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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Apr 3, 1909

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The Secret
of our" euceess is, that we always give
you (rood goods for your good money.
Remember we give the utmost care to
our prescription department and have
the confidence of all the physicians.
eaeh
ehemlst
Fort & Douglas
Terry
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The
°B
R British 6ol umbia Review,
Published at Victoria,  B. 6.
HALL & WALKER   ?
Agents
WELLINGTON   COLLIERY
COMPANY'S COAL
1232;Government St.       t Telephone 8S
roL. vi. No i
&■
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 1909
One Dollar Per Annum
/anted—
backbone.
Undoubtedly   Sir   Wilfrid
Laurier is a heroic figure,
but if the Liberal Party is
satisfied with his stand on
ihe subject of Canada's naval policy it
ust be very easy to please.   The Week
ointed out in last issue that Sir Wilfrid
jtood face to face with the opportunity
>f his life,;   in one short week he has
hissed that opportunity, and do what he
ay he will never remove the impression
i'om the mind of an unprejudiced observer that he has shirked a great issue.
'he Victoria Times must feel not a little
umiliated, after having veered round and
rimmed its sails in the direction of a
readnought, to find that the Premier dis-
umtenances such a policy, and falls back
.pon general platitudes.    With the pronouncement contained in the series of re-
blutions which he fathered no fault can
found. They commit Canada to a policy
[which, when it is matured, will make her
,e with the Mother Country in defence
fof the Empire, but what of the present?
lis the moral effect of academic resolutions
be compared with that of definite
'action?   What would be the influence in
[Germany for instance of pledges which
ave long been discounted, and which no
'one, least of all England's foes, doubted
cfuld be freely given ?   The Times has
(tried to make the best of a bad situation,
nd puts up the best defence for its leader
;hat circumstances will admit of.    It is
■aturally gratified that Mr. Borden and
Mr. Foster were willing to. join with Sir
[Wilfrid in a stage rehearsal, and to adjourn Without debate, as soon as the curtain  fell  on  the  play.    It  is   almost
humorous to read Sir Wilfrid's announcement that "he would lead any movement
aving for its object impressing upon the
minds of Canadians their duty under such
^circumstances."    Sir Wilfrid's constitutional argument, that "all expenditures incurred by the Parliament of Canada for
the defence of Canada as an integral portion of the Empire must be controlled by
the Parliament of Canada" admits of no
question, but its inadequacy under existing circumstances is indicated by the very
words which follow, "that this is the only
enduring principle upon which a permanent policy of naval and military defence
can be based."   With Germany bellicose,
with British  sentiment  aroused  to  the
highest pitch, with the great Party Leaders
at home in perfect accord as to the urgency
of the situation, with spontaneous offers
of warships from Colonies containing only
a handful of people, surely it is a shirking
of the question to say "we cannot make
any practical offer until we have worked
out a permanent scheme.   We are loyal,
and will do our duty, but wait a bit while
'lie elaborate the details."    This is Sir
Wilfrid Laurier's policy, a policy in which
he has been sustained not only by his own
party, but apparently by the leaders of
the Opposition.   The Week believes that
they, in common with the Premier, have
failed to interpret Canadian sentiment,
.which would gladly have proffered some
distinguishing evidence of loyalty whilst
still collaborating with the Home Government in perfecting a permanent scheme.
One wonders that the Times has the hardi!
hood to refer to the acquirement by the
Dominion Government of the Military
Station and dockyard at Halifax and Esquimalt.   Sir Frederick Borden, Minister
of Militia, admitted on the floor of the
House that no effort was made by the
Laurier Government to live up to Article
9 of the Terms of Union when the Imperial forces were withdrawn.    The administration of military affairs at Halifax
and Esquimalt are a by-word throughout
the Dominion, in spite of the gallant effort of the local officers to maintain the
traditions  of the  British Army.    One
would have more confidence in the Premier's assurances with reference to naval
defence if the Government lhad shown
greater competency and liberality in dealing with the requirements of Sir Frederick   Borden's   department.     Even   the
Times seems to get an inkling 'of the
truth when it sapiently remarks "that in
due time Canada may be prepared to
undertake the work of building vessels of
war in accordance with modern require-
mentsi"   There is the kernel of the whole
matter "in due time," which comes the
nearest to a ' laissez faire" policy) which
would  be  tolerated under   the   circumstances.    Meanwhile the Times tries to
rally the courage of the Party with the
reflection that "the situation is in reality
not nearly so complex as it seems," a conclusion with which The Week agrees^ although the application of the truth may
not be the same as that conceived by the
Times.    The situation is by no means
complex, it is simple; Sir Wilfrid Laurier
had his opportunity and has missed it.
Mixed
Marriages.
The writer who is sometimes turned loose in the
sub-editorial columns of the
Colonist has imbibed some
of the peculiar views recently expressed
on the front page of Toronto Saturday
Night by the brand new editor. In a recent issue this sapient ethnologist declares
that people in the United States are making altogether too much fuss over the fact
that an American girl has married a
Japanese, and concludes that it is both
futile and unwise to attempt to prevent
such marriages by statutory enactment.
The argument in favour of such unions is
either distinctly ingenuous or profoundly
occult, it is not easy to decide which.
Perhaps each reader had better be left to
make his own interpretation; here is the
declaration: "Since the dawn of time
men and women, whatever be their nationality, have been drawn to each other
BECAUSE   THEY    HAVE   BEEN    SUFFICIENT
unto each other, and so it will ever be—
laws to the contrary, notwithstanding."
The Week respectfully suggests a course
of reading in the principles of ethnology,
practically illustrated by conditions of life
in the East End of London, and the
Chinese sections of such \ cities as San
Francisco. If after this the writer does
not think that such marriages are of sufficient significance .to warrant a little fuss,
his case is hopeless.
Everyone in Victoria knows
A Public that   the   Water   Commis-
Growl. sioner is a very competent
and obliging official, and
when citizens by the score lodged a protest
against his mismanagement of Sunday last
they forgot that even a Water Commissioner is not infallible and that he, no
more than the Israelites of old, could
make bricks without straw. Have these
growlers forgotten that the city is entirely
without funds? How many times is it
hecessary for the daily press to inform
them that there is no money for street
making, for paving, for watering, for
clearing, for anything? How then could
they expect that there should be money
for advertising % Are they so ignorant of
printing as to be unaware of the fact
that a display advertisement costs more
than a reader. One would suppose that
they expected a half page simply to let
them know that in a city where water is
always scarce they would have to go without for ten hours. People should be reasonable, even if such institutions as Turkish Baths sustain heavy financial loss;
the city did not have to pay it, so what
does it matter ? Above all no self-respecting citizen will hereafter make the Water
Commissioner's life a misery by ringing
Up his private residence every few minutes
to ask, "Can you tell me when the water
will be on?"
Trial By
Torture.
Mr.   George   Tate   Black-
stock, K.C., of Toronto, has
revived in Canadian Courts
.-.-> the method of the Inquisi
tion.   For trial by jury he has substituted
trial by torture in his conduct of the Kin-
rade murder case.   Whether or not Florence Kinrade is guilty of the murder of
her sister makes no difference to the fact
that Mr. Blackstock has felt justified in
adopting methods which would disgrace
the records of the French Criminal Courts,
and put the efforts of the average public
prosecutor in the shade.   His conduct has
aroused a storm of indignation and protest
but what one wonders at most is why the
coroner  has permitted his court to be
turned into a circus, and Mr. Blackstock
to play the part of a mountebank.   It is
to the court that the witness looks for
protection; this is his privilege at all
times, but   it   becomes   of   inestimably
greater value when there is more than a
probability that the witness may become
a prisoner.    Mr. Blackstock has openly
boasted that in his examination of Florence Kinrade, he  has  been  deliberately
preparing the way to handle her as a criminal, and has been endeavouring to choke
up every avenue through which she might
then present a successful defence.    The
Week believes that such methods are utterly indefensible; a witness stands at sufficient disadvantage with a trained counsel
under the most favourable circumstances,
and with the utmost protection which the
Court can afford, but abandoned by the
Court, and left to the tender mercy of an
unscrupulous cross examiner, the chances
of successful resistance are reduced to a
minimum.   It is perhaps too much to hope
that the Benchers of Toronto will take
any cognizance of Mr. Blackstock's unprofessional conduct, but it is certain that his
every move has been noted by public opinion, and there is only too much reason to
fear that the result will be to weaken
respect for the administration of justice,
a circumstance which cannot be regarded
with equanimity, although it may appear
but a trivial circumstance to Mr. George
Tate Blackstock, K.C.
In its issue of January 9
Sooke Lake The Week discussed the
Water Scheme, scheme which Mr.  J.  D.
Taylor brought back from
London looking to the financing of the
Sooke Lake Water project. In its comment the following paragraph appeared:
"Coming to the agreement submitted by
Mr. Taylor The Week suggests that it requires modification in three particulars;
the rate of interest should be four per
cent, instead of five, the bonus or commission should not at any rate exceed
seven and one-half per cent., and the fixed
term should be reduced from thirty-five
to twenty^five years." The Week is in a
position to state that an amended offer has
been received from the parties interested,
and that their terms have been modified in
exact accordance with these suggestions.
On this basis if Victoria decides to go to
Sooke Lake, the offer is an advantageous
one, but since the initial offer legislation
has brought Goldstream within measure-
able distance, and this may alter the merits
of the London offer. There is a further
possibility which, however, cannot be officially confirmed, it is said that a local
gentleman has offered to advance the whole
of the money required at four per cent.,
without bonus or premium. It is high
time that the City Council boiled down
all these offers to the irreducible minimum,
and gave the public an opportunity of deciding once for all which they will accept.
The urgency of the water question is not
even minimised by the fact that the new
water mains have been laid, the source of
supply is thje same as ever, while the
population is increasing every day.
Ominous.
A   recent   despatch   from
Ottawa announces the appointment of Mr. Clifford
Sifton to the Chairmanship of the new
Standing Committee of the Commons on
Forests, Water-ways  and  Water-powers.
Nothing more ominous has occurred in
Canadian public life for years.   Mr. Sifton left the Federal Ministry under circumstances which should have rendered hitf
return impossible. Siftonism had stretched
its tentacles over the West and infused thfl
miasma of its foul breath throughout the
department  which   he dominated.     The
School Question was a mere pretext for the
Minister's dismissal.   He went out before
a flood-tide of public hostility which no
public official could withstand. To his discredit stood the establishment of the political machine, and the apotheosis of Doodling. His personal entourage, which naturally means those who profited by his policy
has never ceased to agitate for his return, and it looks as if Sir Wilfrid the'
immaculate had at last yielded to their
persuasion.   The result cannot but have a
sinister meaning:    Sifton "rampant" is
stronger than Sifton "couchant."
What is the matter with
Lukewarm.       Victoria?     Eight   persons
out of a population of
forty thousand turn up to arrange for
Victoria Day celebration. There is room
for speculation as to the reason, and probably more than one could be assigned,
but The Week believes the real reason to
be that people are sick and tired of personal solicitation to contribute to public,
observances and that the time has come
when all such expenditures should be entirely defrayed from a public fund. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL, 3, 1908
CORRESPONDENCE
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by its correspondents.
. Communications will bo inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the Editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
To the Editor of The Week.
