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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Feb 29, 1908

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Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
Commission and Real Estate Agents.
-i
860 Oraaville, Vancouver.
IXAASJUJUtJLfiJUUUUUXAUUJtJL/
Victoria Edition
The Week
ft British Columbia Review,
Published at Victoria and Vancouver B. -8.
=»mnnnnrm_
Slewtrt WUUmi-j
R.C.J«Bto«   ot
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMMISSION AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
gi FORT ST. VICTORIA, I. C.
3JUJUUUUUUUUUt AAA St UUUUUt
fOL. V.    No. 5
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908
One Dollar Pbr Annu
Political    predictions    are
Bonsensus        proverbially as uncertain as
Pt Opinion.      the   weather,   but   if   the
signs of the times in the
political arena have any significance evi-
Bences are accumulating that the Federal
flection will take place next Fall.     The
[easons why this forecast is likely to be
lorrect need not be canvassed.    It is of
Inore importance to note that leaders of
|oth  parties  favour  the  rumour.     Mr.
3orden has just added the weight of his
rsonal authority, with the result that
from one end of the Dominion to the
pther from now on the Conservative camps
vill be all astir preparing for the fray,
[he first essential is the choice of a standard bearer and the sooner every constituency in the Dominion has made its selec-
Jion the better.   The choosing of a leader
lliminates  undesirables  who  may  have
perished unwarranted expectations, and
Ireaks up little coteries who, lacking a
■{allying centre, dissipate their energies in
Irying to create one.   But more than this
closes up the ranks,  sets the party
lighters shoulder to shoulder, and develops
loncentration and energy of purpose.  By
lommon consent the Conservatives of Vic-
oria have already made their choice al-
Ihough it lacks the imprimatur of an
ficial declaration.   Mr. G. H. Barnard,
ie President of the Victoria Association,
Ind of the Provincial Association, has
apidly come to the front as a Party
leader.    His promotion to the highest
Ice in the gift of the party has been
|iore than justified.   His handling of the
reat Convention held in Vancouver last
J'all raised him so high in the estimation
If the members that without opposition he
las elected President.   His work in Vic-
ria during the last year, especially along
lie lines of organization, marks him as a
aan of high executive ability.    He pos-
esses the confidence not only of the rank
file but of the official leaders of the
larty and of the local Government.   His
[laims over those of any other possible
landidate are so unquestionable that al-
(eady all other names have been dropped,
Ind it is conceded that he is the one man
■vho can defeat the Hon. William Temple-
■nan.   Of Mr. Barnard's personal character, of his professional status, of his
E DITORI AL
Fruit
Inspection.
to and his life-long resilience in the City of Victoria it is unnecessary to speak. His qualifications both
personal and by Association are all that
fcould be desired in a candidate. What he
lacks in platform eloquence he more than
(lakes up in business acumen, executive
Ibility, and devotion to the principles of
[Jonservatism. In the best interests of thc
larty no time should now be lost in determining officially whether he shall be the
landard bearer. This is essentially a case
11 which delays are dangerous, the opposi-
lon candidate is in the field Avith all the
Ircstige of past service and Ministerial
losition; the Conservative party cannot
jfford to wait any longer, the sooner the
leople know under whose banner they
lave to fight the sooner will tliat. enthu-
pasm be awakened which is essential to
liccess.
In the current issue will be
found an important letter
from Mr. McNeill of the
Department of Agriculture,
Ottawa, commenting on the articles which
have recently appeared in The Week dealing with the subject of fruit inspection.
It will be seen that despite the protests of
Provincial Officers Mr. McNeill thoroughly endorses all that The Week said on the
subject.   He agrees that Fruit inspection
as at present conducted in British Columbia is a farce, because it is divided
among so many persons that there is no
responsibility and of no effective control.
He also endorses the recommendation of
The Week that the Inspection should ba
made effective by combining examination
for pests for grading and for condition in
one person, and he concludes by pointing
out that the Provincial Government is in
a position to do this.   Mr. McNeill's dictum in this matter may be accepted as
final.   It is surely not too much to ask
that the Provincial Government will tako
the matter up.    It is perfectly obvious
from the correspondence with which The
Week has heen favored by the Dominion
and Provincial Inspectors that there is too
much politics in the business of Fruit Inspection, as in most other branches of thc
public service.    The man from Ottawa
says the Local Inspector is responsible,
the Local Inspector says "No, it rests with
the Dominion official," and so on "ad
nauseam."     Meanwhile   every   day   the
public is buying fruit that is improperly
graded, improperly described, some of it
containing pests and a great deal of it
unfit for food because of decay.   Ked tape
should not prevent a remedy, and if the
Provincial   Department   of   Agriculture
does not take the matter up at once, The
Week will do so at its own expense.    It
should not, however, be left for private
individuals to discharge the duties which
properly    devolve    upon    paid    public
servants.
The,  Canadian   Mining
Institute  will  hold  its
Annual Meeting in Ot-
Canadian Mining
Institute.
tawa next week, the In
augural Session will be honoured by the
presence of the Governor-General and there
is every reason to hope that the gatherings will pass off with eclat.   In 1908
the Institute occupies a position of honour
and influence.   It has a large membership
drawn from every district of the Dominion.   It has at its head men of light and
leading.    It  attracts brilliant  contributions to Mining Literature and has fairly
come to be recognized as a National Institution.   It originated in a small way, it3
precursor being the Mining Association of
the  Province  of  Quebec  started  about
twenty years ago by a few English Mining
Engineers in charge of operations in the
Asbestos regions of Black Lake ancl Thet-
ford.   A little later Nova Scotia followed
suit,with a branch Institute; the movement grew; following the lead of the Old
Country these Institutes were Federated,
and Ontario and British Columbia joined.
Today the Canadian Mining Institute represents a solidarity.    All the credit for
the inception of the idea, and most of the
credit for its successful carrying out, is
due to the late lamented B. T. A. Bell,
whose loss is felt more year by year.    At
the present moment there is a rift within
the lute, Toronto, always jealous of Mon
treal, indeed always jealous of every competitor, has for several years been endeavoring to shift the centre of gravity from
Quebec to Ontario.   Montreal has always
been the headquarters, this was not so
much a matter of design as of inevitable-
ness, since it is the commercial capital of
the Dominion and the one place where
mining men and capitalists mostly congregate.   In the vestibule of the Windsor
Hotel every man of importance connected
with the Mining Industry, and every mau
of money seeking to be connected with it,
is to be met.   The men who have built up
the Institute and have given of their time
and means to its support, either live in
or around Montreal.   Years ago, J. Stevenson Brown, was installed as Treasurer;
he is a man who enjoys the respect of every
one who knows him. Under his fostering
care the finances of the Institute have
been administered with a discretion and
ability beyond question.   On the death of
Mr. Bell it was decided that his successor
should for the greater convenience of the
Council also reside in Montreal.    Mr.
Mortimer Lamb received the appointment.
Of his personality, of his ability, and of
his services during the last few years it is
not necessary to speak.    Toronto is now
making a desperate attempt to oust Mr.
Brown and Mr. Lamb from their positions.
No fault is found with the manner in
which they have discharged their duties,
therefore any personal equation can be
eliminated from the discussion; it is simply and solely an attempt on the part of
Toronto to secure the control of the Institute.   The movement is engineered by
the editor of the Canadian Mining Journal
who lives in Toronto.   When this journal
first appeared The Week pointed out that
its policy was inimical to mining interests
and that it would work for Toronto and
not for the industry; today The Week is
more than justified of its prediction.   Tho
nature of the controversy is well illustrated by the fact that not only has the
editor of the Mining Journal stooped to
circularize   members   of   the   Institute
against Mr. Brown and Mr. Lamb, but
one of the candidates for Mr. Lamb's position has followed suite.   It is to be hoped
that the Institute will resent these questionable   and  unprofessional   tactics  by
supporting its old and tried officials.    It
is to be hoped further that some means
will be found to put an end to internecine
warfare which can only inure to the detriment of the Institute.
recognition. Tlie Week does not for a
moment suggest that the other occupants of
the gallery are not also entitled to praise
but with all respect Mr. Lumsden is a past
master in liis art.
Doubtful
Wisdom.
The Victoria Colonist de-
Palmam serves great praise for its
Qui Meruit.      admirable   reports   of   the
proceedings of the Legislature during the present session. Never
has the paper been so well served as in
tlie person of Mr. Lumsden who occupies
the Colonist seat in the press gallery.
Having filled that seat thc session before
last and ground out seven colmuns a clay
of long hand report the writer knows
whereof he speaks. Mr. Lumsden gives a
longer report with all the principal
speeches verbatim, misses none of the
salient features and is as fair to tlie opposition as to the Government. It is not always that the fourth estate receives
due recognition. Tlie work in tlie press
gallery is extremely arduous and not always interesting. When it is as well done
as by the Colonist representative it is
worthy of all praise, and should receive
The  silence  of the  daily
press with reference to the
remarks of the Judiciary in
practically disallowing Mr.
Bowser's Natal Act is commendable in so
far as it results from an unwillingness to
weaken judicial authority and respect for
the law by exposing the human fallibility
of its administrators.   With this attitude
The Week sympathises; there is, however,
a sense in which the press fails in its
duty when it allows important incidents
affecting the public interest to pass without comment.    The conscientious editor
may under such .circumstances find himself on the horns of a dilemma and his
choice will depend very largely on the extent to which nature has endowed him
with backbone. Admitting that the Asiatic
Immigration question has been made a
political football, and that both parties
have kicked it about in the endeavour to
score  a goal, it still remains that the
Judiciary weakens its own position, and
sacrifices at least a shred of its reputation
for singleness of purpose when it goes out
of its way to impute political motives and
to question both the loyalty and the honesty of the Legislature.   It should never
be forgotten  that  the  members  of  the
Legislature are the representatives of the
people, and as such they enjoy many privileges.    Among them is one which is
reflected in the rules of the House; more
particularly in the spirit as well as the
letter, of Rule 15.   It may of course be
argued that these rules only apply to the
conduct of the House for the control of
which at the hands of the Speaker they
are provided.    But the underlying principle reaches much further, and he would
be a poor reasoner who would argue that
it is less offensive or less contrary to the
principle involved for a Judge to iiupulc
bad faith to the House than for onr: member to impugn the honesty of another.   Mr.
Hawthornthwaite's impeachment of Justices Irving and Clements, ancl Mr. McDonald's defence were botli characterized
by a degree of feeling sadly at variance
with the gravity of the incident.   It only
tends, however, to show that there was a
clash  of   vital   principles which might
easily lead to serious consequences.   It is
but fair to exempt Mr. Justice Morrison
from any criticism in the matter.     lie
confined himself strictly to a dignified judicial   deliverance.    The   Week  believes
that   on   reflection   his   colleagues   will
realize that they exceeded the limit of
necessary and wise comment.    The Week
declines to believe, as was suggested in
the House, that in doing so they were influenced by political considerations.   The
fact of the matter is that this Asiatic question is one about which men feel more
deeply than they think, and after all even
Judges are men.
When The Week undertook
An Object SOmo months ago to corn-
Lesson, ujent adversely on the manner in which Victoria Bunks
treated their customers it little expected
such ample vindication as has just been
furnished by the recent removal of tho
account of the Oak Bay Municipality from
the Bank of Montreal to the Bank of
B. X. A. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908.
X riusic and
I   The Drama. J
The Arion Club.
On Wednesday night the Arion
Club held its second concert of the
season in Victoria Theatre. It is
worthy of note in passing that this is
the sixteenth season of this popular
musical organization, the Club having
been established in 1892.
I heard a lady who sat behind me
say that the Arion Club concerts were
always good, a conclusion with which
I agree. She also said that what
impressed her most was the fact that
so many of the old members were
still in the ranks. This also is true,
and good as far as it goes. Looking
over the thirty-six gentlemen who
occupied the platform on Wednesday
night, I thought, that with respect to
age they were very well balanced, and
with respect to their musical ability
would compare favourably with any
chorus of similar size in the Dominion. I venture to think that, like
good wine, they improve with age.
This is the sixth concert of the
club which I have had the pleasure of
attending, and the rendering of C. L.
Osgood's "Folk Song" is the best
thing I have yet heard from the members. In correctness of intonation, in
restraint, in feeling, and in exquisite
expression, it was equal to anything
which the Tacoma Club rendered on
their visit to Victoria last fall, and no
higher praise could be given. "King
Charles" was given with spirit and
verve, and Dudley Buck's arrangement of "Home, Sweet Home," was
a treat of the highest order. The
"Sailors' Chorus," from the Flying
Dutchman, was not as successful as
the selections mentioned; the attack
was uncertain and the performance
seemed to be hurried. The opening
selection, Lutzow's "Wild Chase,-'
might have been better done; it is a
beautiful song, well worthy of the
powers bf the chorus, and should be
kept on the repertoire. On the whole,'
the Club acquitted itself with credit.
Of the stellar artists, Miss Winnifred Lugrin is entitled to the first
place. Those who heard her sing a
year ago would be greatly surprised
at the change. She is now an accomplished artiste, with a bright future
assured. In selecting Meyerbeer's
"Roberto tu Che Adoro," she was
challenging comparison with the
greatest of singers, and if recollections of these detracted slightly from
the merit of her performance, it is
only fair to say that she at least acquitted herself with credit. Miss
Lugrin, however, will not establish
her claim to notice in the operatic
field; she is essentially a singer of
ballads. Her rendering of Andrews'
"Oh, for a Day of Spring," was exquisite and heartily deserved the encore it received. Thc singer was well
advised to repeat the song, for on it.i
second rendition she aroused the audience to enthusiasm, and a further
song was demanded and graciously
given. I should be reluctant to overpraise Miss Lugrin, because she has
yet something to learn, but there can
be nothing but encouragement from
' any fair criticism of her admirable
performance on Wednesday night.
