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Week Dec 1, 1906

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Array Bank of Hamilton
Capital $3,500,000
Reserve 12,500,000   »-,-•>
jg Total Assets, $29,000,000
Interest; paid half yearly on deposits ol
ti and upwards in Savings Department.'
wafts and Money Orders on afl parts ol
the world. Vane*u»«r Branches., cor.
•f Hasting and Hamilton Sts., Powell St.
Cedar Grove.
LJiASLSLSLJL^SLJLlUlA}lJLAJLX£SLM^
»£;»-"■-•:;::, 77/7.-?
A?;^?
Week
(Tol. III.   No.
4-4¥
A British Columbia Review,
  <§
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. ©.
to   Stewart Williams R. C. Janion
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
r COMMISSION AND
» SEAL ESTATE ASENTS
£   ji FORT ST. „   VICTORIA, *. C.
PtJLpL0_ftOO«tOOQlt>i»l»IHt«»».J
T
1
DECEMBER i, 1906
One Dollar Per Annum
f he„Editor's Review
©f Current Topics.
The Magic
Waitit.        the
that Sir Thomas Shaug- wheat lands of the prairies, the vast
nes^y Has declared the ffiteritJon of and rich mineral deposits of British
the;,jC. P. R. to seek a western port Columbia and the unbounded virgin-
on fVanconver Island, and to reclaim forests which, clothe almost .every:
150|)00 acres of the E. ft N. Railway mountain side from the Rockies to
grant.   This is the logical and inevit-i the   Pacific.    Mr. Fielding has re-
|ciple of Protection that "eternal vig- sued there would have been no Brit- He has for five years wielded the ed-
|ilarice is the price of safety.'' ish Empire today.   The man in the itorial pen, whilst Mr. J. S. Brierley
  street has been accustomed to believe has directed the paper and lifted it
Parochial   Toronto  has   acquired   a that if John Bull possesses one mark- from the slough into which it had
Politics.     reputation   all   its   own, ed characteristic stronger than  any fallen, making it, as it is today, al-
The em- beit a strong partisan organ, one of
m, .    „ ,. .   .        , „    ,,    _,   ,    . , ,.:' and from the Atlantic to other it is that of tenacity.
The event of the week is and for^the first time maae persona^the Pacific ig gomewhat       nemigtic. M       ^ Britigh Mld      and  fte the cleanest and most influential pa-
5JU0^T6nt ^^^^:^^^*^ designated "Toronto the Good." motto,  "What we have we  hold," pers in the Dominion.     Mr. Walsh
It owes this reputation not by any convey in a rough and ready, but in has a better grip of financial sub-
means to its higher claim of moral- none the less  accurate manner the jects than any other Canadian edit-
ity, either in public or private life principle   which   dominates   British or;   he  is moderate, sane and  sin-
than the average of the Dominion, policy; and while it is an undoubted cere; needless, therefore, to say, con-
but rather because it is the nesting- fact that the majority of Canadians vincing.   The honour just bestowed
.. ,.    „ ..        ..     ..,..,.,       ,  .    nit „   . ..        ,     ,. Place of militant Christianity.   It is were   disappointed   at   the   Alaska "P™ him is very great.   For a young
abb result of the policy initiated by turned to Ottawa well informed as that   twentieth  cent liflca. awarfl   u ig a and ridiculou8 matl) stili linder thirty, who has only
he purchase ofthe.E. ft N. and other to the possibilities and requirements . tion of ^ man rf ^^ exagg(.ration to 86uggest that it rai8ed been in Montreal a few years, to have
ar«e expenditures by the ,C. P. R. «£ t^West.,.   Ia framing Jus new, who did m% m& nig ,{      ^ J g ^ulderi     ^J ot antagonisffi in been seletced to represent a division
in|ietona.   TJe,ex|eucies of Ori, tariff, he has^gnized those condi,, bughel  „ is ^ the home of &band nJ       nhle  *t rf hundred of of the commereial capital of Canada
ental    transportation'  Remand    the tions by adhering to the. pttnciple|of unique philanthropists wh    hav. her citiz       and did ^ toward8 is the highest tribute that could be
furthest   west      port   obtainable, which has guided him ever smce h* ing beeome rich beyond ^ dreams rf b ^ British ^ paid to his excellenee.   Mr.  Walsh
Thi iron horse ^must rush to the ex- became Finance Minister.   This ad|avarice as a resdt rfthe mQgt ^^ elge ^ h&d d hfls made his mark in the journalistic
treble western limit to meet the Em- herence   should   signify   that   when,; ic and rapacioug graft ^ ^ hflg ^ ^ ^ mM. he wiu repeat his success in
press  steamships which  enable  Hns similar industries to those in Nov«| ever known> Qot unnaturall   feel that The mtnie o£ men as wrong.headed Parliament, and if, as is probable, he
Mf sty smails to girdle the world. Seotiaand Ontario are established in| they are ^ chogen of ^ L       and ag profegsor ag makes finanee and trade matters hi8
^77l:^fTr:il £]$%*& *efs; sra-**: «- -««*■* * -««-^-n0W«JLi*. r^>*m^ no ^^
the/ C,
T. P. and the C. N. R. forces financial  aid  will be meted out to
„.,.,,,, , u ,  . „   , .       wards their less fortunate brethren, appointment of a Canadian ambassa- °* imagination to forsee his ultimate
R. to stretch further west   hen.   and m view of the certainty/ But  Toronto  ig not on,    gt •„ dor       Waghi   ton fortlmatei   does succession to the position of Finance
than  Vancouver if it is not to be that before another year has passed *
express
Fielding
crowded out of the race.   Sir Thorn- the preliminary steps will have been/:
as Shaughnessy recognizes this, and taken to establish an iron and steel
in addition, is enamoured of the un- industry at the Coast, it is impos-/
rivalled natural resources of the Isl- sible to over-estimate the important-
'and, in mineral, timber,and soil, and influence of;4he^existing bounties in?
his-will be the role of the prince who, enabling tote/promoters to finance so/
with   magic  wand,   will touch   this gigantic an undertaking.   Mr. Field-
, sleeping   beauty    into    wakefulness ing declares for the continuance of
from a slumber that has already last- the British preference, a policy which
ed|Joo long, although probably as a is popular throughout the Dominionj-.
pri|ctical   man who  does not   carry and against whicli no valid argument
'• seiiiment into his business, he would can be  urged;  and it perhaps not:
rather   be .canonized as .the   Midas to twit Mr. Fielding with inconsisti
whose   touch   turned   everything  to ency   to recall the fact that   three/:
years  ago  Sir Wilfrid Laurier and:
—■  he told the British Government that,
The autumn session which they could not guarantee the contin|
is now being held at Otta- uance of the Preference unless some
wa, was arranged for the quid pro quo were forthcoming. Such..
-purpose of enabling Mr. a representation was as illogical as if
to bring down his budget, was unauthorized, and produced  al
an^ especially to deal with the tariff, little impression on the Imperial aui
THpse who expect anything in the na- thorities as it deserved.    Today the?
tufe of fireworks must be disappoint- British sentiment is stronger through^
edl Mr. Fielding is no longer the rab- out  Canada than ever before,  an*
idjijand  irreconcilable free-trader of instead   of favouring less   generous?
fifteen yearsiago.   In those days two tirade,, relations   with ; the rMothe|:
mifttoes   were -engrafed   upon   his Country, it may yet liapperi: that pubji;
shi«ld, "Free'Trade "and "Annexa- lie opinion will force the hands of the
tion,"   but   at   that   time   he   was Government in a direction which will
lord "paraiiouift   of   the" "'-Maritim^"''fend' largely to' ificrtase^he'importd-
Provinces,   with   a   subservient   lo- tion of British and to lessen the ,im-
cal   legislature,   and   with   the   in- portation  of American goods.    The
fluence   of   his   ultra-liberal   ances- only new feature of the Tariff Bill
try strong upon him.    In 1896 he is the introduction of a third sched-
started to go west, and in Ottawa uie which is designated intermediate.	
soon learned that any love which his Reports to hand do not furnish de- philanthropists and "unco guid," but not reflect Canadian opinion.    Such
party may have had for free, trade tails with respect to this innovation, in professors, and among them is one men would, if they could, sever our
had long ago cooled  off.   The Na- but it is intended to provide for spe- who is most appositely named. connection with the Mother Country,
tional policy  was  a good thing to cial treatment of nations who give    "Since    the    Alaskan    boundary which shows how easy it is for a man
.fight before getting into power, be- Canada the benefit of the "most fa- award," writes Prof. G. M. Wrong to  obtain   a professorship   without
cause it was the offspring of the en- voured nation" clause, and particu- of Toronto University to the London knowing anything of the history of
►emy, and no good could come out of larly to deal with the subject of the Spectator, "there has been a smoul- the Empire to which he belongs.   All
Nazareth; but the responsibilities of German surtax.    It is a matter for dering flame in Canada in the hearts such critics lose sight of the import-
Minister.
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Pf:   '■    •
Bomb or Mr. Rufus Pope, ex-M.
Boomerang. P. for Cookshire, one
of the best known and
ablest men in the Conservative party,
stated on the public platform at Nelson, without any reservation, that the
vacant B. C. judgeship could only be
acquired on payment of $7,000. The
telegraphic despatch announcing this
statement declares that it created
consternation. The Colonist, in commenting upon the incident, declares
that the matter is so serious that it
cannot rest there, and demands that
some notice be taken by the Government. The Week does not agree with
the Colonist. It is the obvious and
imperative duty of Mr. Pope to make
good his statement, and a man of his
experience in public affairs is not
likely to have made it without possessing the necessary proof. If he
holds the trump card, nothing is to
be gained by keeping it np his sleeve;
if he does not his bomb is likely to
become a boomerang.
The Wily
World.
SIR T. G. SHAUGHNESSY.
The Fairy Prince who has waved his magic wand over Vancouver Island.
The Vancouver World is
in a very unhappy state
of mind because Mr.
Charles Wilson, ex-Attorney General,
has failed to "grasp the opportunity to inform his constituency why he
"chucked his job," and warns him
that such opportuities ouly occur
once in a man's lifetime, and that
he is very foolish and unwise to have
let this one slip. No doubt Mr. Wilson will be able to survive the disappointment of The World; he may
even fail to realize that by neglecting to take the tide when it was at
the flood his whole future course may
office,   the  necessity   for  protecting congratulation,   altogether  irrespect- of ninety-nine out of every hundred ant fact that the British Empire co- .    bound -n .<gj,a]iows and [n m;ser.
/t-„_ Ji_^     '_ J ..„.—.;.,_       n«J    ««nni.    hH,lf,„        nm      it-P    *ia**.-ir     nnKtioo        f-t.nt-     i\tn      TOil-i        n-P      lia*     mtloana T .Ai*/1        A laVMT Ann 'O      lii-nmc-     na     llm     **.•.□.lit      nf     n      tnnvnl      nr.i-1 "' ■ ■ j   '.:»    .'    •.
I Canadian industries, and most press- ive of party politics, that the Fin- of her citizens.    Lord Alevrstone's hercs as the result of a moral and
'ing of all the necessity for providing' ance Minister is able to submit bo course in that matter did more to- not a material force, and that the
? revenue, soon completed their work favourable a budget, showing a sur- wards breaking up the British Em- first principle  which actuates every
< of conversion, and in double quick plus of over $12,000,000, and and eg- pire than anything else that has hap- movement  of thc  Imperial  Govern- ^" t*^" to'ailow   himself to  be
time Mr. Fielding became a moderate timated   surplus for next   year of pened during the last quarter of a ment is that the whole can only be j   u„ ..,„ „,;1„ vj^-u     iWnro
f Protectionist.   It almost makes one $13,000,000, together with a sum ap- century.   When you read this Btate- consolidated   and   strengthened   by
gasp   to read of the   millions upon prbximating $1,500,000 available for ment you will probably think it is protecting the smallest part,
(millions   which he   has donated   to reducing  the  debt.    In  commenting grossly exaggerated, but it is not." 	
Canadian   industries in the  way of upon this state of affairs the Colonist     It is greatly to be regretted that A Brilliant   Mr. J. C. Walsh, the ed-
f bounties, especially in the Maritime declares that tariff is no longer an is- men of education and especially men Journalist,    itor   of   the   Montreal	
'provinces.   But if the thing has been sue; there is a sense in which this occupying important positions, should Herald,   has   just  been gignB o{    Victoria   does   not   want
i a little overdone in certain quarters, is true, inasmuch as the Liberal party undertake to speak upon  a subject been elected to the Dominion Parlia- ^ i_{me8.   a ^oom  tna); jg  _e tyn.
ies." But even so it is doubtful if
the genial member for Vancouver will
ever  regret that   he withstood   the
drawn by the wily World. Before
the electoral eamapaigu is over the
World will have plenty to think about
of more importance than the silence
of Mr. Charles Wilson.
iit is better so than that such a pow- is firmly wedded to the principle of of which they are profoundly ignor- ment to represent the St. Ann's divi-
erful   and   capable  minister  should Protection.     There   is,   however,   a ant.    It is amusing to  contemplate sion of Montreal in succession to the ^om ^ ]ike ft rocket and
Hiave identified himself with a policy sense in which it is not true, since the possibility of the Imperial Gov- notorious   Dan   Gallery, disqualified, ,        ... ...     ,.
. ■   .  . ,    , .. , ,      , n . ...       .11     .   1    11 .o comes  uowii ukc  u sui^k.    xis
of resistance, and so have stifled tho the party which originated the Na- ernment  sacrificing the  interests of Mr. Walsh is without doubt one ot
development of trade and commerce, tional policy in Canada can never af- any one of her colonies in order to the ablest journalists, one of the most
Later   in  fact,  so recently  as  last ford to slumber or sleep, for of noth- enrry favour with a friendly nation, stalwart   Liberals, and   one of   the
year Mr. Fielding went further west, ing is it truer than of the broad prin- If such a policy had ever been pur- most honourable men in public life.
ress,
Its
ical western boom, the
t and
prog-
although  slow, has been  sure.
swifter    rivals    have    counted
(■Continued on PaRc Four.) THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906.
fj!*J*J*ff*j5fft|rj'*J!(Ji«Ji| not cons_dered in the dazzling light of back to my old self.   Your letters—this
V     —j,                 _ .                 IP her personal charms" one—has never left my heart—0 Tom,
if     SnOI*t    StOrV     if     "Why do you stumble over that word, it's so comforting.    Nights    when    I
9J9.                                                    9J? ''reputation'?" asked Preston quickly.  'I couldn't sleep  for thinking about—my
*^9_j_"9_k^5_j_?9^^^'^?_jp^'A,fif know as we" as y°u what is said oi cough, I would read this and it brought
Dorothy Leighton, and it is the sort of peace   to   me.    One whole paragraph
An Actress tnd a Bole.             tmng a certa;n ciass of people usually lives in my memory—it is this:   'You
~                           says of clever and successful women in may think that my love  for you' is
y     wy            y'                  her  profession.    A slandering tonguje only for the bright, beautiful part of
"But   an   actrlsTTom!" exclaimed usually utters the venom of an envi°"s you that caPtivates tl* world, but my
heart.   This    woman is immeasurably heart thrills with greatest joy in think-
Morrison   protestingly.     "Marry—why
BRITISH AMERICAS TRUST CO, Limited
VICTORIA OFFICES,
Cor. Broad and View  Sta.
A. C. McCALLUM,
Mgr. Real Estate Department.
you were—it was-
"No," interrupted Preston, "it is not
a joke. It is the most serious thing in
life to me, and your reception isn't—
well, to say the least, it's disappointing."
Morrison studied his friend's face a
moment before speaking, and his voice
had a note of resignation as he said,
Marry—wny        ^ ^ ^ .(.ammnjators_a_K_  she ing of your glorious true self, your soul,
yes, certainly-it's an inevitable   thing ^ ^ defi)e hersdf by using their  Many men haye ,oved y0Uj but non_
for a fellow of your position, I sup- weapons.   And if she were not not one, my love for you is far above
pose.^  But an actress!   Oh, I say now ^^ ^ ^^ ^ she .^ do yQU tnjnk mere _nfatuationi   How gladly would I
"—" that would alter my regard  for her? prove,  if   the   superficial things   were
Tom Preston flicked away the ash of  ^^ ^ affect my ^^ mm>s ]()ve? ^  if yQU  were  m or your bright
liis cigar with an angry jerk Now ^^ ^ ,g fit ^ .udge? May we not beauty {aded( that my jovx, is not cal.
see here, Morrison," he said. "I didnt ^^ ^^ ^^ the heaft <eads? ,Qw affection) but a strong man-s true
take you into my confidence to hear this ^ Morrisonj if these despicable peo- and enduring passion. There will al-
sort of thing.   I've come to you as a '^ ^ ^ ^ ^oM not matter ways bum a taper for you in my heart
friend to whom I thought the happiest that„_preston tossed his cigar away_ __ shM ^ faithful to the end'"
irews of my life would be doubly wel- ^ ^    ^ &g jhey speak but ..^ T     Preston>s mouth opened but no words
come coming first from me.' ^ ^       ^ of their env_oug maiice came    His eyes shifted nervously from
"I know,  Tom,  old    man,"   replied ^ ^ „ the woman,s appea]ing    face   t0    the
Morrison hastily, "but at first I thought     u^ sentiments are admirable," said shapeless bundle of her crouched figure.
Morrison, "and I don't think I need as- His throat went hot and dry—its mois-
sure you that your hopes are mine, and ture seemed to have passed upward to
that I want them to be realized in the his forehead, which grew coldly damp,
very near future."   The two men shook Yet his face burned and the blood throb-
hands   in   silence   and   Preston  began bed heavily in his  temples.   Through
drawing on his gloves.   He shook his his excessive discomfort   vague   ideas
head  in  refusal of Morrison's  invita- drifted—he wondered if he should be
■a   tion  and left him as the waiter placed late for dinner and recalled a business
had a note of resignation as he said, ^ ^   ^^ ^ ^    Morrison gazed appointment for the morrow.   His wits
"How long have you been thinking of ^ ^ absent)y at the bubbles rising wandere(_ and would   not   concentrate
ttiis ? * ^ in tbe g]asS) wbj]e bjs   thoughts   went upon the imploring creature before him.
"Almost a year," answered   Pr«ston' back (o a time when he) t00, had spoken "Whe nwould this  tiresome interview
"I have never spoken of it to you before acted-in an  eminently  re- be over?" he thought, and longed to
because I thought there was no hope        ^ ^^ ^ ^   .^ ^ ^ street_any.
for me, as you know 1 dorit care to ac-     ^^ ^  ^^   down  ^  dub whefe away    „If Dorotby were here_
knowledge failure of any kind.   In this deciding)   in   his   newly-found God! can this woman be Dorothy? With
my heart is too deep to bear upon dis- 'fu, manner)  tQ wa,k    He struck ,his white) drawn face and hoilow eyeSi
cussion of defeat.   You remember last ^ shorehanli stopping and her-her figure so obviously-why,
January the Bailey management gave a ^ ^J^ ^ ^    M ^ florists she_the woman_„
supper to the Kmg of Kickapoo com- ^ ^ ,avish; the jeweler smiled at his "Tom,   dearie,"   said   the   pleading
pany   to   celebrate the three-hundreth ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ prQper ^ ^ you m ^   ^   my
performance  of the opera.    1 was  at ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^ ^ accurate con. answer wi„ be?   Do yQU think that j
the reception and supper, and old Bailey ^    ^ ^ ^^ preston depart_ have ^ for yQu tQ repeat my unkind
himself   introduced   me   to    Dorothy ^ ^^ ^ purveyor of baubles with words, to mock you?   Do you believe
Leighton.    Her brilliant  wit qutshone ^.^ ^ ^^ ^^ fit    ]n ^ j ^y a]wayg ^ ^ ^ ag
ever her remarkable  beauty,  and  Her ^  ^^  ^ ast0Unded   himself    by yours so tightly,  so valueless,  that I
original manner charmed me,   1 tormea some barrel.organ ragtime. should continue to torture you by sus-
an intense admiration for tier at once, ^ reception room of Miss pense?    Ah! no, no, Tom; faith and
and after  two subsequent ^meetings ^.^^   apartment    Preston   noted trust like yours are too rare, too prec-
loved her and told her so. satisfaction the home-like atmos- bus, 100 sacred; why, it would be sin-
"And  sheJ'/uf,0n;d1/0r"S°n. phere which   prevailed,   although   the ful, wouldn't  it,  to throw away such
"She laughed and said   Howjeiymo- v           ^ arrived ^ ^ few hmn ^^ ^ ^ ft gQ unrewarded?„
teresting!'    She advised me quite^sen- ^^    ^ ^^  ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ so„ ^^^ ^^
ously to see a doctor andI ever^ recom- ^   ^.^ ^ ^ sM^ ^ thick)y ^^ yQU haye g rough
mended  Mergenheimer,  the  heart   ap q            o{
cialist.   I was deeply pained to see tha jestful^g  ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^  ^^  ^
her love of banter would not allow ner ^^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^ through when T thoUght of our meeting and your
,0 accept my/7?tl0ann;;;,0m7- " d M his hostess would come. Sev- happiness, I forgot the plunging of the
chaffing   used   to    anger me     y       ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ movement ship ^ ^ danger    And now> ^
words-and »* "»*" J "! . in the apartment and Preston began to dear, tell me how you have been wait-
more because of ,t After atm fad Ws wahing oppres9ive. He glanced fag and-why, you haven't even told
promised to consider the matter ,       ^        ^ ^^ ^ ^ wag ^ ^ g)ad ^ are ^ ^ me|   ^
would wait patiently.    Inen sn esai e uncomfortably when the thick I know you are. the ready tongue does
last March to fill a£»ta.engagement "J*^ ^ J ^ imn cham. m ^ speak from , fu„ hear(_ We
During these months I   have   wnne aside    In gome and ^^
many letters ^^^TJCJ   h   S« the uncertain l!ght revealed you    will    tell   me everything, won't
S^^^^^*?^ fo™ wMeh Preston, rising, scru- you?" She leaned forward and her face
pindmg me of my prom.«Mo waj ^^   ^^   As   he yearned toward his
for an  answer    But  L couia p ^ {orm ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^^^ pres_
asking again ^ «^ Tta-J^ ^ ^^ .^ and preston.s ton rising> .,he_the fact ;, r have a
"i! LTiu,t arrived on the Koptic and eye wandered uncertainly over the awk- -a very   important   appointment   and
1J1  JtT .nartments at the  Shore- ward figure, clad in a queer shapeless	
would take apartments at *e J The face was pale-deathly-     "Why, Tom, you aren't going?"   It
81    Her Tte said tha! sTe wouM and the eyes stared  dully  from blue- was like the cry of a hurt, frightened
answer my appeals, and of course she black hollow sockets.                            child.                 ...''■'='
answer ui/FF   . '           ,         e "Can't     you     say   'how-do-you-do,      Preston passed his hand across his
wotildnt ask me jus to r             -^ Tom?>i ^ ^ fafat ^.^ of & voice  brQws ^ looked away from hef ^
•     ^extended hand.'   His voice "I thought you would be glad to see sorry," he faltered, "but really I can't
rison wnn c j,    j     A—er—business, urgent, can't
sounded more  of resignation  ttjnri me.^^ ^ ^ ^^^ ^   ^
iand and did Mt note his friend's lack ton, retreating a step, "I beg pardon, The woman rose slowly. Her ungain-
nanu aim u » ^ ,, [y figure and form]ess draperies loomed
°f ^"vlTaee" continued Morrison     "Why, Tom," said the plaintive voice, almost monstrous through the half-light.