Dear Sir,—I beg you to use your
influence through your honoured
paper and complain over the shameful way the public here is treated by
the water commissioner and his men.
I have lived in many countries and
cities in Europe, but never has it
happened that the water was shut off
like it was last Saturday and without
sufficient notice being given.
At other places they always do
pipe connections, etc., during the
night hours, 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., and on
Sundays, but here the most busy day
of the week has to be picked out
without regard for anybody.
Now to the point! How can the
people of Victoria stand this? Why
hot rise as one man, and put a stop to
the mischiefs of our ruling spirits.
I was told by the water commissioner to-day that they might break
their legs if working during the night,
but why do they not break legs at
other places—of ocurse plenty of
light is used.
Twice more this spring are we
going to be short of water, and I
hope the authorities will be wise and
kind enough to hnd some other and
better hours for their pipe connections.
I would be very much obliged, if
you would help me in this matter.
Last Saturday I suffered quite a loss
at the Turkish Bath, not having any
water, and I am afraid this will be
repeated again if nobody complains.
Yours truly,
G. BJORNFELT.
JAMES BUCHANAN & CO.
By Royal Warrants
PURVEYORS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY.
Distillers of the
WORLD-FAMOUS RED SEAL AND BLACK AND WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKIES.
Unsurpassed for AGE, PURITY or FLAVOR.
For Sale by all Dealers.
General Agents for B.C. and the Yukon District
RADIGER & JANION,
Headquarters for choice nursery stock.
Apple, pear, cherry, plum and peach trees
and small fruits, also ornamental trees,
shrubs, roses, evergreens, etc. Largest and
best assorted stock in British Columbia.
Ten per cent, cash discount on all orders
above $10.00.
PRICE LIST AND CATALOGUE ON
APPLICATION.
Hprfl
Yukon-Alaska Exposition.
A miniature farm has been established at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific
Exposition where the products of the
state will be cultivated as an object
lesson to the visitors to the fair at
Seattle this summer. It is hoped
that such a farm will do much towards increasing interest in the clearing of logged off lands of the state.
On the exposition grounds is a producing farm in every stage of its
evolution from the country as the
itimber cutter has left it, showing
practical demonstrations of the several methods of clearing. This it is
believed will lead to a brisk demand
among the eastern visitors to the fair
for the logged off lands of the state.
To create further interest excursions will be run to the various sections of the state where the logged
off lands are fast being converted into
great producing farms. The miniature
farm at the exposition will suggest the
possibility of development and the
excursions to places where such work
is being done on a large scale will
no doubt meet with the approval of
thousands of visitors to the 1009 exposition as well as their patronage
after they see the land as it really is.
There will also be demonstrations
of the wonderful productiveness of
To-day, with April wandering in a wood,
Mid last year's withered leaves and trees all bare,
Blithely she sought, dear child, to comfort me;
Showed me how fair the blue, how sweet the air,
The long thin shadows of each leafless tree
Athwart the solitude;
Marked me the path of winter beast and bird,
The woodchuck's hole, the fox's shy retreat,
The path the marten makes with tiny feet,
The songsters few and rare in woodlands heard.
And fain her gentle heart would have outpoured
Such wealth as August or September yields,
The flowers and fruits of high midsummer's day,
Or glory of the yellow harvest-fields;
When, after tol, in bountiful array,
The goodly stacks are stored.     '
But blossoms scant were all she could bestow:
The crinkle-root, and the wake-robin red;
Hepaticas that in their lowly bed
All pearly white or pink or purple grow.
These and the springing trilliums, white and green,
That eagerly the schoolboy plucks, when first
The southwind calls him to the woods of spring,
She gave with slim, cool fingers;—then there burst
Upon our ears the white-throat's carolling,
Calling unto his queen.
Ah, white-throat's song, so plaintive and divine!
So full of longing, throbbing joy and lovel
O tender, singing white-throat that can move
Pity and rapture in this heart of mine I
As thus I wandered, touched by sight and sound,
The meagre blooms, the chill, disturbed me not;
The few lone pipings seemed not desolate;
Something invisible but strong, methought,
Shall soon a richer, fuller life create,
E'en now doth stir the ground.
And this frail child beside me soon
Shall change into a glory like the dawn,
And radiant with abounding joy put on
The beauty and luxuriance of Junel
—Robert Stanley Weir, in "The Canadian Magazine for April.
the virgin soil of the state which will
stand greatly in contrast with the
worked-out farms of the East. This
condition will commend itself to the
eastern farmer who visits the' Fair.
The very fact alone that two crops
of potatoes can be produced every
year on the same ground in the
Puget Sound country is a fact that
will probably surprise many easterners.
The miniature farm has been platted into small rectangular blocks
which have afforded an excellent opportunity for the good roads instructors and landscape artists to sow the
germs of modern road construction
and the art of beautifying the farms
which Will have the effect of making
life on the farm and in the country
more attractive. Practical demonstrations of berry raising will also be
made on the model farm.
When a woman decides that after
all you won't do, and returns you to
life's bargain counter, don't blame her.
She may have discovered all you
thought concealed.
Don't fancy that because a woman lets you love her, you are thereby
made possessor of the latch key to her
soul.
Dixi Tea
IS PIT POR R MANDERIN
"DIXI" Tea is our Queen Card—a specialty we're proud of.
Other folks are proud of it, too, for this famous blend is praised
in hundreds of Victoria homes, spoken of as the best Tea on
the market today.
.     DIXI TEA
Per Pound, 35c (Three Pounds for $1.00), 50c and $1.00.
DIXI H. ROSS CO.
INDEPENDENT GROCERS. 1317 GOVERNMENT ST.
Tels. 5a, 105a and 1590.
Victoria Fuel Co.
PHONE 1377|:
You want the best Coal, the "Burn all" kind, absolutely free
from Slate, Stones and Klinkers.
We are Sole Agents for The South Wellington Coal Mines
Company (Ltd.).
THIS COAL is admitted by all to be the finest Domestic Coal
mined.
Let us know if you want it quick.
VICTORIA PUEL COMPANY
PHONE 1377 618 TROUNCE AVE.
STEEL-CLAD ELECTRIC IRON
An Electric Iron
costs less to operate and maintain than any
other.
Easily attached
to any electric
light socket. Invaluable to the
housewife. Unrivalled for laundry purposes.
H You are particularly invited to call and examine them in our
if    Demonstration Rooms.
I B. C. Electric Company, Limited
^ ' Corner Fort and Langley Streets.
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
TYPEWRITERS, CASH REGISTERS,
SAFES, DESKS, FILING CABINETS,
BAXTER & JOHNSON 809 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
If it's for the Office—atk ua.
«****«*«*»»»»»^
Hot
Cross
Buns
At
Clay's
619 Port St.
Phone 101
Good Friday, Saturday
and Easter Monday
«
_
* ;_.
t
I
:**-»»»»w:******-»»*»»»^^^ THE WEEK SATURDAY APRIL 3, 1909
Sporting Comment
The annual Bench Show, under the
uspices of the Victoria City Kennel
lub will be held in the A.O.U.W.
all on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday of the coming week and
rom the number of entries that have
een received this big hall will be
[none too large for the exhibits. Every
lass is well represented, the Pointers
Itaking the lead with forty-three, followed closely by the English Setters.
his is the largest display of Pointers
hat has ever been made in British
(Columbia and  it  includes the  best
ogs on the Pacific Coast.    Entries
ave been received from Vancouver,
[New  Westminster,  Seattle,  Tacoma
ind other near by cities.   Major Tay-
or has been engaged to act as judge
[and his work will be no snap.
The result of the football match at
[Oak Bay last Saturday between Lady-
mith and Victoria United was a draw
[both teams scoring one point. The
[game from a spectator's point was
very poor one, being frequently
|marked by very dirty play. This was
aused by the very lax methods of
lthe referee. I am not making this an
excuse for the local team not winning
because the visitors had the better of
the game, but if the officials of the
league desire to keep the game going
[in this city, it is absolutely necessary
that referees be secured, who know
[the rules and are not afraid to enforce them. On Saturday no less than
three Victoria players were put out of
business before one foul was given.
In the case of Thomas the referee
had no excuse whatever as it took
place within ten yards of where he
was standing and he could not fail
J to see it, but still nothing was done
to penalize the offending player. This
sort of work on the part of the referee is nothing short of disgusting
and if it allowed to continue will soon
kill association football in this city
^ after the efforts that have been made
to bring it to the front. The Victoria West team will line up against
the All-Star California aggregation at
Oak Bay on Easter Monday and if
the boys in green shirts play anything like their game, they should
show their American cousins how the
game should be played. The game
li-will start at 3 o'clock and it is hoped
that there will be a big crowd out to
cheer the locals to victory.
The B.C.A.L.A. has withdrawn
from the B;C.A.A.U. but will still
play amateur lacrosse. This looks
like a joke, but whether the Mainland delegates intend it as such as
hard to say. I am pleased to see that
it has been decided to remain amateur even if a separation has been
made from the Athletic union. Professional lacrosse in B. C. is as yet a
little premature.
This evening, New York will witness the biggest Marathon race that
has ever taken place outside of the
Marathon race in connection with the
Olympic games. No less than five
starters will face the line and excitement is running high as to the pro-
"' bable winner. The prize for the
winner is $5,000, and is worth going
after. At present Longboat is the
favorite with Dorando second choice
and Shrubb third. The question that
is puzzling the followers of these
races is, has Shrubb taken a lesson
f from his previous race and will he be
able to finish? In connection with
this it is argued that if Shrubb finishes he will ..finish first, and if he
does there will be many Canadian
dollars leave this side of the line.
The baseballers had their first try
out on Sunday and many were present who will try for the first nine.
The majority of last year's team
along with several strangers were out
and some light work indulged in and
Judging from the first practice Victoria  will  have  a   good  team   this
season.
UMPIRE.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cuppage of
Duncans were guests at the Balmoral.
*   *   *
Mrs. Frank Scott of Salt Spring
Island, spent a few days in town this
week.
X Social and        X
* Personal. $
if if
ififififififififif ifif ifif
Mrs. E. V. Bodwell, Rockland Ave.,
expects to leave next week for Spokane.
* *   *
Mr. W. F. Bullen returned last week
from a business trip to England.
* *   *
Mr. Beauchamp left at the end of
last week for Dawson.
* *   *
Mr. and Miss Baker of Vancouver,
who were registered at the Empress
last week, left for home last Monday.
* *   *
Mrs. Vernon went over to Vancouver during the week. She was accompanied by her son.
* *   *
Mr. John Poff, very well known
here, spent a few days in the city
last week.
* *   *
Mrs. Butchart entertained at luncheon last Monday.
w   w   *
Mrs. Pemberton of "Gonzales,' has
issued invitations for her daughter's
marriage, Miss H. S. Pemberton and
Mr. William Curtis Sampson, for
Wednesday afternoon, April the 14th,
at Christ Church Cathedral at 2:30
o'clock and afterwards at "Gonzales."
The marriage of Miss Olive Peters,
second daughter of Colonel and Mrs.
Peters of London, Ontario, to Mr.
Frank Coulson, has been arranged to
take place on April 17th in Ottawa.