I am sorry that I cannot speak as
flatteringly of Miss Kacthe Pieczonka,
of Tacoma. I never heard of the
lady before, and should be sorry to be
ungallant, but fairness compels me to
say that she possesses neither the
temperament nor the skill which
would enable her to appeal to a musical audience. I wish once more to
protest against the importation of
third-rate aliens to take part in Victoria concerts, when we have far better performers in our own city. In
offering this criticism I am not for a
moment unmindful of the fact that art
is cosmopolitan; my only criticism is
directed against the engagement of
inferior artists. I am not so partia
as to believe that Victoria possesses
all the talent, but when it cannot pro
duce a better instrumentalist than the
lady from Tacoma it will bc quite
time enough to import.
Forty-five Minutes from Broadway. |
On Monday evening at the Victoria
Theatre, the musical comedy entitled
"Forty-five Minutes from Broadway"
was produced by what is known as
the Number One Company. This is
easily the best aggregation which has
appeared here. The company played
to capacity, and kept the house in
good humour from start to finish. The
part of Mary is now taken by the
young lady who was previously understudy, and it is no exaggeration to
say that she excels her predecessor.
With such a caste, Victoria would not
tire of another performance of the
amusing comedy. I venture to make
a suggestion to the manager: Let
him cut out the kiss and the funny
business which occur in the last moment of the play. When Mary, after
a period of delightful hesitation, finally takes the Kid's arm, let them
walk off; it would be more effective
and more artistic. A word of praise
is due for the admirable manner in
which the properties were handled by
Mr. North and his efficient staff. All
the audience knew that the sets were
very attractive, and that everything
moved without a hitch, but they probably did not know that during those
waits the largest quantity of scenery
ever handled on the Victoria stage
was being moved and set up. For so
small a stage the amount of work
done was as remarkable as it was efficient.
New Grand.
Before saying a word about the programme at the New Grand this week,
I want to congratulate Victoria on
the fact that Messrs. Sullivan and
Considine have relented and in deference to the wishes of the theatregoers of this city have broken
through their rule by which the managers of their various houses are periodically moved round. No man is indispensable, and if Mr. Jamieson had
gone elsewhere, the New Grand
would have Continued to run as a
popular vaudeville house; but I venture to think that the proprietors
would not have raked in as many
shekels, and Victoria would have lost
a theatrical manager of high personal
character, under whose management
nothing objectionable will ever be
tolerated. There is not a single vaudeville house in the West to which
young people and children can go
with such absolute safety as to the
New Grand.
With reference to this week's programme, I can only say that it is a
topnotcher." For once there is not
one turn which falls below the standard, and there are several above it.
The best is that of Armstrong and
Levering, in their comedy bicycle act;
nothing more skilful has been seen on
any stage. An amusing and enthusing turn is that of May Rerdelle and
her Village Cut-ups. This merry
party is assisted by a sheep, a pig, a
dog, and some chickens, all of which
contribute to the fun. It is a really
good rousing song, dance and comedy
act. Hopson and Sheldon are distinctly above the average in tlieir
comedy sketch, "Meet Me in Syracuse." The moving pictures are nothing out of the ordinary. Thomas J.
Price rounds up the musical end of
the programme with a decidedly weak
selection, but the orchestra is "all
there," as usual. It has become quite
thc custom to speak of crowded
houses at the New Grand, but it is
no mere figure of speech.
Next week's bill includes Gilday
and Fox, reputed to be the greatest
Hebrew comedians on the stage today; Vera DeBassini, the Italian
nightingale; Anita Hcndri, David
Miles and Company, in a little melodrama of the West, entitled "The
Marshal"; the Sidonias, "The Eccentric Tramp and the Goll Girl"; Mr.
and Mrs. Blessing, presenting their
original mysterious comedy, "The
Sui prise Dinner"; Thos. J. Price singing the illustrated song, "Perhaps";
new moving pictures, entitled "Good
Wine" and "The Amateur Hunter,"
and "The Talisman," by Kretschmer,
as an overture by the orchestra.
MOMUS.
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Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid	
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Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
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Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
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The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
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K>
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design; large or small, magnificent or modest.
Send me your ideas and I
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M.I.C.A.
Architect.
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WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE   BEST
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ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
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Bridget—Sure, mum, ain't it harder
for me when I don't know how?—
Life.
If.
Many a man who loves his neighbour as himself would be in serious
trouble if his wife knew it.—Chicago
Record-Herald.
Mistress—Why, Bridget,   it   seems
to me you want large wages for one
Speaking Up.
"The goods I sell speak for themselves."
"What are you selling?"
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McNulty — Phat is yitre hoorry,
Moike?
Moike (on the sprinkling cart)—
Shure, it's going to rain, an' it's me
that wants to get me wur-rk done
before it conies.—Brooklyn Eagle.
Readvertised from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to apply for a special
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Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
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Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
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Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
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Victoria, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908
By BABETTE.
! **** ********
A Lady's Letter *
_ t
*
Dear Madge,—Last week I visited
|he Shrine of Our Lady of Gaudalupe.
This is the Lourdes of Mexico, and
(rom the time of the opening of the
little chapel which first housed the
-aiming, it has become a pilgrimage
Jto the Mexicans, and many are the
■miracles of healing related to havc
■occurred through the intercession of
|Our Lady of Gaudalupe.
The present church is a comparatively modern structure, and is the
Ifourth one that has been built on the
Ispot where the Virgin first made her
(appearance. The centre facade
(through which is the mian entrance,
lis of stone and marble, handsomely
I'sculptured. Immediately above this
(entrance is a sculptured representation of the scene in the Bishop's
Ihouse where Juan Diego let the roses
l.fall from his "tilma," disclosing the
[image of thc Virgin. The legend has
lit that on the morning of the 9th of
I December, 1531, an Indian neophyte,
I Juan Diego, was on his way to hear
Ithe Gospel expounded by the Fran-
Iciscans. His home was at Tolpetlac,
land he had to pass the hill of Tepey-
l.ac. On reaching the eastern side of
Jthe hill, he heard strains of music
lilike the notes of a chorus of birds.
(He stood still to listen and behld on
[the hillside a beautiful lady surround-
led by clouds tinged with the colours
|of the rainbow.
The lady called Juan, and as her
[presence was commanding.and gra-
icious, he at once obeyed. She ad-
|dressed him as follows: "Know, my
[son, that I am the Virgin Mary,
1 Mother of the true God. My will is
[that a temple should be built on this
[spot, where you and all your race
[will always be able to find me and
[seek my aid in your troubles. Go to
[the Bishop and in my name tell what
lyou have seen and heard. Tell him,
[too, that it is my wish that a church
[be built for mc here, and for doing
[this you will be repaid with many
•graces." Juan sought the Bishop, and
■after some trouble i'l gaining admis-
Ision, told his story. Very little at-
Itention was paid to it. He returned
[to his village that afternoon, and
[again saw the vision in the same spot,
[lie related to the lady the slight at-
Itention which the Bishop had given to
Ihis errand, and asked the lady to be
[pleased to choose another messenger.
JBut she replied that he must not be
[dejected; to return to the episcopal
[residence and deliver her message
[again on the following day.
It was Sunday. Juan rose early,
land after he had heard mass in thc
[parish church, repaired to thc house
[of the Bishop and again related his
[story with great earnestness. This
[time the prelate paid more attention
fto the Indian's narrative, and told
I him if the lady appeared again he was
[to ask for a sign. With this Juan was
[dismissed, and the Bishop sent two
f servants after him to watch what he
I did and whither he went.
The servants followed him to the
J bottom of the hill, when suddenly he
became, invisible, to. them. . They
searched everywhere, but finding no
trace of him, returned to the Bishop
and said they believed that he, Juan,
1 was an impostor and a devil.
But while Juan was invisible to the
servants he was engaged once more
1 in conversation with the lady. He
told her that the Bishop had directed
I him to ask for a sign,' and she told
[him to return the next morning and
[she would give him a sign that would
[win full credit for his mission. When
[he reached home he found his uncle
[seriously ill, and he had to remain
[near his bedside and could not return
[for the promised token. His uncle
[grew steadily worse and on the 12th
lof December, 1531, he started out to
|secure a priest to hear the last coii-
Ifession of his relative. The road to
■the dwelling of thc priest was up the
[hill of Tepeyac, and fearful of meet-
ling the vision again hc determined to
[pass by another route. But this did
Inot avail him, for near the spot where
a spring now bubbles he saw the vision for the fourth time. The lady did
not seem at all offended with Juan for
not having .come as she had directed.
She told him not to be anxious about
his uncle, as at that moment he was
sound and well. She then went on
to speak about the sign or token that
the Bishop wished, and told Juan to
clirnb to the top of the hill, where a
small chapel now stands, and he
would there find roses growing. She
directed him to gather them all, to fill
his "tilma," or coarse garment, that
hung from his neck, and to carry the
flowers to the Bishop. Juan knew
well that the barren and rocky spot
never produced flowers, but he immediately did as the lady ordered, and
found the place indicated, blooming
with beautiful roses. He gathered
them, filled his "tilma," and repaired
to the.Bishop. The prelate received
him, and the Indian relating what had
happened, opened his "tilma," the
flowers fell to the ground, and it was
then seen that a picture of the vision
had appeared miraculously on the
coarse fabric of the "tilma." The
Bishop fell upon his knees, and after
spending some time in prayer, untied
the "tilma" from the Indian's neck,
and temporarily placed it over the
altar of his private chapel. For
ninety years the piety of the Mexicans
was displayed toward the picture in
this small chapel. But the offerings
of the faithful soon provided a sumptuous shrine for its reception, and at
the present day the building is one of
the most beautiful churches in the
world.
The legend is generally believed all
over the Republic of Mexico, and
among the lower classes their belief
reaches absolute adoration. Guadalupe is considered a thorough Mexican divinity.
The picture of the Virgin so miraculously placed on the rough garment
of the Indian, stands in a great frame
over the altar. No one can look at it
without feeling that there is something wonderful about its construction. The material on which the picture is placed is a rough, coarse cloth,
with meshes far apart. The same
material is used a great deal all over
Mexico, and many of the Indians and
natives wear exactly the same sort
of garment as that worn by Juan
Diego. The image appears on this
material without any preparation or
background whatever; in fact," it
shows both sides exactly the same.
A number of artists and scientific men
of great repute have examined it and
they all have deposed under oath that
they cannot account for its production. They say that it represents no
known style of art, and that there if
no other picture in the world that has
the same characteristics. Four different kinds of paintings are discernible
in different portions of the same canvas, and in addition the gilding which
appears in the stars embroidered in
the garment and the texture of the
robe itself, as well as the rays of
light which artistically fall on the picture, appear to be woven rather than
painted.
More wonderful than its beauty and
the exquisite detail work, is the manner in which it has been preserved.
For years it was exposed without any
covering, not only to thc smoke of
the cencers and the innumerable candles borne by the faithful, but to the
damp air, charged with saltpetre,
which continually arises from the
neighbouring lakes ancl marshes, ancl
which corrodes the heaviest substances. Ancl yet, after a period of
more than three hundred and sixty
years this product of the native
maguey plant, which ought to have
perished long ago, is still in a perfect
state of preservation and retains all
its freshness and beauty.
There arc many interesting and
wonderful old legends in Mexico, and
everywhere one meets with quaint old
ruins of monasteries, churches and
convents, many of which wcre built
long before the Pilgrim Fathers first
landed in America. I hope to be able
to write you more later on when .1
become better acquainted with the
historical facts connected with many
of these ruins.
BABETTE.
Not to know G. H. Mumm & Co.'s  Champagne argues  yourself
unknown.
The man who orders Mumm's Extra Dry or Selected Brut proclaims at once his good standing in society—the society which,
being the best, demands the best. In some (so-called) champagnes, the vintage is only on the label, and the undiscerning
drink these inferior brands because they have been accustomed to
them; they recognize no more than the label tells them. Mumm's
label is known on all the four continents as a passport of healthful reliability. On account of its unrivalled quality and exceeding
purity, Mumm's Champagne is used at all the exclusive clubs, high-
class banquets and functions the world over. Perhaps its endorsement is still stronger in the fact that Royal Warrants are granted
to G. H. Mumm & Co. by
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
His Majesty
King Edward VII.
the German Emperor
the Emperor of Austria
the King of Italy
the King of Sweden
the King of Denmark
the King of the Belgians
the King of Spain.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Direct Importers
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTORIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and raude* Ue
artiati while in the Capital cily, aho of
other kindred bohetnians.
WRIQHT et FALCONER, Proprietor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular $2 a Dav Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur,
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
TO START NEW INDUSTRY.
Sanitol Company Will Open Branch
in Toronto.
Within the next few weeks there
will open in Toronto a new industry
which promises to grow as rapidly in
Canada as it has in the United States.
The new plant to be opened is that
of the Sanitol Chemical Laboratory
Company, which is an international
association of druggists and dentists
conducted on the co-operative profit-
sharing plan.
The products of this company are
already well known to Canadians, although they have always in the past
been manufactured in the United
States. Some time ago the Sanitol
people conceived a distribution
scheme to better introduce their products to the public, and as a result
the demand for the dainty toilet requisites they turn out has marvelous-
ly increased, which is the best evidence possible of their quality. The
company also adopted a very clever
advertising plan which was conducted
for them in Canada by the Woods-
Norris Advertising Agency. At all
events, the sale of their products increased with such rapidity that they
found it necessary to enlarge their
plant.
The new factory in Toronto will be
at the corner of Bathurst and King
Streets, and at the start the company
will employ about fifty hands. The
main idea of thc company in establishing a plant in Canada was to give
the druggists the benefit of increased
profits, which will naturally be made,
from the fact that no duty will havc
to be paid. Thc company will also
do a good part of its export trade
from the factory lo be established.in
Toronto, which will bc conducted
under the management of Mr. J. A.
