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BC Historical Newspapers

Week Mar 7, 1908

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Array I Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stook and General
AUCTIONEERS
(Commission and Real Estate Agents.
I 860 Qrasvllle,
Vaacoaver.
<£SULXXA_l___t_JL_l_l__^
Victoria Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria and Vancouver B. 6.
*f_rm_rr_ _ mrrr»»i
Stewart Williams R. &
Jaato»5
Vol. V.   No. 6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908
The wisest of all books,
The Spirit and and tbe one wbicb even
The Letter. in this degenerate age is
still looked upon by many
men as the guide of life, declares that "It
is tbe letter that killeth and the spirit tbat
maketh alive."    The McPhillips episode
of tbis week furnishes a singularly apt
illustration of the truth of this dictum.
Mr. McPhillips occupies a high position
in tbis community; against his personal
character, his integrity, and his honesty of
purpose not even his bitterest political
enemies have a word to say.    But there
are circumstances under which the possession of these high qualities only tends
to accentuate tbe weakness of a man's conduct.   Mr. McPhillips committed the unpardonable error of sitting in judgment on
Ibis client's case.    By voting twice on a
[matter on which he should never have
I voted at all he effectually blocked tbe city's
Waterworks Bill and at least prevented
I tlie house from dealing with it.    In a long
I speech before the Assembly and another
I long one at the City Hall, he defended his
I action by copious references to tbe rules
lof the House and emphatic declarations of
Ibis personal integrity. Both defences were
I superfluous; no one had attacked the latter
land no one questioned the former.   What
[Mr. McPhillips apparently is not able to
■understand is that in matters of conduct
lthe average man does not judge by fine
■distinctions.      Admitted   that   Mr.   Mc-
JPhillips was perfectly conscientious and
■strictly within his legal rights in giving
Ian ordinary vote and a casting vote, the
■fact still remains tbat while his conduct
lis legally unassailable it is morally inde-
Jfensible.   What was wanted in tbe matter
Iwas not legal knowledge but "horse sense."
1T0 any but the legal mind, and the legal
Jmind peculiarly constituted at that, a large
(legal fee constitutes a pecuniary interest
Iwhicli might easily be very much greater
■than a few shares of stock, yet tbis is the
[distinction that Mr. McPhillips draws.   It
lis greatly to be regretted that some of bis
[political friends did not suggest the advisability of his retiring from the Committee
■when the case of liis clients came before it.
IA man of lesser reputation would have
[hesitated to place himself and his friends
Jin the invidious position in whicli Mr.
■McPhillips lias placed his.   The unfortun-
lato part is that his conduct does not affect
jthe merits of the question at all; it simply
I interposes  an effective block whicli  has
I made trouble for the party, trouble for the
[city,   ancl   trouble   for   Mr.   McPhillips'
[reputation for "savoir faire."
[Scott and
■Sloan.
A week  ago  the  Victoria
Times   published   a   long
speech    of   Mr.    William
Sloan, M.P., on the subject
lof the sealing industry, and commented
gleefully on the interest which is manifested for scalers.   In tbe Sessional Papers
rf February 21st, when this subject was
inder • debate in tbe Federal Parliament,
he Honourable Mr. Scott, whose official
.osition gives Governmental weight to his
ktteranc.es, made the following declaration:
'I look upon the Sealers, as a rule, as a
ward of pirates.    They have no respect
'ov law ancl no regard for the animals they
estroy.   The result will be that before an-
ither generation there will be no seals
eft."   What does Mr. Richard Hall think
)f the opinion of Mr. Secretary Scott ?
EDITORIAL
It is just about twenty
Asiatic years   since   tbe   Yellow
Question. Peril began  to  be talked
about. The subject was introduced to public notice in a very clever
pamphlet. Tbe interest of tbis pamphlet
today is that it furnishes a remarkable
contrast to the propaganda of the Exclusionists. The writer depicted in vivid
colours the intelligence, the industry and
the aggressiveness of the Orientals. He
pointed out that their danger to the white
races lay not in their inferiority, but in
their superiority. In the ultimate issue
they overran the world by reason of their
numbers, but their numerical superiority
only became effective because it was directed and controlled by intelligence. He
treated them as the masters, not tbe servants, of the white races, and their
triumph became in his hands the logical
conclusion of natural forces intelligently
applied. The Exclusionist has so far approached the question solely from the
standpoint of inferiority. The only protest lodged against Oriental immigration,
whether into Canada or tlie United States,
has been in tlie interests of white labour;
tbe suggestion is that unrestricted immigration means flooding tbe market with
Orientals and displacing white labour.
Undoubtedly tbis is a correct proposition,
but is it not taking altogether too narrow
a view of the subject ? By narrowing the
issue, the Exclusionist is ignoring broader
considerations, some of which, at any rate,
are more potent than the one he urges.
The Week has never agreed with the
methods of the Exclusion League; it has
always sympathized with its objects. Now
that the League bas been made an International one, it is the more important that
Canadians should thoroughly understand
the question in all its bearings. Whilst
Canadian and American Exclusionists
have some things, they have not all things,
in common. The interests of the former
are distinct; where they touch questions
of International policy they merge on all
the broader issues. There has been a
great deal of talking at cross-purposes; at
one time the League has stated that the
question is primarily a racial one; again
it has declared tbat it is purely an economic one. Tbe AVeek holds the view tliat
both aspects of the case are predominant,
ancl that neither can for a moment be
ignored. It is in the highest interests of
civilization that such racial differences as
exist between tbe Mongolian and the white
man should be maintained in their integrity. Tlie history of the world furnishes no instance of tbe commingling of
such races, ancl the profoundest students
of anthropology are a unit in concluding
that it would be disastrous. Only less
fatal would be tbe peopling of any Province of tbe Dominion with the yellow-
races to the exclusion of the white, a self-
evident proposition which need not be discussed. It is when tbe economic side of
the question is considered that difficulties
begin to arise. The AVeek strongly urges
the necessity for educating public opinion
as to the real character of the achievements, the policy, and tbe ambitions of
tlie Mongolian races. This phase of tbe
subject is less insistent witb respect to the
Chinese than the Japanese, not because the
former will always be less formidable, but
because at the moment they are less aggressive. It will be many generations before
the subjects of Nippon, whatever the extent of their colonizing agencies, approach
in the slightest degree to the population
of the Chinese empire. There is tbe further consideration that the closest students
of human nature are unable to fathom the
Chinese mind, whilst the Jap is now an
open book. The civilization of the former
is buried in antiquity. Its records are
in evidence for at least 6,000 years. Japanese history is practically contemporary
with the Christian era. China is still
asleep, or at any rate is barely waking up.
At intervals during tbe last half century
it has fitfully yawned, only to close its
eyes and steadfastly refuse to be aroused.
What the disciples of Confucius will do
when they fall in step with the march of
modern civilization, the profoundest philosopher cannot even surmise. Japan is
wide awake, with every nerve a-tingle;
with its eyes steadfastly fixed on a fair
horizon. Its policy has been decided on,
its course is mapped out, its mission is in
the word of one of its greatest statesmen,
"To lead sia." This is an intelligible programme, there is no deception about it.
He who runs may read, and be who talks
exclusion without mastering its provisions is ill-equipped for the controversy.
The ambition of Japan is to stand on
International equality with tbe white
races. It admits no point of inferiority,
and is straining every nerve to gain ana
, maintain its forces. In military and naval
warfare it has established equality, if not
supremacy. Its victories in the sphere
of arms have been so brilliant as to dazzle
the onlooker, and confuse his judgment
with regard to the achievements of Japan
in other fields. A few facts carefully pondered will tend to correct any misconception on tbis point. The foundation of
all national prosperity is education, ancl
Japan is today the most highly educated
country in the world. It has 30,000 public
schools, 120,000 teachers, and 5,500,000
pupils. Last year over 1,000,000 pupils
graduated. No other country can approach these figures proportionately to its
population. When Canadians talk of an
inferior race, ancl when they consider tliat
a Japanese invasion is most to be feared
from the standpoint of labour, let them
recall tbe fact that the school attendance
of Japan is practically equal to the total
population of Cannda. Let them consider,
further, tbat thc English language is on
the curriculum of every public school, and
that the average Jap scholar is better
versed in mathematics than the Canadian
scholar in ordinary arithmetic. It should
also bo remembered that the Japanese
people are firm believers in higher education, tbat they have numerous universities for women, and that in all of those
the three primary subjects are domestic
science, Japanese literature, and English
literature. In the Japanese army, in time
of peace, are G,000 officers and 1,000,000
men; in tbe navy, 50,000 men. The navy
tonnage is 500,000, ancl tho tonnage of the
mercantile marine 1,000,000. The industries of Japan arc little understood outside
its borders. There are over 7,000 factories, the various industries employ the
following number of hands: Silk manufacture, 120,000; cotton, 80,000; shipbuildings ancl machinery, 28,000; weaving, 59,500; printing, 8,000; paper mills,
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
COMIIISSIOII MB
REAL ESTATE A6ERTS
fl FORT ST. VICTORIA, B. C.
WtJ.t I JXkXXASiSLiSXJLXXAl
Onb Dollak Pan Anno
6,000. In these the highest wage paid is
35 cents per day and the lowest 10 cents.
The average farm in Japan consists of
two acres, the value of its product is $60
per year, and on tbis sum a J ap will support himself and family. Several years
ago Japan commenced to build steamers
for export, and actually furnished a gunboat in the United States navy. In addition to the industries mentioned, sugar
raising, dyeing, papermaking, glass-blowing, lumbering, brickmaking, pottery, and
brewing are all firmly established and
nourishing. Japan bas an extensive anil
remarkable railway system, witb 5,000
miles in operation, although the empire
only contains 161,000 square miles and is
about the same size as California. To put
it another way: In one-twentieth tbe area
of tbe United States, Japan has a population of 50,000,000. In connection with
the subject of immigration there are two
significant facts. Tbe first is tbat Japan
retains control over all immigration into
the empire; the second is tbat while there
are only 3,000 white people in the wholo
of J apan there are 200,000 J aps in foreign
countries. Reverting for a moment to the
State railways, the skill of Japanese management is marvellously illustrated by the
following figures: Passengers curried last
year, 150,000,000; freight carried, 20,-
000,000 tons; gross earnings, $22,000,000;
expenses of operation, $10,000,000; profit, $12,000,000. What other country in
the world can show profits exceeding 50
per cent, of thc gross earnings of its railroads'. Notice how the Jap has imbibed
the principle of thrift and economy. Last
year there were 3,000,000 depositors in
the State Savings Bank, and the amount
of their deposits exceeded $20,000,000, a
sum equal to that saved by the Austrians,
ancl more than the savings of the Dutch
or the Swedes. Look at the Qovernment
finances, with an expenditure of $150,000,-
000 (double that of Canada), a trade value
of $250,000,000, a currency of $200,-
000,000, and a property valuation of six
billions. Little more than twenty years
ago Japan adopted popular representation
and a modern constitution; the British
model was copied exactly. In addition to
the House of Representatives, there is a
.House of Lords, consisting of Prince.-,
Marquises, Counts, Viscounts and Barons.
The people were divided into three grades,
and social status accorded in the following
proportions: Nobility, 4,600; gentry,
2,200,000, and common people, 42,000,-
000. With all this modern machinery, in
the adoption of whicli the Japanese havo
shown themselves to bc the greatest imitators the world bas known, let it not be
for a moment supposed that they are riot
governed hy something more powerful than
mere machinery. Their constitution rests
nn fundamental principles, among which
the strongest are "reverence to superiors,"
"self abnegation," and "an absolute conviction that the empire is familv." Such
uu example of solidarity, springing from
conviction and devotion, has rarely been
seen. Their policy has been well "described
as "Constitutional Imperialism." Japan
has slept for 250 years; it is now wide
awake. The people can, because they
think they can. They are awake not for
thc purpose of furnishing diggers and del-
vers for other lords of creation, but for the
purpose of becoming a governing and a
ruling race. Their competition in tho
labour market might occasion momentary
inconvenience, but it fades into insignificance in the light of tbe above facts and
of the infinitely profounclor conception
which they furnish of the ambition and
the policy of an awakened Japan.—Reprinted from Westward Ho!. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, i<)o8.
At The Street e)
Corner h
p               By THE LOUNOBR f
\[tt^/*lJ^/uS\t»t
Soon after the opening of the Empress Hotel I called attention to the
fact that the stack of the power house
was emitting volumes of heavy black
smoke. During the present week a
correspondent has complained to the
daily press of the same thing. It is a
pity that the management should require to have their attention called
to such a nuisance. The proprietors
of the hotel own the only Anthracite
coal mine in Canada. Anthracite is
a comparatively smokeless coal. The
mine is situate at Banff, the coal can
be delivered in Victoria, eliminating
merchants' profits, for less than the
price charged for Extension coal, and
there is, therefore, no reason why the
latter should be used. I feel sure the
management will take notice of this
complaint, which is now registered for
the second time, and will be willing to
mitigate the nuisance.
I should like to point out that what
with the black smoke from the Empress buildings and from the numerous vessels in James Bay, it will not
be many years before our beautiful
Parliament buildings will be blackened
and difigured unless the matter is taken in hand by the authorities in a
determined manner.
Whilst speaking of the Empress, I
must congratulate the manager on the
facilities afforded to the general public for afternoon tea. The palm room
is a delightful rendezvous, and thither the ladies flock in great numbers.
Every afternoon between four and six
the youth, beauty and fashion of Victoria may be seen. "Take tea with
me at the Empress" is a daily salutation. One thing, however, is, in my
humble judgment, a little out of place,
even in an up-to-date hotel; the other
afternoon I was lounging in the palm
room, in company with some lady and
gentlemen friends. We were partaking of the cup that cheers, and indulging in the inevitable small talk,
when with a start one of the members
of our party drew our attention to a
well-known society lady who had just
come in and sat down at a nearby
table. Whilst the waiter was fetching her tea, she produced a small hand
satchel, opened it and pulled out an
exquisite set of manicure instruments,
and proceeded forthwith to manicure
her nails. Now, this may be the latest thing in New York or Baltimore,
then again it may not, but in any case
I am satisfied that I shall have ceased
to lounge long before it becomes "au
regie" in Victoria. What surprised
me most was that the ladies who accompanied her seemed to take it as a
matter of course. My party made a
hasty exit, under terror of the thought
that she possibly travelled with her
chiropodist.
Last week I made some strictures
upon the provincial police for their
conduct of a matter in which Mr.
Willey figured. Several friends of
Sergeant Murray have complained of
my remarks, but as he has not done
so I conclude that he realizes the justice of the complaint and is willing to
allow judgment to go by default.. As
some of his friends question the accuracy of my report, I have asked the
editor to insert in the current issue
Mr. Willey's own signed statement,
which in no important particular differs from my complaint, although the
latter was written from memory. It
is because I have invariably stood up
for the provincial police and am jealous of their reputation, that I again
call attention to this case, and emphasize the importance of prompt action
without too much red tape, if the ends
of justice are to be attained.
I lounged into the police court on
Wednesday, when the case of the notorious Estella Carroll was disposed
of, and must confess that I was very
much disgusted. I do not set myself
up for a purist, and I have never yet
advocated the abolition of a certain
class of houses. But I did think that
the people running these houses were
perfectly well aware that the traffic is
barely tolerated by public opinion. All
thoughtful men realize that under the
most favourable conditions it is an
evil, the existence of which raises a
problem and arouses public sentiment whenever it becomes obtrusive.
This woman has been in Victoria for
some years; her business is notorious;
her counsel boldly declared in court
that she was worth twelve thousand
to fifteen thousand dollars. If this
statement meant anything, it meant
that because she had fleeced the city
for so long and had accumulated so
much money by detestable means, she
must be allowed to flout the police
and to defy the law.
I understand that she was warned
before fitting up the house in question
that she would not be allowed to use
it. In spite of this she persisted, with
the result that publicity has been
given to many disgraceful details and
a sidelight thrown upon the means by
which these houses accumulate their
ill-gotten gains. The whole story is
told by the case of the man Brewer,
who was charged up with fourteen
bottles of wine. Unless I am greatlv
mistaken, the publicity given to this
case will lead to an investigation as to
the amount of liquor consumed in
these unlicensed houses and by what
right that branch of their business is
permitted to continue.
Whilst on this subject, I wish to
call the attention of the police to the
growing custom of women of loose
character and their companions of
rendering night hideous by racing
through our streets at lightning speed
during the small hours. This traffic is
a constant one between the city and
the suburbs, and is not only an annoyance to quiet residents but a danger to
decent people returning from the
country late at night. Within a week
I have had two narrow escapes of almost certain death from autos containing a party of this character which
overtook me in the Esquimalt district.
In each case the auto was travelling
at a greater speed than 30 miles an
hour and passed within a few inches
of my team. I hope the fact that I
have criticised the provincial police in
another matter will not disincline
them to protect me in this even if I
am only an inconsequent
q£
tTe^-f&r,
Preferred Cash.
'Mr. Heavyweight," said the minister, "is willing to subscribe $10,000
for a new church, provided we can
get other subscriptions making up the
same amount."
"Yet you seem disappointed," said
his wife.
"Yes, I was in hopes he would contribute $100 in cash."
One Woman's Wisdom.
Her Husband—My dear, how did
you happen to employ such a pretty
nurse-girl?
His Wife—I didn't happen to do
it. I did it because I wanted the
children to have police protection
when they are in the park or on the
street.
Agreed With Him.
Parishioner (a little the worse for
liquor)—J hearzh you preazh las'
night.
New Minister—You didn't heat
much, I fancy.
Parishioner—Thaz what (hie) I
thought myself.
Knew His Advantage.
"Why not set your cap for that
young fellow? He's single and well
off?"
"Yes; he's single, but he knows he's
well off."
Always Absent.
Quizzem—To what religious denomination do you belong?
Stayaway—I'm a seventh-day ab-
sentist.
The Merchants Bank
'of Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fully paid $6,000,000
Reserve Funds   4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
ARE YOU
COUGHING
YET????
It is unwise to let a Cough run
on, for frequent coughing naturally increases the irritation in
the bronchial passages. If you
are wondering what to take,
suppose you try
BOWES'
BRONCHIAL BALSAM
It has relieved others and will
relieve you. We do not say it
will cure your cough in one
night, but a few days' use will
cure a long-standing hoarseness,
croup or bronchial cough. Recommended in all throat and
lung troubles, asthma, whooping cough, etc. Per bottle, 50c
only, at this store.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
(^imf*^*******^****^!/****^
"The world is full of stumbling
blocks for those who try."
"And tumbling stocks for those
who buy."
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
$27.50, $80, $B5.
ALLEN & CO.
Fit=Reform Wardrobe
Victoria, B. C. '
SEEDS, TREES, PLANTS,
for the farm, garden, lawn, boulevard or conservatory. Acclimatised
stock. Oldest established nursery on
the Mainland.   Catalogue free.
M.  J.  HENRY
3010 Westminster Road,  Vancouver
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
BREWERS OF
ENGLISH ALE AND STOUT
The Highest Grade Malt and Hops Used in Manufacture.
PHONE 893. VICTORIA
BEST
WHY   NOT   HAVE   THE
THE REPUTATION OF
James Buchanan & Co'sSCOTCH   WHISKIES
Is world-wide, and stands for the BEST that can be produced.
The following brands are for sale by all the leading dealers:
RED SEAL BLACK AND WHITE
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD      VERY OLD LIQUEUR SCOTCH
RADIGER & JANION, Sole Agents for B.C.
By Appointment to H. M. the King.
A REVOLUTION IN FRUIT CULTURE.
V FLUID
The Winter Spray-Fluid kills the eggs of insects and mites
and the spores of Fungi.
V2 FLUID
The Summer Spray-Fluid is deadly to Aphis, Psylla, and Scale
Insects, and does not injure leaf or blossom. One spraying a year
with each fluid is quite sufficient. These fluids mix easily with
cold water and without any sediment. They are not injurious to
skin or clothes.
Manufactured by
WM. COOPER & NEPHEWS
BERKHAMSTED,  ENGLAND.
Sole Agents for British Columbia.
e. g. prior st ee..
LTD.
LTY.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Send for free booklet, "The Spraying of Fruit Trees," which gives
full particulars of these wonderful insecticides.
Established 1867
B. C. Funeral Furnishing Co.
52 Qovernment St., Victoria, B. C,
Charles Hayward, President F. Caselton, Manager.
We make a specialty ot Undertaking and Embalming,
An experienced certificated staff available at all times, day
and night.
Phones Nos. 48, 30S, 404 or S94, Victoria.
Investigate the
"Cushman" flarine flotor
As good as the best.   Cheaper than the rest.
BAXTER & JOHNSON 811 Government Street
Victoria, B. C.
You can always      __.      ^    It tastes different
tell an M. B. cigar _y\%   \_\%     than others.
Union Made. (tBI fl 21 f*
Havana Filler.      WI*|C1I
Made by S. A. Bantly, Victoria, B. C.
Two Sizes.
Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908
'porting
Comment.
The followers of association foot-
Iball in this city were considerably surprised on Saturday last by the line-up
[of both the Ladysmith and Y.M.C.A.
I teams.    Both had been strengthened,
I in fact it was the strongest aggregation that has represented these clubs
I this season.   Since the last appearance
I of the Ladysmith team they have added   three   players   to   their   line-up,
which   assisted   them   materially   in
winning the match.    It was a  great
surprise to everyone to see  Provins
and   Wynne,   late of   Seattle, along
with    Hartley,   of   Vancouver,   and
Clegg, of this city, in the line-up of
the   Ladysmith  team,  while  for  the
Y.M.C.A.  Schwengers made his initial appearance for the season.   With
t both teams strengthened, it was  expected that the game would be very
teresting, but this was far from being
the case, as it was very listless from
start to finish.   The Ladysmith club
is strengthening their team in view of
their match against Nanaimo, the re-
| suit of which will have a great effect
on the Island championship, and it is
I understood that a further addition will
be made before this game is played.
