blenkinsop.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
lays nfter date, I intend to apply to
(the lion. Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
[from the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post on the
feast side of the North Fork of Coeur
d'Alene River, about 7 miles from its
[outlet  into   Effingham  Inlet,   Clayo
quot District; thence 80 chains north;
80 chains west; 80 chains south; 80
chains east to point of commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the
southeast corner of No. 1; thence 160
chains north; thence 40 chains east;
thence"160 chains south; thence 40
chains west to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
d'Alene River, about 100 chains S. of
No. 2; thence 100 chains N.; thence
80 W., along boundary No. 2; thence
60 S.;  thence 40 E.;  thence 40 S.;
thence E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
4. Commencing at a post on Coeur
d'Alene River, near and south of the
S. E. corner of No. 3; thence 100
chains N.; thence 40 W., to E. boundary of No. 3; thence 40 S., to S.E.
corner of No. 3; thence 40 W.; thence
60 S.; thence 80 E. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
5. Commencing at a post by the S.
E. corner of No. 4; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 E.; thence 80 S.; thence
W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th. 1906.
6. Commencing at a post by the S.
VV. corner of No. 5; thence 40 chains
VV.; thence 80 S.; thence 80 E., along
N. boundary of Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., to S.
boundary of No. 5; thence 40 W. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 20th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post by the
N.E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene
Mineral Claims; thence 80 N., along
E. boundary of No. 6; thence 80 E.;
thence 80 S.; thence 80 W. to point
of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, iqo6.
8. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. corner of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims; thence 80 chains S.;
tnence 80 E.; thence 80 N; thence 80
W. to point of commencement.
VV. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st. 1006.
9. Commencing at a post by the W.
boundary of the Coeur d'Alene Mineral Claims, about 40 chains S. of
S. boundary of No. 6; thence N. 40
chains; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160; thence E. 40; thence N. to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906.
10. Commencing at a post by the S.
W. corner of No. 8, and about 10
chains E. of Coeur d'Alene River;
thence 40 chains S.; thence 40 W.;
thence 60 S.; thence 80 E.; thence 100
N., to S. boundary of No. 8; thence
40 W. to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 21st, 1906. Dec.15
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE11,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
43. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the north half of Section 23 and south
half of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District; 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
69: thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
following the shore line to point of commencement
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District;   5.
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
tiience 00 chains west; thence 20 norm;
thence 90 west; thence 50 souta; thence
east to the waterfront thence following
the shore line to point of commence-
menu
C. LUTK1N,
W. B. GARRARD, Ageat
oct. 27th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: 1. Starting at a post
10 chains east of the mouth of Handy
Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
40 chains west; thence south to the
shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
to. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. iiarvey s
land, tiience uortn do chains; tnence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
theuce east So chains to point of coni-
lneucunent
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September ioth, 1900.
2. Starting at a post 40 chains nortk
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. Gj-VRRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct 29th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: 1.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 south; thence 80 east, thence
80 north, to place of commencement
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent
Oct. 19th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
S. L. TEETZEL
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906?
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
M. A. MACDONALD.
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
(hence west 80 cnains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 3o chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 15th, 1006.
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1006.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
thc north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north <So chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark, Agent.
September ioth, 1906.
61. Commencing at a *. ist planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. xiarvey's
land; thence north 80 chains; tnence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B. Wtason, Agent
September ioth, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E. L Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank ol
said river to point of commencement,
640 acres, more or less.
MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, Agent
September lath, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett s
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906?
6s. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west comer of Hubert Haines'
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north Ho chains to point of commencement
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September ioth, 1906?
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of. Kniguit leaes;
land; thence north 80 chains; thence
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
land; thence north So d.'.ms; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
land; thence north 80 chi.us; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September nth, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted af
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
the north-east corner of Knight's land;
south 80 chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement
E. N. MacBETH,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townshin 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tiience east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
73. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, rr.ore or less, to
•the Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1006.
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite the south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
of the Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less,
EDGAR L BLAKE.
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence fast 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
77. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 13th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchas*
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Age*ht
37. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey thence south 80 chains; thence east
So chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey,
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
Located July 12th, lttUO.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5. Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
J. C. PORTER.
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
ih-; Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 9,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
December I, 1906.
e. f. G. McGregor.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar District, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9, Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 9, ihence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains more or les** to
the Hasrwilghet River, thence following
the river in a westerly direction to the
point of commencement, containing To
acres more or less.
December 1, iqofi.
G. P. ROBERTS.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days after date, I intend to apply to
thc Chief Commissioner of Lands aud
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land on the right
bank of the Skeena River, Range V,
Coast District: Commencing at a
post marked "James McGown, initial
post," at the N.E. comer of the New
Town Indian Reserve; tiience west,
along the Indian Reserve line, 40
chains; thence north 40 chains, 'hence
cast 40 chains; thence south along
the Skeena River tn point of commencement, containing 150 acres,
more or less.
JAMES McGOWN.
December 13th, 1906. Dec.15
TAKE NOTICE that, 60 days from
date, I intend to apply to thc Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase thc following described lands, situated on
the left bank of thc Skeena River,
about one mile below thc Little
Canon and commencing at Ed. Mi-
chaud's N.E. corner post on the bank
of thc Skeena. Thence S. 40 chains;
thence I'? 40 chains; thence N. 42
chains, more or less, to SotlSlVs S.
boundary; thence VV. 38, chains, more
or less, to thc Skeena River; tiience
N. 3 chains, more or less, to point of
commencement, containing 170 acres,
more or less.
