BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Week Jun 24, 1911

Item Metadata

Download

Media
pwv-1.0344312.pdf
Metadata
JSON: pwv-1.0344312.json
JSON-LD: pwv-1.0344312-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): pwv-1.0344312-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: pwv-1.0344312-rdf.json
Turtle: pwv-1.0344312-turtle.txt
N-Triples: pwv-1.0344312-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: pwv-1.0344312-source.json
Full Text
pwv-1.0344312-fulltext.txt
Citation
pwv-1.0344312.ris

Full Text

 THE
Furniture Store
[WEILER BROS.
Victoria, B.C.
A British Columbia Newspaper and Review,
Published at Victoria, B. e.
HALL & WALKER
Agentl
WELLINGTON COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232 Go-rernment St Telephone 81
DL.IX.    No. 25
Eighth Yeab
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
Eighth Year
One Dollab Pee Annum
I, CORONATION
liere are two   aspects  in  which the
[nation may be viewed; the first, and
lar the more vital, is as a symbol of
Conferring of kingly power upon the
J.n ruler of a people.    The second is
personal relation of the King to his
lie and to the official act which crowns
llliance.   In the case of King George
■personal element is subordinated to
Jigger idea.   Not that it is necessary
epreciate  the  kingly  qualities  and
ly character of His Majesty, but that
lircumstances surrounding the British
Ine and the British Court have kept
[in the back-ground, and he enters
his exalted office with spurs yet to
oh, and niche yet to be attajned in
temple of Fame.    What his people
jiow of him is all to his credit.   He
|3 most widely travelled man of all
fritish Princes who have come to the
., he is a man of culture, of ideals
id profound sympathy with the life
Occupations  of his  subjects.    The
[important chapters of history are
written  and  for  this  reason the
does not know what sagacity, what
111  thought,  what  forbearance  and
|courage King George may have ex-
during the brief period which has
|d since the death of his illustrious
It is not meet that the part of a
|_ign in momentous issues should be
nphatically outlined, but there are
leople who have followed the trend
Ints at the heart of the Empire who
realise that King George must have
his part like  a man,  and have
^ed an active and potent influence
direction of a peaceful solution of
Constitutional problems.   It will be
layer of every loyal British subject
reign so auspiciously inaugurated
Jo lengthened out, and that the life
ian who inherits such splendid tra-
and who at the threshold of his
career has manifested so earnest a
to continue those traditions, may
bsed with health, strength and long
I If in the designs of an All-wise
fence this heart-felt wish of an Em-
liould be realised there is no doubt
lie personal equation will increase
year, and that King George will
[earer and ever nearer to his people,
Btimately fill so large a place in
[earts that they will learn to love
they loved the greatest of all
and the wisest of all kings. But
list revert to the greater aspect of
Ironation. The sceptre placed in
ids of King George is the symbol
liority; it descends to him through
lline of royal ancestors; it is his by
If birth and blood, but it is his also
greater right of the will of a con-
and loyal people. We are being
Imost daily that this is a democratic
Ihat King George is a democratic
|ndeed, so democratic as—God for-
be "middle class." The only
lin which this is true is that the
If the people was never so truly
|d or so directly interpreted in the
Constitution as today. Ever since
pi of King John we have had what
never tired of referring to as the
ler of our Liberty," but it is becom-
|er ancl truer every year that British
depends less on charter than on
lightened and ever-advancing senti-
If the British people. There would
Ieen no "dark ages" but for the fact
linety-nine per cent, of the people
In profound ignorance, ancl it is the
II emergence of civilized peoples
state of ignorance which has slow-
surely widened the rights of the
|and curtailed the privileges of the
This is the true democratizing in
fluence, and the true test of advancing
civilization, and among no people and under no Emperor or King has its advance
been so marked as among the subjects of
the British Empire. We are not praising
ourselves merely, we are accepting the
verdict of the civilized world when we
claim that the British Throne and all
which it represents of might, of power
and of rule stands for freedom and justice, and for a greater measure of freedom and justice than has been attained
by any other people. The King is the
key-stone of the arch which supports this
great fabric; he is not only the key-stone
but happily he is the corner-stone, the ornament, the symbol both of might and of
justice. Every ceremonial act in the
great pageant which has filled the Empire
with delight and the world with envy
possesses a significance which is but
faintly reflected in the gorgeous pomp of
a Coronation Celebration. It is the expression of an idea whieh springs now
from Saxon, perhaps now from Norman,
now from Tudor, and now from Stuart
times, but all pointing to the realization
of a great idea, the preservation to the
British people of British institutions, of
British ideals and of the British symbol
of rule. Our people everywhere are content that the highest expression of their
greatness shall be centred in one ruler,
who, as long as he interprets the will of
his people, shall act for his people. The
homage of 500,000,000 loyal subjects of
diverse races and climes springs from appreciation of the blessings which have
flowed from British rule, as well as from
affection for the chosen representative of
that rule. Let every subject of the greatest Empire the world has known bow the
head and bend the knee in humble recognition of the blessings which have descended upon them from age to age, under
a form of government which has not yet
become too democratic to recognize a
ruler, and yet which is so democratic that
lhey have been able to realize the highest
■*" nn of government yet attained, and
profoundly to believe in the hand of destiny, and the guiding of a Providence
supreme over all earthly sovereigns however great; that Providence whicii
''Shapes our ends, rough-hew them
how we will.
THE VICTORIA CELEBRATION
It is not for the new-comers but rather
for the old-timers to say, and they do say
it; that Thursday's celebration was by far
the finest in the history of the Capital
City. Much of this was due to the fact
that there are twice as many people in
Victoria and (he environs now as there
were when King Edward VII came to
the throne. Never was the old saying
that "there is sympathy in numbers" better illustrated. Two things were most
noticeable: the universal goocl temper and
joyousness of the immense concourse of
people and the picturesqueness of the
scenery. The outstanding features were
first and foremost the crowd. Then the
superb decorations and illuminations at
the heart of the pageant around James
Bay Causeway; and then the fairy-like
scene of magnificence of colour ancl of
life presented on Beacon Hill Park when
the whole of the parade had arrived and
twenty thousand people lined the hillside.
Words fail to describe the beauty of the
scene. It was almost Oriental in its significance and in its luxury and riot of
colour. But the gorgeous colouring of
floats and decorations were subdued by the
exquisite masses of broom whicii suggested once more "a field of the cloth of
gold." It has been said, ancl said with
truth, that probably nowhere outside the
City of London was there a more brilliant
display, or more universal evidences of
light-hearted happiness. To this unqualified success there were many contributions.
The Government did their share well, contributing substantial sums in cash and
exquisitely artistic souvenir programmes,
illuminations, decorations and an official
reception. The City through its Council
made a handsome cash donation, and the
leading merchants and many private citizens, supplemented the amount. The
various societies entered thoroughly into.
the spirit of the affair, and were well represented hy "floats," most of which were
models of constructive beauty. Families
in every walk of life sent their lovely
daughters to grace the "floats." Indeed,
no one held aloof, ancl the celebration exemplified a unanimous feeling of loyalty
and delight. Where so many people
worked hard to ensure success it would be
impossible to name even a small proportion of those who are entitled to praise,
but it would be equally impossible to
close any reference to the celebration without according the highest possible praise
to the Daughters of the Empire and to
a few ladies who were conspicuous in their
labours by day and by night. To the
Daughters of the Empire is due the credit
of having organized the celebration and
to the following ladies in particular every
man in Victoria should take off his hat,
for they set an example of self-denying,
unremitting, arduous toil of which few
men would have been capable and in
which they could only have been sustained
by the highest motives and the most devoted loyalty: Mrs. Croft, Mrs. Hasell,
Mrs. R. B. McMicking, Mrs. T. Watson,
Mrs. J. A. Wylde, Mrs. R. S. Day, Mrs.
Maclure, Mrs. Curtis Sampson, Mrs. L.
G. Tilton, Mrs. Parker Hibben, Mrs. H.
C. Hanington and Mrs. Jenkins.
FREE ADVERTISING
The local Council of the W. C. T. U.
did not see fit to cancel the engagement
of the Seattle "Chadband" who is so
anxious to see the "Stars and Stripes"
floating over the whole of the American
continent. One hardly likes to suspect
these estimable ladies of any lack of loyalty, especially in Coronation week when
the women of Victoria have done so nobly.
But it will for ever remain a mystery to
the mind of mere man how these good
ladies could consistently ask such a "fire-
eater" to address an audience in a city
like Victoria, which is nothing if not ultra
loyal, after his vagaries in Vancouver had
been brought to their knowledge. Obviously they did not view the matter in
the same light as The Week, and they may
not alter their opinion now that the Colonist has at the eleventh hour endorsed
what The Week said. However, knowing
something of the splendid work done by
the local members of the W. C. T. U.
The Week can only charitably suppose
that "Dr." Matthews was not personally
known to them. After seeing and hearing him on Tuesday night they will probably be disposed in future to steer clear
of vulgarians of this type.
LAURIER IN LONDON
It is all very well for the Liberal Press
to belittle the comments of the London
papers on Sir Wilfrid Laurier's utterances at the Imperial Conference ancl
elsewhere, but the time has not yet come
when such papers as the Times, the Globe,
the Pall Mall Gazette, the Morning Post
ancl the Saturday Review aro to be regarded as irresponsible journals without
any sense of the importance of their
editorials. All these papers unite in denouncing Sir | Wilfrid's attitude on the
Reciprocity question. They take the
ground that the proposed treaty is antagon
istic in spirit to Imperial unity and calcu-r
lated to delay that perfect rapproachement
between all parts of the Empire which is
now universally desired. Even if, which
is by no means a fact, Canada would get
the best of the bargain, the policy is regarded by English critics as parochial and
not Imperial. But it is not alone the
attitude of Sir Wilfrid Laurier on Reciprocity which has aroused the criticism
of the English Press: it is his obvious
determination to evade responsibility, to
disregard obligations, and if possible to
constitute Canada an "independent kingdom." True he coats the pill with sugar
when he adds the words "within the Empire," but he ought to know that such a
thing is impossible. There can be no independent country in a coterie of nationalities. The Saturday Review puts the
case in a nutshell when it says "if Canada
is content to remain part of the Empire
she must bear her share of the penalty of
greatness." The English people have
found out, what some Canadians have
known all along, that this particular idol
like many others who have gone before,
has feet of clay.
A CHANGE OF OFFICE
Mr. W. S. Drewry, who has rendered
such excellent service as Water Commissioner for the last year and a half, has
been appointed to take charge of the surveys of the Government. Mr. Drewry is
an expert surveyor and will be regarded
by most who know him as the ideal man
for the post. Mr. J. F. Armstrong of
Cranbrook, who is temperarily assisting
the Minister, may possibly succeed Mr.
Drewry. He is one of the most popular
men in the Province, having filled every
position which the Government has had at
its disposal in the Kootenay for the last
thirty years. He is universally respected
and possesses the absolute confidence of all
who have been brought into contact with
him. If the Government should find it
possible to retain Mr. Armstrong permanently there will be nothing but commendation for so excellent an appointment.
A MUSICAL FLOAT
One of the most attractive features of
the Coronation Celebration was a musical
"float" which perambulated the streets
after the fireworks were over and attracted a great deal of attention. The "float"
was furnished by the Victoria Transfer
Company ancl was hauled by three fine
horses abreast. It was decorated and carried a piano on board. A number of the
best singers in the city, male ancl female,
mostly in carnival costume, rendered a
programme of songs and choruses which
was highly appreciated and applauded.
This is an innovation in Victoria which
was suggested by the Committee of the
Amateur Dramatic Society. It should become a permanent feature in all such
celebrations.
THE OVER-SEAS CLUB
The Over-Seas Club held its last meeting before the summer vacation on Monday last, and was delightfully entertained
by the Cymrodorion Society. All thc
world knows that in the matter of singing the Welsh are pre-eminent, but all
Victorians do not know what n strongly
rooted organization the Cymrodorion Society is. To Mrs. Jenkins and her colleagues the hearty thanks of the Over-
Seas Club is due. In this connection it
may not lie out of place to mention that
the Over-Seas Club and the Cyinrndorion
Society jointly raised the sum of $50.00
which was expended in toys nnd other
presents for the children in St. Joseph's
and the Jubilee Hospitals who wcre prevented by sickness from otherwise enjoying the Coronation Festival. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
I suppose that you have all been
"coronating." If you haven't you
oughf to have been; and I hope you
all "coronated" nicely and didn't have
a head-ache yesterday morning; if you
had, you deserved it. Moreover, there
was no excuse for you as by special
dispensation of His Majesty you had
a perfect right to drink his health in
any non-alcoholic beverage you liked.
At the same time I admit that icecream sodas or straight lemonades do
not conduce to that fervent pitch of
vociferous loyalty whicii is an integral part of a Coronation ceremony.
However, it 'S all over now and as in
all probability you won't have another
chance till you are old and grey-headed, keep the "head" as a souvenir of
as good a celebration day as Victoria
has ever seen.
* *   *
Consider the crowds, and remember that it is only a few years ago that
all this part of the world was practically unknown to white people. It
really seems marvellous where all the
people come from on these occasions.
One thing is sure, and that is that we
are wofully lacking in hotel accommodation, and I am sure I don't know
where everybody slept on Wednesday
and Thursday nights. Hotel lobbies
were crowded with visitors who appeared to have had no idea that there
would be any scarcity of accommodation. We need more summer hotels
badly and it will be a long time before the supply will be greater than
the demand.
* *   *
Everyone is unanimous in declaring
that the parade was a huge success.
Far be it from me to venture an opinion as to the respective merits of the
various floats. Probably Mrs. (Senator) Macdonald's was the finest, but
I may be allowed to say that the originator of the idea of "The Cradle of
Empire" float is specially deserving of
congratulation. It was charming in
conception and most effective in design. Of street decorations one cannot say much. They are of necessity
largely the same the world over and it
is impossible to introduce much originality in the decorative scheme. To
my mind the most effective window
decoration was that of Moore &
Johnston, real estate agents, at the
corner of Yates and Broad streets.
The German Club are to be congratulated on the musical design outside
their clubrooms; it was highly original and formed a conspicuous feature
of the illuminations. Of thc Parliament Buildings I need say little. It
is impossible to express in words the
fairylike aspect they present when illuminated; I had hoped, however, that
the whole outline would have been
picked out by electric light. The Empress Hotel illuminations were superb; little short of them fell those of
the Post Office. The Causeway looked splendid as did thc boats in the
harbour. I should also like to mention thc Dominion Express Co., Fletcher Bros., the Hinton Electric Co.,
thc New Grand Theatre and the New
England Hotel, where thc illuminations were excellent. It is a pity to
have to say that there were some
storekeepers on South Government
street who had not thought it worth
while to go to the trouble and slight
expense of putting on gala attire. I
should have thought also that our big
departmental store, seeing how con- j
spicuous it is in the present state of,
Government street, and how many.
dollars it raked in for decorations, j
might have done more in the decorative line than hang out a few flags.!
One thing more I must say in c^nncc- !
tion with the celebration and that is
that there were far too many covered
male heads at the various singings of
the National Anthem. Possibly they
all belonged to Americans. The
crowning feature of the day was the
carnival at night which was one mad
riot of good-natured fun, music and
laughter.
I like to see the way in which the
Coronation has pervaded everything.
Take the advertisers.and consider the
skilful manner in whicli they turn a
world-famous event to their own material use. I admire the inventive
brain which can turn such things to
good and useful account. See the
pompous herald proclaiming the merits of J. N. Harvey Company; admire
the striking yet subdued note struck
by Weiler Bros, in their newspaper
advertisements of the 22nd; just two
sceptres, a crown, the Royal Arms
and a phtriotic sentiment. I always
have been fond of reading advertisements and these two coining as they
did at the right time took my fancy.
Well, I have discoursed enough of the
Coronation celebration. May it be
many a long day before any of us witness another.
* *   *
It was only just lately that I made
some pungent remarks with regard to
the way in which the unfortunate inhabitants of the Islands in the Gulf
were now being left without proper
passenger steamer service. Since that
time the launch which was used to
carry the mails has been burnt and
the Islanders are worse off than before. • However, I am pleased to be
able to state that this condition of affairs is now. being remedied to some
extent. .Messrs. Beckett & Major, a
new real estate firm who have opened
up an office on Langley street in the
eity, together with two others have |
placed a launch into commission
which will be licensed to carry passengers, ancl will leave Victoria twice
a week. The "Tuladi," as the boat is
called, is a gasoline schooner 60 feet
long with a beam of IS feet and driven by engines of 45 horse-power. She
will be capable of carrying 35 to 40
passengers and 60 tons of freight. The
"Tuladi" will be under the command
of Captain M B. Wi'son, F. R. G. S.,
late of the Liverpool Salvage Company, who was successful in raising
the "Gladiator" and who brought the
"Suevic" into dock after she had been
cut in two. Captain Wilson with his
brother, Mr. Ashley Wilson, are the
other two members of the syndicate
who are responsible for placing the
"Tuladi" on the run. Messrs. Becket
& Major have large interests throughout the Islands and state that they
are in a position to bring a considerable amount of British capital into
circulation.
* *   *
But this is not all. Readers of The
Week will notice an advertisement in
the current issue to the effect that the
C. P. R. is putting the steamer "Don"
(Capt. Bottrill) on the Islands route.
The "Don" will leave Victoria three
times in the week and will carry both
passengers and light freight. It would
therefore seem that the Islanders will
have no cause for further complaint as
regards thc question of transportation.
They had sufficient cause, goodness
knows, and at one time it seemed as
though their prayers were never to be
answered, but all things come to those
who know how to wait long enough,
ancl to supplement the period of waiting by the presentation of frequent petitions. By the way, it's a curious thing
but 1 always manage to get my pen
on to paper just before the needed reform is concluded. Or is it sometimes
the case that the reform is the result
of the pen. However, as I have remarked before, there are strange coincidences in this world.
* *    *
1 hear that within a short time
there is to be another "grill" in Victoria. 1 am told that the Westholme
Hotel is to institute this popular form
of restaurant. There is plenty of room
in the city for another "grill," provided that it be one of the right sort.
"Murphy's" is invariably crowded at
lunch and dinner times, and it is not
always easy to find room at the Empress. The Westholme being right in
the heart of town -should make a suc
cess in its venture. A little bird has
whispered to me that there is some
chance of Professor Nagel being invited to take charge of an up-to-date
orchestra in connection with this
scheme. I hope that this is true, for
then there can be no doubt but that
good music will be "on tap" all the
time. The Professor is well known
throughout the city as a capable and
sympathetic pianist who has the faculty of being able to drag the music
out of his orchestra and who has also
the divine gift of knowing how to fit
his music to the occasion. If the management have really decided to have
an orchestra they could not find a better man to take charge of it than Herr
Nagel.
* *   ■*
It would appear that there are occasions when the person or persons
responsible for the turning out of the
slight lack of common or horse
slight lack of common sense or horse
sense. As a rule these electric clusters are extinguished at midnight or
thereabouts, but one would have
thought that whenever the theatre is
going to sit so late that even the
tramway company have to provide extra cars after hours the lights might
be left on till everybody has had a
chance to make a get-away. Not so
however. For instance, when the So-
thern-Marlowe Company were here in
their Shakespearean repertoire the audience made its way out into the darksome streets and had to find its individual cars, hacks, and Shanks'
mares as best it individually could. It
is a pity that "Hamlet" did not happen
to have been the play of the evening,
so that Mr. Sothern could have laid
special emphasis on those words
"There is something rotten in the
State of Denmark."