A'    y        B ' -     ■• •      "aren't you glad to see me?" Preston dared not look.   It was too—
''Jove!"  cried  Preston, this isn't—it why the devil didn't she stay in Lon-
can't be " don!   Had she no pride, no consedra-
-•■ „   . t,rrupted   Preston     "Yes, it is I—Dorothy." tion for the feelings of others?   How
"Young   men.    in       p "But-but," began Preston, "what  is dared she come back-like this?
7Tr'< love of dZ ion  of con-  the-you are so changed I—" "Tom," said Dorothy, stifling a sob,
they know oi love, 0  d votion, ot ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^    you ^ ^ me ..
;:s yefr: who i •?■*, ^ ™ ^-^     . a *. hr ^ i ^:r^ i w
mature yea vearnings 0f the     The   woman   cowered down into a your love, your sympathy, your protec-
Hie deepest joy,^     y        ^ ^^ drawing ^ ]o(jse gown about in ^   l thought_you said_yoU said-"
i  ,™     A  young vine springing a pathetically palpable attempt to con- She broke down utterly and sank back
ZL =,n oak is easily uprooted, its ceal the clumsy bulk oi her figure. into her chair, weeping,
up about an oak is ««iy^P . D whh  a     preston swaUowed hard    -If there is
tendrils rcad'ly ""tl^l^firm   pitifu   little  smile,  "I've  had  a hard anything I can do," he began lamely.
I"86,' Tl «Z   Zi 7 to the   imc of it-the work, you know, and the     "0 Tom," she whispered, "how can
y, ehng w, h great r   treng ^ ^ ^ iungs    ^ nQw ^ ^ hQw ^ you!„   she struggled to
loved one-and  witn g ^ ^^^ ^ soon ^ rf. ^^ ^ contro,    ^   ^^.^ before  speaking
,0"va*ay' r d Morrison "if you were  I?    You  will be such good  medicine again.   At last she looked up at him,
- fellow  I should set down your  for me, won't you?   All through this- ,. world of abject appeal in her eyes.
f IZ a s!m«   fane -inLuation for trouble, your letters have helped me so. Don, you  care  a little,  Tom, just  a
feeing as a mere       7 so jo know that tberc was j.^.   For what you saidi {of what you
rironment    ST  re^ctractcf was one who would receive me and love me (Continued on Page 15.)
FOR SALE
One of the few remaining good Cattle Ranches left
in B. C. This property controls some 300 square
miles of Range and will carry 2000 head of cattle
and 300 horses. Full particulars on application.
Price $45,000.
Mail Us Your Xmas Fruit Order NOW
And get the pick ot this
Season's Crop.
Xmas Fruits
Seeded Raisins, 2 lbs. for	
Re-Cleaned Currants, per lb	
Sultanas, per lb	
Mixed Peel, per lb	
Citron Peel, per lb'.	
Figs for Cooking, per lb ,.   .
Figs for Table Use, per lb	
Dates, per lb	
Shelled Almonds, per lb	
Molasses, per tin	
Pure Spices, per packet	
Raw Sugar, 4 lbs for	
Gilbey's Scotch Whiskey, per ..bottle   ...
Gilbey's Spey .Royal Scotch, per bottle
Cooking Brandy 	
..25c
..ioc
...15c
...20c
,..25c
..ioc
...25c
...IOC
...50c
...20c
...IOC
...25c
.$1.00
. 1.25
. 1.00
I Bottle Four-year-old Port 	
1 Bottle Four-year-old Sherry ....
1 Bottle French Brandy 	
1 Bottle Gilbey's Scotch Whiskey.
1 Bottle French Claret 	
1 Bottle Canadian Rye
XMAS BOX
You know the old custom of a Christmas Hamper containing a complete outfit of fine Wines and Spirits for Xmastide? Well, this year
we are introducing this system.   Here it is:
.     NEATLY PACKED
1   $5.00
\   Freight paid to nearest
  _______! Station.
OUR MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT SAVES YOU ALL TROUBLE; IT IS A SPECIAL FEATURE OF OUR BUSINESS.
We pay freight on all orders amounting to $25.00 and upwards to all
points on C. P. R and V. & S. within a radius of 50 miles of Victoria
-"EXCEPT" ON FLOUR, Sugar and Coal Oil.
If desired, two or three families can club together to get the benefit
of the free delivery, provided the goods are consigned in one shipment
to one name.
TERMS:   Cash MUST accompany all orders.
dixi h. r®ss & eo
Independent Grocers.
iu Government Street, Victoria
R. 1»37
reflectively,  "the   affections   fix  themselves   deeply   and    strongly.   Young
men
rrrrirrirnnrrn^
WE   ARE   MARINO  A SPECIALTY OF SUPPLYING
Private
Christmas Cards
PRINTED TO ORDER.
Call and see our lines.   The newest things
in View Books, just the thing to send
your friends at Christmas time and
let them know something of
our beautiful city.
T.N. Hibben&Qo
Government St.,, Victoria, B. C.
3 i'."^?!
vrtvbf^^^w^^]m
■■fl"^' J^tja><^'*T^»yj»^'»>'a4't-^
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, i9°6-
British Columbia
THE FRUIT GROWING RESOURCES
OF THE PROVINCE. '~£$3g&&
Fruit Growing.
British Columbia fruit is preferred
above all others in the markets of
the Middle West, where it commands
profitable prices. In 1904 a small
exhibit sent to England was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and last year
(1905) a car lot, exhibited in London, won the first prize from all competitors, while no less than eight
medals were awarded the individual
exhibits which made up the collection. This goes to prove that despite
the great distance British Columbia
fruit has secured a prominent place
in the British market, in which Oregon and California applies have heretofore sold at the highest prices.
The fruit industry of British Columbia is in its infancy, but the results so far secred are convincing as
to its future importance. The actual
extent of fruit growing land has not
yet been ascertained, but by a conservative estimate at least one million acres south of the 52nd degree
will produce all the fruits of the temperate zone. The recognized fruit
districts include the southern part
of Vancouver Island and the Gulf
Islands, Lower Fraser River Valley,
Thompson River Valley, Shuswap
Lake, Okanagan, Spallumcheen, Oso-
yoos, Similkameen, Upper Columbia
Valley, Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake,
Lower Columbia River and Grand
Forks, which are all suited to the
best grades of fruit, and which contain extensive areas of fruit lands.
Other good fruit districts are: West
Coast of Vancouver Island, West
Coast of Mainland (where patches of
fruit lands are found at the heads of
the numerous inlets), Lower Fraser
Valley, Nicola, Grand Prairie, and
many other localities. In some of
these sections irrigation is necessary,
and, as mentioned elsewhere, water is
being supplied where the influx of
population warrants the necessary
expenditure. Many localities, which
are now proved to be suitable for
fruit culture, were but recently "discovered," for a few years ago fruit
was only raised in the settlements
along the coast and along the rivers,
and in quantity that failed to supply
even the limited local demand. In
1891 the total orchard area of the
province was 6,500 acres. In ten
years it only increased 1,000 acres,
but from 1901 to 1906 it jumped to
22,000 acres, and it is safe to say
that that acreage will be more than
doubled again before the close of
1906. Ten years ago British Columbia did not produce enough fruit to
supply her own population. The fol-
following table of fruit shipments is
interesting in showing the steady
growth of the industry:
By freight. By Express.
1902    1,169  tons 487 tons
1903    1,868 tons 676 tons
1904    2,161  tons 864 tons
1905    3,181  tons 1,176 tons
An increase of over 50 per cent in four years.
Total.
Increase,
1,956 tons
2,544 tons
, 588 tons
3,025 tons
, 481 tons
4,357 tons
1,332 tons THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906.
EDITORIAL, CONTINUED.
(Continued from Page One.)
which Victorians have been waiting
forty years.
■rui*ii.MTj'~i1|*y f I ""**** i-'^**" ■**«■■»■
heads;  its  far-seeing thinkers have
counted industrial and potential developments.    When an investigation
of these was made early in the year,
and the results tabulated for the first
time, it was found that the Capital
City  had more than seventy  established manufacturing industries, with
payrolls   ranging   from   $3,000   to
$150,000 a year.   The publication of
these facts opened the eyes of outsiders to a condition of affairs that
they had not expected, and the judicious advertising  and  exploiting  of
the resources" ofthe Island men of influence and capital of which no one
is fully aware.  The Week has always
been   enthusiastic    and    optimistic
about the future of Victoria and the
Island, has watched its growth and
prosperity and recently has shared in
it.   To us the most important fact is
that the circulation of The Week has
doubled,  and  its  commercial advertising quadrupled during the last six
months.   But this is not a fact which
will be of  as much interest to the
general public as the two which may
now be mentioned.   The first is, that
a genuine movement in real estate is
taking place; that lots in every part
of the city have changed hands recently   at   advances   over   previous
prices  ranging from  25   to  50 per
cent.   Of more importance still is the
fact that in the most valuable section
of Government Street, that reaching
from the postoffice to Johnson Street,
at least 50 per cent of the property
has been transferred to new owners
within the last six months.   It would
be easy to take this property lot by
lot and show that it had realized values  which  would  have been considered impossible even last year.   One
illustration   will suffice.    A lot  on
Government Street was bonded two
years ago for $25,000, the bond Was
relinquished a year ago, the property
was sold three months ago for $45,-
000, and this week a bona fide offer
of $65,000 was made.   Within ten days
real estate in  the City of Victoria
to   the value of  over $900,000   has
changed hands, among the most notable   purchases being the   Balmoral
Hotel   block for $130,000, and   the
Adelphi Block, on the corner of Government and Yates, for $90,000.    A
long pending deal for the Driard Hotel has also been carried to the point
of settlement, and nothing remains to
be done   but to sign the   necessary
transfers.    Other instances could be
given, all tending to prove that the
movement in real estate is widespread
and genuine, and perhaps in this connection nothing will impress the public more than the fact that the British American Trust Company has just
established an important department
for the handling of real estate, under
the capable management of an experienced broker.   The  shrewd  president of this far-reaching institution
is fully aware that V ictoria is on the
threshold of great development.   The
other important fact which The Week
is the first to announce is that a large
English company, with a capital of
£5,000,000, has been formed through
the agency of several of the most influential   financiers   in Victoria,  to
amalgamate important industries at
Victoria and Vancouver, and establish a new industry which will play
an important part in the development
of the Province at the Pacific Coast.
This company will have the largest
cash capital of any industrial enterprise in the West, and will be but
the forerunner of other gigantic concerns to be established with English
capital.    It is probable that in the
next issue of The Week details of this
important organization may be given,
but   in  any event the   company is
formed, the capital is subscribed and
all the preliminaries have been settled.   The year 1907 will bring the
era  of prosperity   and activity   for
Breakers   The greatest manufactur-
Ahead.     ing industry in Canada is
struggling to reach a safe
port, and by the latest account may
founder before getting in.   Even Mr.
Fielding had to refer in his budget
speech to the Dominion Iron & Steel
Company, which, in spite of the fact
that it has received upwards of $6,-
000,000 in bounties from the Dominion Government, is unable to make
both ends meet, and has just entered
on  a  course of litigation with the
Dominion Coal Company, an unfavourable termination of which would
probably terminate its existence.   In
addition  to such enormous bounties
it has received  the  benefit of fuel
from the coal company under a contract made by Mr. H. M. Whitney,
the then president, at fifty cents per
ton. less than actual cost price, which
is equal to $400,000 a year.  Furthermore, since the steel company commenced operations the price of its
product has nearly doubled, so that
it has benefited by three factors, two
of which, the price of fuel and the
market   can, only be   regarded   as
transient,  and the  third of  which,
the bounty, cannot be regarded as
permanent, in view of its enormity.
The  result is  no  surprise  to those
who are  acquainted  with the  local
conditions, and was predicted from
the commencement.   The attempt to
establish a Pittsburg in Cape Breton
is doomed to failure for two reasons,
if for no other.    The first is that
there is not in the whole of the Maritime Provinces  a first  class coking
coal, which is the most essential consideration both for smelting and the
manufacture of steel.    In order to
utilize the local fuel it has to be subjected to costly processes, and in addition a larger quantity has to be
used than is economical.   The second
reason, and possibly the strongest, is
fehajt   the  Newfoundland   ore, upon
which the Dominion Steel Company
has to depend, is not suitable for
steel making without a large admixture of imported ore, which is difficult to obtain, and which greatly increases the cost of production.   The
time will come, if it has not already
arrived,' when the Government will
have to consider whether the country has not paid enough to bolster up
an industry which has to date cost
the public directly more than $6,000,-
000, and has handicapped Canadian
railroads by raising the price of steel
rails seven  dollars a ton, and that
without any resultant benefit to the
shareholders in the concern.   This is
not protecting infant industry; it is
squandering public money to enable
the Toronto gang and a few of their
Montreal friends to get rich quick on
a   stock-jobbing   proposition.     The
Nova Scotia Steel Company, wbich
has been   in   operation   for  thirty
years, and has conducted its affairs
upon  conservative lines, keeping its
capital within moderate bounds and
taking no  part in stock operations,
has made good profits, is paying satisfactory dividends and has earned
a large fortune for its owners.   It is
only necessary to compare these two
institutions to understand the whole
situation.
Retiring From Business....
»  „.     «T/.TrnAnn   —;_1 4„   „_11   i.V.„
A Sad Maiden's Plaint.
There came to the beach a poor exile
of summer;
The due on her thin robes was heavy
and more;
For flirtation she sighed when at twilight repairing
To wander alone on the wave beaten
shore.
"Sad is my fate," cried the heartbroken
maiden.
"The wild deer and wolf from the
hunter may flee;
Here wait I, a tame   dear,   with   no
thought of fleeing,
Yet never a fellow comes hunting for
mel"
—Baltimore American.
t
j  JV
MRS. W. BICKFORD wishes to call the attention of her patrons to her TWENTY PER CT. J
DISCOUNT SALE. One dollar on every five j
means a big saving of money. Call and inspect *
our up-to-date stock.    No trouble to show goods.
Mrs. W. Bickford, 61-63 Fort Street.
Go to the
PEOPLE'S POPULAR
PRESCRIPTION
PHARMACY
For all
SEASONABLE GOODS
Hot Water Bottles,
Chest Protectors, etc.
George A. Fraser
Succ.aaor to J. I. White a Co.
VICTORIA
Th Sanitarium Hotel, which is beautifully situated, overlooking the Bow Ulver and its lovely and
romantic valley, is a large 5-story building elegantly
fitted with every appointment calculated to bring
pleasure and enmfort to thc tourist or invalid.
A private hospital, which, though isolated, is in
close proximity to the Sanitarium, is presided over by
skilfully trained nurses and is also fitted out with
every appliance necessary to a first class institution
ot its kind.
A very commodious bath-house adjoins the hotel'
where Turkish, Russian, plunge, shower and douche
baths are given under medical supervision, with
water'ilirect from the celebrated hot sulphur springs.
A first class livery in connection so that rldos and
drives through the magniflcant scenery may be en-
ioyed.
Terms: W.CO a day upwards. .Special rates by week
or month.  Open all the year.
W. H. SCAUTH, Manager.
Medical Staff:
B. O. Bkett, m.d ;   G. M. Atkin, m.d.;
It.. H. Brett, h.a.. m d.
8
Have You Seen Our
Assortment of
French Worsteds
and Scotch Tweeds
Suitings ?
They are the finest, and the
way we make them up ia the
very best and fit guaranteed.
We want your business and
we will treat you right.
Peden's
TAILORING PARLORS
31   FORT   STREET
8-
ft
If you love your wife
BUY  HER  A  GAS STOVE
It will save her a lot of extra work and
give her time for other things
besides cooking.
Cook Your Boast, Do Not Boast Tour Cook,
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, LIMITED.
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agents for the Nanaimo Collierlet.
New Wellington Coal.
The best household coal in the tnarket'at
current ratei.  Anthracite coal for sale.!
34 Broad Street. Phone 047
VICTORIA
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
HOLLY TREES
Prices from 35 cents to $5.00, according
to size. Write for seed and tree catalog.
JAY & CO. VICTORIA, B. C
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BBEWBRS OP
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 89a. VICTORIA
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following described land, viz.:
Commencing at the south-west corner
of Lot 9, Cassiar District, situated on
the Skeena River; thence east 40 chains
to the south-east corner of Lot 9,
thence south 20 chains, thence west 40
chains more or less to the Skeena River,
thence northerly along the Skeena River
to the point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
November 27, 1006.
e. f. g. McGregor.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situate in Cassiar Distript, viz.:
Commencing at the North-East corner of Lot 9, Cassiar District on the
Hawilghet River—thence south 46
chains and 26 links to the south-east
corner of Lot 9, thence east 20 chains,
thence north 40 chains more or less to
the Hagwilghet River, thence^ following
the river in a westerly direction to the
point of commencement, containing Po
acres more or less.
November 27, 1906.
G. P. ROBERTS
A
"PROMPT"
DRUG STORE
When you come here you are waited o
promptly.
When you ask us to deliver any dru
store article it reaches you in "donbl
quick time."
When we order anything especially ft
you—we get the goods for you withot
making you wait a moment longer tha
necessary.
Promptness is a hobby with us.
CYRUS H. BOWES
9S Government St., near Yates St.
letve Your Baggage Cheeks at thi
Pacific Transfer Co';
No. 4 PORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E, KENT, Propriel THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i. 1906
OPALESCENT  CENTERPIECE, a
family gift for mother $3.00
ART PICTURES AND ENGRAVINGS, a splendid assortment, at
prices ranging from $2.50 up
CRUMB BRUSH AND TRAY, floral design  $i-5o
CRUMB BRUSH AND TRAY, shell
pattern   $2-°°
TOAST RACKS, various shapes and
styles,  from $100 up
SPECIAL
HOLIDAY
COFFER:)
SUTHERLAND ART VASES	
 $1.50, $2.50 aud $3.50
BRETBY VASES, from 20c up
FISH CARVER SET, in leather
case, engraved fern pattern blades.
 $4-50
MEAT CARVER SET, buckhorn
handles $400
BEER STEINS, smallest size, 35c;
small size, 40c; medium size, 75c;
large size  .$1.25 and $4-°°
CHILDREN'S SET, knife, fork and
spoon,  in  silver plate $1.25
1847 Rogers  $1.75
MISSION ROCKER, upholstered in
finest soft Spanish leather $20,00
SPIRIT TANTALUS, in English
oak, cut glass decanters, plated
mounts, a splendid gift for a gentleman  $15.00
TEASPOON  SET,  six  spoons  and
sugar tongs  $5.00
SET of six Coffee Spoons $2.00
JARDINIERES, in Bretby ware, 4%-
inch, 25c; 6j4-inch 60c; 7-inch..$1,00
II  MUCE-      S55E M.KTtD      H.M1
miT-EWACK MP PICK COMBINED.
DRAWING ROOM LAMP,
Rochester burner, cardinal
globe; a snap at $6.00
WEDGWOOD JUGS for. .25c
DUTCH JUGS for 50c
FLORAL JUGS for 5°c
OAK TRAYS, 16-inch, $2;
18-inch, $2.25; 20-inch,
$2.50; 22-inch, $3.od ; 24-
inch  $3.50
NUTCRACKERS, each 25c;
set of two crackers and
one dozen picks, in best
silver plate  $+°°
CUT      CLASS      SCENT
SPRAY   $1.50
WAREHOUSE
Cor. of Broad and Broughton Sts.
VICTORIA, B. C.
AST Mail Orders Filled Promptly and Carefully
Weiler Bros.