The bridesmaids are to be Miss
Madge Morse, Ottawa; Miss Gronne
Nordheimer, Toronto; Miss Gladys
Peters, sister of the bride, and Miss
Dorothy Langford of Winnipeg.
Miss Peters is very well known in
social circles here, her family having
resided in Victoria for many years.
* *   *
Mrs. Garry of Vancouver is a visitor
in Victoria.
w   *   *
Dr. Fagan left on Monday night's
boat for Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Biggerstaff Wilson intend spending the Easter holidays at
their pretty summer house on the
Cowichan River.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Pim Butchart returned home from Los Angles last week,
where they had been spending the
last two months.
* *   *
Mrs. Beauchamp, after an enjoyable
visit   spent   in  Vancouver,   returned
home last week.
* *   *
Mrs. G. Johnson of Duncans spent
a couple of days in town during the
past week.
* *   *
Mr. R. H. Sperling of Vancouver
came over on a business trip on Tuesday last.
* *   *
The Bridge Club met on Tuesday
last at the residence of Mrs. Brett.
The house had been prettily arranged
with spring blossoms and greenery.
Mrs. Carmichael was the fortunate
prize winner.
Mrs. Crowe Baker entertained a
few friends at luncheon on Thursday
afternoon at her lovely residence on
the Gorge.
* *   *
Mr. R. Wickham of Thetis Island
was registered   at   the   Driard   this
week.
* *   *
Mrs. A. Walter of Salt Spring
Island enjoyed a short holiday in Victoria, making during her stay the Balmoral her headquarters.
* *   *
Mrs. Corsan's and Mrs. Simpson's
private subscription dance takes place
on April 22, in the A.O.U.W. Hall,
Yates street. Miss Thain's' popular
orchestra has been secured for the
occasion.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Byng-Hall of Shawnigan Lake came down on Wednesday
and were registered at the Balmoral.
* *   *
Mrs. Fred. Byng-Hall arrived from
England during the week and was a
guest at the Balmoral.
w   .   *
The marriage of Miss Dorothy
Beanlands and Mr. Thomas Peacock
was solemnized by the Rev. Canon
Beanlands, father of the bride, on
the 18th of March at North Bay, Ont.
* *   ♦
Mr. E. J. Palmer of Chemainus
came down on business this week.
* *   *
Major Nicholles was in Seattle for
a few days this week.
* *   *
Mrs. (Col.) Holmes, accompanied
by her daughter, Miss Fva Holmes,
leave in a few weeks for Los Angeles
where they will spend several months.
Make Some
Money on
the Side
CYPHERS
INCUBATORS AND
BROODERS
Will enable you to do this without trouble. Call and see us or
write.
WATSON
McGregor
647 Johnson St.
if if
I Prompt, Careful, j
!
»| Leave Your
|| Baggage Checks at
The Pacific I
Transfer
Co.
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
A. E. KENT, Proprietor
Pbeie 249.
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Oriental Cream
OS HACHCAX. BEATOIHIB
BEAUTY THAT LASTS.
Where is the woman who has not
the praiseworthy desire to enhance
her personal charms and preserve as
long as possible her delightful power
of enchantment, which lasts as long
as her beauty? The Oriental Cream,
prepared by Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of
New York City, is a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacy
of the complexion and removing
blemishes. - It is the favorite toilet
article of the leading professional
artists, who owe so much of their
popularity to their personal charms.
Scarcely a star dressing room in the
land is without Gouraud's Oriental
Cream, which is the most wholesome
and perfect beautifier known. Druggists will supply you. No. 8.
The Mixture
That's Different
To Others.
Is Dudleigh's Mixture. Does
not burn the tongue, has a
pleasant aroma and is sold at a
moderate price.
gift Richardson
PhOM 346
Something New
We are now able to offer to our patrons
A GUARANTEE
on our splendid line of PLATED KNIVES, FORKS and SPOONS.
This line Which is specially made for us is guaranteed to have
MORE SILVER than any other standard make and we GUARANTEE to replace
Free of Charge
any of these goods which, after use, do not prove satisfactory. This
condition we believe accompanies* no other flatware made.
Prices as follows:—
COFFEE SPOONS  per doz.   $3.70
TEASPOONS ........
DESSERT SPOONS
TABLE SPOONS
DRSSERT-FORKS .
TABLE FORKS ....
DESSERT KNIVES
TABLE KNIVES ...
3.15
4-95
5.85
4-95
5.85
4-95
5.40
Challoner & Mitchell
Diamond Merchants and Silversmiths
1017 Qovernment Street Victoria, B. C.
Breakfast
Lunches
Afternoon
Teas
Dinners.
Smoking Room.
1 *
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S3
_-_-               '%     1*1 '              .V*
'      '_                           '      -
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rj POtis*   §§
. '^^t%n_f___m_________\
_>*%_——-!■■_________*
'^mmwrnm' ® $ ' **6es. ?■ -5' •
Tea Room.
We grow our own produce.       Parties catered to and tables reserved.
Cosy Corner Cafe and Tea Rooms
616 Fort Street.
PHONE 1440
_?i\.&&i^&f_i
EMPRESS THEATRE
Cor. Government and Johnson Sts.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES   AND ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
COMPLETE CHANGE  OF PROGRAM   EACH   MONDAY
WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY.
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE.       a to 5.30. and 7 to 10:30 pan.
Admission—10 cents.
Children's Matinee Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday—5 cents. THE* WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL 3, 19*9
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
i_ HE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Prtltohod tt VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
1208 Government St., Victoria, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE, Editor.
An Erotic Novel.
By BOHEMIAN.
Hubert Wales has written several
books recently; they have attracted
attention partly on account of their
audacity in dealing with sex problems,
and partly for their literary style.
Hubert Wales is a scholar and a literary craftsman, his language is well
selected, his plot well thought out and
his ideas well arranged.
I should hesitate to give prominence
to his work but that he is probably
less objectionable than any writer who
has tackled the subject. And since hc
voices opinions which are daily gaining ground, it is perhaps wiser to
criticise than to  ignore.
The title of his latest book is
"Hilary Thornton." As a story it is
above the average, delineating and
analyzing four or five deeply interesting characters. First there is Hilary Thornton, the obscure managing
clerk of a noted firm of lawyers.
Then there is a brilliant society lad*
who is an equally brilliant authoress;
she resides at the Manor House. The
Hall is occupied by a wealthy lady
who may fairly he classed with the
"nouveaux riche." The latter has a
daughter who has been brought up
so strictly that she knows nothing,
she becomes engaged to the curate
and they are shortly married, the day
afterwards .she returns home a disappointed heartbroken woman, as she
words it, "The shocking indelicacy"
.of the marriage relation has shattered
her ideal and she can; never again
have faith in purity or nobility.
The brilliant authoress undertakes
to apply a remedy to this abnormal
disease and takes the young wife on
a Continental tour, winding up at
Nice and Monte Carlo.
By this time, although no one seems
' to have found it out, the bloom has
been brushed from her wings, and
she has formed an attachment for a
prominent society man, who it is unnecessary to inform the average
reader turns out to be the semi-detached husband of the brilliant authoress,
Here is material for a very pretty
plot, for much introspection and for
character analyses "ad nauseam." In
the end the erring wife is restored
to the arms of the pale young curate,
and the obscure lawyer's clerk having
developed into a successful author naturally forms an alliance with the
brilliant society lady.
This all sounds very commonplace,
and not a little blase, indeed it would
be inexcusable to retail so sordid a
story, but that it furnishes the excuse
to trot out all the stock arguments in
favour of greater freedom in the relations of the sexes. This is the
theme, and although the author, with
exceptional.skill, elaborates his argument, and illustrates it by the experience of his characters it must be
admitted that the final conclusion is
very impotent, that is from the standpoint of the author.
The net result of the story is to
deepen the conviction that the marriage state furnishes the only safe
medium upon which to base mutual
sex relationships, and that while interesting variations may afford temporary amusement they lack the element of permanence and satisfaction.
This is not to admit that all marriages are idyllic, and that there
should be no exception to the cast-
iron rule, which by common consent
should regulate such delicate matters,
but it is to say that as a working proposition marriage is more than ever
enthroned in an unassailable position.
In view of the extent to which relaxation of the marriage tie has been
advocated recently it is not a little
comforting to note how little real
progress has been made towards inventing a substitute.    Probably the
greatest discouragement in this direction arises from the fact that woman
is by nature incapable of sustaining a
dual relation, and sooner or later tires
even of golden chains. This is the final
and decisive answer to those who ig-
norantly contend that freed from restraints woman too would be polygamous.
I am not recommending Hilary
Thornton, but on the ground first set
out one might easily read a worse
book, and one less informing on a
topic, which may be abhorred, but
cannot be ignored.
(Hilary Thornton, by Herbert
Wales; on sale at the Victoria Book
and Stationery Co.   Price $1.50).
i.i?<fyi_,iti_>i?i_ii!ifyipiti;
I Jlusic and |
*   The Drama. |
if $i?tyiii?i?ipi?itipi!ii!i
Next week the Victoria Theatre
will hold in connection with the London Bioscope another amateur performance. The pictures will be shown
on Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. Any amateurs wishing to take
part can obtain all information at the
Theatre Box Office.
The Right of Way.
In these days when the stage seems
to be almost wholly devoted to the
exploiting of cheap music and scantily clad women, it is a relief to be
able, occasionally, to turn from the
theatrical tawdriness and "tommy-
rot" and see real actors play real
parts in a real play. It is a relief to
watch the development of a logical,
interesting story and see real, living,
breathing characters walk the stage.
It is for this reason that Klaw &
Erlanger's presentation of the dramatic version of Sir Gilbert Parker's
"The Right of Way," with Guy Standing and Theodore Roberts in the leading roles, is being ranked as one of
the biggest successes on the road this
season.
In "The Right of Way" Sir Gilbert
Parker wrote a virile, vital story, and
in dramatizing the book, Eugene W.
Presbrey has made a virile, vital play.
In Charley Steele and Joe Portugais,
Sir Gilbert drew two characters that
have not been excelled in modern
fiction. Mr. Presbrey has injected the
breath of life into these characters
and has transferred them from the
pages of the novel to the stage in all
their sympathy-compelling force and
all their naturalness. In the hands
of Mr. Standing and Mr. Roberts thc
two characters live and breathe upou
the stage and have already taken
their places among the greatest characters of modern drama. No one has
read Sir Gilbert's great novel but
wishes to see the play and those who
have not read it will like it the better
for having first become acquainted
with Charley Steele and Joe Portu-
gais in the flesh. "The Right of Way"
is now making its first extensive
Western tour and will be seen here
with Mr. Standing and Mf. Roberts
and the New York cast at the Victoria
Theatre on Tuesday, April 6.
The New Grand.
"The one" George Wilson, America's favourite minstrel comedian, will
lead a strong bill at the New Grand
next week. Mr. Wilson has made
the greatest success of any minstrel
who has left the legitimate stage of
vaudeville and commands the highest
price. Other tried features that have
made good all over the circuit en
route will be The Meeh International
Trio, world's greatest hand balancers
and physical culture marvels; the
Quaker City Four, singing blacksmiths; Duff & Walsh, two clever
dancers in intricate fancy steps; Thos.
J. Price, singing "Katie Darling, I Am
Waiting," and new moving pictures
and overture.