This is importing players on a large
scale, and the question is now being
asked, "Where will it stop?"   I can-
I not blame the   Ladysmith   club   for
[their action, as they refrained from
j doing this until the league practically
[gave it their sanction.   They objected
[to the practice and brought it before
[the league, but they were not support-
led.   At that time only two teams were
[playing outside players, and the Lady-
Ismith team objected, but these teams
[did  not realize that more  than  one
I could play this game and continued to
[play  their   players   on   whom  they
[placed great reliance.   Given the opin-
Jion of the League, the Ladysmith club
I did not wait long before they got busy
I and now some of the teams that startled the practice are wishing they had
Isided with Ladysmith. Personally, I
lam strongly opposed to the practice,
land I congratulate the Esquimalt and
IJ.B.A.A. teams on their decision to go
hrough the season without playing
(these outsiders. It is all very well to
lallow professionals and amateurs to
Iplay together, but the result of this
(importation of players can but have
lonly one effect, and in time it will cer-
Itainly kill the game on the Island.   As
II have already stated, these players
Idid not show much improvement over
Ithose left off, and the Ladysmith team
Iwill have to play a much better game
■against Nanaimo than they did against
lthe Y.M.C.A., if they expect to retain
Itheir present title. The alterations on
lthe Y.M.C.A. team only benefited the
Iteam in goal, where B. White played a
lremarkable game. On his showing of
(Saturday, he has the makings of a true
■goalkeeper, and if he decides to con-
Itinue in this position he will be hard
Ito beat with a little experience. The
[other changes were miserable failures.
[While these teams were battling for
[supremacy, the Esquimalt and Bays
[were fighting for honors, which were
[won by the former in a most decided
[manner.    The result of these games
places the Y.M.C.A. and Bays a tie for
last place, and it will be for them to
I fight   it   out   to   see   who   ends   the
I league leading at the wrong end.
of the season will be played this afternoon at Vancouver, when the All-
Island aggregation will try conclusions with the best from the Mainland.
This should be a good game, and I
am sorry that the game will not be
played here, but we had our turn last
year, and if football is to be encouraged, everyone must have their turn.
The result of this match will be
watched with interest by all lovers of
soccer in the Province, but I venture
to say that the Mainland supporters
will not be as jubilant after the game
as the Islanders.
The cricketers of this city have a
hard proposition to face this season in
the handling of the annual tournament, and it is up to every devotee of
the game to get together and form
some plan under which the visitors
may be entertained. This is an important matter, and one that should
not be overlooked. I learn that a
meeting has already been called to
discuss the question, and I hope ther-
will be a large attendance. It requires
considerable of the wherewithal to
carry out a project of this magnitude,
and it is hoped that the lovers of the
game who are able will not be backward in coming forward.
UMPIRE.
I music and      J
I   The Drama. J
Antony and Cleopatra.
On Saturday night last Mr. Hanford paid a farewell visit to the Victoria Theatre and distinguished himself as usual in a modern farcical
comedy, entitled Antony and Cleopatra. It is understood in future Mr.
Hanford will confine himself to such
parts as the* Wrestler in "As You
Like It," and the Executioner in
" 'Twixt Axe and Crown."
Dream City.
A moderate-sized audience had a
thoroughly enjoyable time at the Victoria Theatre on Tuesday night, when
"Dream City" was presented. This is
an up-to-date, typical American musical comedy, boisterous and farcical,
but one of the best of its kind that
has ever been seen in Victoria. Little
Chip and Mary Marble are artists in
their line, and kept the audience in
continuous roars of laughter. The
latter's song, "I Shall Never Be a
Lady," was the most amusing and
best rendered. Although not very
high class, the show achieved a success which more pretentious ones
might envy, in that it was full of fun
from start to finish and kept the audience in good humour.
I am pleased to see that the Kelow-
I na team is billed to meet the Bays at
I Oak Bay this afternoon.   It is saying
I much for football when a team will
[travel the distance that this aggregation is doing, and I hope that it is
[only the forerunner.   I am very sorry,
[however, that their trip was not post-
Iponed for a month in order that they
|might have have had the honour  of
competing for the People's Shield.   If
(this had been arranged, it would have
brought all parts of the Province into
[the   competition,  and  it  would  also
have shown that British Columbia is
(fully alive when it comes to association football, and not dead as some of
ie players in the Prairie Provinces
■/ould^Ijjid people to believe.
One of the most important games
New Grand.
A sensational feature on a big bill
of nine numbers arranged for next
week will be the original Young Buffalo, in a wonderful sharp-shooting
act. He is assisted by Mlle. Vera,
and among the feats are the shooting
out of the five lighted points in a star,
the breaking of small balls arranged
in a circle close around Mile. Vera's
face, and the severing of the bonds
that hold her robe at each shoulder
and at the waist, so that it drops off,
the shooting being done from back in
the audience. The O'Neill trio have
a good musical sketch; Miss Gladys
Van is a dainty soubrette, who has
made a hit all along the circuit; Signor Dominicus is a world-renowned
cornetist, lately with Marco Vessella s
band; Brooks and Jeanette will appear in a singing and talking sketch
they call Fluffy Ruffles and Spoony
Sam; Lottie Meaney & Co. will present "The Bowery Bud"; Thos. J.
Price will sing the illustrated song,
"That's What the Rose Said to Me";
new moving pictures are entitled "The
Witch's Kiss" and "The Bellboy's Revenge," and the orchestra will play
"The Pilgrim's Chorus," from Tannhauser, as an overture.
IT
"Westward Ho!" for March is distinctly a Horse Show number with
its unique three-colour cover design,
its  sixteen   pages   of  cuts   done   in
Are You Interested        O
in Foreign Countries •
If so, Read the March Issue of
WEJTWdRb HO!
MORoee©
^
Besides a Splendidly Illustrated Section of Vancouver's
First Horse Show there is much entertainment
and Instruction to be found in the
following; table of contents :
COVER DESIGN    Dominion  Publishing Association.
EDITORIAL	
A  DEAL  IN  HEIFERS Prank  Dllnot
Story.
AT THE SHACK   Percy Flage
Literary Causerie.
THE ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD Godfrey  Chealander
Article.
HER LITTLE HAND  	
Poem.
MEN I HAVE MET—Hon. W. S. Fielding W.  Blakemore
VANCOUVER'S HORSE SHOW  D. Thomas Tees
Letter.
MOROCCO    L. McLeod Gould
Article.
CANADIAN RIFLE  CLUBS Bonnycastle  Dale
Article.
THE TWO WIDOW DOOLANS C. Dell  Smith
Story.
SHAKMUT    Clive  Phillipps-Wolley
Serial Story.
IN THE STUDIO  A.  V.  Kenah
Photography.
REVERIES OF AN OLD COIN  Henry Morey
Story.
A VOICE FROM THE CITY De Courcy C. Ireland
Poem.
THE THIEF     Billee Glynn
Story.
THE LILY SHRINE Blanche E. H. Murison
Poem.
1
"OUR BOY"   R. Thompson-Tinn
Story.
A SONG OF THE SPIRE R. Rambler
A. Reminiscence.
COUNTRY AND SUBURBAN HOMES E.  Stanley Mitton
THE AFFAIR AT SAN HUECA   John Haslette
Story.
TO EXPENSE—A Widow  Howland  Hoadley
Story.
PROGRESS AND PROFITS  	
Article.
THE NEW PAPER MILL 	
PRICE 10c. A COPY.        -        $1.00 A YEAR.
royal purple and even the advertisers
have taken advantage of the occasion
to "boost" Vancouver's big social
event. There are several clever
stories, including the continuation of
"Shakmut," a powerful serial by Clive
Phillipps-Wolley, which is one of the
finest pieces of fiction from the pen
of that gifted writer. In his department "Men I Have Met," the Editor
this month has a sketch of Hon. W.
S. Fielding. L. McLeod Gould contributes an interesting article on
Morocco which is beautifully illustrated. "The Two Widow Doolans"
is a most laughable yarn, by C. Dell
Smith of the Victoria Times, and
Henry Morey of New Westminster
contributes a delightful story, "Reveries of an Old Coin." The departments of "Country and Suburban
Homes," "In the  Studio" and "Pro
gress and Profits" arc well maintained.
Altogether the March issue is by far
the best yet attempted by the enterprising publishers.
TO HOMESEEKERS.
Where It Belongs.
"Excuse me," said the playwright
to his friend who was hissing the
piece, "do you think it is good form
to hiss my show when I gave you the
ticket that admitted you?"
"Certainly," resentfully replied the
friend. "If I'd bought a ticket I
would havc contented myself by going outside and swearing at myself."
Wife—"Was thc chauffeur sad because you discharged him?"
Husband—Oh, no. Hc said while
he was with me he spent most of
his time in jail, anyway."
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by excellent road. About 20
acres fenced, in acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft,
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale. $2,000, terms
to suit.    Box 162, Victorin.
MAPS  OF  TIMBER AND  LAND
The   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric   Blue   Print   and   Map   Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C. THB WBBK, SATUM)AY MARCH 7, 1908
Incorporated 1MI
Capital, IStO.e-SMe
Capital lncreaaed
IS   ,0.Vm. MM.|
Subscribed
Capital,    $K»
Beaerre . . »M.»«|
Surplua, to J». d
nr closing up estates
either as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy Is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor In
your will. Blank will forma furnished free of charge and stored
In our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Limited.
338 Hastings St, West
Vancouver, B. C.
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
"1 HE WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
83M Government Street...Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.. ..Vancouver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manaeer and Editor
Saint David.
It was a jovial party which gathered at the Driard Hotel, Victoria, on
Monday evening last, to celebrate the
anniversary of St. David, the patron
saint of Wales. Fifty jovial Welshmen gathered round the festive board,
and two or three less-favoured mortals, including Bohemian, were permitted to look 011.
It was a good-humoured gathering,
the feast was worthy of the occasion,
the music was such as Welshmen only
could furnish, and the speeches were
brief, pithy and pointed. David Spencer, the respected senior of the well-
known firm bearing his name, born in
Cowbridge, presided, and did so with
kindliness and dignity. On his right
hand was a Cariboo veteran, 85 years
of age, well known and highly respected in Victoria, I refer to Mr.
John; he was'by no means the least
energetic of the party and favoured
the company with a brief speech.
At the cross table sat Dr. Owen
Meredith Jones, who hails from Carmarthen, and who has achieved a reputation and position in the country
of his adoption of which even a
Welshman may be proud. Near to
him sat Dr. Leader, from Cardiff, who
assisted Dr. Jones last summer, and
is now supplying for Dr. Hazel at the
Jubilee Hospital. On his right was
Mr. Llewellyn Wood, a modest
Welshman, whose knowledge of
yachting is as extensive as it is unique. On the left of the chairman was
the popular American consul, Mr.
Abraham Smith, who delivered a very
happy speech, proving that he has
more than a nodding acquaintance
with Welsh history, and that he has
inherited a strain of diplomatic skill
which any politician might envy.
The gathering would have been incomplete without the gentleman who
sat to the extreme left of the speaker. I refer to Parker Williams, the
respected member for Newcastle district, who hails from Treorky. Whatever may be thought of Mr. Williams'
Socialist views, no one can deny that
he is a most genial companion, with a
distinct vein of humour, and a bon-
hommie which is irresistible. If Mr.
Williams had not been born a Welshman, hc would have been an Irishman; as it is, he is probably the most
typical Welshman in the Province.
Of   course,   the   ceremony   would
have been incomplete without the contribution of Stewart Williams, who,
equally of course, is a thorough
Welshman. It would not be fair to
overlook the splendid work of the
musical contingent. Foremost among
these was Mr. Petch, who, in spite of
the fact that he has sons singing in
public, still retains a beautiful tenor
voice, which he uses with excellent
effect. Mr. Grant, whom I have spoken of beforetime as one of the best
singers in Victoria, sang several selections in excellent style. The same
may be said of Mr. Evans, who has
a beautiful light tenor voice.
Mr. Morgan, who is a recent arrival
in the city, proved himself to be an
efficient M. C. He not only organized
the celebration, but stage-managed it,
played all the musical accompaniments, and finally sang, to the delight of the audience. He has a rich
baritone voice, and is an accomplished
musician.
The celebration was one calculated
to cause an Englishman several sober
reflections. He had to be reminded
that Wales had never been conquered,
that the Welsh language had been
handed down from generation to generation in all its pristine purity, whils*
English had passed through so many
changes that the language of Tennyson and Swinburne could hardly be
recognized as that of Spenser and
Chaucer. He had to be reminded, also,
that while the patron saint of England, St. George, was a mythological
hero, destroying a mythological dragon, in order to rescue a mythological
maiden, the patron saint of Wales, St.
David, was a man, born of respectable
parents, who founded a monastery,
filled important public positions, was
buried in his native church, and enshrined in the cathedral city of his
name.
When it came to a question of
natural beauty, there was not one
Welshman present who did not claim
that the glorious mountain scenery of
the little Principality was the finest
in the world. Mounts Stephen and
Hector might be bigger than Snow-
don or Cader Idris, but they were neither more magnificent nor more impressive, and in none of the valleys of
British Columbia is a lovelier panorama unfolded than in the Pass of
Llanberris or in the Vale of Llangollen or Beddgelert.
When it came to industrial development, the Englishman again had to
take a back seat. He had to swallow
the more or less unpalatable fact that,
with the single exception of London,
Cardiff is the greatest seaport in the
world, and that in respect of coal tonnage it is unapproached by any other.
Even the jubilant American consul,
waving his Stars and Stripes, had to
accept the gentle reminder that the
great American naval fleet would
never have been able to visit the Pacific Coast but for Welsh steam coal.
It would, indeed, be hard to find in
any part of the civilized world a little
country containing less than 10,000
square miles, with a population of 2,-
000,000 people, and an industrial development that would begin to compare with that of Wales.
But the Welshman has a soul above
materialism, and while he has developed his natural resources in a marvellous manner, he has retained his
Celtic fervour and his innate love of
art. As musicians, the Welsh are unexcelled; in the possession of rich,
musical voices they have no competitors, they sing at their daily avocations, whether it be in the mine, the
mill, or the field. Their annual Eisted-
fodds are unapproached as evidences
of popular culture in art, literature,
and music.
Last, and by no means least, Wales
has always produced great men, patriots, soldiers, statesmen. As long as
there is a British army, and as long
as its records are preserved, men will
turn to the page of history which tells
again and again of the achievements
of the Welsh Fusiliers. As long as
hero worship lasts in this world, men
will be proud to recall the glorious
career of the little Welsh general who
has distinguished himself in every
part of the world, and whose name is
identified with the great wars of tin:
Empire for the last half century—
Bobs.
One enthusiastic Welshman wound
up with the prediction that Wales
would furnish the next Liberal Pr:cue
Minister, in David Lloyd George; and
who will venture to say that he i«
wrong? It was a privilege to be a
Welshman for one night. I doff my
hat to Taffy and his Patron Saint.
Departmental Circular.
Post Office Dept., Canada,
Ottawa, February, 1908.
Publishers of legitimate newspapers
and periodicals issued less frequently than daily are informed that the
United States will permit the posting
in that country of Canadian newspapers and periodicals addressed to
bona fide subscribers upon prepayment of postage at the one-cent per
pound rate. Publishers to obtain this
postal privilege for their publications
must make application at the United
States post office at which they desire
to mail. Memorandum giving information as to mode of procedure in
making this application is enclosed
herewith.
Deputy Postmaster General.
R. M. COULTER,
Information and Suggestions for Canadian Publishers Who Desire to
Post Their Papers in the
United States.
(February, 1908)
Canadian publishers desiring to obtain United States postal privileges
must make application for the admission of their publications to the
United States mail through the Postmaster at the place where entry is desired, submitting two complete copies
of the publication accompanied by a
declaration executed on a form that
will be provided by the Postmaster of
the office of entry. Further instructions to the* publisher as to proper
procedure will be found on the form
in question.
Should the publisher's application
bc granted the Postmaster at the
United States Office of entry will
issue a certificate on the form furnished by the lost Office Department
of the United States for that pur-
ficate the publisher is required to
print upon each copy of the publication  so  entered  the words:
"Entered..(date)..at the Post Office at..(name of office of entry)..as
second class matter under Act of
March 3rd, 1879."
When the Canadian publisher, after
entry at a United States Post Office
has been authorized, desires to post
without employing an intermediary
agent, it is suggested that he forward his mailings to the United States
Postmaster either by express or
freight, charges prepaid, the consignments to be addressed;
Postmaster at 	
(name of office of entry)
Contains copies of	
(name of publication)
Date of issue 190...
If such method is adopted it will be
necesasry that the publisher make
such arrangements for the payment
of the postage as wil! be satisfactory
to the Postmaster at the office of entry in the United States, depositing
with the United States Postmaster a
sum of money to cover postage and
renewing this amount from time to
time, or remitting with each shipment, or making such other financial
arrangement as may be permitted.
CORRESPONDENCE
W. H. Hayward, Esq., M.P.P.,
Victoria.
Dear Sir:
Referring to your telephone of yesterday regarding reported starvation
on Mt. Sicker, I beg to report as
follows:
This morning I drove to Mt. Sicker
and made personal canvas of the few
families that are at present living on
the mountain, and find there are ten
families on the mountain. The heads
of these with the exception of three,
all have employment, these three being men of means and not obliged to
work for a livelihood.
A FEW FACTS ABOUT
OUR FACTORY.
In our large manufacturing department there is every possible
facility for the turning out of work promptly and well. The
presses and various heavy tools are all of the most modern
description, while electricity furnishes the motive power. We melt
and refine our own gold from the raw material. See small display
in our soutli window. Here you will also find a photograph of a
busy corner where cunning workmen with deft fingers shape rings,
bracelets and every imaginary kind of trinket. A large corps of
competent designers, jewelers, enamelers and engravers is
constantly employed. None but the most expert workmen mount
our gems; our settings are therefore invariably appropriate and
tasteful.
We buy Diamonds in large quantities direct from
the cutters and mount them in our own factory;
thus we eliminate all middlemen's profits,—you
buy at first cost here.
Our diamond settings would do credit to any large Eastern or
European house. We have a special department for jewelry
repairing; the remodelling of family jewels is a specialty; this
work is always executed with great care and dispatch.
We make to order any article of jewelry.
Designs and estimates furnished on application.
SovtS! VICTORIA.
il-
Victor-Berliner
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
foil orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance! How you could
dance to such  music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone  in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.    No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
^-w__-_-_---__w_m---------m---______\ entertainment of every kind
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in your
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
The world's foremost   uayers and singers make Victor
v Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone
\'-^v plays them as no other instrument can.
Gc lo any Victor or Berliner dealer's and hear
\1»9.   _, «-/^». Gc to any ncior 1
\ \ 'l\ these wonderful instruments.    Ask him to
v       _*c *-**J<\ «P*a-nth-eW-P*>yiM'>tplin.
\     v_ °.._^\ Write us on  the coupon for   catalogue
\    '*V-7i\X aud full Information.
The Berliner 6ram-«-pbora
, _X Company oi Canada, Ui
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■MTttlL   606
The residents of the mountain wish
me to extend to the Government their
thanks for the prompt action taken
on their behalf, and to state that there
is no one in need in the neighbourhood.
I am sir, Yours obediently,
ALFRED THOMAS,
Govt. Agent.
The Wrong One.
"You say you wish to marry my
daughter. But she is only a mere
school-girl as yet."
Count Nocash—"I understand that,
sir, I came early to avoid the rush.''
Mr. Gunson took two cigars fron
his pocket, carefully selected one an<]
handed the other to his guest.
"Fine  cigars,"  he  remarked,  strikj
ing a match.    "Two for a quarter.'
The guest puffed a light into hi. I
cigar and blew a cloud of smoke int.
i the air.
"Two for a quarter?" he <$ked.
"Yes," replied Mr. Gunsoftjlf^roudl
ly-
"Sorry I didn't get the twenty-cenj
one," remarked the guest. THE WEfiK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
i?i?i?ifififi?i?i?ifi?i>$
* Short Story *
POLITICS  AND   THE  GROCER.
By H. C. BAILEY.
This is a story of a suburb. Of
which suburb I do not intend to say,
because I have still some friends
there. Think of the perfect suburb.
It is also a story of the higher politics—of the causes of portents and
the mysterious forces which have
made our British Empire the quaint
thing it is.
The story requires you to give all
your sympathy to one political party.
Which is rather original of the story.
But you will have no difficulty with
your sympathy. For the political
party requiring it is the Sensible
Party, and that everyone knows is his
own.
There was distress in the headquarters of the Sensible Party. The Suburb had misbehaved itself. For a
decade and a half the Suburb had
always returned a Sensible to Parliament. But now, at a by-election,
the Suburb had disgusted half England and delighted half and amazed
the whole by returning an Insensible.
So at the headquarters of the Sensible
Party two or three gentlemen who
knew a good deal about politics and
believed in them very little, asked
each other what was the matter with
the Suburb, and what ought to be
done to it. With one voice and with
one cry they condemned the virtue of
the suburban leaders of their party.
"They're too respectable to live,''
said Dr. Ferguson-Smyth.
"We'll send them Edale," said Colonel Cholmondeley.
Not   even   his   enemies   have   ever
said  that Lord Edale is respectable.
He is young.   And probably one cannot bc both.    If you forget his size
—which   is   difficult—and   his   moustache—which is easier—he looks like
a pleasant schoolboy asleep.    Tliere
is no reason to believe that he will
■ ever be old.   His father, the Earl of
Castleton,  now  nearing sixty  and a
[grandfather twice over, often makes
Ihis daughters    despair    of   his ever
[growing up.   As for Lady Castleton,
Edale's mother, even Edale finds that
(she makes him feel fatherly.    There
lis, in fact, a taint in the family, the
I taint of enduring youth.
But they did not know that in the
(Suburb; the Suburb only knew that
1 Edale was the son of thirty-three
I earls, and took him as one takes a
I puppy, on account of his pedigree.
] He did not seem very intelligent, but
lthe Suburb did not expect that. You
I cannot have everything. So when
I Edale presented himself to the Sen-
|sibles of the Suburb, they chose him
as their candidate without dispute, but
Iwithout enthusiasm.
Mrs.  Graham   Rawson  would  not
lliave allowed them   to   indulge    in
■-either.   You may ask what Mrs. Gra-
lham Rawson had to do with it, but
Ithat is merely because you have not
Lived  in the  Suburb.    She was the
(wife of the chairman of the Sensible
j Party, and he knew it, and the party
knew it, singularly well.   No one ever
I dared   to   like   her,   but   many   have
feared her.   Within the Sensible Party
she  reigned supreme.    Some people
have wondered at her power. For she
lis not richer than her neighbours; she
lean never have been good to look at.
iThere is no reason to suppose that
Ishe has an intellect.   But she believes
lin herself intensely.   She is by nature
Itinable to   conceive   that   she could
luake a mistake, or that anyone but
lierself deserves consideration.    Th;
Consequence is great ability in being
(tide.    She regards  the world as a
ulgar place,   inhabited   by   her interiors.   People better off than herself
lhe considers not respectable.   People
Ivorse off she calls the lower classes.