Complete Home, Hotel, Club and Office Furnishers,
SHOWROOMS:
33 GOVERNMENT STREET
Corner of Broughton and Government Streets, Victorit, B. C
FR6TORY
HUMBOLDT   STREET,
VICTORIA, B.C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i. 1906.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS
Politics at Cumberland. influence, in a few months, at the ex-
The Conservatives at Comox have se- pense of the public, is not forgotten;
lected as their standard bearer at the and the interests of peace and harmony
next   Provincial   election   Mr. Robert were not advanced when G. G. S. Lind-
Grant, the present member,   the   only sey,  a  lawyer  from Toronto, with no
other name  put before the convention experience in handling men, and as full
was Mr. M. Manson of Union Bay, but of contention as an egg is full of meat,
the genial  Robert received  support in was made  general manager at  Fernie.
the ratio of 4 to I so ihat there was no There is no questioning Mr. Lindsey's
difficulty in making the invitation unani- ability as a lawyer and his well known
mous.    There  is little  doubt  that Mrl devotion  to the cause  of  Grittism  on
Grant will be elected by a substantial Toronto  politics  will account   for  the
majority,  as he   is personally popular, readiness of the Liberal press to espouse
The loggers are loyal to him because his cause in  haggling  with   organized
of his association with the lumber trade, labor when he wants lo drive a hard
whilst lhe goody-goody church folk are bargain for his company.   This haggling
against him on the principle of "Com- may  be   appreciated hy   the   company,
pounding for things they arc inclined to hut is not conducive to the nrintenance
by damning those they  have  no mind of   peace   and   good-will  between  em-
to"    His opponent,  Mr.  Bennett,  has plovers and employed."
resolved to continue his scholastic du- _	
•ties t0 lhe end of the year   which will
not give him much time for canvassing,
bn   it  is  understood that  this will be     The Kootenaian  is not in love Wl h
Cettv well looked after for him by the Socialism; in this respect it frds itself
:-p aim singers" a   substitution   which in good company, and has the authority
will be quite as acceptable to the peda-  of a standard work to support its views'
gogue as it will not entail any consider
able strain on his finances.
Getting Busy.
Mr, William Manson, M.P. P., paid a
visit to Victoria alt he beginning of
this week, after which he started on a
tour of. his constituency, which is extensive and difficult to cover, He went
along the West Coast, which he will
travel as far north us Cape Scott, returning by way of Alberni. Mr. Man-
son is an energetic Consvi vative, who
makes himself acquainted with the
wishes of his constituents; he did good
work in the House last se-ssion, and will
110 doubt lie returned again to make his
mark on thc legislation of the Province.
The following cutting is from the last
issue of Kaslo's enterprising journal j
"Willi" lhe Fernie strike settled, now
conies word of more trouble at Greenwood. ''By their fruits ye shal know
them," says the Good Bonk, and it is a
noticeable fact that the centres of turmoil and strife in British Columbia are
Socialistic hotbeds."
A New Townsite.
Right for Once.
The eccentric editor of the Greenwood ledge has said many things that
were smart and some tint we're true,
but the following is about as near to
both as the average editor ever succeeds
in getting, and if Col. Lowery had con-
lined himself to social comments and
tabooed  theology the West would not
.n. «.... ,iave  j_eei_   c|ei,rjvef|  Qf  .q-|le   Qa;m».
A big land deal has been put through .^  (,igni(y q{ ^        ^ ^ ^
whereby Maddock  Bros.,  of  Winnipeg (|.e m ^ .g ^ ^^ so
and Moosejaw, who commenced opera- ^ boys tQ ^ fa ^.^   Nq ^
tions  in   the   Okanagan    district    last ^.^ mMe| young  ^  tQ  bfeak
summer by purchasing the B. X. ranch, im ^ ^ ^ iotmAtion of high so.
have acquired about 4,000 acres  about dcly upQn ^ ^ abbrcviaUd sa,ary
17 miles south of this city, says thc Ver- The ^^ socJety ladies r$ g rule im_
non News.   Thc purchase   was   made ^ ^ M huJkMa wi|, €rre_tltl_ml_
from Charles Harvey, of Kelowna, and ]y mvn ^ bank they starye ^ ^
embraces a strip of land lying between (bcn  how   fommk {o ^vq  ^^ g
Okanauan and Long lakes, with a fron-    - , ,       , .       ,. ,   ,
,<jK,uiuBaii 4-u"b i«     , ^      ^  ncb   man  wnen  bc  was s_r_,ggilng  _0
get fat on about 30 plunks a mokifhj,
and standing pat on a white shirt against
the dyke hi fortune's fissure vein."
Another Association.
Nelson is a great place for associations and organizations. In addition to
as many fraternal societies as can be
found in any city of the West, there is
Tourist Association, a Twenty Thou
tage on both sheets of water. It will
at once be subdivided in 10-acre lots.,
anil ample water is said to have been
secured by records from lakes and
creeks in the hills about eighth miles
distant in the east to irrigate every lot.
A Worthy Pioneer.
Allan McNab, one of the pioneer engineers of the C. P. R- and who took
the first  trairt  into  Port Moody over _  	
twentv years ago, and now residing at _and club, and now, thanks to the in-
Kamloops is seriously ill. Mr. McNab itiative of Harry Cummings and Fred
has a long and brilliant record as $n Hume, a Kootenay Pioneer Associa-
engineer on this road, and one which tio„. As Mr. Cummings pathetically rein every way reflects credit on him. marked: "A few years ago you could
self Both he and Mrs. McNab are well |,ave walked along Baker Street and
known in Revelstoke and made it their colmted the old-timers by the dozen."
home for a number of years, showing This is not so now; one by one they
themselves hospitable to all and being! arc dropping out, but the following are
rreatly esteemed by those who knew ___| pioneers, and the two originators of
them Among the railroad men Mr. t|_c scheme have been in the Kootenay
McNab was the most popular man in over twenty years. During that time
tl ■ west Mr. McNab is a brother of they have seen many changes: Donald,
the editor of the Montreal Star, who f,„- instance, has dwindled from the
has for years been one of the most in- first town of Kootenay to a hall'-for-
fluential men in Eastern Canada. gotten station.   The experiences of the
 - Kootenay   pioneers   outvie"   in   interest
even those of thc men who fought their
way to the frozen North, Every condition was more strenuous twenty years
ago than now.    Among old-timers still
An Incisive Criticism.
The lledlcv Gazette, discussing the
settlement of thc Fernie strike, has the
following to say: "While technically' __
the men may have placed themselves m remaining in Nelson may be mentioned
the wrong in view of the agreement Mr. Selous, Frank Fletcher, Dr. Ar-
which lhey had made not to raise the ihur, Dr. Lal.au. John Hamilton, John
issue, of the 'closed shop,' it is by n"** A. Gibson, Jacob Dover and Jim Mc-
means clear that thc company are blame-   Donald.
less, or that General Manager Lindsey 	
did not break in spirit an agreement
which he made, and which he endeav-'
ored to observe in the letter only. From
its inception the Crow's Nest Coal
Company has not been an organization
which the people were disposed to bc
enthusiastic over. The hti'-c graft by
which a few individuals of the Jaffray
and Pellalt stripe were, through political pull, given those cal lands and
lifted  from  pinched circumstances into
The Fur business is done better in Victoria than almost anywhere else on the
continent. We set the pace with handsome displays of
Persian Lamb Jackets
Canadian Hink Coats
Handsome Sealskin Coats
Labrador Mink Stoles
in qualities that are absolutely dependable, and at the lowest prices that really
high-grade Furs ever sell for. We know
the market and we know your needs.
Out-of=town customers should write for our catalogue.
THE B. C.  FUR MANFG  COMPNY
VICTORIA, B. C.
CTT /f^   \  TT\ tcy   for ^ Christmas trade are toeing received daily I
I (I TT A  h*r ^S   also presents for the most fastidious devotee of |
Jl^Jli^irV^ Lady   Nicotine. —
Your Favorite Brand Can Now Be Had in Perfect Condition.
If you smoke Havanas we shall be pleased to show aud quote low prices for fine cigars.
The Old Post Office Cigar Store
J.   A.   WORTHINGTON, PROP. VICTORIA, B. C.
M. J. HENRY'S
NURSERIES and SEED HOUSES
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Headquarters for Pacific Coast grown
Garden, Field and Flower Seeds for
Spring planting.
A large stock of home grown Fruit
and Ornamental Trees now matured
for the Spring trade.
No expense, loss or delay of fumigation or inspection.
We do business on our own grounds
—no rent to pay—and ate prepared
to meet all competition.
Let me price your list before placing your order. Greenhouse plants,
floral work, bee supplies, fruit packages, fertilizers, spraying material,
etc.   Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY
HMO Westminster Road, Vancouver
Irish Poplin
Ties.
A big shipment just to hand direct fiom Dublin. All the latest
plain shades, club stripes aud
fancy patterns.
We are also showing exclusive
Irish Poplin blouse lengths, real
Irish Lace Ties, and Linen Mesh
Underwear.
Write for samples.
Quite Sue.
Fitz:   "I say, are all yur beaters out
out of the wood?"
Keeper:    "Yes, sir."
Fitz 1   "Are you sure?"
Keeper: "Yes, sir."
Fitz:   "Have you counted them?"
Keeper:    "No, sir; but I know they're
a' right."
Fitz:   "Then I've shot a roe deer I"—
Punch.
PURITY
Pure food is absolutely essential to
health. The purest, niost delicious
and delectable marmalade in the
world is made entirely from the finest Seville oranges and pure sugar
by
CROSSE & BLACKWELL
Purveyors by  Royal   Warrant  to
His Majesty King Edward VII.
r.n. 1942
E. CHAPMAN
DAVIS  CHAflBERS
Opposite Strand Hotel,
Vancouver.
FREE!
Three Courses
IN THE
Sprott-Shaw
Business Institute
LIMITED
336 HASTINGS ST., W.
VANCOUVER
Bookkeeping, Gregu nnd Pitman
Shorthand, Telegraph}-, and Engineering.
Eight Teachers.
Forty-five Tvpewriters.
Kor pmtlcnlais regarding how these
cnur^eb may ueohtaimd, see The Week's
announcement in in otuer column.
R.J Sprott, B.A., Principal.
H. A. Scriven, B A , Vice-Principal.
J, R. Cunningham, Secretary,
JOHN COOPER
Taxidermist and Fur Dresser
Mounting Large (lame Heads
a Specialty.
826 PENDER STREET,
VANCOUVER.
GOLDEN   GRAIN.
Vast quantities of the rich
golden grain of Canada are
used in the world's best biscuits
manufactured by Huntley &
Palmers', biscuit makers to His
Majesty the King.
Ask your grocer for these
choice biscuits, and see that
you get them.
Shopping by Mail.
Since We advertised that we could
do your buying for you in Victoria,
we have received orders daily.   We
save you all trouble, and can bny anything you require.   Write to us to-
i-ay.
References: Northern Bank.
Manager or Manageress,
Purchasing Dept.,
O'Dell's Advertising Bureau,
Victoria, B. 0. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i.  tgo6.
&J^jtJij>r*\J\/*-iA>%vS\iMrf£j,f\ had  determined to enrol themselves iu
< i the militia,' but somewhat of a surprise
J to learn that the gallant members of
J the force  there  strongly  resented  this
2j addition  to  their  ranks.    The soldiers
At The Street
Corner
»
IIUUIIIUI,        ...        .......
who have fought side by side with British   soldiers   in  India,   and  who have
proved themselves to be equal to any
!- -' —u -.«
CAJTPBELL'S
fBy THE LOUNOER W i   ,, ,        .     ,
^   proved themselves to be equal to any
XP'S/''^^m^l**~Hfr*'J%/<&  fighting body of men in the world are
Tn tw» a      v.     -a ■ ..        not Sood enough   for   our   Canadian
in these days, when it is our boast     -iv      ,,  .     o     .    . _
mihitia.    Verily Canada is  more leflV
that we are in a state of high civiliza- ciently guarded than we were aware of
tion, a boast which is sometimes rudely before,  and so  the Sikahs have been
shaken by the accounts of barbarities given the cold shoulder, for as it is
committed in our midst, we are only Pertinent,y   Pointed   out- if "°  »ega|
,,    ,     , .   . grounds can be found   whereby   these
able  to show our superiority  to the „,,,        u .  .■ ,
v ' "•« men may  be  prevented   from   serving
'common and unclean" in ordinary ey- their King, there is still the doctor to
eryday life, by the cultivation of po- fall back on; they may be made to fail
liteness  and courtesy  the one to the m  tlle'r    medical    examination.    The
other, a state of conduct which is best Sikahs plllckily rt^ that if they ca"-
. c    , . ,-. „ not serve in the militia as at present
defined in a general term as  good man-        ... ,  ,  ..        ...       ,   ,      .... .
constituted, they will apply for permis-
ners."    It is no longer merely neces- sion t0 form a cotnpany by themselves,
sary to refrain from shooting a man wh_ch wili be a bad i00k-out for the
on  sight  to  obtain   a   reputation   for New Westminster militia; for as the
peaceableness; it is not enough to re- sage  said>  "Comparisons are  odious."
strain oneself from disparaging the an- ______ _t __. a curious thing bow servile
cestors of one's neighbour in order to some people  are  _n  the land  of   _be
make a name for oneself as a person free
of culture.   "Good manners" nowadays     when the Lounger first came to Vic-
are not acquired by acts of omission toria the piles for the present Empress
alone, but acts of commission as well. Hotel were being dr_ven in tbe mud 0I1
It is as well that one should moralize the land side of james- Bay Causeway,
thus at times, and remind the people of since then  everything  has  progressed
the twentieht century that we no longer with wonderfui speed, until even now
live in the stone age, because the march the new hotel bids fa_r to be a tlling
of progress has   brought in   its wake  o{ rea, beautyi and an ornafflent to the
such a confusion of hurry and rush that  cky    But| and as usual the «but» is a
the little things of life are apt to be big  one; how about the  flats bebind>
forgotten,  and  as   everyone  knows, it  which were t0 be ready {or the c p R.
is  the little things that hurt.    Polite-  when the CpR were ready for tbem?
ness is a little thing, so is a drop of  Mnch has been saidi much wriUen, and
oil dropped into a bearing.   It was Ad- mudl  excellent  advice  bas been   _en_
dison who compared  politeness to an (lered on the subject> but the fact re.
air cushion, "For,"  said he, "there is mains tbat  „ie  King Edward  dretlge
nothing  in  it,  yet it eases  the  joints  is sti„ Qn ,he Fraserj and New West.
wonderfully."    To   apply   thc   general  minster is putting up a big fight t0 keep
principle to a particular case  is  now it tllere    It wiu be a serious thing for
my intention.   I wish once again, for victoria if we are unable to obtain the
I have done so before, but so long ago  „se of this (lredgei but there does not
that I may be forgiven for again bring- seem t0 be a great deal of interest taken
ing thc matter  to   the   notice   of  my  in tWs maUer    of course| T know we
readers, to say a few words on the con-  ,jvc •„ Vic_0I.ia  and  _iierefore hate to
duct of the average Victoria audience he hurried, but still, even the snail burin any one of the three theatres in the  ried when he heard from the whiting
city.   I am sure of support in my re- that the porpoise was comnig aiong.
marks from, the managers and the ac-     It is curious how some people llever
tors;  I am confident,  too,  that  there can remember a joke S3 a5 t0 repeat ft
are many among habitual theatre-goers ,Q others    j came across a typica, case
who will  agree with me when I say mysdf ,,le other day    T was walking
that as a rule there is less considera-  up  Fon  street   on one of those  nfe
tion shown in Victoria for the feelings moUt days we bave befm having ,ately>
of others than in most cities.   Of course  in cimpany witb two  friends,  one  o{
the habit of coming in late is like the whom has a reputa,_on for possessing
poor, it is, and always will be with us; a pretty wJt    Said my third {Hend tQ
and in this respect Victoria is no worse Kn^ .-George) there is onc tbing abnut
off than any other place which boasts l never Mn understand. you )lem
a fashionable (sic) audience. It is the -— an overcoat» ..No» said GeorgCi
abominable habit which grows worse „■, know j never was» We ,aughedi
and worse of people getting up and and parted The next day t mct my
robing themselves before the last scene Mmi of the bad memQry |n compally
is finished, which is so intensely an- ^ oth,erS) when he suddenly said
noying,   and    incidentally  so intensely „0h) by the way_ yQU fel|owS| j hcard a
New Tailored
Coats and
Costumes.
These a.ke the new London
and Paris models i o r
which many of our customers have been waiting. We
have secured a number of these
new and exclusive hand-tailored garments in the latest
winter and early spring materials. In cut, design and build ,
each garment is distinctive in'
style and character.
EVERY LADY IS INVITED to inspect .these
beautiM creations; they are marked in
plain figures at our usual low prices.
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Angus Campbell & Co.
THE INDIES' STORE
Promis Block. Government Street, Victoria
C.3027
rude.
r       allO       lllClUCllioMJ     -  - uu,   uy   u.v,   •• »j,   j - I        »
rune ' It is rude to other members of good tbing from George the other thy.
the audience;  it is nnpardonably rude „what was  that?"   they    chimed    in.
to  the  actors  on the  stage.    It is  in „Welli you SCe, I was walking up Fort
everv sense a piece of "bad form," but glreet with Ge0rgc in thc rain, and said
the  habit  grows and  flourishes.    An- ,0 hiin> «You never wear an overcoat
She   example of the same thing may and he replied, ha, ha, "No, I know J
m .     ..      «....   r.*n„A   Tlieatre     	
be seen  in  the
i   mc   o»i»^  o        -    iiiiu nc   iv-1-...v.",  .—j   -—.■
New   Grand   Theatre  ncvcr do."   Naturally my poor friend s
during the   second  performance;   peo.
llCVtl     >viv».
Ul,li"8  """   ' "       .",,_.      CC,'   ■   /   repetition fell rather flat; he looked un-
pie who have com* in half way through comfortablC) thought very hard anf, ^
the  first part  carefully wait until  the
beginning of thc turn they have already
seen  and  then  make  preparations  for
departure, regardless of the fact ihat
their movements are interfering with
their neighbors, and that the noise
which they make prevents many from
hearing the opening words of the act.
To such as these it is a matter of no
concern that they should talk loudly
on their way out. It is not a case of
"malice prepense"; it is merely a Wi\-
ter of ignorance of good manners. t
more attention were paid in the schools
of this country to the teaching of manners, even if the time so employed were
subtracted from such desperately important subjects as drawing and a pro- Ag a prisoner was Drougui ™
found study of English literature, the Judge sberman for sentence the c.erk
esull might be evident in the building i_appcned l0 be absent. Judge She.r-
nf a society which would be more man asked tbe officer in charge of the
' •'P accord with the theory of Henry prisoner wbat the offense was with
Wvkcham Bishop of Winchester, and whidl be was cbarged. "Bigotry, your
I like that which prevailed before Honor Hc-S b^tj married to three
history was written. .   .   women."   "Why, officer, that's not bigo-
repetition km	
comfortable, thought very hard and then
said, "Do you know, it doesn't sound
half as funny to me now, as it did
then." Personally I am inclined to
think that few things are as comic as
to hear a man, or woman try and tell
a tale when you are morally certain
that they have never seen thc point of
it themselves. However, it is a contrary world, and most people think
that there is nobody who can tell a
story as well as themselves; for my
part I am convinced that the only decent   story-teller   in   this   part   of  the
world is
THE LOUNGER.
A New Science.
prisoner was    brought
before
FUEL
In cold, chilly, damp weather nature calls
for warmth and heat. The human body
carries warmth and heat but it needs fuel
to keep the fires going and the blood
warm and healthy. The finest fuel in the
world for the human body is a dish of
Rolled Oats
II K  1920
sec thai
try,
It was good reading to mc t
the  Hindus, so-called, in   Westminster  ,lomctry."
said    the    judge,  "that's   trigo- THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906.
The Week
▲ Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Office*:
mi Government Street .... Victoria B. C.
Empire Block   Vancouver, B. C.
W. BLAKEMORE...Manager and Editor
BADINAGE    1
By BOHEMIAN
Jj^MfMJ*Wj>__l_M44»i
I find it almost as difficult to select
a suitable subject for discussion, presenting the necessary vaiiety and interest as the average parson does in
selecting his Sunday text. There are
many subjects upon which I think I
know a little, and some upon which I
think I know a great deal. Unfortunately many of the latter are more suited
for the select circle which gathers in
my den for the enjoyment of good cheer
both mental and material, than for exploitation in the columns of a review.
There is, however, one subject upon
which the spirit moves me to make "a
few remarks" this week, and if exV
perience in such matters may be regarded as a fair test, then it comes under
the head of those subjects upon which
I think I know a great deal.
Next to conversation correspondence
is the most delightful of all relaxations,
that is of course assuming the conjunction of two kindred spirits. 1 am not
thinking of letter writing as a means of
conveying the sententious utterances and
didactic reasoning which characterise
Lord Chesterfield's letters to his son,
nor the worldly wisdom and fin de
siecle advice of a merchant to his son,
but rather am I thinking of the written
word as a substitute for the spoken
word, of the letter which is the vehicle
for the spontaneous and iinuttered impressions of one's innermost thoughts,
in short of letter writing as a substitute for conversation. History accords
nothing more entertaining in the realms
of literature than the correspondence
which has passed between celebrated
personages. Biographers have done
their work, and done it admirably; they
have tried to show to the observant and
critical world the career of their hero
as seen through their own spectacles;
they have presented his conduct in the
light in which it has appeared to them,
or in which they would fain have it appear to posterity, and the whole fabric
has been shattered by the production
by a bundle of faded letters. The Written word of the man himself has told
the true story of his life, of the motives which actuated him, of the hopes
which he cherished, of the adversity in
which he foundered or the unsuspected
indulgences which wrecked his career.
Against this evidence there is no appeal ; by common consent the revelation
of his private correspondence is accepted as the last word upon the man
and his works. Correspondence with a
tried friend holds an important place in
the economy of nature. It is the safety
valve by means of which the surplus
steam of a fevered and agitated existence is permitted to escape. Many
a man whose environment is uncongenial or whom destiny has compelled
to spend his days among those who have
no sympathy with his aims, and who
perhaps deride his ideals, has preserved
his sanity and perhaps even his composure by resorting to the sealed missive as an easement to his heart and
brain.
As a Bohemian my enconiums upon
the delights of correspondence are confined to the class of leiter writing which
is a pure relaxation, and whose object
is not to convey philosophical and moral
teaching but to seek an interchange of
sympathetic thought. This class of
correspondence possesses many charms
and furnishes many surprises. Out of
it mere acquaintances, attracted in the
first place by a few candid ideas, have
developed into deep and stable friendships with an established accord as perfect as that which resulted from true
telephathy. In other instances perfect
strangers whom accident has led to interchange the first letters, have, by
some inexplicable but inevitable stroke
of fate been led to continue the correspondence until, although they may
never have met, they have learned to
know each other so well that the spiritual comprehension of each other's character and capacities would hardly have
been strengthened by actual acquaintance.