* *   *
When the policy of non-segragation
was. first inaugurated in Victoria 1 inveighed against it iu these columns
ancl amongst other things.I-said that
il meant that when people went away
for a prolonged holiday and let their
houses, unless they took the utmost
care in the negotiations they would be
liable, to find that their temporary
tenants were draw-n from an undesirable class. The truth of my prophecy
has been proved. A highly respectable family in a highly respectable
quarter of the town lately left for
England and apparently did not exercise all the care which they should
have clone in examining into the credentials of tlieir incoming tenants. A
friend from the country on coming
into town determined to pay a surprise visit, knowing nothing of the
change. Judge of his surprise when
the door was opened by a "lady" with
the encarmined lips and blazoned
cheeks of the demi-monde. On another occasion a householder had to
warn callers to be sure and not make
a mistake as to the house, as the one
next door had been sub-let in ignorance to "ladies of an undesirable
class. " Whicii makes it bad again,
doesn't it, for those who pride themselves on the high respectability of
their neighbourhoods. Well, they
know where to lay the blame, and it's
not an atom of good trying to put it
on the shoulders of erring humanity
as a whole.
afri
"^OK^t,
VICTORIA L.AND DISTRICT
District of Coast,  Range 1
TAKE  notice   that  I,  Ernest   Austen
Hall,   of   Vancouver,   B.C.,   occupation
Auto Dealer,  Intends  to apply  for permission  to  purchase  the  following  de-
sei-lbeil   lands:—Commencing  at  a  post
planted  Immediately  adjoining  Thomas
S.   Annandale's   southeast   corner   and
Thomas   E.   Butters'   northeast   corner
thenee south  SO chains;  thenee east  20
chains;  thenee  north  SO  chains;  thenoe
west  20  ehains  to  point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated 17th day of May, 1911.
ERNEST AUSTEN HALL.
Charles  B.   Stark,  Agent.
June 24 aug 19
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
Distriot of Coast, Range I
TAKE notice that I, Frederick Stock,
of  North  Vancouver,  occupation  Clerk,
Intends lo apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commenolng  at   a  post  planted   about
one mlje south of the N. W. corner of
T.   L.   32429;   thence   40   chains   west;
thence 80 chains south; thence 40 chains
east;   thence   80 chains north to commencement   and   containing   320 acres,
more or less.
April 11, 1911.
FREDERICK STOCK.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
may 15 July 8
The Alien Problei
Two Irishmen visiting Victoria recently were much
disturbed by the large number of Indians, Chinese and
Hindoos to be found here.
"Thim furriners is gettin' an awful hold av British
Columbia," said one of them.
"Yez spake thruly," said the other. "Oi,was radin' over
a list av persons naturalized here an' shrue ivery wan av'
'em was furrin."
How about yourself?
Are you a naturalized British subject?
If so, doubtless you drank to the health of King George
and Queen Mary on Coronation Day in the King of all
Wines, G. H. Mumm & Co.'s "Extra Dry."
Remember,  every  little  capsule  has  a  meaning of  its
own.   Mumm's genuine  Extra  Dry, the King of Wines, is ,
always crowned with the pink cap.
VICTORIA
PITHER   &   LEISER
Sole Agents for B. C.
VANCOUVER
NELSON
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO., by Royal Appoihtmenlj
Purveyors to H. M. King George the V and the Roys
Household.   Distillers of the popula'f
k
Black and White" Scotch Whisk]
Unsurpassed in Purity, Age and Flavor All Dea
Headquaij
TREE!
SHRUBS
Fruit an]
mental.   Large stock of healthy plants'
name.    Now is the time to make sq
Get Catalogue or visit the Nurseries.
LAYRITZ NURSERIES
Carey Road, Victoria, Branch at Kelov
NONA/
Have you seen the "Best" Automobiles?   McLaughlin-!
are the "Best," and being manufactured in
Canada you
SAVE
The Duty.   McLaughlin-Buick's Cost you Less
MONEY
And give you More Value than any other make.
Model  _f is here.      Yes!.. Fully equipped
Write, Phone, Wire, or best of all, come and see u^
$1,750
We'll demonstrate the "Goods"
WESTERN MOTOR AND SUPPLY
1410 BROAD ST.
(Limited.)
PHONEl
HANft
The Best of All
No one would willingly buy al
ferent painting when for practlcl
same price a real masterpiece c
secured. Neither would anyone,
she knew lt, buy a shoe of Ind
style and Inclpable of comfort whl
could just as well own a1T_HfAlf|
masterpiece.
It li to yon, who do not knoti
are ipeaklnr.   XAXAN Shoei nil
ply   an   Introduction—that's
itylei, all lhapes.
H. B. Hammond Shoe
Broadwalk Scullers for Chlldj
Sole Agents:
Hasan fe Son, Wlohert fe 1
N. T. N.Yl
Pemberton Building, 621 Fort Street THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24,1911
jhe
r-QM}
IThe New Grand Theatre
|George Trumbul hasl been forin   securing   for   Coronation
really first-class, well-balanced
All the turns are features and
man remarked to me on leav-
vatideville house, the weakest
'"way ahead" of some of the
turns of the average week,
lonours lie between the Olivotti
Idours and Geo. Rolland & Co.
Irmer are represented by two
ll     stringed     instrumentalists
Ith violin and Hawaiian guitar
lipular selections in a very acre manner.   The latter are pro-
\ this week's playlet which is
classic in slang and possesses
limusing features.    Miss Josie
Is is a graceful and bold expon-
lthe  art of wire-walking and
"pes  some audacious novelties
j- turn.   Miss Josephine Davis
Icinating soubrette who sings
|ittle songs in a clever little
Sandberg & Lee appear to-
In an absurdity duet which is
It to keep the house in one
pus roar of laughter.   All told,
Ai vaudeville entertainment.
IThe Crystal Theatre
Ivhat of a novelty in the shape j
T>ng continuous story told with I
lof two films was on view at i
Btal on Monday and Tuesday
he title of the same was "Sex- ]
fe" and it proved to be a de-:
yarn   as  thrilling as  any  of;
Id by Conan Doylo about the
|erlock.   The denouement was :
iatic in the extreme and the
loduction was a feather in the \
[the Gaumunt  Company and j
gigement of the Broad Street:
i
Romano's Theatre
|irner is now in charge of the
at Romano's Theatre and
Iquence  all  those  who  flock
Jut  the  day  to  this  popular
Iiieture house are sure of good j
1 entertainment,  especially  as
pe absence of Miss England I
^•nett is undertaking the song •
always  think  that  one  of
pleasing   features of Mr.'
Itti's  theatre  is  the  singing,
|mlv good, standard songs arc '
there is no nonsense about'
Ifit them into absurd pictures, j
lis a galaxy of real comedy j
In on the screen during the
It of the week.
lhe Majestic Theatre
li   long  time   since   T   have
Is much as T did last Monday
Iiieture   story   entitled   "The
liographer."   The two sinful
lers were delightful and the
Is unique.   Tf adipose tissue
[suit  of  inane   cacchination,
|who attended Mr. Christie's
the  first  two  days  of the
Iweek ought to be going in
|ti-fat cure by now.   Another
excellent  educational   films
|provided showing the native
of Cochin-China.   There is
but that the Majestic has
}n" wonderfully well in Vic-
the   place    is    invariably
Ifrom 7.30 onwards: there is
ptle doubt but that its popu- j
veil deserved.
|che Bates and Applied
Kindergarten
Bates,  whom   David   Be-
present in this city during
[oming tour of that phenom-
ccessful New York produc-j
Jibody's Widow," is a keen
If human nature and an ex-
nologist.   It is to Miss Bates',
fe latter province of learning!
she and her manager, Mr. ]
Ittribute much of her success
|irtrayal  and  delineation  of
Indeed. Miss Bates could
lielp being well grounded in
ly,   having   been   originally
educated and trained for kindergarten
work, and being to this day one of
the most enthusiastic disciples of
Froebel.
"To know Froebel is to know little
children, and to know little children
is to know how to act," Miss Bates
declares.
The Old Homestead
What can possibly be said at this
late clay for or against, in praise or
blame, of Denman Thompson's "The
Old Homestead?" which will be seen
at the Victoria Theatre on Monday,
June 26th. Criticism of this play has
long since been annihilated. "Who
builds stronger," queried the First
Gravedigger, "the mason, the shipwright or the carpenter?" The
answer should have been, Denman
Thompson. Verily the play that hc
builded will "last till Doomsday." It
is not so much of a drama now as
an institution. The production in this
the twenty-fifth season of "The Old
Homestead" is said to be up to the
same standard of excellence which has
engagement at Terry's Theatre, was
a very successful one both artistically
and financially.
The play embraces a strong yet natural development of the humorous
and pathetic and Aunt Mary is a
"scream." The same company and
effects that were seen in London will
lie seen here when Miss Robson appears on Tuesday, June 27, at Victoria
Theatre.
The story of the play concerns a
maiden aunt who has always lived in
a country village with strong prejudices against the larger cities. Her
nephew, who is a student in college
contrived to avoid all peaceful pleasures by getting involved in all sorts
of scrapes—the last one being a fight
with a cabman whom he injured. To
avoid the law and publicity, it is necessary to appeal to Aunt Mary for
five hundred dollars to settle the case.
The next interesting episode in the
young man's career is a breach-of-
promise case, to cap the climax of
Aunt Mary's patience;  she disinherits
May Robson, who will present her delightful comedy, "The
Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary," at the Victoria Theatre,
Tuesday, June 27th
always been the aim of the manage- *
ment.    In fact this high standard of
company and equipment is the very
reason the old play has been so successful these many years.
The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary
"The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary,"
one of the really funny comedies pro-,
duced originally at the Garden Thea-j
tre,  New York, was a whirlwind of
success.    And since this engagement,
Miss May Robson has appeared in all
well known cities in this country and
lately duplicated her success in Lon- \
don, England, where her recognition
as an exceptional actress was instantly acknowledged, and her eight weeks
him, but after listening to the
nephew's roluable explanations, reconsiders her decision. And all ends
happily, lt is during this visit to her
nephew that the rejuvenation takes
place. The process is extremely funny
and there are no dull moments to retard the story, nor check the movements of the characters, and Miss
Robson interests and amuses the audiences until the final curtain closes the
incidents of "The Rejuvenation of
Aunt Mary."
Mrs. Dot
Miss Billie Burke comes to the Victoria  Theatre on  Thursday evening,
June 29, in "Mrs. Dot," the satirical
Change   of   Programme
three times a week
Monday, Wednesday
and Friday
HIGH CLASS
Motion Pictures
shown for the first time
in Victoria
POPULAR  MUSIC
AND SONGS
We cater to Ladies and
Children
THE
Crystal Theatre
BROAD STREET
The Largest, Best Furnished and Most
Comfortable Picture Theatre
in the City
WATCH FOR CONSTANT IMPROVEMENTS IN APPOINT-
MENTS AND SERVICE.
T/itQ r/\ N D1  *"'■«*■ 1
■** m_r-_ i_ __r    t vt »r hody'
VAUDEVILLE     cocs     1
SULLIVAN-A: CONSIDINE
Sullivan and Considine
WEEK JUNE 26TH
THE FRANCOLI TROUPE
o
The Billposter and the Living
Lithographers
SPENCER KELLY AND MARION
WILDER
In Melodies, Past and Present
MURRY LIVINGSTON AND
COMPANY
The Man from Italy
The  English  Music  Hall   Favourites
EMERALD AND RUPREE
"A Hot Scotch"
Three        BROWNIES Three
In  Unique and  Enlivening
Specialties
THE GRANDISCOPE
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Christina Willis-
croft, wife of W. A. Willlscroft, of
Victoria, B.C., intends to apply for permission to purchase tho flolowlng described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner of
John Clayton's pre-emption claim, known
as Lot 328, Range 3, Coast District,
thence east 60 chains more or less, to
the west boundary of Section 30, Township 1, Range 3, Coast District; thence
south 20 chains; thence west CO chains;
thence north 20 chains to the point
of commencement.
Dated May 20th, 1911.
CHRISTINA WILLISCROFT.
Per H. Brown, Agent,
july 10 aug. 6
comedy by W. Somerset Maugham,
the author of "Smith." in which she
has bcored one of her biggest hits in
a star. In this piece Miss Burke has
the role of an absurdly youthful
widow who wants to get married
again. The man she is in love with
is quite willing to take her—heavy
pocketbook and all—only lie is already
engaged to another young woman
whom he can't quite see his way clear
to jilt. The widow is a master of
strategy, however, and her manoeuvres to get rid of the other woman
furnish the material for a most amusing comedy.
•    -*rf^-       XV    -- —A    I I 'Atl  a   M&-S-.A,-
MONDAY, JUNE 26.
Twenty-fifth season, "Just as good
as ever."
Denman Thompson's Celebrated Play,
The Original
"The ©Id
Homestead"
The Famous Double Quartette; the
Palms; the Grace Church Choir. A
per feet cast; a complete scenic production.   All the favourites.
Personal direction Mr. Franklin
Thompson.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c,. $1.00 and $1.50.
Seats now on sale.
TUESDAY, JUNE 27.
(One Night Only)
L. S. Sire Presents
The  International   Comedienne
MAY ROBSON
Direct from her remarkable success
at Terry's Theatre, London, Eng., in
the most ucccssful comedy of modern times,
"THE REJUVENATION OF
AUNT MARY."
Prices—50c, 75c, $1, $1.50 and  $2.50.
Seat sale now open.
COMING!   COMINGI
(One Night Only)
THURSDAY,   JUNE 29.
Charles Frohman Presents
MISS
BILLIE BURKE
In the Wittiest Comedy of the Year
"MRS.   DOT'
By W. Somerset Maugham
Author of "Smith," "Lady Frederick,"
and "Jack Straw."
Priccs-50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00
Seats on Sale Tuesday, June 27. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24,1911
The Week
A  Provincial  Newspaper   and  Review,
published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at  1208  Government  St.,
Victoria, B.C.,  Canada
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor
INTERESTING TO CANDIDATES
IN VOTING CONTEST
Candidates entering "The Week's"
Ladies' Great $1,000.00 Voting Contest should provide themselves with
the necessary vote and subscription
blanks and receipt books without
delay.
Those who are in the race and have
not yet filled their nomination or acquainted "The Week" with their intentions should do so at once.
Be sure and have subscription
blanks and receipt books with you.
Provide some for your friends and
have them secure a few votes for you.
Those who are not acquainted with
this feature should call on, write or
telephone the Contest Manager of
"The Week."
Vou should not fail to have your
name or that of your favourite Candidate in the first publication of Candidates. It will be of great assistance
to the Candidate to have her name
appear in the first list. Her friends
will see that she is in the race and
the votes they otherwise would give
to some other candidate will be given
to her.
A great number of people are holding, and will hold their votes until
they see who the Candidates are before casting same.
Candidates who have not taken this
opportunity of announcing their candidacy may find out that some of the
people they were confidently relying
on for votes, have pledged their support to some other Candidate, not
knowing that you were in the race.
Be in with the others. There is a
distinct advantage in starting on even
terms with your opponents.
If you have not sent in your own
name or the name of a lady you would
be pleased to see win one of the beautiful prizes, do so now. Secure all the
advantage possible.
Remember Candidates will not hold
back their votes to the last day, for
in doing so they will lose a great
percentage.
See the Vote and Subscription
Schedule in this issue.
Your friends will do more for you
if they see you are somewhere near
the top of the list than if you were
near the bottom.
One and all have an equal chance
to win the Grand Prize of $300.00 in
gold.
Cut out the coupon in this issue,
worth twenty-five votes, and fill the
lines in with name of the lady you
wish to vote for and send to Contest
Manager of "The Week," 1208 Government St.   Phone 1283.
The names of the Candidates and
the number of votes they have to
their credit will be published from
time to time in the columns of this
paper. The first list of Candidates
will be published in the near future.
Lieut.-Governor Paterson will preside. Short addresses of congratulation will be given by delegates from
the Synod of British Columbia, the
B. C. Methodist Conference, the
Church of England, and other organizations. At the end of this programme the ladies of the congregation will take the meeting in hand.
This celebration marks an interesting period in the history of Presbyterianism in the province. While the
Church of Scotland, and the Canadian Presbyterian Church were discussing the advisability of sending a
missionary to British Columbia, the
Colonial Committee of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland sent to Vancouver Island'the Rev. John Hall. He
arrived in Victoria, and preached the
first sermon midst Presbyterian auspices on the last Sabbath of June,
1861. On the 3rd February, 1862, a
meeting was held, and the congregation of First Presbyterian Church
was organized. In March, 1863, His
Hon. Chief Justice Cameron laid the
foundation stone of First Presbyterian
Church, which was opened for public
worship the 15th November of the
same year.
On the Sabbath 6f the Church dedication the Rev. James Munro, missionary of the Church of Scotland,
who arrived in Victoria early that
year, preached an appropriate sermon in the forenoon, and the Rev. Dr.
Evans of the Wesleyan Methodist
Church, preached in the evening. The
Colonist of the 16th November of
1863, has this item:
$314, making, with the proceeds of
the service lately held in the building,
a gross amount of upwards of $1,000."
This Church opening was a great
day of rejoicing among the little
bands of Presbyterians in the city.
While the Church in many ways had
a checkered history, and much up-hill
work, for sometimes "the winds were
contrary," it did noble work for God
and the people during the fifty years
since the first sermon was preached
by Mr. Hall on the last Sunday' of
June, 1861.
The Church was burnt a couple of
times, and when repaired was always
made larger and more comfortable
than it was before the fire.
After four years' pastorate Mr. Hall
resigned to go as missionary to Australia. Mr. Munro was withdrawn,
and the Colonial Committee of the
Church of Scotland sent out Mr. Som-
erville, who afterwards was for many
years minister of Grey Friar's Church,
Glasgow.
About two years after the arrival
of Dr. Somerville, trouble arose in
the congregation of First Church, and
an exodus took place when Dr. Somerville and with him many of the congregation organized St. Andrew's
Church.
In 1876 Dr. Reid was sent from
England and re-opened services in
First Church. The scattered fragments of Presbyterianism were soon
gathered together, and a vigorous congregation once more worshipped at
the corner of Pandora and Blanchard
streets.
Half a Century of
Presbyterianism
in Victoria
(Contributed)
Next Sunday, the 25th inst., First
Presbyterian Church of this city will
celebrate the jubilee of the introduction of Presbyterianism into British
Columbia. The Rev. Professor Stalker.
D.D., of Glasgow, will preach in thc
forenoon, and the Rev. Principal MacKay, D.D., of Westminster Hall, in
the evening. A mass meeting of
Presbyterian Sunday Schools and
their friends will be held at 3 p.m.,
when Principal MacKay and Professor Stalker will give suitable addresses.
•   On Monday evening a Jubilee Assembly will be held when His Honour
CORONATION DAT
Empires of old have risen; slowly like dying stars
They have dwindled again to darkness, or perished in wrath and pain,
Ruled by the rod of terror, harried and seamed with scars,
Offsprings of vain endeavour, born of a tyrant's brain.
Weak from the lust of conquest, they lived but a little space—
Ah, must ours vanish as they did, unfitted for God's great plan?
Nay, for our fathers built it to the glory of our race
On freedom, truth, and justice, and love for our fellow man.
Therefore, true to the light that shines in our nation's soul,
We hold to the great traditions to which our race must cling,
And rivet the link that binds us into one mighty whole:
With the stern Crown of Duty this day we crown our King,
Praying that Heaven may help him in this tremendous hour;
Knowing that he will follow the path his father trod,
That his mind will grow in wisdom and his words be filled with power,
Strong in the love he bears us and the faith that he has in God.
Not in the spirit of children who fondle a glittering toy,
Although with azure and scarlet full half the world be gay,
But in deep thought with reason our hearts are stirred for joy,
For the Empire of our fathers has honoured her Throne today!
—W. H. S.
"Church Dedication
"The First Presbyterian Church of
Vancouver Island was formally opened for divine service yesterday. Ere
the deep, heavy tones of the fine new
bell had ceased to vibrate through
the building, it was crowded to excess by a large and attentive congregation, a great many being unable to
obtain admittance. The Rev. James
Munro, missionary from the Church
of Scotland, officiated at the morning
services, and delivered an appropriate
and excellent discourse, selecting as
his text the following beautiful words
from the sublime prayer of Solomon
at the dedication of the Temple. "The
Lord our God be with us, and he was
with our fathers. Let Him not leave
us nor forsake us; that He may incline our hearts unto Him, to walk
in all His ways, and to keep His commandments, and His statutes, and
His judgments, which Hc commanded our fathers."