'eople of about her own income she
patronises or bullies.    She comes of
hue  of lhe oldest  families  in  Clap-
| am. _^^L
Anflj V you will readily underhand wny she was the ruler of the
I'.ensible Party, and the Suburb elected an Insensible by a large majority.
So now I will begin the story.
Mrs. Graham Rawson, when she
allowed the party to choose Edale as
its candidate, knew little more of him
than you will find in Burke. She had
him to dinner ou approval, and Edale
opened his mouth only to eat and
drink. This commended him to Mrs.
Graham Rawson, who is interested in
no conversation but her own. Edale
has since explained that he was
afraid to speak, for fear he should
scream.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson gave
the party her conge d'elire, and Edale
was chosen as the Sensible candidate,
and Mr. and Mrs. Graham Rawson
held a reception ("Evening Dress to
meet Lord Edale") in the Alexandra
Hall.
Behold yourself now in the Alexandra Hall. It is like many halls in
many suburbs. Virulent draughts
come from all points of the compass.
The pa;nt on the walls appears to suffer from some disease. There is a
stage at one end with battered footlights and diseased palms and a curtain painted with the kind of landscape you see in a nightmare. On the
floor of the hall are assembled the
Sensibles of the Suburb, the Sensible
wives and daughters. With all humility we approach Mrs. Graham Raw-
son. Mrs. Graham Rawson is massive. On her head is a tower of frizzy
hair and some jewels. Her dress is
brocade in a large pattern of yellow
and black. The impression she gives
you is—size.
The thin man, looking exhausted,
behind her is, of course, her husband.
The tall man on her left, with
straw-coloured hair and a straight,
straw-coloured moustache, and eyes
more than half shut, is Lord Edale.
But Edale was looking out of his
eyes. He was observing the manners
and customs of Mrs. Graham Raw-
son. With most of her guests she
shook hands in a way that suggested
doubt of their personal cleanliness or
suspicion that they suffered from contagious disease. To most of them she
said no more than four words in the
sort of voice you hear from the telephone. But to a select few she was
almost polite. A select few were presented to Edale.
The few and the many remained
permanently separate. Around Mrs.
Graham Rawson gathered the few—
the superior people. Afar off herded
the many. The few people stared at
the many; the many eyed thc few furtively. Edale began to understand
why the Suburb as a whole was not
anxious to belong to the Sensible
Party.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson received a shock. "Mrs. Rawson," said
a voice. She shuddered. Not for
many years had anyone dared to omit
the Graham. She glared. "Mrs.
Rawson," said Edale, placidly, "don't
you  think  if we  did  a  little  mixin'
 ?"    He  indicated with  nods  the
many and the few.
Mrs. Graham Rawson frowned at
him, then frowned at the many.
"Those, Lord Edale, are the tradespeople," she said, severely.
"Awfully good of you to let them
come in at the front door," Edale
drawled. "I say, they look almost
human."
"Tradespeople and others of the
lower classes," Mrs. Graham Rawson,
impervious, continued; "wc receive
them on these occasions, but, of
course, they appreciate their position,
and "
"What an exhilaratin' time they
must have!" Edale drawled.
Mrs. Graham Rawson frowned at
the interruption. "—-and," she continued with emphasis, "they do not
attempt to mix with my friends."
Even as the words left her lips, her
extensive face darkened. "Kindly tell
my daughter to come to me at once!"
she snapped.
Edale opened his eyes. "Is your
daughter like you?" he asked, amiably.
Mrs. Graham Rawson stared. "Oh,
of course. She was away when you
dined with me. There she is—talking," the outraged mother gasped—
"talking to the grocer."
"I'm ashamed to say I don't know
a grocer when I see one," Edale
drawled.
"The young man by the wall in a
white waistcoat.    She is in white."
Edale saw a girl of lithe, light
form, of delicate, pale face. "Is that
really your daughter?" he asked.
"Lord Edale!"
"I beg pardon, I beg pardon. Of
course you must know best."
"She is considered like my husband."
"Eh? Oh, yes. Yes, of course. I
forgot your husband."
Mrs. Graham Rawson made the
sound which in lower animals is called a snort. "Kindly send her to me,"
she snapped.
Edale strolled across the hall. The
girl in white and her grocer seemed
to him quite happy. He stopped and
made friends with some of the "lower
classes." Mrs. Graham Rawson
glared. Edale ultimately attained to
the grocer, "I have to introduce myself," said he, bowing. "The fact is,
Miss Graham Rawson, your mother
asked me to send you to her; but
there's no reason why you should
go."
"Oh!"—the girl blushed painfully
—"oh! yes, I—I—thank you—I must
go."
"She could really get on quite well
without you," Edale drawled, "if you
weren't so visible." He turned a
humorous eye to her grocer.
"I must go. Good-bye, I—Mr.
Mr. Knight, good-bye!" she fled.
Mr. Knight looked after her, and
Edale looked at Mr. Knight. "Sorry,"
said Edale.
"Thanks," said Mr. Knight .gruffly,
and turned on his heel.
"I'm afraid I've lost a vote," said
Edale to himself, lie meandered for
a while among the "lower classes,"
and at last, approaching the outskirts
of the superior people, came upon
something that could not be passed.
A piquant face of strawberry and
cream—a face with short nose and
short upper lip, and a strong little
chin, a round creamy neck and brown
hair glistening with gold, a little form
of joyous curves. "I'm sure I've been
introduce dto you," said Edale.
Brown eyes smiled. "You're mistaking me for my father, Lord Edale,"
said this delectable girl.
"I am," said Edale. "Please introduce me to your daughter." She gave
a little, low laugh and held out her
hand. Edale annexed that. "I didn't
catch your name," he suggested.
"Of course, my name is the same as
my father's."
"As yet," Edale admitted. "But not
your Christian name?"
"Aren't you a little expeditious,
Lord Edale?"
1 "It is pleasanter to go slow sometimes, isn't it? I like lingerin' over
makin'  friends  and—other things."
"I think we had better linger. Here
is my father." A pleasant, plump little man approached. "Now, will you
mistake him for me?"
"No. I don't know how to talk to
daughters. He shall be a father to
me, too."
She looked away from him with a
laugh in her eyes. "Well, Nancy,'
said her father, arriving, "who ar':
you making fun of now?"
"I think it was me," said Edale,
modestly.
"Ah, well, you mustn't mind Nancy,
my lord."
Edale smiled upon Nancy with benevolence. "I don't," hc assured her.
"Papa wants to talk about politics,
not me, Lord Edale." ,
Edale sighed. "Well, my lord,"
said Nancy's father, "I'm thc secretary of the party, and -"
"You will see a great deal of mc,
sir," said Edale, with an eye upon
Nancy,
"Honoured, my lord, I'm sure."
The little man was much pleased.
"May I ask what you think of our
party now?"
Edale's eyelids fell again. Again
he looked asleep. "It's too respectable by heaps," he drawled.
The little man stared up at him.
Nancy, too, looked up with interest.
"Between ourselves, my lord," said
the little man, "between ourselves—I
can't say you're wrong. But I hope
you'll make plenty of friends."
"The first thing I'll have to dn is to
make some enemies," Edale drawled.
The little man gasped.   Then Edale
engaged  him  to  dine,  and departed.
(Continued on  Page  Eight)
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
ST. ANDREWS
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Kasldealial aad Day School ior Roys
Handsome New Buildings. Larg"
Athletic Field. Careful Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A.,LL.D>
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-dst. itylM.  Eitlmat.a aid
denlgns furnished.
HOLLY TREES
Priew frew of 6tn4t te |fc.e% Meer-slng
to tin Write fer seed mt tret eata-
hft
JAY ft CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
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TIOTOBIA, B. O.
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
]
VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The borne oi all theatrical aad rauder Ue
artist, while in the Capital city, all. of
other kindred bohemlans.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Pra-yrletor*.
CAMBORNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMBORNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff's Most Popular Ja a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur*
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
N«w. Modern hot water ly.tem. Bleetrk
lighted. Tub aad shower baths and laundry la
connection.  The miners' heme.
•• DANNY " DEANE, Proprietor
BOSSLAND
Hoffman House
R05SLAND, B. C.
Rates $1.00 per day and up.   Cafe in
Connection.
GREEN & sniTM. Prop's.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,   B.C.
Leading Hotel of the Kaettntfl.
J. FRED HUME, Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NELSON. B. C.
Th* home of the Industrial Workers
of the Koot.najs.
W. E. HcCandllsh,     -     Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The Best Family Hotel in tha City.
tl.HO ii day.
Mm. Wm. Roberta,       Proprletraee
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write for "Home List" and
information.
R.   8.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOOOS
Realty Brokers.
620 BOBT BTBBBT      II     TIOTOBIA.
TBOMAB OATTBBAU
BmlUe* ana •eawal O.ntra-r-Mr.
Tenters glrea ea Brick, It.a. an
Frame, Alterations, Parquetry Fleerlni
Oaea, Bank. Bt.r. anl Baleen nttlngi
Pile DrlTlni, Wharres tad Deck Ike*
oenatructtf anl ra-talrad. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
Observant.
Mr. Meane—"I have nothing but
praise for the new minister."
Mr. Goode—"So I noticed when the
plate came around."
Not To Be Seen.
"Is your sister in?" inquired the
gentleman caller.
"Yes," replied the youth of the
house; "but you can't see her."
"Oh!   Is she sick?"
"Nope; she ain't sick. She's gone
an' locked herself in, so's nobody kin
see her."
"How ridiculous! Is she indisposed?"
"Nope; she's in the bath."
Expert Opinion.
"I like to hear your wife talk," remarked the visitor. "She has such
liquid tones, as it were."
"You bet she has," replied the husband. "Her talk simply drowns every
other sound."—Chicago News.
Neighbourly Cordiality.
Mrs. Gadder (rising to depart-
Well, you must come and call on me
some day.   It's your turn now.
Mrs. Chillicon-Kearney — Yes; I
think it has been my turn for the last
five or six times, hasn't it?—Chicago
Tribune.
The Rural Accommodation.
"I see you have a rural trolley line
down here now," remarked the city
drummer. "Does it carry many passengers?"
"Wall, I should say it docs, stranger," boasted the old postmaster.
"The last car that passed carried sixteen men, ten women folk, six children, eight live chickens, four geese,
two turkeys, a livepig and a possum
in a trap. If the platform had been
a little wider they could have got Jeff
Weatherby's red calf aboard. Passengers? Wall I reckon the Sandy
Bottom and Frog Holler Railroad
hauls them, stranger." — Chicago
News.
Caught With the Goods.
Mrs. Naybor—Yes, Mrs. Swellman
has been robbed of her jewels and
Mrs. Meanley is the guilty	
Mrs. Sububs—Gracious! You don't
mean to say she stole	
Mrs. Naybor—What else is it but
stealing? She offered the cook $8 a
week and the maid $8 a week, and
now she has them. — Philadelphia
Press.
Just the Same Hours.
"When a man's engaged to a girl,'
said Miss Singleton, "his idea of good
hours is to stay from 8 o'clock until
any time after midnight."
"Yes," replied Mrs. Brierly, "and
even after marriage the hours are the
same. The only difference is that iu
one case they are hours 'with her,' and
in the other 'away from her.' "—Philadelphia Press.
The Postman Arrives.
"I thought the door bell rang a
few minutes ago," said Mr. House-
keep, at breakfast.
"So it did,"' replied his wife, "and
Bridget answered it."
"But what's keeping her so long?"
"A postal card, perhaps."—Philadelphia Press.
The Innocent Must Suffer.
"Music has charms to soothe the
savage breast," quoted the young lady
with a simper, as she seated herself
at the piano.
"That may bc," muttered a crusty
bachelor, "but there are some of us in
this crowd who are civilized and deserve a little consideration."—Philadelphia  Inquirer.
Meat of the Nut,
"Your honour," said thc lawyer, "I
ask the dismissal of my client on the
ground that the warrant fails to state
that he hit Bill Jones with malicious
intent."
"This court," replied the country
justice, "ain't a graduate of none of
your technical schools. 1 don't care
what he hit Bill with. The p'int is,
did he hit him? Perceed."—Philadelphia Ledger.
He Was a Clergyman.
A couple of New Yorkers were
playing golf on a New Jersey course
on election day when they saw a fine-
appearing gentleman looking at them
wistfully. They asked him to join the
game, which he did with alacrity. He
was mild in speech and manner, and
played well. But once when he made
a foozle, he ejaculated vehemently
the word:
"Croton!"
A few minutes later when he made
another bad play, he repeated:
"Croton!"
The fourth time he said this, one
of his new-made friends said: "I do
not want to be inquisitive, but will
you tell me why you say 'Croton' so
of teii?"
"Well," said thc gentleman, "isn't
that the biggest dam near New
York?"
He was a Presbyterian clergyman
from Brooklyn.—Exchange.
His Occupation.
"You say you have an occupation?"
asked the lady at the back door of
the itinerant.
"Yes, ma'am; I'm a wrestler, ma'am."
"A wrestler?"
"Yes, ma'am; I wrestle with poverty, ma'am,"—Yonkers Statesman.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Vietoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing 160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W. N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Viotoria, oeoupation surveyor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
ehains; thence west 80 chains; thenoe
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 aores, more or less.
Dated December 16th,  1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I Intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described  lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the  following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Viotoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence southerly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
& PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
Distriot, thence southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
Arthur Gorc,
Manager
TIMBER MAPS
Office Phone. /S34.
Residence 4-33:.)
Kind Mrs. Brown—Here, my poor
man, take this shilling; it may help
you to find work.
Bill Borntired—Thank you kindly,
lady; just put it in me weskit pocket,
will yer, mum?—Philadelphia Inquirer.
posted up to date every day.
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT L MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHANCERY    CHAMBERS.
BLUEPRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STREET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of WW
toria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men were armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
cither one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Phillppl,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thence
north 80 chatns; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 16 A. Olson, Agent.
Readvertlsed from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to apply for a special
tlmbor licence over the following described lands, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north from the northeast corner of T.L. 11,892; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thenee
north 80 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thonce south 120 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO., LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agont.
Complete    set of Maps shorv/ny all
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up  in Br iti sh Columbia.
Blue  Prints  can be   obtained at short notice.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 26, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.B. corner of section
24. township 27; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains', thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 26, 1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD NORRIS.
Fer Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 25,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement;  640  acres,  more or less.
Located January 29, 1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W.  corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chatns; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of seotlon 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corne.*' of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chatns; thence
east 80 chatns to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Porcher Island;
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated Dec. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands in Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the eaBt side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 26th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thence along McClure
Lake in an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 86, township 5, Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thenee west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
6,  and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
Distriot of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
20 ehains north of the north shore of
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St. James; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; to point
of commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less,
Dated November 24th, 1907.    '
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber lioenoe over the following desoribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 80
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; more or less to river bank;
thence following river up stream to
point of commencement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Wat-
Bon, of B'ort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on eaBt
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1V4 miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked in my
name on October 26th, 1907; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 161
chains to point of commencement, ane
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that William Rose, 0
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, intends to ap
ply for permission to purchase the fol
lowing described land:
Cemmencing at a post planted abou
two mlles south of Refuge Bay, on th
west coast of Porcher Island and at th
northwest corner of lot 128-jL Cassia
district; thence east 80 chajflft thenc
north 20 chains; thence wesd^^Uhains
thence south following col ■« t
point of commencement, camWmg 16
acres.
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
H0<>00<>0<>00<-><><><>000-00©00000<>--^^
g^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'OOOOOOOOO-OOO
Furniture Newness Everywhere
Apparent.   Daily Visits Should
be the Rule, Now.
Spring Wedding
Season's
Gift Problem
_ In the wonderful exhibition of
fancy china, art pottery, cut glass
and other objects, collected especially for the occasion, the gift
problem is easily settled here, no
matter how much or little you
figure to expend.
fl You should see the beautiful decorated bits of china, the dazzling pieces
of cut glass, the marvelous things in
pottery. French, German, English
and Austrian imports together with
the distinguished American products
—all here in splendid variety and
attractive values.
fl Com*; in and enjoy the feast of
things urti&tio.
This Spring?   Then See This Unusual Showing
IN our Broughton Street windows, we are showing a few samples from our immense stock of
Spring Carpets and Squares—an exhibit of newness you should see. However, it is just a
taste of what is in store for you on our Second Floor. Never before in the history of this
store's business experience have we had such an immense stock of Carpets and Rugs; never
such a complete range of beautiful designs; never have we offered better Carpet values.
If you have ever had any experience with "cheap" Carpets, it is not necessary to advocate
the claims of the reliable sorts, for one experience with the former is usually sufficient. But
there are some who are about to invest in their first Carpets, who may perhaps be lured by the
apparent cheapness of some Carpet offerings. It is to these we wish to say: "Cheap" Carpets
aren't cheap, but very dear at any price. We are exclusive Victoria agents for the world's best
Carpet makers, and, buying the immense quantities we do, are in a position to offer you these
finest grades at the price usually asked for the "cheap" sorts. We ask you to investigate OUR
Carpet offerings.
A Special Showing of Art Pottery To-Day.
There is an interesting collection of Art Pottery in our showrooms today—some dainty and
unique examples from the foremost potteries of three continents, and representing the best efforts
of the potters of several countries. From the handsome and interesting Japanese Cloisonne and
Satsuma to the less costly, yet dainty and novel, Ioga; from the artistic examples of Ruskin Pottery to the odd and curious reproductions of Ancient Rome, as shown in Basaltine ware, the
windows and our China showrooms offer "food" for an interesting half hour or more of "looking.''
One line to which we call special attention is the Ruskin Pottery. This is a line with which
we are positive you'll be delighted. The aims of Ruskin Pottery are good potting, beauty of form
and rich and tender colorations. The potting is so good it makes the ware as delightful to handle
as to look upon. The shapes are such as grow only under artistic guidance, and the colorings are
so delightful as to rival Eastern Cloisonne enamels, and are suggestive of rich hues seen in rock
pools by the sea—but Ruskin is only one of many interesting lines we show in our showrooms.
Don't you think you can spare a half-hour today?
OUT-OF-TOWN ORDERS PACKED AND SHIPPED PROMPTLY.
Don't hesitate to send us your orders for China and Glassware from your country home.
Matchings for sets or other needs, the selection of which you may confidently leave to us, will
have most careful attention. Just give us a price limit and a general description. No matter
how small or large the order, the packing will ensure safe carriage to any distance. Selections
made of articles suitable for card prizes, the best value being assured.
Special   Showing   of   "Kitchen
Things"  on  Our   First  Floor. +
New Lines Shown.
Supplies for
Restaurants
and Hotels
_ Do you believe that the largest
and finest collection of Hotel
Supplies in this section is here in
our establishment?
_ Fact I
_ Do you know that we control
the best patterns in hotel china
made at home and abroad and
carry the most complete stocks of
glassware and bar goods?
fl If you will take the pains to investigate you will discover it's a fact.
fl Placing direct orders before the
goods are made, large and continuous,
enables the manufacturer to cut the
prices to us, which means a big saving
to our hotel customers.
_ You can prove it any time you drop in.
DAINTY CHINA
In the China store are hundreds of dainty pieces suitable for wedding gifts, card
prizes, etc. You'll be surprised at the low prices on
some of these dainty pieces.
Come in and stroll through.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
SPRING FURNITURE.
The splendid offerings of our
Furniture Department are attracting special attraction
these days. We have now
an unusually good showing
and we invite you to come in
and see this display. Third
and Fourth Floors.
Vancouver
Horse Show.
There is no more popular attraction
now-a-days than a first class horse
.show. In England, United States and
Eastern Canada, it draws larger
crowds of people than any other function. The reason for this is not far
to see. Inherent in the human race
is a love of animals, and the horse is
the noblest of all animals. There may
be more fascination about the wild
beasts of the forest because of their
dangerous propensities, but fascination merges into admiration and even
affection for the graceful animal which
has been curbed and trained to the
uses of civilised man. So universal
is this admiration that in the temperate zone civilization may be
gauged by the extent of the homage
paid to the horse. Horse worship is
a species of hero worship. The lover
of horses fulfils his ambition when
he owns and drives a span of thoroughbreds. In this day of exhibition
and competition no self-respecting
man is content to drive a scrub. He
looks for breed, and with it style and
! class.    Indeed it may fairly be said
i that the day of the scrub has gone by.
I Express Companies, Transfer Companies, as well as hack drivers employ
a very different class of horse now-
I .'i-dajsjtom the ill-bred, under-sized
aninfl^Kch   did   duty   twenty-five
I >°fl I The farmer has led the
wa^B)pPs improvement, and it is
no  uncommon  thing  now-a-days to
find, even in the new province of
British Columbia, thoroughbred stock
engaged in the ordinary work of the
farm, while many an aristocrat of the
turf, worth one thousand, two thousand, or even three thousand dollars,
is broken in at the plough tail. The
one conspicuous factor in achieving
this result has been the Horse Show.
To view the lovely and graceful animals which parade, or perforin, on
such occasions is a liberal education
in itself. It not only illustrates the
difference between well-bred and ill-
bred stock, but it opens the eyes of
the public to the possibilities and exploits of animals well-bred and well-
trained. For this reason all thc world
flocks to the Horse Show. It is a
public exhibition, and the greatest society function of the year. The community which has such an institution
firmly established in its midst, not
only stamps itself progressive, but attains a reputation which becomes a
valuable asset from every standpoint.
The forthcoming Horse Show at Vancouver marks a new departure and
shows that the Terminal City has
reached that stage of development
mhen it is entitled on every ground
to rank with the leading cities of the
Dominion. Seattle, Portland, Tacoma
and Spokane will all contribute largely to the new venture, and success is
assured by the generous response
which has already been mad *
a week's engagement in his new play
"The Wheel of Love." Mr. Gilmore
long ago became a positive local favorite and the enthusiasm which
greeted him yesterday is the best evidence that his popularity grows from
year to year, like the proverbial green
bay tree. The principal reason is
perhaps to be found in the fact that
he is always honest with his public.
His sincerity not only as to his own
art, but in the matter of production
has earned him a reward well worth
working for.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Paul Gilmore.