Thunder.' Ten years ago the Sanitol
business was started with one product, Sanitol Liquid Antiseptic, and it
was started with but one man, but
the company has continually grown
and now turns out a complete line
of toilet preparations, while over s.ooo dentists in thc United States are
associated in thc business co-operatively, ancl over four-fifths of the dentists in thc United States ancl Canada
are prescribing Sanitol tooth preparations to their patients.
The company will start to install
ils machinery in the new plant in
Toronto immediately, and will begin
operations about the beginning of
April.
Buttermilk
Toilet Lotion
prevents and heals chaps,
roughness, sunburn, etc. counteracts the bad effects of dust-
laden winds on the complexion. Keeps the skin soft and
smooth; makes the hands delicately white.
Does not promote hair-
growth. Is neither greasy
nor sticky. Excellent for
gentlemen's use after shav-
ing.t Always fresh; always
pure. Made from an especially fine formula, from
the best and purest ingre-
dients.   25c bottle only at
this store
CYRUS H. BOWES, Chemist
Government St., near Yates.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date atylca.  Estimates and
design, lurnlihed.
HOLLY TREES
Prices fro* JJ ctflta to fe.00, according
to Mt Writs for seed nl tret estate*
JAY A CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water ijritem. Etectrle
lighted. Tub aad shower bathi and laundry la
connection.  The miners' heme.
"DANNY" DEANE. Proprietor
 ROSSLAND 	
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
OREEN & SniTH. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B. C,
Leading Hotel ot tha Kootentyi.
J. FRED HUME,      -      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
The home ol the Industrial Workers
otthe Kootenays.
W. E. ncCandllsh,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Bent Family Hotel in thi City.
$1.80 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts.        Proprietress
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get onr price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOGGS
Realty Brokers.
630 .TOBT BTBEET      tl      TIOTOBIA.
THOMAS OATTEBAIX.
Builder   and  Sonera)   Contractor.
Tenders given on Brick, Stone an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Flooring
OBce, Bank, Btore and Saloon Ftttlngi
Pile Driving, Whenres and Dock Shed:
constructed and repaired. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 29, 1908
Incorporated llll
Capital. tCtO.tSMt
Capital lncrsassd
In 1107
to ...$».«••,••♦.•»
Subserlbad
Capital,   $11*.
Bsservs . . tl*.***
Surplus, Jan. tt,   .
lift . . I1M.M*
J. a. X&TBSBS, Ota. Kaa.
nr closing uv estates
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy ls directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
ln our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO-
Limited.
338 Hastings St- West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"THE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83% Government Street...Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
The Missing Link.
A "dolce far niente" is the climacteric of Bohemian life. However
much the true Bohemian may condescend to mundane affairs and to
the activities of a strenuous existence,
his horizon is always bounded by
Lotus-land.
Ever since I first visited Victoria,
ten years ago, I have regarded it as
an ideal counterpart of the poet's
dream. I shall never forget that first
sail along the Straits of Georgia. It
was on a summer afternoon, the day
had been perfect, and the evening was
.dyllic. A blue sky tinging to orange
and crimson, a glow in the atmosphere, a ruddy sheen on the faint ripples of the water; isle after isle rising
to view, with carpet and canopy of
verdure; myriads of seagulls circling
around the boat; here and there a lone
fisherman hauling in his net; now and
again a solitary home planted on the
shore and a tiny clearing to tell of the
industry of man in nature's paradise.
In thc far distance was the promontory and island, rounding which came
the full view of the most favoured city
on the Pacific Coast; so beautiful, so
peaceful, so inviting, that sign of life
seemed a blot on the fair picture. As
I looked over the city and into the
lovely country beyond, involuntarily
the words of Tennyson leaped to my
memory, and I said, "This is the Island valley of Avilion," and it lied
"deep meadowed, happy, fair with
orchard lawns and bowery hollows,
crowned with summer sea."
My first impression of Victoria has
never been effaced, nor indeed has it
been modified. No wonder that the
early settlers, having faced the dangers of a voyage round the Horn or
across Panama and up the West
Coast, when once they gazed upon
this fair land, made it their resting-
place. And this it has been ever since,
a resting-place; and whatever ill-
advised enthusiasts may do to mar its
natural beauty, this it must ever remain.
Pioneers who established themselves in business in Victoria sixty
years ago have remained here ever
since, and those who have crossed the
divide are represented by their descendants. The wealth of the Fraser
River, and of Cariboo, and later still
of the Yukon and Alaska have been
poured into its coffers. Now the
wealth of prairie land is beginning to
filter here through various channels,
and no one who has watched recent
developments doubts that Victoria is
destined to become the permanent
home of thousands who have accumulated a competency amid the rigours
of the Northwest.
By common consent, Victorians
have a failing which, however, only
establishes their relationship to all
other civilized communities. Their
failing is one so easily remedied that
it is a thousand pities that it should
have been allowed to continue so long.
Their city is an ideal home city, nature has exhausted herself in conferring upon it the blessings of climate,
scenery, and environment, but man
alone has failed to do his duty. Mr.
Topp, the city engineer, tells us in his
annual report that this is only because
man has not dug deep into his pockets, and undoubtedly the statement is
justified.
We clamour for clean streets, good
roads, and arboreal decorations, but
we do not furnish the funds. The
City Council has stood a lot of hard
knocks and severe criticism for a condition of affairs in our principal
streets which can only be regarded as
disgraceful, but the City Council has
never made it clear to the public that
the sole reason of this was insufficient
funds. Now that the fact has been
prominently set forth, with the addition of careful estimates, the City
Council will no doubt prepare a well-
digested scheme for dealing with the
whole subject in a manner commensurate with the requirements of the
times.
But this is only one of the many
things which should be done to round
out an intelligent programme. The
opening of the Empress Hotel has inaugurated a new era. Even during
the present year thousands of wealthy
tourists will make it a calling place.
Under existing conditions, how long
will they remain? On an average,
twenty-four hours. Why not one, two
or three weeks? Simply because they
will have exhausted the sights of the
city in one day. When they have seen
the Parliament buildings and thc
Provincial Museum, and have taken
the tally-ho drive round the beach
from Beacon Hill Park to Oak Bay,
they are brought back to the hotel
and are told, "That is all." If they
stay over they make the same run the
second day, and the third day, and so
on every day.
There are no organized trips to
Goldstream, to Metchosin, to Sydney,
to Cordova Bay, or indeed to any
point outside the city; and yet it is its
magnificent hinterland which is the
real asset of Victoria. Under proper
organization there are sufficient lovely
drives to keep visitors busy every day
for several weeks, and the. roads are
the delight of all outsiders who travel
on them for the first time; but the
stranger within our gates has to find
out all these things for himself, there
is no one whose business it is to tell
it, and no systematic arrangement for
taking him in hand.
What other city has such glorious
possibilities for excursions by water?
There are a thousand places within 1
day's sail of the city where the most
delightful picnic parties could be held,
but only the oldest inhabitant knows
of them, or avails himself of the privilege. Victoria has no such thing as a
Country Club, and, most astounding
of all, no provision for bathing. Vancouver, the commercial, possessing
not a tithe of the natural advantages
of Victoria, has its English Bay, and
has made it a fashionable and attractive rendezvous. Victoria has Cadboro Bay, an infinitely superior bathing place, within easy reach of the
city, but no one knows anything about
it except the citizen who camps there
for the summer months. With tramway connection and a modern bathing
pavilion, Cadboro Bay could be made
one of the most attractive spots on
the Pacific Coast.
The only enterprise shown in connection with developing the attractions of Victoria must be accredited
to the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, who have done wonders for the Gorge Park, but while
they cater very successfully along the
line of amusement, no one would suggest that the Gorge Park fills the bill
for those who wish to spend some
time in a pleasure retreat, by the
waterside, with the advantage of surf-
bathing.
Now, I call all this deficiency the
Missing Link. The responsibility, of
course, rests primarily with the community, but communities rarely take
the initiative; they naturally incline to
follow the leader. We have a Tourist
Association, which should undoubtedly do its utmost to arouse public interest in this direction; we have public bodies, such as the Board of Trade
and the City Council, which might
fairly assist in the work of education.
We have some public-spirited citizens
with large business and property interests, who on every ground would
benefit by joining such a movement,
and we have 'the man in the street,"
who is a power when once he starts
moving.
Is it too much to suggest that one
or other of these will take up the
study of the Missing Link before the
coining season? A little more of the
spirit of enterprise, a little more appreciation of our advantages and possibilities, and Victoria would have
embarked upon the policy which has
has made Los Angeles, with fewer
natural advantages, the summer home
of sixty thousand visitors, and one of
the wealthiest cities in the West. All
of which is respectfully submitted to
the consideration of loyal Victorians
by
Socialists and Their Work.
Robert Hunter, the author of "Poverty," has recently returned from a
year and a half abroad where he has
been studying the growing labour and
socialist movements. In a volume
entitled "The Socialists at Work,"
which is to appear this Spring, he
gives a picturesque description of the
men, the congresses, the organizations and the propaganda which go to
make up this extraordinary movement.
Even readers who think themselves
familiar with the rapid growth of socialism in Europe, will be startled by
the facts Mr. Hunter has to disclose.
Not the least in*.-esting portion of
the book will be the pen pictures and
estimates of the leaders of the movement—such men as Bebel, Jaures,
Liebknecht, Gorki, Vandervelde, and
Belfort Bax.
The Orthodox View.
Marryat—You don't believe in divorce, then?
Mugley—No, sir; I've got too much
sporting  blood.
Marryat—What has that to do with
it?
Mugley—I believe in a fight to a
finish.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build;   dressed   in
dark-colored  clothing;  wore  dark
cap.    Both men were armed with
dark-colored   revolvers and   wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward  will   be  given  for  information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
either one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
1908 Wedding Presents
This Season gifts to the bride will, it is foretold, frequently take
the form of an ornament she can wear. By so doing, donors may
avoid giving presents of an absurd character and may bestow
something of real service.
Brooches and Bracelets
are presents most brides would gladly cherish as souvenirs, for
like the proverbial hairpin, a woman can never have too many
brooches or bracelets. You will find a splendid selection here—
an endless variety—at all prices from the gorgeous real gold
diamond-set, tourmaline, a quamarine, or peridot-set creations down
to the plain gold-filled Jewel Set Brooch or the "Olga Nethersole"
Bangle. All the very latest designs in Brooches and Bracelets;
all undeniable values.
MS
VICTORIA. B.O
Victor-Berlinei
Vaudeville
How would you like to hear
May Irwin, the queen of fun-makers,
Vesta Victoria and Alice Lloyd, the
famous English comediennes; that
celebrated tenor, Richard Jose;
clever Clarice Vance, with her
irresistibly humorous song-hits;
Harry Lauder, the great Scotch
comedian ; popular Eddie Morton,
in your own borne?
You can hear them all on the Victor
or Berliner Gram-o-phone just the same
as if you  were at the theatre—these
**-^^^M_______a_____i^M famous vaudeville artists who are delighting thousands of people every night in
the theatres all over the United States and Canada and who
make records exclusively for the Victor.
You can do what you can't do at the theatres; you can
pick out your own performers and arrange your own program to suit yourself.
Then there's  Billy Murray,   Harry   Macdonough,
Arthur Collins, Ada Jones, Harry Tally and other favorites
to sing for you.
You can also have a complete minstrel show with a Victor er Berliner
Gram-o-phone.   Or you can have music by famous bands; dance music;
<^\ classic symphonies; sacred songs; and grand-opera by the world's
%H \ greatest stars.    All these things are absolutely true to life,  and
■*i *«■ °<V\are heard at their best on the Victor or Btrliner Gramophone,
Any Victor ot Bnliner dealer will gladly play Victor Records for yoa.
ve> "a %_\.<-a" a".c* asK to llear 'hem,an<** Bet him to tell
you about the easy-payment plan.
Write us for catalogues—Just fill out the
coupon and mail it to us.
__    -..        -v.   •.  **>'   \ wuwu auu mull u io un.
. \\ %\;VV   The Berliner 6ram-o-phone
«v\\ \ v^A. ComPany °' ^mit> ^
\\\vw\    Moirtreal' 607
You can always      __      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar |V|#    J3^     than others.
Union Made. O^lfi^W
Havana Filler.       Wiy C1I
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WESK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 39, 1908.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District ot Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Buffling-
ton Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation Gentleman, intends to apply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at. a post planted twenty
chains north of the northeast corner ot
section 12, thence forty chains north,
one hundred and twenty chains west,
forty chains south and one hundred and
twenty chains east to point of commencement.
Dated  21st December,  1907.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan  18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of section 21, thence
eighty chains east, eighty chains south,
eighty chains west and eighty chains
north to point ot commencement.
Dated 21st December, 11107.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Goldstream.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Bufflngton
Vrooman of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Gentleman, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described  lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of section 20, thence
eighty chains west, eighty chains south,
eighty chains east and eighty chains
north to place of commencement.
Dated 21st December, 11107.
FRANK BUFFINGTON VROOMAN,
Jan 18 R. W. Wilkinson.
TAKE NOTICE that M. Brennan, of
Ootso Lake, occupation Farmer, intends
to apply for permission to lease the
following  described   land:
Commencing at a post marked M. B.
Southeast Corner, situated about 40
chains north and 40 chains east of Lot
325, N.E. Cor.; thence 40 chains north;
thence 40 chains west; thence 40 chains
south; thence 60 chains east to point
of commencemnent, containing 240 acres.
Dated   November   15,   1907.
De. 14 MARK BRENNAN.
Best Buy.