N. GOWEN.
A. W. HARVEY, Agent
Dec.15 i6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 1907
% riusic and      f
I   The Drama. |
" In Town" had its sec6iul4«^P(^
ation to Victorian:? By theV-pt>puIar
Pollards at the Vi'ctori*i«-Theatre last
evening, the merry'and tuneful farce
moving with the same smoothness
(the perfection of stage management)
that characterized the local premiere, lt is a jolly musical show,
and there are not one but half a
dozen characterizations in it that
stand out conspicuously by reason
of the cleverness of the artists, lt
is a source of satisfaction that in
anticipation of a popular request, "In
Town" has been set aside for yet
another production at the Saturday
matinee. This evening the bill is to
be "The Runaway Girl," admittedly
one of the best and most generally
appreciated items in the Pollard repertoire. It is a comic opera that
has lived more than the usual span
of life by reason of its substantial
quality, both musically and in the
book, and in the hands of the Pol-
larck it is happily cast. It is quite
to bc expected that the house will
be a large one. During the past few
years Victorians—as indeed all residents of the cities of western Canada—have become well acquainted
with the Pollard kiddies. It will,
therefore, be a matter of interest and
also of regret for many friends of
the little folks in this city to know
that the present is to be their final
visit 'for several years, the plans of
the management calling for an early
return to Australia. Comic opera
routes appear to go in cycles—and
the Pollard utilization of the western
Canadian field is about ended. For
a few years it was the Carleton
Opera Company that came as an annual visitor for weeks at a time.
Then it was Jules Grau's company—
and again thc Pike Opera Company.
More recently the Pollard have been
the frequent visitors. What organization will be the next?
" The Little Duchess."
Countess Olga von Hatzfeldt, who
is starring at the head of a company
of fifty people in Anna Held's greatest musical comedy success, "The
Little Duchess," is announced as one
of the most promising attractions of
the season, and will appear at the
Victoria Theatre on Monday, January 21. Those who were captivated
by dainty Countess Olga's charms
in such former musical productions
as "The Burgomaster" and "The
Storks" need no magnetism. Though
she is one of the youngest stars on
the musical comedy stage, she is also
one of the most popular in the cities
where she has been seen. As to the
organization supporting her this season, it embraces thc same clever cast
of principals who were seen with her
in this same offering in the eastern
cities last season, most prominent
among whom are five clever comedians—Robert Lett, who has won
success in such productions as "King
Dodo" and "Thc Strollers"; Irving
Brooks, who made a hit in a Dutch
comedy role in George II. Cohan's
compauy; Harry Carter, who followed De Vvolf Hopper in "El Capitan"
with success; George Moore, famous
as a comedian and song-writer; and
Eugene O'Brien, formerly in support
of Elsie Janis. Other characters arc
enacted by other artists of equal
standing, surrounded by a beauty
chorus that lias received flattering
praise from newspaper reviewers in
other cities where "The Little
Duchess" has been seen this season.
The splendid production of scenery,
costumes and Parisian gowns for
which the Anna Held presentation of
this musical comedy was famous, are
used intact with Countess von Hatz-
feldt's organization, elaborated and
rejuvenated.
Plenty of Time.
City Man (with important engagement)—Suffering Caesar! How do
you expect I'm going to catch that
train at this rate of going?
Stranger—Ain't your ticket good
for thirty days?
Do you want a quiet place to
smoke and read the paper while
waiting for  that appointment?
Try then, my friend    \jfi
The Wilson'&ir
VICTORIA, "ftfe. -lr-
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VICTORIA, B. C.
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Note Our Leader   -   SMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
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An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
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Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victoria.
P
DID YOU HEAR
MADAME
SCHUMANN*
HPUVrk" at WEDNESDAY'S
IlCllldV CONCERT?
Wouid you like to hear her again when you please and
in whatever selections you like best ?    If so
Buy a
Gramophone
and the Famous Red Seal Records,  reproducing faithfully the voices of Caruso,   Melba,   Patti,
Schumann-Heiuck, Tamagno, &c.
FLETCHER BROS.
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
Sole Agents Vancouver Island.
Mail orders and inquiries receive  prompt  and  careful
attention,
A Cony Curuer ut the Poodle Dug.
The
Poodle Dog
Grill,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
ACTUALIV
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the delicacies of the
season.
W. S. D. SMITH,
Proprietor
It Is Evident
from the large crowds at the Bismark each day that the
people of Vancouver appreciate a strictly first-class Restaurant.
For a thoroughly enjoyable meal, upper-country visitors should patronise
The Bismark
CORNER ABBOTT AND HASTINGS STREETS
VANCOUVER.
(N.   B.—Three-piece orchestra every afternoon and
evening.)
The Hinton Electric Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
Electrical Machinery and Supplies
MARINE   GASOLINE MOTORS, ETC.
^
VICTORIA,
20 Government Street.
VANCOUVER
606 Granville Street.
^
••  ¥-%•
Picadilly"
The   name   "PICCADILLY" stands for the highest attainable
quality in men's clothing.    That quality is attained by the use of
"MODERN   METHODS,"  which translated means:
—Human skill where it excels.
—Mechanical skill where it is best.
—Combined to make the perfect product.
The cloths, linings and different   materials  used  in  manufacturing PICCADILLY BRAND CLOTHING, are imported direct
from the best mills in Europe, and special care is always taken
to have for each season the correct colourings and weaves of
cloth.
Manufactured by
H. E. BONO & e©., Ltd.,      -      TORONTO
Lezve Your Baggage Checks at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.     a. E, kent, Proprieto North Government St., Victorii
The Taylor Mill Co|
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564

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