Paul Gilmore has come to Portland
for his annual visit and opened with
a matinee at the Marquam yesterday
Electric Lights.
Victoria,  March  5.
Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—I have not a copy of
the by-laws by me, but if you look
them up you will find one section
which says that the inspector is to
keep a book and record all installation with full particulars such as number of lights and switches, size of
wire, whether the wire is properly
insulated, etc. Now then, we come
to the point. Is this book kept? If
so, the inspector should know exactly
how many lights wcre in each house
at the time of inspection and if any
have been added since without inspection. The question arises: What is
the use of having ninety-nine lights
in one house thoroughly insulated
when the one hundredth is bared and
liable to fire the house at any time.
I do not know whether the inspector
has power to enter any house at reasonable  hours  to ascertain  this  fact
or having the power does not exercise
it. One thing 1 do know he should
have power and exercise it a little
like the sanitary and other inspectors.
There are houses in this city with 40
or 50 feet of flexible wire on one
light. Is this safe? Will this pass
inspection? If so inspection is very
lax compared with other cities. What
is the use of an inspector or inspection when such things are allowed?
Why is it that only new houses come
under inspection and after inspection
any number of lights can be added
without inspection. There are a number of houses iu the city which were
wired before au inspector was appointed. This is no reason why they
do not come under inspection now
there is an inspector. Another question crops up. Does a person safeguard his own house by having it inspected when there are veriitable fire-
traps on each side of them and hack
and front.
We constantly hear about defective
wires being the cause of fire (I pass
no comment whether they are or not),
but simply say with the wiring in this
city we should all be too frightened to
go to sleep.
With regard to the by-laws they
certainly want revising and adding to,
and the inspector wants to conic under some department to which he will
have to report his day's work. Then
this state of affairs will be at an end.
There is one more point which calls
for comment. We have several large
buildings for public use, such as
churches, theatres, halls, etc., which
are dependent on electricity alone for
their lighting. This is deplorable. In
thc event of the lights suddenly going out while a ghost story is being
told, there would ue a stampede and
with no gas jets to mark the exits
and give a faint light in the hall the
death roll would be appaling. Who
is responsible for this satte of affairs?
"LUX."
"My wife never pays any attention
to what I say."
"Mine does—sometimes."
"How do you manage it?"
"I  talk in my sleep."
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
Social Event of the Season—A guaranteed Attraction.
JULES MURRY
Presents
PAUL GILMORE
In  an  Up-to-date   Comedy
THE WHEEL OF LOVE
A Semi-Western Automobile Play,
by George V. Hobart, author of Mrs.
Wilson, May Irwin's Last Season's
Success, Mclntyre & Heath's Great
Hit, "The Ham Tree," Song Birds,"
Eleven John Henry Book's," Creator
of Thc Famous "Dinkel Spiel Stories,''
and Co-author of Lillian Russell's
Stupendous Success "Wildfire."
Wonderful Scenic and Light Effects.
Carriages at 10.45.   No Free List.
PRICES: $1.50,  $1.00,  75c,  soc, 45c. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
POLITICS  AND   THE   GROCER
(Continued from Page Five)
The little man was left gasping,
must say, my dear," said he to Nancy,
gold brown hair on her brow to her
pale blue blouse. "Oh!" said Nancy,
"I thought you were my brother."
"I can never be a brother to you,'
'I said Edale, and looked at her solemnly.    Then he observed that her hair
"Ah!"  Edale turned on the steps, stared at him helplessly.   They shook
"And the grocer?" hands with him like jointed dolls. And
Nancy became wholly serious. "No. even   as  they   did   so, Mrs. Graham
It wouldn't do any good.   But isn't it Rawson, massive, with jewels resplen-
a shame?" dent in her frizzy hair, sailed into the
"It's nasty foolishness," said Edale, room with her daughter.   The wicked
"there's     a—a-
him."
"He's fun," said Nancy.
In the next few weeks some things
celerityp     about  was in delicious disorder.   An apron  wit henthusiasm, and then was about grocer, turning from Mr. King's hand,
covered her from her neck to her little toes. The cuffs of her blouse were
turned back to show the dainty prom-
happened in the Suburb. That is un-  ise of her arms.
usual and not considered  quite   re-     "We're all higgledy-piggledy," said
spectable. Nancy.
to beg her pardon.   But  met  Mrs.  Graham  Rawson  face  to
"Yes!"   said   Nancy,   with   hearty face.    Mrs. Graham Rawson checked,
sympathy.   "Poor Mary!" making noises like a motor under the
"Is she coming?" brake.    Jack  Knight   stepped   aside,
"Oh, yes.    Her mother never lets bowing.    Mrs. Graham Rawson gave
her out of her sight. ...    Do you the tips of her fingers to her alarmed
Rhine
W I N E Si
It was largely the fault of the gro- "It's most becoming," said Edale, know, I should like to be horribly, hostess. "I did not know, my dear,
cer. And here, lest you should think and looked for somewhere to put his horribly rude to Mrs. Graham Raw- that I was asked to meet the lower
this story beneath your dignity, let hat. The hall was bare. son." classes," she said, in a strident voice,
me explain that he was not really an "You simply can't come in," said "You're awfully human," said "Good evening, Mrs. Graham Raw-
Nancy.                                                      Edale.    For a little while they con- son!" said Lord Edale.
"I'm awfully good in chaos," Edale tinued their labours in silence. . . . Mrs. Graham Rawson was actually
pleaded. "I can be more chaotic than Edale descended. a trifle perturbed. However much
anyone, except the Prime Minister." "Thank you," said Nancy, and you may disapprove of him, you can-
"Oh, we couldn't possibly have any looked from door to door. "Yes, not, if you are of Mrs. Graham Raw-
more chaos." they'll do." Then she swept critical son's faith, say that a real lord be-
"And I can be as orderly as a first eyes round the room and finally let longs to the lower classes. "I—I was
lieutenant."                                               them  linger  on   Edale.    "I   suppose not referring to you, Lord Edale," she
"Can you possibly speak the truth? you generally dance on a floor?"  she  stammered.   "I "
ed in the crime; but Son was more  Oh, but truly you can't come in.  You  said. "You're too kind," said Edale.    "I
villainous.     Son—Jack   Knight—pro- see what I'm like—and the rooms are      Edale started.   "I don't often dance think—have   I   had   the   pleasure   of
posed to Miss Graham Rawson that worse—and mother, poor mother!"      on a tight rope," he admitted. meeting your daughter?"
she  should marry him.    To  acquire      Edale put his hat and stick down      "No.    I mean parquet or polished Mrs. Graham Rawson made the un-
some faint notion of what this would  on the floor.   "Miss King, you wanted wood or something.   You see, this is necessary    introduction.      The    girl
look like to Mrs.   Graham   Rawson, a brother.   You'll find me much more  drugget over a carpet.    Tom always blushed  painfully.    Her hands  were
conceive of an insect proposing   to use than a brother."                             says it's heavy going." trembling.   "May I have the honour
take to wife the daughter of an arch-      Nancy looked at him with her head      "Let's try," said Edale.   And Nancy of the first waltz?"
ordinary grocer. Even Mrs. Algernon
Jobson, junior, admits that he is "in
quite a large way." The fact is,
Knight and Sou occupy "spacious
premises" in the high-road, and supply all the Suburb with the sort of
things that the modern grocer does
supply.
Knight and Son were both concern-
angel.   You can hardly think that the on one side.    "But much less obedi-
angelic daughter would consent.   But ent," said Nancy.    She was smiling,
Miss   Graham  Rawson  did.    Then— but her cheeks were rosy.
this is one of the signal instances of      Edale began to take off his frock-
British heroism—Jack Knight went to coat.
Mrs. Graham Rawson.
Now we come  to  his  father's  of-
was swept round in his arm. "I am sure Mary will be pleased,"
Edale does anything that requires said Mrs. Graham Rawson.
him to move himself very well, and Mary,  without  daring  to   look  at
Nancy is deliciously light of foot. . . . Edale, held out her programme. Once
They enjoyed themselves. . . .   And again Edale engaged himself for the
"Oh, what are you doing?"   cried  Mrs.  King, entering, beheld her ap- first waltz.    The  music—a  quartette
Nancy in real alarm.   She knew Edale  roned daughter waltzing with   Lord stationed in the hall—began.    Nancy,
Nancy!" deserted, had the pleasure of seeing
said Mrs. King.   "NANCY!" in large Edale's arm go round Mary.
capitals. Mrs.   Graham   Rawson,   with   the
The waltz ended.   "We were just light   of  battle   in   her   eye, looked
trying   the   drugget,   mother,"   said round for the peccant grocer.   He had
Nancy, calmly. vanished.     Mrs.     Graham    Rawson
"And I've been a draper,"   Edale sought her hostess—who not unskil-
explained. fully avoided her.
"Lord Edale's rather a good draper, Mary   was    dancing
We carry a full stock of "the
good Rhine Wines," both pints
and quarts. The following is
a partial list:
Laubenheim
Nierstein
Steinwein
Zeltinger
Hocheim Vintage, 1893
Liebfraumilch Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Moselle
Rudesheim Vintage, 1900
Berncastler Doctor
Johannisberg Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Hock
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
fence.   Mrs. Graham Rawson scorned well enough to have fears about what  Edale in his shirt-sleeves.
"the lower classes" to much  to pay would come next,
them   cash.    She   had   a   bill   with "Something desperate," said Edale,
Knight and Son which appeared   to resuming his coat.   "Where shall I do
Mr. Knight too long.    So he sent it it?"
in with the comment: "Prompt pay- Nancy looked at him a moment,
ment would oblige," and on the same then gave a joyour little gurgling
day Jack Knight went to Mrs. Gra- laugh. "Up the steps," said Nancy,
ham Rawson to talk matrimony. It and whirled away into the drawing-
was a little unfortunate. Jack Knight room, which Edale found bare of fur-
found the lady, whose daughter he niture, with its carpet covered by
came for, fuming over his father's bill, shiny white drugget.   "Are you good
There was some confusion at first, for at drapery?"
Mrs.   Graham   Rawson   thought   he      "Splendid.    I'm a politician."
wanted her money, and abused him
for that, while he was trying to explain that he wanted her daughter.
very badly.
Edale had to save her once from a
fall. He felt her hand trembling in
his. But Edale himself danced like a
Viennese, and steering close on thc
really, mother '
"My dear child!"
" and he's coming to the dance
to-night."
Poor Mrs. King—she was heavily outskirts, began to talk softl yin the
"Then get up there and do that like aproned and rather flushed—gasped, girl's ear. "Don't be afraid. There's
this," said Nancy, succintly. The sev- "I'm sure, Lord Edale, if you care to nothing in this world worth being
eral doors of the room had been re- come, I should be delighted. But I afraid of. And everybody worth
She grasped the situation at last, moved. One doorway was already don't know what you can possibly counting on is on your side."
Into a few crowded minutes she com- draped with folds of pale blue and think of Nancy." For the first time the girl looked in
pressed rudeness enough for nine white. The other still required cloth- "And I should like to know what his eyes. "Lord Edale!"
lives. Then Jack Knight—what else ing. Necessary yards of pale blue and she thinks of me," said Edale. "You "You know, if you haven't pluck,
could he do?—went away. And then white lay with hammer and tacks must not blame me, Mrs. King. I was you make a mess of all your life—and
Mrs. Graham Rawson sent for her upon the steps. determined on being a draper. I somebody else's, too." Edale's voice
daughter. What she said to the girl Edale ascended and began to work, shall be very glad to come to-night, was low. He steered beautifully
it is unpleasant to imagine. She has Nancy went to perfect the costume of Thank you very much. But if I am round the edge of the dance. "You
not a wholesome mind. the other doorway. . . . There was for to come, I must go now." And he mustn't be afraid any more. You
Mary Graham Rawson was ill for a while an edifying display of energy, went. mustn't, for his sake. . . . And now
some time afterwards. When she • • • Then Edale spoke. His head was A little while after, Tom King, the you're coming through the conserva-
came downstairs again, her mother invisible; his voice came muffled out peccant brother, arrived. "You're a tory," he whirled sharply through the
forbade her to write to Jack Knight, of folds of pale blue. "I get awful horror!" said Nancy, severely. "I've doorway, and drew her on through
or to speak to him, or to see him. morose when alone." had to do it all by myself." the gloom, "into the garden—where
(This sort of thing seemed to Mrs. Nancy turned to see his rather ruf- "Nancy!" her mother protested the beggar ought to be."
Graham Rawson to savour of the true fled head emerge. Nancy struggled— aside. They came down the steps to the
aristocratic temper.) You may de- gave a feeble, helpless chuckle— "Mummy, don't!" Nancy whispered, garden path, The fresh air met them.
spise the girl for obeying; but think laughed outright. Then her con- Tom was made to carry large palms Then suddenly the girl's hand tight-
how little spirit you would have for science, it is to be presumed, smote about, and rebuked as a brother ened on Edale's arm; "Oh, Lord
yourself if you lived for twenty-two her.    She  came  swiftly   to   Edale's  should be. .'. . Edale—I—I—indeed,   I   won't   be   a
years in the same house as Mrs. Gra- steps.   "It's an awful shame; and you
ham  Rawson.    Remember also that haven't even been asked," she said.
Mrs.  Graham  Rawson  threw  herself      Edale looked down upon her from
zealously into the work of a gaoler on high.    "You certainly might have
and a spy. guessed   I   was
These double duties, no doubt, dis- gravely.
Edale came early to the dance. Mrs. coward."
King received him with less embar- The    white    shirt-front    of   Jack
rassment in grey silk.   Mr. King was Knight came out of the blackness,
most genial.   From them Edale swift- Mary—this,   perhaps,   was not re-
a  draper,"   he   said,  ly reverted to Nancy; Nancy, a dainty spectable—ran to it.
form of pale blue with white camel- Edale turned away and lit a cigar-
tracted her attention from Edale. Nancy again collapsed into laugh- Has in the glistening gold of her hair, ette. "That must be quite gratify-
Edale was being busy. Me did much ter. There was something extremely and coral pink against the cream of in'," he murmured to himself. "Well,
visiting in the Suburb, and his choice  incongruous in Lord Edale manipulat
of people to visit would have horri- ing a cloud of pale blue musiln, and
lied Mrs. Graham Rawson. They in- his usually sedate, straw-coloured hair
eluded not only Knight and Son, but had a dissipated appearance. Nancy
many other specimens of "the lower strove with herself. "No. Oh, no.
classes."    And  Edale  arrived  at  thc  I mean—you see—I mean it's only a
her neck. well.    In this case virtue is goin' to
"You're beautifully punctual,   Lord be its own reward."   With great con-
Edale." tentment   he   finished   that  cigarette.
"I  had to make sure  of this  first Then another.    "I feel excruciatin'ly
waltz. Let me see—the first, the third, benevolent," said he.   And he went in
the ninth, and supper, wasn't it?" said to meet Mrs. Graham Rawson.
that  if hc  wanted  to  be little dance, and, really, mother didn't  Edale, shamelessly.
conclusion
elected, he would have to educate his like to ask you.   That's why."
party into being less respectable and "May I  have the first and supper
more   human,    lie  had  no  hope   of waltzes?" said Edale, gravely.
making  Mrs.  Graham  Rawson   very Nancy   hesitated.     "You're   doing
human; but of thc other ruling pow- that  very  nicely,"  said  she  at  last,
The third waltz had begun when he
But Nancy's "Oh!" of horror was entered the drawing-room again,
not for him. To her alarm, to her Nancy, forlorn against the wall, look-
mother's, to her father's alarm, Jack ed at him with reproach in her eyes.
Knight, the offending grocer, had Edale smiled upon her benevolently
stalked in. "Look!" gasped Nancy in and approached. Nancy stood very
ers of the Sensiblcs there might be looking at his muslin. "And it would Edale's ear. straight, her chin up in the air. But
some chance. The little man who only be fair." But Edale had quietly possessed before Edale arrived, Mrs. Graham
rejoiced in the double honour of bc-     "What    a    beastly    reason!"   said  himself of her programme.    "First— Rawson crossed his path.
ing secretary to the Sensiblcs and
Nancy's father, and whose name is
Mr. King, dined with Edale, and
Edale dined with him, and found him
almost as human as his daughter.
Edale.
For a part of a second Nancy looked at him. "Yes," she said. "For no
reason at all."
"That   will   do,   thank   you,"    said
Edale went to pay the after-dinner  Edale, and went on with his muslin,
call on Mrs. King.   As he knocked at
thc door it opened.
"You—horror!" said Nancy.
"I'm sorry to disappoint you, Miss
King." said  Edale, entering.
third—ninth—supper," he said, writing.
"Oh, look!" Nancy entreated. "And
you know we didn't ask him!"
"That makes it all the more enterprising of him," said Edale, blandly.
"Lord Edale! Where is my daughter?" she demanded.
"Really, I shouldn't like to say,"
Edale smiled an engaging smile. "But
I'm sure she's enjoyin' herself."
Mrs. Graham Rawson opened her
Nancy began to help with the lower
folds. "I do hope you're sure you
want to come, Lord Edale. You see,"
she looked up with wickedness in her
eyes, "Mrs. Graham Rawson is corn-
Nancy was rosy from the ripples of  ing"
Nancy turned upon him swiftly.   A mouth, but for lack of adequate words
suspicion had suddenly possessed her. spake not.   So she stood, massive and
But Edale looked (once again) like a gaping, and her horrified eyes beheld
pleasant schoolboy asleep. the wicked grocer enter the room with
Jack Knight came to his tmexpect- her daughter's arm under his.   They
ing  hostess.    She  and  her  husband came nearer and nearer.   The grocer
smiled, and the girl was rosy and
happy. Mrs. Graham Rawson found
her voice. "Mary!" she said. "Mary!":
that only: but the music was for thc
moment extinguished and the dancers
checked, to stare.
A rosier blush came up Mary's neck,
but she held her grocer's arm still.
"How dare you!" cried Mrs. Gra
ham Rawson. "Go and get your cloak
at once. I am ashamed of you." She
had now succeeded in attracting the
attention of all the company. "I am
ashamed of you!" she repeated in
shriller tones.
"I think you forget, Mrs. Graham
Rawson," said Jack Knight, quietly,
"you are talking to the lady who is to
be my wife."
Mrs. Graham Rawson, Edale relates, seemed to swell all over. "I
think," she cried, "I am talking to my
grocer! Kindly be silent till you are
addressed. I do not expect you to
know how to behave yourself in decent society, but " Edale confesses
that it was he who chuckled at this
point. Mrs. Graham Rawson's fact
became dark crimson. "Mary! Tell
that person you will never see him
again."
"No, mother!" For the first time
since she was a little child Mary Gra
ham Rawson looked in her mother's
eyes.   "No, mother," she said.
Mrs. Graham Rawson glared in
stupefied silence. Through the silence
spake a still small voice: "How perfectly splendid!" Nancy was looking
at Mary with shining eyes.
Mrs. Graham Rawson turned upon
Nancy and made the sound which (a
before remarked) in lower animals ii
called snorting. Then she revertet
to her daughter and glared. . . . She
had acquired her empire by bullying
people: hitherto people had alway*-,
been afraid. . . . "Mary! You wil
tell that person at once you will never
see him again, or you will never come
in my house."
There was a rustle in the room. . .
And Mary, looking into her mother';
eyes, said: "I—I'm sorry, mother. Bu
—no!" and her hand moved on Jack
Knight's arm.
"Mary has a home now, Mrs. Gra
ham Rawson," said Jack Knight
quietly.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson de
scended to the lowest depths. "Oh
In the shop!" she sneered.
Mrs. King started forward, in hon
est motherly horror. 'Mrs. Grahan
Rawson—you can't possibly meal
this.   It's terrible!"
Mrs. Graham Rawson sniffed at hei
"One who chooses her guests fron
the lower classes is well uMMed t.
judge ^L jA
"Oh, it. ifl Skin
classes?" Mrs. King <_^ ___^he
your daughter, and " THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
"She   is   not  my   daughter,"    said  leaders of the party think that Edale
Irs.  Graham Rawson.    "I have no-  has great ability in the higher politics.
Ihing to do with a girl that disgraces  There   is   at   least   one   person who
lerself."
"Nonsense!" said Mrs. King.
At last Mrs. Graham Rawson heard
|he truth.   "Madaml" she gasped.
"I shall ask Mary to stay with me
■ill she is married."
"No doubt the society will suit
|ier," Mrs. Graham Rawson sneered.
"My dear chap " —it was Ed-
hle's pleasant drawl to Jack Knight—
'I want to give you my very best
pongratulations."
"Lord Edale!" cried Mrs. Graham
taw son.
Edale continued placidly: "And I'm
(sure you'll be happy now, Miss Raw-
|>on. I'm awfully glad I was able to
iielp."
"Lord Edale! . . .   A-ah!" ..."   A
light dawned on Mrs. Graham Raw-
lson's magnificent mind,
■lo thank for this?"
"I'm delighted
laid Edale.
Mrs.
found.
agrees with them. Baby, however,
looks as if he thought Edale rather
young.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by Its correspondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not Involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plums, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona fides. In no case will it be
divulged without consent.
The Shooting Incident.
Dear  Sir,—As   the   incident   commented upon in your issue of the 29th
ult.  is  not strictly  accurate,  I  shall
I have you esteem it a favour if you will kindly
give publicity to the following details,
to   say you have," in order that no erroneous impression
might be formed by those interested
Graham     Rawson    whirled in the protection of the public, and
She went out of the room, that a correct account be reported.
lays Edale, like an elephant in hy-     On Sunday afternoon, the 19th of
Iterics. January, being   fine   and   bright,    I
But all that happened was a gather- walked down to the water front with
tig of everyone to wish her daughter the intention of taking a row.   Nearly
|oy. opposite to me was a boat containing
In the midst of which, Edale took two  men,  and  this  appeared  to  be
■Jancy by the arm and drew her away, drifting slowly with the tide.   I stood
iLord  Edale 1"  Nancy  protested, several minutes on the water's edge,
|l wanted to kiss Mary." then launched a canoe about 12 feet in
"You might do better," said Edale length, and had paddled out about a
almly. dozen yards, when a puff of smoke
I The piquant little face was turned and the report of a gun indicated the
worn him.    "This  isn't your  dance, owners of the boat to be hunters, the
|,ord Edale," said a cold little voice,     shot striking the water on all sides of
"Isn't it?"    Edale was very inno- the canoe.   The gun appeared to be
fent. aimed directly at the canoe, but for-
"If it were, you wouldn't be here," tunately I was at such a distance thit
|iid Nancy, severely. the penetrating effect of the shot had
"I was workin' in a noble cause.   I about lost its destroying power.   Be-
las tryin' to be unselfish." fore I could shout, the gun was turned
] "You were being unselfish at my a little to the left and a second shot
<pense." fired directly in line with the house.