"The evening services were conducted by the Rev. Dr. Evans, pastor of
the Wesleyan Methodist Church, who
preached to a densely crowded audience, an able and eloquent sermon
from Romans 1:16, 'For I am not
ashamed of the gospel of Christ; for
it is the power of God unto salvation
to every one that believeth; to the
Jew first and also to the Gentile.'
"The collections which were taken
up in aid of the building fund
amounted to the handsome sum of
When Dr. Reid withdrew he was
succeeded by Rev. J. Gamble of the
American Presbyterian Church, whose
pastorate was less than two years.
After Mr. Gamble's resignation the
congregation extended a call in 1884
to the Rev. Donald Fraser, M.A.,
of Mount Forest, Ontario, which was
accepted, and Mr. Fraser began work
in Victoria in August of that year.
Mr. Fraser was'a man of commanding appearance and forceful character,
of strong convictions and moral character, a robust highlander from the
Count: of Glengarry. He was educated at Queen's University, and had
two pastorates previous to that of
First Presbyterian Church here. Mr.
Fraser died in 1891, and was succeeded by the present pastor, Dr.
Campbell, whose induction on the
22nd of June, 1892, was the last official act of the Presbytery of Columbia, for that month the General Assembly divided the Presbytery into
three Presbyteries—Victoria, Westminster and Kamloops, to constitute
the Synod of British Columbia.
In this city Presbyterianism has
kept pace with the growth of population, and has been for fifty years
one of the strong factors for the elevation of character, moral purity and
the preaching of the gospel of Jesus
Christ.
Besides First Church and St. Andrew's there are now in Victoria three
other  vigorous  and  well   organized
Independent of all Combines
Kirkham's Wine am
Liquor Store
has responded well to the requirements of Victoria's most particula
people.   It has built up for itself a fine family trade.
FINE OLD PORT, PRIME SHERRY,
CHOICE CLARET.
a specialty.   All the best brands of Wine, Liquor, Liqueur, Ale, Bee
Porter, Mineral Water, Soft Drinks, Cigars, Tobacco, etc.
H. 0. Kirkham & Co., Ltd.
Grocery Store
Tels. 178, 179.
Butcher Shop
Tel. 2678
Liquor Store
Tel. 2677
Steamer "DON'
Capt. J. L. Bottril
DIRECT SERVICE TO THE ISLANDS
Carrying Passengers and Light Package Freight
NORTH   PENDER,   FULFORD   HARBOR,   GANGE|
SALTSPRING, MAYNE ISLAND AND GALIANO
LEAVES Oak Bay Boat Club House at 10 a.m. Mondaj|
Wednesdays and Fridays.
RETURNING LEAVES Mayne Island at 8 a.m., Tuesday]
Thursdays and Saturdays.
Passengers have the option of landing at Sidney.
Sundays Steamer runs to the Gorge every hour, commenci|
at 1 p.m.
For Rates and Other Information apply to
ROBERT W. BULLER,    C. P. R. DOCKS    PHONE i_
E. A. STILES
Upholsterer, Cabinet Maker and French Polisher
FURNITURE PACKED BY EXPERT
1109 FORT STREET
'PHONE 21
PROVINCIAL TAXES
Real Property, Personal Property and Income Taxes
Taxpayers are hereby reminded that Friday, the 30th June,
is the last day upon which Taxes are payable in order to be all<|
the Statutory Discount of ten per cent.
All arrears ought at once to be paid, with interest at 6 per
from date of deliquency, otherwise the land will be advertised a|
Next Tax Sale, and this applies to all lots in Townsites.
No discount is allowed on arrears or upon Rural School Tl
and Rural School Taxes should be paid immediately to preventf
land being advertised for sale.
E. E. LEASON,
Assessor and Collector,
Victoria Assessment Disl
Collector's Oflice,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., 20th June, 1911.
congregations, St. Paul's in Victoria
West, of which Dr. MacRae is pastor, Knox at Spring Ridge with Rev.
T. MacConnell as pastor.
The Sabbath services and the social
event on Monday evening should bc
largely attended, as this jubilee is of
interest, not only to the old-timers,
and to Presbyterians, but to all classes
who have the interest of the betterment of humanity at heart. The
Week extends its congratulations to
the congregation of First Presbyterian
Church, and wishes it greater prosperity and power for good in the next
fifty years than even it had in the
last half century.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRll
District of Rupert
TAKE   notice   that   Evelyn
Squire   of  Vancouver,   B.C.,   od
Spinster,  Intends to apply for]
slon to purchase the following
ed lands:—Commencing at a po
ed   on   the  shore  of  Quatsln
about 90 chains distant and in
westerly direction from the S. '
of Lot 12,    Tp.    27,    Rupert
thence north 40 chains; thence
chains; thence along shore to
commencement, and containing
more or less.
Dated May 17,  1911.
EVELYN MARJORY SQU:
Per George O.  Shor
June 10
The viceroy of India, Lord Dufferin,
once had a shikaree, or hunting servant,
whose duty it was to attend the visitors
at the viceregal court on their shoot
ing excursions.    This young 1
above all noted for his tact.
Returning one day from one
expeditions, the shikaree em
the viceroy, who, full of court)
citude for his guests' enjoymer
"Well, what sort of sport
  had?"
"Oh," replied the scrupuloui
Indian, "the young sahib shot
but God was very merciful to t r
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
dominion and Provincial News
Seeing's Believing.
fc Hope News says "that no mat-
pw alluring the prospects may
lin Hope or on the trail, there is
Bguising the fact that in Vancou-
kepticism prevails regarding the
possibilities of the Hope-Steam-
district." The free use of the
and dynamite will soon demon-
* the value of this new excite-
in the Cascade range. Hot air
ihe rosy statements of real estate
■ers never make r permanent
'g camp.
Retiring From Service.
It is probable when Sir Wilfrid
Laurier returns from London that
Colonel White, comptroller of the
Royal Northwest Mounted Police, will
retire, after 43 years of public service.
As in the Days of Yore.
Jackson and J. M. Challish, at-
j/s of Atchison, Kansas;  Harry
chardson, of Boston, and W. H.
■pson, of Seattle, all expert archill start on July 2 for a hunting
British Columbia armed with
)ows, arrows, hunting knives and
tackle. All firearms are barred,
men   expect  to   hunt   mountain
bears and deer.    Mr. Richards
'the archery championship of the
tt States and England.
The Largest Drydock.
The largest drydock on the Pacific
will soon be under construction in
Prince Rupert by thc Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway. Over 4,000,000 feet
of lumber will be used for the pontoons. The Grand Trunk Pacific will
also build a million dollar hotel in
their terminal city.
A "Nailing" Proposition.
ail factory will bc established in
'-y. It is estimated that the out-
Jll be 90,000 kegs of nails a year,
,)0 men will bc employed.
Roosevelt for Ottawa Fair.
ffort to bring Colonel Theodore
Ivelt, ex-President of the United
and big game hunter, to Otta-
open the Central Canada Exhi-
in September, is to be made by
Pate, president of the exhibition
ition, and Mayor Hopewell.
Oases for Women.
Canadian Pacific Railway arc
cring installing soda fountains
sir trans-continental dining
The fountains will be of spe-
sign, taking up little room, but
enough to permit of all the var-
cs and soft drinks being served
hour of thc day. The experi-
vi 11 be tried on the Toronto and
.iver Expresses and thc Special
*, and if a success the fountains
introduced on trains on short-
I'ew Depot for Vancouver.
C. P. R. announces that owing
J remarkable growth of Vancou-
I* company will build a hand-
large depot here, abandoning its
I intention of making additions
Iprcscnt (inc. It is now at work
Ins of the proposed structure,
lis likely to be one of the finest
■line.
Invention Better Than Cure.
result of several small pox
Ihich have been found in Mon-
lic city has decided to enforce
Inpulsory vaccination law, and
|is end in view, a special by-law
considered.
■Another Condemnation.
Board of Directors of the B. C.
Growers' Association has just
J.ed an important meeting at
lips, at the conclusion of whicii
lissed a resolution condemning
|iprocity pact between Canada
United States, as being det-
to the fruit interests of this
1*0.
Sammy, Make Room for Your Uncle!
So ostentatious has the display of
the Stars and Stripes become in the
theatres of Winnipeg that the City
Council issued orders recently to the
theatres to avoid in future any unnecessary use of the American flag on
the stage, ancl to discontinue thc custom of relegating the Union Jack into
inconspicuous places in thc performances.
The Damming of the St. Lawrence.
Shortly before the house rose it was
announced that a commission would
be appointed to study various projects
to dam the St. Lawrence river, and
the sum of $40,000 was provided in the
estimates for the purpose. The commission has not yet been named, but
a preliminary survey is now being
made in the vicinity of Cedar Rapids
and Beattharnois by engineers of the
Public Works Department. These engineers arc instructed to thoroughly
test thc claims of the Long Sault and
Canadian Light and Power companies
that development of power will not
intcreferc with navigation.
Enforcing the Law.
Stanley Russell, when brought before Police Magistrate Irvine recently
was fined $100 or nine months for selling liquor to C. F. Hutton, an interdicted person.   Russell paid the fine.
Albertan's New News Editor.
T. VV. Quaylc, late proprietor of the
Claresholm Review, has joined the
staff of The Albertan in the capacity
of news editor. Hc is a newspaper
man of wide experience, for some
years being news editor of thc Ottawa
Citizen and city editor of thc Calgary
News for the first couple of years of
its establishment four years ago. He
is widely and favorably known
throughout thc West.
Premier Leaves on June 30.
A letter received at Ottawa on June
16 from Hon. L. P. Brodeur, Minister
of Marine and Fisheries, states that
Sir Wilfrid Laurier will sail for Canada on June 30. Mr. Brodeur will
either accompany the Premier or return to Canada a week later on the
Victorian.
LOVE AND THE LAW.
A Famous Actress.
lOlga Nethersole has bought a
ltdcnce property on the Marine
(Vancouver, and is erecting a
(ne residence, of which she will
lissession at the close of the
I month.
IA Change of Control.
j'der-in-council has been passed
|iwa,   transferring  the   control
ese immigration and the col-
|of the poll tax of $500, from
le and commerce department
Immigration department.   The
is in accordance with the rec-
llation of the Royal Commis-
(lich recently investigated the
of  Chinese immigration  at
■ver.
And apropos of these legal luminaries, people are asking, "Who will
play Juliet to Mr F. E. Smith's Romeo
at the forthcoming great Shakespearean Ball, which wc arc hearing so
much too much about?" There will be
a rush on thc character, of course-
that goes without saying! And this
despite the fact that, in these days of
fine women of the only age—thirty—
that anyone ever seems to bc nowadays, lifelike impersonation of the
fourteen-year-old (not to mention
"true and faithful") Juliet is passing
difficult.—The Bystander.
LIPTON APPOINTED TEA MERCHANT TO KING GEORGE V.
Sir Thomas J. Lipton has again
been honoured, being the only tea
merchant to receive the special appointment as tea merchant to His Majesty the King. This speaks highly
for Lipton's tea, the splendid quality
of whicii has won this distinctive favour from three successive British rulers.
An  Herbarium.
The Provincial government has decided to undertake a complete botanical survey of the province and to
prepare an herbarium for the Provincial University at Point Grey. Mr.
G. K. McLean, landscape architect
and engineer, of Vancouver, has been
placed in charge of this work by Hon.
Dr. Young, minister of education, and
will be assisted by Mr. John Davidson, formerly assistant professor of
■botany in Aberdeen University, Scotland. 	
Coal Mine Closed.
The Reliance Coal Company mini,
near Taber, which has been closed
for several years, has been sold to a
British syndicate. The mine has an
excellent plant, but was poorly managed.
Fire Opals.
H. McAllister has made a discovery of what are believed to be genuine tire opals, in the Similkameen district, and a find of jasper is reported
from the same locality.
Bank at Salmon Arm.
Work has been started on the foundation of the new Bank of Commerce
building at Salmon Arm. The new
premises will be 40 x 30 feet, with
full basement and two storeys high.
It will, wc understand, be after the
style of the structure usually erected
by this banking institution and is estimated to cost here in the neighborhood of $20,000.
Western Fire Fighters.
Fire fighters from all over the west
will meet in Calgary during the exhibition, when the sixth annual convention of the Western Canada Firemen's association will be held. July
4-6 arc the dates, and it is expected
that it will be the largest gathering
of fire chiefs that has ever been
held in the west.
Winnipeg Buildings.
The Winnipeg Electric Railway
Company is preparing plans for the
erection of a ten-storey building on
the site 100 feet square recently acquired at the corner of Notre Dame
and Albert streets. As soon as the
cnmpany moves out of the present
building on Portage avenue the Quebec Bank will erect a new building
there.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents. Communications will be
inserted whether signed by the real
name of the writer or a nom de
plume, but the writer's name and address must be given to the Editor as
an evidence of bona fides. In no case
will it be divulged without consent.
CORRESPONDENCE.
To the Editor of The Week:
Sir,—The recent decisions of the
juries at thc assizes has shown up the
weakness or one of the weaknesses of
our jury system in a strong light.
The individuals who composed those
juries havc brought upon themselves
universal condemnation, so much so
that it is not too much to say that
they arc quite unfit to serve their fellow-citizens in that or any other responsible capacity again. For which
they would probably bc truly thankful. In nearly all other cases where a
body of men have to perform any
work or business for their fellows, thc
public for whom they act has an opportunity of learning how each individual carries out his part of thc work,
but in the case of a jury it is, or ought
to bc, impossible to lind out how each
man acted, so that a just and sensible
man who desires to bring in a verdict
in accordance with the facts of the
case has to suffer thc ignominy and
obloquy incurred by a weak and silly
majority. It is true that a minority
can and often docs (to its credit) hold
out against thc majority, so that the
jury disagrees and is at length dismissed. But to do this requires a sacrifice of valuable time and thc protraction of a very disagreeable duty performed under disagreeable conditions.
It is no use pretending that this is not
a money-grabbing age or that wc are
not a money-grabbing people, and a
man deserves greal    praise    who    is
ready and willing to sacrifice his interest and possibly make great financial losses in the service of the public.
But because of these defects the system must not be entirely condemned.
It has many obvious virtues which far
outweigh its defects. Still those defects are so serious that any change
will be welcome, and in these days of
advanced thought and enlightenment
it should surely be possible to devise
a better arrangement. I regret that I
have never heard even a suggestion of
such a one, npr do I pretend even to
have the glimmerings of one in my
own brain, but I think the subject is
one of such great importance that no
harm can be done by turning public
attention to it in the hope that some
bright idea for a remedy may spring
into being and so faulty a system may
be replaced by one which will insure
justice to all without calling for any
sacrifice at all from the men who arc
called upon to perform it. It is a
pleasure to note that the treatment of
jurymen by all the officers of the
court from the judge down to the
lowest official is now marked by more
courtesy and consideration than used
to be the case only a few years ago.
1 am, etc.,
CHARLES ST. BARBE.
Victoria, B.C., June 19, 1911.
INSULTING CARTOONS
Victoria, B.C., Canada,
June  ipth,  1911.
To the Editor of the Week:
Dear Sir,—We send you a copy of
the letter we have sent to thc Chinese
Consul General at San Francisco, of
the complaints of the Chinese Students at Victoria, B.C., for the insulting and disgraceful cartoon published
in the editorial page of thc Seattle
Daily Times of June _6th, 1911, a copy
of which we enclose.
Will   you   kindly   as   a   favour   to
publish in your paper a copy of thc
said letter and notify the people?
Yours respectfully,
LIU TSUNG SHUI.
""LIU NU,
;ss? LIU FUNG TSUEN,
Victoria,   B.C.,   Canada,
June 19th, 1911.
Mr. Li Yung Yew,
Chinese Consul General,
San Francisco, Cal.
Sir,—The Chinese Students of Victoria, British Columbia, beg respectfully to draw  your attention to  the
insulting      cartoon       published       in
the editorial page of the Seattle Daily
Times of date June 16th, 1911, being
a Donkey's head with Cue, Mandarin
Cap and Claws, holding a placard for
"Demand for indemnity of $6,000,000
for Loss  of Life and  Property."
"Apology for insult to China's Flag.'
We send a copy of newspaper referred to.
It is very important that this kind
of thing should be prohibited forthwith for if it is carried on the Chinese
Merchants in Canton, including Hong
Kong, will boycott thc American
Merchants and will not deal with them
for any of their merchandise.
Hoping that   you    will    give your
earnest  attention   to   this   matter   a.*.
soon as possible.
Wc arc Sir,
Yours respectfully,
Chinese Students:
LIU NU,
LIU FUNG TSUEN,
LIU TSUNG SHUT.
FAMOUS  HERD  SOLD
Thc sale at Warlaby, North Yorkshire, on March 15th, of thc famous
herd of the Booth Shorthorn cattle
was an event of much interest to
agriculturists. The herd dates back
to 1790, when Mr. Thomas Booth occupied both the Warlaby and Killcr-
by estates, Darlington, and has been
continued in unbroken succession by
four generations of breeders. Thc
herd has given to the world one of
'he finest types of cattle that has yet
existed—a type that in its padmy days
won great show yard records and
commanded very big prices. The
twenty-six cows, heifers, and bulls offered for sale realised 656 guineas,
which was regarded as a fairly satisfactory figure.
"SWIMEESY
BUOYS"
Make
Bathing Fun
Much more than that they really
teach   a   person   or   child   to
swim.    Procure    them    here—
Waterwings   or   "Swimeesy
Buoys,"  per  pair 25c
Bathing Caps, all colors, up
from   25c
Gyrus H. Bowes
Chemist
1228 Government Street
Tels. 425 and 450.
AVATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V
of the "Water Notice Act, 1909," to obtain a license in the Malahat Division
of Victoria Water District.
(a) The name and address and occupation of the applicant—Beaumont
Boggs, Real Estate Agent, Victoria, B.C.
(b) The name of the stream—Arbutus
Canon.
(c) The point of diversion will be
near the crossing of Vancouver Island
Trunk Road and stream from Arbutus
Canon about 10 miles north of North
Boundary of Lot 110.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for is 10 cub.  feet per second.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Industrial purposes.
(f) The premises on which the water
Is to be used to be erected at or near
the mouth of Arbutus Creek on Saanich
Arm,  Lake Number not  yet allotted.
(g) The purposes for which the water
is  to  be  used,  Industrial  purposes.
(h) If for irrigation describe the land
intended to be irrigated, giving acreage.
None.
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe the
place where the water is to be returned
to some natural channel, and tlie difference in altitude between point of
diversion and point of return.    None.
(j) Area of E. & N. Ry. Co.'s land
intended to be occupied by the proposed works; about twenty acres.
(k) This notice was posted on the
Eifth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner
on thc Tenth day of July, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of
any rplarlan proprietors or licensees
who or whose lands are likely to be
affected by the proposed works, either
above or below tbe outlet. The E. &
N.  Ry. Co,
(Signature)        BEAUMONT BOGGS.
P. O. Address, 1120 Fort Street, Victoria,  B.  C.
WATER   ACT,   1909,   AND   AMENDING
ACTS
Notice Under Section 87
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Vancouver Island Power Company,
Limited, Intends to apply to the Lieu-
tenant-Governor-ln-Councll, on Friday,
the 28th day of July, 1911, at the Parliament Buildings, Executive Chnmlier,
at the hour of eleven o'clock in the
forenoon, or so soon thereafter as the
Lieutenant-Governor-ln-Counoll may appoint for approval of its proposed undertaking and works In Malnhat District, at Trout Lake, near the head
waters of one branch of tlie. Jordan
River, East of the Jordan Meadows In
pursuance of, and In exercise of nnd
Utilization of tlie license issued to tbe
said Company, on the twelfth day of
July, 1910, and numbered 1902. Maps
and plans of the said proposed undertaking and works will be open for
public Inspection and may be seen on
any day following Ibis Notice within
office hours at the office of the Honourable, the Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
VANCOUVER   ISLAND
POWER COMPANY. LIMITED.
By  A.  T.  Goward,
Local   Manager.