The Canadian Magazine for April
makes another record in the magazine
field in Canada. It gives a frontispiece of at least six colours, reproducing a fine drawing by C. W. Jef-
ferys, depicting the death of Brock at
Queenston Heights. There is considerable colour throughout the magazine, which in this respect is unusually attractive. The table of contents includes some strong names and
equally strong contributions. Gold-
win Smith comes first in importance,
with an article entitled "Labour and
Socialism." "Power: Wizard of Settlement," illustrated in colour, is a
significant article, written by Clayton
M. Jones. Other contributions are "A
Canadian Literature," by Arnold
Haultain: "Digby An Impression," by
Newton MacTavish; "Lord Milner's
Imperialism," by John S. Ewart;
"Photographing Wild Birds," by Ronald L. Fortt, with a number of unusually attractive illustrations; "Can
Women Write History?" by Arthur
Hawkes; "After Schimpf," illustrated,
by Aubrey Fullerton, with short
stones by Lois F_. Longley, J. J. Bell,
Marjorie MacMurchy, and Albert R.
Carman, and poems by L. M. Montgomery, Jean Graham, Isabel Eccle-
stone Mackay, George H. Clarke, C.
L. Armstrong, and R. Stanley Weir.
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF  AN  EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
No. 374.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that "The Michigan Trust Company" has this day
been registered as an Extra-Provincial
Company under the "Companies' Act,
1897," to carry out or effect all or any
of the objects of the Company to which
the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Grand Rapids,
Kent County, Michigan, U.S.A
The amount of the capital of the
Company is Two hundred thousand dollars, divided into Two thousand shares
of One hundred dollars each,
The head offlce of the Company ln
this Province is situate at No. 1114
Langley St., Victoria, and William John
Taylor, Barrlster-at-law, whose address
is Victoria aforesaid is the attorney for
the Company, not empowered to issue
and transfer stock.
The time of the existence of the
Company is thirty years from the lst
day of June, A.D., 1889.
The Company is limited.
Given  under  my  hand  and  Seal  of
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this sixteenth day of March,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for whicn this Company
has been established and registered are:
To carry on a trust deposit and security business, and any other business
authorized by the provisions of Act. No.
108 of the Public Acts of 1889 as
amended, the same being Sections 6156
to 6189 of the Compiled Laws of 1897
of the State of Michigan, U.S.A
apl 24
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Alternative Sealed Tenders, superscribed "Tender for Wharf, Prince Rupert," will be received by the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up
to noon of Tuesday, the 27th April,
1900, for the erection and completion
of a reinforced concrete wharf with timber superstructure at Prince Rupert,
B.C.
1. For   wharf   complete  inclusive  of
slips:
2. For  wharf  complete  exoluslve  of
slips.
Plans, Specifications, Contract and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the 27th day of March, 1909, at
the offices of the' Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; of the Government
Agent, New Westminster; of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver;
and at the Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certlflcate of deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
equivalent to ten per cent, of the
amount of the tender, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline
to enter Into contract when called upon
to do so, or if he fail to complete the
work contracted for. The cheques or
certificates of deposit of unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless
made out on the forms supplied, signed
with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes
furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EDWARD MOHUN,
EDWARD HOHUN,
Assistant Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C.,  19th March, 1909;
apl 24
«fgJHEATR
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
Klaw & Erlanger
Present the original New York Company and production in Sir Gilbert
Parker's  Great Drama
THE RIGHT OF WAY
With  Guy Standing and  Theodore
Roberts
Roberts in Leading Roles.
Seat Sale opens Saturday, April 3rd.
Prices—50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50.
8 •
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co'y
1016 Qovernment Street, Victoria, B. C.
Chas. Hayward, Pres*
R. Hayward, Sec.
F, Caselton, Manager
Oldest and most up-to-date
Undertaking Establishment
in B. 0.
Established 1867
I Telephones—48,   594,   1905,   305,   or   404.
*.*WMMJ»M,o*MfiK**_
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Bargains inO rienta    i■ \\;
Silk Nightdresses, Kimonas,
Handkerchiefs, Waist Patterns
Our Prices are the Lowest.
Pongee Silk
In purchasing Pongee Silk it will be to your advantage to visit
our premises. We have a line of the finest quality in the follow-
ings widths:—
34 inches wide  .50c per yard.
34 inches wide 60c and 65c per yard.
EXTRA HEAVY QUALITY.
34 inches wide $1.00 per yard.
26 inches wide 40c per yard.
We are correct in stating that we carry the nest make of grass
linen at—
34 inches wide.   Regular price $1.00, now goes for 80c.
ORIENTAL IMPORTING COMPANY
510 Cormorant Street
Phone 1221.
So Hop & Co., 639 Port Street
PHONE 1884.
639 FORT STREET.
GOODS AND SAMPLES SENT FREE
j BY MAIL
I   Silk Dresses Made to Order to Meet
I the Latest Tailoring.
Nothing in
Modern Years
has so aroused the interest of
the music loving public and
commanded the enthusiasm of
the musical authorities as the
NEW SCALE WILLIAMS
PLAYER PIANO.
An instrument that enables anyone to play the piano artistically, without practice or any
previous knowledge of music.
There is something in the
principal of this wonderful instrument that grips the imagination powerfully and causes it
to appeal to all classes of people
—those to whom music has
heretofore been a sealed book,
as well as, those who have spent
years of tedious practice in trying to master some musical instrument.
It will pay you to Invest this
Player Piano.
M. W. WAITT & CO.
LIMITED
Herbert Kent, Manager
1004 Government Street
WEEK APRIL 5
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a CtMIDINI,    Pnnrlatars.
■•UIMIMl of RMT. JAM IIS«II.
GEORGE WILSON
"Waltz Me Again"
The Celebrated Master of
Minstrelsy.
THE MEEH INTERNATIONAL
TRIO
World's Greatest Hand Balancers
and Physical Culture Marvels.
THE QUAKER CITY FOUR
The Singing Blacksmiths.
"The Dancing Adonises"
DUFF and WALSH
In a Series of Intricate Fancy,
Steps. ^
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"Katie Darling I Am Waiting."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M. Nagel, Director.
mm THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 1909
For Your Room
SPLENDID SHOW OF
CHIFFONIERES.
Eliminating the bed, a chiffoniere
is the most useful furniture piece
you could have in the bedroom.
When one has used this furniture
item they cannot do without its
great convenience. We show such
a splendid choice and offer such a
broad range of prices that there
isn't a bedroom in the town but
could own one.
WE SHOW CHIFFONIERES
FROM $10.00 EACH.
IN CHIFFONIERES WITH MIRRORS WE OFFER SOME
UNUSUALLY HANDSOME PIECES.
Prices range up from $14.00.
Here are three very fine values:
CHIFFONIERE—A Mahogany Finished Chiffoniere of very
stylish design. Has five drawers, and a good sized bevel
mirror of fine quality. Very nicely finished throughout,
and good value at  $25.00
Chiffoniere—Here is a Weiler-made style, in solid oak, finished
golden. This one has four large and two small drawers
and large mirror. Made in our own factory in the Weiler
way $30.00
Early English Chiffoniere—This is a fine design in oak, finished
in Early English. Has four large and two small drawers
and a large mirror. A very attractive design and finely
made and finished.   Price $35.00
Chic Styles in Lace Curtains
Come in and see the chic, new styles in lace curtains for this
Spring's selling.
We are showing some handsome lines and want to spend a few
minutes in the new Drapery Department soon. Why not come
in today?   No trouble to show these dainty materials.
Sparkling Shimmering "Libbey"
Cut Glass
In two ways, at least, we excel all other stores in our Cut Glass
showing—we show the largest showing and we show the finest
glass.
Our Cut Glass Room is the finest in the West, and our glass
comes from the famous "Libbey" ork shops—the place where the
World's best glass is made.
If you wan to see Cut Glass shown as it should be shown, if
you want to see the very finest Cut Glass made, come and visit
our Cut Glass Room. You'll see there the very finest glistening
crystal.
And not the least interesting thing is .the prices. The values
are splendid.
NO  • ••    TUMBIIM
NBW BRILLIANT PATTERN
No 111  ■■men mem.
NEW BRILLIANT PATTERN.
Here are a Few of the Many Pieces Shown:
Clarets, from $20.00 to  $10.00
Whisky Jugs, at, each, $20.00 to $12.00
Loving Cups, at, each, only $20.00
Compotes,, at, each, ouly  $15.00
Centre Vases, at, each, only $20.00
Ice-Cream Plates, $40.00 to  .$15.00
Vases, from $30.00 to  — $3.50
Nappies, from $20.00 down to $3.00
Bowls, from $40.00 down to $6.00
Footed Bowls, at, each $30.00
Puffs, at, each, only  $9.00
Hair Receivers, at, each  $9.00
Clarets, at, each, only  $16.00
Celery Trays, from $12.00 to  .'. .$6.00
A VISIT TO THE CUT GLASS ROOM IS "WORTH WHILE."
STOP AND THINK
What sort of a mattress are you sleeping
on? Plenty are made to look well and wear
out quickly, but if you buy an
OSTERMOOR MATTRESS
You can depend upon something really luxurious at a popular price. We are sole agents
and sell this mattress at same price as it is
sold in Eastern cities—$15.00.
Fine Values in Library Tables
We show a fine range of handsome Library Tables, a most
useful piece of furniture around the home.
. We have these in many different designs and in several
different woods, such as Golden Oak, Early English finished Oak
and Mahogany.
Come in and let us show you the special values we can offer
you in stylish tables at—
$16.00, $20.00, $22.50, $24.00, $27.00, $32.00, $35.00.
Other excellent tables ranging in price from $40.00 to $12.00.
TO RETAILERS
Isn't it poor business to
carry a large stock in your
little town when the quantities you require may be purchased from us on short
notice. We help you. Prompt
and satisfactory service guaranteed.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers
VICTORIA, B. C.
TO DEALERS
We solicit correspondence
from dealers who are not
already acquainted with us
and who wish to get
acquainted with the largest
wholesalers of Homefurnish-
ings in the West. Try furniture as a "side-line"—we
help you.
'    _*
At The Street   a)
Corner i
r
1
_-*aj*_*%ri)
By THB LOUNOE*
fymfy*J%/**A_r*
Since last issue I have made it my
business to lounge in every part of
the city, and even further afield in
the suburbs. The result is that I am
prepared to aver that Victoria is
growing much more rapidly than people seem to be aware. We have been
so in the habit of "grousing" and of
comparing our beautiful city disadvantageous^ with others that if wc
could only realise that there is really
a move on everybody would feel the
better for it.
Some people will accept nothing but
figures, data, and statistics like thc
"Man from Missouri," but anyone who
takes stock of what is going on
around must become an optimist on
the future of Victoria. I do not
know anything about building permits but I have counted eighty-five
dwelling houses in course of construction, and twelve business premises.
This does not include projected blocks
of which mention has been made in
the daily press. Now if eighty-five
new homes are to be established in
Victoria that means an addition of
four hundred to five hundred to the
1 population. It means also that employment is being found for so many
more people and that at a moderate
estimate a quarter of a million more
money will be earned and spent in
Victoria next year. Surely this is
growth, and it behooves the pessimist
to discard his green glasses, put on
his gold-rimmed ones, and acquire the
genial and optimistic frame of mind
which made Benjamin Goldfinch so
loveable.