I "I say, you did care, then?" I immediately approached these men,
I "Of course I didn't care the least and their explanation was they did not
It." see me, neither were they aware there
["But this is my dance, isn't it?"       was a residence there.
1"I   haven't  another   left."    Nancy     These men were good enough to in-
pld out her programme in triumph, form me their names were "Jones,"
dale took the programme and      their address Government street, three
J But Mr. King came up. "Really, doors below Dixi Ross & Co., and
lird Edale, I'm extremely sorry this they kept their boat "at the bottom."
Tould have occurred in my house. I The name being rather common, the
II—it's a very serious matter for the locality not being particularly residen-
|rty—it " tial  and the boat house being pecu-
"It is," Edale agreed with enthus- liarly situated, I suggested, as a guar-
|;m.   "It's beautifully serious." antee of good faith, they leave me a
l"I—I regret very much you should gun, and they could pick it up at the
ive been concerned in it. If you provincial police office the following
link it would smooth matters over, day, which they naturally and point-
In quite ready to resign. But I'm edly refused. I paddled ashore, the
■raid, I'm very much afraid the Sen- hunters then rowing towards town;
|)le Party will lose Mrs. Graham mounted by cycle and proceeded to
liwson." the Gorge Hotel to ring up the pro-
I'Tve been yearnin' to loose her ever vincial police, with the object of in-
lice I saw her, Mr. King." Edale tercepting these gentlemen at Point
|iiled an engaging smile. "The fact Ellice bridge, or meeting them by
I   produced   this   little   play.    I boat on their way down.   At this time
lought Knight here " the hunters would be between   the
I"And you took Mary into the gar- boat landing at the Gorge Park and
In," Nancy broke in. the landing at the Victoria Gardens.
("And you said it was perfectly Central made two attempts to get the
llendid," said Edale, and Nancy be- provincial police, and failed. To lose
[me pink. little time, I then hurried to town to
|"But —but — but "   Poor   Mr. the provincial police office, and upon
|ing struggled beneath an avalanche my arrival found the ojce closed.   I
the   unexpected.    "Mrs.   Graham at once rang up Sergeant Murray, re-
lawson has been the life of the Sen- ported the matter, asking for immedi-
Ible Party in the Suburb." ate assistance to secure these men.
1 "She's nearly been the death of it,"  Sergeant    Murray    informed   me   it
|iid Edale.    "And now we shan't be would take  some  little  time  to  get
early  so respectable,  but we shall into communication with a constable,
lin every time." and was afraid he would not be able
J Mr.  King gazed at him with the to get there in time to secure them.
Imnd eyes of amazement, then, still In ringing up Sergeant Murray I fully
Teechless, was swept away in thc dis- anticipated that the assistance would
living throng. have been rendered by himself forth-
|Edale leant over Nancy.   "It's per- with.
fctly splendid in the garden," he said     Later I went along to Point Ellice
j a low voice. bridge, wit lithe intention of seeing
■Edale put her programme in his the constable deputed for this duty,
Icket. which I informed Sergeant Murray I
['They're all mine, Nancy," he said, would do, intending to give him a de-
jftly.   "Come." scription  of the boat and its occu-
|For one moment Nancy's eyes look- pants, and although  I hung around
into his.   "I suppose you always the bridge until dark I failed to locate
It what you want," said Nancy .... the  constable,  returned  home,  con-
|He did. JJnder his joyous guidance eluding he had  displayed thc neces-
pf the Suburb soon lost sary tact in the performance of his
pectability.   He won duties to prevent his profession being
by a vast majority, discovered.
was   claimed  as  a     The following morning I interview-
Immortal Principles  ed Sergeant Murray, gave him the de-
ensible Party.    What they tails, and he informed me that being
tre just then,  I forget.    But   the in the South Saanich district I should
A Victorian
Definition of a Kiss.
One man's definition of a kiss is
"a pleasure smack." It's needless to say this man is a sailor.
Another Victorian's definition
of a pleasure smack is "a glass
of Allsopp's Pale Ale." Everybody enjoys a glass of the
famous Burton-on-Trent XXXX
—the best that's brewed.
On draught at all the leading hotels, bars, clubs and cafes.
If your dealer is unable to
supply you with a keg for home
consumption, kindly 'phone the
importers and distributors.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
have reported to their constable, also
that he had reported the matter to
this constable; whose address I did
not know at the time, but have since
learned is near Cedar Hill; and also
stated that it was very likely that he
would call and see me.
Up to the time of writing, the district constable has not made the expected call.
On the 2nd of February, just before
it was getting dark, a boat containing
hunters returning from an expedition
to Portage Inlet, were passing the
house, when the occupants were good
enough to discharge their surplus ammunition in front of the house, three
or four shots, the contents being distinctly heard, within the house, rattling through the trees and around the
house.
I did not approach these men. I
did not report this latter incident. In
the first instance, I was not inclined
to again chase a phantom; secondly,
from previous experience, concluded
it was immaterial whether it was reported then or a month later.
Such incidents as these are to be
found weekly any time during the
shooting season—if looked for by our
police.
When some person is maimed for
life, lost his eyesight, or otherwise
mangled by the reckless sportsmen
that visit these waters, we shall perhaps have a reward offered for their
capture, and the unfortunate party
will, no doubt, be the recipient of a
great amount of sorrow and regret;
but this will not compensate a man
for the loss of his sight, limb, or lifelong injury to his children, when the
deed has been accomplished.
Residents and visitors should have
the pleasure of viewing the natural
beauties of Victoria Arm and Portage
Inlet in safety.
Yours truly,
T. E. WILLEY.
The  Phillipines,  Craigflower   Bridge.
March 4th, 1908.
A new Minister at the War Office
who was consumed with a zeal for
making himself perfect in his work
visited the various rooms and inquired
as to all the details. Meeting a gentleman in the passage he asked at
what hour he usually came to his
duty.
"Oh," said the gentleman in reply,
"I usually stroll in about 11 or 12
o'clock."
"Stroll in!" said the Minister ill
surprise; "then I presume you do not
leave until a late hour?"
"Well," replied the gentleman, "I
generally  slip   off  about  3  o'clock,"
"Slip off at three!" said the Minister. "Pray, sir, may I ask what department you belong to?"
"Certainly, I come every Saturday
to wind up the clocks.
WEEK 9th MARCH.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN a COWSISINI,    fraprlatora.
■ anag.m.nt af HOST. JAMIIS0N.
YOUNG BUFFALO AND CO.
America's Most Sensational Marksman, in Rifle and Pistol Shooting.
O'NEILL'S COLLEGE BOYS
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LOTTIE MEANEY AND CO.
In her own Comedy Sketch
"The Bowery Bud."
BROOKS AND JEANETTE
Sam Rose
In "Fluffy   Ruffles   and   Spooney
Sam," on the Main Street.
SIGNOR DE DOMINICUS
World-Famous Cornetist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"That's What  the  Rose  Said  to
Me."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Witch's Kiss."
"The Bellboy's Revenge."
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M.  Nagel,  Director.
"The Pilgrim's Chorus," from
Tannhauser.
TIMBER
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JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA, B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....Do
Evenings, Balcony  Ito
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at
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8 and 9.15
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For particulars write or call
THE  SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.O.
B. A. MacMillan.
LADIES        MEDICAL   OEHTS
MASSAGE
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VIBRATOS  TREATMENT
KB.     BJORNPELT,     SWEDISH
MASSEUR.
Special  Massage and Hometreat-
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Room 2, Vernon Blk„ Douglas Ht.
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Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
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Wc carry a most complete line of smokers'
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Ma°N$r   Richardson
Cigar Store
Phone 345
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days ue getting Cold.
|THE
WILSON BAR
Ii Warm and Comfortable. ""
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C
COAL
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
Victoria Agentl for the Nanaimo Collierle*.
New Wellington Coal.
The beat household coal in tha marke  at
turrent rates.  Anthracite coal Br sale.
34 Broad Street. Phone 847
VICTORIA
P
Al fclYTS  an* Trade Marka
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Enjineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Vour Baggage Cheek* at the
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
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Phone A476. NUF SED.
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for your spare time. In other
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in twelve months. We have a
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be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C. THE WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 7, 1908,
TTtTTTTTtfTTT
*
Social and
Personal.
*
*
*
VP VP 'I' V V V V '*' '»"t"t"»"_P
Mrs. W. Monteith is visiting relatives in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. John Hirsch are
spending a couple of weeks in town.
* *   si-
Mrs. Tunstall  of Tacoma spent a
few days  this week with  her sister,
Miss Bowron.
* *   *
Miss Garnan, who has been staying
with Captain and Mrs. Martin for the
past few months, left for England
on Thursday morning.
* *   *
The many friends of Mr. Harry
Ross will be sorry that he is ill in
St. Joseph's Hospital, but he hopes
to bc out again very soon fully recovered.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Powell will sail from
England in a few days and expect to
be home about the end of thc present
month. Miss Violet Powell has gone
to Germany to study music for two
years.
* *   *
Among those who went out to
Cloverdale to attend the concert given
in aid of St. Marks last Tuesday night
were the Misses Suzette and Viva
Blackwood, Miss Morley, Miss Tuck,
Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Pearce, Miss Perry,
Miss Troup, Miss Heyland, Mrs. Heyland, Mr. Scott, Mr. C. Pemberton,
Mr. T, King, Mr. Smart, Mr. A.
Gore, Mr. C. Berkeley, Miss Kean,
Miss V. Bolton, Rev. Baugh-Allen
and Mrs. Allen and others,
* *   *
A surprise party was given to Miss
R. Arbuthnot on Tuesday evening by
some of her young friends. Miss
Thain's orchestra supplied the music
and dancing was kept up till an early
hour. The refreshment table was
decorated with scarlet carnations and
streamers of red ribbon. Those present were the Misses Phillys Mason,
G. Savage, E. Pitts, M. Pitts, M.
Little, V. Mason, D. Mason, T. Monteith, W. Troupe, Phippen, and the
Messrs. Bromley, Troup, R. Monteith,
Heyland, W. Brown, B. Parker, I. O.
McKay, A. Brown, McDougal, C.
Gamble, J. Gaudin, A. and C. Pitts.
* *   *
Mrs. Blackwood, assisted by her
two daughters, gave a large five hundred party last Tuesday afternoon.
The prizes were vjon by Mrs.
Matthews (ist), Mrs. Genge (2nd),
and the consolation by Mrs. Hall,
The drawing-room and tea tabic
were very pretty and fresh looking,
.with large clusters of daffodils in
handsome bowls.
Among those present were: Mrs.
Matthews, Mrs. Hirsch, Mrs. Alister
Robertson, Mrs. Crowe-Baker, Mrs.
Arundel, Mrs. Roy Troupe, Mrs.
Chai les, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. J. Wilson, Mrs. Genge,
Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs.
Blaiklock, Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. Spratt,
Mrs. Troup, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs.
Courtney, Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Mason,
Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Cleland, Mrs. H. Kent, Mrs.
McKenzie, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Arbuthnot, Miss Arbuthnot, Miss Gaudin,
Miss Troup, Miss Clapham, Miss
Holmes, Miss M. Lawson and others.
The Misses Pitts were the hostesses
at quite one of the most enjoyable
and jolly dances of the season 011
Monday evening last. Their beautiful home on Rockland Avenue was
profusely decorated with spring flowers and hot-house plants, and the
supper table was arranged with yellow daffodils, pussy willows and
maidenhair fern. In thc hall were
large bowls of calla lillies. The Misses
Pitts, who were assisted in receiving
their friends by their aunt, Miss Williams, were dressed in white. Among
thc many invited guests were Mrs.
Genge. Captain and Mrs. Martin, Mr.
and Mrs. V. Eliot, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Barnard, Mr. and Mrs. Muskett, Mr, and Mrs. Martin, Mr. and
Mrs. C. Pooley, the Misses Pooley,
V. Pooley, Angus, Amy Angus, P.
Irving, N. Dupont, A. King, E.
Browne, Lawson, J. Lawson, Little,
H. Peters, M. Gibson, Day, Walker,
Blackwood, P. Mason, Hanington, P.
Drake, N. Coombe, j. Bell, Bolton,
Loenholm, Page, Arbuthnot, Savage,
Martin, Cobbett, Garnan, Butchart, J.
Butchart, Ethel Tilton, Wigley, Helmcken, Tuck, Phipps, B. Irving, G.
Irving, Troupe, Gillespie, and the
Messrs. B. Wilmot, F. Rome, Owen
Martin, Bromley, Parker, J. Bridgman, R. Gibson, Williams, Kingscote,
Bostock, R. Monteith, C. Keefer, W.
Pemberton, S. Angus, 11. B, Phipps,
Arbuckle, Dewdney, Eves, 1). Bullen,
Loenberg, C. Pemberton, Fraser-
Biscoe, Meredith, W. Todd. McDougall, Wallace, Samson, H. Eberts, D.
Gillespie, S. Powell, C. Gamble, Ward,
H. Lawson, J. Lawson, B. Irving, T.
0. Mackay, Holmes, Landry, Captain Hughes, Dr. Dolbey, Lieutenant
Eaton and many others.
Mrs. Savage and Mrs. Arbuthnot
made very charming hostesses at an
"at home" given at the former's residence on Belcher street last Monday.
Miss Thain's orchestra was in attendance during the afternoon. Tllis
and a few tables of bridge assisted
in entertaining the numerous guests.
The first bridge prize was won by
Mrs. Rithet and the second by Mrs.
W. S. Gore.
Mrs. Arbuthnot wore a most becoming gown of black lace and Airs.
Savage wore a very handsome gown
of black lace over white.
Miss Arbuthnot, pale blue embroidered taffetta.
Miss Savage, pale blue gauze, semi-
Empire, with Empire sash.
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, handsomely
attired in a eoline blue Princess clotn
dress with pale blue hat with plumes.
Mrs. Bodwell, in a pale blue taffeta, with white hat, with white plumes.
Miss Phippen (Winnipeg) in a
pretty dress of pink embroidered taffetta.
Mrs.    Guy    Warner    in  s  art
brown suit, pale blue hat, brown fox
furs.
Mrs. B. Tye, red voille semi-Empire dress.
Miss Mary Butchart, in a pretty
pink Princess dress, with black and
white hat.
Mrs. Hirsch, in a smart brown suit.
Miss Drake, green suit, with while
hat.
Miss Little, grey check suit.
Mrs. C. M. Roberts, smart black
taffetta dress, pale blue panne velvet
hat with plumes.
Miss Troupe, pink flowered muslin
dress, white picture hat, with ostrich
plumes.
Mrs. Ker, in a very pretty pink silk
dress, with pink straw hat with roses
of the same shade.
Mrs. Sprate, brown suit and hat.
Mrs. Helmcken, handsome black,
lace robe with white satin finishings.
Miss Vera Mason, biscuit coloured
eolienne green hat.
Miss Doris Mason, green dress with
white and brown hat.
Mrs. James Dunsmuir, plum-coloured  gown with hat to match.
Miss   Hickey,  brown  tailor  made.
Mrs. Brett, grey Empire frock.
Among others present were Mrs.
W. S. Gore, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Miss P. Mason, Mrs. George
Gillespie, Miss Gillespie, Mrs. Genge,'
Mrs. Phippen, Mrs. Blaiklock, Mrs.
Rome, Miss Heyland, Mrs. G. Hunter, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. Gibbs, Mrs. Stevenson,
Miss Day, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Herman Robertson, Miss Paula
Trving, Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. McCurdy,
Mrs. Johnstone, Miss Johnstone, Mrs.
Roberts (black taffetta blue hat), Mrs.
Troupe, Miss Troupe (flowered muslin, white hat with flowers), Miss P.
O. Irving', Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Roy
Troupe, Mrs. Ker (pink silk and pink
hat with roses), Mrs. Cleland, Miss
Holmes, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs. Spratt
(brown costume) Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs.
Rithet, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs. Gaudin,
Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Hickey, Misses
Hickey, Mrs. Rycot, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs,
Blackwood, Misses Blackwood, Mrs.
Courtney (brown voile), Mrs. Helmcken (black lace ; nd sequin), Mrs. McCallum, Miss Moresby, Mrs. Raymour.
When Percy Proposed.
"Refuse me," cried Percy Pickle,
desperately, "and I shall sink through
the floor."
The beautiful belle of the big department house gazed on him with
cold hauteur.
"Please don't," she said in icy
tones; "the floor has just been stained,
and, besides, you would ruin the paper
on the ceiling of the flat below. Take
the elevator."
Fierce Critics.
Dick—How is your woman's club
getting on these days?
Eva—Fine. 1 am on the "hanging committee" now.
Dick—Hanging committee? Do
you hang pictures?
Eva—Oh, no. The ''hanging committee" sits at the club windows on
rainy days and criticises the hang of
their sisters' skirts as the latter pass
outside.
Victoria Theatre
MONDAY, MARCH 9
Third Triumphal Tour and All New
Edition of R. F. Outcault's
BUSTER BROWN
With the best of them all, MASTER
REED, acting "Buster." Replete with
a company of well-known Comedians,
Vocalists, Dancers, Musicians, etc.,
introducing Buster Brown's Bobby
Bums Brigade.
. .Prices: 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Friday,
March 6. Mail orders accompanied
by cheque will receive their usual
attention.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
SIS Hastings St.
Vancouver, B. C.
No Breakfast Complete
Without Marmalade.
That is from the Englishman's standpoint.   These delicious dainties
satisfy the most epicurean tastes:
C. & B. Marmalade, glass jars, each 25c  '
C. & B. Marmalade, 1 lb. tin  tcc
C. & B. Marmalade, 4 lb. tin  60c
C. & B. Marmalade, 7 lb. tin  $1.00
Keiller's Malted Marmalade, per jar  35c
Keiller's Pineapple Marmalade, per jar   35c
Keiller's Ginger Marmalade, per jar  35c
Apricot Marmalade, per jar   25c
Marmaroy, the new Fig Marmalade, per jar 25c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
VCRANDA
 !	
a
A $2,800 Home. Plans of this
beautiful home only $20.00. Full set
of working drawings and specifics!
tion prepaid. Send 5 cents for booklet on "Homes."
E. STANLEY MITTON
Architect     -     VANCOUVER, B.C.
L. MUELLER
Hair Specialist
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436   Granville   Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
Valuable
Timber Sections
For quick sale, 15 licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20,000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre.
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
5^xx>ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<y
Poodle Doa
Hotel
A most pleasant place of sojourn at any time of the year for
either health or pleasure. The handsome dining-room is one of
the largest and brightest in Western Canada. The table is supplied with the best the market affords,—all the delicacies of the
season.
THE ONLY REAL GRILL ROOM IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
<><><>0000*00*0-*»0*00000*^^
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Hasturned but little expense." Other Victorian shrdlu shrdlus
Has turned my cheerless den into a real 'dtilce domum.' Gas is
no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsde£
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B. C, ^r_xvppr_if,y_rr_y_j___yrp
Kingsford Smith & Co.
Stock and General
AUCTIONEERS
JCommiwion and Real Estate Agents.
[: 840 Qrasviile, Vaacoaver.
\XtL*JXXXMXaJLXX_lXiX_..*J 9 %i-£_
Vancouver Edition
The Week
A British Columbia Review,
Published at Vietoria aad Vaacoaver B. C.
7o_ V.   No. 6
THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908
the G. T. P.
Agreement.
Eather more than a month
ago   The  Week  was  per
mitted to announce that an
agreement had been reached
ietween' the Provincial Government and
ie Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Corn-
any.    Whilst not at liberty to announce
11 the details it was able to say that the
lights of the Province in the Indian Re-
rve had been recognized to the extent of
quarter interest, that construction would
|egin in three months, that the Railway
ould be completed by 1911 and that there
ould be no land grant.    When Premier
IcBride made this statement in the House
lis week all these points were confirmed
id it was found that other concessions
hich Mr. Wainwright did not feel free
grant without reference to Mr. Hays
ltd been finally accepted.   These include
e employment of white labour and the
trchase of supplies in British Columbia.
It spite of the ridiculous attitude of the
[ictoria Times, Mr. J. A. McDonald, the
ider of the Opposition, had too much
use and too much respect for his political
putation to raise any factious opposition,
d contented himself with the single pro-
it that the area of the terminal land
.quired by the Company was larger than
cessary.    In adopting this course, Mr.
|cDonald has not only done justice to
aself, but has furnished the most satis-
tory and conclusive evidence that the
vernment has made a good bargain.   In
t the bargain is so good that it is diffi-
[it to believe that it is actually concluded,
at more they could have asked it is
easy to see.    They secure for the Pro-
lice  everything  that  was  sought  four
rs ago and several things in addition,
that time it is more than doubtful if
glit would have been made for a're-'
sionary interest in the Indian Reserve.
is certain that public sentiment had.
assumed the form which would have
fnanded a white labour clause and it is
ibtful whether the purchase of supplies
the Province would have been made
pulsory.    Now that the matter is so
Dpily settled the Province will be more
nt on seeing construction begun, work
lied, and money expended, than on dis-
sing the political aspects of the ques-
i and The Week proposes to dismiss
latter phase with the comment that
for the determined resistance of the
vincial Government the Railway Com-
y would have acquired the Indian Reive without any tribute to the Province.
le Dominion Government had sanctioned
s course and indeed urged the Province
acquiesce.   Mr. McBride's firmness has
|)cured an asset which, according to the
st moderate estimate, will run into mil-
The Week is in a position to an-
lince that the first hundred miles from
lnce Rupert east will be built by the
of Foley, Welch & Stewart.     The
fement made in the daily Press that the
million dollars loan raised in London
[or this purpose is not correct; it will
ised further east, and the firm men-
ed will finance the work of construc-
, taking bonds in payment.    This is
ursuance of an arrangement made witli
late Mr. Pete Larsen and confirmed the
rmation which leaked out two years
as to the important financial relations
h he sustained with the Company,
settlement of this great question pos-
>s a significance which few people are
to grasp;  the effect, however, will
tly be seen.   During the coming sum-
thousands of people will trek north-
I; many of them will become settlers,
before   Southern  British   Columbia
v realises the situation it will have a
E DITOR1 AL
competitor in all lines of agricultural and
industrial activity of which no one dreamt
a few years ago.