Dated this 20th day of June. A.D. 1911.
June 2*1 July 22
SWEDISH MASSAGE
MEDICAL GYMNASTICS
VIBRATORY TREATMENT
Q. Bjornsfelt, S.M.
Phone 1856
821 Fort St.
THE BROADWAY
852 Yates St.
SMOKERS'  SUPPLIES
Candy,  Stationery  and  Toilette
Requisites THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
MOTHERLAND
£5 for a Queen's Ring.
A silver ring of the wife of Ma-
hemes I., Queen of Egypt during the
time of Moses (700 B.C.), was sold at
Sotheby's London auction rooms for
£5.
Sleeping Sickness.
Professor R. Newstead, entomologist of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, will go with a Government expedition to Nyassaland, Central Africa, to study the various species of the tse-tse fly, which are suspected of being the carriers of sleeping sickness.
M. P.'s Refusal of £400.
Mr. Stanley Baldwin, M. P., speaking at the West Worcestershire Conservative Association at Worcester declared that he hated the idea of payment of members. If he was forced
to take the £400 no one could make
him spend it on himself. He would not
touch a penny of it.
Mr. Churchill's Heir.
Mrs. Winston Churchill, the wife of
the Home Secretary, gave birth to a
son on Sunday morning, May 28th.
Both mother and child are doing well,
Mr. Winston Churchill has one other child, a daughter, who was born on
July 11, 1909.
Oil Fuel for the Navy.
It is reported that the British Admiralty has come to an agreement
with the Scotch mineral oil companies
to supply annually 40,000 tons, or ten
million gallons, of oil for fuel purposes for the navy. The amount fixed
is exactly double that originally negotiated. The oil fuel is to be delivered
in regular quantities. A huge oil storage tank is to be erected at Rosyth
naval base.
Extension of Borough Boundaries.
The draft has been issued of a provisional order for the enlargement of
the boundaries of the borough of Cambridge, so as to include parts of the
districts of Chesterton, Cherryhinton,
Grantchester and Trumpington. The
new borough will have a population
of about 57,073, and the town council
is to be enlarged by the addition of
five new wards, making the number
of aldermen seventeen and councillors
fifty-one.
The Law of the Air.
Seventeen states, including Great
Britain, which was represented by Sir
Thomas Barclay, Sir Frederick Pollock, Mr. Perowne, and Mr. Mesnil,
took part in the International Congress of Aerial Public Law which was
opened last month at Paris.
Lord Carrington's Farm.
Lord Carrington, Mmister of Agriculture, at a luncheon given in his
honour by the Rural Development Society, said that he intended to start
an experimental farm, so that, with
careful selection, people from the
towns could be put on the land again
to see what sort of a job they would
make of it.
The Calcutta Sweep.
Dr. Bolton, the emigration agent for
Trinidad at Calcutta, who drew Sun-
star in the sweep, disposed of a half-
share in him for £12,000. With the
first prize amounting to about £65,000
this 'ucky man still pockets well over
£40,000—a comfortable fortune.
Sale of Lord Abingdon's Estate.
Lord Abingdon's Rycote property
was offered for sale at Oxford recently
by Messrs. Knight, Frank and Rutley.
Mr. Howard Frank said: "Lord Ab
ingdon feels that if he is to pay the
heavy taxes which fall upon a large
landowner he must reconsider his position." The average price obtained
was just over £40 an acre. Rycote
Farm, 300 acres, sold for £12,152,
while Church Farm and Fernhill, 244
acres, fetched £10,851.
Toasting the King.
In reference to the drinking of the
King's health in non-alcoholic beverages, the Rev. E. C. Carter, vicar of
St. Jude's, Whitechapel, London, has
received a reply from Sir Arthur
Bigge which states that the King approves of the permission given to total abstainers to drink His Majesty's
health in any non-alcoholic beverage
being extended to all who choose to
avail themselves of it.
The General's Grace.
At an important public dinner in
London lately a novel grace before
meat was uttered. There was no son
of the church present, and in default
the chairman, without warning, called
upon a very distinguished general to
perform the office. All rose as the soldier did. He looked thoughtfully at
the opposite wall, as though struggling with an unfriendly memory, and
after a pause suddenly exclaimed,
"God save the King—and bless this
dinner."
Derailment Impossible.
Experts on behalf of large British
railroads have reported favorably upon the invention of a safety appliance
whicii is a modification of the bogie
principle. The invention makes impossible the derailment of trains while
running curves, thus allowing an increased speed. It is claimed that it
will enable trains to make the 185
miles between London and Manchester in two hours.
Winchester's New Headmaster.
Mr. Montague John Rendall, at
present second master of Winchester
College, has been appointed headmas
ter, in succession to the Bishop of
Southwark. Mr. Rendall, who has
been second master of Winchester
since 1899, has been acting headmaster
for the last two years during the absence of Dr. Burge. He was born at
Great Rollright (Oxon.) of which parish his father was rector in 1862, and
was educated at Elstree, Harrow and
Trinity College, Cambridge, of which
he was foundation scholar. He is a
brother of Mr. Vernon Rendall, editor
of the Aethenaeum and Notes and
Queries.
700 Lb. Halibut.
The largest halibut on record was
landed at Billingsgate Market, London, last month. It weighed 700 lb.,
or nearly a third of a ton, and was
part of a catch of 100 tons of fish from
the White Sea, North Russia, landed
by the trawler Macfarlane, of Hull.
The mammoth fish was brought
from the trawler into the market on
planks borne on the shoulders of six
porters. It was offered for sale by
auction by Messrs. Peter Forge, but
such is the glut of fish just now that
it only realized £2 5s., or just over
three farthings per lb. It was purchased by Mr. Taylor, fishmonger, of
Watney street, Stepney.
Split Sundays.
In order to effect a compromise between the Sabbataian and the secular
views of Sunday sport Lord Darnley
suggested at the Rochester Diocesan
Conference that we might be guided
by the practice of the Roman Catholic
Church. He regarded Sunday as a day
of worship, rest and recreation.
He suggested that all churchmen attend morning services, but that after
noon the church should countenance
legitimate recreation and games.
A wide resolution recommending
the spread of Sunday recreation to
the anxious consideration of the
church was adopted.
Britain and Portugal.
Admiral Sir Archibald Douglal
Rear Admiral Reginald Bacon, t(f
er with Lord Furness and reprel
tives of Messrs. Thornycroft's|
Messrs. Palmer's, have arrived ;
bon, Portugal, their object beil
present a British tender in connl
with an extensive project for tf
organization of the Portuguese]
One essential part of the schef
the transference of the Lisbon a)
to the other side of the Tagus,
vast works are to be constructed
How Fish are Protected.
"Until quite recently I im<|
that fish were protected chiefly I
coincidence of their markings wil
stones and reeds of the water in]
they live," declared Dr. Francis J
in a lecture at the Royal Photogj
Society's Exhibition, "but I
all silvery fish are mirrors, ref]
generally the dark bottom
pond. It is only when they apd
the surface and the light shin
them that they become visible
larger fish that prey upon then
Seal oi —Bubber?
In the States, the happy homej
slang word, they have invented
for the inquisitive man.   They c|
a "rubber neck," or "rubber" for)
A man in a New York car th-J
day sat opposite a woman carrl
particularly hideous baby. The f
face was so remarkable that tlj
was utterly unable to keep his
it. The mother noticed the prJ
stare, and growing angry, she]
forward and blurted out vi4
"Rubber!"
The man gave a great sigh of|
"Thank    goodness,     ma'am!"
claimed.    "I thought it was real]
They had to stop the car.
A Broken Reed
"M-my dear," said the muddll
zen, "I 'sure you I wouldn't beeif
but  footpad stopped  me."
"And   you   were    so     scaredl
tongue    clove    to    the     roof
mouth."
"How'd   you   know   that?"
"I  smell the clove."
LOVE HAS WINGS
and Brings Many
Good Things in His
Train
Cupid has made many flying trips this month from the up-to-date furniture house to the
June bride. The bride-to-be should visit this leading house of leaders and she cannot come too
soon. Never has there been such a complete variety of Furniture. If money is worth saving,
our offers are certainly worth investigating. Look everywhere, ours are the best anywhere.
Looking elsewhere "clinches" the argument that we sell the best. A bride never made a mistake
in buying her first furniture when she came here.
a FEW CHOICE PIECES FOR THE PARLOR
PARLOR CABINETS
PARLOR TABLES
Parlor Tables, Empire oak, fancy top 20x20.
Price $2-25
Parlor Tables, Empire Oak, fancy top 24x24.
Price   $2-75
Parlor Tables, Empire oak, square top 21x21.
Price $3-5"
Parlor Tables, solid quarter cut oak, golden
finish, with heart-shape top $4-5°
Parlor Tables, solid quarter cut oak, golden
finish,   23x30,    square   top,    or   24-inch
round top $5-5°
Parlor Cabinet, mahogany finish, new, handsome designs $15.00
Parlor Cabinet, mahogany finish, a new style
worth seeing—requires to be seen to be
appreciated  $20.00
Parlor Cabinet, mahogany finish, 3 large
shelves and mirror on top $18.00
Parlor Cabinet, mahogany finish, 3 large
shelves and mirror at back $65.00
Parlor Cabinet, mahogany, 4 shelves, 2 large
glass doors    $85.00 THE WEEK, SATUEDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
BUILDING PERMITS
June 15 to 21
iS-
|l. A. Belbeck—Douglas and Burnside—Store  $12,000
Irs. A. M. Brown—Fort—Store  55,ooo
E. Maddock—Cook—Dwelling  5,400
laynes & Small—Fort—Store   7,000
[i6-
t. E. Blakeway—Cowan and Cowichan—Dwelling  1,600
fdwards, Mansfield & Gardner—Langley—Alt  700
17-
ames Oxendale—Montreal—Garage  100
Hitchin—Cecil—Dwelling   1,500
Ilrs. E. J. McGregor—Empire St.—Dwelling  2,500
■[ickman Tye & Co.—Yates St.—Warehouse   10,000
fm. V. Storte—Denman St.—Stable  125
|. John—Alpha St.—Dwelling  1,900
I R. Saunders—Pembroke St.—Laundry  5,000
M9-
L. Carruthers—Wilson—Dwelling  1,500
obt. Ducrest—Burnside Rd.—Stable  300
Ilex. Ingram—Lewis St.—Dwelling   150
20—
|hos. Lumsden—Cook St.—Dwelling  2,500
W. Jones and E. McDowell—Princess St.—Laundry. 500
lien Standish—Irving St.—Dwelling  2,200
I21—
|r. G. L. Milne—Fort St.—Store and Office  25,000
BRITISH COLUMBIA TIMBER
Premier of British Columbia Outlines a Brilliant Future
(Reprinted from The Financial Times, London)
[hat British Columbia timber has become a steadily appre-
|g asset is now a truism. The recent flotation of two com-
s, with large capital, for the specific purpose of exploiting
In timber limits in that Province of the Dominion affords an
[lustration of the present attitude of the City to this article.
List be confessed that, as is too often the case, London's
|;iers have been backward in discerning the value of Colum-
timber,   one  of  the   Empire's  most  valuable  properties.
[while American capital has not neglected this great oppor-
For years past citizens of the United States interested in
r, and even outside speculators with some capital to lock up,
|been quietly but steadily buying up timber limits in British
ibia.   What is more, these American purchasers seem dis-
to firmly hold such standing timber as they have acquired
le inevitable rise which will take place within quite a measur-
period. No doubt an exact estimate of the actual extent of
I American holdings is difficult to form, but those with an
knowledge of the timber situation in British Columbia
Jisly estimate the amount of timber limits held by American
(lists at from 50 to 75 per cent, of the total timber area.
are large figures, but many good judges look on 50 per cent.
I under-estimate of the quantity of timber actually in Ameri-
lands.   The United States is certainly a rich country in all
of that term. It boasts several millionaires whose fortunes
lito many millions sterling, but it would be a grave error to
Ise that America is a land abounding in loose cash. There is
bo much work to do in the United States in the way of
jting her great natural resources that American capital is not
ly invested outside the land of the Stars and Stripes. It is
lmbt true that the American investors in Columbian timber
secured an excellent property at an easy price, but collectively
Lmerican dollars invested in British Columbia timber must
Lent a very large sum, and hitherto this capital has been
Ically idle. That one fact should stamp British Columbian
|r as a first-class investment for the man who can afford to
certain amount of capital and wait for his returns,
hie importance of this subject has been so borne in upon us
ye have devoted many articles in this section of The Financial
to the exposition of the British Columbian timber position,
Ive are sure our readers will peruse with great interest the
ying remarks which the Premier of British Columbia (the
Richard McBride, K.C.)—now one of our welcome Oversea
|s_has been good enough to address to a representative of
journal. Referring to the timber limits of British Columbia,
Iremier said:—
[Men thoroughly conversant with the timber position today
lie North American continent are a unit in believing that
lh Columbia now holds the last great stand of timber left—
3-SPE6IftLS-3
__■-
HERALD STREET, between Douglas and Blanchard,
lot 60x120, revenue producing.   Price $20,000
BROUGHTON STREET, 60x120, running through to
Courtney with 30 ft. frontage on the latter street,
between Douglas and Blanchard.   Price $3S,ooo
DOUGLAS STREET, 56x128, S. of Bay St.   Price.. .$31,000
GILLESPIE & HART
Fire, Accident, Sickness, Employers' Liability and
Plate Glass Insurance
Phone 2040. 1115 LANGLEY ST., VICTORIA, B.C.
IMPROVED  SUBURBAN ACREAGE
PROSPECT  ORCHARD, THOMAS' CROSSING, OVERLOOKING BAZAN BAY, SAANICH
10 ACRES, about 2-3 orchard, six year trees, Italian prunes, King apples, Bartlett pears and plums. Balance meadow now being
ploughed  $6,000
26 ACRES, 2 houses and extensive outbuildings; about seven acres orchard and small fruits, 3 acres bush; balance in hay and meadow.
Fine soil, good location and view $12,500
8.2S ACRES all cleared, fall wheat now up $3,300
8.24 ACRES all cleared, fall wheat now up; on two roads, house and
usual outbuildings  $4,500
FIFTY ACRES, being W^ Section 15, Range 2; cottage 4 rooms, outbuildings, strawberry vines, orchard, 40 trees, 5 years old; well.
Price, per acre  $200
THIRTY ACRES WATERFRONT, S/2 Section 13, Range 6-Tim-
bered, red soil, nice short, no rock.   Price per acre $300
Telephone Q^y    &    BOGGS ^m*
620 FORT STREET, VICTORIA, B. C.
JAMES BAY
KINGSTON ST., close in, large two-story 8-roomed house on brick
foundation, with two full sized lots; rents for $40 per month.
Price $8,000.   Terms $2,000 cash, balance arranged.
ST. LAWRENCE ST., close to sea, three 6-roomed houses, 3 bedrooms in each. Price $3,150 each. Terms, $500 cash, balance $25
per month including interest.
A GOOD BOARDING HOUSE AND INCOME PRODUCER
COOK ST., close in, two lots on a corner, 120 feet square, with two
large houses renting for $100 a month, with an additional expenditure of about $5,000; these houses would bring in $200 a
month. Price, $20,000. Terms, one-third cash, balance 1 and 2
years at 7 per cent. This price is for a short time only; come
in and talk it over.
Bagshawe & Co.
REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL BROKERS
Telephone 3371
Rooms 10 and 11 Green Block 1316 Broad Street.
that is to say, in no other part of that continent will you find such
an extensive belt of valuable virgin timber as still exists in British
Columbia. Perhaps it would be difficult to convey to people in
this country a clear idea of the place whicii timber holds in thc
economic life of Canada, and, let me add, of our neighbours in the
United States. Wood is the raw material of many industries
which have hardly got a counterpart in the United Kingdom.
Timber enters more largely into the construction of our homes
than is the case here, and this is true of every part of our habitations, from the boards of the floors to the shingles on the roots.
Our railways consume an immense quantity of timber, and you
must not forget that Canada is on the road to, perhaps, better the
example set by her neighbour in the building of great transcontinental railways. One great line already stretches from the Atlantic
to Vancouver, on the Pacific, while two other railways which are
spanning the entire breadth of the Continent will soon be there,
to say nothing of the line which is approaching its terminus at
Prince Rupert. The mere rolling stock of those railways makes
an appreciable demand for timber, to say nothing of the sleepers,
of which the life is not by any means unlimited. I should say that
the one item of sleeper renewal on the railroads of Canada and of
the United States must alone exert a sensibly hardening influence
on the value of lumber.
Fegan & Co.
Real Estate and Stockbrokers
'Phone 1500 P. O. Box 848
Mahon Bldg.,  Government St.
VICTORIA, B. C.
A SMALL
WATERFRONT LOT IN
ESQUIMALT
One  minute's  walk  from  car
line.   A snap for $850.
All active stock bought and
sold on the Vancouver and
Victoria Stock Exchanges upon
commission.
I&UP
MDOKM
J>
SEATTLE
Chas. Pemy, mop.
THEBESTdrEVEWTBINfi
IN THE MART OF THECITT
135RooNsWiTHBwH-50SmnEl?ooMs
Office Roll-Top
& Flat-Top Desks
Our stock offers you a
more varied selection and
range of prices than has ever
been shown in Victoria before.
Baxter & Johnson
Co., Ltd.
Complete Oflice Outfitters
i2i Yates St.        Phone 730
Crown Brant
and License Timber
Northern B. C. Wild Lands
In acreage or in Large Tracts.
For  particulars  apply to
ERNEST BRAMMER
Tel. 2095
Office:   103   Pemberton   Block
____
±>AS
CANCELLATIOW OP BESEBVE
Notice is hereby given that the reserve established over certain lands ln
the Cariboo and Lillooet Districts, notice of which bearing date June 30th,
1908, was published ln the British Columbia Gazette on July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled In so far as the same relates
to the following surveyed lands in
Townships 52 and 54, Lillooet District,
viz.:—Sections 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,
15, Fractional Sections 16, 17, Sections
18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, Fractional Section 25, Sections 26, 27, 28, Fractional
Section 29, Sections 30, 31, 32, 33, 34,
Fractional Sections 35 and 36, all ln
Township 62; and Sections 3, 10, Fractional Section 11, Section 13, Fractional
Section 14, Sections 24 and 26, all in
Township 54, and that all the aforementioned lands not already alienates*,
by pre-emption have been set aside for*
the endowment of the University of
British Columbia.
ROBT. A.  RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister of Lands,,
Lands  Department,   Victoria,    8,   Q,v
April 10th, 1911.
apl15 Julyl* 8
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
"Then think of the enormous demand which the constant
increase of our great cities and the building of new cities must
exert on the timber market. In the three Prairie Provinces of the
Dominion, stretching, as they do, for hundreds of miles, from
Winnipeg to the foot of the Rockies, new and handsome cities
have been springing up within the past few years as if by magic.
The growth in population of several of these Prairie cities is
measured within a very few years by hundreds per cent. This
movement is not showing any signs of slackening, but, on the
contrary, the growth of our new cities in the West is accelerated
year by year by the ever-rising tide of emigration from Eastern
Canada, from all parts of the United States, and from Europe.
You may say that every fresh homestead that is broken up by
the eager settler calls, directly or indirectly, for the cutting of so
much stumpage. But the Prairie Provinces, rich as they are in
almost everything which civilized man can desire, are practically
timberless. They must have timber, and plenty of it, from somewhere; as things are, their only store-house is British Columbia.
In Eastern Canada the lumbermen have been busy—too busy, perhaps—for a quarter of a century past, and limits in the Provinces
of Quebec and Ontario which were worth not more than a couple
of dollars, say, fifteen years ago, would fetch $12 to $14 today per
1,000 ft. on the stump. But in British Columbia there is still a
great store of standing timber, most of it of quality almost unattainable elsewhere.
"At first sight it might seem strange that such a belt of
standing timber should be left in our province and be obtainable
at such reasonable figures. But the explanation is simple enough.