BEST   BUT  IN VICTORIA OF  BUSINESS PROPERTY. WITH WATER
FRONTAGE ON JAMBS BAY.
DISTRICT OB CASSIAR.
TAKE NOTICE that The Hidden
Creek Mining Co., or Vancouver, occupation,  , intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land, about 3 acres:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south east corner post of Lot 479; thence
north one chain; thence southwesterly
parellel to high water mark, about 30
chains to west boundary of Lot 479;
thence south about one chain forty links
to high water mark and thence along
high water mark to point of commencement.
Dated Nov. 26th, 1907.
HIDDEN CREEK MINING CO.,
Dec. 7 Per J. Herrick MacGregor.
I
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest
corner of Timber Limit No. 3193, thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th Dec, 1907.
THOMAS MILER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation, Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted SO chains west of southwest corner of Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
norih SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east SO
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY   WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted 80 chains west of southwest cor
ner ot Timber Limit No. 13193; thence
east 160 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Located 7th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Double Corner on Wharf and Government streets, with 100 feet water
frontage on James Bay. This property
has the Poat Offlce to tho North, the
C. P. R. Hotel to the East, Parliament
Buildings to the South, and a Steamship Company's wharf to the West of It.
As an Hotel Site the situation of these
lots ls unrivaled ln the City of Victoria,
hundred of thousands of dollars have
been spent ln valuable Improvements on
all sides of them by tho Provincial Government, the City Council and th*
C. P. R.    Price $52,500.
Easy terms can bo arranged with deferred payments bearing interest at 7
per cent.
For further particulars apply to
A. O. P. FRANCIS, Broker.
610 Pender Street,
VANCOUVER. B. C.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W.  N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of   Victoria,   occupation   surveyor,   intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap In-
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Max. J. Cameron,
of Vancouver, Merchr intends to apply for a special tlinodr licence over
the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River, S. W. corner;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement.
20th December, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
about 6 miles from Ramsay Arm, on the
main Quatham River; S. E. Corner;
thence 160 chains N.; 40 chains W.; 160
chains south; 40 chains east to point of
commencement.
December 20th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and ln an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains.
20th December, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one chain distant and in an easterly direction from Quatham River,
about seven miles east of Ramsay Arm,
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west JO chains; thence
south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 5—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about eight and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an easterly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about nine and one-half
miles east of Ramsay Arm; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains,
21st December, 1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains distant and in an east-
Arthur Gore.
Manager
Manager     *  lPriD_t_.M\   IYl_A "O   Residence 438
posted up to date every day.
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT L MAP CO
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHAN CERY    CHAMBERS.
BLUE PRINTING
52 LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west of the northwest corner of timber Limit No. 18544,
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains; thence;
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Located 8th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan 18
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Baird and
S. Wood of Victoria, occupation Timber
Cruisers, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains west and 10 chains
south of the southwest corner of timber limit No. 18646, thence west 40
chains; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south about 60
chains; thence easterly along shore 120
chains; thence north about 60 chains to
point of commencement.
Located 9th December, 1907.
THOMAS MILLER BAIRD.
STANLEY WOOD.
Jan. 18
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 36, township 5, Range 5.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains lo place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 80, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,  and  containing  160  acres,   more  or
Dated  23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny all
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken   up in Br iti sh Columbia.
Blue_Pnnts  can be   obtained at short no fir.
No. 8—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles east of claim No. 7, on
north bank of unnamed river, emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 9—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Claim No. 8,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence south 40 chains; thence west
160 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 160 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of claim No. 9,
on north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke Channel; thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thenee south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated December 17th, 1907.
No. li—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile east of Claim No. 9, and
adjoining corner post of claim No. 10
ou north bank of small river emptying
into Koeye Lake, south of Burke channel; tiience west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
about 20 chains west of Claims No. 9
and 10, on south bank of small river
emptying into Koeye Lake, south of
Burke Channel, thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains; thence west 10 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Dated December 17, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore line of Koeye Lake; thence
south along shore line SO chains to point
of commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
Dated   December   18th,   1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
about one and one-half miles south of
the head of Koeye Lake, south of Burke
Channel, thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to shore of Koeye Lake, thence north
along shore 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 15—Commencing at a post planted about one-half mile east from the
foot of Koeye Lake, on the north shore
of said lake; thence north 80 chains;
theuce east 80 chains; thence south 8U
chains; to shore of Koeye Lake; thence
west along shore of said lake 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 18th, 1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot 241A,
Burke Channel, and about one mlle south
of corner post of claims No. 3 and 4;
ihence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains; thence
east SO chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
about two miles south of Lot No. 241 A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claims No. 3 and 4; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 040 acres more or less.
Daied December 16th, 1907.
Jan.  18 ED. BROWN.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following  described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marbie
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore Une a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
316.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A Grlerson, Agent.
let Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
erly direction from east bank of Quatham River, about ten and one-half miles
east of Ramsy Arm; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains.
21st December,  1907.
MAX. J. CAMERON,
Jan 18 L. W. Kingsley, Agent.
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Kesldtatlal •■ i Day School lor Boys
wwmmv
Handsome New Buildings. Larg**
Athletic Field. Carelul Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..LL.D-
PrlQclpr.l
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Harry McMicken
Keefer of Vancouver, occupation Broker,
Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on the
W. E. Coast of Savary Island and about
25 chains from the easterly end of the
Island, thence west 20 chalna to low
water mark; thence south 400 chains
along low water mark; thence east 20
chains to high water mark; thence north
400 chains to point of commencement,
and containing eight hundred acres,
more or less.
Dated Dec.  2nd,  1907.
Dec 14      HARRY McMICKENKEEFER.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Patrick Rogers of Vancouver, occupation
carpenter, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner of Lot 1347, G. I., New
Westminster district; thence west 20
chains; thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence south 20 chains
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less.
Dated November  26th,  1907.
FREDERICK PATRICK ROGERS.
Dec.14
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range i.
TAKE NOTICE that Ed. Brown, of
Vancouver, B.C., Cruiser, intends to apply for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
one mile west of Lot No. 241A; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence nortli 80 chains to shore line of
Burke Channel; thence west along shore
line 80 chains more or less, to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated December 16, 1907.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
on south shore of Burke Channel, about
three mlles west of Lot No.241 A; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains more or less, to
shore line of Burke Chanel; thence west
along shore line 160 chains more or less
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or loss.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of Lot No. 241A,
on bank of Newcomb River, Burke Channel, thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about one mile south of lot No. 24 IA,
Burke Channel, adjoining post of claim
No. 3; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 2 miles south of Lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and one mile south of
corner post of claim No. 3 and 4; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thenco west 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
No. 6—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles south of lot No. 241A,
Burke Channel, and two miles south of
S. W. corner of Claim No. 5; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
No. 7—Commencing at a post planted
about four and one-half milos south
of lot No. 241A, Burke Channel; on a
bank of a small river about one-half
mile oast of claim No. 6; thenco north
80 chains; thenco east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres moro or less.
Dated December 17th,  1907.
B.C.
Timber Maps
of All Districts
VANCOUVER MAP and BLUE-PRINT CO,
Suite 20-21 Crowe and Wilson
Chambers.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
llne intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
&  PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at tbe
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chaina
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north  line  of  section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Bwlag Span.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Superstructure Metal for
Swing Bridge, North Arm, Fraser
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Tuesday, the 31st of December,
1907, for manufacturing and delivering,
f. o. b„ scow at Vancouver or New
Westminster, all the metal work required for the superstructure ot a steel
swing span.
Drawings, specifications, condition of
contract and tender may be seen by
intending tenderers on and after Tuesday, the 26th of November, 1907, at
the oflice of the Public Works Engineer,
Lands and Works Department, and at
the office of the Provincial Timber ln
spector, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certllicale
ol' deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Uonourablu the Chief Commissioner ln
the sum of two hundred and fifty U260J
dollars, which shall be forfeited if the
party tendering decline or neglect to
enter Into contract when called upon
lo do so. The cheques or certificates
of deposit of successful tenderers will
be relumed to them upon the execution
of the contract.
The successful tenderer will be
called upon to furnish a bond, himself
and two securities, satisfactory to the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, lu
the sum of (1,000 each, or to furnish a
bond of a Guarantee Company satisfactory to the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner ln the sum of 13,000 for
the due fulfilment of the work contracted for.
Upon the execution of the contract
and a satisfactory bond being supplied,
signed with the actual signatures of the
tenderers aud enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Worka Engineer.
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
Private Bills.
The time limited by the rules of the
house for the presentation of petitions
for leave to introduce private bills expires on Monday, 27 January, 1908.
Bills must be presented to the house
by Thursday, 6th  l'ebruary,  1908.
Reports on bills will not be received
after Thursday, 13th February, 1908.
Copies of the bill, petition and notices must bc deposited with the undersigned, and the house fees paid, not
later than Wednesday, 8th January,
1908.
Dated this 2nd day of December,
1907.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
Superstructure of Swing Span.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
time for receiving tenders for the
Superstructure Metal for Swing Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River, has been extended up to and Including Friday, the
31st day of January, 1908.
F. C. GAMBLE.
Public Works Englnoer.
Lands and Works Department,
Vietoria, B.C., December 17th, 1907.
Dec. 28
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and Jamos
H. McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 3—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northwest corner post; thence south
160 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
June 13, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James 11. Mcl_auchlan.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Renfrew.
TAKE NOTICE thnt Harvey Waters,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Timber
Cruiser, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described  lands:
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted south five and one-half miles
and east six miles of W. C. Nelson and
H. Waters' post of their No. 1 claim
on Cheewhat Lake; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
H. WATERS.
Located on 26th August, 1907.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that James Purdy
Nelson, of Bellingham, Ws.sh., U.S.A.,
occupation broker, intends to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
about 30 chains distant and in a southerly direction from the northwest corner of Lease No. 222; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains.
JAMES PURDY NELSON.
Dec. 24, 1907. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 chains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains', thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thenoe
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated  November  24th,  1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
mlles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and ln a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160  acres,  more or  less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES,
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omoneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a spe*
cial timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about ""
miles west of Fort St. James, thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south £0 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEO. B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Prospector, intends to apply for a special timber licence over the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north side of Stuart Lake, about 33
miles west of Fort St. James and 16
chains north of the southwest corner
of my application No. 1; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to place of commencement.
Dated October 26th,  1907.
Feb. 1 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT,
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 mlles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1% miles
south of the south line of lthe Indian
Reserve at the south end j of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence wes^ 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing | 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 190/7.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a. special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th,/1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Orhlneca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, (B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked in my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART  LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; Ihence east 160 chatns;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA   LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of commencement, containing 160
acres.
WILLIAM  ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
New House to Rent, or
For Sale.
I have for immediate possession to
rent or will sell on very easy terms
—small cash payment—one of the
best built dwellings in the city. Only
IS minutes' walk from Post Office,
and oue block from car line. Situated in one of the best residential
sections.
Bungalow, with large balcony,
seven-roomed house, absolutely new,
with full sized cement basement, concrete floor; electric light in every
room in the house. Hot and cold
water equipment; heavy porcelain
wash bowl and bath, also separate
toilet in basement. Laundry in thc
basement equipped with latest concrete tubs and hot and cold water.
Walk has been laid in extra heavy
concrete from street to verandah
steps. This is a proposition that will
be snapped up quickly. Call or
phone 1543.
G. W. DEAN
Adelphi Block   -   VICTORIA, B.C.
DISTRICT   OF   RUPERT.
TAKE NOTICE I. T. S. McPherson,
Agent of Victoria, B. C, intend to apply
for a special timber license over the
following described lands:
No. 10—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner section 3,
township 26, marked T. S. McP., No.
10, which is two and one-quarter miles
northerly from west arm of Quatsino
Sound, thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains, south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
Dec. 19th,  1907.
No. 11—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of section 2,
township 26, marked McP. F., No. 11,
which is two and one-quarter mlles
northerly from west Arm Quatsino
Sound, thence east 160 chains; north 40
chains, west 160 chains; south 40 chs.,
to point of commencement.
Geo. H. Jackson, Agent.
Staked Dec. 19, 1907.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted one and one-half mile in a northwesterly direction from the west end
of Nah-Wl-Ti Lake, and one-half mile
west of S. E. Corner section 1, township 33, thence west 40 chains; thence
north 160 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 160 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
Staked Dec, 20, 1907.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted one mile in northwesterly direction
from west end of Nah-Wi-Ti Lake, and
at N. W. corner section 31, township
25, thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted one mlle from west end of Nah-Wi-
Ti Lake ln northerly direction, half
mile north of N. W. corner seotlon 32,
township 25; thence south 80 cliains;
thence east following shore line 80
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 20,  1907.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
and at N. E. corner section 36, township 26, thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted one-half mile north of T. L. 13222,
of W. Corner section 31, township 19,
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres, more or less.
Staked Dec. 20, 1907.
Jan. 11. T. S. McPHERSON.
The Taylor Mill Co,
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St.. Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Sayward.
TAKE NOTICE that W. E. Simpson
of Iowa Falls, Banker, intends to apply
to the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special timber licence over
the following described lands thirty
days after date.
No. 12—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.
S.E. No. 12, which Is seven and one-half
miles distant and ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 13—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 13, which is eight miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; south
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 14—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 14, which ls eight miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and one mile north of bank
of Upper Salmon River; thence north
80 chains; east 80 chains; south 80
chains; west 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 16, which ls eight and one-half
miles distant from Crown mountain and
15 chains west of Island Power Company's line near bank ot Upper Salmon
River; thence north 100 chains; west
64 chains; south 100 chains; east 64
chatns  to point of commencement.
No. 16—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner marked W.