The public of this Prov-
New Brunswick.   inCe have heard a great
deal about New Brunswick since a certain gentleman attained
to the dignity of the Editorial
chair, but never a word of the leaven
of Conservatism which was so mysteriously but effectively working in its
political life. Not one prediction was
made that the party which had ruled for
twenty-five years would be dethroned. The
unexpected has happened, and the defection of New Brunswick from the Liberal
ranks naturally suggests wider possibilities.. The question of the moment is how
far the result has any bearing on the next
Federal election. Of course that must be
a matter of conjecture, but the closest observers are a unit in declaring that the
most potent factor in bringing about the.
recent change was the disgust of the Province with the conduct of Emmerson and
Pugsley. If this is a correct diagnosis
then undoubtedly there is more to follow,
and the logical conclusion will be a Conservative majority for Ottawa. It is true
that "one swallow does not made a summer"; it is equally true that "coining
events cast their shadow before."
The terrible holocaust
The Cleveland which has plunged tlie peo-
Tragedy. pie of Cleveland into such
profound sorrow and which
has'aroused the 'sympathy of the civilized
world is one of a class which is becoming
far too prevalent. It does seem a strange
comment upon the boasted progress of the
twentieth century that the fire demon
should so frequently be able to claim its
tribute and under such distressing circumstances. The Iroquois fire lias been
duplicated in Montreal, .in Shields, in
Cleveland, and in other places with a'
rapidity which is as startling as it is
shocking. Anyone who follows the evidence adduced from time to time in connection with these disasters will notice
tliat invariably the disaster would either
have been prevented or greatly mitigated
but for the violation of some simple rule.
Eoi' instance it is ascertained that at the
Cleveland fire one of the main exit doors
was either constructed to open inwards or
was so blocked that it could not open outwards. This should constitute a criminal
offence for which someone should hang.
When one thinks of the life of even one
poor little child being sacrificed because
some official was either too lazy or too
indifferent to see that an emergency exit
was clear it is difficult to write or think
calmly. Speaking from a wide experience of theatres, meeting halls, and even
churches, The Week does not hesitate to
say tliat most of these are very inadequately supplied with emergency exits and tliat
in the event of a fire breaking out the
horrors of Cleveland would be repeated in
many Canadian cities. In Montreal there
is a monthly inspection and written report
on all public places with respect to fire
appliances and means of escape, and the
most stringent measures are adopted by
thc police authorities in tlie event, of
neglect being discovered. This is u salutary custom and should prevail everywhere ; moreover, there should be compulsory use of emergency exits every time a
building is used, so that people may become familiarized with them. It is the
unheeding rush and consequent block
which is responsible for the worst features
of these disasters.
A Sign Of
The Times,
The Victoria Colonist comments with satisfaction upon the fact that the Blue-
Jackets of the Egeria who
recently left for England, confined their
libations en route to Radnor water, and
eschewed alcohol. It professes to regard
this as a sign of the times and an evidence
that Jack Tar will in the near future become a total abstainer. The question is
too broad to be decided by a single illustration, and there may be more reason
than the Colonist wots of for the self-denying ordinance of the Blue-Jackets. The
AVeek would be the last to deplore the
raising of the standard in the matter of
sobriety in any branch of the service, but
begs leave to doubt both the facts and the
true significance of the case referred to.
The despatch appeared first in the Montreal Gazette, Radnor Water is a local product in which many influential men are
largely interested and by dint of judicious
and persistent advertising it has run all
its competitors out of the field. Moreover,
the proprietors have a cinch on the sparkling water department of the C. P. R.
When all things, are considered it will be
just as well to have a little more evidence
of a direct character before drawing any
far-reaching conclusion. Meanwhile in
this connection The Week has been requested to register a kick from the men of
Paardeburg who were required to drink
the King's Health at tlie Canadian Club
Lunch in Victoria in WATER. The kick
is justified. Probably the Committee
never gave the matter a thought for they
cannot be so Canadian that they are not
aware of the Englishman's deep-rooted objection to toast anybody in water.
A Vancouver Weekly some-
Fair Play.       what churlishly goes out of
its way to criticise Victoria
and says that before the Capital City can
establish any valid claim upon the Provincial funds for beautifying that City, it
should first learn to keep its streets clean
and fit to walk in. It would be a very
easy retort tliat the Vancouver paper
should turn its attention to the streets,
lanes, and vacant lots of its own city, but
let that pass, Vancouver has been well
treated by tlie Provincial Government;
grants to public works and buildings have
been liberal ancl the Terminal City is the
last which can justify criticism of its
neighbour. The Press at any rate should
take a broader view. Provincial interests
are not served by fanning local prejudices;
a movement to beautify Victoria, even
with Government assistance, should not
bc unpopular, and there is every reason to
hope that next Session it will assume
practical shape.
Toronto Saturday Xight
Misdirected recently published nn edit-
Immigration.     0rinl illustrated by a front
page cut on the subject of
Misdirected Immigration. The cut was
nioi'c impressive than the editorial, as is
often the case. It was a split picture, the
right half showed the streets of Toronto
thronged with the unemployed. The left
half showed the boundless prairie with
^(TVtttyy-i i«i ^wmrrwrrpa
Stewart William K. C. JanUa
WILLIAMS & JANION
AUCTIONEERS
SEAL (STATE AOIHTS
|i FORT ST. VICTORIA, S. C.
■W*AaJuuut««im8*A_uuut*
Onb Doiaak Put Amnv
man represented by a solitary speck. Saturday Night has touched an important
subject in the right way and yet it is not
equally certain that the title of the article
was correctly chosen, Because the streets
of Toronto, and other Eastern Canadian
cities, are thronged with unemployed it
does not follow that they are there because
of misdirection. In many cases they are
there in obedience to the law of gravitation. It is probably the same with Toronto and Montreal as it is with Winnipeg
and Vancouver, that during the last three
months thousands of men who have previously been employed in the country have
flocked to the town. This statement does
not ignore the fact that the industrial
labour market has been overstocked and
that Immigration Agencies have been indiscreet, but making allowance for the
disturbance of equilibrium in the labour
market occasioned by the fluctuation of
good and bad times the fact remains that
uncertain tenure of employment in the
country causes men to gravitate to the
cities. This applies to every class of)
labour. Canada is not like England, while
it is a country of boundless resource and
immense promise, it lacks the stability
which characterises the Old World. In
England when a capitalist starts or acquires an industry he feels in honour
bound to keep it in operation year in and
year out, whether times are good or bad,
ancl he often does so at a positive loss
rather than discharge his men. It, is not
so in Canada; no sooner do profits shrink
than the employer begins to cast about for
a means of ridding himself of the obligation to operate, and the agriculturalist,
the mine owner and the lumberman in particular has no compunctions about closing
his works down and discharging his employees. This occurred even in British
Columbia last fall, and entirely changed
the conditions of the labour market in
less than a month. In October large employers of labour were advertising for men
and were willing to hire Orientals because
they could not gnt white men; in November there wcre thousands of white men
roaming the streets of Vancouver in search
of employment. These men had ull come
down from the country where they had
been employed in various capacities. It
is this uncertainty which presents the
greatest difficulty in the way of securing
suitable immigration, and there is no
remedy for it but a steady development of
the country on permanent lines. It will
be interesting to study the results of the
Salvation Army scheme. Xo doubt the
utmost care has been taken to ensure tho
minimum of inconvenience, mid as all the
men brought out are under contract there
should be no immediate difficulty. Indeed
as The Week has all along contended this
is the only certain means of solving the
Oriental problem, by crowding lhe yellow
men out of the labour market, but employers and the Government should bear
in mind that the British born immigrant
will not submit to the same indifferent
treatment as may with impunity be
accorded to the Oriental, ami permanency
of employment, subject only to good conduct is the first condition he will demand. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
At The Street   ^
Corner        h
P By THE LOUNOBR f
Soon after the opening of the Era-
press Hotel I called attention to the
fact that the stack of the power house
was emitting volumes of heavy black
smoke. During the present week a
correspondent has complained to the
daily press of the same thing. It is a
pity that the management should require to have their attention called
to such a nuisance. The proprietors
of the hotel own the only Anthracite
coal mine in Canada. Anthracite is
a comparatively smokeless coal. The
mine is situate at Banff, the coal can
bc delivered in Victoria, eliminating
merchants' profits, for less than the
price charged for Extension coal, and
there is, therefore, no reason why the
latter should be used. I feel sure the
management will take notice of this
complaint, which is now registered for
the second time, and will be willing to
mitigate the nuisance.
I should like to point out that what
with the black smoke from the Empress buildings and from the numerous vessels in James Bay, it will not
be many years before our beautiful
Parliament buildings will be blackened
and difigured unless the matter is taken in hand by the authorities in a
determined manner.
Whilst speaking of the Empress, I
must congratulate the manager on the
facilities afforded to the general public for afternoon tea. The palm room
is a delightful rendezvous, and thither the ladies flock in great numbers.
Every afternoon between four and six
the youth, beauty and fashion of Victoria may be seen. "Take tea with
mc at the Empress" is a daily salutation. One thing, however, is, in my
humble judgment, a little out of place,
even in an up-to-date hotel; the other
afternoon I was lounging in the palm
room, in company with some lady and
gentlemen friends. We were partaking of the cup that cheers, and indulging in the inevitable small talk,
when with a start one of the members
of our party drew our attention to a
well-known society lady who had just
come in and sat down at a nearby
table. Whilst the waiter was fetching her tea, she produced a small hand
satchel, opened it and pulled out an
exquisite set of manicure instruments,
and proceeded forthwith to manicure
her nails. Now, this may be the latest thing in New York or Baltimore,
then again it may not, but in any case
I am satisfied that I shall have ceased
to lounge long before it becomes "au
regie" in Victoria. What surprised
me most was that the ladies who accompanied her seemed to take it as a
matter of course. My party made <x
hasty exit, under terror of the thought
that she possibly travelled with her
chiropodist.
Last week I made some strictures
upon the provincial police for their
conduct of a matter in which Mr.
Willey figured. Several friends of
Sergeant Murray have complained of
my remarks, but as he has not done
so I conclude that he realizes the jus
tice of the complaint and is willing to
allow judgment to go by default. As
some of his friends question the ac
curacy of my report, I have asked the
editor to insert in the current issue
Mr. Willey's own signed statement,
which in no important particular differs from my complaint, although the
latter was written from memory. It
is because I have invariably stood up
for the provincial police and am jeal
ous of their reputation, that I again
call attention to this case, and emphasize the importance of prompt action
without too much red tape, if the ends
of justice are to be attained.
I lounged into the police court on
Wednesday, when the case of the notorious Estella Carroll was disposed
of, and must confess that I was very
much disgusted. I do not set myself
up for a purist, and I have never yet
advocated the abolition of a certain
class of houses. But I did think that
the people running these houses were
perfectly well aware that the traffic is
barely tolerated by public opinion. All
thoughtful men realize that under the
most favourable conditions it is an
evil, the existence of which raises a
problem and arouses public sentiment whenever it becomes obtrusive.
This woman has been in Victoria for
some years; her business is notorious;
her counsel boldly declared in court
that she was worth twelve thousand
to fifteen thousand dollars. If this
statement meant anything, it meant
that because she had fleeced the city
for so long and had accumulated so
much money by detestable means, she
must be allowed to flout the police
and to defy the law.
I understand that she was warned
before fitting up the house in question
that she would not be allowed to use
it. In spite of this she persisted, with
the result that publicity has been
given to many disgraceful details and
a sidelight thrown upon the means by
which these houses accumulate their
ill-gotten gains. The whole story is
told by the case of the man Brewer,
who was charged up with fourteen
bottles of wine. Unless I am greatlv
mistaken, the publicity given to this
case will lead to an investigation as to
the amount of liquor consumed in
these unlicensed houses and by what
right that branch of their business is
permitted to continue.
Whilst on this subject, I wish to
call the attention of the police to the
growing custom of women of loose
character and their companions of
rendering night hideous by racing
through our streets at lightning speed
during the small hours. This traffic is
a constant one between the city and
the suburbs, and is not only an annoyance to quiet residents but a danger to
decent people returning from the
country late at night. Within a week
I have had two narrow escapes of almost certain death from autos containing a party of this character which
overtook me in the Esquimalt district.
In each case the auto was travelling
at a greater speed than 30 miles an
hour and passed within a few inches
of my team. I hope the fact that I
have criticised the provincial police in
another matter will not disincline
them to protect me in this even if I
am only an inconsequent
a£i
rct*LS%sr,
Preferred Cash.
"Mr. Heavyweight," said the minister, "is willing to subscribe $10,000
for a new church, provided we can
get other subscriptions making up the
same amount."
"Yet you seem disappointed," said
his wife.
"Yes, I was in hopes he would contribute $100 in cash."
One Woman's Wisdom.
Her Husband—My dear, how did
you happen to employ such a pretty
nurse-girl?
His Wife—I didn't happen to do
it. I did it because I wanted the
children to have police protection
when they are in the park or on the
street.
The Merchants Bank
'of Canada
Established 1864.
Capital, fuUy paid $6,000,000
Reserve Fundi  4,000,000
Head Office: Montreal
Banking By Mail.
Deposits and withdrawals can
be made by mail; no delay, and
will receive prompt attention.
Savings Bank Department.
Interest allowed quarterly at
highest current rate.
Victoria Branch: R. F. TAYLOR,
Manager.
ARE YOU
COUGHING
YET????
It is unwise to let a Cough run
on, for frequent coughing naturally increases the irritation in
the bronchial passages. If you
are wondering what to take,
suppose you try
BOWES'
BRONCHIAL BALSAM
It has relieved others and will
relieve you. We do not say it
will cure your cough in one
night, but a few days' use will
cure a long-standing hoarseness,
croup or bronchial cough. Recommended in all throat and
lung troubles, asthma, whooping cough, etc. Per bottle, 50c
only, at this store.
Cyrus H. Bowes
CHEMIST
Government Street, Near Yates.
Agreed With Him.
Parishioner (a little the worse for
liquor)—I hearzh you preazh las'
night.
New Minister—You didn't heai
much, I fancy.
Parishioner—Thaz what (hie) I
thought myself.
Knew His Advantage.
"Why not set your cap for that
young fellow? He's single and well
off?"
"Yes; he's single, but he knows he's
well off."
Always Absent.
Quizzcm—To what religious denomination  do you belong?
Stayaway—I'm a seventh-day ab
scntist.
FOR THE BALL
Dress Suits
$37.50, $80, $35.
ALLEN & CO.
"The world is full of stumbling
blocks for those who try."
"And tumbling stocks for those
who buy."
Fit'Reform Wardrobe
Victoria, B. C. '
1
The SILVER SPRING BREWERY, Ltd.
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phone 1,3. VICTORIA
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Sold Everywhere. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908
^porting
Comment.
Se followers of association foot-
lin this city were considerably sur-
ed on Saturday last by the line-up
'both the Ladysmith and Y.M.C.A.
bams.    Both had been strengthened,
li fact it was the strongest aggrega-
fion that has represented these clubs
Niis season.   Since the last appearance
If the Ladysmith team they have add-
|d   three   players   to   their   line-up,
vhich   assisted   them   materially   in
vinning the match.    It was a  great
lurprise to everyone to see  Provins
[nd   Wynne,   late of   Seattle,  along
vith    Hartley,   of   Vancouver,    and
tlegg, of this city, in the line-up of
Kie   Ladysmith  team,  while  for  the
JT.M.C.A. Schwengers made his initial appearance for the season.   With
loth teams strengthened, it was   ex-
lected that the game would be very
[.resting, but this was far from being
ie case, as it was very listless from
|tart to finish.   The Ladysmith club
strengthening their team in view of
lieir match against Nanaimo, the re-
iil't of which will have a great effect
the Island championship, and it is
nderstood that a further addition will
made before this game is played.
Ihis is importing players on a large
lale, and the question is now being
Iked, "Where will it stop?"    I can-
pt blame the   Ladysmith   club   for
[eir action, as they refrained from
ping this until the league practically
live it their sanction.   They objected
the practice and brought it before
|e league, but they were not support-
At that time only two teams were
|aying outside players, and the Lady-
lith team objected, but these teams
Id not realize that more than one,
luld play this game and continued to
[ay  their   players   on   whom  they
aced great reliance.   Given the opin-
of the League, the Ladysmith club
not wait long before they got busy
|d now some of the teams that start-
the practice are wishing they had
Jed with Ladysmith.   Personally, I
strongly opposed to the practice,
|d I congratulate the Esquimalt and
J.A.A. teams on their decision to go
rough  the  season  without  playing
pse outsiders.   It is all very well to
ow professionals and amateurs to
|iy together, but the result of this
portation of players can but have
Jly one effect, and in time it will cer-
|nly kill the game on the Island.   As
have already stated, these players
not show much improvement over
?se left off, and the Ladysmith team
jll have to play a much better game
ainst Nanaimo than they did against
Y.M.C.A., if they expect to retain
^ir present title.   The alterations on
Y.M.C.A. team only benefited the
[m in goal, where B. White played a
larkable game.   On his showing of
Jturday, he has the makings of a true
lalkeeper, and if he decides to con-
lue in this position he will be hard
J beat with a little experience.   The
tier changes were'miserable failures.
|hile these teams were battling for
premacy, the Esquimalt and Bays
fcre fighting for honors, which were
pn by the former in a most decided
anher.   The result of these games
aCes the Y.M.C.A. and Bays a tie for
st place, and it will be for them to
■'ht   it   out   to   see   who   ends   the
Igue leading at the wrong end.
of the season will be played this afternoon at Vancouver, when the All-
Island aggregation will try conclusions with the best from the Mainland.
This should be a good game, and I
am sorry that the game will not be
played here, but we had our turn last
year, and if football is to be encouraged, everyone must have their turn.
The result of this match will be
watched with interest by all lovers of
soccer in the Province, but I venture
to say that the Mainland supporters
will not be as jubilant after the game
as the Islanders.
The cricketers of this city have a
hard proposition to face this season in
the handling of the annual tournament, and it is up to every devotee of
the game to get together and form
some plan under which the visitors
may be entertained. This is an important matter, and one that should
not be overlooked. I learn that a
meeting has already been called to
discuss the question, and I hope ther?
will be a large attendance. It requires
considerable of the wherewithal to
carry out a project of this magnitude,
and it is hoped that the lovers of the
game who are able will not be backward in coming forward.
UMPIRE.
I nusic and      }
I the Drama. {
cAo9fiocAosA*cAscAoo__saAea__oo__«eA*e_loe__o
Antony and Cleopatra.
On Saturday night last Mr. Hanford paid a farewell visit to the Victoria Theatre and distinguished himself as usual in a modern farcical
comedy, entitled Antony and Cleopatra. It is understood in future Mr.
Hanford will confine himself to such
parts as the Wrestler in "As You
Like It," and the Executioner in
'"Twixt Axe and Crown."
Dream City.
A moderate-sized audience had a
thoroughly enjoyable time at the Victoria Theatre on Tuesday night, when
"Dream City" was presented. This is
an up-to-date, typical American musical comedy, boisterous and farcical,
but one of the best of its kind that
has ever been seen in Victoria. Little
Chip and Mary Marble are artists in
their line, and kept the audience in
continuous roars of laughter. The
latter's song, "I Shall Never Be a
Lady," was the most amusing and
best rendered. Although not very
high class, the show achieved a success which more pretentious ones
might envy, in that it was full of fun
from start to finish and kept the audience in good humour.
am pleased to see that the Kelow-
j team is billed to meet the Bays at
[k Bay this afternoon.   It is saying
|ch for football when a team will
vel the distance that this aggrega-
is doing, and I hope that it is
the forerunner. I am very sorry,
vever, that their trip was not post-
led for a month in order that they
tht have have had the honour of
|ipeting for the People's Shield.   If
had been arranged, it would have
|ught all parts of the Province into
competition, and it would also
|e shown that British Columbia is
alive when it comes to associa-
football, and not dead as some of
players in the Prairie Provinces
lid lead people to believe.
New Grand.
A sensational feature on a big bill
of nine numbers arranged for next
week will be the original Young Buffalo, in a wonderful sharp-shooting
act. He is assisted by Mile. Vera,
and among the feats are the shooting
out of the five lighted points in a star,
the breaking of small balls arranged
in a circle close around Mile. Vera's
face, ancl the severing of the bonds
that hold her robe at each shoulder
and at the waist, so that it drops off,
the shooting being done from back in
the audience. The O'Neill trio have
a good musical sketch; Miss Gladys
Van is a dainty soubrette, who has
made a hit all along the circuit; Signor Dominicus is a world-renowned
cometist, lately with Marco Vessella's
band; Brooks and Jeanette will appear in a singing and talking sketch
they call Fluffy Rufifles and Spoony
Sam; Lottie Meancy & Co. will present "The Bowery Bud"; Thos. J.
Price will sing the illustrated song,
"That's What the Rose Said to Me";
new moving pictures arc entitled "Thc
Witch's Kiss" and "The Bellboy's Revenge," and the orchestra will play
"The Pilgrim's Chorus," from Tannhauser, as an overture.
0*
)ne of the most important games
"Westward Ho!" for March is distinctly a Horse Show number with
its unique three-colour cover design,
its  sixteen   pages   of  cuts   done   iu
Are You Interested        O
in Foreign Countries •
If so, Read the March Issue of
WEJTTOD HO!
^
MORoeeo
I
Besides a Splendidly Illustrated Section of Vancouver's
First Horse Show there is much entertainment
and Instruction to be found in the
following table of contents :
COVER DESIGN   Dominion  Publishing Association.
EDITORIAL	
A  DEAL  IN  HEIFERS Frank  Dilnot
Story.
AT THE SHACK   Percy Flage
Literary Causerle.
THE ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD Godfrey  Chealander
Article.
HER LITTLE HAND 	
Poem.
MEN I HAVE MET—Hon. W. S. Fielding W.   Blakemore
VANCOUVER'S HORSE SHOW  D. Thomas Tees
Letter.
MOROCCO   L. McLeod Gould
Article.
CANADIAN RIFLE  CLUBS    Bonnycastle  Dale
Article.
THE TWO WIDOW DOOLANS C. Dell  Smith
Story.