I have known instances in which without design, after the receipt of one letter a person has felt impelled to persist
in a course of correspondence, which
increased in interest with every interchange of thought, and which finally
established so strong a hold upon the
affections that it could only have been
terminated with a pang as great as that
which would characterise the separation
of two dear friends who had known
personal intercourse for years.
ln what consists the charm and fascination of correspondence between people, and especially between a man and
a woman, who have never met, or who
having met are only slightly acquainted, who have no expectation and no
particular desire to stand in a closer relationship to each other; who have no
designs or arriere pensee, but who for
sheer love and pure enjoyment of each
other's letters continue to correspond,
and feel when the end is reached that
something has gone out of their lives
which can never be replaced? I think
the answer to this lies in the fact that
with the conditions such as I have laid
down the interchange of thought is more
spontaneous and unaffected than in the
case of personal intercourse, because
complications are less likely to follow
and both parties can afford the luxury
of a degree of abandon which would
be indiscreet, if not impossible, otherwise. With the sane, thoughtful man
and woman there is always a desire for
a fuller interchange of ideas upon many
topics; this desire can without any impropriety be gratified from a distance.
There is a subtle piquancy resulting
from the uncertainty as to how the last
letter will be received, what the recipient will think, and in what language
thc reply will be couched, an uncertainty
which it will take days and perhaps
weeks to resolve, meanwhile furnishing abundant room for speculation and
curiosity. Then there is the further
attraction of building up one's conception of the whole personality of the correspondent through the medium of the
correspondence only, a process which
calls for the exercise of i -.finitely
Stealer judgment and skill than if one
were aided by all the physiological and
psychological conditions which are present in the case of personal contact. And
then there is another charm, it is that of
being able, without restraint because of
absolute safety, to flee from one's
troubles and difficulties to the quiet retreat of the little sanctum, and there to
pen a recital of all our woes, or maybe our desires, with the certain knowledge that they will speedily reach one
who understands and responds to our
every thought and mood. Surely this is
an alluring picture, possibly too alluring some of my readers may say; otlv
ers may scout the picture as overdrawn, and oth;rs again may object to
its tendency, but all such should remember that corrjspondence like this is
a substitute for thj direct personal sympathy which every man and woman
needs, and that it would be entirely out
of place, indeed impossible, if they had
already found (hat sympathy among
their personal acquaintances.
It is hardly necessary for mc to say
that this is the rarest and possibly thel
highest form of intercourse because it
looks to no material reward, and because comparatively few are so constituted that they would seek through it
their goal of ease; but there are some
and to them it means salvation; it may
mean more, for under such conditions
the highest ideals are developed and
thc loftiest and the most disinterested
thoughts expressed. Two lives at least
are definitely and visibly strengthened,
and what added influence radiates from
them can never be estimated by thej
Philistine who disbelieves and the cynic
who scoffs. Some men are happy in
counting   their   friends   around     th,e
hearthstone, others number them in the
pages of an album, but among those who
still treasure them in a package of faded
letters, preserved from the desecrating
touch of time by many a fragranj:
memory is
BOHEMIAN.
Books and
Hagazines
In "White Fang," Jack London's
latest book, the author has given an excellent story of the life of the Wild.
It would seem that the greater part of
the book is a justification for the horror of the first few chapters, in which
is depicted the turning of the Wild
against the gods of the Wild. The story
of the hunting down of the hapless
trackers is told in that terse, cold'
style which serves to accentuate the
depth of it by leaving so much to he
filled in by the imagination. The tale
of the early days of White Fang, the
cub of the half-breed Kiche, is intensely interesting, and shows a familiarity
with the ways of animals rarely met
with. One of the greatest charms of the
book is the introspective reasoning
which Mr. London puts into the mind
of his wolf hero, showing by a series of
natural deductions the absolute necessity for every act being done as it is
done. Thus the training of White
Fang to the laws of life, and later in
the books to the laws of civilization;
his first trial of water, his ignorance of
the meaning of a slope which cost him
an akward fall, are all detailed with
the nicest discretion, so as not to impair the recital with monotony. The
story will be read by all lovers of animals with the greatest interest, and not
without a corresponding advantage to
themselves, and maybe to such animals
as may chance to be under their care.
"White Fang," by Jack London, published by MacMillan & Co., on sale at
lhe Victoria Book & Stationery Co.,
Victoria, B. C.
*   *   *
The first Canadian edition of "The
Doctor," Ralph Connor's new novel,
lias been published by the Westminster
Company, Limited, Toronto. There is
noticeable throughout the story an attempt on the part of the writer to give
to it a variety of plot and action that
is not found in his former stories. It
seems, however, the part of unwisdom
for him to depart in any degree from
the path of easy, direct narrative that
has led him to fame. "The Doctor" is
extremely interesting, and has the fine
Connor wholesomeness, pathos and excellence of character delineation. It is
perhaps scarcely as well balanced, however, as some of his former stories;
certainly not greater. The effort to
lend complexity to the plot, the rapid
shifting of the settles of action, and the
introduction of considerable extraneous
material have a tendency to weaken
the grip of the story on the reader's
mind. Decorative qualities add to mediocre work, but tiioy seem incongruous
in a story by K dpi. Connor.
In point of character-drawing, the
author has given us, in "Thc Doctor,"
a real flesh-arid U-od hero, thoroughly
human and life-like An intimate knowledge of the unaccountable workings of
the huma heart is levealed in the love
story of Dr. Barney Boyle. The story
recalls that of Pip and Eslella in "Great
Expectations." It will be remembered
that Pip knew that his love for Estella
was against hope and against reason,
yet he loved her. So with Barney, as
with many, many others in real life.
OUR window owes you a slight idea of our large stock
of silver plated tea and coffee services. If you are interested in this subject our experts will gladly explain
the different body metals and finishes used in the manufacture of silver plate ware; also the different schools of design; vamable knowledge which should assist you in selecting silver plated goods that will last a lifetime.
IF you cannot get to Victoria,  our  Mail   Order Department will gladly give you all particulars and information.
OUR showing of Tea and Coffee Services in finest silver plate for this Christmas season comprises a most
unique assortment.   Each set was personally selected
on account of the artistic beauty of the design and the durability and value of the plateware, now  ready for your inspection at this, "The Gifting Season."
THREE-PIECE AFTERNOON TEA SERVICE in the ever-popular and fashionable Queen Anne design  $12.00
THREE-PIECE FAMILY SIZE SERVICE, in very richly engraved floral design $12.00
FOUR-PIECE, medium size, finest  solid edge,   Butler finish  pattern  $18.00
FIVE-PIECE,  oxidized, applied pattern with repousse work $35.00
THREE-PIECE, Coffee Set and Tray, solid edge pattern, gilt-lined
sugar and cream $21.75
THREE-PIECE SET, Cream, Sugar and Tray, in rich Butler finish, Greek pattern, a very beautiful and artistic set $15.00
FOUR-PIECE  SET, best   English   nickel   silver   in   Alexandra
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SINGLE TEAPOTS, English design and workmanship—Quadruple
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CHALLONER & MITCHELL
THE XMAS GIFT STORE
7-49 Government Street, Victoria, B. C.
V
CM 2019
A Question of Pedigree.
At Birmingham this, .week a schoolmaster was trying to instil a rudimentary knowledge of Greek into the heads
of his class.
"Now, tell me," he said, "who was
Bacchus?"
No answer.
"Come, come; Mars was the God of
War, Venus the Goddess of L ne, Bacchus was the God of "
"Bookmakers I" timidly suggested   a |
broken punter's son,
(5
SM TH STUMP PULLER
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a short job to clear 40 acres with a SMITH STUMP PULLER, a steel machine scarcely covering two feet square by one
foot high. With the exception of a very few extra parts, it is
in two pieces, of nicely proportioned soft steel, weighs 300
lbs., which includes 75 feet of oil and copper tempered steel pull rope,
steel rope coupling hook, anchor rope. By far the most powerful machine of its kind. One horse on end of sweep gives 28 tons pull; 2
horses, 56 tons; by using our single snatch block, pull is increased to
112 tons, and by using Smith's new compound patent snatch block,
force is doubled to 224 tons. The ropes wear forever, as there is
nothing to break nor wear out. The SMITH STUMP PULLER costs
very little money. Write or call for special catalogue and prices to
the sole agents for B. C,
E.G. PRIOR & ee., Ld.
Hardware, Iron and Steel Merchants,
123 Government Street, Victoria, B. <3.
Alao at Vancouver, Kamloops and Vernon.
p, R.1911 THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906
* A Lady's Letter *
* By BABETTE. if
if if
ifififfyififififififififii
Dear Madge-.—Napoleon called the
English a nation of shopkeepers. It was
intended as a reproach, but, unfortunately for England, the reproach no
Conger applies. England is now a nation of footballers and cricketers, as to
Its masses, a nation given over to bridge
fiid racing as to its classes, and genially speaking a nation where the people who take "shopkeeping" seriously
ire the many of good family and small
neans, who, within the last twenty
lears, have gone into trade, perceiving
Ind profiting by its opportunities One
lears of dozens of men .and women of
Lie aristocracy who are making a living
Ii one way or another, from stock ex-
Ihange to stockings, and whose forbears would have fainted at the thought,
lust at the time when the great Corsi-
lan twitted the Saxon, for a tradesman,
tow it is the descendant of grocers,
vho yearns after a cavalry regiment,
knd the "retired" retailer of ribbons who
petakes himself to "shires," . sends his
Ions to the Varsity, subscribes to the
[unit, and supports local charities. A
J.opsy-uirvy world indeed, and "mad"
|as ever Shakespere found it.
Sometimes when one reads society
hews, one is tempted to imitate the historic millionaire, and say: "'Ow 'or-
ribly 'cllow it all is," remarks the Manchester (Eng.) Chronicle. For in-
Itance, would not this advertisement,
vhich appears in a fashionable London
taper, make you feel just a little doubtful about your society acquaintances?
[Ladies moving in good society may
:arn substantial commissions by pro-
noting a subject easily and naturally
Introduced into conversation." Just imagine what ballroom conversation will,
become if this sort of thing spreads. You
lead out the charming Countess of Ros-
lendale to the mazy dance, and her first
■ cmark is: "Don't you find dancing a
[ink tiring, Capt. Vavasour?"
Of course, you reply that in her com-
liany no one could possibly be tired. The
Countess beams her thanks for your
|>retty compliment, and proceeds:   ' But
am sure you suffer from tired feet
Ihe day after." Eager to gain her sympathy, you admit the soft impeachment,
I'Then, captain, let me urge you to use
iDcath to Corns.' It is only li/2 a box.
Ivlind you, beware of imitations. With-
lvut the trade-mark of the dancing skeleton you have been basely imposed up-
In. And, please say I recommended you
Ivlien you write—then you are sure to
|>e properly attended to."
And you leave the Countess and her
torn cure to flirt with a Duchess who.
Is pushing somebody's cocoa, and finish
[he night by sitting out the last dance
vith a Marchioness  who begs you to
jise "Mugge's Soap."
As some people are so misguided as
Jo feel "below par" and "cheap" occa-
liionally, it becomes of importance to inform them how these undesirable co-
litions can be kept at bay. A judicious
Bliet of "Nemo" will do more to preserve normal health and ward off disease than many people who don't re-
|!lise the philosophy of "stitch-in-time"
•inciple will ever understand.
The subject of Christmas presents is
beginning to occupy one's mind already,
Ind amongst the choicer gifts which
feinta Claus is bringing in that corner of
(ys wallet reserved for adults, I am in-
pined to give furs the place of honor.
Apropos, the B. C. Fur Manufacturing
Eompany is offering some real bargains
■Hist now, and as furs may be counted
Imong the mose desirable of gifts, those
M10 intend to let their remembrance
jfike this welcome form will be well ad-
lised to pay this company a visit,
ft Why does Christmas-time, I wonder,
Ifi-ing back so many youthful escapades
mind? One of the best remembered
rimes of my own infancy was the regu-
?r and stealthy raiding of the reserve
jjigs of currants awaiting in the pantry
|eir ultimate destiny in the shape of
|ince pies, plum puddings, or even the
Kimble but toothsome "spotted Dick."
Ehndign ounishment followed the of
fence, but since modern analysis has
disclosed the fact that a pound of currants contains over three times as much
actual nourishment as the same weight
of lean beef, it is possible that Nature
was guiding me to the very food my
system required. The receipt for a
wholesome currant cake suitable for afternoon tea or for the youngsters is as
follows: Take 2 lbs. flour, 4 oz. butter, y2 oz. carraway seeds, J4 oz. allspice, lfe lb. pounded sugar, I lb. currants, 1 pint milk, 3 tablespoonfuls fresh
yeast. Rub the butter lightly into the;
flour, add the dry ingredients and mix
well together. Make the milk warm but
not hot; stir in the yeast with this liquid,
make the whole into a light dough;
knead well and line the cake tins with
strips of buttered paper about 6 in.
higher than the top of the tin; put in the
dough; stand it in a warm place to rise
for more than an hour, then bake the
cakes in a well heated oven.
I had a great treat on Thursday in
the fashionable show rooms of Angus
Campbell & Co. I was buying neckwear, when one of the assistants drew
my attention to some extremely beautiful new coats which were just being
unpacked. My dear Madge, these are
the very coats you have been looking
for, and next time I meet you I know
you will be wearing one.
BABETTE.
Regimental.
FIFTH REGIMENT, C. A.
Regimental orders by Lt.-Col. J. A.
Hall, commanding. Regimental headquarters, Victoria, B; C, November 28,
1906:
1. Discharge—The following man hav
ing been granted his discharge has been
struck off the strength of the regiment: No. 19, Gunner G. W. Power,
November 26, 1906. That portion of R>
0. 45, referring to Bandmaster W. V.
North, is hereby cancelled. Bandmaster
W. V. North, having been granted his
discharge, is struck off the strength of
the regiment.
2. Officers Meeting — The monthly
meeting of the officers' mess will be
held on Thursday, December 7th, in the
Drill Hall, at 8.30 p.m. Dress: Undress
uniform.
3. Tax Certificates—0. C. companies
will fill in and initial tax certificates for
those N. C. O.'s and men who earned
efficiency pay last drill season, and will
hand in same at office on December ijjth,
1906.
By order,
(Signed)   W. RIDGWAY-WILSON,
Capt., Adjutant 5th Regiment, GA.
A Legend.
There has come to my mind a legend
I think I'd half forgot;
And whether I read it or dreamt it
Ah, well, it matters not.
It is said that in Heaven at twilight
A great b'cll softly swings,
And man may listen and hearken
To the wonderful music that rings,
If he puts from his heart's inner chamber
All the passions, pain and strife;
Heartaches and weary longings
Thai throb in lhe pulses of life.
If he puts from his soul all hatred,
All thoughts of wicked things,
lie can hear in the twilight hour
The bell that the angel rings.
And I think that there is in this legend
If we open our eyes to see,
The throb of a deeper lesson
Appealing to you and me.
Let us look in our hearts and question,
"Can pure thoughts enter a soul
And dwell with thoughts that are vile?"
Contending  for common goal?"
Then let us ponder a little,
Let us look in our hearts and see
If the twilight bell of the Angel
Could ring there for vou and for me.
F. G.
Quality Our Watchword!
OUR DRIED FRUITS ARE THE FINEST
NEW ARRIVALS
Ontario Dried Apples 2 lbs. for 25c
Fancy Seeued Raisins 2 lbs. for 25c
Finest re-cleaned Currants ioc a lb.
Golden Sultanas 15c 1 lb.
Finest Table Raisins 250 a lb.
Fancy Candied Peel 20c a lb.
Shelled Wallnuts 50c a lb.
Soft Shelled Almonds 25c a lb.
Finest Almond Paste 60c a lb.
In fact everything needful for a successful Plum Pudding or Christmas Cake.
Wines and Liquors the Finest.
THE WEST END
GROCERY.
Phone 88.
t
42 Government Street, Victoria
THE PARTICULAR GROCERS
PICTURE
FRAMING
^■w|/w*\ftr*H I
.
C.H.Smith&Co.
Have you ever thought what
makes a good picture frame?
The frames we make always
suit the picture; they are well
made and are reasonable in
price—in other words, they
are good frames. We make
this a special feature of our
% business—other things too.
■
Fine Art Dealers
32 Fort St., Victoria.
;
:
1
**+**tyfa
Chinese- made Skirts ^Overalls
MUST GO I
H1RN BRAND
BUTTING AHEAD.
■-.-.-.■■---■-1 10
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906-
Semi-Ready Top Coats & Raincoats
$10 to $30.
B, WILLIAMS & CO.
OF THE
SEMI-READY WARDROBE
Beg to announce that their stock of
Christmas Goods
is now complete and comprises
Dressing Gowns, Smoking Jackets, Suit Cases,
Valises and Bags, Travelling Bugs, Fancy Vests,
Cardigan Jackets, Gloves, Fine Umbrellas, Fine
Top Shirts and Underwear, Silk and Linen Initial Handkerchiefs in fancy boxes, Fine Suspenders, Cuff Links, Dress Shirts, etc. The
XMAS NECKWEAR STOCK is the largest ever
shown in B. C, and consists of some 2,090 dozen
SCARFS in all the LATEST MODES,
OUR NEW SUITS
AND
Semi-Ready Suits,
Select your XMAS GIFTS NOW.   No trouble ^
show goods. I rouse rs,
to show goods,
$12 tO $25
$ 4 to $7
THE   MOTHERLAND
Exchanges With Our Kindred.
Hands Across the Sea,
The Unready Dreadnought. NOTICE is hereby given that thirty No. a. ^^        . ^ days aftcr ^^ l y°^^ctl  ls  __ere,_,y given ,t____t  thirty
We want the finest and most efficient ^^Si^oT S^and TS^^^JSt^t!SSSStSSi Sfi t^n^» $£
ship's company in the finest and most g^ f«                               and g^^ffl^^*,{5* % ^SA^»S^SASS3SS,
efficient ship in the world.   But that can carry away timber from the following g"°^f sound? Rupert District: sltunted on the south  side of San Juan
only be got by keeping the Dreadnought described lands situate upon the south" ginning « a post planted   at   th. River'^il^^^^^.
. La in full commission.   Instead, we west shore ^Stuart Ute-d gjt ^— E^§§$g the east ^g. *narM,.. Young, No,,
thence  south  80 chains;
Ezperto Orede.
What is worse than raining cats and ^^^^^^
dogs? —  Hailing    motor-omnibuses.—  shiP's company,
t-,        , ...li-1.  .,  ...or,, niir
Punch.
,   ■•   i ■ ~ :„  nine miles from Fort St. James, hnundarv or no. s ™ uuhimb, m™». <=•>...   :; —    r-.„„   ,—.—--  i,—-  --  iv. -^a
are to have an untested ship lying   n  ^^  fi   r    y-        Commencing * g^ .  or St?^ e&V°Pte S
ci,=„.„»c= with   not  even  an   untested  a oost placed on  the  lake shore  and  east  80 chains,, thence  souu   about   tu  mmm'._..,...   _.0I1tni„i,,e «40 acres.
Sheerness with   not  even  an _ ____      	
but   what   is    worse,  marked "E. J. M.—N. E." and thence chains to the snore, ...
Th* nrr,nn«1   astronomically  west 8o  chains, thence  sl-or« southwesterly   io  point   ot   com
lhe proposal ■» *  ~ .    > iiienceiritnt, containing 040 acres more or
...  astronomically south 8o chains, thence iess •;■..?'■
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. ist, 1906.
1 r, ijf M    Uf I I
The Girl's Century.
This is the girl's century. She has
come to be the great factor in every department of life.—Girls' Realm.
with a mere nucleus crew,   inepiuijuao. -
  ,     ,    ,., astronomically   __ 	
for dealing with this great and splendid astronomically   east   ^   chains>   and
ship would be ridiculous if it were not thence astronomically north 80 chains,
*    -a •-  .— «.,., nniv to  point  of commencement and  con-
he shore/: thenc"eUiollowing the  commencement, containing 040 acres.
------        Dated  nt  Port   Renfrew,   October  29th,
11)06.
ALEXR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1900.
JOHN  HIRSCH.
heart-breaking.    As it is, we can only  ^J™^
The Leading Disease.
To be quite frank, "thc blooming
hump" is undoubtedly the disease of
the present generation, even more than
appendicitis, adenois, or rheumatoid
arthritis.—Ladies' Field.
turn m shame and sorrow from this
Chinese scheme—a scheme which, remember, is not a landsman's device, but
one for which the Sea Lords are responsible.—Spectator.
acres.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Per J, A. HICKEY, Agent.
July 23d, 1906.
No. 26.
T
No. 4-
NOTICE   Is   hereby   given   that   thirty |
' ,         .1      n,of   in riTva afier date   1 aWs   after dnte   I Intend to npply to the
x'ake notice that, 30 days «"'«■«>• chief Commissioner of Lnnds and  Works
intend 10 apply tothe Chief Commissions for n speo_a_ lleense to cut alM_ C!_rry away
of Lands and Works for a special llcensr following described lands,
to cut and carry away  limber from the s[tnnm  0„  thfi gouth  £&e of gnn  j   ^
following    described    land,    situate
Kyuquot  Sound,   Ruperi   Disirlet:
Beginning  at  a   post   planted    on
"                                               '                      '        ———^^——- J\yUl.|llllL      kJUU.tu,       .»»,*....        .....
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty Beginning at a  post  planted   on   thf
days after date  I  intend   to  apply  to east side of a iMver unnamed entering In
aa.    u~ ~     ui   .l    r\ ■ 1 r~     _:   • to  Clan  n nick   Harbor  about  V-k  m es-
.i.~  u„„„„,„m» t)lB  rinpf Commission- ,.„„   fhtt  molUh.  thence  ens:  60 chains
me xiunuuiaujc mc ^n.v.4 wv .  ,11.ui   <„*-.  ,.,u ,
er of Lands and Works for a special north U< chains, wesi 811 chains, south
_________      , _.       _.   ,    license to cut  and carry away timber chains, east 20 chains to point of 00
advanced    woman,   figuratively  {rom the _ollowil?g deScfibed lands sit- ™£ceme"t' °°nl*"»ns M0 ■lcr<
Feminine Demands.