E. S., S.E. No. 16, which ls nine miles
distant ln a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and one and one-half
miles north of stake 12, on the Bank
of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 40 chains; west 160 chains; south
40 chains; east 160 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 17—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner, marked W.E.S.,
S. E. No. 17, which is nine and one-half
miles distant in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
north 80 chains; east 80 chains; soutli
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 18—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner marked W.
E. S., S.W., No. 18, which ls nine and
one-half mlles in a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and two and one-
half miles north of Upper Salmon River,
thence east 80 chains north 80 chains;
west 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 19—Commencing at a post planted
at' the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 19, which ls ten and one-half
mlles distant ln a northerly direction
from Crown Mountain and three miles
northerly and westerly from post No.
12, on bank of Upper Salmon River;
thence north 80 chains; east 80 chains;
south 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 20—Commencing at the southeast
corner marked W.E.S., S.E., No. 20,
which Is ten and one-half mlles distant
In a northerly direction from Crown
Mountain and three miles northwesterly
from stake 12, on the bank of the Upper Salmon River, thence north 80
chains; west 80 chains; south 80 chains;
east 80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 21—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No, 21, which ls eleven and one-
half miles distant In a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence north 80 chains; west 80
chains; south 80 chains; east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
No. 22—Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W. No. 22, which ls eleven and one-
half miles distant ln a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and four
miles ln a northwesterly direction from
stake 12, on the Bank of the Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
80 chains to point of commencement.
Staked Dec. 18th, 1907.
No. 23—-Commencing at a post planted
at the southwest corner marked W.E.S.,
S.W., No. 23, which is seven and one-
half mlles in a northerly direction from
Crown Mountain and on Bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains; west
SO chains to point of commencement.
No. 24—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner No. 24, marked
W.E.S., S.E., No. 24, which is eight and
one-half miles distant in a northerly
direction from Crown Mountain and one
mile north of the Upper Salmon River;
thence west 80 chains; north 80 chains;
east 80 chains; south 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 25—Commencing at a post planted
at the northwest corner marked W.E.S.,
N.W., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
north 80 chains; west 80 chains to point
of commencement.
No. 26—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E., No. 26, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thonce
south 80 chains; west 80 chains; north
80 chains; east 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 27—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 27, which is seven and one-
half miles distant in a northerly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
Bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
north 80 chains; west 80 chains; south
80 chains; east 80 chains to point ot
commencement.
No. 28—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner which is marked
W.E.S. N.E. No. 28, which is eight and
one-quarter mlles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain, and on the south bank of Upper
Salmon River; thence west 80 chains;
south 80 chains; east 80 chatns; north
80 chains to point of commencement.
No. 29—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 29, which is eight and one-
quarter mlles distant in a northwesterly
direction from Crown Mountain and on
bank of Upper Salmon River; thence
west 80 chains; north 80 chains; east
80 chains; south 80 chains to point of
commencement.
No. 30—Commencing at a post planted
at the northeast corner marked W.E.S.,
N.E. No. 30, which ls ten miles distant
in a northwesterly direction from Crown
Mountain and on bank of Upper Salmon
River; thence 80 chains south; 80 chains
west; 80 chains north; 80 chains east
to point of commencement.
No. 31—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E. No. 31, which ls ten and one-half
miles distant in a northwesterly direction from Crown Mountain and on the
bank of the Upper Salmon River; thence
80 chains north; 80 chains west; 80
chains south, 80 chains east to point of
commencement.
Staked Dec. 19, 1907.
W. E.  SIMPSON.
Jan. 11.     Thomas S. McPherson, Agent.
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section ;
4, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
7. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16186, Section
3, Township 83; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
8. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
9. Commencing at a post planted at
northeast corner of T. L. 16194, Section
2, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
10. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16195, Section
l, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
tiience north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 17, 1907.
FRANK KELLY.
Jan 18. George H. Jackson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Nootka.
No. 2—Commencing at a post planted
at the southeast corner marked W.E.S.,
S.E.  No.  2,  situate on the west Bank
Upper Campbell Lake, where the C.P.R.
line cuts same; thence west 80 chains;
north 120 chains; east 40 chains; south
80   chains;   east   40   chains;   south   40
chains   to   point   of   commencement.
Staked December  16th,  1907.
WILLIAM E. SIMPSON,
Jan. 11. T. S. McPherson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE that Francis Joseph
Alma Green, of Quatsino, B. C, occupation Prospector, intends to upply for
a special timber licence over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 192, at the
Narrows, Quatsino Sound, thence east
about 36 chains to northeast corner of
Lot 192; thence north about 120 chains
to the southern boundary of the Indian
reserve; thence west to the shore of
Narrows; thence south along the shore
to point of commencement; 640 acres,
more or less.
Jan 11
FRANCIS JOSEPH ALMA GREEN.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICE that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, Intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence eaBt 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Frank Kelly,
of Victoria, B.C., timber cruiser, Intend
to   apply for a special   timber   license
over the following described lands:
1. Commencing at a post planted at
southeast corner of Section 29, Township 32, Rupert District; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chatns; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
2. Commencing at post planted about
one-half mile west of southeast corner
of Section 32, Township 32; thence west
40 chains; thence north 160 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
3. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
5, Township 33; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
4. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16196, Section
4, Township 33; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
5. Commencing at a post planted at
northwest corner of T. L. 16186, Section
4, Township 83; thence west 40 chains;
thence north 160 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 160 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 16, 1907.
6. Commencing at a post planted   at
3&
&m
NOTICE TO  LOGGERS.
Bridge, North Arm, Fraser River.
PUss.
ALTERNATIVE sealed tenders, superscribed "Tender for Piles, Bridge,
North Arm, Fraser River," will be received by the Honourable the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works,
Victoria, B. C, up to and including
Tuesday, the 31st of December, 1907,
for furnishing and delivering at tht
bridge site on the North Arm of the
Fraser River, on the line of tha Cemetery Road, fir and cedar piles.
About six hundred (600) will be required, varying in length from twenty
(20) to forty-five (45) feet. They must
be straight, sound, and not less than
ten (10 inches at the small end. No
butts will be accepted.
Further printed particulars can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
Tenderers must state the price per
lineal foot for piles delivered.
The successful tenderer will be furnished with a list giving the number
of piles required and the length of each.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate
of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable to the order of the
Honourable the Chief Commissioner, In
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($260), which shall be forfeited
if the party tendering decline or neglect
lo enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or fail to complete the work
contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful ten-
tenderers will be returned to them upon  the execution  of the  contract.   .
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the form supplied, signed
with the actual signatures of the tenderers, and enclosed ln the envelope furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Nov. 30 Public Works Engineer.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 4—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thonce west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 14, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan 11. James H. McLauchlan.
NEW    WESTMINSTER    LAND    DISTRICT.
Distriot of New Westminster.
TAKE NOTICE tliat Roman Z. Chandler, of Vancouver, B. C, ocupation
Broker, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
ten chains south of the southeast corner ot D. L. 1413; thence north 160
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 160 chains; thence west 40 chalus
to place of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
December 23, 1907.
Jan 11. ROMAN Z.  CHANDLER.
VICTORIA  LAND  DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastle of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B.C., Contractor, Intend to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:
No. 1—Commencing at a post planted
about 4 miles to the west of Robinson's
Bight, on a small unnamed creek, being
the southeast corner post; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 11, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan, 11. James H. McLauchlan,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Rupert District.
TAKE NOTICE that James Hastie, of
Victoria, B. C, Merchant, and James H.
McLauchlan, of Victoria, B. C, contractor, intend to apply for a special
licence over the following described
lands:
No. 2—-Commencing at a post planted
about 4 mlles to the west of Robinson's
Bight on a small unnamed creek, being
the northeast corner post; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains
to point of commencement.
June 12, 1907.
JAMES HASTIE,
Jan. 11. James H. McLauchlan. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908.
ftooooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooooooo-ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooooooooooooooooooo
soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Some New Library Tables
Just now we are showing a splendid range of Library
Tables. We list here a few of the styles carried simply
to show how reasonably-priced these tables are. While
being a highly valuable piece of furniture from a decorative standpoint, the usefulness of one makes it doubly
desirable. We show a great variety both Golden Oak and
Early English Oak, and offer quite a choice as to price.
We should appreciate an opportunity to show you these
and other excellent furniture items for the library, shown
on our 3rd and 4th floors.
Library Table—A* splendid table style this, and low-priced
too. Made in oak, mission style and finished in the
popular Early English style of finish. Top is 42 in. x
26 in. Has large shelf beneath. A pretty style and
excellent value at the price $22.50
Library Table—A quarter-cut oak, style, finished in
golden, top is 32 in. x 48 in. Table has two large
drawers. Legs are round. This is a very attractive
table style and good value at, each $25.00
Library Table—A mission style finished in Early English
style of finish. Made of finest quality oak in finest
possible manner. Top is 48 in. x 30 in. There are
two drawers.   Price each  $30.00
Library Table—Another style in golden oak that is worthy
of special mention. This style has large drawer,
shelves at both ends for books and magazines, etc.
Top is 29 in. x 50 in., and is handsomely polished. A
rich looking table and one you'll like. Price, each $35.00
Library Table—Another Mission style in the Early English finish. This style has one large drawer and has
shelves at both ends for books, magazines, etc. Top
is 29 in x 50 in.   Priced fairly at, each $35.00
Library Table—A genuinely fine style in mission. This
table has two drawers, two small and two large
cabinets for stationery, etc. There is also a large shelf.
Top is 29 in. x 50 in.   Price, each, only $40.00
Splendid Values in Tea Sets
China Tea Set—A 40-piece set, pink floral decoration. The
body is of very fine china. Marked down at the very
lowest price of per set  $4.00
China Tea Set—A splendid set, in pink floral decoration.
This set has 39 perfect pieces and is a very attractive
set.   Marked now at, per set  $4.75
China Tea Set—Here is a dainty set in blue which should
appeal to those who favor blues. It is a pretty floral
effect.   Forty pieces, per set  $5.00
China Tea Set—This is a very handsome decoration in
green and gilt. The design is very dainty, and the
set at this price, genuinely good value, 40 pieces, per
set   • $5.00
China Tea Set—A printed and gilt set in blue hawthorn,
a design that is pleasing. We have marked this 40-
piece set at a price that will move it in a hurry.
Now at  $7.50
China Tea Set—An especially attractive set this. The
decoration is light blue and gold worked into a design
that is at once attractive and pleasing. There are 36
perfect pieces, and the set is now offered at $16.00
Some of Our New Carpets
Axminster Carpets—A splendid range of pretty and attractive designs in this favorite carpet. Prices range at,
per yard, $3.75, $3.00, $2.25 and  $2.00
Wilton Carpets—In Wiltons we also show a very extensive range of handsome designs and splendid range of
colorings.   Per yard, $3.50, $2.75, $2.25 and $1.90
Axbury Carpets—This is a splendid carpet style and in
it we have an unusually fine range of patterns and
colorings.   All at once price.   Per yard  $2.75
Tapestry Squares—In low-priced, hard-wearing carpets
we show a splendid line of Tapestry Carpet at a great
choice of prices. We have it at, per yard, $1.25, $1.00
85c and  75c
Brussels Carpets—In our offerings of this Housekeepers'
Carpet you'll find a great choice of styles. It is probably the most serviceable carpet one could buy. Per
yard, $2.00, $1.75, $1.60, $1.50, $1.40, $1.25 and $1.00
Velvet Carpet—This is a nice carpet style from the famous
Crossley looms.   At, per yard  $1.70
Splendid Showing of Reed Styles
Reed Rockers—A large assortment of styles and prices.
Excellent rockers all. Full of comfort and goodness.
Prices range at, each, $14.00, $12.50, $12.00, $10 and $4.75
Reed Arm Chair—Here are four excellent styles in arm
chairs that appeal to us as being as near perfection as
possible. Each is well and strongly made. Price,
each, $12.50, $12.00, $10.00, $10.00 and $8.00
Reed Reception Chairs—A lucky seven combination of
styles. Each full of special merit. Just try one of
these. They'll make a difference in the appearance of
a room.   Each, $12.50, $12.00, $10.50, $9.00 and $6.50
Reed Settee—Several styles and sizes, ranging in price at,
each $18.00, $16.00, $14.00, $9.00 and $7.50
Reed Couches—Two very fine new styles in these comfortable pieces, at, each, $20.00 and $14.00
Children's Rockers—Pretty little pieces for the little tots.
Very pretty styles and all made in best possible manner. Made to stand lots of ill-use. Prices range at,
each, $6.50, $5.50, $4,00, $3.50 and $2.50
Children's Arm Chairs—A pretty line of these dainty little
chairs. . They are excellent values at, each $3.50
Reed Roman Chairs—An attractive piece at, each $8.00
Ottomans—In Reed. Made in several styles. Priced at,
each $7.50, $6.00 and  $5.50
Reed Chair, Rocker and Settee—These are of finest quality
reed and painted green. They are very attractive and
priced reasonable—Chair, $ro; Rocker, $10; Settee, $16.
Dainty New Dinnerware
In semi-porcelain Dinner Services we offer a splendid
lot of new arrivals and new designs. This ware is specially adapted for the hard wear of everyday use and will
withstand satisfactorily the hard knocks of frequent use.
The new patterns are uncommonly dainty and pleasing, and we offer among these listed here some services
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or such liberal pricings are not offered elsewhere.
Dinner Service—In semi-porcelain.   A very neat and pretty
floral decoration.   97 pieces.   Special value, at, per
set  $8.50
Dinner Service—A "stock" pattern in a pretty blue rose
decoration. There are 114 pieces in thi sset. Match-
ings from stock at any time  $13.50
Dinner Service—One of the newest decorations. A tulip
in blue with lots of gold as well. 96 pieces of newness  $14.00
Dinner Service—In semi-porcelain, 96 pieces in a very
pretty green and gold carnation decoration. Neat and
pretty.    Per set   $14.00
Dinner Service—A 105-piece set in semi-porcelain. A
"stock" pattern which you can replenish at any time.