1 walked down Fort Street on Tuesday with an old inhabitant, who was
a fair specimen of the genus growler.
He had lived here forty years, and
firmly believed, like one of old, that
no good could possibly come out of
Nazareth. He spoke of the mud in
Winter and the dust in Summer, the
rotten streets, the unsightly shacks,
the littered lots, the loads of debris,
indeed he seemed to have an eye for
nothing But the unsightly. I asked
him if he had noted that every day
a few square feet were being added
to reclaimed streets and' sidewalks.
That boulevards were stretching in
every direction, that hundreds of trees
had been planted this year, that several miies had been added to our
street railway system, that many
miles of new water mains had been
laid, that hundreds of houses have
been built, to say nothing of splendid
new blocks, like the Pither & Leiser,
and a magnificent hotel like the Empress, which has few equals and no
superior. I asked him how the Princess Charlotte, and the Princess Victoria compared with the boats, which
plied between Victoria and the Frazer,
or Victoria and Seattle, in the days
of his youth; in fact I was almost
rude enough to ask him if he were
not a twentieth century" Rip Van
Winkle. Still I failed to satisfy him
that Victoria now-a-days is a progressive city, and I think I failed because, like too many more men of his
age, he lives in the past, and never
"lifts his eyes to the hills."
I want to congratulate the ladies of
Victoria on the good taste they are
displaying in their selection of spring
millinery. It may be true that this
year the hats are larger than ever
but it is also true that they are less
fantastic, and more artistic.   I have
been particularly pleased to note the
large number of straws with black
trimming. If ladies only knew how
becoming these hats are, they would
have a greater vogue. I begin to think
that we have really got away from
the cabbage gardens and "parterres"
which ladies carried on their heads a
year or two ago. Of one thing I am
certain that nearly all the present
shapes and styles make the wearers
look younger.
1 notice that an enterprising citizen
intends running a launch to Pedder
Island during the Summer. This is
ii move in the right direction and I
wish the idea could be extended and
other beautiful islands brought within
a few hours' journey of Victoria. The
Georgia Straits in Summer time present attractions to the tourist which
are not excelled in any part of the
world, but they are inaccessible. W,c
get a glimpse from the deck of the
Princesses as we make the swift trip
to Vancouver, but what a delight it
would be to take a day off, or even
a week-end, and camp on one of the
scores of islands which dot the
Straits. All what is wanted is enterprise, and a rich harvest could easily
be reaped. With the promise of an
unprecedented influx of visitors this
Summer I commend to the consideration of the Island Development
League the suggestion to use its great
influence in establishing trips by water
at a moderate cost.
I have taken the trouble to find
out whether the Victoria Theatre is
going to house a first, second, or third
class stock company this coming season; the result of my enquiries is
more encouraging than I hoped, and
I am prepared to vouch for a series
of excellent entertainments. I hope
Victorians will take the matter up,
and accord the movement their generous support.    At the present mo
ment good stock companies are having an unprecedented success in other
cities, and there is no reason why
Victoria should not line up.
tions rather than the spirit of revolt
and defiance that we usually connect
with sin.
Worth Noting.
Referring to the Stirling divorce
case, the Daily News says:—What
strikes us most about our present
state as revealed in this trial is not
so much its sin as its inanity. Great
sins may spring from the devouring
passions, from illimitable desires that
count the world well lost for a
moment's joy, and also from excess
of energy and the enormous ambitions
of a superman. But among society,
as we see it here revealed there are
none of these things. It would be
profane to talk of passion in regard
to the comfortable and easy satisfaction of these tame and selfish lives,
for in passion there is always a certain purifying fire of unselfishness.
Here there is no great motive and
no great emotion. As Lord Guthrie
said, the only occupation approaching
seriousness or usefulness was the
manicuring of each other's nails. It
is a world in which bridge is about
the most solemn and far thc most intellectual pursuit—a world of bed,
breakfasts at eleven and a silly succession of "enjoyments" for the rest
of the day. We do not hear of
great ambitions or even of violent
purposes; there is nothing superb
or titanic in the way of life, but instead, the judge tells us of unreasonable and uncontrolled tempers, unstable and undisciplined characters,
and extravagance without object or
taste, It is all a picture of silliness
and indifference to common obliga-
Brother-Artists."
Mr. George Scott, the well-known
theatrical and music-hall manager,
whose tragic death is mourned generally by the profession, was a splendid story-teller. One of the best anecdotes relating to himself is associated with a tour, during which he
visited Leicester. One evening, when
he was in "front" of the house, two
seedy-looking individuals came forward and asked to be admitted. "We
want two passes," said the spokesman. "Are you connected with the
profession?" asked Mr. Scott, "Of
course," was the reply. "We are running a Punch and Judy show round
the coiner, and you have taken all our
customers." "Pass two brother-artists," said Mr. Scott, with a smile, to
llic doorkeeper.
Ol Dr. King, the Bishop of Lincoln, who entered on his eightieth
year the other day, many curious
stories are told, notwithstanding the
placid and uneventful life that he has
led. One day, and he tells the tale
himself, hc was sjtting in a chair by
thc seashore, and pn attempting to
rise found that liis legs were not so
young as they were. While he was
still struggling to gain an erect position a'» fisherman's little daughter
came along and lent her aid. "Thank
you, little girl," said the Bishop, when
safely on his feet. "Oh, it's nothing,"
said the girl, in reply, "I've helped
father to get up many a time when
he hasn't been near so sober as you."
"The time, the place and the girl.
Mow seldom we scc them together.'
"And another rare combination i =
the man, the scheme and the coin.1' THE WEEK, SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 1909
WHEN OLD SOL SMILES
If you have a good Gas Range in your kitchen life is worth living in the warm weather.   So different to cooking the cook  (more especially if the cook
yourself) over a hot coal or wood stove.   If you do not like cooking all the more reason for making your labor as easy as possible.
A housewife will revel in the possession of a Gas
Range, appreciating the saving in time, strength and
worry, the cleanliness, accuracy and healthfulness of
gas for cooking purposes. Henceforth she will have
no kindlings to buy, no coal to carry in, no ashes to
take out, no blinding, choking smoke in starting wood
or coal stove, no blistering heat while cooking and no
fear of fire from over-heated flues. Early breakfast
will have no terrors for her, just as easy will she be
able to get up a late supper for unexpected guests.
If she has a dinner to cook which takes hours, she
will set the Range right and she will find it hours
later just exactly as she left it.
A Gas Radiator or a Gas Grate forms a charming
addition to any residence.   Either is extremely use
ful to a lady or a man who "batches" even if only one
room forms "home." A furnace may be balky, or out
altogether, steam heat may become obstreperous, wood
or coal fires entail labor in relighting, but a Gas
Heater is always ready with the turn of the tap and
scratch of a match. It is a most economical apparatus,
the expense stops the minute the gas is turned off.
It can be brought into service in a second without
work, so different from fire-building. It will not only
give the required warmth, but will at once dispense a
genial air of hospitality. As a little heat is required
almost every day of the year in British Columbia, a
Gas Radiator, or a Gas Grate, should be installed in
every house.
You are most cordially welcome to visit our showrooms whether you desire to purchase or merely to look.   We will gladly explain the many advantages of Gas
for cooking and heating purposes.
Victoria Gas Company, Limited
Cor. Fort and Langley Streets, Victoria, B. C.
I A Lady's Letter |
*
if	
'if »y •AM3TTE.
if
Dear Madge:
Recently a judge and a college professor—the latter also a State and
National statistician—have lent the
weight of their influence against the
movement for divorce restriction, both
agreeing that unpleasant conditions,
rather than the desire to marry again,
are responsible for all but a small
percentage of divorces, and that it
would be unwise to make marriage
more difficult. When, however, the
statistician goes on to state that at
the present time one out of every
twelve marriages ends in divorce, and
that by the close of the century, unless the rate decreases, one out of
every two will so end, it is quite impossible for any one vitally interested in his fellowmen to take the cheerful view of the prospect that he apparently  entertains.
Wholesale divorce proceedings,
economically considered, would undoubtedly represent a great waste of
substance. By involving not only the
principals, but family connections on
both sides, they would certainly result in much loss of service of one
kind and another, and, since stability
is a fundamental requirement of both
society and business, their effect in
keeping the world's work^* as well as
social life of every grade, in a state
of more or less upheaval, could not
fail to be demoralizing. Indeed, if
the Christian nations continue in the
direction of facilitating divorce, which
we are told ever since the Protestant
Reformation, all the countries of
Christendom have shown a tendency
to do, they are likely to bring up in
social chaos. Since it seems that the
churches are powerless to stem the
current of disruption, and that regulation of what promises to develop
an intolerable condition of social
anarchy must be left to public opinion,
is it not about time that deliberate
effort of a thorough-going kind were
made to find out why so many who
undertake matrimony, sooner or later,
seek to loose its bonds? It is not
merely an alarmist statement that
the institution is on trial today and is
being found wanting by an ever-increasing number of persons; the
deluge of loosened and loosening ties
is upon us, and in justice to those
who are worthy, as well as for the
best good of society at large, its defects should be scientifically studied
and reform measures formulated.
This would be an eminently fit investigation for the Sage Foundation,
which has already done such excellent
service in behalf of social betterment,
because it has a prestige shared by
very few research agencies, and, in
consequence, its findings would be
given a wide publicity and its recommendations become an important factor in fostering a sound public opinion. Even by its severest critics,
monogamous marriage is conceded to
be infinitely superior to any other
form of such relation between the
sexes, and its stability should not be
permitted to be jeopardized by the
irregular actions of those who regard
their individual fancies as matters of
paramount importance. Patriotism
demands that we find a cure for this
habit of wholesale divorce.
BABETTE.
"LAND BEGISTRY ACT."
i®mmtsi%Mmaasm^mix.
In the matter of an application for a
Duplicate   Certlflcate   of   Title   to
Sub-division 4 of Suburban Lot 12,
Victoria City.
NOTICB ia hereby given that it is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the lirst publication
hereof to  issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to said land issued to Walter
Dunbar   Kirkaldy   Gibson   on   the   26th
day   of   October,   1894,   and   numbered
18783A.
Land Registry Offlce, Victoria, B. C,
the 26th day of March, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
apl 24 Registrar-General of Titles.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Land Registry Offlce, New Westminster.
I
li
if
li
if
I
if
if
if
if
if
if
Mrs. J. H. S. Matson made a most
delightful hostess at a bridge party
on Thursday afternoon. The house
was beautifully decorated with daffodils and ferns. The very handsome
prizes were won by Mrs. B. Heisterman and Mrs. C. E. Pooley. The invited guests were: Mrs. Pooley, Mrs.
W. S. Gore, Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Piggott, Mrs. Carmichael, Mrs. Hind,
Mrs.  J.   S.   Harvey,  Mrs.   Freeman,
Mrs. Tatlow.
*   *   *
The marriage of Miss Clare
Charleston, Vancouver, to Mr. Ray
Rome will take place in Vancouver
on the 17th.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Land Registry Office, New
Westminster," will be received by the
Honourable the Minister of Public
Works, at the Department of Publio
Works, Victoria, B.C., up to and including Monday the 26th or April next, for
the erection and completion of a Land
Registry Offlce at New Westminster,
B.C.