The
speaking, points a pi
istol at the head of uate on the southwest shore of Stuart     Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 25th, 1900.
River, Renfrew District, adjoining A.
Young's southwest corner: Commencing at
a post mnrked "J. Young, Northwest Corner," tiience south 80 chnins; thence enst
80 chnins; thence north 89 chnins; thence
west 80 chnins to place of commencement,
eontnlulng  040 ncre*
Dnted nt Port Renfrew on the 29th dny ,
of October,   1900.
JOHN YOUNG.
November 17, 1900.
Non-Permanent Marriages.
The Socialist no more regards the institution   of   marriage as a permanent
a man, and cries:    "Your breeches or
your life!"—Marmaduke in Truth.
Lake and about ten miles from Fort
St. James, Coast District, viz.:   Com-
JOHX  HIRSCH
—   No,
NOTICE  ls  hereby  given  that  80  days   * NOTICE   Is   hereby   given   that   thirty_
Mark of the Golfer.
imnt*BMMHR-ni-B      .—I Much   golf   makes   one   pigeon-toed
thing than he regards the state of com-  -,   ,.    ,•    , ■    •
i.°.       .   ,      ",. Instinctively   111
petitive   industrialism   as a permanent ^ {et  ^  imvard
thing.—H. G. Wells, in Fortnightly Re-   , • .   ,   . '~ t, -.,,• 1 ,1
. ' b    ' lhey point that way off the links as well
view.
as on them.—Family Doctor,
A Transvaal Prediction.
The  day is not so very far distant
mencing at a post placed on the lake   ^^J.™ f.nTend'Vapply^to the Hon. ,i„'y7'after dat e"°i7ntend' to npply to the
shore and marked    E.  J.  M.—S. r..,     c-lm-le* Commissioner of Lnnds and works ciiiof Comnilssloner of Lnnds and  Works
thence   astronomically   west  80 chains,   fm. permission  to purchnse the following for n speclnl license to cut nnd enrry awny
fhTnrB  sstrnnnmirallv  north  80 chains,   described lnnd sltunted In the Coast   Dis- timber from the following described lnnds,
thence astronomically  nortn ou'"""'»>  "'(."   ,{           -    Beginning    nt  a    post sltunted on the south  side of  Snn Juan
.    ,      more or less, to said southwest shore ol   "    •        *■ the north ,,,,„_. „f the sueenn River,   Renfrew  District,   adjoining  John
('riving and swinging  gtuart Lake and at a point known as   ',         t t__p montl, ot zymqetltz river and Young's southenst corner: Commencing at
1  l r    ■   i™«  It,= «nir. Row" anrl thpnee followine the   iiMrkPfl  n   B's Southwest Owner; thence a post mnrked  "A Young,  Northenst Cor-
ird,  and before  long the   Big Bay,   and tnence loiiowing iue     aike    u.'fj %0'X|™_ thence east 80 ner," tihence north 40 chains; thence west
 said shore in a southeasterly direction   running north 100 cnains ^tnence   ^^ m                       ^^ ^ .^^ ^^
to the point of commencement and con-  Xei" a'lwout W ehaliia more or less; thence ^USlnffift9^*.1*08 ot commencement,
■       •                               -  " '—       following mennderlng of Skeena  river In "XnlThvJfntf™ „„ j*. onfh *.„
a sou'thwesteriy dlrecuon to post of commencement, containing 040 acres of land
■more or less.     MATRlc|. BATEUAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Loeated  September  20th.   1900.
Male Ideals.
The average man is still   jcilous of
tsming about 320 acres, more or less.
E. J. MATHEWS.
Per J. A. HICKEY, Agent.
July 23d, 1906.
Dnted nt Port Renfrew on the 29th dayl
of October, 1900.
November 17, 1900.
ALDXR.   IOUNG.
when the men with a real stake in the i,j_ helpmeet and partner.   His ideal at     „vxxw „ ..v.^j ■r"*""iiS
Transvaal-including British mine own- ,leart ., still the farmyard cock, strut-  days after/iatejjntend_to£$££■*£
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
..ays after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
NOTICE  Is hereby
No. 0— ,
NOTICE   Is   hereby   giveu   thnt   thirty
.1...  on fl.v<  days  nfter date   I Intend to npply to theJ
iven that 80 anjs  (.Mef ConlI?1??lone_ ot !_„„,__ an(f works^
arraved in a solid partv   against    the aro_md him.    He is    willing   to    find awa    timber from the following  for a speclnl licenceto.cut.and cany away  sltunted on the south side of San Juan
,urdy<-u 1      j      b ,.   ,    - ■      .       :.-■— 4 i-»    ..—-H.-J I__j.  :„   Aik..n: nictrlrt.   a    timber from the following described lamis   Kiver. Renfrew District. niHntnlmr t  t**:
forces   of     Socialism.—btar, themn ice little
growing
Johannesburg,
bits, but they must be described lands, in Alberni District:   * ""^/ToiVlWr^^SSa SrS^^Stt^'
,l,l« m find them for themselves.—Sat-  Commencing at a post situate on or near  met  cnsslnr District, B. C:   Starting nt marked   »j.   Young,   Northenst "corner7"
able to hnd tnem ior uicii ^ nort__west corner of Lot 79. Muck-  tt post mnrked southenst comer, said post  thence south  SO chnjns_ thenee  west
urday Review.
Channel Tunnel Arguments.
The Channel tunnel project has been
once more resurrected. . A fantastic
military danger is again being used to
('elay what would be a greal blessing
to commerce and humanity,
other absurd objection is that such a
tunnel "would lead to recurrent national
panics," hardly a tribute to the stability
Heroines Who Wear Well,
AO chains east: thence 40 planted about 20 chains from point dividing chnins; thence north 80 chains; thence east
inn wont • thence 80 south • A"ee and Hastings Arms running 20 chains 80 chnins to plnce of commencement, con-
IOO west, tnence OO sown, T L 8141  theuce north lOO chains;  taining 040 ncres.
toosh; thence
north; thence 100       .
thence 60 east; thence 40 north, to point Sce"ei!stV(Aaiu"s?to shore;"thence south
The up-to-dale heroine may
wil to  shreds and tatters, may suffer
agony   from   an uneasy  conscience, be
Still  an- plunged into the depths of poverty and ^~ ""
distress, or indulge in a career of dissi
, tc-ir her of commencement.	
' lear ller C. F. PARK, S
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 22d, 1906.
along the shore 180 chains to point ot commencement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TIE AND TIMBER
CO.,   LTD.
No. 22.
Dnted nt Port Renfrew on the 30th day
of October, 1900.
November 17, 1906.
JOHN  YOUNG.
No.  7- .
NOTICE   Is   hereby   given   thnt   thirty]
Tnke noilcp thnt, 30 days afier dale   '
Intend lo apply In the Chief Commission"'
mlion that  would  ruin  the constitution   of Lands anil Works for a special licen«'
p.ition 111.11 u ,0 cu.  am] pi)rl.y „,vny  ,imbPr tronl  (h.
nl" a  Hercules, but she still retains nei   fOi|0W|np,    described    Innjl.   situate    nr.
on    th'
of thc English character.—Nation, New |_ea.,tv and her grace, and at thirty or  KynnjV'f Sound.  Rupert   lilsirlcl:
. „. Beginning  nl   a   posl   planted    f
York.
fi.rtv
outshines
Monthly.
Take notice that, 30 days after date,  I iays   n_te_ AntQ   _ intend to apply to the
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner ciiiof Commissioner of 'Lands nnd  Works
of Lunds nnd Works for a special license _or ft special license to cut nnd enrry awny
to out and carry away Umber from the timber from the following described lands,1
following    described    land,    situate    on sltunted  on  the  south  side of  Snn  Junn
Kyuquot  Sound,  Rupert  District: River, Renfrew District, ndjoinlng T. Lee's
Beginning at  a  post  planted   at    the southenst  corner:  Commencing at a  post,
northwest corner of Application No. 8 on marked   "A.   Young,   Northwest   Corner,"
Sweet-and-Twenty.—  west side of Union Island nbout 20 ehnln'   Kokghmie  Arm,   thence   east  40  chains,   thence  south   80   cbnlns;   thence   enst  M
The Simple Life.
The  remnant uf  us  who still  lunch
and dine   is    diminishing.   Thc   other      1 /
night at one of the fashionable restaur-  t|Kl|
atits a very smart lady was observed by
her distressed host to be refusing everything,   from   ' homard   a   l'Amcricaine"
to "peches Mclba."    At last he hospit- principle
ably entreated her to say if there was
anything   she   could   fancy,   when she  perjalism, well  may  one
firmly asked   for a   little    bread    and  Word.    As an enemy of   the    imperia
Liberals and the Empire.
jrals are never tired of professing
hey are the true Imperialists, in—
asmtich as they laid lhe foundations of
th Empire by creating autonomous Col-
soiith nf a group nf small Islands In Bli
Entrance, thenee 80 chains east, thencr W
chnins   nnrlh.   thenco     40   chains   wos1
tiience 40 chains nnrlh, ihence wpst abnn'
20 chclns to lhe shore of Blind Entram
ihence   southerly   nlong    said
point   of  nnti'inencoment.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. loth, 1906.
JOHN  HIKSCH
norih 81 chains, west 00 chains, soulh tu  chnins;    thence north SO chnins;    thence
the  shore    of    Kokshittle   Arm,   thence   west 80 cbnlns to plnce of commencement,
southeasterly along said shore to get one  eontnlulng  040  ncres.
mile   of  southing,   thence  east   about  40      Dnted nt Port
chains   to  a   point   north  of    the  initiul   of October, 1900.
shore   I'   aluke, ihence south 40 chains to point of
comnitucemenl.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. ist, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH.
Dnted i'it Port Renfrew on the 30th day J
ALEXR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1900.
Nn. 24.
Take notice that. 30 dnys after dntp
No.  8-
NOTICB   Is   hereby   given   thnt   thirty!
(lays   nfter dnte   I intend to npply to
Newfoundland r
If this be Ini-
sicken at the
milk.—Vanity Fair.
Mr. Churchill's Regrets.
It makes one's mouth water to think
of the mince-meat to which the Fourth
Parly would have reduced thc present
Ministry, which  is  infinitely more vt.il-
1       i,.,„n il,e„ Interpreted that  Intend tn applv to the Chief Commission"-      Take notice that, 30 days after date, I Chief Comnilssloner of Lands nnd  Worki
low have they interpreted mat  mieno jn npp.y^: to (he ch|ef Comm|ss)oner for « special license to cut nnd enrry awny.
■   " ■"•        '  "' """"s HM"      "l1"'        -   -M     - -0f Lands and Works for a special license timber from the following described lnndsi*
to cut nnd carry away  timber from  the sltunted   on   the  south  side  of Snn  Jua-
followlng    described    land,    situate    on River, Renfrew District, ndjoinlng T. Lee'
the   Ka-o-winch   River,   Kokshittle  Arm, southenst  corner:   Commencing nt  n  posl
Kyuquot   Sound,   Rupert   District: Marked   "A.   Young,   Southwest   Corner/
-      Beginning  at   a  post  planted    on    the theuce  north  40  ehnlns;   thence   east  lflt
. ,1    m  „h„i„=    ,k„„„.  „„,    sr  „„»,h  hn.mrtnrv 'ihont 20 chains west of ehnlns;    thence  soutli  40 chnins:    thenee
hence  north   40  chuins,   thence  ens. "™lh  $«™J™,lol   Application  No. west 10O ehnlns to plnce of commencement
7.  on  Mie east  bank of  the Ka-o-wlnch containing 640 acres,
River,   ihence   enst   20  chiirns,   north   100
chains,  enst  20 chains  to  point  of commencement, containing 040 acres more or
losi
lhe 1 ransvaal, Natal, and |n pllt nn,i pnrry nwny timber from th<
following described lnnd. sltunte nr
Kyii'iiint   Sound.   Rupert   Pistrlct:
Beirinning nt n post plnnted on tb*
snuiii shore nf Narrow Out Inlet, Ihene.
sninh HO  ehnlns.   thence    enst  40 chain"
idea,  Mr. Winston Churchill  has
to learn from Mr. Keir Hardi
of India,  Bombay.
chains. Ihenee nbnut 40 chnins norih .*■
Times the shnrf nf Narrow Gul Inlet, thene.
following the shore in n westerly dlree
tinn to point nf con-.nien'ement. enn
mining fi40 ncres more or less.
. . j ■ ____       ,,     Kyuquot Sound, Oct. 7th, 1006.
'Single Bound the World, Please. .John hirsch
The Railway Magazine points out that No. _Si
British     n'ilwav     Tnlte notice  thnt.  30 dnvs nftpr dnte   '
* inlpnd tn apply tn the(Ghlei Commlsslnne.
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 29th, 1006.
' JnllN HIRSi
Dated nt Pnrt Renfrew on the 30Mi dnyj
of October, 1906.
ALEXR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
IRSCH.
the    most   expensive
No. 20.
Tnke notice that, 30 days nfter dnte. II
Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner!
of Lands nnd Works fnr a sneclnl license!
nerable than the great Cabinet of ,880, ticket is from London to Wick, first* of Lands^ndWs W ^snMnMicc,,^
Nn   V.
Tnkn notice thnt.  30 dnys after dn'e
Intend In applv in ihe Chief Cnmmlsslnn<"   to cut nnd enrry nwny  limber  from  lhe]
Mr. Winston  class return, costing Iq 6s. 6d., hut the  fnnnwlne"-'n'nw-rih«*:   lnnd.    sliunte
0f   Kyunnol   Sound.   Rupert    nlsM-.cl
during  lhe past session.     ^^^^^^^^^^^^
Churchill, in his more rational moments,  mnst expensive ticket issued, which
must   regret that  he  sold    hi "Self   so  course,  includes experses    other
Beginning  nt   n   pitst   planted    nt    lb
than   snilthPMMI  corner of Applicn'inn No. 1. n-
Kokshittle   Atm.   tbence   west   SO   chain-
of Lands nnd Wnrks fnr n speclnl llreno.
tn cut nnd enrry nwny timber from '^'
following described lnnd situate n-
Kyuriunt   Smind.   Runerl   Plslrlcf
Pntrinntng n*  n  no«t   nlnnted    nenr   l*i»
Initial post nf Appllcntinn  Nn. 2fi.  ihe"^-
thence
pniuli   fn  chnins.   thence    ens.   «*  east   lo'chnlns.  'thenco   south   SO   chnln"
following described bind, situate onl
Tahsish Arm, Kyiifllini Sound. RupertJ
Disirlet:
Reginnlng at a post plnnted »" the,
enst boundary of Application Nn 13.1
about 00 chnins snulli ol" lhe nnriiieastf
corner   thereof,   tbence    oust   100   chains.1
cheaply to the other side, as there nev-  (fain fares, is lire one issued by Messrs.   ,,,,.,,,.  -'---" -r'^r'^','-'";,, pnlnl „, ^it 80 fhMni'; north so chains, ens.    <"  thence nnrlh  40 cbnlns.  ihence  wesl
there   never  will  heL   T. Cook and  Son  for n  tour round the  commencement, eniilnlnlttg MO ncres mm.  chnins  tn  pnlnt  nf  commencement,  enn    chnins. tiience south nlong snld hound
er  has been and  th
as  the present for a  world, from London lo London, the cost nr less.
such  an opening  as  the present ior a  world, irom loiiooii to unnn.11. mc 1....-^  	
guerilla   leader.-National   Revie.v. belW/M7't« Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 27th, t00<5.
• JOHN HIRSCH
taining 040 ncres more or les«
Kyuquot Sound, Sept. 2.1th, 1906.
JOHN HIRSCH
40 chains to point of commencement.
Kyuquot Sound, Oct. 5th, 1906.
JOHN   HIRSCH. .mum '■ •ujww.-iim' .'jivihmn.m
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906
11
34. Commencing at a post planted at
•the   south-east    corner of Section 7,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thenee north Ho cnains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 6, Township 12, Range Si of said survey.
HY. KERSHAW,
G. B. Watson, Agent
September 20th, 1906.
35. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 7,
Township 12, Range 5. Poudrier Survey ; thence south 80 chains; thence east
_ 80 chains; thence   north   80   chains;
|i/ thence west 80 chains to commencement,
and   being    Section   5, Township 12,
Range 5, of said survey.
FRED BIN MORE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
W- : ; :
36. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 16 of
said survey.
J. CHAMING,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
,    37. Commencing at a post planted at
' the   north-east    corner of Section  16,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-
I vey ■ thence south 80 chains; thence east
80  chains;   thence  north    80    chains;
. thence west 80 chains to point of com-
, mencemtnt, and being Section 15, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
W. VAN ARSDALEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
described lands in Alberni District:   a.
Commencing at a post situate 80 chains
west and 20 south ofsoutheast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 80 north; thence 80 east; thence
80 south, to point of commencement.
J. T. BUCKLEY,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
' thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
' chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
' east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 25, Township 4,
Range 4, of said survey .
WM. MATTHEWS,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 17th, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of Section 16, Township 12, Range   5,   Poudrier   Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
_ chains; thenct south 80 chains, thence
I east 80 chains to point of commence-
™ ment, and being Section 21, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
CHAS. LEVE'-n,
G. B. Watson, Agent,
September 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 3.
Commencing at a post by the shore of
Alberni Canal, near the southeast boundary post of Lot 658; thence west 80
chains; thence south to the north boundary line, or the same produced of Lot
69; thence east to Alberni Canal; thence
following the shore line to point of commencement.
W. C. RALEIGH,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
Oct. 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District: 5.
Commencing at a post by the southeast
boundary of Lot 77, Nahmint Bay;
thence 60 chains west; thence 20 north;
thence 90 west; thence 50 soutn; thence
east to the waterfront, thence followi; g
the shore line to point of commencement.
C. LUTKIN,
W. B. GARRARD. Agent.
Let., 27th, 1906.
49. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Township 3, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chaias; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 4, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
THOMAS  STARIBRD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
50. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Township 3, Range 4, 1'oudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 3, Township
12, Range 5, of said survey.
MAYE STARBIRD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands:   1. Starting at a post
110 chains east of the mouth of Handy
! Creek, on the north shore of Alberni
I Canal; thence 160 chains north; thence
140 chains  west; thence south  to  the
I shore line; thence following the shore
line to point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. GARRARD, Agent.
November 4th, 1906.
39. Commencing at a post planted at
■ the south-west corner of Section 20,
1 Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-
vty; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 18, Township 12, Range 5, of said survev-
C. A. COCK,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
.    40. Commencing at a post planted at
I the south-west corner of Section   20,
I Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Surrey; thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence    north   80   chains;
ithence west 80 chains to point of commencement,    and   being    Section    17,
Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
ROBERT Lll'TLE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
,  41. Commencnig at a post planted at
the south-west corner of   Section   20,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey ;   thence   north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 19, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey,
JOSEUH TAENHAUSER, Sr.,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
42. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 20,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 20
of said survey.
F, JOSEPH TAENHAUSER, Jr.,
J. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
143. Commencing at a post planted at
lhe south-east corner of the north-east
quarterof Section 22, Township 4,
"Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence nortli
■Jo chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
Fsouth 80 chains, thence west 80 chains
Ito point of commencement, and being
Wie north half of Section 23 and south
Jialf of Section 26, Townhsip 4, Range
|4, of said survey.
EMMA BATEMAN,
Iv A. T. Clark, Agent.
1  September 17th, 1906.
,___	
44. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 27,
[Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
jUience north 80 chains; thence west 80
fhains; thence south 80 chanis; thence
•ast 80 chains to point of commence-
hent, and being said Section 27 of said
Iturvey.
J. S. McEACHERN,
j A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
it NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
lays after date I intend to apply to the
gHon. Chief CommisM f Lands and
Iworks for a special license to cut and
jfarry away timber from the following
2. Starting at a post 40 chains north
of the initial post of No. 1, near Handy
Creek, Alberni Canal; thence 40 chains
east; thence 160 chains north; thence 40
chains west; thence 160 chains south to
point of commencement.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Nov. 4th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands'
and Works for a special license to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands: Commencing at a
post by the southeast corner post of Lot
79, on Uchucklesit Harbour; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 100 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west to
waterfront; thence along waterfront to
point of commencement, excepting
thereout the lands covered by existing
mineral claims.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. GARRARD.
Clayoquot District, Oct. 29th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands in Alberni District: I.
Commencing at a post situated 80 choins
west and 20 south of southeast boundary
post of Lot 658; thence 80 chains west;
thence 3o south; thence 80 east, thence
80 north, to place of commencement.
E. CURTIT,
Per W. B. Garrard, Agent.
Oct. 19th, 1906.
51. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Township 3, Range 4, Poudrier Survye;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
C. T. CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.   .
52. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 33,
Township 3, Range 4, Poudreir Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 34, Township
3, Range 4, of said survey.
VICTOR ROLLINS,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
S3. Commencing at a post planted at
tiie north-east corner of Section 4,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 9, Township 12,
Range 5, of said survey.
N. A. WALLINGER,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
54. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 4,
Township 12, Range s> Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 10, Township 12, Range 5, of said survey.
H. D. HENDERSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
thence east 80 chains to point of com-
menctment
HARRIET NELSON,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
61. Commencing at a 1 ost planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. riarvey's
lease; thence north 80.chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thtnee west 80 chains to point of commencement.
CAROLINE HAINES,
G. B, Wtaspn, Agent
September 10th, 1906. "
of the Nechaco River; thence following
bank of said  river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or lets.
EDGAR L BLAKE,
A. T. Clark, Agent
September 12th, 1906.
62. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement.
MARGARET INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
63. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of G. M. Birkett's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains to ponit of commencement.