To begin with, we are a young province, in this sense—that till
iecently our means of communication with Eastern Canada and
with our neighbours in the south were limited. Today all this is
altered, lt will be but a short time before our coast cities will
be the western gateway of the British Empire, in direct railway
communication with every part of the North American continent.
The tonnage of our shipping has grown by leaps within the past
decade, but what bounds can be put to its development in the near
future, when the Panama Canal will afford a ready passage
between the two great oceans of the world? Of course, I cannot
lix the exact day, but this revolution in the world's commerce cannot now be delayed many years; probably the news that the first
vessel has passed through the Canal will be flashed to all points
of the globe within four years.
"It is easy to see what effect this must exercise on our great
timber industry. It has been said that the active interest lately
taken by American capital in our timber limits has been largely-
stimulated by an idea, current on the other side of the border, that
some sort of reciprocal arrangement between Canada and her
neighbour was imminent. I fancy there is a good deal of exaggeration in this view. Less than six months ago few American
financiers, I believe, would have gambled on Reciprocity, to use
one of their current terms. The fact isthat, quite apart from any
question of Reciprocity, it has been obvious for some years that
the day was fast approaching when the United States, with nearly
100,000,000 people, would suffer something like a timber famine.
Without adopting the extreme view that in twenty years no timber
'at all will be left in the United States, it is a fact that within the
past few years saw-mills in the once well-wooded State of Minnesota have had to be shut down because the country tributary to
them had been absolutely denuded of timber. The plant of those
mills represented an investment of millions of dollars. The forests
of Michigan have all but disappeared. Within very few years the
valuable cedar limits of the southern belt of the United States will
be gone. The last great standing belt of timber left to the North
American continent is found in the Pacific Province of British
Columbia, and I am glad to think that our reserves of this valuable
article will last us, with proper care in conservation, for generations yet.
"But while I thoroughly believe in this, our great asset, I
should be sorry'to think that people here were about to plunge
into timber speculation without taking the ordinary precautions
which every man of business observes when he is investing his
money. Standing timber in British Columbia today is undoubtedly
cheap at the price—cheap, that is, relatively to the market value of
timber, frequently of less valuable quality, in other parts of North
America. But whoever offers a timber limit, even in British
Columbia, makes a business proposition which must be treated on
strict business lines. All our timber limits are not of the same
value—that stands to reason. The variety of the timber and, again,
its situation from the lumberman's point of view are essential
factors in determining its value."
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR INVESTOR AND SETTLER
By the Hon. Richard McBride, Premier of the Province
(Reprinted from The Canadian Gazette)
[The first impression one gets of the Hon. Richard McBride,
Premier of British Columbia, is that of the man's quiet strength
and sense of power, and conversation but confirms the impression.
He has a commanding presence, and his shock of white hair suggests the poet and dreamer rather than the astute politician. And
probably it is a combination of poetic and practical faculties that
has raised Mr. McBride to a leading position in the affairs of the
lusty young giant of the Pacific, and made him one of the pictur-
W. D'O. Rochfort
ARCHITECT
Suite 407 Pemberton Block
Plans and Specifications
on Application
Business   Phone  1804
Residence Phone P 1693
44
»
Dun ord
Bungalows
Our Bungalows are Homes
not Houses
WE DESIGN
AS WELL AS BUILD
We build on vour own terms
2,000
7,500
35,000
12c per Share
R. D. Maclachlan
BOARD OF TRADE
BUILDING
Phone 2106
TAKE NOTICE that George H. Crane,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Contractor, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains west of the north-west corner of the north-west quarter of Section 22, Township 8, Bella Coola Valley;
thence north 20 chains; east 40 chains;
south 20 chains; west 40 chains to
point of commencement, containing 60
acres more or less.
Staked April 3rd, 1911.
GEORGE H.  CRANE.
P. A. Johnson, Agent.
may 13 July 8
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Metal Work—Suspension Bridge, Churn
Creek.
SEPARATE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tenders for Suspension Bridge,
Churn Creek, B.C.," will be received by
tho Honourable Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Monday, the 10th
July, 1911, for the cables and accessories
and metal required in connection with
a Suspension Bridge over the Fraser
River, to be delivered at Ashcroft, B.C.,
on or before the 31st October, 1911.
Drawings, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 21st day of June, 1911, at
the ofllce of the undersigned, Victoria,
B.C., at the offlce of E. McBride, Road
Superintendent, Vancouver, and at the
offlce of the Government Agent, New
Westminster.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, in a sum
of $500 for the metal and $200 for the
cables and accessories, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon to do so, or if he fall to complete
the work contracted for. The cheques
or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. B. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 12th,  1911.
june17 .uly8
Grand Trunk Pacific Investors
The construction of the new transcontinental railway—the GranJ
Trunk Pacific—is to-day opening up new towns that in the very neal
future will be large and important cities. Just as the advent of thj
pioneer transcontinental line—The Canadian Pacific—opened and built ui
divisional points such as Brandon, Regina, Calgary, Lethbridge, etc., si
will the new line of the Grand Trunk make large divisional points of thi
towns we now offer for sale. J
We  have  secured  the agency from  the  GRAND  TRUNK  PACIFIll
RAILWAY CO. for the towns mentioned below and the shrewd investor!
who can recognize the many advantages for investment in these towns a
the prices of to-day, will share in the large profits that will accrue as
result of their rapid development.    No other investment is so safe an*
profitable,  and if you want to get your portion of the wealth Wester!
Canada's development is creating, take advantage of this opportunity noT
before it is too late. I
Prices of lots in all of these divisional points are $75, $100, $150, $20j
$250 and $300 on easy monthly payments, no interest and no taxes tij
1912, with a 5 per cent discount for cash.
MELVILLE: The first Saskatchewan divisional point on the G. T.
and the largest new town on the line between Winnipeg and Edmontoil
Located in a rich agricultural district, an important railroad and distribut|
ing centre,  Melville bids fair to become one of the Important cities i
Western Canada.
WATROUS: The mecca of the health seeker, situate near the shores i
the famous Little Manitou Lake, and in the centre of one of the flneq
farming sections of Saskatchewan.
BIGGAR: The opportunity of opportunities, located in the heart of I
wonderfully rich and fertile agricultural district, and with railway facill
ties that guarantee a future, being not only one of the most importam
Grand Trunk Pacific divisional points on the main line between Wlnnlp^
and Edmonton, but is the junction of the branch lines of the Grand Trun
Pacific to Battleford and Calgary, which will be hurried to completion _
an early date.   The C. P. R. runs through Biggar, and all C. P. R. trairj
stop there. I
TOFIELD: The terminus of the branch line from Calgary, situate nea
the shores of the Beaver Lake. The discovery of natural gas and of cial
and having at its door several square miles underlaid with lignite coal
promise the development at Tofleld of important manufacturing industriel
EDSON: The last prairie divisional point on main line of Grarl
Trunk Pacific, and the gateway to the Peace River Country. Rich -j
natural resources, Edson lots fulfill every requirement for safe and profil
able investment. f
REMEMBER THE PRICES, $75.00 to $300.00, and terms of one-tenf|
cash and balance in nine equal monthly payments—no interest.
PEMBERTON & SON
Exclusive Agents for Victoria and Vancouver.
CORNER FORT AND BROAD STREET
We desire to announce that we have opened offices in Room]
304 and 305 Bailey Building, Handling, Seattle, Wash., handling
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Cotton, strictly on a Commission basis;
in the various markets of the world. Mr. Carl L. Miller, who '
long been connected with important brokerage firms in the wes]
will be in charge.
We  are members  of the  Chicago  Board  of Trade.   Ou
Eastern correspondents are S. B. Chapin & Co., and Logan
Bryan, of Chicago and New York, members of all Exchange!
Private leased wire connections enable quick dispatch in handlin|
all business intrusted to us for execution.
Having carried on a successful brokerage business in Victori]
B.C., for the past 10 years, we refer you to any bank, firm
individual of that city as to our standing and integrity.
Respectfully,
F. W. STEVENSON & CO.
Frank W. Stevenson!
Walter H. Murphey|
Seattle, March 6, 1911.
P. O. Box 618 Phone 24
Alvo von Alvensleben, Lt<
636 View Street
REAL ESTATE     TIMBER       INSURANC
Members Victoria and Vancouver
Stock Exchanges
Stocks and Bonds Bought and Sold on Commission.
HEAD OFFICE:   VANCOUVER, B.C.
Branch Offices:   North Vancouver and Victoria, B.C.
Foreign Offices:
London, Berlin, Paris, St. Petersburg and Vienna.
Mill Bay Waterfrontage
107 Acres on the above bay, good soil, 4 acres under
cultivation, new house and barn; Mill Bay trunk
road runs through the property.   Price $14>7j
One-third cash, balance 1, 2 and 3 years.
R. V. Winch & Co., Ltd.
Financial, Insurance and Estate Agents.
TEMPLE BUILDING FORT STREET THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
■que figures of Canadian national life. The geniality of the man's
Imperament—he is known throughout British Columbia as
|)icky" McBride—is evidenced by the hearty hand grip he gives
Ie visitor, and the friendly movement of the body as he waves him
Ito a chair. "Be seated," he seems to say, "I am a busy man,
It for the time being entirely at your service." And any sense
1 inconvenient or inopportune intrusion the new arrival may have
|t at first is soon dispelled.]
What have I to say about British Columbia?   Well, it is a
Ibject in which I am naturally very interested, and I am glad to
I. so many British people anxious to get further knowledge of
province.   I was in England four years ago, and since then I
Id on my present visit interest has increased four-fold.   This is
■ry satisfactory indeed, as we in British Columbia want British
ltlers and British capital.   A pleasing feature of my stay on
Is occasion is the large number of letters of inquiry relative to
liditions out there from responsible and important sources which
leceive by almost every post.   It is very gratifying.   You of the
Inadian Gazette have been ever generous in your support of the
Iivince, and at the same time protective of the interests of British
lestors and intending settlers, and it is little I can tell you that
ti do not already know.    But if anything I can say personally
ll assist you in your good work, then I shall be pleased.
"It Has Everything Needed"
The more  I travel the more I  am convinced that British
lumbia is one of the most attractive countries in the world.   It
everything needed—a  charming and health-giving climate,
Ignificent scenery, land for fruit growing and general farming,
v materials for manufacturing, railways, inland waterways, an
tensive seaboard, and a hearty welcome to British settlers and
liness men.   The development of the adjoining Prairie Provinces
as fruit growers an ever-expanding market for their produce,
horticulture, already an important industry, is attracting many
tiers from all parts, a large proportion of a fine type coming
In England.    Mixed farming and grain growing offers a field for
^agriculturist, and the opening up of new districts by the rail-
companies will make large additional tracts of suitable land
liable for settlement.
Our mineral resources are of considerable value, and include
entials for manufacturing—iron and coal.   As I told the
ladiari  Manufacturers'  Association,  the  greatest coalfield  of
lish Columbia, or of Canada, is the Rocky Mountain coalfield,
|vhich 8o per cent, is in British Columbia and 20 per cent, in
srta.   The present British Columbian gross output of coal for
■[whole province is 2,400,600 tons, ancl at this rate of production
It Kootenay coalfields can keep up this supply for 15,000 years.
I Henry S. Poole, in the employ of the Geological Survey, says
lis report as to coal still remaining in the Vancouver Island
Ifields:   "Of the quantity of coal exceeding two feet in thick-
within a vertical depth of 4,000 feet an estimate of 600,000,000
would seem conservative."   This does not include other pro-
Ing fields in East Kootenay, Northern British Columbia, and
le River.   The estimated coal in the Rocky Mountains coalfields
\. less than 44,130,000,000 tons, of which some 36,000,000,000, oiler cent, of the whole, is in British Columbia, all of it available
the valley of the Elk River.
IWith such an enormous extent of coal it is quite reasonable to
|ume that the Eastern part of British Columbia, from its coal-
Is alone, is destined to be the Pennsylvania of the Pacific Coast,
■[timber and pulpwood resources are also of considerable extent,
well known. Then, again, the fisheries of the coast give
|oyment to about twelve thousand men, and this is an industry
jle of considerable expansion.
feritish Columbia has undoubtedly a great future before it.
In the country is fully developed it will be capable of sustaining
nidation of many millions. The opening of the Panama Canal
Imean much to the progress of the province. British Columbia
[gateway to the East, and has the mighty markets of China
(japan on the other side of the ocean. With so many blessings
Nature, do you wonder at our optimism and our assurance
|bright future?
A Word of Warning
|As   a  field for   investment   British   Columbia   offers   many
Intageous facilities, and, as I have already said, we welcome
Ish capital, but some of the "propositions" that occasionally
ltheir way to the London market from British Columbia can
Ily be described as of the soundest.   The Provincial Govern-
is anxious to safeguard the interests of capital, but unfor-
Itely we cannot prevent irresponsible men from endeavouring
list equally irresponsible schemes upon the British public.   It
(r the British investors themselves to thoroughly investigate
reliability of financial proposals and to secure independent
Its where possible.   The province offers many facilities for
lsafe and remunerative employment of capital and all that is
led   on   the   part   of   investors   is   ordinary   caution   and
rimination.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY PURCHASE
DOUGLAS STREET SITE
The Hudson's Bay company has purchased the St. John's
Ich site on Douglas street, and during the present year will
|nence the construction of a thoroughly up-to-date departmental
in Victoria, whicii will be one of the largest of its kind wesr
BUSINESS PROPERTY
Government Street—Good corner, 90x120  $60,000
Yates Street—60x120, near Blanchard. For a few days we
offer this property at a less figure than anything else in
the block.
Yates Street—Corner, 60x120  $50,000
Yates Street, between Vancouver and Cook, 30x120 $9,000
(or offer).
Douglas Street—Corner, 150 feet frontage. This is one of
of the most prominent corners on this street. Suitable
for retail stores now.   Price $31,000
Johnson Street, near Blanchard, 60x120 $16,500
Pandora Avenue, near Blanchard, 60x120 $25,000
MARRIOTT & FELLOWS
Phone 645
1212 Douglas Street
Blue Printing
Maps
Draughting
Surveyors' Instruments and
Drawing  Office
Supplies
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT
MAP CO.
1218 LANGLEY STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material.
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
EVERY KIND OF
Insurance
FIRE,   ACCIDENT,   SICKNESS
BONDS,     EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY,
GUARANTEE AND FIDELITY
CONTRACTORS
Green & Burdick Bros.
Phone 1518
Car Broughton and Langley
Thomas Hooper
Architect
Royal Bank Chambers,
Victoria, B. C.
522 Winch Building,
Vancouver, B. C.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing upon Crown lands ln
the Lillooet District and ln the Kamloops Division of Yale District, notice
of which was published ln the British
Columbia Gazette, dated May Sth, 1910,
Is cancelled ln so far as the same relates to the lands ln Lillooet District
surveyed as Lots numbered 1,833,   1,832,
1,831,
1,830,
1,820,    1,821,
1,822,
1,823,
1.818,
1,819,
1,809,    1,806,
1,810,
1,811,
1,817,
1,816,
1,813,    1,656,
1,654,
1,640,
1,639,
1,638,
1,641,   1,653,
1,652,
1,651,
1,643,
1.642,
1,791,    1,644,
1,645,
1,646,
1,647,
1,648,
1,649,    1,829,
1,828,
1,826,
1,826,
1,824,
1.425A, 1.430A
1,629,
1,631,
1,617,
1,622
1,637,    1,636,
1,636.
1,634,
1,614,
1,615,
and   1,616.
ROBT.  A.   HKNWICK,
Deputy Minister of Landa.
Department
of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May 26th,
1911.
June 3
sept. 2 of Winnipeg. The property for its location in this city, was
acquired by the company from Messrs. T. R. Cusack and R. L.
Drury for a sum in the neighbourhood of $225,000. Mr. Andrew
Wright acted as the local agent for the Hudson's Bay company,
and the deal was negotiated by Messrs. Grant & Lineham. The
site has a frontage of 240 feet on Douglas, 120 feet on Fisguard,
and 120 feet on Herald streets. The entire site will be occupied
by the structure which the Hudson's Bay company purposes erecting. The church's tenancy of the site will expire on September
15th. By that date it is understood that the plans for the new
departmental store will be ready, and that actual construction will
commence within a month, that is before October 15th.
The announcement is probably the most important ever made
in the mercantile life of the city. The decision of a company, which
enjoys the highest of business reputations, to enter into the retail
trade of the city on such an extensive scale, will have the effect of
giving an immense impetus to the upbuilding of Victoria. The site
selected on the city's widest thoroughfare must necessarily, not
only enhance the values of property on Douglas street, but throughout the entire business area. In the announcement of its plans
in Victoria, the company promises to build a departmental store
which will be up-to-date in every particular, and which will rank
beside any similar institution which it has established in Canada.
While the figure to be expended on the structure has not been
divulged, pending the drawing up of the plans and specifications,
it is generally considered as probable that it will not fall far short
of the million dollar mark.
FIELD CROPS IN CANADA
A bulletin of the Census and Statistics Office issued recently
states that the season this year has been favourable for field crops
in all parts of Canada, and excellent reports have been received
from all the provinces. The lowest percentage of condition is
made for fall wheat, which suffered from inadequate protection in
the winter months, and also to some extent from spring frosts
The areas of fall wheat are greater than last year by 4.50 per cent,
and of spring wheat by 13.70 per cent. The total area in wheat is
10,503,400 acres, as compared with 9,294,800 in 1910 and 7,750,400
iri 1909. The per cent, condition of fall wheat at the end ot May
was 80.63, and of spring wheat 96.69. The area in oats is
10,279,800 acres and its condition 94.76, as compared with 9,864,100
acres and 93.95 per cent, condition last year. Barley and rye each
show a small decrease in area, but the condition is higher than at
the same period last year. Slight decreases are also reported for
areas of peas, mixed grains, and hay and clover, with per cent,
condition of over 90. Hay and clover have a reported condition
of 91.45 for the Dominion, being practically 100 in Manitoba,
Saskatchewan and Alberta. The area of the field crops named is
32,051,500 acres in 1911, compared with 30,554,200 acres for 1910
and 28,194,900 acres for 1909. In the provinces of Manitoba,
Saskatchewan and Alberta the area in wheat, oats and barley was
3,491,413 acres in 1900; 6,009,389 acres in 1905; 11,952,000 acres
in 1909, and 13,809,300 acres in 1910, and it is I5,355»5°° acres -h's
year. The increase of these crops from 1900 to 1911 was 2,663,699
acres in Manitoba, 7,364,315 acres in Saskatchewan and 1,836,073
acres in Alberta.—Archibald Blue, Chief Officer.
GIANT MERGER FOR B. C. LUMBER
Advices from Cranbrook this week state that a huge lumber
merger is under way in that city. English capitalists, it is understood, are arranging to acquire the East Kootenay Lumber Co.,
the Baker Lumber Co., the King Lumber Co., the Rock Creek
Lumber Co., and other concerns, with headquarters at or near
Cranbrook. It is said that the interests seeking to acquire these
lumber companies have a working capital of $20,000,000 and if the
deal is put through they purpose establishing a couple of hundred
retail yards on the prairies.
EIGHT THOUSAND BARRELS OF OIL PER DAY
Local shareholders in the Canadian Pacific Oil Co., owning
lands in the Bakersfield region, California, are much elated at the
good news received on Saturday to the effect that their bore had
struck oil at the rate of 8,000 barrels per day. The oil is under
control, and a contract has been made with the Standard Oil Co.
for the sale to them of 500,000 barrels. The well has been
inspected by a representative of that corporation, who states that
it is the best he has yet seen in the Bakersfield district. A large
number of shares were bought throughout the Okanagan, at the
moderate price of 25 cents, and as they are bound to appreciate
sharply, the fortunate shareholders are to be congratulated on
the brilliant prospects of their investment.
CABLED NEWS FROM LONDON
It is expected that the Canada Cement Company before long
will enter into closer working arrangements with the Associated
Portland Cement Manufacturers here.
The association recently announced its intention of establishing
works and depots in various foreign countries, and Canada is not
included, as the directors contemplate arrangements with the
Canada company, which will obviate the necessity of fresh works
in Canada.