Pretty apple blossom decoration.   Price       ... .$15.00
Dinner Service—Here is one of our daintiest sets. A
pretty pink rose and wreath of gold make a pleasing
decoration.   102 pieces.   Per set $18.00
Dinner Service—Another 102-piece set in semi-porcelain.
Dark green, orange and gold, make a very attractive
decoration on this.   Per set  $ao.oo
Dinner Service—Flown green, orange and gold on finest
semi-porcelain makes this set a set worth special note.
102 pieces.   Price, per set  $20.00
Dinner Service—A 107-piece service in light green and
gold decoration. A really handsome style and excellent
value at price marked.   Per set  $25.00
Dinner Service—Another semi-porcelain set of 107 pieces.
Flown blue and gold decoration. A set you'll be
pleased with.   Per set  $27.50
NEW MUSLINS
This year's new ideas in j
Muslins discloses some inter- ■
esting designs. We have just
put into stock several large
shipments of the daintiest of
materials for making curtains, covers, etc. All priced
fair.
Shown on Second Floor.
NEW DINNERWARE
Unusually good values and
uncommonly new designs in
Dinnerware await you here
today. We do not remember
ever having gathered together such an excellent variety of Medium-priced Dinner Services and wc are quite
sur enone such delightful
patterns nor such values are
offered elsewhere.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
•^000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
jSSoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooog
Sporting
Comment.
The Nanaimo and Ladysmith football teams were again successful in
winning their matches last Saturday,
the former defeating the Y. M. C. A.
and the latter lowering the colours of
the J. B. A. A. These victories now
make the tight between the teams
from up the line, with the odds in
favour of Nanaimo. The game between the Bays and Ladysmith was
a very listless exhibition, neither team
showing any great ability. The principal interest was centred in the play
of McKinley at left half-back for
Ladysmith, as he has been selected to
fill that position on the All-Island
team. In the game on Saturday he
showed to better advantage than he
has done for some time past, but
'even at that the strength of the opposing forwards has to be taken into
consideration, and they were not as
strong as he will have to meet in the
tig match. Very little interest was
taken in this match, the majority of
the spectators giving their attention
to the intermediate match being played alongside between the Nanaimo intermediates and the Victoria West
eleven. In this match the home boys
played a splendid game and well deserved their victory. They are well
balanced and it will take an exceptionally strong combination to beat them.
From tiie goal to the last man on the
forward line the team is composed of
very promising young players, and it
can easily be seen that Victoria will
not want for association football players for some years to come. In the
junior game the North Ward juniors
clearly demonstrated their superiority
over the Ladysmith juniors, and at no
stage of the game were they in danger. On this team there are some
very promising youngsters, and the
team, if kept together, will certainly
be heard from in years to come. Their
style of play is that which will certainly win games, thc players are always on the ball, and with perhaps
one or two exceptions are sure kickers. The only fault that can be found
with the team is that, given a lead,
the players are inclined to loaf. This
is a very bad habit to get into, but it
is one that can be easily rectified, and
it is hoped that the boys will in future pile up as many goals as they arc
able, even if they do make the other
team appear ridiculous.
I am still waiting to hear that arrangements have been made for the
All-Island vs. All-Mainland rugby
football match. There has been considerable talk, but as yet nothing definite has been done. It would be a
grand game, and I hope that every
effort will be madeto bring the project to a head.
great   strides   since   they   were   last
seen here.
Two important soccer games will
be played at Oak Bay this afternoon.
The first will be the Y. M. C. A. vs.
Ladysmith and the second, Esquimalt
vs. J. B. A. A. The first will be the
most important, as a win for the visitors will put them on an equal footing with Nanaimo, and as they are thc
only players that can give the Coal
City team a hard game, the next meeting should be interesting. The Bays
and Esquimalt will furnish a good exhibition, as both can play good football. The Navy boys have already
administered a defeat to the players
from across the Bay, but the latter
are confident of their ability of beating them.
was to act, and in the face of this of
appointing him again is to say the
least very strange. I am pleased to
see, however, that the two teams
which this game affected most have
arranged to meet to decide the supremacy. At present the Y. M. C. A. art*
in the lead and have been awarded the
championship of the city, and even if
it should so happen that they should
be beaten by the Bays in this match,
it will be a great satisfaction to every
sportsman in the city to know that
they have acted as good sports, and
their action in playing when they have
practically everything to lose and nothing to gain is sure to gain them
many friends.
The Victoria hockey team journeyed to Seattle last Saturday and administered a defat to the Seattle team
by the score of 3—1. From all accounts the game was a very interesting one and the Americans have made
I am very sorry to sec that the Victoria basketball league has had a very
unpleasant ending, lt is very evident
that there is a lack of harmony in
managing this league, otherwise it
would not end by practically breaking
up two years out of three, but such
has been the case. In this instance
the trouble arose through the appointment of referees, and in the particular
instance nobody but the officials of
the league are responsible. It must
have been well known to them that
the referee over whom the dispute
arose had already had trouble. In the
first instance in fighting with one of
the players after a game, and on the
Saturday evening previous to the
climax, when both teams left the floor
when it was learned that this official
In another column in this issue
there appears a communication from
Mr. L. Tait, principal of thc North
Ward school, in which he claims that
I "deliberately,and needlessly insulted the North Ward Football team" in
my remarks in the last issue of The
Week, and he further insinuates that
I have ulterior motives in criticizing
the North Ward Football team. I do
not care to enter into a controversy
with Mr. Tait, but for his benefit I
must say that I consider that in making my criticisms I do so in a most
fair-minded manner. The report on
which I based my remarks was taken
from one of the local dailies in which
a member of the North Ward team
gave as the reason for their defeat
"the condition of the grounds and
thc rulings of the referee." Knowing as I do that the North Ward team
does not require to make any excuses
for their defeat I did not think that
these observations should come from
any member of the club, and I said
so; and for this I havc been grossly
insulted by Mr. Tait. That I have
always treated the North Ward team
in a fair manner can he seen by referring to the back numbers of The
Week and also in today's issue, which
was written before Mr. Tait's communication was brought to my nonce.
I know from experience that a critic
is severely censured if he happens to
state the truth when a team play a
bad game and is always supposed to
boost the home team whether they
play a good or bad game. This, however, 1 decline to do, as I think it is
entirely wrong, and unless an athlete
can stand to be roasted as well as
applauded he had better retire.
If a team plays a good game I will
give them credit but if they fail to do
so 1 havc as much right to say so as
if they had played a good game, and
I will continue to do so despite Mr.
Tait's objections. I have also to remind Mr. Tait that the North Ward
players are not the only athletes from
Victoria who have always paid their
own expenses as there are players in
Victoria today who are now retired,
who always paid their own way, and
paved the way for the conditions that
exist at present. I do not care to
refer to thc other insinuations of Mr.
Tait, but I can now understand why
the young players arc so hard to deal
with when they follow the example of
resistance to criticism shown by Mr.
Tait.
UMPIRE. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908.
Staking the Mountain
Echo.
By Arthur P. Woollacott.
(Continued from last issue)
She thanked him with a glance, looked
queerly again at Loring, and then let
Letherdale know that her aunty was in
desperate need of her. The Doctor came
up to greet her and she seemed to find
it hard to leave. She hung between him
and the door, moved, as the guide
thought, by a soft desire to be generous
to a former intimate, ancl an equally shy
desire to get safely out of an embarass-
ing situation:
Haddington looked up with an exclamation, "Why!" he said, "it appears that
both Dr. Loring and Mr. Twining wish
to record identically the same ground,
as agents for you Miss Newcombe. This
is certainly extraordinary, for only ten
minutes ago "
"Constable Haddington!" Eleanor
cried, with a warmth of color rising in
her face—"the ground was recorded by
you, acting in Mr. Loring's interests,"
the Constable concluded, looking over
his spectacles. "Oh, oh, oh yes, of
course," he added, subsiding in his chair
and getting hopelessly mixed up with
his papers.
Twining turned quickly and went for
Nagle in a tempest of wrath: "Here!"
he cried, thrusting notes, and the geese
as an afterthought, into the man's hands,
"now take yourself off. Sue me, do anything, but—get!" Nagle was completely cowed by the savage look in Twining's eyes and began making profuse
apologies, but an impatient growl sent
him tumbling down the steps.
The Doctor was looking at Eleanor
in a way tliat seemed to frighten her,
but she said quickly: "It's a case for
equity then, Mr. Loring. You'll let me
explain, won't you ? I must go! Aunty
is waiting," and with a parting glance
that graciously embraced the lot, she
vanished.
Twining followed the rancher along
the green to kick him and settle matters with Tony, Letherdale thought, but
it turned out that he had merely gone
for his'hat.,
Eleanor met her aunt on the promenade.
"Now Eleanor, you may as well tell
me which it is. Really it is shocking to
leave me in such bewilderment," Mrs.
Walton said reproachfully and not without a touch of resentment. "Well, that
colour becomes you, but in whose honour,
pray?   Tony went up "
"Aunty, it's the other one," Eleanor
cried, taking the elder lady's arm, "and
really, that heathenish business has nothing whatever to do with it!"
"But this dainty vesture, my dear!"
the aunt exclaimed, proudly surveying
the result of her handiwork. "An accomplice, however innocent of a knowledge of—the right one, should be favoured, if only with a maid's reward,
for diligence and taste. Eleanor, you
look splendid, which you certainly would
not, had I not been there to dress you.
Why! you actually did not know what
you were doing. Now, I concede that
abstraction is sometimes an oblique indication of a great mind,—but in a woman, pray!"
Don't, please don't! It's wickedness,
cruelty.   If you only kne "
Mrs. Walton laughed a delighted, matronly laugh, at her niece's distress.
"What I've been through, all for the
sake of that young man—" she pleaded
in extenuation. ,
"Oh! It is a young man, then. Well,
I thought it might possibly have been
a young man considering the fact that
you are—"
"And he will be so grateful. I think
he hardly yet suspects—the full enormity of what I have done."
"Oh Eleanor! Suspects? Look at
me. No, no, don't Aunty me in that
unsophisticated way. I imagine I see
him—suspecting!"
Eleanor began lifting her eyes, but they
seemed beyond her control, until she
found an escape from the ordeal by
smothering her aunt in an embrace.
"There, dear, if you're satisfied, I am,"
said Mrs. Walton with feeling. "But
did you tell him you went up that river
and staked that claim, and was mortally
afraid that in their rivalry they would
* blow each other's heads off, and that
you passed the night staring down upon
them from the top of a bluff like a—a
red man, eager for—scalps ?"
"Scalps!" the young lady murmured
with an air of mystification. "It wasn't
that. That is—you know, I would die
of shame if I thought they knew what I
had clone. Aunty!" she cried with the
greatest concern, "dear, promise me, that
you will never, never tell him."
"Never!" was the enigmatical response. "But he knows, if he has a
head.   Who does not!"
"I am so glad I was there, because
Fred—Dr. Loring, you know. Aunty, I
heard, surmised a great deal. Do you
know, I was drifting down the river,
singing, when I heard a shot—and loud
voices, followed by more shots. I won't
tell you what I thought, but I made my
Indian paddle for dear life, ancl we almost ran into their camp. I believe
their Indians saw us, ancl I had the
greatest difficulty in preventing my men
from making our presence known, and
presently, from the top of a bluff I had
climbed, I heard Letherdale and Genelle
talking, saying things—a revelation to
me, taking my breath away completely,
ancl making me—well, wildly happy."
,Mrs. Walton smiled, with a soft look
in her eyes: "I'm afraid dearie, that
with all your remarkable airs of distinction you are still just a wee bit of a
simpleton." ,
"Indeed I'm not!" she protested, but
her trouble was serious enough.
"You must advise me," she said ap-
pealingly, indeed with a note of panic in
her tones. "I don't know what I shall
do when I meet him."
"Of course you don't, poor girl!" Mrs.
Walton said, with much commiseration.
"But, Eleanor! Men you know, are so
resourceful in such circumstances, if
you'll only be idiotic enough. Go on,
now. Don't wait for me!" she added
with unaccountable imperiousness, pushing Eleanor along the path, and turning
into the Nagle homestead. "Fever!
small-pox, I warn you! I'm going in
here to dispense castor-oil and—flattery."
Eleanor, still remote in a horizon of
fluttering possibilities, saw her aunt withdrawing, and wondered, with a foreboding that presently flamed scarlet upon the
advancing cause of her aunt's treachery.
But the evening was deepening, and one's
voice can be made to respond to the
habit of years.
Dr. Loring, it transpired, was merely
relaxing after the canoe trip, for which
she was devoutly thankful, and as a mark
of gratitude to the  fates that preside
over the commonplaces she immediately!
evinced a glowing interest in the topic.f
The narrative had its exciting moments,!
which appealed to her strongly eliciting!
little exclamations and comments worth)
years of uncertainty.
The inevitable, fearful enough in thej
prospect did not appear half so terrible]
when presented in a manner that admitted of a little verbal juggling.
"What you did Eleanor will bear several interpretations."
"Pray accept the handiest version, Mr.
Loring.   That is the practical one, for!
as you know, I am as deeply interested
in the question as you are.   But Aunty
agrees with you all the same!"
"Your aunt," he returned gravely, "is
a mere commentator. But seriously,
Eleanor—by—the—way," he put in as a
solution presented itself, "did Letherdale
tell you—"
"Letherdale!" she exclaimed with
laughing good-natured scorn. "Dr.
Loring, don't you know that loyalty may
be carried to the verge of wickedness.
Letherdale, be sure, is loyal to the core.