HUBERT HAINES,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
6«. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Hubert Haines'
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence cast 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains to point of commencement.
MAXWELL S. INGLES,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
75. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of E L. Blake*!
lease; thence west 80 chains; south 80
chains; east 80 chains to bank of Nechaco River; thence following bank'of
said river to point of commencement.
640 acres, more or less.
.    MARY BLAKE,
A. T. CLARK, Agent
September t2th, 1906.
76. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Mary Blake's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
more or less, to the Nechaco River;
thence following the bank of said river
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
GEORGE BATEMAN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906,
17. Commencing at the south-east cor-
near of George Bateman's lease; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco Rvier; thence following
the bank of said river to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
B. P. COOK,
G. B. Watsoq, Agent
September 13th, 1006.
66. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of . Knignts leaes;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence souht 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
ROSABELLA GOODWYN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
67. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of E. Knight's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement.
CHAS. KNIGHT,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
68. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas.. Knight's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement.
W. H. GOODWIN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
55. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 3o chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 22, Township
4, Range 4, of said survey.
LILIAN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 15th, 1906.
45. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 31,
Township 3, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 31 of said
survey.
HENRY BARNARD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
46. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 36,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 3o chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36 of said
survey.
MATILDA BARNARD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
47. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 30, Township 3,
Range 4, of said survey.
ELMA MATTHEWS,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
48. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 24,
Township 4, Range 4, Potdrier Survey;
56. Commencing at a post planted on
the north-east corner of Section 15,
Township 4, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence west 80 chains; thenee south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 15 of said
survey.
GLEN CAMPBELL,
A. T. Ciark, Agen.t
September 15th, 1906.
69. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Chas. Knight's
lease; thence west 80 chains; thence
south So chains; thence east 80.chains,
thence north 80 chain sto point of commencement.
E. N. MacBETH/
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September nth, 1906.
70. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 35,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier survey ; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
M. WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 17th, 1906.
57. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres,
KATE CLARK,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
58. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
J. A. HARVEY,
A .T .Clark, Agent.
September 10th, 1906.
59. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Lot 547; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement.
G. M. BIRKETT,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
Septtmber 10th, 1906.
60. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of J. A. ilarvey's
lease; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
71. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of the south-west
quarter of Section 14, Townslun 12,
Range 5, Poudrier survey; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, and being
the south half of Section 14 and north
half of Section 11, Township 12, Range
5, of said survey.
H. RENNIE,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 19th, 1906.
72. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of B. P. Cook's
lease; thence nortli 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres.
WILLIAM MEREDITH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 13th, 1906.
73. Commencing at a post planted at
lire south-west corner of Maxwell S.
Ingles' lease; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, more or less, to
the Nechaco River; ihence following
bank of said river to the south line of
Maxwell S. Ingles' lease; thence west
80 chains, more or less, to point of commencement.
MINNIE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 12th, 1906.
74. Commencing at a post planted at
a point on the west side of the Upper
Nechaco River, opposite th'e south-west
corner of Lot 545; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the bank
Notice is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intende to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands situated on Long Lake,
which empties into the Owun River,
which flows into Masset Inlet, Queen
Charlotte District:
Claim 18—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner, at the
head of Long Lake, thence 80 cnains
west, 80 chains south, 80 chains east,
80 chains north to post of commencement.
Claim 19—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, at the
head of Long Lake, thence 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west,
80 chains north, to post of commencement.
Claim 20—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
wets shore, at the head of Long Lake,
thence west 40 chains, 160 chains north,
40 chains east to shore of lake, then
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 21—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, at the
east shore, at the head of Lonk Lake,
thence east 40 chains, north 160 chains,
west 40 chains to shore of lake, then
following to shore to point of commencement.
Claim 22—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, two
miles from the head of Long Lake, on
the west shore, thence 40 chains west,
160 chains north, 40 chains east to shore,
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 23—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, two
miles from the head of Long Lake, on
the east shore, thence 40 chains east,
thence 160 chains north, thence 40
chains west, more or less, to shore, following the shore to point of commencement
Claim 24—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
west bank of Long Lake, four miles
from its head, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south to shore, thence
following the shore to point of commencement.
Claim 25—Commencing at a post
planted at the southwest corner, on the
east shore, four miles from the head of
Long Lake, thence east 80 chains, 80
chains north, 80 chains west to shore,
more or less, thence following the shore
to point of commencement.
Claim 26—Commencing at a post
planted at the southeast corner, on the
north shore, about five miles from the
head of Long Lake, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, more or less, to the
Omun River, thence following the
shore, river and lake, lo point of commencement.
Claim 27—Commencing at a post
planted at thc southwest corner, on
the northeast shore, about five miles
astronomically south 80 chains, thence
from the head of Long Lake, thence
cast 80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains, more or less, to
the Owun River, following the shore of
the river and lake to the point of commencement.
Claim 16—Commencing at a post
planted on the west side of lake, at the
crossing of south line of lot 32, thence
west So chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence 80 chains cast, more or less, following the lake shore to point of commencement.
CHARLES WATKINS.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent.
NOTICE is hereby given thnt sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for permission to purchase
section 24, township 8, range 5, Coast
District.
EMMA HOWE.
JOHN DORSEY, Agent. 12
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i. 1906.
NOTES ON PROVINCIAL NEWS.  |^^^^^^^^|
Forest Protection.
It is understood that Hon. R. F.
Green, commissioner of Lands and
Works, has almost completed his plan
for the protection of the forests of the
province from destruction by fire.
The outline of the plan has already
been published iii "The Lumberman
and Contractor." It is believed that it
can be satisfactorily worked out and
be the cause of saving much of the forest wealth of the country. Mr. Green
has given the question of forest fires
a great deal of attention, and the McBride Government will be able to put
the measure he has fathered into execution. For this he and the Government will deserve the commendation of
every man in the province who believes in conserving the forests, one of
our greatest natural resources. It is,
so to speak, the "ready money" of the
province. The 84,000,000 people of the
United States have reduced their timber limits of the United States to a
very small area, and the time is not far
distant when they will be compelled to
rely on Canada for nearly all the lumber they consume. Already the price
of lumber has advanced to high figures
owing to its scarcity in the United
States. From now on the outlook is
that lumber will keep increasing in
value with each year. The demand will
be so great that British Columbia will
be paid vast sums for her timber. Timber will materially aid in enriching the
people of the province. It is a wise and
statesmanlike measure of precaution on
the part of Mr. Green to endeavor to
save as much of our timber limits from
destruction by fire as possible.—Ashcroft Journal.
They include all sorts of staples required in case of injury or sickness.
Their purpose is to prevent want in case
of wreck or snow blockade that might
cause unusual delay.
Christy's
Hats	
Endorsed by Government.
There is rejoicing at Nicola in consequence of the promise of the Government to build a bridge across the river
to the new C.P.R. station. The Nicola
Herald thus comments on the good
news:
''Messrs. A. E. Howse and A. W.
Strickland, who interviewed the Government as delegates from Nicola, to
request a new bridge for that town,
returned home yesterday. They reported the complete success of their
mission. A new bridge costing $2,500
will be built across the Nicola from the
town to the new C.P.R. station. This
will bring the main business street of
the town within a couple of hundred
yards of the station, and prove a great
improvement over the present method
of reaching it, which is fully half a
mile around, and besides being inconvenient, is dangerous.   The new bridge
will aiso shorten the road    to   Aspen
Grove by hat distance.
Take Tour Choice.
People who have lived on the prairies
for ten or fifteen years find that they
have had enough of frost and snow and
are now moving to the milder climate of British Columbia. Hitherto
Victoria has been their Mecca, and for
those who want the most equable temperature and practically no snow or
frost it is of course the finest place in
Canada, if not on the continent. There
are others, however, who prefer a drier
climate, and to such the following
characteristic paragraph from the Enderby Progress is well worth reading:
"Since Monday morning about a foot
of snow has fallen in the district, and
at the time of writing (Wednesday) is
still falling, and with the hard bottom
that it has, sleighing will soon be at its
best. Our farmers, lumbermen and merchants will welcome this early heavy
fall of snow, as the harbinger of a busy
winter, and hope that the white mantel
will remain on the ground all the winter. While an open winter is very
pleasant in many respects, it is the season with good sleighing that means activity in the lumber camps, produce
moving in the country districts and
money circulating in town. An early
fall of snow coming before very hard
frost protects the ground and ensures
early farming operations and plenty of
moisture in the ground next spring, and
also protects the roots of the fruit
trees from the possibility of being
frosted. So, that although the townsman may sigh as he gazes sadly at his
fast decreasing wood-pile, or tramps his
weary way along snow-covered sidewalks, he can console himself with the
thought that a busy and prosperous
winter is ahead of him and all. The
old-fashioned winter is the best for the
country, however much we may have
enjoyed the open weather and bare
ground of the past two or three seasons,
I Are self-conforming |
I Will adjust themselves I
I to any shape head. I
I    That's why gentlemen
I of discriminating   taste
I wear them, the lightness
in weight make them the
most  comfortable   hats I
ever produced. I
I    Three Grades, I
I      $2.50, $3.00, $3.5o I
*j? I
I Sea & Gowen |
I HATTERS & FURNISHERS I
! 64 Government St. Victoria {
51? 51s
*|«Hti'H"i'H*''r
NOTICE is hereby given that, $0
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, in Alberni District:
Commencing at a post on the Alberni
Canal, about 30 chains S. of Hayes
Landing; thence W. 40 chains; thence
S. 160 chains; thence E. to water front;
thence following the water front to
point of commencement.
W. E. GREEN,
W. B. Garrard, Agent.
October 29, 1906. no29
Remarkable Provision.
Nothing could better illustrate both
the novelty and the possible contingencies attendant upon a winter trip
through the Rocky Mountains than the
provision that has been made by the
C.P.R. for dealing with any emergencies which may arise at any time between November and May; Few transcontinental travellers have not experienced a hold-up by snow-slides, and
as these unpleasant experiences may occur at a distance from the base of supplies the C.P.R., with the thoughtful-
ness which usually characterises that
enterprising corporation, has adopted
an ingenious plan for preventing any
inconvenience to its passengers. In addition to the provision boxes with which
the Canadian Pacific equips its trains
that cross the mountains, this road has
just issued an order giving notice that
emergency boxes have been cached at
a number of points along the line to be
drawn upon in case of need or unusual
delay. General Superintendent R. Marpole. of the Pacilic Division, has issued
a circular to employees of thc company
saying provision boxes in charge of the
baggageman, and to which conductors
hold thc keys, are continued on the
trains.
Provisions have also been stored at
Hector. Glenoglc, Donald. Mountain
Creek. Bear Creek Rogers Pass, Ross
Peak,   Albert  Canyon and   Notch  Hill.
Mount Sicker.
Although the Cowichan Leader voices
the views and the ideas of one of this
most picturesque and fertile sections on
the Island, it manages to keep one eye
on Mount Sicker to let the outside*
world know every now and then what
is going on at the mines at that camp.
The following concise little bulletin
gives the latest news:
''Mining is Still progressing favorably at thu mines on Mt. Sicker. The
Tyee Company are steadily working on
both taking out ore and developing with
conditions fa'-orable and the Richard
III are pushing their work ahear still
in solid ore, every day's work in which
means many thousands of dollars for
that company. The force of men is to
be increased and work started to the
east as well as the west, with the best
kind of conditions to work on."
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30 days
after date, I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
c   -iVd  lands, in Alberni District:
No. 1.—Commencing at a post on the
p"st side of Silver Lake, about 40 chains
fro-i' the outlet: thence 40 chains E.;
80 chains N.; thence west to Silver
Lake: thence following the shore line
to point of commencement.
No. 2.—Commencing S. W. corner of
No. 1, on east shore of Silver Lake;
thence 40 chains E„ 40 chains N.; 60
chains E.; 80 chains S.; thence west to
outlet of lake; thence following the
shore line to point of commencement.
No. 3.—Commencing at a post at the
outlet of Silver Lake; thence 40 chains
S.; thence io chains W.; thence 40
r'inins N.; thence 100 chains W.; thence
>T. to Silver Lnke; there? following
shore line to po|nt of commencement.
W. E. GREEN.
W. B. Garrard, Apent.
31st October,  1906, no29
Getting Even.
Butcher Ludwig was continually being robbed of meat by a large black tomcat belonging to a next door neighbor.
Finally his temper got the best of him,
and he poisoned the cat.
The cat's owner, the next morning,
found his large black cat lying dead before his door. He knew at once who
had done the killing, and with a low,
bitter oath he took the dead cat up by
the tail and went indoors.
Butcher Ludwig had happened to advertise for the week a mark-down sale
on sausage. That night his shop was
thronged with sausage buyers.
Suddenly, when thc crowd was thickest, the outraged neighbor elbowed his
way through thc people, and threw upon the chopping block the dead body of
the huge black cat.
"There you are, Mr. Ludwig," he
said. "That, makes thirty-five. I'll
bring thc fifteen others when you're not
so busy."
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, 1 intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber, exclusive of hemlock, from the following described
lands:
1. Commencing at a post by the N.
E. boundary post of the Indiai Reserve, on the shore of Nahmint Bay by
the mouth of the river; thence 80 chains
N.; thence 80 chains W.; thence S. to
Nahmint River following same to N.
boundary of I. R.; thence E. to point of
commencement.
2. Commencing at a post by the N. E.
boim'Vv post of the Indian Reserve
and at the S. E. corner of No. 1;
"thenc" •''o chains N.; thence E. tn W.
boundary of Lot 79; thence S. to shore
line: thence following the shore to E.
boundary of I. R.; thence to point of
commencement.
Located October 28th, 1906.
W. B. GARRARD.
Alberni District. no29
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special licence to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands: Commencing at a post
on the N. shore of Uchucklesit Harbour, on the W. boundary of Loe 699,
'Cascade" Mineral Claim; thence N.
and E. along boundary of "Cascade"
M. C. to the W. boundary of Lot 79;
thence N'. and E. along 79 to Fern M.
C. thence N. and E. along boundaries
of "Fern." "Wasp" and "Sunshine" No,
2 Mineral Claims, to the N. E. corner
of "Sunshine" M. C.; thence N.. 40
chains; thence W. 100 chains; thence S.
to shore; thence westerly along shore
to point of commencement.
W.  E.   GREEN,
W. B.  Garrarci,  A|nie'.
Clayoquot District. 11029
THE BEST OF
QOOD CHEER
FOR CHRISTMAS
"Should be on every table."
Mumm's Champagne
Kilmarnock Scotch Whiskey
(Johnnie Walker.)
Carnegie's Porter
Olympia Beer
White Rock
With a fund of good humor and
genuine Christian charity.
Jxici Dry
Mumm & c
resasggaf
GOD SAVE THE KING
P,L. 4035
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Uovernment St., Victoria, B. C.
Charles Hayward, President. F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty ot Undertaking and Embalming.
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 305, 404 or 594, Victor(a.
f
START
TONIGHT
THERE is nothing like independence.
We will start you on the right road TONIGHT between 7.30 to 9 p. m. Deposit a portion of your week's wages in our Savings
Department, where interest is compounded
quarterly. Start to-night.
A General Banking Business Transacted,
The Northern Bank
Head Office Winnipeg.
Authorized Capital, $a,ooo,ooo.
VICTORIA BRANCH
GODFREY BOOTH
Manager.
Established 1856
M. R. SMITH & CO.
Factory and Head Office:
VICTORIA
Manufacturers of
Warehouse and Offices:
VANCOUVER
BISCUITS ™* CONFECTIONERY
Note Our Leader   -ISMITH'S SWISS CREAHS
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.       1
LONDON AND GLASGOW
Purveyors to the Royal Family,
DISTILLERS OF HIGH GRADE  SCOTCH WHISKIES
Buchanan's Royal Household at }i.so per bottle
Buchanan's Black and White at fi.ij per bottle
Buchanan's Red Seal at Ji.oo per bottle
ARE LEADERS AMONG THE BEST
For sale by all dealers, VICTORIA, ■. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1906.
13
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
Have an exclusive list ot specially selected ACREAGE, ESTATE and FARM
PROPERTIES for sale at prices which
will attract purchasers.
NOW IS THE TIHE TO BUT
Victoria Property is the safest aud best
investment to be found in Real Estate on
the Pacific Coast.  There will be a
50 PER CENT.
IN VALUES IN 1907.
You cannot make a mistake in buying
Business,
Residence, or
Acreage
Property.
Write or call on us for particulars.  We
can show you how to make money.
The Pacific Coast
Realty Co., Ltd.
12 MacQregor Bl'k, Victoria, B.C.
(Opposite Driard Hotel)
REAL
ESTATE
FIRE, LIFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE.
Viotoria Real Estate today ie the I
best investment in the Province
Prices advancing rapidly.   I ad
vise immediate investment.
Consult me.
J S. Murray
46 FORT STREET
VICTORIA,   B. C.
13.   P. O. BOX 77 PHONE 1279
I The Home
;; Seekers
Goal.
} Special   Bargains to
Wind Up An Estate.
6}i acres in the North
End, only 20 minutes walk
to Post Office, with southern aspect, $600 per acre,
5 acres is all cleared and in
high state of cultivation.
Seaview lots from $50 to
$100 each, chiefly cleared,
and ready for building on.
Easy terms if necessary.
The B. C. Land & Investment
Agency, Ltd.
Real Estate, Financial and
Insurance Agents,
VICTORIA, B. C.
i
Subscribe for The Week.
Money
Properly invested
leads on to
Fortune.
We are the medium
through which this
happy result can be
ACHIEVED, therefore invest in
Vancouver Realty.
BURNETT, SON & CO.
Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
We Will Buy
10,000 Denora Mines  $o.n_4
5,000 Cariboo McKinney      .04
1,000 Diamond Vale .; VJ
100 Consolidated Smelters  ..134.00
S.ooo Telkwa Mines  Offer
We Will Sell
500 International Coal   $0.68
2,000 Rambler Cariboo  34
2,000 Nicola Coal Mines, Ltd...   .0634
500 La Plata   25
100 Dominion Copper  5-8°
If you are interested in stocks, our
quotation sheet will be of benefit to you.
We will mail on request.
B.B. MIGHTON & CO.
Mining and Investment Brokers,
Drawer 1082. Nelson, B. C.
FOR SALE
In a good Kootenay town, splendid newspaper outfit and job
plant.
An opportunity for a live man
with small capital.
Address "The Week," Victoria.
W.B.Smith
WnttrtaU
35 YATE5 5.
PHONE,     892
Navy
Sale
Having bought np all the
large Sj.j lb. brass shells
curio collectors and others
will And them highly desirable for umbrella stands,
flower pots, jardinieres,
etc. They are 4i in. in diameter and cannot tumble
over. Nice for Christmas presents.   To be had at
H. STADTHAGEN
THE INDIAN TRADER
79 Johnson St. VICTORIA
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED
rTCAvaiERTT^
VIOTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and vaudeville
artists while in the Capital city, alto of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIGHT & PALCONER, Proprietors.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
REVELSTOKE
Hotel Victoria
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Headquarters tor miners and
lumbermen.
ROBT. LAUQHTON, Prop'r.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
WE
HAVE
Fruit Lands
Timber Limits
Range Land
and
Mineral Claims
Throughout the
BOUNDARY
DISTRICT
Deane's Hotel
phoenix, b. c.
New. Modern hot water system, Electric
lighted. Tub and shower baths and laundry in
connection.  The miners' home.
" DAINNY " DEANE, Proprietor
GREENWOOD,
The Windsor Hote
GREENWOOD, B. C.
American and European Plan.
Cafe in Connection.
ERNEST J. CARTIER, Prop.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $ 1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
QREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot the Kootenays.
J. FRED HUME,      •      Proprietor,
UNRIVALLED OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FRUIT CULTURE
IN THE KETTLE
RIVER VALLEY.
Before Locating Send   Us  Particulars of What You
Require
A.
Erskine
Smith &
Co.
REALTY and MINING
I VESTMENTS
Reference:  Eastern Townships Bank.
Grand Forks, B.C.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home of the Industrial Workers
olthe Kootenays.
W. E. HcCandllsli,
Proprietor
Royal  Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in the City,
tl a da>.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts, Proprietress
CRANBROOK.
Cranbrook Hotel
Cranbrook, B. C.
Rates $2 per day.   Opposite the C.P.P..
depot.
Hogarth & Rollins, Proprietors.
IDEAL
CLIMATE
SOIL
and
LOCATION
FOR FRUIT
Plots.
That is what I can offer orchardists
on the shores of beautiful Kootenay
Lake.   Write for literature and maps
J. E- ANNABLE,
The Land Man,
NELSON, B.C.
Having a Climate and Soil
equal to any other section
of British Columbiai
Nelson Fruit
Lands
will save you 25 to 50 per f
cent, on cost of original
investment.
H. E. CROASDAILE & CO.
Nelson, B.C.
Nelson Iron Works
Machinery of all kinds built,
erected and repaired.
Complete Mining Plants
Cammell Laird Steel, Eto.
B.A.Isaac Hali.4.4.    D   t*
R.W. Hinton      HclSOn, D. L.
Collectors!
I oarry an assortment of 400
subjects ot*
Genuine
Photographic
Post Cards
of Banff and the Canadian National
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PRICE 60c. PER DOZEN.
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
My quotations by the hundred are
the lowest in Canada. Photo post
cards made from any subject yon
may send me.
Write for particulars.
Byron Harmon
Photographic Artist,
Banff, Alberta.
C. S. BAKER
Assayer,
Chemist
and Ore Shippers' Agent.
GRAND FORKS, B. C.
I ASSAY CHARGES.
I
I Gold    $1.00
Silver  1.00
i Copper    1.25
Lead   1.25
Iron    1.50
Zinc   2.00
Gold and Silver  1.50
Gold and Copper  2.00
Gold, Silver and Copper  2.50
Gold, Silver and Lead  2.50
Other metals on application.
A discount allowed to regular customers.