Ton Can Xeep Posted om aU Developments Is tn* Peace Biver, the Cariboo
and
FortGeorge
Country, Reading onr
PBEE monthly
B. C. Bulletin of
Information
which gives all the news impartially,
clipped from the leading dailies, weeklies and magazines; articles bearing on
British Columbia, covering Farm Lands,
Fruit, Lumbering, Mining, Fishing, New
Railways; also synopsis of Land, Lumber, Mining, Immigration and othel laws.
wx _u» jonre owvebs ass
■ou aoehts or txb
POST GEOBOX TOWB8XTS
at the junction of 1100 miles of navigable waterways, the strategic point for
the building of the second largest city of
British Columbia, having more varied
and Important natural advantages than
Spokane.
Seven railroads building and projected.
One hundred million dollars (estimated) will be spent in next five years in
railroad building radiating from Fort
George.
Millions of agricultural acres waiting
for farmers.
Coal, timber lands, water power and
rich gold mining country all tributary
to Fort George.
Write us today. We don't ask you to
buy; just get posted—then do what you
think is wise.
Natural Resources
Securities Co., Ltd,
693 Bower Kit; Yancouver, B.O.
643 POBT BT.,     •   •      TIOTOBIA, B.C.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve of a parcel of land situated on
Graham Island, notice of which appeared in the British Columbia Gazette
of the 25th of February, 1909, being
dated 23rd February, 1909, is cancelled
to permit of the lands being acquired
by pre-emption only and for no other
purpose.
ROBT.  A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., April Sth, 1911.
july 8
CANCELLATION OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing over vacant Crown lands
ln Cariboo District, situated on the
South Fork of the Fraser River, notice
of which, bearing date of June 26th,
1907, was published in the British
Columbia Gazette dated August 29th,
1907, is cancelled in so far as the same
relates to lands surveyed as Lots numbered 3,040,   3.040A,   3,039,   3,049,   3,042,
3,051
3,077,
3,081,
3,087,
3,112,
4,135,
3,046,
3,084,
3,098,
3,111,
3,119,
3,046A,
3,052,
3,076,
3,033,
3,091,
3,129,
3,134,
3,047,
3,097,
3,106,
3,115,
3,116,
3,059,
3,043,
3,082,
3,088,
3,099,
3,130,
3,035,
3.054A,
3,106,
3,102,
3,124,
3,109,
3,048,
3,041,   3,046,   3,044,
3,078,    3,079,   3,080,
3,085,   3,086,   3.087A,
3,100,    3,089,   3,108,
3,132,
8,086,
3,057,
095,
Bevan, Gore & Eliot
LIMITED
STOCK AND BOND BROKERS
Members Vancouver, Victoria and Spokane
Stock Exchanges
WE BUY AND SELL ALL LISTED AND UNLISTED
STOCKS ON A STRICTLY COMMISSION BASIS
MINING STOCKS CARRIED ON MARGIN AND SOLD
• FOR 30, 60 OR 90 DAY DELIVERY
MONEY INVESTED FOR CLIENTS ON MORTGAGE
OR IN DIVIDEND PAYING INDUSTRIAL STOCKS
Quotations furnished on all Active Stocks
1122 QOVERNMENT STREET
Phones 2470 and 2471
VICTORIA, B.C.
"Mount Edwards"
Coutts-way and Vancouver Street
MODERN AND LUXURIOUS APARTMENT HOUSE
In favorite residential district within one minute of Fort Street
car and eight minutes' walk of Post Office and Theatre.
Heated throughout with Hot Water; Electric Light, Hot and Cold
Water and all Up-to-date Conveniences
OPENS MARCH 1ST
Suites may now be rented at moderate rates.
Domestic help for all tenants can be obtained on the premises on
economic terms.
For full particulars apply
THE MANAGER,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range I
TAKE notice that I, Harold W. Wood,
of Vancouver, occupation Merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains  west of  S. W.  corner of T.  L.
30927, thence 80 chains south; thence 80
chains east or to timber licence; thence
80 chains north; thence west to commencement and    containing    600 acres,
more or less.
Dated April 10, 1911.
HAROLD W. WOOD.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
may 13 July 8
CAMOSUN REALTY CO.
Phone 1139
Room i, Royal Hotel Building,
Port St.
City and Suburban Real Estate,
Acreage at Sooke and Saanich,
at reasonable prices.
P. KROEGER
ABTISTIC  UPKOLSTEBY
"Wlndowphanie"
Makes Stained Glass out of Plaii
Glass
Rai removed to
721 COUBTNEY ST.
Opposite Alexandra Club
Telephone 1148
Boy's Art Glass Worki and Stor
848 Tatei St., Victoria, B. O.,
Albert F. Roy
Over   thirty  years' experience i
Art Glass.
LEADED   LIGHTS
Sole    manufacturer    of    Steel
Cored Lead for Churches, School.-
Public    Buildings    and    privat
Dwellings. Plain and Fancy Glas
sold.
Sashes Glazed by Contract.
Estimates  free.
PHONE  694
3,066A,   3,063,   3,062,
3,065,   3,067,   3,064,
3,068,   3,072,
3,093,   3.093A,
3,127,   3,131,
and 3,114.
ROBT. A.
3,073,
3,094,
3,123,
3,118,
3,132,
3,037,
3,054,
3,101,
3,103,
3,125,
3,110,
3,055,
3,061,
3,069,
3,076,
3,113,
3,128,
3,133
3,038,
3,063,
3,096,
3.090A, 3,0DO,
3,126,   3.119A,
3,104,   3,107,
3,066,   	
3,060,
3,070,
3,074,
3,117,
3,122,
3,066,
3,058,
3,071,
3,092,
3,120,
3,121,
RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., May 26th, 1911.
june 3 sept. 2
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that J. A, Wright, of
Golden, occupation Farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands;—Commencing at a post planted at S. W. corner
of Lot 321; thence South 40 chains;
thence west 20 chains to South Bentick
Arm; thence in a north-easterly direction back to point of commencement.
Dated  May 4,  1911.
JOHN  ANDREW  WRIGHT,
june 3 july 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE notice that The Michigan Pacific Lumber Company, Limited, of Victoria, B.C., having its head offlce for
British Columbia at 1114 Langley St.,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted midway on
the shore line between the S. E. and
S. W. corners of Lot 77, Renfrew District; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 44 chains; thence* north 80 chains;
thence east following the shore line
of lots 76 and 77 Renfrew District to
point of commencement containing 360
acres more or less.
Dated  26th May,  1911.
MICHIGAN PACIFIC LUMBER
COMPANY,  LIMITED.
By Its agent, H. A. Hoard,
juno 8 July 29
BECKETT & MAJOR
REAL    ESTATE,    FINANCIAL    AND    INSURANC1
AGENTS,   MANUFACTURERS' IMPORTERS
Shipping Agents for the G. S. "Tuladi," the Victoria, Sidne
and Islands Freight Service
Estates Managed Money to Loan Rents Collecte
Houses for Sale and to be Let
Building Lots    Acreage    Farm Lands
1205 LANGLEY STREET, VICTORIA, B.C.
Office Phone 2967 P. O. Box 1522        Res. Phone 20!
Waterways Survey.
Engineering parties have been sent
out to complete the survey of proposed navigable waterways from Edmonton to Winnipeg via Saskatchewan River. It is expected the work
of clearing and deepening the chan
nels will bc begun next summer
suits of preliminary surveys last
mer indicate that 10-foot wate
can be obtained from Winnip
Clear Lake and six-foot wate
for the rest of the distance t
foothills of the Rockies. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
11
%
Lais' Great
Voting Contest
One Grand Prize of $300.00 in Gold
Twelve District Prizes Amounting to $700.00
TO BE GIVEN AWAY BY THE AVEEK
PRIZES
THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS IN GOLD   300 00
DISTRICT PRIZES
MAHOGANY CABINET OF SILVER, comprising 96 pieces, secured from and now on exhibition at Challoner & Mitchell's  150 00
BEAUTIFUL DIAMOND RING, to be selected by Winner from Challoner & Mitchell  ■   125 00
HANDSOME BEDROOM SUITE, secured from and now on exhibition at Weiler Bros  100 00
HANDSOME DINING-ROOM SET OF FURNITURE, secured from Weiler Bros, and now on exhibition  75 00
LADIES' GOLD WATCH AND CHAIN, to be selected by Winner, from Redfern & Sons  60 00
LADIES' GOLD WATCH AND CHAIN, to be selected by Winner from Redfern & Sons  50 00
A BEAUTIFUL MOTOR BAG AND MANICURE SET, now on exhibition at Redfern & Sons  40 00
QUEEN ANNE TEA SET, of French quadruple plate, comprising three pieces, now on exhibition at Redfern & Sons  30 00
BEAUTIFUL FRENCH GOLD FILLED MESH BAG, now on exhibition at Redfern & Sons   25 00
NO. 3A FOLDING POCKET KODAK, now on exhibition at C. H. Smith & Company   20 00
LADIES' BEAUTIFUL SUIT CASE, secured from F. Norris & Sons  15 00
LADIES' UMBRELLA OR PARASOL, to be selected by the Winner from Redfern & Sons      10 00
HOW VOTES ARE SECURED
Votes are issued on coupons printed in "The Week." Cut out the
coupon and fill in the Contestant's name you wish to vote for and send
to the Contest Manager of "The Week." Votes are also issued on prepaid subscriptions to "The Week." (See vote and subscription schedule). Candidates turning in the greatest number of votes, whether
coupon votes, subscription votes or both, will be awarded the prizes
according to their standing in their respective districts. No papers will
be sold in bulk. No votes issued on the amount of money turned in.
Votes issued on coupons and prepaid subscriptions only. Subscriptions
must be filled out on proper subscription blanks with the subscriber's
name, address and length of subscription and remittance covering same,
as evidence of "bona fides." Votes once cast are not transferable. Votes'
are polled as soon as they reach the Contest Manager. After August
19th no personal cheques will be accepted in payment of subscriptions
for the purpose of securing votes. Post Office and Express money orders
will be accepted the same as cash.
HOW PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED
To the lady receiving the largest number of votes in the entire contest will be awarded the grand prize of $300.00 in gold. After the grand
prize winner has been eliminated from the race, the leader of each
District will be awarded one of the twelve District prizes. The District
prize winner having the largest number of votes will be awarded the
first District prize. The leader of the next highest District will be
awarded the second District prize, and so on down until the twelve
District prizes have been awarded. The candidate having the next
highest number of votes to the grand prize winner in the same District
will be awarded the District prize, thus one of the twelve Districts will
receive two prizes, the grand prize and a District prize. In case of a tie
between two or more prize winners, a prize of equal value will be
awarded to each.
WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO COMPETE
Any lady, married or single, of good repute residing in British
Columbia.
The Week reserves the right to omit any name it considers not
eligible.
No employee of The Week nor the relative of any member will be
allowed to enter the contest.
DISTRieTS
District 1—All territory known as Oak Bay and Mount Tolmie, East of
City Limits.
District 2—All territory known as Esquimalt, South of Old Esquimalt
Road and West of City Limits, South side of Esquimalt Road
inclusive.
District 3—All territory known  as  Victoria  West and  North of old
Esquimalt Road, West of City Limits to Victoria Arm; North side
of Esquimalt Road inclusive.
District 4—All territory North of Foul Bay Avenue and Victoria Arm
West of Harriet Road and West of Maple Wood Road, North side
of Tolmie Avenue, West side of Maple Wood Road and West side
of Harriet Road inclusive.
District 5—Part of the City of Victoria, North of Bay Street, East of
Harriet Road, South of Tolmie Avenue and West of Cook Street,
North side of Bay street, East side of Harriet Road, South side of
Tolmie Avenue and West side of Cook street inclusive.
District 6—Part of the City of Victoria South of Yates Street, East of
Douglas Street, Beacon Hill Park and Cook street and West of Moss
street, South side of Yates, East side of Douglas and Cook streets
and West side of Moss street inclusive.
District 7—All territory known as James Bay, West of Douglas and
South of Belleville streets.
District 8—Part of the City of Victoria South of Bay street, North of
Yates street to Douglas, West of Douglas from Yates to Belleville
Street and West of Cook street to the Bay; South side of Bay, West
side of Cook, North side of Yates, West side of Douglas and both
sides of Belleville street inclusive.
District 9—Part of the City of Victoria, East of Moss street, South of
Fort Street and West of City Limits; East side of Moss and South
side of Fort Streets inclusive.
District 10—Part of the City of Victoria, East of Cook Street, North of
Yates from Cook to Fort and North of Fort Street to City Limits,
East side of Cook, North side of Fort ancl Yates (from Cook to Fort)
inclusive.
District 11—All towns, outside of the City of Victoria, on Vancouver
Island.
District 12—All towns and cities, outside of Vancouver Island, in British
Columbia.
VOTE AND SUBSCRIPTION SCHEDULE
The following number of votes will be allowed
on subscriptions to THE WEEK from June 17th
to August 26th, 1911:
1st        2nd        3rd       4th
period    period     period    period
End       End        End        End
JulylS   Atig.S   Aug. 19   Aug.26
450 400 350 300
1000 900 800 700
1650 1500 1350 1200
2400 2200 2000 1800
3250 3000 2750 2500
The same number of votes will be allowed on
old and new subscriptions.
A subscription for a longer period than five
years a proportionate number of votes will be
allowed.
Price
1 year subs. .$1.00
2 years subs.. 2.00
3 years subs.. 3.00
4 years subs.. 4.00
5 years subs.. 5.00
CLOSE OF CONTEST
THIS LADIES $1,000.00 VOTING CONTEST WILL CLOSE
SATURDAY, AUG. 26, 1911
AT 10 P.M.
Progress of candidates and special Contest
News will appear on Page 4 of The Week
during the  Contest.   See  Page 4 of this
issue.
NOTICE
For any further information, Call on, Write
or Telephone
CONTEST MANAGER
OF
THE WEEK
1208 Government Street,        Victoria, B.C.
Phone 1283
FREE VOTING COUPON
GOOD FOR GOOD FOR
25  VOTES 25  VOTES
To THE WEEK, VICTORIA, B.C.
Cast TEN VOTES in THE WEEK'S
GREAT VOTING CONTEST
..ForM	
Address   	
District	
THIS COUPON IS VOID AFTER JULY iS, 1911
Cut out this Coupon, fill in the name of the
lady you wish to vote for and send to the
Contest Manager of THE WEEK
GOOD FOR GOOD FOR
25 VOTES 25 VOTES 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2
TAKE notice that Frederick A. Smith,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Prospector,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 2 miles
in a westerly direction from the head
waters of Smith's Inlet on the north
shore of Smith's Inlet; thence north
20 chains; thenee west 40 chains; thence
south 20 chains more or less to shore
Une; thence easterly along shore line
to point of commencement, containing
80 acres more or less.
Dated May 19th, 1911.
FREDERICK  A,   SMITH,
june 17 aug. 12
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range I
TAKE notice that I, James McKechnie,   of  Vancouver,   occupation  Author,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about 60
chains west of the N. W. corner of T.
L. 30927 on old survey line; thence south
80 chains;  thence east 60 chains or to
timber licences, thence north 80 chains,
thence west to the commencement, containing 400 acres more or less.
Dated April 14, 1911.
JAMES McKECHNIE.
Morton S. Jones, Agent.
may 13 July 8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Alfred Arthur
Codd of Victoria, B.C., occupation,
Musician, intends to apply for permission to purchase the foUowing described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the shore of Euchiniko Lake, and
about one mile west from the southwest corner of Indian Reserve, No. 4,
Euchiniko, and about four miles easterly from the crossing of the Kluscus
Lake trail on the Blackwater River;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south to shore of Lake;
thence east meandering Lake shore to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated 17th March,  1911.
ALFRED ARTHUR CODD.
Henry A. Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that I, Maud E.  Shepherd  ,of   North  Vancouver,   occupation
Married  Woman,   Intends  to  apply  for
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about one mile S. E. of 109 on
bank of  river; thence north 80 chains;
thence   west   80   chains;   thence   south
40 chains or to shore; thence meandering snore to commencement, containing
400 acres, more or less.
Dated April 13, 1911.
MAUD E.  SHEPHERD.
Morton S. Jones, Agent.
may 13 July 8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
Take notice that I, Minnie Wood, of
North   Vancouver,   occupation   Married
Woman,  intends  to  apply  for  permission   to    purchase    the    following described  lands:—Commencing  at  a post
planted about one mile north and one-
half mile east of L.  295, being blazed
to shed on river, thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains or to the river,
then   south  along  river   to  point  west
of Post; thence east to commencement,
containing 300 acres, more or less.
Dated April 13, 1911.
MINNIE WOOD.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
may 13 July 8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range  III
TAKE notice that Sarah Beatrice
Sheppard of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Widow, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the shore of Dean Channel, about
sixty (60) chains more or less in a
westerly direction from the Northwest
corner of Lot 12, thence north twenty
(20) chains; thence west twenty (20)
chains, thence south twenty (20) chains
more or less to the shore of Dean Channel, thence easterly following the said
shore line to the point of commencement, and containing forty (40) acres,
more or less.
Dated 14th March, 1911.
SARAH BEATRICE SHEPPARD.
Lewis Hind, Agent,
may 13 luly 8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast.
TAKE notice that George Switzer, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Labourer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Euchiniko Lake, and about
three miles west from the south-west
corner of Indian Reserve, No. 4, Euchiniko, and about two miles easterly from
the crossing of the Kluscus Lake trail
on the Blackwater River; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south to Lake shore; thence west meandering shore of Lake to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911.
GEORGE SWITZER.
Henry A.  Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that William Angus
Gleason, of Victoria, B.C., builder, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted southeast corner of Section 23, Township 21,
Range 1, Rupert District; thence 80
chains west; thence 80 chains north;
thence 80 chains east; thence 80 chains
south to the point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated March 14th,  1911.
WILLIAM ANGUS GLEASON.
apl 8 John Dalby, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast.
TAKE notice that Pauline Vasherresse
of Victoria, B.C., ocupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
left bank of the Blackwater river about
five miles westerly from the south-west
corner of Indian Reserve No. 4, Euchiniko and at the crossing of the Kluscus
Lake trail on the Blackwater river;
thence north SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south to bank of river;
thence east meandering river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911.
PAULINE VASHERRESSE.
Henry A.  Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Emma Marshall, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
left bank of the Blackwater River
about seven miles westerly from the
south-west corner of Indian Reserve,
No. 4, Euchiniko, and about two miles
west from the crossing of the Kluscus
Lake trail, on the Blackwater River;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south to bank of river;
thence west meandering river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 18th March,  1911.
EMMA  MARSHALL.
Henry A. Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Metal for Towers—Chilcotin Suspension
Bridge.
SEALED Tenders, superscribed "Tender for Chilcotin Suspension Bridge,
Cariboo District, B.C.," will be received
by the Honourable Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Friday, the 30th
June, 1911, for the metal and bolts required in connection with the replacement of existing wooden towers of the
Suspension Bridge, over the Fraser
River, to be delivered at Ashcroft, B.C.,
on or before the 15th day of September,
1911.
Drawings, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 16th day of June, 1911, at the
offlce of the undersigned, Victoria, B.C.,
at the offlce of E. McBride, Road Superintendent, Vancouver, and at the
offlce of the Government Agent, New
Westminster.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank
of Canada, made payable to the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works, in a sum
of two hundred dollars, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fall to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., June 12th,  1911,
june 17 june24
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cowichan.
TAKE notice that we, James Hunter,
Joseph Hunter, Thomas Hunter and
William Hunter, of Thetis Island, occupation Farmers, Intend to apply for
permission to lease the following described land, viz.:—the following foreshore:—Commencing at a post planted
on the shore line at high water mark
at a point on the northern boundary
of Lot 27, Thetis Island, about 25
chains south-easterly from the Northwest corner of said lot; thence northerly to low water mark, a distance of
about one chain; thence easterly, northerly and southerly following low water
mark about 90 chains to a projection
of the north boundary of Lot 22, on
the said Island; thence westerly about
one chain to high water mar1*: thence
northerly, southerly and westerly Allowing high water mark about 90 chain,
to the point of commencement, conta...
ing 9 acres, more or less.