Indeed, I imagine his discretion to be
tinctured with a spirit of literalness," she
concluded, with an affectionate asperity
that was one of her distinctive charms.
"I'm going away tomorrow, tonight,
if the boat comes in."
"Oh, but you will not—indeed, must I
not," she returned quickly. "It's a great
mistake, believe me. Mr. Walton would
never forgive me if I—we let you go.
He wants your monograph on the Hoffman Bacillus, and has promised himself
any number of discussions on that and!
kindred themes, and besides there are|
others, Mrs. Walton—"
"And you?"
"I ask you to stay."
"You know I would stay, will stay, but I
on one condition, not otherwise. The|
place would be unbearable."
"Stay then, Mr. Loring."
"Eleanor!"   He took her hand, and I
looked into her glowing face which was
slightly averted, but very attentive. "My |
meaning's  slain after  all  these  years.
Will vou say yes?"
THE END.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by Its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not Involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
free cigars to callow youths should bc
rigidly enforced.
"BRUCE COUNTY."
Vancouver, Feb. 25.
Editor Week.
Sir,—It was inevitable the potency
of the free champagne, so generously
supplied by the management of the
Empress Hotel during George Ham's
opening movement; should result in
something more disastrous than free
advertisement.
Mr. Hani should have been informed we had in our midst a fledgling
more accustomed to thc apple juice of
Ontario than to the nectar of thc
gods. Owing to dense ossification of
the fledgling's cranium, and the total
absence of superior frontal brain con-
vulatioh, it has taken quite a considerable time for the visions arising
from the wine fumes to assume outward and.visible form in the shape of
cold print on the front page of the
B. C. Saturday Sunset of last week.
The fledgling has been seeing things
with a vengeance; horrid little brown
Japs running all over the editorial
sanctum; visions of the future where-
ing the Anglo-Japanese alliance is discontinued; steamships havc appeared
to him as shuttles, and more awful
still, the spectral form of Benjamin
Disraeli has danced the can-can to a
scenic accompaniment of thc Crimean
War, and Canadian flags, with Gold-
win Smith as light comedian, and
Count Okunia as heavy lead.
Surely it is quite time the laws prohibiting thc supply of free Ji inks and
Victoria, Feb. 28,  1908.
The Editor of The Week.
Sir,—You allowed your sporting
editor in your last week's issue to deliberately and needlessly insult the
North Ward Association football
team. He apparently has not been
taught by his failures, but is determined to pursue the same contemptible course that has in the past belittled his opinions and brought him
into disrepute with the reading public. The North Ward team blamed
nobody for their defeat. The bald,
unexaggerated facts of the game wer;
given, and they simply left thc public
to judge for themselves. Anything
bearing the name of North Ward acts
upon your so-called sporting editor
like a red rag upon a mad bull, and
he, of course, seized the opportunity.
Now, sir, I think you would be well
advised to be more careful in allowing such things to appear in print in
The Week, which you control, thereby injuring thc reputation of what has
undoubtedly been the most representative and best soccer team that Victoria has ever had.
In closing, allow mc to state that
the North Ward team is composed of
Victoria boys, who work for their
living, and who have in nearly every
case paid their own expenses, am!
have never squealed if beaten by a
better team.
I am, yours sincerely,
L. TAIT, Pres.,
N. W. F. B. T.
Ottawa, February 19, 1908.
The Editor The Week,
Victoria, B C.
Dear Sir,— I note in your paper of
FebraUty 8, a reference to the inspection of fruit in British Columbia.  You
very forcibly point out the absurdities
that may result, if sticklers for red
tape insist upon the limits of their
authority in connection with fruit inspection. Part of this difficulty arises
from the highly organized condition
of modern governments. The Dominion Government looks after trade and
commerce, and, therefore, takes
charge of a general sale and inspection Act. The Provincial Government
looks after sanitary matters, and,
therefore, takes cognizance of anything which affects the health of the
consumer. The provincial authorities
also take charge of inspection for
fruit pests within the Province, and
no doubt every public-minded citizen
would be glad to see some general
scheme whereby a single officer would
much more efficiently take charge,
perhaps, of all three.
Permit me to note this fact, that for
all practical purposes the Provincial
Government could make this combination. They have it within their power
to unite the Sanitary Inspector and
the Pest Inspector, and the Dominion
Fruit Marks Act may be enforced by
anyone. There is nothing in the Act
to prevent any officer or private individual from laying an information under this Act. Consequently, if the
Pest Inspector or the Health Officer
found a package of fruit which did
not correspond to the definitions of
the Fruit Marks Act, there is not the
slightest reason why he should not
lay an information and secure conviction quite as readily as any Dominion
officer, I am sure that you will be
pleased to have the fact, that the difficulties might be removed, at least,
by this much, pointed out to you. A
copy of the Fruit Marks Act is enclosed herewith.
Yours very truly,
a. McNeill,
Chief, Fruit Division.
Resolutions Adopted by the North
American Fish and Game Protective Association at Its Annual
Convention in Albany, February
13. 190-5.
Whereas, the North American Fish
and Game Protective Association has
obtained reliable information that in
a certain portion of southeastern British Columbia, situated between the
Elk and Bull Rivers, there exists
about 450 square miles of waste lands,
which is to-day richly stocked with
mountain goat, mountain sheep, grizzly bear, deer and other species of
valuable wild animals, all of which
are positively known to breed in and
inhabit that region all the year round;
and
Whereas, this Association is credibly informed that the region in question contains neither valuable timber,
coal, nor agricultural lands, and that
no claims of any kind have been entered therein: now therefore be it
Resolved, by the North American
Fish and Game Protective Association, in annual convention assembled,
that it is to the best interests of the
sportsmen of all Canada, and of the
world at large, that the whole of the
region referred to be permanently
set aside as a game and forest preserve, and that action tending thereto
be recommended to the Government
and people of British Columbia. Ancl
be it further
Resolved, that it is the view of this
Association that the permanent preservation of the wild animal life and
scenery of the region, now tentatively
known as Goat Mountain Park, would
redound to the credit and also the
practical benefit of the people of British Columbia for centuries to come.
Professor Seymour's Magnum Opus
Professor Thomas Day Seymour, 0
Yale University, who died on the las
day of the year, was not only one 0
the most distinguished Greek scholar
in America, but also an author wlios
reputation in his special field seem
likely to endure with that of the grea
European scholars. His magnun
opus, "Life in the Homeric Age," wa
published only a few weeks before hi:
death. It represented practically
lifetime of work, for in it Professo
Seymour had summed up, classified
and explained every allusion containef
in the Homeric poems that couh
throw light on the life of the earl;
Greeks. The book is a worthy monu
ment to its author and an honour t(
American scholarship.
"Peter Pan" in Pictures.
The return of Miss Maud Adams tc
New York to play her annual Christmas engagement in "Peter Pan," ane
the enthusiasm with which the play
was welcomed, indicate that Barrie's
masterpiece is already to be numbered
among the classics. Another sign
pointing to the same truth, is the appearance of "The Peter Pan Picture
Book," one of the most charming of
the year's books for children. In il
the story of the play is re-told brief!}
by Mr. Daniel O'Connor, as an accom
ment for the series of charming pie
tures by Miss Alice B. Woodward, re
produced in colour.
Secretary, North  American Fish and
Game Protective Association.
(The above is a correct copy.)
"Who's Who, 1908."
"Who's Who, 1908," is out, large
than ever before and by so much bet
ter. The new edition contains ove
two thousand pages, and nearly twen
ty thousand biographies—an increas
of between two and three thousan
over last year's edition. In point 0
accuracy and careful editing, the wor'
has always been a model, and im
provement in this respect is hardl
possible. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1908.
Lounging this week has been no
sinecure. I came to the conclusion
:hat I was not earning the handsome
salary paid me by The Week by
lounging at street corners, and the
heading of Bohemian's article in last
issue suggested that I should lounge
in "fresh fields and pastures new."
Accordingly, I betook myself to the
country roads and lanes with the express purpose of studying the bona-
fide traveller and his Utopia at close
quarters. I studied him, and here is
the result:
On Sunday last' not "fewer than four
hundred men and women, from eighteen years of. age up, quenched their
thirst and worked off their rowdy energy, at roadside houses within five
miles of Victoria postpjffice*. Of the
four hundred, about "one'liundred were
women, and of the,'four, hundred at
least three hundred and fifty did not
travel outside the three-mile limit.
Taking the most liberal, view, this
means that three hundred .and fifty
were not bona-fide travellers within
the Act, and it means that not only
they but the owners of the road-
|hOuses openly violated the law.
I do not wish to particularize, be-
Icause this condition of affairs is due
Ito the laxity of those whose duty it
lis 'to see that the law is enforced; un-
lless, indeed, one goes behind that
{altogether and is willing to admit the
I plea that even officials are exonerated
Ifrom responsibility when public sen-
Itiment acquiesces in law-breaking.
This is an old subject. I well re-
I member the turmoil which resulted
I when Sunday closing was enforced in
(Cardiff and Swansea some fifteen
lyears ago. Those cities were in an
1 uproar; thousands of men drove out
I into the country and thronged the
| road-houses and raised—-disorder.
■ Shebeens were opened on every hand,
land it took a long time to get things
|into working order.
No such problem exists in Victoria;
land, moreover, public opinion has
Imade a great advance in the last fif-
Iteen years, not only in favour of tem-
Iperance, but in determination to up-
Ihold the law. Two principles, are in-
Ivolved in this matter of road-houses,
[temperance and obedience to law. It
lis a trite saying, "that you cannot
I make men sober by Act of Parlia-
jment," and personally I am not in
j favour of any legislation of a propagandist character, but as a loyal Brit-
1 ish subject and a loyal Canadian I
[have the strongest objection to winkling at disregard of laws which have
I been placed on the Statute Book for
lthe protection of His Majesty's peace-
lable and law-abiding subjects.
Lawlessness of the worst kind, not
I confined to drinking, can be witnessed
1 at some of these road-houses  every
I Sunday.   I could name one at least
which has a reputation as unsavory as
the lowest dive on Chatham Street.
I There seems to be a widespread impression that the line of demarcation
between law-observance and lawlessness is to be drawn at the city limits.
The  sooner  the  Provincial  Government disabuses the public mind of any
such impresison the better it will be
for all concerned.
Whilst dealing with a subject in
which the Provincial police have a
special interest, I wish to call atten-
| tion to an incident which has not
I found its way into the daily press, but
I which has an important bearing in thc
I matter I have been discussing.
On the 19th of January, Mr. J. E.
I Willey, a well-known and highly-
I respected Victorian, who lives near
I Craigflower Bridge, was the subject
lof what can only fairly be called an
j outrage. Whilst standing near his
I house, two young sportsmen seated in
I a rowboat on the Gorge, fired a num-
|ber of cartridges directly at the front
J of the house. Luckily none of the
(shots hit Mr. Willey, although he
I heard them rattle upon the trees and
I the front of the house.
Rushing to the water-edge, he de-.
manded an explanation, only to receive an insult. Feeling that such
reckless conduct,, being also a breach
of the law, called for notice, he,
mounted his bike and made a quick
trip to town, where he at once found
Sergeant Murray and laid the facts
before him. He urged the sergeant to
accompany him to Point Ellice
Bridge, where he felt sure the boat
could be waylaid.
Unfortunately, Mr. Willey's powers
of persuasion were not sufficient to
induce Mr. Murray to undertake the
journey; the latter made excuses, one
of them at any rate exceedingly ridiculous. He told Mr. Willey that as
there was a police constable stationed
in' the South Saanich district, he
should have complained to him. As
this constable.lives at Cedar Hill, and
as Sergeant Murray is a provincial
officer, most people will think that
Mr. Willey acted with intelligence
and promptness. If Sergeant Murray
had shown as much zeal, no doubt thc
men would have been caught, and the
case would have been properly investigated. Under the circumstances Mr.
Willey had to continue his investigation single-handed, with the result
that'while he had been delayed with
Sergeant Murray the men got away.
I give publicity to the foregoing
facts as a matter of justice to Mr.
Willey, as a warning to reckless
sportsmen, and as a reminder to the
police authorities that while The
Week is their strongest defender, it
will never hesitate to criticise them
when they deserve it. '
My editor has been inundated with
letters demanding to know who the
lady is to whom I referred last week
as having distinguished herself at the
Empress dance. I am surprised that
anyone should waste their breath in
asking such a question, I distinctly
stated at the time that under no circumstances would I say anything to
lead to the identity of the lady in
question. My sole object was to pillory unsuitable costumes, and since at
least half-a-dozen persons think they
recognize the lady referred to, I am
satisfied that I was right in supposing that she had erred in her choice.
I was discussing the matter with a
lady this morning, and she laid down
a rule which I think is admirable in
every respect and one which can be
followed with safety. She said: "No
lady should appear in public in a costume in which she would not like to
see a member of her family." With
this I dismiss the subject.
(&l
noKjJl*.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described   lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 5—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less,
Located January 25,  1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section,
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement;  640 acres, more or
less.
Located  January  25,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;  640  acres,  more or less.
Located January  29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chatns; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 26,  1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
ll^)^MXt%*W^»***'^^W»»*^^*t^
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
; $27.50, $80, $35.
ALLEN & CO.
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Victoria, B. C.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
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M. J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver
Will You Take
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and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
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be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647 Johnson  Street,
VICTORIA, B. C.
LLOYD & CO., chimney sweepers
and house-cleaners, 716 Pandora
St. Satisfaction and cleanliness
guaranteed. All orders by post or
otherwise promptly attended to.
Trial respectfully solicited.
PHONE 191.
WEEK MARCH 2ND
The New Grand
SULLIVAN • COMItlRE,    Pr*»rUtora.
Manag-amant at R*iT. JAMItSOR.