SHAKMUT    Clive  Phillipps-Wolley
Serial Story.
IN THE STUDIO A.  V.  Kenah
Photography.
REVERIES OF AN OLD COIN  Henry Morey
Story.
A VOICE FROM THE CITY De Courcy C. Ireland
Poem.,
THE THIEF     Blllee Glynn
Story.
THE LILY SHRINE Blanche E. H.  Murison
Poem.
"OUR BOY"  R. Thompson-Ttnn
Story.
A SONG OF THE SPIRE   R. Rambler':
• A. Reminiscence.
COUNTRY AND SUBURBAN HOMES E.  Stanley Mitton
THE AFFAIR AT SAN HUECA    John Haslette
Story.
TO EXPENSE—A Widow  Howland   Hoadley
Story.
PROGRESS AND PROFITS  	
Article.
THE NEW PAPER MILL	
PRICE I0c. A COPY.        -        $1.00 A YEAR.
_9
royal purple and even the advertisers
have taken advantage of the occasion
to "boost" Vancouver's big social
event. There are several clever
stories, including thc continuation of
"Shakmut," a powerful serial by Clive
Phillipps-Wolley, which is one of the
finest pieces of fiction from the pen
of that gifted writer. I11 his department "Men I Have Met," the Editor
this month has a sketch of Hon. W.
S. Fielding. L. McLeod Gould contributes an interesting article on
Morocco which is beautifully illustrated. "The Two Widow Doolans"
is a most laughable yarn, by C. Dell
Smith of the Victoria Times, and
Henry Morey of New Westminster
contributes a delightful story, "Reveries of an Old Coin." The departments of "Country and Suburban
Homes," "In the Studio" and "Pro
gress and Profits" are well maintained.
Altogether the March issue is by far
the best yet attempted by the enterprising publishers.
Where It Belongs.
"Excuse me," said the playwright
tn his friend who was hissing the
piece, "do you think it is good form
to hiss my show when I gave you the
ticket that admitted you?"
"Certainly," resentfully replied the
friend. "If I'd bought a ticket I
would have contented myself by going outside and swearing at myself."
Wife—"Was the chauffeur sad because you discharged him?"
Husband—Oh, no. He said while
he was with me he spent most of
his time in jail, anyway."
TO HOMESEEKERS.
100 ACRES
Six miles from Victoria by water
and ten by excellent road. About.20
acres fenced, 10 acres cleared ready
for cultivation; good soil; balance in
good timber. Building containing
two rooms, also two stables and loft.
About one-quarter mile from sea-
front, with magnificent view. Good
hunting. For quick sale. $2,000, terms
to suit.    Box 162, Victoria.
MAPS  OF TIMBER AND LAND
Thc   kind   that   show   what's
taken   up   and   what's   vacant.
Electric   Blue  Print   and   Map   Co.
1218 Langley Street
Victoria, B. C. THE WBBK, SATURDAY MARCH 7, 1908
Incorporated till.
Capital. UU.MMI
Capital Increase*
la 1M7
to ...|l,MMM.M
Subscribed
Capital.   UIMM
Reserve . . *■»•.<
Surplus, !•*; **_•-_
lift . . UIMM
j. a. ma1
nr cx.oex.re nr estatm
•lther as Executors or Assignees
the Dominion Trust Co., Ltd., Is
never Influenced by ulterior motives. Their entire ambition,
effort, and energy Is directed towards securing the best possible
returns for all concerned.
Name this company executor ln
your will. Blank will forms furnished free of charge and stored
in our safety deposit vaults,
when we are made your executor.
DOMINION TRUST CO,
Limited.
338 Hastings St, West
Vancouver, B. C
The Week
A Provincial Review and Magazine, published every Saturday by
♦THE; WEEK" PUBLISHING
COMPANY, LIMITED.
Published at VICTORIA and VANCOUVER
t3K Government Street.. .Victoria, B.C.
626   Hastings Street.... Vancou ver, B.C.
W. BLAKEMORE..Manager and Editor
Saint David.
It was a jovial party which gathered at the Driard Hotel, Victoria, on
Monday evening last, to celebrate the
anniversary of St. David, the patron
saint of Wales. Fifty jovial Welshmen gathered round the festive board,
and two or three less-favoured mortals, including Bohemian, were permitted to look on.
It was a good-humoured gathering,
thei feast was worthy of the occasion,
the music was such as Welshmen only
could furnish, and the speeches were
brief, pithy and pointed. David Spencer, the respected senior of the well-
known firm bearing his name, born in
Cowbridge, presided, and did so with
kindliness and dignity. On his right
hand was a Cariboo veteran, 85 years
of age, well known and highly respected in Victoria, I refer to Mr.
John; he was by no means the least
energetic of the party and favoured
the company with a brief speech.
At the cross table sat Dr. Owen
Meredith Jones, who hails from Carmarthen, and who has achieved a reputation and position in the country
of his adoption of which even a
Welshman may be proud. Near to
him sat Dr. Leader, from Cardiff, who
assisted Dr. Jones last summer, and
is now supplying for Dr. Hazel at thc
Jubilee Hospital. On his right was
Mr. Llewellyn Wood, a modest
Welshman, whose knowledge of
yachting is as extensive as it is unique. On the left of the chairman was
the popular American consul, Mr.
Abraham Smith, who delivered a very
happy speech, proving that he has
more than a nodding acquaintance
with Welsh history, and that he has
inherited a strain of diplomatic skill
which any politician might envy.
The gathering would have been incomplete without the gentleman who
sat to the extreme left of the speaker. I refer to Parker Williams, the
respected member for Newcastle district, who hails from Treorky. Whatever may be thought of Mr. Williams'
Socialist views, no one can deny that
he is a most genial companion, with a
distinct vein of humour, and a bon-
hommie which is irresistible. If Mr.
Williams had not been bom a Welshman, he would have been an Irishman; as it is, he is probably the most
typical Welshman in the Province.
Of   course,   the   ceremony   would
have been incomplete without the contribution of Stewart Williams, who,
equally of course, is a thorough
Welshman. It would not be fair to
overlook the splendid work of the
musical contingent. Foremost among
these was Mr. Petch, who, in spite of
the fact that he has sons singing in
public, still retains a beautiful tenor
voice, which he uses with excellent
effect. Mr. Grant, whom I have spoken of beforetime as one of the best
singers in Victoria, sang several selections in excellent style. The same
may be said of Mr. Evans, who has
a beautiful light tenor voice,
Mr. Morgan, who is a recent arrival
in the city, proved himself to be an
efficient M. C. He not only organized
the celebration, but stage-managed it,
played all the musical accompaniments, and finally sang, to the delight of the audience. He has a rich
baritone voice, and is an accomplished
musician.
The celebration was one calculated
to cause an Englishman several sober
reflections. He had to be reminded
that Wales had never been conquered,
that the Welsh language had been
handed down from generation to generation in all its pristine purity, whilst
English had passed through so many
changes that the language of Tennyson and Swinburne could hardly be
recognized as that of Spenser and
Chaucer. He had to be reminded, also,
that while the patron saint of England, St. George, was a mythological
hero, destroying a mythological dragon, in order to rescue a mythological
maiden, the patron saint of Wales, St.
David, was a man, born of respectable
parents, who founded a monastery,
filled important public positions, was
buried in his native church, and enshrined in the cathedral city of his
name.
When it came to a question of
natural beauty, there was not one
Welshman present who did not claim
that the glorious mountain scenery of
the little Principality was the finest
in the world. Mounts Stephen and
Hector might be bigger than Snow-
don or Cader Idris, but they were neither more magnificent nor more impressive, and in none of the valleys of
British Columbia is a lovelier panorama unfolded than in the Pass of
Llanberris or in the Vale of Llangollen or Beddgelert.
When it came to industrial development, the Englishman again had to
take a back seat. He had to swallow
the more or less unpalatable fact that,
with the single exception of London,
Cardiff is the greatest seaport in the
world, and that in respect of coal tonnage it is unapproached by any other.
Even the jubilant American consul,
waving his Stars and Stripes, had to
accept the gentle reminder that the
great American naval fleet would
never have been able to visit the Pacific Coast but for Welsh steam coal.
It would, indeed, be hard to find in
any part of the civilized world a little
country containing less than 10,000
square miles, with a population of 2,-
000,000 people, and an industrial development that would begin to compare with that of Wales.
But the Welshman has a soul above
materialism, and while he has developed his natural resources in a marvellous manner, he has retained his
Celtic fervour and his innate love of
art. As musicians, the Welsh are unexcelled; in the possession of rich,
musical voices they have no competitors, they sing at their daily avocations, whether it be in the mine, the
mill, or the field. Their annual Eisted-
fodds are unapproached as evidences
of popular culture in art, literature,
and music.
Last, and by no means least, Wales
has always produced great men, patriots, soldiers, statesmen. As long as
there is a British army, and as long
as its records are preserved, men will
turn to the page of history which tells
again and again of the achievements
of the Welsh Fusiliers. As long as
hero worship lasts in this world, men
will be proud to recall the glorious
career of the little Welsh general who
has distinguished himself in every
part of the world, and whose name is
identified with the great wars of the
Empire for the last half century—
Bobs.
One enthusiastic Welshman wound
up with the prediction that Wales
would furnish the next Liberal Pr:_w.
Minister, in David Lloyd George; and
who will venture to say that he i-*-*
wrong? It was a privilege to be a
Welshman for one night. I doff my
hat to Taffy and his Patron Saint.
Departmental Circular.
Post Office Dept, Canada,
Ottawa, February, 1908.
Publishers of legitimate newspapers
and periodicals issued less frequently than daily are informed that thc
United States will permit the posting
in that country of Canadian newspapers and periodicals addressed to
bona fide subscribers upon prepayment of postage at the one-cent per
pound rate. Publishers to obtain this
postal privilege for their publications
must make application at the United
States post office at which they desire
to mail. Memorandum giving information as to mode of procedure in
making this application is enclosed
herewith.
Deputy Postmaster General.
, R, M. COULTER,
Information and Suggestions for Canadian Publishers Who Desire to
Post Their Papers in the
United States.
; (February, 1908)
Canadian publishers desiring to obtain United States postal privileges
must make application for the admission of their publications to the
United States mail through the Postmaster at the place where entry is desired, submitting two complete copies
of the publication accompanied by a
declaration executed on a form that
will be provided by the Postmaster of
the office of entry. Further instructions to the publisher as to proper
procedure will be found on the form
in question.
Should the publisher's application
be granted the Postmaster at the
United States Office of entry will
issue a certificate on the form furnished by the Post Office Department
of the United States for that pur-
ficate the publisher is required to
print upon each copy of the publication so entered the words:
"Entered..(date)..at the Post Office at..(name of office of entry)..as
second class matter under Act of
March 3rd, 1879."
When the Canadian publisher, after
entry at a United States Post Office
has been authorized, desires to post
without employing an intermediary
agent, it is suggested that he forward his mailings to the United States
Postmaster either by express or
freight, charges prepaid, the consignments 'to be addressed:
Postmaster at 	
(name of office of entry)
Contains copies of	
(name of publication)
Date of issue 190...
If such method is adopted it will be
necesasry that the publisher make
such arrangements for the payment
of the postage as will be satisfactory
to the Postmaster at the office of entry in the United States, depositing
with the United States Postmaster a
sum of money to cover postage and
renewing this amount from time to
time, or remitting with each shipment, or making such other financial
arrangement as may be permitted.
CORRESPONDENCE
W. H. Hayward, Esq., M.P.P.,
Victoria.
Dear Sir:
Referring to your telephone of yesterday regarding reported starvation
on Mt. Sicker, I beg to report as
follows:
This morning I drove to Mt. Sicker
and made personal canvas of the few
families that are at present living on
the mountain, and find there are ten
families on the mountain. The heads
of these with the exception of three,
all have employment, these three being men of means and not obliged to
work for a livelihood.
A FEW FACTS ABOUT
OUR FACTORY.
In our large manufacturing department there is every possible
facility for the turning out of work promptly and well. The
presses and various heavy tools are all of the most modern
description, while electricity furnishc ihe motive power. We melt
and refine our own gold from the raw material. See small display
in our south window. Here you will also find a photograph of a
busy corner where cunning workmen with deft fingers shape rings,
bracelets and every imaginary kind of trinket. A large corps of
competent designers, jewelers, enamelers and engravers is
constantly employed. None but the most expert workmen mount
our gems; our settings are therefore invariably appropriate and
tasteful.
We buy Diamonds in large quantities direct from
the cutters and mount them in our own factory;
thus we eliminate all middlemen's profits,—you
buy at first cost here.
Our diamond settings would do credit to any large Eastern or
European house. We have a special department for jewelry
repairing; the remodelling of family jewels is a specialty; this
work is always executed with great care and dispatch.
We make to order any article of jewelry.
Designs and estimates furnished on application.
SovtSt VICTORIA.
■il
Victor-Berlina
Dance Music
Just imagine having a
foil orchestra to play for
you whenever you want
to dance! How you could
dance to such   music as
that! And you can actually have it with a Victor-
Berliner   Gram-o-phone in
your home.
Better music than you ever
had before—loud, clear and in
perfect time.   No expense for
musicians, nobody tied to the
piano—everybody can dance.
Besides special dance-music :
the Victor and Berliner Gram-
o-phone   provides   high-class
m____m_____-___________m____m__-m_____m___mm entertainment of every kbd I
between the dances. Grand opera by the greatest artists,
beautiful ballads by leading vaudeville singers, selections by
famous bands; instrumental solos and duets; "coon" songs;
popular song hits; minstrel specialties, and other good
healthy fun.
In no other way can you hear this entertainment in yonr
home, except on the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phone.
AThe world's foremost -layers and singers make Victor
4*<\ Records only, and the Victor and Berliner Gram-o-phme
"VV*\ plays them as no other instrument can.
Gc to any Victor or Berliner dealer's and hour
V these wonderful instruments.    Ask him to
QiX explain Oi- etsy-Mymtnt |~
1 the coup
_$ "^V'w'rite us on Hie coupon for  caUlsgw
l*5» VV and full information.
• <I*Xfl» Beriiner 6rui i pbw
NF
Cmpuj tf Cmd* IM.
606
The residents of the mountain wish
me to extend to the Government their
thanks for the prompt action taken
on their behalf, and to state that there
is no one in need in the neighbourhood.
I am sir, Yours obediently,
ALFRED THOMAS,
Govt. Agent.
"You say you wish to marry my
daughter. But she is only a mere
school-girl as yet."
Count Nocash—"I understand that,
sir, I came early to avoid the rush.'1
The Wrong One.
Mr. Gunson took two cigars fi|
his pocket, carefully selected one
handed the other to his guest.
"Fine cigars," he remarked, stl
ing a match.   "Two for a quartl
The guest puffed a light into \
cigar and blew a cloud of smoke i|
the air.
"Two for a quarter?" he asked.l
"Yes," replied Mr. Gunson, pro!
ly.
"Sorry I didn't get the twenty-c|
one,"  remarked the guest. THE WESKf SATURDAY, MARGH 7, 1908.
_h f_h
* Short Story *
POLITICS  AND   THE   GROCER.
By H. C. BAILEY.
This is a story of a suburb. Of
whicli suburb I do not intend to say,
because I have still some friends
there. Think of the perfect suburb.
It is also a story of the higher politics—of the causes of portents and
the mysterious forces which have
made our Britisli Empire the quaint
thing it is.
The story requires you to give all
your sympathy to one political party.
Which is rather original of the story.
But you will have no difficulty with
your sympathy. For the political
party requiring it is the Sensible
Party, and that everyone knows is his
own.
There was distress in the headquarters of the Sensible Party. The Suburb had misbehaved itself. For a
decade and a half the Suburb had
always returned a Sensible to Parliament. But now, at a by-election,
the Suburb had disgusted half England and delighted half and amazed
the whole by returning an Insensible.
So at the headquarters of the Sens'blc
Party two or three gentlemen who
knew a good deal about politics and
believed in them very little, asked
each other what was the matter with
the Suburb, and what ought to be
done to it. With one voice and with
one cry they condemned the virtue of
the suburban leaders of their party.
"They're too respectable to live,"
said Dr. Ferguson-Smyth.
"We'll send them Edale," said Colonel Cholmondeley.
Not even his enemies have ever
said that Lord Edale is respectable,
lie is young. And probably one cannot be both. If you forget his size
—which is difficult—rand his moustache—which is easier—he looks like
a pleasant schoolboy asleep. There
is no reason to believe that he will
ever be old. His father, the Earl of
Castleton, now nearing sixty and a
grandfather twice over, often makes
his daughters despair of his ever
growing up. As for Lady Castleton,
Edale's mother, even Edale finds that
she makes him feel fatherly. There
is, in fact, a taint in the family, the
taint of enduring youth.
But they did not know that in the
Suburb; the Suburb only knew that
Edale was the son of thirty-three
carls, and took him as one takes a
puppy, on account of his pedigree
He did not* seem very intelligent, but
the Suburb did not expect that. You
cannot have everything. So when
Edale presented himself to the Sensiblcs of the Suburb, they chose him
as their candidate without dispute, but
without enthusiasm.
Mrs. Graham Rawson would not
have allowed them to indulge in
either.. You may ask what Mrs. Graham Rawson had to do with it, but
that is merely because you have not
lived in the Suburb. She was the
wife of the chairman of the Sensible
Party, and he knew it, and the party
knew it, singularly well. No one ever
dared to like her, but many have
feared her. Within the Sensible Party
she reigned supreme. Some people
have wondered at her power. For she
is not richer than her neighbours; she
can never have been good to look at
There is no reason to suppose that
she has an intellect. But she believes
in herself intensely. She is by nature
unable to conceive that she could
make a mistake, or that anyone but
herself deserves consideration. Thp
consequence is great ability in being
rude. She regards the world as a
vulgar place, inhabited by her inferiors. People better off than herself
she considers not respectable. People
worse off she calls the lower classes.
People of about her own income she
patronises or bullies. She comes of
one of the oldest families in Clap
ham.
And now you will readily understand why she was the ruler of the
Sensible Party, and the Suburb elected an Insensible by a large majority.
So now I will begin the story.
Mrs. Graham Rawson, when she
allowed the party to choose Edale as
its candidate, knew little more of him
than you will find in Burke. She had
him to dinner on approval, and Edale
opened his mouth only to eat and
drink. This commended him to Mrs.
Graham Rawson, who is interested in
no conversation but her own. Kdale
has since explained that he was
afraid to speak, for fear he should
scream.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson gave
the party her conge d'elire, and Edale
was chosen as the Sensible candidate,
and Mr. and Mrs. Graham Rawson
held a reception ("Evening Dress to
meet Lord Edale") in the Alexandra
Hall.
Behold yourself now in the Alexandra Hall. It is like many halls in
many suburbs. Virulent draughts
come from all points of the compass.
The pa:nt on the walls appears to suffer from some disease. There is a
stage at one end with battered footlights and diseased palms and a curtain painted with the kind of landscape you see in a nightmare. On the
floor of the hall are assembled the
Sensibles of the Suburb, the Sensible
wives and daughters. With all humility we approach Mrs. Graham Raw-
son. Mrs. Graham Rawson is massive. On her head is a tower of frizzy
hair and some jewels. Her dress is
brocade in a large pattern of yellow
and black. The impression she gives
you is—size.
The thin man, looking exhausted,
behind her is, of course, her husband.
The tall man on her left, with
straw-coloured hair and a straight,
straw-coloured moustache, and eyes
more than half shut, is Lord Edale.
But Edale was looking out of his
eyes. He was observing the manners
and customs of Mrs. Graham Raw-i
son. With most of her guests she
shook hands in a way that suggested
doubt of their persona! cleanliness or
suspicion that they suffered from contagious disease. To most of them she
said no more than four words in the
sort of voice you hear from the telephone. But to a select few she was
almost polite. A select few were presented to Edale.
The few and the many remained
permanently separate. Around Mrs.
Graham Rawson gathered the few—
the superior people. Afar off herded
the many. The few people stared at
the many; the many eyed the few furtively. Edale began to understand
why the Suburb as a whole was not
anxious to belong to the Sensible
Party.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson re-
j ceived a shock. "Mrs. Rawson," said
a voice. She shuddered. Not for
many years had anyone dared to omit
the Graham. She glared. "Mrs.
Rawson," said Edale, placidly, "don't
you  think  if we  did  a  little  mixin'
 ?"    He  indicated with  nods the
many and the few.
Mrs. Graham Rawson frowned at
him, then frowned at the many.
"Those, Lord Edale, are the tradespeople," she said, severely.
"Awfully good of you to let them
come in at the front door," Edale
drawled. "I say, they look almost
human."
"Tradespeople   and   others   of   the
lower classes," Mrs. Graham Rawson,
impervious,   continued;    "we   receiv
them   on   these   occasions,   but,   of
course, they appreciate their position,
and "
"What an exhilaratin' time they
must have!" Edale drawled.
Mrs. Graham Rawson frowned at
the interruption. " -and," she continued with emphasis, "they do not
attempt to mix with my friends."
Even as the words left her lips, her
extensive face darkened. "Kindly tell
my daughter to come to me at once!"
she snapped.
Edale opened his eyes. "Is your
daughter like you?" he asked, amiably.
Mrs. Graham Rawson stared. "Oh,
of course. She was away when you
dined with me. There she is—talking," the outraged mother gasped—
"talking to the grocer."
"I'm ashamed to say I don't know
a   grocer   when   I   see   one,"    Edale
drawled.
"The young man by the wall in a
white waistcoat.    She is in white."
Edale   saw a girl   of   lithe,   light
form, of delicate, pale face,   "ls that
really your daughter?" he asked.
"Lord Edale!"
"I beg pardon, I beg pardon. Of j
course you niust know best."
"She is considered like my husband."
"Eh? Oh, yes. Yes, of course. I
forgot your husband."
Mrs. Graham Rawson made the
sound which in lower animals is called a snort. "Kindly send her to me,"
she snapped.
Edale strolled across the hall. The
girl in white and her grocer seemed
to him quite happy. He stopped and
made friends with some of the "lower
classes." Mrs. Graham Rawson
glared. Edale ultimately attained to
the grocer. "I have to introduce myself," said he, bowing. "The fact is,
Miss Graham Rawson, your mother
asked me to send you to her; but
there's no reason why you should
go."
"Oh!"—the girl blushed painfully
—'"oh! yes, I—I—thank you—I must
go."