Dated  April  24th,   1911.
JAMES HUNTER,
JOSEPH   HUNTER,
THOMAS HUNTER,
WILLIAM HUNTER,
apl 29
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 3
TAKE notice that Malcolm Bruce
Jackson, of Victoria, occupation Barrister, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the Salmon River,
about two miles west of the Salmon
House; thence south eighty chains;
thence west eighty chains; thence north
eighty chains, more or less, to the south
bank of the Salmon River; thence following the south bank of the Salmon
River in an easterly direction to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1911.
MALCOLM BRUCE JACKSON.
Frank Hallett, Agent.
may 6 July 1
CANCELLATION OF BESEBVE
Notice is hereby given that the reserve established over certain lands in
the Cariboo and Lillooet Districts, notice of which bearing date June 30th,
1908, was published in the British Columbia Gazette on July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled in so far as the same relates
to the following surveyed lands in
Township 4S and 50, Lillooet District,
namely, Fractional Sections 2, 3, Section 4, Fractional Section 5, Fractional
E. % of Section 6, Fractional Section 7,
Sections 8, 9, 10, Fractional Sections
11, 12,  13;   Sections 14,  15,  16,  17,  18,
19, 20, 21, 22, 23, Fractional W. % of
Section 24, Fractional W. V4 of Section
25, Fractional Section 26, Sections 27,
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, Fractional Section 35 and Fractional West _■ of Section 36, all In Township 48; Fractional
Sections 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, Sections 13,
14, Fractional Sections 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,
20, 21, Sections 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28,
29 and Fractional Sections 30, 31, 32, 33,
34, 35 and 36, all in Township 50, to
permit of the satd lands being located
by pre-emption entry only.
ROBT. A, RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of  Lands.,
Lands   Department.   Victoria,    B.   C,
April 7th,  1911.
apl 15 july 15
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Blanche Elizabeth
Neill, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Married Woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the left bank of the Black-
water River, about four miles west
from the south-west corner of Indian
Reserve No. 4, Euchiniko, and about one
mile from the crossing of the Kluscus
Lake trail on the Blackwater River;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south to bank of river;
thence west meandering river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911.
BLANCHE ELIZABETH NEILL.
Henry A. Porter, Agent.
may 6
julyl
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT
District of Cassiar
TAKE notice that I, A. W. McVittie,
of Victoria, B.C., Surveyor, intend to
apply to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands for a license to prospect for
coal and petroleum on the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the right bank of the
Skeena River about eight miles up
stream from the Indian Village of Kispiox, thence south SO chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
March   lst,  1911.
ARCHIBALD  W.   McVITTIE.
apl  29 Robt. MacDonald, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that John Schoeder, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.—
Commencing at a post planted on the
left bank of the Black water river,
about nine miles westerly from the
south-west eorner of Indian Reserve No.
4, Euchiniko, and about four miles
westerly from the crossing of the Kluscus Lake trail on the Blackwater river;
thence north SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south to bank of river;
thence west meandering river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated 18th March, 1911.
JOHN   SCHOEDER.
Henry A.  Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
___^g_
CANCEUIATION OF BESEBVE
Notice is hereby given that the reserve existing by reason of the notice
published in the British Columbia
Gazette of the 27th December, 1907,
over lands situated on one of the
Islands in the Pearce Group of Islands,
Rupert District, formerly covered by
Timber Licence No. 27806, is cancelled
and that the said lands will be open
to location by pre-emption only, after
midnight on July 13th, 1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of  Lands.,
Lands   Department,   Victoria,    B.   C,
April 10th, 1911.
apl 15 july 15
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT
District  of   Rupert, Vancouver  Isl
TAKE notice that Alexander Kn
of London, Eng., occupation Gentle:
intends to apply for permission to
chase the following described lane
Commencing at a post planted on
shore of Quatsino Sound about 90 ch
distant and in a south-westerly d
tion from the S. W. corner of Lol
Township 27, Rupert District, th
north 40 chains; thence east 80 chi
thence south 40 chains; thenoe a
the shore to the point of comm<
ment, and containing 350 acres,
or   Igss
Dated 2nd May,  1911.
ALEXANDER KNIGHT.
Per George G. Shone, Age
may 6 j
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT
District   of   Rupert,   Vancouver  Is
TAKE notice that Gwendolen B
Colthurst, of Vancouver, B.C., oci
tion Spinster, intends to apply for
mission to purchase the followlnl
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
planted on the shore of Quatsino 6
at the south-east corner of Lc
Township 27, Rupert District, tl
west 30 chains; thence north 10 cl
thence west 10 chains; thence sou
chains; thence along shore to poi
commencement, and containing "
more or less.
Dated 2nd May, 1911.
Gwendolen Buller Ooltbunt.
Per George G. Shone, Ag
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE  notice   that  I,  John  S.   Shepherd,   of   North   Vancouver,   occupation
Bookkeeper,  intends  to  apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the  following  described lands:—Commencing at a  post
planted about one mile north and one-
half mile east  of L.  295, being blazed
to river at shed; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains to commencement and    containing    640 acres,
more or less.
Dated April 13, 1911.
JOHN S. SHEPHERD.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
may 13 july 8
WATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made under Part V
of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain
a licence In the Malahat Division of
Victoria Water District,
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—B. H. John, Victoria, B.C., 2219 Blanchard Avenue,
Broker.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's
Certificate  No.  —
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description
Is)—Arbutus Canon.
(c) The point of diversion about 700
feet np stream above the bridge on
Mill  Bny Road.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second) flve (5).
(e) The character of the proposed
works In connection with Oyster Culture  and  Canning.
(f) The premises on which the water
Is to be used (describe same)—A parcel of ground fronting on Finlayson
Arm at the confluence of Arbutus Creek.
(g) The purposes for which the water
Is to be used—Domestic and Industrial.
(h) If for Irrigation describe the
land Intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage	
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe the
place where the water Is to be returned
to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude between point of
diversion and point of return.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to
be occupied by the proposed works—
None.
(k) This notice was posted on the
14th day of June, 1911, and application
will be made to the Commissioner on
the llth day of July,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of
any riparian proprietors or licensees
who or whose lands are likely to be
affected by the proposed works, either
nbove or below the outlet the Canadian
Pacific Railway Co., or the Esquimalt
& Nanaimo Railway Co.
(Signature) B.  H.  JOHN.
(P.O. Address)  Box 22, Victoria, B.C.
Note—One   cubic   foot  per   second  is
equivalent   to   35.71   miners'   Inches.
June 17 July 15
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that James Darcy of
Victoria, B C, occupation Labourer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
left bank of the Blackwater River,
about nine miles westerly from the
south-west corner of Indian Reserve No.
4, Euchiniko, and about four miles
westerly from the crossing of the
Kluscus Lake trail on the Blackwater
river; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south to bank
or river; thence east meandering river
to point of commencement containing
6*10 acres, more or less.
Dated  ISth  March,  1911.
JAMES DARCY.
Henry A. Porter, Agent,
may 6 july 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT*
District of Coast, Range II
TAKE notice that I, Ernest A. Paige,
of New Westminster, occupation Editor,
intends to apply for permission to purchase  the  following described  lands:—
Commencing  at   a   post  planted   about
one mile north and one-half mile east
of L. 295 being blazed to shed on river;
thence north SO chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
west 80 chains to commencement, containing 640 acres more or less.
Dated April 13, 1911.
ERNEST A. PAIGE.
Morton S. Jones, Agent,
may 13 july 8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICI
District of Coast
TAKE notice that Sydney Clarks
Victoria, B.C., occupation Clerk, ii
to apply for permission to purcha:
following described lands:—Corami
at a post planted on the left ba
the   Blackwater   river   and   aboi
miles east and 40 chains north <
south-east corner of Indian Resen
4,  Euchiniko;  thence  north  80  c
thence west 80 chains;  thence so
bank of river; thenee east mean
river  to point  of commencement
taining 640  acres,  more or less. I
Dated 17th March,  1911. 1
SYDNEY CLARKSON.
Henry A. Porter, Aj
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRIC
District of  Coast.
TAKE notice that George A
Williams of Victoria, B.C., occi
Walter, intends to apply for perr
to purchase the following del
lands:—Commencing at a post I
on the left bank of the Blac
River, about four miles east i
chains north from the south-eai
ner of Indian Reserve, No. 4, Euc
thence north SO chains; thence <
chains; thence south to bank of
thence west meandering river t(
of commencement, containing 64C
more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911,
GEORGE ANTHONY WILLIA
Henry A. Porter, A
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRIC
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Charles Har
Victoria, B.C., occupation Labo
tends to apply for permission
chase the following described 1
Commencing at a post planted
left bank of the Blackwater Rive
four miles east and 40 chains n
the south-east corner of the Ind
serve, No. 4, Euchiniko; thence r
chains; thence west SO chains;
south about 80 chains to bank (
east meandering river to point
mencement, containing 640 acre
or less.
Dated  17th March,  1911.
CHARLES HANSON,
Henry A.  Porter,
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that James Gibson Hay
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Blacksmith,
Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
left bank of the Blackwater river, about
eleven miles westerly from the southwest corner of the Indian Reserve No.
■I, Euchiniko. and about six miles westerly from the crossing of the Kluscus
Lake trail on the Blackwater River;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains', thence south to bank of river;
thence west meandering river to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  ISth  March,  1911.
JAMES GIBSON HAY.
Henry A. Porter, Agent,
may 6 July 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Thomas Charles
Hubbard of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains north from the left
bank of the Blackwater river, and about
eleven miles westerly from the southwest corner of Indian Reserve No. 4,
Euchiniko, and about six miles westerly
from the crossing of the Kluscus Lake
trail on the Blackwater river; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east about SO chains to shore
of lake; thence north meandering lake
shore to point of commencement, containing about 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 18th March,  1911.
THOMAS CHARLES HUBBARD.
Henry A. Porter,  Agent,
may 6 july 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Esther Louise
Downs, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the left bank of the Blackwater
River, about seven miles westerly from
the south-west oorner of Indian Reserve No. 4. Euchiniko, and about two
miles-westerly from the crossing of the
Kluscus Lake, trall on the Blackwater
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south to bank of
river; thence east meandering river to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated  18th  March,  1911.
ESTHER  LOUISE DOWNS.
Henry A.  Porter, Agent,
may 6 July 11
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Sarah Amelia Mll-
hy, of Victoria, B.C., occupation Married
Woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lnnds:—Commencing at a post planted
at the south-east corner of Indian Reserve, No. 4, Euchiniko, on the shore
of Euchiniko Lake, and about b_ miles
easterly from the crossing of the Kluscus Lake Trail, on the Blackwater river;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains: thence south to shore of Lake:
thence west meandering Lake shore to
point of commencement, containing 560
acres, more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911.
SARAH AMELIA MILBY.
Henry A. Porter, Agent,
may 6 July 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRll
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that John Charlei
of Victoria, B.C., occupation L:
intends to apply for permission
chase the following described ',
Commencing at a post planted ab
miles east and 40 chains north
south-east corner of Indian Rese
4, Euchiniko, on the shore of Ei
Lake; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; thence south i
shore; thence west meanderin
shore to point of commencemfr
taining 640 acres, more or les.
Dated  17th  March, 1911.
JOHN CHARLES RANNS.j
Henry A.  Porter,
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRI
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that John  vVooc
toria, B.C., occupation Mechanic
to apply for permission to pure
following described lands:—Core
at a post planted about one n
and 20 chains  north of south-s
ner of Indian Reserve, No. 4, E
and  on  the  shore  of  Euchlnik
thence north 80 chains;  thence
chains; thence   south   to   Lake
thence west meandering Lake
point of commencement, contal
acres,  more or less.
Dated  17th March,  1911.
JOHN WOOD.
Henry A. Porter,
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District  of Coast.
TAKE notice that Thomas Morris, of
Victoria, B.C., occupation Janitor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Euchiniko Lake, and about one
mile west from the south-west corner
of Indian Reserve, No. 4, Euchiniko, and
about four miles easterly from the
crossing of the Kluscus Lake Trail on
the Blackwater River; thence north 80
chnins; thence east 80 chains; thence
south to Lake shore; thence west meandering shore of Lake to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more  or  less.
Dated  17th  March. 1911.
THOMAS MORRIS.
Henry A.  Porter,  Agent,
may 6 July 1
VICTORIA LAND DISTRI
District of Coast.
TAKE notice that Peter Fl(
Victoria, B.C., occupation Carps
tends  to  apply  for  permission
chase the  following described
Commencing at a post plantei
left   bank    of    the   Blackwate
about five   miles   westerly   f
south-west  corner   of  Indian
No. 4. Euchiniko, and at the cr*
the Kluscus  Lake  Trail on th
water  River;   thence  north   8C
thence east 80 chains; thence
bank of river; thence west m<
river to point of commeneem
taining 640 acres, more or less.
Dated 17th March, 1911.
PETER  FLEMING.
Henry A. Porter,
may 6
VICTORIA LAND DISTR
District of Coast, Range
TAKE notice  that I, Mary
Vancouver, occupation Married
Intends to apply for permlsslo
chase the  following described
Commencing at a post planted i
mile  north  and  one-half  milt
N.  W.   corner  of  L.   295,  bell
west   to   shed   on   river;   ther
80 chains; thence west 40 cha
river; thence meandering rivei
west of post, thence east to c
ment. containing 300 acres moi
Dated April 13, 1911.
MARY WOOD.
Morton S. Jones,
may 13 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
13
OTTO VOCE
Coronation Rumours and
Humours
By "The Gadfly"
crowds!   What celebrations!
you Carnival!!
*   *   *
were   all-   very coron-
e we,
Iti
Victoria's cora-notions for the
ion pageant were simply cor-
us.
the Mayor's carriage—with Al-
Moresby   on   the   box was
ned the "Fighting Five."
*■'"**
the   mounted   beauties   with
keys of Empire" looked as if
>uld take care of themselves.
* *   *
there were enough Foresters
* care of everyone else.
* *   *
the "Cradle of Empire" show-
t British Columbia can do.
* *   *
the best "Lines  of Athletic
were the figures on the J. B.
float."
* *   *
the entire celebrations in Vic-
ere the greatest things that
ppened.
* *   *
the  Empire is proud of its
ers."
* *   *
hough it came last, the Navy
s float was by no means least.
* *   *
Elizabethan men-o'-war were
ifore motors.
* *   *
hough its motor broke down,
ry League were not    a   bit
P-
That the Decorations were artistic
triumphs—even without the contractors' advertisements on the arches!
* *   *
That we hope the Decoration Committee got a rebate for this truly Imperial idea. .
* *   *
That though the spirit of the people
was the best demonstration of all, it
was a pity they could not keep the
"spirit" even off the Empress flowerbeds.
* *   *
That the Fancy Dress carnival was
an unparalleled success.
* -*;'■♦
That Mephistopheles—as Master of
the Revels—certainly played the "very
devil." ■
* *   *
That ' the Royal Pantechnicon
Players were an excellent travelling
concert  party—though  they  did  do
more travelling than concerting.
* *   *
That we know who the picturesque-
looking bearded brigand in charge of
the concert "float" was—but that to
give him away would be "week-ed."
* *   *
That the Devil's Dray was not a
patrol wagon   recruiting   for H	
New Westminster!
* *   *
That the Princess -Adelaide was
nearly wrecked by some masked revellers.
* *   *
That this was not the only "wreck"
in the mad "maelstrom" of motley
and mirth.
* *   *
That the first "entree" served up
in the Empress dining-room on a
soap box was one of Victoria's
smartest and most charming social
leaders.
* *   *
That two of tbe loveliest and liveliest of the lady masqueraders were
the White Nun and the Candy Kid.
That the antics of these—with the
Devil and Falstaff—on the Empress
Lawn were better than any side show.
* *   *
That they concealed the identities
of two charming daughters of one of
Victoria's most distinguished families.
* *   *
That the captivating Mexican cowgirl was the maddest and merriest of
the masquerade party.
* *   *
—Excepting the masked Chinese "entree," who was—as might be expected
—the life and soul of the party.
* *   *
That there were many amusing
"joy-riders"   (carnival  kind)   in   the
Empress rotunda.
1   *   *   *
That it would be hard to say what
did not happen in the midnight celebrations in the "Palace by the Sea."
*■'.*'. *
That it was all very exuberant and
mirth-making, but it ne'er o'erstepped
the modesty of Nature.
* *   *
That Manager Jackson's unfailing
urbanity and good humour made him
a "host" in himself.
* *   *
That the Empress' Coronation Supper was a "crackerjack," and its host
the hero of the hour.
* *   *
That those not in fancy dress were
all decorated in table cloths and napkins before the dancing in the dining-
room began.
* * . *
That many respected and sober-
minded citizens were given a reputation though none of them lost one.
* *   *
That when the Victoria A. D. C.
members began to sing in the concert
"float" even the dray horses bolted.
* *   *
That sometimes the disguise is so
good that even a wise child does not
know its own father.
* *   *
That the "chef" on the tea-tray was
not on the staff.
That a little mask covers a multitude of mischief.
AU Things Coma, Stp.
Here is  the  latest Boy Scout yam.
Every Boy Scout, as ls generally
known, has to do one good deed every
day. A high personage connected with
the movement once said that the most
tragic spectacle he could imagine was
a Boy Scout wandering about ln search
of a good deed and finding lt not.
Somebody suggested that the boys
should work ln couples—say, one boy
might knock an old lady down and the
other pick her up again.. The second
boy's good deed ls obvious; the good
deed of the first lies in having provided a good deed for the second.
However, to the story:
One unfortunate youth had utterly
failed to find a good deed and had retired to bed disconsolate. As he lay
sleepless with misery, he heard a faint
squeaking in the room. He scrambled
out of bed, and found that a mouse had
got caught in a trap.
"My good deed at last!" he murmured happily, as he took out the poor
little prisoner—and gave it to the cat!
vaccinated. And the third day( the
petty officer he says, 'Cum along, we're
going   to   drown   yer!""
Musical Not*
"Your daughter practices on the
piano faithfully, I notice. Now, mine
hates it."
"Mine does too. But she'd rather
practice all day than help with housework."
Wot What Ton Thought
As a memory of the late Ell Perkins,
somebody has recalled one of the humorist's surprise stories, and his way
of telling it.
"I was on a train going east one
summer night," he says, "when there
was a wreck. The train was derailed
and all the passengers were more or
less shaken up. Everybody in the
sleeping ear tried to get out as hurriedly as possible, and ln the confusion
our clothing got considerably mixed.
I had worn a pair of white duck trousers, but I couldn't find them. Finally
I did find a pair of trousers. I put
them on quickly, but I couldn't leave the
car. You see, they were not men's
trousers   "
Here there is always general laughter,
and Perkins looks about in a pained
sort of way, then goes on:
"They were boy's trousers."
Tlie Third Degree
A few days ago a second-class stoker
was paraded before the commanding
officer of the Devonport naval baracks
on a charge of insubordination. His
insubordination took the form of resistance to bieng introduced to the swimming bath. Asked what he had to say
for himself, the youth replied:
"Sir, I've only bin in the navy three
days. The first day the doctor drawed
six of my teeth.   The second day I was
NOTICE TO CONTBACTORS
Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender
for Courtenay School," will be received
by the Honourable the Minister of Pub-
He Works up to noon of Friday, the
14th day of July, 1911, for the erection
and completion of a large one-room addition to Courtenay School, ln the
Comox Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 24th day of June, 1911, at the
offices .of R. Carter, Esq., Secretary to*
the School Board, Courtenay, B.C.; the
Government Agent, Cumberland, and
the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for
the sum of (250, which shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to
enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or If he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 21st June, 1911.