YMIR ll a thriving mining:
town, situated 18 miles
south of Nelson in tho rich
mineral distriot of West Kootenay. It is essentially a
frco-mllllngcamp, and there
are six iHtap-nillls operating
in the vicinity—one of them
(the Ymir) being the largest
In Canada, wilh its80stamps
constantly dropping. There
are numerous mints in active
operation In the camp, and
reliable inlormation ia always available In Ymir.
Waldorf Hotel
Headquarters for Mining and Commercial Men.
Sample Rooms in Connection.
YMIR, 8. e.
G. S  COLEMAN.
Proprietor.
YMIR enjoys every facility
for mining operations.
Timber and Water are abundant, the roads and trails are
In good condition in the
main, and new ones are being opened up. There la direct railway communication
with three smelters, all within fifty miles ol Ihe town.
The climate Is congenial and
every necessaij and luxury
of llle can be sectred In the
camp and at prices that compare favourably with those
of any other district. H
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i 1906
31. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 34.
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
vest 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement ; 640 acres,
E. V. ISARD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 17th, 1906.
32. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 18,
Township 12, Range 5, Pouarier Survey; thence south 40 cnains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being the north half of
Section 8 /Township 12, Range 5, of
said survey.
BENJAMIN WERDEN,
G. B. Watson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south side of Camelia Inlet, about 18
miles from the mouth of the Skeena
River, commencing at a post marked C.
T., N. E. corner purchase claim, thence
running south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
C. TAKADA.
November 2nd, 1906.
33. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section i3,
Township 12, Range 5,_ Poudrier Survey ; thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being Section 7, Township 12, Range 5, of sid survey.
chas. Mcdonald,
G. B. V/tson, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
No. 10.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty-
days after date I intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining E. J. Palmer's northeast
comer: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 5th day
of November, .1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
CHie Commissioner of Landg and
Works for permission o purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
June's purchase claim marked C. W.
Peck, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
C. W. PECK,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated on the
south bank of the Skeena River adjoining H .A. Draper's preemption claim,
south boundary line, at a post marked
M. V. Wadham's N. W. corner post,
thence east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west to bank of river,
following the river bank north to post
of commencement, containing one hundred and sixty acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
M. V. WADHAMS,
Locator.
H. DRAPER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date 1 intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land rituated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. E. corner marked
L ,L. Watson, theuce running 40 chains
west to N. E. corner of E. A. Wadham s
purchase claim, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 40 chains, thence soutli 40
chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
L. L. WATSON,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 36,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 36
of said survey.
E. A. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
daysafter date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of W.
Bruce's purchase claim, marked E. A.
Wadham's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
E. A. WADHAMS,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 3,
Township 10, Range S. J-'oudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 3 of
said survey.
A. B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August sth, 1906.
mencement, and being said Section 12]
of said survey.
CELIA J. MANSFIELD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 7th, 1906.
No. 11.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
,       irrdll Iintendtoawly to he ' days after date I intend to apply to the
rFt   rlmfssoner^  of   Lands   and  Chief   Commissioner   of   Lands   and
Chief   Commissioner   of   Lands
Mrry away ^^$n% I ^^^MM±SLb±
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 10: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast
Corner," thence north 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains, thence south 160
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 160 ch.ains, thence east 40 chains
to place of cemmencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew this 5th day
of November, 1906.
Nov. 24.
ALEX. YOUNG.
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. E. corner of L.
L. Watson's purchase claim, marked D.
M .Moore, S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less. Located
October 26th, 1906.
D. M. MOORE,
Locator.
F. W. BOHLER,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Camelia Inlet about 18 miles from the
mouth of the Skeena River, and adjoining C. Takuda's purchase claim, commencing at a post marked G. B. W., N.
E. corner purchase claim, thence running west 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chainsh t opost of commencement, containing 320 acres more or less.
November 2nd, 1906.
GORDON B. WADHAMS,
Locator.
W. A. WADHAMS,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 4,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 4 of
said survey.
EMMA HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
16. Commencing at a post planted at!
the south-east corner of Section n,f
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur-1
vey; thence north 80 chains; thence west!
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;!
thence east 80 chains to point of com-f
mencement, and being said Section 11]
of said survey.
L. W. PATMORE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 7th, 1906.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 34,
Township 1,-Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 34 of said
survey.
ISABEL HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
17. Commencing at a post planted
the south-east corner of Section iufl
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier SurX
vey; thence north 80 chains; thencV
west 80 choins; thence south 80 chains j
thence east 80 chains to point of comf
mencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
ANDREW F. WhiR,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
18. Commencing at a post planted a
the south-west corner of Section i"J
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Sur
vey; thence north 80 chains; thenci
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of com
mencement, and being said Section
of said survey.
CLARA WEIR,
A. T. Clark, Agent
August 8th ,1006.
i
No. 12.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's timber limit
No. 11, on the east boundary: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
Southeast Corner," thence north 160
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 160 chains, thence west 40 chains
to place of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the Sth
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
No. 13.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining J. Young's east boundary of limit No. 12: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Southeast Corner," thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
ALEXR. YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days after date, we intend to apply to
the Honourable the Chief Commissioner
of Lands and Works for a special licence to cut and carry away timber
from the following described lands in
Eas* Kootenay: Commencing at a post
planted 20 chains south of the southwest
corner of the Isabel Mineral Claim;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to place of commencement.
Dated November 12th, 1006.
CROW'S NEST PASS LUMBER CO.,
LTD.,
N022 ED. GEAGAN, Agent.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 33,
Townshpi I; Range,4, Poudrier Survey:
thtnee south 80 chains: thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 33 of said
survey.
MAGGIE B. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August Sth, 1906.
19. Commencing at a post planted at]
the north-west corner of Section
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence east!
80 chains; thence north 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 6 o\
said survey.
MINNIE BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-east corner of Section 9,
Township 10, Range f. Poudrier Sur-
vev. thence north 80 chains: thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement, and being Section 9 of said
survey.
D. M. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim marked J.
Curther's S. E. corner, thence running
40 chains west, thence 40 chains north,
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
J. CURTHERS,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated in the
Kitsumkalum Valley, commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of D.
Menard's purchase claim, marked W.
Bruce, S. E. corner, thence running 40
chains north, tnence 40 chains east,
thence 40 chains south to post of commencement, cintaining 160 acres more or
less.
Located 26th October, 1906.
W. BRUCE,
Locator.
D. MENARD,
Agent
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 30
days' after date, we intt"d to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special licence to cut
and carry away timber from the following described lands in South-East
Kootenay, viz.: Commencing at a oost
planted on the southeast corner of Lot
494. running south 50 chains, more or
less, to the northern boundary of Lot
2 595; thence east 100 chains, more or
less, to thewestern boundary of Lot
423 ;thence north 80 chains, more or less,
to Lot 2; thence west 60 chains: south
20 chains; west 40 chains to olace of
commencement; containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November T2th, 1906?
CROW'S NEST PASS LUMBER CO.,
LTD.
N022.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 10,
Township to, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 10
of said survey.
LILLIAN HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
/vugut 6th, 1906.
20. Commencing at a post planted aj
the north-east corner of Section i,
township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Suri
vey; thence south 80 chains; thena
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains*
thence east 80 chains to point of com'
mencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.       	
E. H. BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
No. 14.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date I inttnd to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands, situated on the north
side of San Juan River, Renfrew District, adjoining A. Young's east boundary of limit No. 13: Commencing at a
post marked "J. Young, Southwest Corner," thence north Too chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 160 chains,
thence west 40 chains to place of commencement.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 5th
day of November, 1906.
JOHN YOUNG.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, commencing
at a post planted on the right bank of
the Skeena River about 20 chains below the Yamoqotitiy and at the N. E.
corner of Indian Reserve and marked
L. S. H., S. E. corner post, thence west
40 chains.thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 chains to
place of commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
Located Oct. 1st, 1006.
L. S. HUTCHESON.
Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN,
Agent.
Nov. 24.
NOTICE is hereby given that, 60
days from date, we intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a 21-year lease of the
following described lands in the Nechaco Valley, Coast District:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 25,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey:
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said section 25 of said
survey.
W. H. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 'th, 1906.
11. Commencing at a pot planted at
the outh-eat corner of Section 8, Town-
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains • *nence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; and being said Section 8 of said
survey.
GEORGE CURRIE,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
12. Commencing at a post planted at
tne north-east corner of Section 5,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains1 thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains:
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and bein? said Section 5
of said stirvev.
MARY E. LINEHAM,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 6th, 1906.
21. Commencing at a post planted a
the south-west corner of Section 7
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Suj"
vey; thence north 80 chains; thence eas
80 chains; thence south 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of com
mencement, and being said Section 7 d
said survey. 1
THOMAS SHOPLAND,
A. T. Clark, Agent. '
August 8th, 1906.
22. Commencing at a post planted a
the south-east corner of Section 1^
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sui
vey; thence north 80 chains; thenc
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains
tnence east 80 chains to point of corn
mencement, and being said Section I
of said survey.
MABEL BOWDEN,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 8th, 1906.
2. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 26,
Township 1, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
nortu 80 chains to pont of commencement, and being said Section 26 of said
survey.
Epw—   • HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
3. Commencing at apos t planted at
the north-east corner of Section 35
Township i, Range 4, Poudrier Survey;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains; thence
cast 80 chnins to nninf of commencement, and being said Section 35 of said
survev.
C. W. HARVEY,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 5th, 1906.
13. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section I,
Township 10, Range <■ Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of com-
mtneement, and being said Section 1 of
sai dsurvey.
CHAS. F. MAXWELL,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 7th, 1006.
14. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 2,
Township 10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 2
of said survey.
CHAS. F. MAXWELL, Tr„
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 7th, 1906.
23. Commencing at a post planted i
the north-west corner of Section I
Township 11, Range 5, Poudrier Sui
vey; thence south 80 chains; thence eai
80 chains; thence north 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of con
mencement, and being said Section 1
of said survey.
WM. STANLEY BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 10th, 1906.
24. Commencing at a post planted 1
the north-west corner of Section 3
Township 3, Range 4_ Poudrier Surves
thence south 80 chains, thence east I
chains; thence north 80 chains; them
west 80 chains to point of commenc
ment, and being said Section 32 of sa
survey.
R. RICHARDSON,
G. B. Watson, AgentJ
September 20th, 1906.
IJ. Commencing at a post planted at
the south-west corner of Section 12
Township 10. Range 5, Poudrier Surrey ; thence north 80 chains; thence eas'
'"o chains; thence south 80 chai"s-
thence west 80 chains t'o point of com-
23. Commencing at a post planted
the north-west corner of Section i
Township 3, Range 4, Poudrier Surve;
thence south 80 chains; thence east I
chains; thence north 80 chains; then
west 80 chains to point of commenc
ment, and being said Section 29 of sa
survey.
a. p. Mcdonald,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
September 20th, 1906.
26. Commencing at a post planted
the north-east corner of Section 35,1
12, Range 5. Poudrier Survey; then
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chair
thence north 80 chains; thence east
chains to point of commencement, a
being said Section 35 of said survey.
.    FRANCIS T. BATT,
A. T. Clark, Agent,
August 15th, 1906. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER i 1906.
15
An Actress and • Role.
(Continued from Page a.)
felt—once—-can't you care for me, can't
you pity me, just a little."
"Assuredly," thought Preston, "this
interview can only be ended without
further annoyance by determination and
tact. If she would only go away until
—until afterwards, he would be a trufe
friend indeed to her. Jove! it was
lucky that lie had spoken of her to
Morrison alone. It would all come right
after a while, but just now—tact and
•' common sense."
i    "Yes, Dorothy," he said   soothingly,
i "I do care.   But let us be sensible."
I_    'Ah,    Tom!"    cried    Dorothy in a
1 strangely altered voice, "do you really
and truly want to be sensible?"
"Yes,"   he    replied, puzzled, "to be
J sure."
"Then wait here a moment," she said
, with something very like a chuckle. She
'-. skipped  lightly  through   the  portieres
I and Preston collapsed   into   a   chair,
(mystified and speechless.   He was still
f groping   minutes   later,   the   curtains
J parted and before the astounded Pres-
|j ton appeared Dorothy Leighton.    Not
■ she of ghastly countenance and hideously clad, uncouth figure, but the bewitching Dorothhy of old, her   lithe   form
gloriously robed in close-fitting brown
silk.    Preston gasped  and  stared.
"And now," said Dorothy with a
stunning smile, "we shall have that
tea."
"0 yes!" cried Dorothy.    "Your appointment.    I almost forgot.    I'm awfully sorry you must go, but business,
! of course, is inexorable.   You men of
W business are so devoted to your promise,
I so   invariably   constant to your given
word.   But we people of the stage—airy,
|! unstable creatures   of   dream-stuff—we
1 are so changeable.   A little grease-paint,
I a change of costume—and we lose our
I' real selves so utterly.   So interesting,
I don't you think?"
Preston could not think.    His brain
, whirled and in a daze he gained the cleft vator and the street.
The Bights of a Woman.
_ "The rights of woman," what are they?
The right her husband to obey,
The right to show forth all her life
How proud she is to fc> a wife.
|. The right to know how eggs are boiled,
■ To see that wristbands are not soiled,
To know the state of every button,
And how to hash a leg of mutton.
The right, oh, noble destiny!
The daughter of a man to be.
The right to have one for a brother!
Or be first cousin to another.
The right, should  Fate be still propitious,
To be the wife of one—delicious I
The right, oh! grasp it those who can,
To be the mother of a man I
Wisdom for Women.
A heart which has been domest'cated
hy matrimony and maternity is as tran-
I r;uil as a tame bullfinch.—Holmes.
If men knew all that women think,
1 they would be twenty times more .audacious.—Karr.
A beautiful  woman pleases the eye,
.7a good woman pleases the heart; one
■"is a jewel, the other a treasure.—Napoleon I.
■J   Women are especially to be talked to
'as below men and  above  children.—
Chesterfield.
When joyous a woman's license is not
I to be endured; when in terror, she is
, a  plague.—Aeschylus.
Modesty in woman is a virtue most
deserving since we do all  we can  to
I cure her of it.—Lingree.
When we speed to the devil's house,
1 woman takes  the lead by a thousand
["steps.—Goethe.
When a woman pronounces tie name
of a man but twice a day, there may
lhe some doubt as to the nature of her
[isentiments; but three times I—Balzac.
Women know by nature how to dis-
I guise their emotions far better than the
imost consummate male courtier can do(
I —Thackeray.
Woman alone knows true loyalty of
affection.—Schiller.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Preparing For a Second Term.
Sir,—The end of the year is now approaching, and Ihe uiual municipal
tactics practised by gentlemen who desire to obtain a further itr.n 01 omce
as Mayor are already painful y evident.}
By way of convincing the public of his
earnest zeal for the mo.al welfare of
Victoria, Mr. Morley. is showing great
activity in the tuppression of gambling
in Chinatown, and, with the able assistance of his adviser-in-chief, the Rev.
T. W. Gladstone, is preparing mcr. u;--
vere measures against the holders of
liquor licenses in Victoria.
These latter measures may be disposed of in a few words by remarking
that they simply represent a resumption
of the campaign of abuse and vilification of the hotel men by a few self-cpn-
stituted reformers, which was a feature
of last winter's public entertainments.
The present recrudescence of activity
along these lines is an attempt to set
the public by the ears for political ends.
It has not even the faint excuse of necessity, for Victoria >is now, as lit always has been, the most liw-abiding
and orderly seaport town in Canada.'
It is a bare-faced piece of gallery play
—with two thousand dollars a year and
trimmings as the reward of success,   j
The Chinese gambling cases are another matter altogether. Cn Mayor
Morley assuming the reins o o.l ce,
there was an immediate move made
upon anything which could. 1 y any distortion of the imagination, be considered as a game of chance. The Savoy,
the nickel-in-the-slot machines, the race
sweepstake drawings, lotter.es—all fell
under the ban. And.sM:yor Morley,
and his clerical importation from
Wandsworth, who watch over our
morals for us when we are too busy)
boasted through press, platform and pulpit that gambling in Victoria had ceased
to exist.
But was that the truth? During the
past few weeks there have been several
raids on Chinese gambling places, resulting in large hauls. Does this mean
that the wily Celestial, after having
been a good boy all the year, has suddenly become possessed of a spirit of
wickedness just at this most convenient
time, when his summary suppression
will redound so greatly to the credit of
the municipal firm of Morley and Gladstone ?
Or does it mean that there has never
been any cessation of gambling in
Chinatown, and that the present activity
in suppressing it on the part of our
worthy Mayor and his ghostly adviser
is simply to serve the two-fold purpose
of augmenting the city's revenue and
making municipal capital. Is it not a
well-known fact that gambling in
Chinatown has been in operation during
the whole of the past year? Is it not
equally a matter of common knowledge
that numbers of our citizens have played
the Chinese lotteries throughout the
year, some successfully and some un
successfully, but all without hindrance?
Is it not a fact that an individual, occupying the possibly lucrative and certainly dishonorable post as spy for Mr,
Gladstone, reported long ago to that
reverend gentleman that gambling and
lotteries were flourishing freely in
Chinatown? Is it not a fact that this
report was ignored? And is it not a
matter of common report on the streets
that the Chinese pay handsomely for
the  immunity  they enjoy?
These are questions which must be
answered before the citizens permit the
Mayor and his self-appointed adviser
to saddle severe and unjust legislation
upon any branch of the community.
WANDSWORTH.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for a lease of the
foreshore abutting the entire Pacheena
Indian Reserve, lot two (2), Renfrew
District, which said foreshore includes
the islands belonging to the said reserve: Commencing at a post marked
"A. Young, Southeast Corner," placed
on the foreshore at the southwest corner of the said Pacheena Indian Reserve, thence running north along the
entire reservation.
Victoria, B. C, 30th day of October,
1006.
ALEXANDER YOUNG.
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
.ifter date I intende to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range Si Skeena River district, about
one mile from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun," thence running wiest 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chains to
Frank's northeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 480
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land, situated in
range _ 5, Skeena River district, about
one miles from Little Canyon, commencing at a post planted on the southeast
corner, marked "R. Braun." thence running west 80 chains to Turner's southeast corner, thence north 40 chain! to
Frank's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence north 40 chains to
Johnson's southeast corner, thence east
40 chains, thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing 80
acres (more or less).
Located September ist, 1906.
R. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about 31/, miles above
the Lakelse River, and joining John
Neidhart's northeast corner, and marked
"L. W. S.'s Northwest Corner," and
running south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; therce north 80 chains, more or
less, to left bank of Skeena River;
thence westwardly along Skeena River
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
L. W. SLOAN, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
NOTICE Is Hereby given that 60 days
from date 1 Intend to apply tu tbe Cliief
Commissioner uf Laudi aud Works for permission to purchase tlie following described
laud, adjoining Lot 646, Skeeua District:
Commencing at a post inarked "A C.'s .N.
W. Corner"; tbence east 40 cbalns along
soutb boundary of T. Flewln's claim; tbence
soutb 40 cbalns; tbence west 40 cbalns;
tbence nortli 40 cbalns, along east boundary
of Lot 646 to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
ANNIE COPELAND.
NOTICE ile hereby given tbat 60 days
after dote I Intend to apply to tlie Chief |
Com missioner of Lands and Worka for per-1
mission to purchase tbe following described
land situated In the Kitsumkalum Valley,
Usage 5, Coast District: Commencing at
u stake planted at the N. E. corner of N.
T. Cunningham purchase claim, marked
W. A. Wadhams' No. 1 Initial Post; tiience
running 40 ohains west; thence 40 chains
north; thence 40 chains east; thence 40
chains south to post of commencement,
containing 160 acres more or less.
W. A. WADHAMS, Locator.
P. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October 1st,  1906.
No.  9—
NOTICE! Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Work*
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from tbe following described lunds,
situated on tbe uorth side of San Juan
River, Renfrew District, adjoining E. J.
Palmer's southwest corner No: i: Commencing at a post marked "J. Young,
{southwest Corner," thence north 8)
ohains; thence east 80 chains; thence eonbb
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to place
of cummencument, containing 640 acres
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 1st day
of November, 1906.
.       _„ .___      JOHN   YOUNti.
November 17, lOutf.
NOTICE is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 lutend to apply to tbe, Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
laud situated ln the, Kitsumkalum Valley,
Range 5, Coast District: Commencing at
a stake planted at the N. E. earner of
W. A. Wadhams' purchase claim, marked L.
Gune No. 1 Initial Post; thence running
40 chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south to post of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
L.  GUNE,   Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October  1st,   1IHJ6.
NOTICE Is hereby given that two months
after date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry away
timber from tbe following described Isnds,
commencing at a post planted about three
fourths of a mile west of the Elk river,
thence north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence south 40 chains, thence west
40 chains, thence south 40 cbalns, tbence
east 40 chains, thence south 40 ohains,
thence east slong tbe beach of Kennedy
lake, thence north to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
M  J   HAIUKN.
Sept. ioC,  1906.
THIRTY DAYS AFTER DATE I in-
tend to make application to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for per
mission to cut aud carry away timber from
tbe following   described   lands,   situated
No. l. Starting at a post In Bay on west
side of extreme end of the lake and running 80 cbalns west; 80 chains north: 80
chains more or less, east back to shore
and following sthore back to point of commencement.
No. 2. Starting at the southwest corner
of No. 1 running west 106 ohains; running
north 60 chains; running east 106 chains,
and south 60 chains back to point of commencement.
No. 3. Beginning 10 chains south of tbe
northwest corner of No. 2 and running uo
chuins south; 106 chains west; 60 chains
north and 106 chains east back to point of
commencement.
No. 4. Beginning at a post 10 chains
from the nortbwest corner of No. 3 running
Bouth 60 chains; west 106 ohains; north 60
chains and east 106 chains back to point
of commencement.
„,       , ALBERT   FRASER.
Victoria, B. C, November 11, 1906.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that two months
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special licence to cut and carry sway
timber from the following described lands,
commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of Lot 313, Deer creek, Clayoquot, thence east 40 chains, tbence soutb
40 chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 80 ohains, thence west 80 cbalns,
thence northerly along the beach to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres,
mare or less.