Specifications, conditions of tendering if
and contract, may be seen at the offlce ?.♦
of the Public Works Engineer, Victoria,
B.C.; at the offlce of the Government
Agent, at New Westminster; and at the
offlce of the Provincial Timber Inspector, Vancouver, B.C.
Each tender must be accompanied by if
an accepted bank cheque, or certificate if
of deposit on a chartered bank in Ca- tf
nada, made payable to the Hon. the if
Minister of Public Works, or by cash, «
in the sum of five per cent, of the »
amount of the tender, which sum shall ?.♦
be forfeited if the party tendering de- ♦.♦
cline to enter into contract when called »
upon to do so, or fail to complete the H
work contracted for. K
The cheques, certificates of deposit, »
or cash, of unsuccessful<tenderers will fi
be returned to them after the execu- tf
tion of the contract. if
Tenders will not be considered unless 8
made out on the forms supplied signed 8
with the actual signature of the ten- |g
derer, and enclosed in the envelope el
furnished. |'|
F.  C.  GAMBLE, if
Public Works Engineer,  tf
Department of Public Works, U
Victoria, B. C, 27th March, 1909. tf
apl 3 if
You Get What
You Want
When You
Want It
AT THE
Empire Hotel and
Restaurant
Meals, 20c and up.
Rooms, 25c and up.
Telephone 841.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Bring your Family.
A. LIPSKY, Proprietor,
Milne Block
568 Johnson Street,
VICTORIA, B.C
That Tired Spring Feeling
From a disordered liver spring
many ills, such as that feeling
of weariness, sour stomach, biliousness, water-brash, dyspepsia, etc.
BOWES' LIVER AND
INDIGESTION CURE
is a splendid remedy for these.
An excellent medicine to take
at this time of the year.
50c per bottle at this store.
CYRUS fl BOWES.
CHEMIST
Govt. St., Near Yates.
VICTORIA, B.C.
fammmmmmmmmmmmm
CASCADE MINERAL CLAIM.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the Reserve existing on Lot 223, Rupert District, is cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department  of  Lands,
Victoria, B.C., March 17th, 1909.
Mr. Ray Rome and Mr. Jenkins
came over from Vancouver for a few
days during the latter part of last
week.
Situate ln the Alberni Mining Division
of the Alberni District.
Where located—On Uchucklesit Harbour,
Alberni Canal.
TAKE NOTICE that we the Cascade
Mining Company, Limited, Non-Fersonal
Liability, Free Miner's Certlflcate No.
B23151, intend, 60 days from the date
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a Certlflcate of Improvements for
the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under section 37 must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 18th day of March, 1909.
THE CASCADE COPPER
MINING COMPANY, LIMITED.
.Ml, Non-Parannal Liability.
Prepare yourself against Jack
Frost.
See BOLDEN
THE CARPENTER AND
BUILDER.
For your weather strips, etc.,
760 Yates St. Op. Dominion
Hotel. Phones: House, A.1125;
Shop, B1828. \
          _mm#M_
The Taylor Mill C<
Limited.
All kind* ef Building Materiel,
LUMBER
SXSH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Qovernment St.. V|tfc THE WEEK SATURDAY, APRIL 3t I9°8
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
ake notice that W. Wentworth Bell,
Toronto,  Ont.,  engineer,  intends  to
ly  for permission  to  purchase  the
owing described lands:—Commencing
i post planted about 80 chains north
>t of the north west corner of Lot
S.A.W. script; thence east 10 chains;
nee north 40 chains; thence west 40
ins,  more  or  less,   to  lake;  thenoe
therly along lake 40 chains, more or
i, to point of commencement,
lated February 15th,  1909.
W.  WENTWORTH BELL.
27 J.   R.  Morrison,   Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
JM      District of Coast
Fake notice that Lilias Ross, of Vic-
fia, married woman, intends to apply
permission to purchase the following
cribed lands:—Commencing at a post
nted about  20 chains  north or tue
th west corner of Lot 28; thence west
chains;    thence    north    40  chains;
nee east 40 chains; thence south 4U
.ins to point of commencement,
lated February 15th, 1909.
LILIAS ROSS.
t>. 27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent,
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
forks of Palmer trail and Morrison's
trail to Lewis Creek, and about 100
chains east of small lake lying north or
trail; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 320 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JANET E. MESHER.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
1 District of Coast
'ake notice that William Fernie, ot
[toria, capitalist, intends to apply for
'mission to purchase the following
icrlbed lands:—Commencing at a post
nted about 20 chains north of the
'th west corner of Lot 25, Anaham
ke; thence running west 80 chains;
knee south 40 chains; thence east 80
tins; thence north 40 chains to point
■commencement,
pated February 15th, 1909,
WILLIAM FERNIE.
27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
_M       District of Coast
JFake notice that Edith Rose Scott, of
Incouver, B.C., spinster, intends to ap-
w for permission to purchase the folding described lands:—Commencing at
post planted about 20 chains north of
J> north-west corner of Lot 25, Anaham
Ike; thence   east   80    chains; thence
Irth 40 chains; thence west 80 chains;
fence south 40 chains to point of com-
fencement.
Sated February 15th, 1909.
EDITH ROSE SCOTT.
> 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
■JH       District of Coast
iTake notice that Susan Mary Baiss, ot
Ictoria, B.C., married woman, intenas
'apply for permission to purchase tne
llowing described lands:—Commencing
-a post planted about 3 miles east of
.Imon river and about 16 miles north
Anaham   Lake;    thence   north   40
ains;  thence  east  40  chains;  thence
uth 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
SUSAN MARY BAISS.
ib 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
I District of Coast
Take notice that Chartres C. Pember-
n, of Victoria, B.C., lawyer, intends to
ply for permission to purchase the
llowing described lands:—Commencing
a post planted about 3 miles east ot
.Imon River and about 14 miles north
Anaham Lake; thence north 80
ains; thence east 40 chains; thence
uth 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
CHARTRES C. PEMBERTON.
|eb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
II Take notice that Katherine Phylllss
iurrell, of Victoria, marled woman, in-
inds to apply for permission to pur-
hase the following described lands:—
ommencing at a post planted about S
liles east of the Salmon River and
bout 15 miles north of Anaham Lake;
tience north 80 chains; thence east 40
hains; thence south 80 chains; thence
vest 40 chains to point of oommence-
Jient.
I* Dated February 15th, 1909.
KATHERINE PHTLLISS BURRELL.
('eb _■___■_■
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella Bell, of
Toronto, married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east of
Fish trap on Palmer trail, and about 40
chains south of small lake near Lewis
Creek; thence north 40 chains; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ISABELLA BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Mary L. Dupont, of
Victoria, married woman, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 1-2 miles soutn
of the Indian ranch on Salmon River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
MART L. DUPONT.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast '
Take notice that Michael Finnerty, of
Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east of Salmon
River and about 7 miles north of Anaham Lake; thence west 40 chains! thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of commencement,  containing  160  acres.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
MICHAEL FINNERTY.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles C. Revans,
of Victoria, farmer, intends to apply for
permission   to  purchase   the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles north of Anaham
Lake;  thence south  80  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
CHARLES C. REVANS.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Ellen S. Bell, of Victoria, widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north east corner of Lot
27, S.A.W. script; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
ELLEN S. BELL.
Feb 27   ' J. B. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that William S. Maher,
f Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
[or permission to purchase the following  described  lands:—Commencing  at
, post planted about 40 chains south of
ihe south west corner of Lot 28, Ana-
iam   Lake;    thence   south 40 chains;
hence west 20 chains; thence north 40
ihalns; thence east 20 chains to point
>f commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
■ WILLIAM S.  MAHER.
IjTeb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
I. Take notice that James Stevenson
Baiss, of Victoria, rancher, Intends to
ipply for permission to purchase the
(ollowing described lands:—Commencing at a post planted near Morrison
trail to Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River) and about 10 miles trout
forks of said trail and Palmer trail;
ithence north 80 chains; thence east 80
Jbhalns; thence south 80 chains; thence
Iiwest 80 chains to point of commence-
I ment, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
1\        JAMES   STEVENSON   BAISS.
feb 27	
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that J. Stirling Floyd, ot
Victoria, clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south west corner of
Lot 28, S.A.W. script, near Anaham
Lake; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
J.  STIRLING FLOYD.
Feb 27 J.- R. Morrison*, Agent.
described lands :*—Commencing at a post
planted west of the Salmon River, about
1 1-2 miles from foot of Anaham Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 40
chains, more or less, to river; thence
northerly 80 chains along river; thence
west 40 chains, more or less, to point
of commencement.
Dated February  15th, 1909.
JOSEPH D.  VIRTUE.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John D. Bell, of Victoria, banker, intends to apply for permision to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east shore of Anaham
Lake, about 2 miles from head of lake;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 40
chains, more or less, to lake; thence
80 chains, more or less, south westerly
along lake to point of commencement,
containing 320 acres, more or less.
Dated  February  15th,  1909.
JOHN D.  BELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George Edward Wilkerson, of Victoria, gardner, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the south east corner of Lot 26, near Anaham Lake; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 20
chains to point of commencement, containing 80 acres, more or less.
Dated February  15th,   190?.
GEORGE EDWARD WILKERSON.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Jessie Clara Bell, of
Victoria, spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on Palmer trail, about 6 miles
north west of J. Lunos' ranch on Upper
Salmon River and about 1 mile east ot
Towdestan Lake; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres,
more or less.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
JESSIE  CLARA  BELL.
Feb 27 3. R. Morrison, Ageni.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that David H. Bale, ot
Victoria, contractor, Intends to apply for
permission  to purchase  the  following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 3 miles south of Indian
house on Salmon River; thence south 80
chains;  thence east 40  chains;  thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
DAVID  H.   BALE.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elsie Bell, of Vic*
toria, married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 1 1-2 miles north
west of the north west corner of Lot
27; thence north 20 chains; thehce west
40 chains; thence south 20 chains; thence
east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
ELSIE BELL.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
LICENCE   TO   AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
"Companies' Act, 1897."
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of  Coast
Take  notice  that Arthur  Davies  Intends  to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—
Comencing  at  a post   planted  at  the
south  east corner of Lot  25,  Anaham
Lake;  thence south  40  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
ARTHUR  DAVIES.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that George C. Mesher, of
Victoria, contractor, intends to apply for
permision to purchase the following described  lands:—Commencing  at  a  post
planted about 4 mlles south of Indian
ranch  on  Salmon River;  thence south
80 chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th,  1909.
GEORGE C. MESHER.
Feb 27 3. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Frederick Stewarv
Burell, of Victoria, accountant, intenas
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted on the west bank of
Salmon River, about 10 chains north oi
ford on the Bella Coola Ootra Lake trail
and near the foot of Anaham Lake;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains, more or
less, to river; thence northerly along
river to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
FREDERICK STEWART BURRELL.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
"LAND  REGISTRY ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to Lot
31, Range 3, Coast District.
Notice is hereby given that lt is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof, to issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to said lands Issued to Robert
Morris Thompson on the 16th January,
1903, and  numbered  8398C.