June 24 July 8
The Ruud Instantaneous Water
Heater Will Solve the Hot
Water Problem
Turn the faucet
The "Ruud" does the
rest
Convenience
Economy     Efficiency
Reliability
During this month all heaters are sold at
cost price.   Call and see them in operation
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Head Office and Demonstration Rooms, 652 Yates St. Telephone 2479 w
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
The members of the Imperial Naval
Dance Club of H. M. S. "Shearwater,"
and H. M. S. "Algerine," held their
Coronation dance on Tuesday evening,
June 20th, at H. M. S. Yard, Esquimalt. Miss Thain's orchestra provided excellent music and the floor was
all that could be desired. A special
car left Esquimalt at _. o'clock to
convey the guests to Victoria. The
following were among the invited
pests: Commander Stewart' and
Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Graham, Mr, and
Mrs. Phillipps, Mr. and Mrs. Guy
Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin, Mr. and
Mrs. Tunnard, Mr. and Mrs. Barclay,
the Misses Dunsmuir, Miss Helen
Peters, Miss Genevieve Irving, Miss
Newcombe, Mr. W. Newcombe, Mr.
Marshall, Miss Page, Miss Banfield,
Mrs. P. C. Musgrave, Mr. Walley and
many others. Appended is the novel
programme:
Extra I
Extra II.
Extra III.
Partl-
Waltz
Two step
Schottische
Bon ton
Three  step
Grand March and Lancers
Barn dance
Carmicietta
Empress Promenade
Two step
American Schottische
Waltz
Quadrilles
Part II—
Extra I
Extra II.
Extra III.
Waltz
Bon ton
Schottische
Moon light two step
Three step
Lancers and Grand March
Empress Promenade
Carmicietta
Barn Dance
Two step
Waltz
Three step
American Schottische
Square dance
*   *   *
Mrs. Spalding and Miss Spalding,
from Pender Island, are visiting their
relatives in Victoria.
Mr. F. F. Paget has returned from
a two months bear-shooting expedition in the region of Bella Bella.
* *   *
An engagement has been announced
between Miss Edith Mainguy and Mr.
Barber Starkey, both of Chemainus.
* *   *
Mr. Arthur Marcon is the guest of
Mr. William Blakemore, Rockland
avenue,
* *   *
Mrs. W. Finch-Page entertained at
a small informal tea on Monday last
at her beautiful residence, "Burdette
House." The rooms were arranged
with gorgeous pot plants and quantities of fragrant white pinks. Miss
Hilda Page and Miss Newcombe attended to the refreshments. Among
the guests were Mrs. W. S. Gore,
Mrs. Rant, Mrs. Cecil Roberts, Mrs.
and the Misses Blackwood, Mrs. and
Miss Johnson, Mrs. Warren and Miss
Peri Warren, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. A.
J. Bechtel, Mrs. Sam Hughes (Toronto), Mrs. G. B. Hughes, Mrs. Guy
Goddard, Mrs. Stevenson and Miss
Mason, Miss Monteith, Miss Troup,
Mrs. Loenholm and Mrs. Griffin.
* *   *
Mrs. George Paddon, Mayne Island,
has been spending a few days in Victoria.
* *   *
Mrs. Genge was one of the week's
tennis hostesses.
' *   *   *
Mr. C. P. Wolley, Duncans, was in
town for the Coronation festivities.
* *   *
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Duncan
Gillies, Victoria Road, Nanaimo, B.C.,
was the scene of a pretty wedding
last week, when Mr. David T. Jones
of this city, was married to Miss
Isabella Adam Gillies. The services
were conducted by the Rev. J. R.
Robertson, pastor of the St. Andrew's
Presbyterian church, Nanaimo. The
bride, who looked very charming in
her wedding gown, was given away
by her father, Mr. Duncan Gillies.
After the ceremony a reception was
held, at which a large number of
friends attended. Mr. and Mrs. Jones
are spending their honeymoon in Vancouver and other cities. They will
later take their residence up in Victoria.
Mr. Walker, Kelowna, has been a
guest at the Empress.
* *   *
Miss Leigh-Spencer, Vancouver,
was a visitor in the city, during the
week,
* *   *
Among the graduates of the Royal
Military College at Kingston as a
result of the examinations just held,
are Messrs. L. A. Wilmot and G. B.
Irving of this city, the former of
whom passes with high honours.
* *   *
Mrs. and ,Miss Morley of this city
are visiting Mrs. C. F. Battle, Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Geiger have
taken up their summer camp on
Saanich Inlet.
* *   *
Mr. John Bray was a guest in Nanaimo during the week.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Emstus Wyatt and
party from Vancouver, paid a flying
visit to Victoria last week.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Herman Robertson,
who have been making an extended
visit abroad, leave Germany shortly
on their return to Victoria.
* *   *
On Tuesday, June 27th, there will
be a Coronation dance at the Metchosin hall.
* * ' *
Mrs. Ross Turner, who has been
paying an extended visit to her relatives in Victoria, left last week for
her home in Vancouver.
*'•'_*•;.■*
Miss Finlayson is the guest of Mrs.
Harry Pooley, Esquimalt Road.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs.' Victor Eliot were
guests recently at the Tzouhalem
Hotel, Duncan, B.C.
* *   *
Miss Kathleen Dunsmuir is the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Hope at
Hhaughnessy Heights.
* *   *
Mrs. Bennett was hostess last Monday afternoon of a charming tea.
given at the Alexandra Club, in
honour of Miss Little. The tea
table was artistically arranged with
pale pink carnations ancl asparagus
fern.
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the reserve existing over certain lands situated in Range 5, Coast District, notice
of which bearing date of December 17t!>,
19(^8, was published In the British Columbia Gazette, in the Issue of December
17th, 1908, is cancellej In so far as the
same relates to lands surveyed as the
north half and south-west quarter section 9, north half section 10, north half
and south-east quarter section 11,; sections 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,
22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30, all in
township 19, range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1911.
june 24 sept 21
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE  notice that I  .Thomas  S. An-
nandale, of New Westminster, B.C., occupation  Grocer,   Intends   to  apply  for
permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands;—Commencing at a post
planted about 2 miles ln a north-easterly
direction from Anna Mclntyre's southeast   corner   application   for   purchase;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains;   thence east  80  chains;   thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement,   containing   640   acres,   more   or
less.
Dated 17th day of May, 1911.
THOMAS S. ANNANDALE.
Charles  B.  Stark,  Agent,
june 24 aug 19
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing over certain lands in
Range 5, Coast District, notice of which
bearing date of July 13th, 1908, and
December 17th, 1908, were published In
the British Columbia Gazette in the
Issues of July 16th, 1908 and December
17th, 1908, respectively, Is cancelled In
so far as the same relates to lands surveyed as the east half and north-west
quarter section 8, west half section S
and north-east quarter section 9, section
14, north half and south-east quarter
section 15, north half and south-west
quarter section 16 and section 17, fractional north half section 18, sections 19,
20, .21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33. 34, 36 and 36, all in township
18, Range 5, Coast District.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 16th, 1911.
june 24 sept 21
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated lfitli day of May, 1911.
ANNA McINTYRE.
Charles   B.   Stark,  Agent,
june 24 augl!)
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE notice that I, Anna Mclntyre,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation School
Teacher, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands;—Commencing at a post planted
Immediately adjoining Hope Parke,
south-east corner application for purchase—thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 ohalns;
VIOTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast. Range 1
TAKE notice that  I, Hope Parks,  of
Vancouver.    B.C.,    occupation    Married
AVoman,   Intends   to  apply  for  permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted
on the hanks of the Toba  River, about
one mile  from  southeast  corner of  lot
103 and adjoining northern boundary of
Timber    Limit    36315;    thence west SO
chains;  thence north  80  chains;  thence
east SO chains;  thence south  SO chains
to  point  of  commencement,   containing
640 acres more or less.
Dnted  16th day of May, 1911.
HOPE PARKS,
Charles H. Allen, Agent.
June 24 aug 19
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE notice that I, Thomas E. Butters, of New Westminster, B.C., occupation Carpenter, intends to apply for permission   to  purchase  the  following described  lands:—Commencing at a post
planted   Immediately  adjoining  Thomas
S.  Annandale's  southeast  corner application   t,o   purchase;    thenee   west    80
chains; thence south 80 chains: thence
east 80 chains;  thence north  80 chains
to point  of commencement,  containing
640 acres more or less.
Dated 17th day of May. 1911.
THOMAS E. BUTTERS.
Charles H. Allen, Agent.
June 24 aug 19
Robinson & Andrew:
Just 75 Pair:
of
Best Quailt
BLANKET
at
Greatly Reduced Prio
Borders are in either pink or blue. Quality: Well, tha
the very point that will make the next couple of dq
unusually busy with us.   Here are the sizes and prices:
6oin. x 6oin., per pair $j|
66in. x 82in., per pair $
72m. x 84m., per pair $
Bye the bye, we are showing a splendid line of gray
CAMPING BLANKETS at, per pair $
Robinson & Andrews
The Cash Dry Goods Store.
642-644 Yates Street. Phones 656-1
The " Modem!
French Dry Cleanii
SPECIALISTS IN LADIES FINE|
GARMENT CLEANING AND
PRESSING
Office and Finishing Rooms
1310 Government St.,     Opp The "Gran
Phone 1887
Call us up in regard to prices or anj
information desired.
Four car tickets given free with each orl
of One Dollar or more brought to us".'
Men's Suits Cleaned and Pressed
A Small Detective ! at all her trinkets and lingered about   that uncanny  insight  so disct)
The man was nearly through taking' , to his elders, observed ln hls]
a-~_, »_.„ ..„._.. _. ..._._,_  .u. v.,,..    „  _  the room on one pretense and another 1.   .,     „,. ■_._...*,
down the awnings when the bell rang treble:    You  go   right along,
for luncheon.    Little Mrs. Day  looked   until  her  small boy,  looking up  with | I'll watch him." THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
15
effective gown, in whicii a thin
. silk formed the foundation, has
wer part of the skirt of satin,
s a satin vest and sleeves. The
breadth is very broad and is
ed it bit evenly at the top, then
where a satin band stretches
ally    across    it.    The    back
is corresppndingly narrow,
:d at the top, and about half-
iwn is finished with a section of
in ending in a train. The bodice
up over a foundation of dot-
i, black over white silk, with a
raped girdle terminated at the
back with two limp loops, all
e satin edged with black velvet
Very fine hand-embroidered
etted batiste is much used with
ilks,. and even plain batiste,
nes tucked or shirred.   It is, in
Three yards of ribbon at least nine
inches wide are required, and it encircles the waist to the centre back,
to be caught there by being drawn
through a buckle or else simply knotted securely with the ends of equal
length. One end is allowed to fall
straight down, the other is halted a little below half length and there is
knife-plaited. It is then spread "out
fan-wise with the centre edge drawn
up with a tiny heading for a finish.
Another new sash has the ribbon
plaited for a space of twelve or fourteen inches, and this part is stitched
tlat to the skirt, taking in the girdle,
and with the end fringed,
*   *   *
It is interesting to note, as the season advances, how the position of
the  waistlines  is  shifted.    The  first
the apparent length of the latter and
of abbreviating the former.
*   *   *
Beading has had its day for fashionable blouses, though the girls are
still embroidering with the beads,
reluctant to give up so effective a
trimming. But French knot work is
ahead of bead work, and even that
is bound to become passe from overuse by the time the next season arrives. Heavy work on thin cottons
with big side frills tells much of the
story of smart waists at this hour.
Coloured embroideries, coloured
stitchings, coloured collars and cuffs
and other introductions of colour are
prevalent among the handsomest
white blouses. Smart models with
kimono sleeves and Dutch neck finished more often than not with Irish
crochet have tucks stitched with a
colour, and the same tone appears
again in the hand edging the side
plaiting and the turnback cuffs. Tailor waists of coquettish style have
handkerchief collars witli square
; backs and knotted fronts which in-
; troduce a pretty touch of colour and
i the same shade is used on the plait
with a colour, and the same tone appears again in the band kerchief with
j an edge of the same colour. One of
the smartest tailored waists is the
satin one made in severe    style    in
aMiwMfVitpiHinM
a*t#*S«T*^^^Wf<^M
'*-:'-..■:-■">&■■_,.:,:■_ '...■■■:■■■£$?::
•"A-sfcv.i*..** ?$.". :._$_■:;.■'_ ■ -..":•■•■::>
si* H
ler feature that is developing
Ingly is the sash. Before the
Ivas well ui'der way it seemed
jh fashion arbiters must have
led their stock of devices iri
sash could figure, but al-
bry day there crops up another
(lerally a better way of using
latest treatment to which the
Ids itself is a fan-like drapery.
prophecies of spring were emphatically for the pronounced Empire effect: then there were hints that thc
normal line would prevail. These, in
turn, were followed by intimations
that the centre front would bc dropped an inch or two, retaining the
brightened sides, and now ag;ain has
the line been shifted, all within the
space of a few short weeks. As a
matter of fact, the waistline that is
being adopted for the moment—it
may have suffered another move by
the time this has been put into type-
is not raised as much as it appears to
be—an optical delusion, so to speak,
caused by the combination of the
ittle skirts oil the bodice with the
ong, scant, low-trimmed skirts,
which has the effect of exaggerating
white or the color of the tailormade.
With white serge suits nothing is
smarter than this white satin shirt.
.Marquisette-and voile are leading
lingerie materials for waists and for
gowns, though batiste and linens are
always staple. White wash net, made
in a semi-tailored style with fine
tucks all over it, long sleeves and
high stock are among the smart
showings. These waists are washable in fact as well as name and are
practical for little summer suits.
Taotful Truth
"I appeal to Mr. Verity, whose truthfulness nobody doubts," said the outraged hostess, with a glitter In her
eye. "Mr. Verity, do you think I supply my boarders with bad butter?"
Attractive and Exclusive Gowns
We have just cleared through the customs some exceedingly
pretty gowns. The quantity is rather greater than we care for at
the present--time, but rather than return to thc makers we have
decided to display them on Monday morning in our showrooms at
practically end-of-season prices.
They are of the nicest newest fashions of the year, cleverly
designed, and exquisitely made.
Marquisette Dresses in white and cleverly blended colours, whicii
are proving such a big success this season at prices from $25.00 to
$50.00.   Actual value $50.00 and $75.00.
We are making the prices very low on these Dresses and this
should prove a splendid opportunity of purchasing some wonderful
creations at popular prices.
LINGERIE DRESSES IN MUSLINS AND MULLS
A few only of these in white, pink, blue and mauve, specially
priced, at $10.50 and $12.50—a pretty little garden party frock daintily
embroidered and trimmed.
SOME ELEGANT LACE AND NET GOWNS
for reception, evening ahd theatre wear. These garments are most
fascinating and we consider them of the choicest of the season.
These, too, will be offered at 33 1-3 per cent, discount. Black,
White, also Ecrue, with the new colours introduced in silk. All are
silk lined, and of very best finish and workmanship.
A FEW DOZEN AMERICAN WAISTS
Just the waists for the present wear—no two alike, in Dutch
collar effects, high ne.k, with three-quarter or half sleeves in Marquisettes, Silks, Ninon and other fashionable fabrics. All these
waists on Monday will be ON SALE at much less than ordinary
pricesi
WHEN BUYING HOSIERY AND GLOVES REMEMBER
THAT WE ARE EXPERTS
Finch & Finch     717-719 Yates Street
LIPTON'S TEA
OVER 2 MILLION PACKAGES SOLD WEEKLY
The gowns shown in the above
cuts are taken from designs now being  displayed  at  Messrs.  Finch   &
"the  truth  on  which  you  compliment   Fjnch*s Ladies'  Outfitting Rooms on
me forces me to declare that your but-
ter ls one of your strong points." I Yates street.
The others looked eager attention to
see how Mr. Verity would get out of
It.
"Madam," he answered, with a bow. 16
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911
w
' .
A   CROWNING
_-^_i-____^\
CLOTHING SAL
This is the final clearance of the
CLOTHING,  HATS and  FURNISHING STOCK
taken over from B. Williams & Company
On April ioth last we took over from Messrs. B. Williams & Co., more than $100,000 worth of stock, at the selling price. Since then goods have been
arriving which had been ordered months before and which had been made up specially for B. Williams & Co. These goods we are under contract to
accept. During our opening sale we cleared out about half of the stock taken over. At this sale it is our intention to clear out every article and
garment bearing the Williams mark, as the goods we carry are all designed and tailored specially for the J. N. Harvey, Ltd. Stores, bearing our own
trade mark and sold under our own guarantee.
SALE STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 23
Mens 2-piece Outing Suits
AT THREE SPECIAL PRICES
*g.75, *7.95, *10.7g
Prices so low as these should convince any man of the wisdom of purchasing   an   outing   Suit,   especially
when the opportunity comes right at the  commencement  of  the  wearing season. -
THESE SUITS are made of good
quality homespuns, Flannels and
Cheviots, in neat greys, browns,
etc. These comparative prices
show you what you save.
MEN'S  OUTING SUITS, $8.50 to
$10 Suits. Sale Price $5.75
$12 to $15 Suits. Sale price..$7.95
$15 to $18 Suits. Sale price $10.75
BARGAINS IN BUSINESS SUITS
Every garment bearing the B. Williams & Co. label must be sold and
in order to assure a speedy clearance
we have marked these Suits at prices
so low that they will tempet even a
man with a well filled wardrobe. Note
what you save:
$15, $18 and $20 suits. Sale price $11.75
$18, $20, $22.50 Suits. Sale price $15.75
$25, $28, $30, $35 Suits.
Sale price  $19-75
$28 to $35 Suits.   Sale price.. ..$23.75
MEN'S STRAW HATS
These are in Boater shapes, desirable
in every way. We expect them
to go quickly, as it is right in
the heart of the selling season,
and they are regular $2.50 to $4.00
Hats.   Special price at $1.65
WE HAVE TOO MANY SOFT
HATS
But not for long, if you appreciate
bargains. These hats include all
the latest colors and are made by
some of the most reliable makers.
Regular $3 and $3.So Hats. Sale
price $1.95
HERE'S A SPECIAL IN MEN'S
SOFT HATS
Most of them are just odd hats, or
only two or three of a kind. Just
the thing for a working hat, and
some of them are very good indeed. They are regular $2 to $3
Hats. The price is ridiculously
low, but have a look at them.
Sale price . . 50c
MEN'S   WORKING   SUITS
GREATLY REDUCED
Our Sale Price—75c
There are some splendid bargains in
these Shirts. They include Flannel, Flannelette and Cashmere
Twills, in light and dark colors;
plain and fancy materials. Many
of these Shirts were $1.50 each,
so they will sell readily at this
price .   75C
SOFT BOSOM SHIRTS
In neat stripes, light, medium and
dark colors. All this season's materials. Regular $1 and $1.25
Shirts.   Sale price  85c
SOFT BOSOM SHIRTS
Extra quality material in a host of
pretty patterns; all carefully made
and perfect fitting. These are
regular $1.50, $1.75, $2 Shirts.
Price $1.25
UNDERWEAR AT SALE PRICES
Good quality Balbriggan Underwear.
Reg. 60c value.    Sale price 35c
HOSIERY BARGAINS
150 dozen Fancy Cotton and Lisle
Hose, in all. the latest shades.
Regular 35c Hose. Sale price, 3
pairs for  75c
Black Cotton Hose, regular 25c quality.  For the sale, 6 pairs for $1.00
Black Cashmere Hose, extra good
value at 25c. For the sale, 5 pairs
for $1.00
Natural Merino Hose, 4 pairs for 50c
Heavy Grey Wool Hose, 5 pairs
for $1.00
The advance Fall showing of these goods are due to arrive within the next few weeks. It is therefore necessary for us to clear out in the shortest
possible time every Williams garment now in stock and it must be done quickly, every day counts. We realize that this cannot be done without your
assistance and we are willing to pay you handsomely for such assistance in this way.
YOU CAN BUY HIGH-CLASS CLOTHING, HATS AND FURNISHINGS AT ABOUT HALF REGULAR PRICES WHILE SALE LASTS]
J. N. HARVEY, Ltd.
614-616 YATES STREET.     SUCCESSORS TO B. WILLIAMS & CO.
SALE STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 23,9.30 a.m.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.pwv.1-0344312/manifest

Comment

Related Items