M. J. HAUGKX.
August 28th, 1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that sixty days
from date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase tbe following
described land, situated In Range 6, Skeena
River District, about one and one half
miles from Little Canyon, commencing at
a. post marked West N. E. Corner and K.
Braun S. E. Comer, thence 80 chains west
to Schilling's S. E. Corner, thence north 40
cbalns, tbence east 80 chains, thence aouth
40 chains to point of commencement, containing 820 acres more or less.
Located Sept. 3rd, 1006.
K. BRAUN.
NOTICE is hereby given that sixty
days after date I intend to applv to the
Chief Commissioner of Land and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land: Commencing
at a post planted on the left bank of
Skeena River, about four miles above
Lakelse River, adjoining L. W.' northwest corner, and mariced "N. M. J.s* N.
W. Corner," thence running south 8o
chains; thence east 8o chains; thence
north 8o chains; thence west 8o chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
N. M. JOSEPH, Locator.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Evolution.
Stage I.
High-cut gown—
Low-born maidie;
Supper at Childs'—
Luckless Sadie 1
Stage II.
Low-cut gown—
"Highborn lady I"
Supper at Del's—
Sequel—shady!
Notice is hereby given that sixty days
after date I intend tp apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the
following described lands, Range V.,
Skeena River District, about 1 mile
from the Little Canyon.
Commencing at a post planted on the
South-west comer, marked A. 0. Cunningham's S. W. Corner, thence North
40 (forty) chains( thence East 40
(forty) chains, thence South 40 (forty)
chains to Little's Southwest corner,
thence West 40 (forty) chains, to point
of commencement, and containing 160
(one hundred and sixty) acres more or
less.
Located October ist, 1906.
A. C. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
S. C. WEEKS, Agent.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described lands situate In the Kltsnm Kalnm
Valley, Range V, Coast District: Commencing at a stake planted at tbe N. E.
corner of Jas. Adams' purchase claim,
marked N. T. C. No. 1 Initial Post; thence
40 chains west; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement and containing 160 acres more or less.
N. T. CUNNINGHAM, Locator.
F. W. BOHLER, Agent.
Located October 1st,  1906.
NOTICE ls hereby given that 60 days
from date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land, adjoining Lot 646, Skeena District:
Commencing at a post marked "A. C.'s N.
W. Corner"; thence east 40 chains along
south boundary of T. Flewln's claim; thence
soutb 40 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains, along east boundary of Lot 646 to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
ANNIE COPELAND.
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date, 1 Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for
permission to purchase tbe following land,
adjoining Lot 467 on Portland Canal:
Starting from a post marked "W. P. F's.
•N. W. Corner"; thence 20 chains soutli;
thence 40 chains east; thence 40 chains
north; tbence 40 chains, more or less, west
to shore Une; thence southerly along shore
line to point of commencement, containing
120 acres, more or less.
W.  P. FLEWIN.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE) Is hereby given that 60 days
after date, I Intend to apply to tbe Chief
Commissioner of -Lands and Works for
permission to purchase the following land,
situate on Observatory Inlet, adjoining
Lot 479: Starting from a post marked
"W. «3. P's. S. W. Cor."; thence north 20
chains; tbence east 20 chains; tnence
south 20 chains, more or less, to shore
line; tbence slong the shore line westerly
to point of commencement, containing 40
ncres, more or less.
W. G. PINDBR.
November 17, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
days after date we Intend to apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land situated near Graveyard
Point, commencing at a post on tbe North
bank of the Skeena river, thence In a
westerly direction 40 chains; thence northerly 40 cbalns; thence easterly 40 chains;
thence southerly 40 chains along bank of
river to point of commencement, contain-
Ins 160 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1006.
E.   EBY AND 8.  McKBNZIB,
Locators.
November IT, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given that sixty (60)
iys after date I Intend to apply to the
Hon.   Chief Commissioner  of   Lands  and
NOTICE Is hereby given that 60 days
after date 1 Intend to apply to the Hot.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase the following
described land: Commencing at a post at
ihe northeast corner of Lot 182, Range
Uve (3), Coast District, marked E. Davies'
Southeast Corner; theuce running 40 Chains
west; thence 40 chains north; thence 40
chains east, more or less, to Ky-yex river;
theuce following meandering of Ky-yex
river to point of commencement, containing
one hundred aud sixty acres, more or less.
E.   DAVIES.
Located July 12th. 1006.
Works for permission to purchase the
following described land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
the North bank of the Skeena river; thence
In a westerly direction 40 chains; thence
southerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
chains; thence northerly 40 chains along
bank of river to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres, more or less.
Located October 16, 1006.
H. McKENKIE,  Locator.
S.   MCKENZIE,     Agent.
November 17, 1006.
27. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of Section 18, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
soutn 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
tnence north 80 chains; thence thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and being said Section 18 of said
survey.
0. H. ISARD,
A. T. Dark, Agent
August 15th, 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given thnt sixty (80)
days after date I Intend to npply to the
Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for permission to purchase the following deacrlbed land situated near
Graveyard Point: Commencing at a post on
tbe North bank of the Skeena river; thence
In a westerly direction 40 ohains; thence
northerly 40 chains; thence easterly 40
ehnlns; thence southerly 40 chains following bank of river to point of commencement, containing 16u ncres, more or less.
Ixicated October 16,  1006.
G.  R. BAILLIR,   Locator.
B. BBY,   Agent.
November 17. 1906.
NOTICE Is hereby given tbat sixty days
after date I Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works for permission to purchase the following described
land, starting from a post planted on the
south line of lot 109, at the bead of Union
Ray. thence 40 cbalns east, thenee 40 chains
south, thence 40 cbalns west to shore
line, thence northerly along shore
line of Union Bay to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Staked September 4th, 1006.
JOHN <3.  JOHNSTON.
28. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 17, Tp.
10, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, and
being said Section 17 of said survey.
BERTHA FISHLEIGH,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 15th, 1906.
No. 1—
NOTICE Is hereby given that thirty
days after date I Intend lo apply to the
Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for a special license to cut and carry away
timber from the following described "ends,
situated on the aouth side of Snn Juan
Ulver, Renfrew District, Joining Parkinson's southeast corner: Commencing at a
post marked "A. Young, Northeast Corner," thence south 160 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains, thence
east 40 ehnlns to place of commencement,
containing 040 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew on the 1Mb day
of October, 1906.
ALF3XR.   YOUNG.
November 17, 1906.
29. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36, Tp.
12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
cnains to point of commencement; 640
acres.
A. J. ISARD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1906.
No. 2—
NOTICE ls hereby given thnt thirty
days after date I Intend to npply to Ihe
Chief Commissioner of 'Lnnds nnd Works
for a special license to cut nnd enrry away
timber from the following described kinds,
situated on the south side of Snn Jnan
River, Renfrew District: Commencing at
n post marked "J. Young, N. B. Corner,"
ndjoinlng Mrs. J, 8. Young's south boundnry. thence south, 120 chains: thence west
HO ehnlns: tbence north 40 chains; thence
•■nst 40 chnins; thence north 80 chains;
thence enst 40 chains to place of commencement, containing 610 acres.
Dated at Port Renfrew, this 20th day of
October,   1006.
JOHN  YOUNO.
November 17, 1906.
30. Commencing at a post planted at
the north-east corner of Section 36,
Township 12, Range 5, Poudrier Survey; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of commencement ; 640 acres.
J. C. ISARD,
A. T. Clark, Agent.
August 16th, 1006.
j    NOTICE Is hereby  given  that 60 days
I nfter date I Intend to apply to the Hon.
I Chief Commissioner of  Lands and Works
I for permission to purchase the following
' described land, situated In the Coaat District. Range 5:   Beginning at a post planted on the north bank of the Skeena river
about  one   mile   southwest   of  Zymqetiti
river at the southeast corner of J. B. Bate-
man's pre-emption claim and market I. B.'a
Northeset Corner; thence running west 120
chnins; thence south about 60 chains, more
or less, to bank nf Skeena river: thence la
n northeasterly direction following meant- .
erlng of the Skeena river to post of commencement, containing about 820 acne of
lnnd more or Jess.
EMMA BATEMAN.
J. E. BATEMAN, Agent.
Ixicated September 20th. 1006. i6
THE WEEK   SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 190b.
9_j?5_j_i ?j_?9jj_?9ij?5^ 9J? *$?<%! ^9^^^
I flusic and
:*
The Drama.
if
EVENTS OF the Coming Week . .*..
Monday.
Empress Thetare—"The Fatal Card,"
International   drama,   and every night
. during the week; matinees Wednesday
and Saturday.
New   Grand   Theatre—High    class
vaudeville,   and   every   afternoon and
evening during the week.
Tuesday.
Victoria  Theatre—Maxine Elliott in
"Her Great Catch."
Wednesday.
Victoria Theatre—George Ade's musical beauty show, entitled "Peggy from
Paris," with New York company.
Friday.
A.O.U.W. Hall—Mrs. Norton's invitation dance.
 * *:* ■""■"
It is a long time since I have seen
anything as pretty and effective in the
vaudeville theatre of Victoria as the(
turn presented this week at the New
Grand 'by the Fishers, entitled "The
Frog and the Lizard." Apart from the
contortionist feats, which are a miracle
in themselves, the staging and the artistic arrangement of the coloured lights
serveto make the supple movements of
the two principals one of the features of
the bill. This one turn in itself is well
worth a visit to the theatre. Another
thing which pleased me was the change
in the Comedy Sketch introduced by
Maxwell & Dudley. Instead of the
usual farce, there is a prettily staged
scene with some very good singing.
Miss Daisy Dudley has a fine voice,'and
both her solors and her duet work with
her partner were much appreciated.
"The Village Blacksmith," as sung, by
William Maxwell, was far above the
average performance heard in modern
vaudeville. It is not the first time that
I have listened to the droll "Dutcheries"
of Tegg & Daniels, and I sincerely hope
that it will not be the last. There is
something about Dutch comedians
which always goes down well, and this
is particularly the case with these two,
who are old favorites with Victorians.
C. W. Littlefield gives some clever imitations of animals and people, and his
illustration of the lonely bachelor sewing a button on his coat evoked roars
of laughter, he would do well, however,
to speak more slowly when introducing
his various imitations, as at present it
is very hard to be prepared for what is
coming. James and Kitty Brady give a
line bag-punching show, interspersed
with songs and dances.
I am glad: to be able to say that the
result of having but one piece a week
on at the Empress has been so far justified that Manager Owens intends to
cotinue the arrangement. The natural
consequence is that the actors are less
fatigued, and the audience obtain better
value for their money. Certainly no
one »could have grumbled at the performance of "Zoara," which has been
running this week. It is a strong play,
and if had evidently received careful
attention from the actors! The large
numbers which witnessed it nightly
testify to its success.
. ■ *. *   *
Miss Maxine Elliott's appearance at
Victoria Theatre on Tuesday, December 4th, in Clyde Fitch's play, "Her
Great Match," should, prove one of the
most important events of the local theatrical season. This is Miss Elliott's
fourth season as an individual star, and
her tour will embrace practically the
entire United States. The present season likewise marks her first appearance
as the director of her own-affairs. Her
tour is being managed by George J.
Appleton, for twenty-three . years Nat
Goodwin's manager. Like Richard
Mansfield, Miss Elliott h-s chosen to
entrust her affairs to her own personal
representative. In ;"Her Great Match,"
Clyde Fitch has supplied Miss Maxine
Elliott with a play that shows her rare
talent to excellent advantage. This combination of a great play and; a .star of
universally recognized 1 greatness i should
-prove' one of the strongest attractions of
the season.     ,''."....'  „    ?
George Ade,. the gifted humorist who
wrote "Peggy From Par.iV?the' clever
musical Comedy which-will be at Victoria Theatre Wednesday, December
5th, has fold in this play a story which
has been pronounced of absorbing in
terest and of sufficient worth to make
a clever comedy even without musical
accessories. Mr. Ade, wit that he is,'
in "Peggy From Paris" has amusingly
poked fun at that class of Americans
which heaps attentions on gifted foreigners while showing indifference to
home talent. Peggy Plummer of Hickory Crick, Illinois, after studying music
in Paris, is brought to this country under the name of M'lle .Fleurette Car-
amelle, and is represented as a cele1-
brated Parisienne singer. Her father
and sister and friends in Hickory Crick
learn the real Peggy is in Chicago and
go, there in search of her. They make
their way to the stage of the Paragon
Theatre, a place no less strange to them
than are these rustics amusing to the
larky stage hands. Of course nobody
knows Peggy. Attaches of the theatre
are preparing a reception for M'lle
Fleurette. Suddenly these country visitors are bewildered by a burst of activity, when stage hands set the scenr
ery for Fleurette's reception. Here is
an interesting process in full view of
the audience. The stage is actually set
as if for a performance. Peggy comes,
but denies her identity eve to her relatives. Again at her apartments in
Honeymoon Terrace she still poses as
a foreigner and there society of all
grades makes its way, everyone ambitious to honor the celebrated Parisienne. Peggy's father is here, too. He
has taken a position as footman at the
house. Society men and women, stage
struck girls, autograph fiends and various others pursue Peggy even to the
servants. Through all there is limitless fun and merriment. But at length
Peggy wearies of the masquerade and
declares her identity. All the characters in the play are ' interesting and
amusing. The scenes and situations
abound in drollery and humor. The
music, which was composed by J. A.
Raynes, is bright, sparkling, and the
chorus numbers are particularly effective. All the scenes- are laid in Illinois. The first represents an "old
time" party, the second the stage of
the Paragon Theatre, the   third   the
A Cosy Corner at the Poodle Dog.
The
Poodle Dog
Gril,
Yates St.,
Victoria, B. C, is
the only real
"grill" in British
Columbia—the
only place where
you can
ACTUALIV-
obtain your
choice of meats
and all the delicacies of the
season.
W. S. D. SMITH,
Proprietor
WHEN YOU HAVE THAT
"BLUE PEELING" DROP
IN AT THE
GARRICK'S HEAD
BASTION STREET
Nufp Sbd !
SIM & JACK, Proprietors
VICTORIA, B. C.
Mrs. R. VV. Dunsmuir, Mr. and Mrs. L
Genge, Miss Foster, Miss Keeter ana
miss ferry.
Tuesday night, December 4th.
One appearance only
Miss Maxine Elliott
In the Clyde Fitch comedy,
HER GREAT MATCH
Direction George J. Appleton.
Prices—$2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 500,
Box office opens 10 a. m. Saturday, De-I
cember ist. Mail orders accompanied|
by cheque will receive their usual at-<
tention.
On Saturday last, the 24th ult., Hr.
John Alfreu Graham and Miss Heitn
Mar   Mc Williams,   of  Stockton,  California, were married at St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Victoria, by the Kev.
D. MacRae. Mr, Graham and Miss Wil-
cburtyard of Honeymoon Terrace. The Hams were on  their first visit to the
scenes  are particularly  handsome, the Capital  City, which they admire very
.       . I much, so much so indeed, that on leav-
coinpany talented. , ing  it they both  expressed themselves
MOMUS.    j in the highest terms to Mr. G. R. Wer-
'   1 ner, who chaperoned them to see the
; sights.    The  happy  pair  were  staying
SoClfll   £Hld at the  Po°dle  DoS  Hotel.    After the
•^■vFV'.lKll  CtllW , wedding a  reception  was held   at  the
residence. of Mde. Kosche, Craigflower
44^^^—^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ road,  w'-n dispensed   h°r  usual hospi-:
,   -,  ,— j tality to a circle of friends.
Mrs. T. S. Gore and Mrs. Russell, bf I *   *   *
Oak Bay spent several days this week     Things nave been very quiet _j_is w_ek
in Seattle. -••• «*'•"»•■ j fa society circles, nearly everyone being
busy with the Fancy   l<air,   under   Uie
Tt<<> •iimiiv friends of Mrs. Oliver will  auspices  of   the Auxiliary Anti-'iui.e.-
he glad to learn that she is convalescing culosis Society, at the Drill Hall.   '1 he
rapidly after undergofag ah operation.      affair has proved a great success,  and
■'*'** *   1 all who have not attended should sei;.e
Mrs. Wj Boultbee (nee Nicholles), of  tlle opportunity of going this afternoon
.couver, spent some days in the city,  °r. -eve»me-  when the  fair will close.
••?*   . "   ,v  . /,      .... A'   This afternoon children will be admii-
Wednesday, December Sth,
Geo. Ade's musical beauty show,
Peggy From Paris
Music by J. A. Raynes.   Large chorusj
of pretty girls.
Prices—25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50. BoxJ
office opens 10 a. m. Monday, December!
3d.
Personal.
Nothing
Will Please
Your Friends
Like a
TALKING
MACHINE.
the guest of "her mother Mrs. (.Major)
Nicholles.
*   *   *
Columbia Graphophones $12.50, $18, $25, $35 and up
Victor and Berliner Gramophones	
 $25, $33, $45- $55 and up
Edison Phonographs $25, $35, $50 and up
Over 12,000 Records to Choose From.
FLETCHER BROS.
SUPERIOR QUALITY   MUSIC HOUSE
93 GOVERNMENT STREET
ted  free of charge and there w 11 be
special attractions for them.   Yesterday
...     ,.   . , ... ,   ,, ,    ,       the   orphanage   children   were   enter-
Miss Muriel Nichoiles is 111 the ho - tajncc_ by the society and a most capital, haying.undergone an operation for joyai_ie afternoon's amusement given
appendicitis. H?r friends will be them. The ladies fa charge deserve
pleased to learn that she is making aj great credit for the way in which mat.-
good recovery. ters have been  managed, and such  a
* *   * j great success ensured.   Tne decorations
Miss Helen Peters was hostess at a alone are well worth seeing and repre-
most enjoyable dance given on Tuesday | ««"Vt  an enormous amount _ of   labour,
evening last at her home at Oak Bay. There is to be a vote cast in favourof
The affair was most delightful and Mrs.' the prettiest stall, the result of which
Peters and her daughter entertained in will be known later,
their usual charming manner. 	
* *   «
r, ■     .   _.    . _     . >. _.     The following new books are on sale
Owing to the date of the engagement 1 ,    ■     ■■   „.,, s   „  _
of Miss Maxine- Elliot at the Victoria! by T. N. Hibben & Co.:
Theatre falling .or. Tuesday December;    what We Dream Frances Harod.
Oth, it has been thought   advisable   to     _.    ,. , u    r.. /*__..
postpone    the    invitation    subscription j    The Voyage of the Discovery, Capt.
dance arranged bv Mrs. Norton for that j Robert Scott
date lo Friday, the 7th. Treasure of Heaven, Marie Corelli,
a * c   ..1 ti.    j      '1-1    1    ■        History of Northern Interior of Brit-
At beattie  on Thursday—1 hanks?iv-1 . ,     _ ,    ,.        ..    ao    „       .    n
ing Day-St. Mark's (Episcopal) church'-. lsh   Columbia,    1660-1880, Rev. JV. U.
was the scene of a quiet wedding, when   Morice, O.M.I., $3.00,
EMPRESS
IHEATRBk
H. M. OWENS, lessee and Manager]
Monday and every night during the
coming week,
THE FATAL CARD
. powerful  international drama, with]
scenes laid in London, Eng., and
United States.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
Admission—ioc,  2DC, 30.
WEEK DECEMBER 3
The New
Grand
SULLIVAN • CONSIDINE,    ProBilttors.
M.n.f.m.nt of ROBT. JAMIESON.
Percy F. Godenrath, of this city, and
Miss Eva B. Duncan, of Belmont. Ken-|
tncky, were united in marriage by the
Rev. J. P. D. Llwyd. The bride w"'s!
given away by her brother. Everett B. j
Duncan, of Nome, Alaska. Immediately
after the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. God- j
enrath left for Vancouver.
*   *   *
The Lieutenant-Governor   and   Mrs.
Dunsmuir entertained at dinner at Gov-j
ernment  House on   Monday   evening, 1
covers Hn.tr laid for thirty-four.   The
guests were:   Commander Learmouth,
R.N.. Col. and Mrs. Herchmer, Mr. and
Mrs. F. S. Barnuard.    Dr.   and   Mrs. I
Hasell,   Commander   Thorpe   Double, I
R.N.,  Mrs.   Thorpe-Double.   Mr.   and
Mrs. T. S   Gore. Mr. and Mrs. Little?
Air. and Mrs. Gibb, Mr. and Mrs. C.
,,r    Rhodes,   Dr.   and Mrs. Meredith
Tones. Air. and Mrs. Stewart Wi'!iam<
Mr. a'r>rt Mrs, L. V. Cuppage, Mr. .ind
Fool's Gold, Stillman.
What Became of Pam, Baroness Von
Hutton.
Clippinge Borough, Stanley J. Wey-
man.
A Lady of Rome, Marion Crawford.
The Guarded Flame, Maxwell.
A Fighting Chance, Chambers.
House of Defence, E. F. Benson.
*   *   *
Mr. and Mrs.
PERKINS  FISHER
In the Pastoral Rural Sketch
The "Half-Way House"
By Ezra Kendall
THE THREE HILTONS"
Bicycle Experts Extraordinary
TIPPLE and KLIMENT
Comedy Musical Act
Fred Dot
SANFORD and DARLINGTON
Twenty Minutes in Vaudeville
FREDERIC ROBERTS
Illustrated Song
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Masqueraders"
Prof. M. NAGEL'S ORCHESTRA]
Overture, Cornet Solo, "Prophet
King," by Shepherd Camp
The Cruise of the Dazzler, Jack L01
The following new books are on sale don.
by Victoria Book & Stationery So.:
Drink, Hall Caine.
The Dream  and the Business, John
Oliver Hobbes.
The Cattle Baron's Daughter, Harold
Bindloss.
A    Waif   of    Circumstance,    Lotj
Tracy. t
The Futtu-; in America, W. G. Wel^
Benita, H. Rider Haggard.
The   Queen's   Tragedy, Robt. Hut]
Benson.

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