Land Registry Office, Victoria, B.C.,
the 3rd day of February,. 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
mch. 6 Registrar-General.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Elizabeth M. Coulthard, of Victoria, widow, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 3 1-2 miles
southerly from Indian ranch on Salmon
River; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
ELIZABETH M. COULTHARD.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison,  Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Francis Barton, ot
Victoria, merchant, intends to apply ior
permission  to  purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 1 mile south of Blayney's
pre-emption; thence    south    80 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence north 8u
chains; thence west 40 chains to polnv
of comencement.
Dated February 15th,  1909.
FRANCIS BARTON.
Feb.  27 J.  R.  Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that John V. Clegg, of
Victoria, accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains south oi
the south east corner of Lot 28, S.AW.
script, near Anaham Lake; thence east
80 chains; thence south 40 chainB;
thence west 80 chains; thence north 40
chains to point of commencement.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
JOHN V. CLEGG.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
.._■ District of Coast
|> Take notice that Charles T. Dupont,
lof Victoria, capitalist, intends to apply
(for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles north of
.Fish trap where Palmer trall crosses
Isalmon River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 80
ichains; thence east 40 chains to point ot
ICommencement,   containing   820   acres,
cnore or less.
|   Dated February 16th, 1909.
I        CHARLES THOMAS DUPONT.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Charles Poole, of Vic-
;riao, laborer, Intends to apply for per-
nision to purchase the following described   lands:—Comencing   at   a   post
I planted on the east shore of Anaham
jifilte, about 2 miles from head of lake;
'thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
jihains to lake; thence westerly along
bake  80  chains,  more  or  less;  thence
northerly along lake 80 chains, more ot
iess, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
* Dated February 15th, 1909.
I CHRALES POOLB.
Feb 27
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
,' Take notice that Janet B. Mesher, of
Victoria, married   woman,    intends to
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that H.  P. 0'Fn.n ill,  of
rancher, Intends to apply ror
permission   to   purchase   tho   following
described lands:—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of Lewis
Creek  (branch of Salmon River)  at a
point  about  13   miles   from  mouth  of
creek;  thence south  40  chains;  thence
west 40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more
or less.
Dated  February  16th,   1909.
HENRY PERCY O'FARRELL.
Feb 27 ______■____■
*m*
i&M
- CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve covering the fractional sections
31, 82 and 33, Denman Island, notice
of which was published ln the British
Columbia Gazette of Ootober 21st, 1878,
ls cancelled.
ROBT. A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Landa and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1901.
17 mmgim
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Marion Maher, oi
Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at
a post planted near the south bank of
Lewis Creek (branch of Salmon River)
and about 12 miles from mouth of creek;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 8o
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated February 16th, 1909.
MARION MAHER.
Feb-27 J. R. Morrison, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Isabella McQuillan,
of Victoria, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the narrows on
Salmon River, near the foot of Anaham Lake, on west bank of river; thence
west 40 chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less to
lake; thence northerly along lake to
point of commencement.
Dated February 15th, 1909.
Isabella Mcquillan.
Feb 27 J. R. Morrison, Agent,
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast
Take notice that Joseph D. Virtue, of
Victoria,  accountant.  Intends  to apply
for permission to purchase the following
WING ON
Employment Agent.
Wood and Coal for Sale.
Also Scavenging.
1709 Government St. Phone 43
VICTORIA, B.C.
MAPS
OF
Timber and Land.
The   kind   that   (how   what'i
taken up  and what'a  vacant.
Electric Blue Print & Map Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria.. B.C
NOTICE.
NOTICE ls hereby given that the Reserve on Lot 29a, Range 4, Coast District, is cancelled.
R. A RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of
Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., 15th October, 1908.
3m
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Arthur S.
Blakemore will within 60 days from this
date, apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post on a stump at
the centre of the north shore of Tumbo
Island at high water mark; thence north
one mile; thence west one mile; thence
south one mile; thence east one mile
to place of beginning.
February llth,  1909.
apl 17 ARTHUR S. BLAKEMORE.
Canada:
Province of British Columbia.
No. 469.
This is to certify that the "Winnipeg
Oil   Company,   Limited,"   is  authorised
and licensed to carry on business within
the Province of British  Columbia, and
to carry out or effect all or any of the
objects of the Company  to which  tne
legislative authority of the Legislature
of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company ls
situate at the City of Winnipeg, in the
Province of Manitoba.
The amount of the capital of the
Company is fifty thousand dollars, divided into five hundred shares of one
hundred dollars each.
The head ofllce of the Company ln this
Province is situate at the City of Victoria, and Andrew Wright, Financial
Agent, whose address is Victoria aforesaid, is the attorney for the company.
Given under my Hand ana Seal of
Office at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this third day of February,
one thousand nine hundred and nine.
(L. S). S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has been established and licensed are:
To purchase, acquire, hold, and operate oil refineries, plant and machinery
of all kinds', to carry on the business
of buying, leasing, letting and selling
petroleum and oil lands; buying, selling,
producing and manufacturing all kinds
of oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all articles and substances
of which oil ls an ingredient; of sink-
ink, boring, making, putting down, and
building oil wells, and all buildings and
erections which rfiay be requisite in connection therewith and of otherwise developing and operating upon petroleum
oil lands; of erecting, leasing, buying,
letting and selling oil refineries together
with all such buildings and works as
may be necessary In connection with the
production and sale of oil products and
all compounds thereof, and all sud-
stances and articles of which oil is an
ingredient; to manufacture, buy, sell,
and deal in oil producers, machinery,
supplies, and utensils of all kinds; to
carry on the business of storing, tanking and warehousing refined and cruae
oil and all products and compounds
thereof, and all substances and articles
of which oil is an ingredient and granting warehouse receipts for the same;
to construct, equip and operate pipe
lines and other contrivances or ap- .
pliances for the transportation of 011;
the doing of all such other acts ana
things as are incidental or conducive
to the attainment of any of the objects
aforesaid.
BRADSHAW & DAVIE
Solicitors for the said Company,
mch 20 HB
"LAND   REGISTRY   ACT."
In the matter of an Application for a
Duplicate Certificate of Title to Lot
30, Subdivision of Sections 3 and 4,
Fairfield Estate (Map 826) Victoria
City.
Notice ls hereby given that lt is my
intention at the expiration of one month
from the date of the first publication
hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate
of Title to above land issued to John
Sherburn on the 4th day of August,
1908,  and numbered   18349 C.
Land Registry office, Victoria, B.C.,
the 19th day of January, 1909.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Feb. 27 Registrar-General of Titles.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that Clarice
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Com-
misloner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme westerly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence west one mile; thence south
one mile; thence east one mile to place
of beginning.
February llth, 1909.
apl 17 CLARICE BLAKEMORE.
-ffOTXOE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve placed upon certain lands ln the
vicinity of Lower Kootenay River, District of Kootenay, notice of which appeared ln the British Columbia Gazette
of the 14th of August, 1884, is cancelled, for the purpose of disposing of
such lands by public auction, and lo
permit of giving effect to the recommendations contained ln the report of
Mr. W. F. Teetzel, a commissioner appointed to adjudicate upon the claims of
certain squatters upon the said lands,
but for no other purpose.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK.
Deputy   Commissioner   of   Lands   and
Works, Lands and Works Department.
Victoria, B. C, 6th October, 1908.
janS.
Y.M.CA.
40 BROAD STREET.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice is hereby given that William
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
extreme easterly end of Tumbo Island
at high water mark; thence north one
mile; thence east one mile; thence south
one mile; thence west one mile to the
place of beginning.
February llth, 190J.
apl 17 WILLIAM BLAKEMORE.
VICTORIA   LAND   DISTRICT.
Coal Prospecting Notice—Tumbo Island.
Notice ls hereby given that Barbara
Blakemore will within 60 days from
this date apply to the Assistant Commissioner of Lands at Victoria, for a
License to prospect for Coal under the
area described as follows:—
Commencing at a post made on a
stump at the centre of the north shore
of Tumbo Island at high water mark;
thence north one mile; thence east one
mile; thence south one mile; thence west
one mile to the place of beginning.
February 11th, 1909.
apl IT BARBARA BLAKEMORE,
No. 372.
CERTIFICATE   OF   THE   REGISTRATION   OF  AN   EXTRA-PROVINCIAL COMPANY.
Companies' Act, 1897.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that the "Michigan-Pacific Lumber Company" has
this day been registered as an Extra-
Provincial Company under the "Companies' Act, 1897," to carry out or
effect all or any of the objects of tne
Company to which the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia extends.
The head offlce of the Company is
situate at the City of Grand Rapids,
Kent County, State of Michigan, U.S.A.
The amount of the capital of ■ tne
Company ls One Million Five Hundred
Thousand Dollars, divided Into One Hundred and Fifty Thousand shares of Ten
Dollars each.
The head offlce of the Company in
this Province is situate at No. 1114
Langley Street, Victoria, and William
John Taylor, Barrister-at-Iaw, whose
address is No. 1114 Langley Street, Victoria, B.C., ls the attorney for the
Company.
The time of the existence of the
Company ls Thirty years from the 26th
of January, AD. 1909.
Given under my hand and Seal ot
Offlce at Victoria, Province of British
Columbia, this first day of March, one
thousand  nine  hundred and nine.
S. Y. WOOTTON,
Registrar of Joint Stock Companies.
The objects for which this Company
has   been   established   and   registered
are:—Buying,    selling,    manufacturing,
and dealing in forest products,
mch 6 THE WEEK, SATURDAY APRIL 3, 1909.
PREFERRED STOCK
In offering the remaining portion of the first issue of
300,000 Preference Shares of this corporation to the public,
we do so with a feeling that it is the best industrial stock
ever offered for subscription in Western Canada. This
stock is entitled to a fixed cumulative preferential dividend
of 7 per cent, per annum on the capital for the time being
paid up on the shares. Said dividend is due and payable
before any dividend is paid on the Ordinary Shares. After'
7 per cent, has been paid on the Preference and Ordinary,
both shares thereafter participate equally. In addition to
the preferential dividend of 7 per cent., the Preference
Shares are likewise entitled, in the event of the winding
up of the Company, to priority as to return of capital and
payment of arrears of dividends, whether declared or not,
over the Ordinary Shares, We are confident that the
Preference Stock will eventually pay from 20 to 40 per
cent, annual dividends, and that within 90 days from the
opening of the plant the stock will be selling at a big
premium. Upon the incorporation of the Company the
gentlemen responsible for its organisation were very conservative and cautious regarding the amount of "capitalisation," which, after thoughtful consideration, was placed
at $1,500,000, which in itself is a most conservative amount
and thoroughly consistent with the object and purposes
of the Company. As a matter of fact, the "capitalisation"
is much lower than that usually adopted by concerns of
like magnitude. For instance, the Laurentide Pulp &
Paper Co., of Grande Mere, Quebec, has $1,600,000 Ordinary Stock, $1,200,000 Preference Shares, and $1,000,000
Debentures; the Willamette Pulp & Paper Co. has $1,-
500,000 Outstanding Stocks and Bonds; the International
Paper Co., operating 38 mills, has Bonds and Stock to the
amount of $65,000,000—an average of over $1,500,000 per
mill, and the remainder of the large operating paper
mills accordingly. The plan of the Board of Directors is
to place the first 300,000 shares of Preference Stock at
par $1.00 per share, which amount will be ample to complete the first division of fhe plant now under course of
erection, and then offer a second issue of 200,000 ordinary
shares, either at $1.15 or $1.20 per share. The first unit
conservatively will pay from 15 per cent, to 25 per cent,
on the money invested, so that the subscribers of the first
300,000 not only will enjoy a preference over subsequent
stockholders in' regard to capital and dividends, but likewise the advantage of big dividends on the first unit of
the plant. Everything considered we regard this as an
exceptional opportunity to secure a high class dividend
paying stock.