GILDAY AND FOX
Hebrew Impersonators, the greatest Hebrew Comedians of the day.
Something   unique   in   vaudeville.
VERA DE BASSINI
"The Italian Nightingale."
ANITA HENORI, DAVID
MILES & CO.
Dramatic Sketch, "The Marshall."
THE SIDONIAS
The   Eccentric   Tramp   and   The
Golf Girl.
MR. AND MRS. BLESSING
Presenting   their   Original   Mysterious Comedy
"The Surprise Dinner."
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Perhaps."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"Good Wine."  "Amateur Hunter."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
N. Nagel, Director.
"The Talisman"...By Kretschmer
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matlness (any part of house)....Wo
Evenings, Balcony  ...l»c
Lowor Floor JJo
Boxes    *te
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 OXIock.
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8 and 9.15
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WITH A THOROUGH
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school will enable you to secure and
hold a position with the best Arms.
Terms reasonable.
For particulars write or call
THB SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.O.
B. A. HaoKUlan.
BABIES        MEDICAL   OEHTB
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TBEATMEHT
HB.     BJOBHFELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Room 2, Vernon Blk., Douglas St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries.
«y   Richardson
Cigar Store.
Phone 3_|5
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,  B. C.
Tbe daya iue getting Cold.
ITHE
WILSON BAR
!■ Winn and Comfortable.1"
VISIT IT.
648 Yatet St, Victoria B. C
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Pictoria Agent! for the Nanaimo Collier ln.
New Wellington Coal.
The but household coal in tha marke at
turrent rates.  Anthracite coal »r sale.
34 Bread Street. Phone 647
VICTORIA
Holland French and
Japan Bulbs
For Fall Planting.
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard  or   conservatory.    Acclimated
stock.   Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland of B. C.  Catalogue free.
M. J. HENRY,
3010 Westminster Rd, Vancouver, B.C
P
HTENTS an« Trade Marka
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Vour Baggage Check* at th*
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LATEST NUMBERS
English
Magazine
CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. O. THE WEEK, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 39, I9°8,
'I' 'J.' 'V 'i'TT '4' It"*"*? V *T V
X Social and        *
•J.        Personal. J
Mr. and Mrs. Roper of Cherry
Creek are registered at the Empress.
* *   *
Mr. J. R. Anderson has returned
from a flying visit to Ottawa.
* *   *
Miss Martin of New Westminster is
the guest of Miss Phyllys Mason,
Rockland Ave.
* *   *
Mrs. H. Pooley left with Col. A.
W. and Mrs. Jones on Thursday for
England and  the  continent.
* *   *
Mr. Kirkley of Riverside, Cowichan
Lake, spent a few days in Victoria last
week.
* *   *
Mrs. Stewart Robertson is making
satisfactory progress from her recent
illness and is once again at home.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. A. Herbert Ritchie
are in Victoria and are the guests of
Mrs. Flumerfelt, Pemberton Road.
* *   *
Miss Tuck is arranging a concert in
aid Of St. Mark's church, Cloverdale,
to be given in the parish room on
Tuesday, March 3rd.
* *   *
Mrs. Brabazon Parker, on the staff
of the Canadian Bank of Commerce
in Mission, has been transferred to
Victoria.
* *   *
The Rev. Archdeacon Scriven and
Mrs. Scriven are expected back from
California shortly and upon their return will reside in the Bishop's Close.
* *   *
Captain Parry gave a luncheon at
the Empress for Miss Gladys Perry
last Monday. The table was arranged
with pink carnations and asparagus
fern. Those present were: Miss
Gladys Perry, Miss Violet Pooley,
Miss Helen Peters, Miss Petty Drake,
Miss Vera Mason, Miss M. Little,
Miss F. Gillespie, Miss Genevieve Irving, Miss Langley, Miss K. Cobbett
and Miss Norah Coombe.
* *   *
Miss Phyllys Mason, Rockland
Avenue, on Wednesday afternoon,
gave a very charming luncheon for
Miss Gladys Perry, who left for England on Thursday last. The table was
very prettily decorated with daffodils
and yellow ribbon. The guests were:
Miss Martin, Miss Gladys Perry, Miss
Violet Pooley, Miss Ross Arbuthnot,
Miss Florence Gillespie, Miss Marguerite Little, Miss Doris Mason,
Miss Winona Troupe.
* *   *
Miss Phyllys Mason gave a five-
hundred party on Wednesday and a
few others caine in later to tea.
Among those present were: Mrs.
Gresley, Mrs. Alister Robertson, Mrs.
A. Gillespie, Mrs. Genge, Mrs. Martin,
Miss Vera Mason, Miss Doris Mason,
Miss Paula Irving, Miss Violet Pooley, Miss B. Irving, Miss G. Irving,
Miss A, Arbuthnot, Miss D, Day,
Miss N. Holmes, Miss Gladys Perry,
Miss Martin, Miss N. Coombe, Miss
M. Pitts, Miss Ethel Pitts, Miss Little, Miss Elinor Hanington. The first
prize was won by Miss Winona
Troupe; second, Miss R. Arbuthnot;
Consolation, by Miss Gillespie.
* *   *
Mrs. Harold Robertson, St. Charles
St., Tuesday afternoon was hostess at
a very delightful "at home." She received her guests in a pretty frock of
pale blue chiffon with panels of pale
blue taffeta and a lace yoke, and was
assisted by her sister, Mrs. H. Barnard, who was attired in a pale grey
Empire gown. The table which was
round had a large brass bowl of
daffodils surrounded by little silver
vases of violets. Among the guests
were: Mrs. Ogden Grahame wore a
pretty violet suit, with black picture
hat; Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs. G. L.
Courtney in brown voile; Mrs. Gresley, a Pongee silk frock with an Alice
blue hat and feather stole; Mrs. Gor-
do'n Smart, black suit; Mrs. Gillespie,
red velvet; Mrs. Jeffrey; Mrs. James
Dunsmuir, violet suit and sables; Mrs.
Little; Mrs. Berkeley, brown, with
violet hat; Mrs. R. Janion, in black
velvet; Mrs. Allen, Mrs. Rome, Mrs.
Blacklock, Miss Martin, in red; Mrs.
Watt, Mrs. Butchart, brown suit and
toque; Mrs. Burton, in a Dresden silk
and a Paris hat; Mrs. J. Raymour,
Mrs. Swinnerton, Mrs. Kirk, Mrs. J.
Wilson, Mrs. Alister Robertson, Miss
M. Lawson, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Hermann Robertson, Mrs. A. W.
Jones, Mrs. Lampman, Mrs. Ambery,
Mrs. Gibb, Mrs. Spratt, brown costume, Mrs. Grilliths, Mrs. Harper.
Mrs. Church, Mrs. Baynes Reed; Miss
A. Baynes-Reed, Miss P. Mason, Mrs.
T. S. Gore, Miss Mabel Eberts, Mrs.
J. H, Todd, Mrs. McGill, black suit
blue hat; Mrs. J. Irving, violet suit,
black hat; Mrs. Shallcross, Miss T.
Gillespie, in a fawn suit; Miss Monteith, Misses V. and D. Mason, Miss
N. Coombe, Misses Pitts and others.
Baiting the Police.
Sir,—The Week has done the public
a piece of good service by putting
its foot down at once on the first sign
of that peculiar form of police court
argument which is commonly termed
"baiting the police." In some parts
of this continent, this style of legal
argument (?) is the regular practice,
with a resultant heavy loss to the
public in the efficiency of the guardians of the peace.
The system is both weak and cowardly. Weak, because it is the invir-
iable refuge of a lawyer who has
either got a bad case or lacks the ability to do justice to a strong one. Cowardly, because it always takes the
form of an attack upon a paid servant
who is in no position to defend himself.
The result of this continual 'baiting of the police" by lawyers, press
and pulpit is excellently illustrated by
the frightful state of affairs prevailing
today in our sister city of Vancouver.
For years past the police of the Terminal City have been publicly and
persistently bullied, until now they
hardly dare call their souls their own,
and protection of the public has become a mere empty form of words.
The police force of Victoria, on the
other hand, backed by a strong support of reputable public opinion, has
kept this young and growing sea-port
town wonderfully free from crime,
with the result that Victoria is far
ahead of all other maritime towns on
the American continent in the matter
of the preservation of law and order.
We do not want and will not permit, the methods of Vancouver, the
United States or Ontario, to be employed in our Victoria police courts.
You have called the offender in the
present instance very sharply to account, and the citizens of this town
appreciate your public spirit and thank
you for it. Should any further trouble
of a similar nature arise, kindly accept the assurance of very practical
assistance of a nature which will once
more demonstrate the well-known fact
that persons most ready to find fault
with the police are not infrequently
the ones who are most in need of
police attention.
COGNOSCO.
'e ain't done nothin' since we've 'ad
'im!—Punch.
Tom—The average woman seem;
to lead an aimless life.
Jack—Well, it's her misfortune
rather than her fault that she is unable  to throw  straight.
Green—I'd like that fellow Brown
better if he didn't laugh at his own
jokes.
White—Brown doesn't laugh at his
own jokes. He laughs at you fellows
who are silly enough to listen tc
them.
"De    cho'    nuff financier,"    said
Uncle Eben, "is de woman wif only
a two-dollar bill an' a family of eight
to market fur."
"Deduction is the thing," declared
the law student. "For instance, yonder is a pile of ashes in our yard.
That is evidence that we have had
fires this winter."
"And, by the way, John," broke
in his father, "you might go out and
sift that evidence."—Houston Chronicle.
Telephone mistakes may have their
serious sides. A man who wanted
to communicate with another named
Jones looked in the directory and
called up a number. Presently came
through the receiver a soft, feminine
"Halloa!" and he asked: "Who is
that?"
"This is Mrs. Jones."
"Have you any idea where your
husband is?"
He could not understand why she
rang off so sharply until he looked
in the book again and discovered that
she was a widow.
Dream City.
"Dream City," the New York production from Weber's Theatre, New
York, the latest of the Weber offerings, will be the attraction at the Victoria on Tuesday, March 3. A splendid company, headed by the clever
comedian, Little Chip, and the fascinating little artiste Mary Marble, together with usual big sprightly beauty
chorus, will be the combination of
mirth and music,
"Dream City" is vastly different
from thc regular Weber production,
being of a higher order and with legitimate claims to a logical story, which
is founded upon the periodical boom
in suburban real estate. A typical
country village is visited by a breezy
cheeky dealer in surburban property,
who fills the minds of the simple
country folk with visions of vast
riches which they will realize by selling their property for building lots,
on which a model city is to be built.
Among those interested in the plan
is Wilhelm Dinglebender, played by
Little Chip, owner of a large truck
farm, and who has a chronic dislike
for hard labour. In studying over the
plans of the city, Dinglebender falls
asleep, to dream of events which happen in the second act. The village is
tnnsformed into a city of skyscrapers
and everybody is wealthy beyond their
wildest expectations. The finale is a
surprise which should not be anticipated.
"Marshall Field, Jay Gould and
Potter Palmer habitually carried only
small amounts in their pockets," said
the man who has a taste for the odd.
"Well," responded his friend, "when
I am gone you can truthfully say the
same about me"—Washington Herald.
Consoling friend (to weeping young
widow)—"This is a terrible affliction,
but it might have been much worse."
Widow—"Yes, the loss is covered
by  insurance."—Tit   Bits.
"EVERYBODY  WORKS   BUT
FATHER."
School Visitor (to small applicant
for a holiday)—What is your father?
Small Applicant—'E's me father.
School Visitor—Yes, but what is
he?
Small Applicant—Oh! 'E's my stepfather.
School Visitor—Yes, yes. But what
docs hc do? Does he sweep chimneys, or drive buses, or what?
Small Applicant (with dawning
light of comprehension)—O-o-w! No,
Angell
Engraving Co,
PHOTO-ENORAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In AH Branches
S16 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
&#HlTHEATR
/W__^\\X-A.r.<L\-< V.
lfJ5_f S. MANS.
TUESDAY, MARCH 3RD
JOE WEBER'S
New York Production of the Musical
Gayety
"DREAM CITY."
(From Weber's New York Theatre)
Book  by   Edgar   Smith.    Music  by
Victor Herbert.
Organization of Sixty, Headed by
LITTLE CHIP
—and—
MARY MARBLE.
America's. Most Fascinating. Beauty
Chorus.
Prices—$1.50, $1.00, 75c, 25c.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phlllppi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chatns to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 16 A. Olson, Agent.
Cure Your Cold With a Good
"Hot Scotch."
Take Shakespeare's advice and throw physic to the dogs.   We
can well recommend these excellent brands:
Simpson's Blue Funnel Scotch, per bottle $1.25
Spey Royal Scotch, per bottle  $1.25
Strathmill, per bottle  90c
Gilbey's Invalid Port, per bottle  $1.25
Gilbey's Dry Gin, per bottle $1,00—pint, 50c
Plymouth Dry Gin, per bottle  $1.00—pint, 50c
AROMATIC SCHNAPPS
Distilled from Juniper recommended by leading physi-
for Diseases of the. Kidneys, Rheumatism, Neuralgia,
etc.  Per bottle '. $1.25
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
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Poodle Doa
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A most pleasant place of sojourn at any time of the year for
either health- or pleasure. The handsome dining-room is one of
the largest and brightest in Western Canada. The table is supplied with the best the market affords,—all tbe delicacies of the
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THE ONLY REAL GRILL ROOM IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
When You Know
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for your work, you find that well
made clothes cost no more than
most poorly made ones. We employ only he most thoroughly
trained union operators, We use
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charge only living prices.
SCOTLAND WOOLEN MILLS
538 Hastings Street,
VANCOUVER.
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Hasturned but little expense." Other Victorian shrdlu shrdlus
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no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.

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