A few years ago the stock of the Canadian Pacific Railway could have been purchased at 90, today it is up to 179.
Northern Pacific was likewise quoted a few years ago at
88, today it is 143. The Bank of British North America
is now quoted at 145; Dominion Bank, 234; Imperial
Bank, 215; Bank of Montreal, 242; Molsons, 200; and
others accordingly. The Allis Chalmers stock has jumped
from $10.00 to $15.00 in one year. Alaska Packers was
quoted in 1907 at $50.00; today it is $58.00, American
Cement, eight years ago went begging at $9.00 per share;
it is now $43.00. Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation in 1904 sold at $1.25, today it- is a good buy at $1.50.
Pacific Mail S.S. Co. once sold as low as 27; in 1900 Wells,
Fargo & Co. Express Co. was quoted at 140; today it is
up to 325. At the same time the American Radiator stock
was peddled around at 50; today it is a good buy at 209.
In 1907 Bethlehem Steel was offered at 20; it is now ruling
at 27. American Refining Co. went from 56 in 1900 to
107 in 1908. In 1902 Hudson Bay stock was quoted at 37;
today it is 118. American Cotton Oil Co. jumped from 36
in 1907 to 44 in. 1908. In 1905 Comstock Tunnel Company found no buyers at 10; today it is a magnificent buy
at 50. In 1907 Consolidated Gas ruled at 140; it is now
167. Quaker Oats, in 1902, could have been bought at 77;
it is now quoted at 134.
Who would not be glad now to buy a few thousand
shares of stock in the Eastern Canadian Paper Mills, for
instance, at the price they were originally quoted at, such
as the Toronto Paper Co., Dominion Pulp & Paper Co.,
Lincoln Paper Co., Montreal Paper Co., Lawrentide Pulp
& Paper Co., Trent River Pulp & Paper Co., Georgetown
Paper Co., Northern Mills, St. Raymond Paper Co., Kin--
leith Paper Co., and other Eastern mills. As a matter of
fact it is impossible to secure stock in the majority of
operating pulp and paper mills. The last issue of the
British Paper Maker Journal gave the following quotations: Darwen Paper Co., £5 shares are now at £9}£;
East Lancashire Paper Co., £10 shares are now at £I5J4
and £i6J4; the £5 shares of the Guardbridge Paper Co.
are now at &1/.; Ramsbottom Paper Co., £5 shares with
only £3 paid, are now at £654; Roach Bridge, £5 shares
with only £4^ paid, are now at £6. The £5 share of the
Star Paper Co., with only £3 paid, are now worth £5J4
In 'offering the Preferred Stock of the Western Canada
Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd., for subscription there is
no question but that it is the best industrial stock ever
offered in Western Canada. ., The Company have acquired
55,669 acres of magnificent Pulp Limits at Quatsino Sound,
Vancouver Island, large water power on Marble Creek,
Quatsino Sound, and are proceeding with the erection of
the Pulp and Paper plant, which when fully complete will
have a capacity of 600 tons of news and wrapping paper
per week. The erection of the plant is under the supervision of Mr. Chas. B. Pride, of Appleton, Wis., one of
the most distinguished authorities in the United States
or Canada on the erection of Pulp and Paper Mills, having
built more than fifty of the leading mills of the country
during the past twenty years. We are rushing the work
along and are confident that we will have the pulp division,
with a capacity of 100 tons of pulp, in operation by Dec.
1, this year. The Preferred Stock which we are now
offering is entitled to a cumulative preferential dividend
of 7 per cent., payable before any dividend is paid on the
Ordinary Stock. After 7 per cent, ahs been paid upon the
Ordinary and Preferred Stock both stocks thereafter participate equally in all surplus profits which the Company
may determine to distribute for that year. Remember,
"the time to buy the stock of any corporation is in the
embryo stage before a wheel has been turned."
WE NOW OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION THE REMAINDER OF THE FIRST ISSUE OF
300,000 PREFERENCE SHARES
In Blocks of 100 Shares at $1 per share.
PAYMENTS : 15 per cent, on application.   15 per cent, in 30 days.   Balance 10 per cent, per month until fully paid.
COL. HENRY APPLETON, Royal Engineer, retired, Director
British Canadian Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
CHARLES J, V, SPRATT, President Victoria Machinery Depot.
Victoria,
DR. LEWIS HALL, Mayor of Victoria, B.C.
CHARLES LUGRIN, Editor "Colonist," Victoria, B.C ,
DIRECTORS
W. K. HOUSTON, Member W. K. Houston & Co., Victoria.
JOSEPH McPHEE, Gen'l Merchant, Cumberland and Coqrtenay.
F. J. MARSHALL, formerly Asst. Manager National Bk. of India.
FREDERICK APPLETON, Director M. R. Smith & Co.. Ltd.,
GREELY KOLTS, Director and Fiscal Agent British Canadian
Wood Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
BANKERS AND REFERENCE, ROYAL BANK OF CANADA.
Address all subscriptions direct to the Head Office of the Company, 638 View Straet, Victoria, B. C.
WESTERN CANADA WOOD PULP & PAPER COMPANY, LTD.
%wmwmmmm^^mi^i*^^i^^^&immm^^^^_mim^mm^
De Profundis.
There is a story told by Sir Richard
Burton. There is no moral to it, and
I hope it is a Number Six lallapa-
loosala, altho Sir Richard, being a
knight of the Golden Garter, ought
not to try and push in the door of
fhe Ananias Club and aspire to shine
in the Society of Nature Fakirs, at
the same time.
So to thc story! It seems there
was an English officer by the name of
Captain Pollard. He was stationed
for a time in the Malaysian Peninsula. One evening, just at dusk, the
Captain was walking along a road
abou'. a hilf-milc from the fort, when
sudd uly he heard a woman screaming wildly for help. Hc rushed forward and saw an immense Dog-
faced Baboon—a specimen of thc Si-
mia Majoralis—half carrying and half
dragging a woman. Now and then
the beast would stop to rest, but hc
never took his hands off his prey,
The woman's clothes were town to
shreds and her face was covered with
slime and blood, where the beast had
bitten her. She was nearly insensible, but now and again would arouse
.elf enough to scream.
I I Baboon did not retreat on ap-
proacn of ihe man, as this animal
usually does, but stood and growled
light and defiance.
The Englishman drew his pistol and
with a well-directed shot sent a bullet through the brain of the beast,
at least through all the brain it had.
The woman was in a sorry plight
from her wounds and her rough handling. The officer bore her to the fort,
and she was cared for according to
the  best  rules  of  modern   surgery.
She proved to be the daughter of a
local pundit, who was duly notified,
but as the girl was suffering so from
her wounds and the shock, it was
thought best, for the time, to leave
her in the Military Hospital.
She was a rarely beautiful young
woman, a Malay, but spoke good English, having for a time lived with a
Baptist Missionary.
The gentle reader, being psychic,
here flies faster than I can write—
the Englishman loved the girl, and
the girl iu gratitude to the man who
had saved her life, loved him.
So they married at High Noon at
the Consulate, by the Post Chaplain,
according to the rites of the Church
of England. It was a quiet wedding.
The friends at home were duly notified.
Soon after his marriage Captain
Pollard was transferred to Hong
Kong, then to Manila, later to thc
Isle of Martinique.
A year had passed, a year of
strange, weird, sad happiness,—when
the bride languished. She grew ill,
and died.
But an hour before her passing she
motioned her husband to come close
to the cot where she lay.
With faint breath, and with painful
pauses, she gasped, "I am dying—I
feel—I feel I must not die with a lie
in my heart. I—I did not want to
seem ungrateful—to you—but I—I
never loved you—a woman loves but
once—you must forgive me—I loved
—I loved—I always have loved that
Dog-faced Baboon!"
She sank back, and all was still,
And outside thc storm clouds flew
across the face of the blue, and far
away on the rim of the Night-tide a
Cuckoo called plaintively to its Mate.
Newspapers.
The woman's page iu the newspapers is got up by women for women, and what does it reflect, with its
appalling gush, its everlasting disclosure of serious endeavour petering
out in teas and tattle? If it be the
last word ■
But let's not be unjust. As properly assume that the remaining
pages, their sporting slang, their political hysterics, their murders and
tlieir markets, mirror the minds of
men.
Yet the newspaper has undoubtedly
its significance. It shows, for instance, how hardly the bargaining instinct that's in us withstands the offer of all the print we can carry away
for a cent.
A Substitute for Work.
"Physical culture, father, is perfectly lovely I" exclaimed an enthusiastic
young miss just home from college
"Look! To develop the arms I grasp
the rod by one end and move it slowly from right to left."
"Well, well!" exclaimed her father;
" what won't science discover! If
that rod had straw at the other end
you'd be sweeping."
JALLAND BROS.
Fine Groceries
FRESH  FRUIT DAILY.
6a3 Yates St.    -    VICTORIA. B.C.
Could Only Guess.
"How many ribs have you, Johnny?" asked the teacher of physiology.
"I don't know, ma'am," giggled
Johnny, squirming around on one
foot. "I'm so awful ticklish I nevei
could count 'em."
He Knew.
A member of the Nebraska legislature was making a speech on some
momentous question and, in concluding said:
"In the words of Daniel Webster,
who wrote the dictionary, 'Give me
liberty or give me death.'"
One of his colleagues pulled at his
coat and whispered:
"Daniel Webster did not write the
dictionary; it was Noah."
" Noah nothing," replied the
speaker; "Noah built the ark."
Houses Built
ON THE
Instalment
Plan
d. hTbale
Contractor and Builder.
Phone 1140.
Cor. Fort and Stadacona Streets
The Jury's Verdict.
A south Missouri man recently was
tried on a charge of assault. The
State brought into court as the weapons used a rail, an axe, a pair of
tongs, a saw and a rifle. The defendant's counsel exhibited as the
other man's weapons a scythe blade,
a pitchfork, a pistol and a hoe. The
jury's verdict is said to have been:
"Resolved, That we the jury would
have given $i to have seen the fight."
Not What He Wanted.
"I trust we shall make you feel
quite at home," remarked the hotel
proprietor.
"Don't you try it," expostulated the
married man. "I'm away from it to
have a jolly good time."
The Lesser Evil.
First Guest—Won't you join me in
requesting young Squalls to recite?
Second Guest—But I don't like recitations.
First Guest—Neither do I, but ;f
the young beggar doesn't recite he'll
sing.
Dr. W. F. Fraser
DENTIST
Has Established Himself At
723 Yates Street,
Garesche Block
Where he is prepared to perform
dental operation according to the
"latest scientific methods. Specialist
in Crown and Bridgework.
Phone 261. Hours: 9 a.m., 4 p.m,

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