"She could really get on quite well
without you," Edale drawled, "if you
weren't so visible." He turned a
humorous eye to her grocer.
"I must go. Good-bye, I—Mr.
Mr. Knight, good-bye!" she fled.
Mr. Knight looked after her, and
Edale looked at Mr. Knight. "Sorry,"
said Edale.
"Thanks," said Mr. Knight .gruffly,
and turned on his heel.
"I'm afraid I've lost a vote," said
Edale to himself. He meandered for
a while among the "lower classes,"
and at last, approaching the outskirts
of the superior people, came upon
something that could not be passed.
A piquant face of strawberry and
cream—a face with short nose and
short upper lip, and a strong little
chin, a round creamy neck and brown
hair glistening with gold, a little form
of joyous curves. "I'm sure I've been
introduce dto you," said Edale.
Brown eyes smiled. "You're mistaking me for my father, Lord Edale,"
said this delectable girl.
"I am," said Edale. "Please introduce me to your daughter." She gave
a little, low laugh and held out her
hand. Edale annexed that. "I didn't
catch your name," he suggested.
"Of course, my name is the same as
my father's."
"As yet," Edale admitted. "But not
your Christian name?"
"Aren't you a little expeditious,
Lord Edale?"
i "It is pleasanter to go slow sometimes, isn't it? I like lingerin' over
makin'  friends and—other things."
"I think we had better linger. Here
is my father." A pleasant, plump little man approached. "Now, will you
mistake him for me?"
"No. I don't know how to talk to
daughters. He shall bc a father to
me, too."
She looked away from him with a
laugh in her eyes. "Well, Nancy,'
said her father, arriving, "who are
you making fun of now?"
"I think it was mc," said Edale,
modestly.
"Ah, well, you mustn't mind Nancy,
my lord."
Edale smiled upon Nancy with benevolence. "I don't," he assured her.
"Papa wants to talk about politics,
not me, Lord Edale." ,
Edale sighed. "Well, my lord,"
said Nancy's father, "I'm the secretary of the party, and "
"You will see a great deal of me,
sir," said Edale, with an eye upon
Nancy.
"Honoured, my lord, I'm sure."
The little man was much pleased.
"May I ask what you think of our
party now?"
Edale's eyelids fell again. Again
he looked asleep, "It's too respectable by heaps," he drawled.
The little man stared up at him,
Nancy, too, looked up with interest.
"Between ourselves, my lord," said
the little man, "between ourselves—I
can't say you're wrong. But 1 hope
you'll make plenty of friends."
"The lirst thing I'll havc to do is to
make some enemies," Edale drawled.
The little man gasped.   Then Edale
engaged  him  to dine,  and  departed.
(Continued on Page Eight)
The Taylor Mill Co.
Limited.
All kinds of Building Material,
LUMBER
SASH
DOORS
TELEPHONE 564
North Government St., Victoria
Y. W. C. A.
1208 Government Street
VICTORIA.
Reading and rest rooms, lunch and
tea rooms. Instruction in English,
French, Music, Physical Culture,
Needlework, Domestic Science, etc.
Bible Class. Social evening every
Wednesday.
Y. M. C. A.
A home for young men away from
home. Comfortable Reading Room,
Library, Game Room, Billiards, Hot
and Cold Shower Baths, Gymnasium
and efficient instruction.
Manitoba Free Press on file for
Middle West visitors.
40 BROAD STREET
VICTORIA
ST. ANDREW'S
COLLEGE
TORONTO
A Besides!!*! aad Day School for Boys
r
TRAVELLERS' GUIDE
VICTOBIA
STRAND HOTEL
VICTORIA
The home ol all theatrical and raudcf Ue
artifti while in the Capital city, alia of
other kindred bohemians.
WRIQHT & FALCONER, Prapriatara.
CAMBOBNE
The Eva Hotel
CAMB-BRNE, B. C.
Headquarters for mining men and
commercial travellers.
JOHN A. THEW, Proprietor.
BANFF, ALTA
Hotel King Edward
Banff1! Most Popular $_ a Day Hotel.
Close to Station and Sulphur}
Baths.
N. K. LUXTON, Proprietor.
PHOENIX.
Deane's Hotel
PHOENIX, B. C.
New. Modern hot water system. Blectrt*
lighted. Tub aad ahower batha and laundry la
connection.  The miner,' heme.
" DANNY" DEANB, Proprietor
ML
Whm
iBllfe*—
Handsome New Buildings. Larg*
Athletic Field. Careful Oversight in
every Department. First Class Staff.
Lower and Upper School. Boys prepared for the Universities and Business.
Calendar sent on Request.
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A..I.L.D-
Principal
Re-opens after Xmas on Jan. 8th, 1908.
BOND SIGN CO.
VANCOUVER
Signs
ELECTRIC
BOARD
METAL
BULLETIN
GLASS
COTTON
SHOW CARD
In up-to-date styles.   Estimates aad
designs furnished.
HOLLY TREES
Mm frees n •tam te fc.ee, _\u_t__\%
te mm.   Write fer icei mi tret eata-
JAY * CO. VICTORIA, B. C.
LATEST NUMBERS
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CHUMS
TIT-BITS
THE STRAND
PEARSONS
PUNCH
KNIGHT'SBOOKSTORE
TIOTOBIA, B. 0.
ROSSLAND
Hoffman House
ROSSLAND, B. C.
Rates $i.oo per day and up.   Cafe ia
Connection.
OREEN & SHITH. Prep'i.
NELSON.
HOTEL HUME
NELSON,  B. C,
Leading Hotel of th* Keotentys.
J. FRBP HUME,      -      Proprietor.
Silver King Hotel,
NBL50N. B. C.
Th* horn* of th* Industrial Workers
of th* Kootenays.
W. E. ncCendllah,
Proprietor
Royal Hotel
NELSON, B. C.
The BeBt Family Hotol in ths City.
11.90 a day.
Mrs. Wm. Roberts,       Preprietreee
BEDDING
PLANTS
Cheap Prices.   Get our price list.
Johnston's Seed Store
City Market
VICTORIA
Victoria
FRUIT
and
Farm Lands
Write ior "Home List" and
information.
R.   S.   DAY
and
BEAUMONT BOQOS
Realty Broken.
690 1-OBT ITUIT      II      TIOTOBIA.
nOMAS OATTBBAtt
Bailor  an* ••■•ral Oaattaatai.
T*n**r» givm on Brick, Has* an
Fram*. Alterations, Parquetry FlMrlnt
OBc*. Bank, Star* cat Sale*n nttlagi
Pile DrlTtai. Wli4f*M aad D«ok Ike4
oMstruetai and r*»alr*A THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
OLLA P0DR1DA
Ki^^*JKM«^^!i^!«
Observant.
Mr. Meane—"I   have   nothing   but
I praise for the new minister."
Mr. Goode—"So I noticed when the
plate came around."
Not To Be Seen.
"Is your sister in?" inquired the
gentleman caller.
"Yes," replied the youth of the
house; "but you can't see her."
"Oh!   Is she sick?"     .*'.
"Nope; she ain't sick. She's gone
an' locked herself in, so's nobody kin
see her."
"How ridiculous! Is she indisposed?"    '
"Nope; she's in the bath."
Expert Opinion.
"I like to hear your wife talk," remarked the-visitor. "She has such
liquid tones, as it were."
"You bet she has," replied the hus-
"band. "Her talk simply drowns every
other sound."—Chicago News.
Neighbourly Cordiality.
Mrs. Gadder (rising to depart)—
Well, you must come and call on me
some day.   It's your turn now.
Mrs. Chillicon-Kearney — Yes; I
think it has been my turn for the last
five or six times, hasn't it?—Chicago
Tribune.
The Rural Accommodation.
"I see you have a rural trolley line
down here now," remarked the city
drummer. "Does it carry many passengers?"
"Wall, I should say it docs, stranger," boasted the old postmaster.
"The last car that passed carried sixteen men, ten women folk, six children, eight live chickens, four geese,
two turkeys, a livepig and a possum
in a trap. If the platform had been
a little wider they could have got Jeff
Weatherby's red calf aboard. Passengers? Wall I reckon the Sandy
Bottom and Frog Holler Railroad
hauls them, stranger." — Chicago
News.
Caught With the Goods.
Mrs. Naybor—Yes, Mrs. Swellinan
has been robbed of her jewels and
Mrs. Meanley is the guilty	
Mrs. Sububs—Gracious! You don't
mean to say she stole	
Mrs. Naybor—What else is it but
stealing? She offered the cook $8 a
week and the maid $8 a week, and
now she has them. — Philadelphia
Press.
Just the Same Hours.
"When a man's engaged to a girl,'
said Miss Singleton, "his idea of good
hours is to stay from 8 o'clock until
any time after midnight."
"Yes," replied Mrs. Bricrly, "and
even after marriage thc hours are the
same. The only difference is that in
one case they are hours 'with her,' and
in the other 'away from her.' "—Philadelphia Press.
The Postman Arrives.
"I thought the. door bell rang ;i
few minutes ago," said Mr. House-
keep, at breakfast.
"So it did," replied his wife, "and
Bridget answered it."
"But what's keeping her so long?"
"A postal card, perhaps."—Philadelphia Press.
The Innocent Must Suffer.
"Music has charms to soothe the
savage breast," quoted the young lady
with a simper, as she seated herself
at the piano.
"That may be," muttered a crusty
bachelor, "but there are sonic of us in
this crowd who are civilized and deserve a little consideration."—Philadelphia Inquirer.
Meat of the Nut.
"Your honour," said the lawyer, "1
ask the dismissal of my client on thc
ground that the warrant fails to state
that he hit Bill Jones with malicious
intent."
"This court," replied the country
justice, "ain't a graduate of none of
your technical schools. I don't care
what he hit Bill with. The p'int is,
did he hit him? Perceed."—Philadelphia Ledger.
He Was a Clergyman.
A couple of New Yorkers were
playing golf on a New Jersey course
on election day when they saw a fine-
appearing gentleman looking at them
wistfully. They asked him to join the
game, which he did with alacrity. He
was mild in speech and manner, and
played well. But once when he made
a foozle, he ejaculated vehemently
the word:
"Croton!"
A few minutes later when he made
another bad play, he repeated:
"Croton!"
The fourth time he said this, one
of his new-made friends said: "I do
not want to be inquisitive, but will
you tell me why you say 'Croton' so
often?"
"Well," said the gentleman, "isn't
that the biggest dam near New
York?"
He was a Presbyterian clergyman
from Brooklyn.—Exchange.
His Occupation.
"You say you have an occupation?"
asked the lady at the back door of
the itinerant.
"Yes, ma'am; I'm a wrestler, ma'am."
"A wrestler?"
"Yes, ma'am; I wrestle with poverty, ma'am."—Yonkers Statesman.
Kind Mrs. Brown—Here, my poor
man, take this shilling; it may help
you to find work.
Bill Borntired—Thank you kindly,
lady; just put it in me weskit pocket,
will yer, mum?—Philadelphia Inquirer.
$1,000 Reward
THE GOVERNMENT of the
PROVINCE of BRITISH COLUMBIA hereby offers a reward of ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the two men who, on the
25th day of February, 1908, at the
Gorge Hotel, near the City of Victoria, B.C., armed with revolvers, entered and, while committing a robbery
in the said Hotel, shot and wounded
one Richard Dancey.
DESCRIPTION.
No. 1—Man about 5 feet 11 inches in
height, slim build, dressed in dark-
colored clothing; wore dark cap.
No. 2—Man about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches
in height; slim build; dressed in
dark-colored clothing; wore dark
cap. Both men were armed with
dark-colored revolvers and wore
long white cotton masks.
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS reward will be given for information
leading to the arrest and conviction of
cither one of the said men.
By order, F. S. HUSSEY,
Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., 26th February, 1908.
OMINECA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Marie Philippi,
of Omaha, occupation, Lady, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of section 21, township
1, range 4, Poudrier Survey; thenee
north 80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of beginning, being said
section 21.
Dated January 15th, 1908.
MARIE PHILIPPI.
Feb. 15 A. Olson, Agent.
Readvertlsed from The Week of Oct. 24.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 1.
TAKE NOTICE that Vancouver Timber & Trading Co., of Vancouver, B.C.,
loggers, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lnnds, bounded as follows:—
1. Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north from the northeast corner of T.L. 11,892; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
nortli 80 ehains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 120 ehains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement.
Dated 14th day of October, 1907.
VANCOUVER TIMBER &
TRADING CO.,  LTD.
Feb. 22 C. O. P. Olts, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that W. N. Campbell
of Victoria, occupation Civil Engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of. lot 1294, (J.R.
Cody) one mile west of Jap Inlet, Porcher Island, thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence east 40 chains, containing  160 acres.
Dated Dec. 16th, 1907.
W. N.  CAMPBELL,
Jan 18 J. J. Templeton, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that J. J. Templeton
of Viotoria, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1293, M. S.
McLeod, one-half mile west of Jap Inlet Porcher Island, thence south 20
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 20 chains; thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
Dated December 16th, 1907.
Jan. 18 J. J. TEMPLETON.
ALBERNI LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert.
NOTICE is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Hon. Chief Commissioner of Lands
and Works for a special license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following  described  lands:—
Claim No. 1—Commencing at a post
planted on the shore at the S.E. corner of the north half of section 20,
township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south to
the beach; thence easterly along the
beach to point of commencement.
Located January 26, 1908.
MRS. FRANCIS GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that M. J. Kinney, of
Portland, Ore., occupation Lumberman,
intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described  land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Rupert
District, where the said line intersects
the shore line of the east side of Marble
Bay; thence northerly following the
shore line a distance of about 200
chains to the northeast corner of lot
315.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907
M. J. KINNEY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound,
TAKE NOTICE that The Quatsino
Power and Puly Company, of Victoria,
B.C., occupation, A Pulp Company, intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north line of Township 10, Marble
Cove, Rupert District, where the said
line intersects the shore line on the
east side of Marble Bay; thence south*
erly following the shore line a distance
of about 120 chains to a point intersecting the mouth of Marble Creek.
Staked the 16th day of December, 1907.
THE QUATSINO POWER
& PULP COMPANY.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Rupert, Quatsino Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that Enoch A. White,
of Vietoria, B.C., occupation Lumberman, intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described foreshore:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of an Indian Reserve
at the head of Quatsino Narrows, Rupert
District, thenee southerly following the
shore line a distance of about 160 chains
to a point intersecting the mouth of
Marble Creek, including small island on
north line of section  10.
ENOCH A. WHITE.
Jan.4 Robert A. Grlerson, Agent.
Irthur Gore.
,   Manager.
TIMBER MAPS
Office. Phone I53-4:
/?_rs/or/vcc 438
ELECTRIC BLUE PRINT I MAP CO.
VICTORIA. B.C..
CHAN CERY    CHAMBERS.
BLUE PRINTING
SZ LANGLEY   STftEET.
DRAUGHTING OFFICE.
Complete    set of Maps show/ny all
TIMBER   LICENCES
and other Lands   taken  up in Br itish Columbia.
Blue  Prints  can be   obtained at short notice.
Claim No. 2—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains to the beach; thence easterly and
northerly along beach to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
CHRISTEN   JACOBSEN.
Claim No. 3—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
28, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; 640 acres, more
or less.
MRS. CHRISTINA McALPINE,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 4—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
19, township 18; thence north 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east to shore; thence
along shore to point of commencement.
Located January 25, 1908.
FRANCIS J. A. GREEN.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.E. corner of section
24. township 27; thenoe north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 26, 1908.
WILLIAM EDWARD NORRIS.
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 6—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. eorner of seotion
30, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 26,  1908.
WILLIAH TYRONE POWER,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 7—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S.E. corner of section 30, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commeneement;  640 acres,  more or less.
Located January 29,  1908.
TYNINGHAM VERE PIGOTT,
Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
Claim No. 8—Commencing at a post
planted at the S.W. corner of section
31, township 18; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement; 640 acres, more or
less.
Located January 29, 1908.
MINA C. E. NORRIS,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 9—Commencing at a post
planted about 40 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 31, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commeneement.
GEORGE DAY,
Per Christen Jacobsen. Agent.
Claim No. 10—Commencing at a post
planted about 60 chains north of the
S. E. corner of section 28, township 18;
thence north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains to point of commencement; 640 acres, more or less.
Located January 25, 1908.
WELLINGTON McALPINE,
Feb. 22      Per Christen Jacobsen, Agent.
SKEENA  LAND  DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Noakes,
of Victoria, B.C., occupation Civil Engineer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land—on Poroher Island:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 1292, about 2
miles distant and in a southeasterly direction from Jap Bay; thence north 40
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains; thence west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres, more or less.
Dated Deo. 20th, 1907.
Jan. 18 ARTHUR NOAKES.
KOKSAILAH MINERAL CLAIM.
Situated in the Victoria Mining
Division of Helmcken District, on
Koksailah Mountain, west of and adjoining "The Bluebell" mineral claim.
Take Notice, that I, Lars Nicholas
Anderson, of Victoria, B.C., Free
Miner's Certificate No. B17380, intend
60 days from the date hereof, ot apply
to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of
the above claim.
And further take notice that action
under Section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated at Victoria this 23rd day of
January, A.D. 1908.
LARS NICHOLAS ANDERSON.
NEW WESTMINSTER LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast, Range 2.
TAKE NOTICB that George Young
and Arthur Bell, of Victoria, B.C., timber dealers, intend to apply for the
right to purchase the following described lands ln Kildalla Bay, Rivers
Inlet:—Commencing at a post planted
on the east side of the bay, about one-
third of a mile from the point at the
mouth of the bay, being the southwest
corner post; thence east 20 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence west 20
chains to beach; thence south along
beach to point of commencement; containing 40 acres, more or less.
Staked November 25th, 1907.
GEORGE YOUNG & ARTHUR BELL,
Jan. 11 George Young, Agent.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that William Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation Farmer,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thenee north 20 chains
to McClure Lake; thenee along McClure
Lake ln an east southerly direction 43
chains, more or less; thence west 40
chains to place of beginning and making 40 acres more or less, and known
as the southwest fractional quarter section of 86, township 5, Range 6.
Dated November 20, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Jennie Croteau
of Aldermere, B.C., occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner; thence north 40 chs.;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thenoe west 40 chains to place
of beginning and known as the northwest quarter section of 30, Tp. 6, Rge.
5,  and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
Dated 23rd of November, 1907.
Jan. 18 WILLIAM CROTEAU.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineea.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about .
20 ehains north of the north shore of \
Stuart Lake, about 29 miles west of
Fort St, James; thence north 80 chains;
thenee west 80 chains; thenee south 80
ehains; thence east 80 ohains; to point
of commeneement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 32 miles
west of Fort St. James on the south
line of timber licence staked ln my
name on October 26th, 1907; thenee west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, Intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake, about three
miles west of Fort St. James; thence
north 40 chains; thence east 160 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west 160
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 29th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
SKEENA LAND DISTRICT.
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICB that William Rose, of
Ingersol, Ont., Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described land:
Cemmenclng at a post planted about
two miles south of Refuge Bay, on the
west coast of Porcher Island and at the
northwest corner of lot 1282, Cassiar
district; thenee east 80 ehains; thenee
north 20 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south following coast line to
point of cammencement, containing 160
WILLIAM ROSS.
Jan 11. A. O. Noake, Agent.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE*NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 29
miles west of Fort St. James and on
the eat line of my location No. 1;
thence north 80 chains; thence east 80
ehains; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains to point of commeneement, and containlug 640 acres, more
or less.
Dated November 24th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following desoribed lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north side of Stuart Lake about 30
miles west of Fort St. James and at
the northwest corner of my location
No. 2; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 24th,  1907.
Feb. 16 GBORGB B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE  LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca,
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank, of Tather River, about four
miles up the river, above the Tather
Indian Village, thence west 80 ohains;
thence south 80 chaina; thence east 80
ehains; more or less to river bank;
thenoe following river up stream to
point of commeneement and containing
640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 21st,  1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
.  STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineea.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence ovar the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
north shore of the north arm of Stuart
Lake, about 6 miles easterly from the
head of said arm; thence north 40
chains; thence west 160 chains; thence
south 40 chains; more or less to Lake
shore; thence east following shore line
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
Dated November 26th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICE that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber licence over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on east
bank of Sowchca Creek, about 1ft miles
south of the south line of the Indian
Reserve at the south end of Stuart
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains to point of commencement and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 16th, 1907.
Feb. 15 GEORGE B. WATSON.
STUART LAKE LAND DISTRICT.
District of Omineca.
TAKE NOTICB that George B. Watson, of Fort Steele, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for a special
timber lieenee . over the following described lands'.—
Commencing at a post planted on the
south shore of Trembleur Lake, about
one mile west of outlet; thence south
80 ehains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains to lake shore; thence
following shore line to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
Dated November 20th, 1907.
Feb. 16 GBORGB B. WATSON. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908.
^oooooo-oooooooooooo-ooooooooooo^
?&<>0000<H><><H><><>0©-00©-00000'0'0©0^
♦
V
Furniture Newness Everywhere
Apparent.   Daily Visits Should
be the Rule, Now.
Spring Wedding
Season's
Gift Problem
_ In the wonderful exhibition of
fancy china, art pottery, cut glass
and other objects, collected especially for the occasion, the gift
problem is easily settled here, no
matter how much or little you
figure to expend.
•I You should see the beautiful decor*
ated bits of china, the dazzling pieces
of cut glass, the marvelous things in
pottery. French, German, English
and Austrian imports together with
the distinguished American products
—all here in splendid variety and
attractive values.
fl Come in and enjoy the feast of
things artistic.
This Spring?   Then See This Unusual Showing
IN our Broughton Street windows, we are showing a few samples from our immense stock of
Spring Carpets and Squares—an exhibit of newness you should see. However, it is just a
taste of what is in store for you on our Second Floor. Never before in the history of this
store's business experience have we had such an immense stock of Carpets and Rugs; never
such a complete range of beautiful designs; never have we offered better Carpet values.
If you have ever had any experience with "cheap" Carpets, it is not necessary to advocate
the claims of the reliable sorts, for one experience with the former is usually sufficient. But
there are some who are about to invest in their first Carpets, who may perhaps be lured by the
apparent cheapness of some Carpet offerings. It is to these we wish to say: "Cheap" Carpets
aren't cheap, but very dear at any price. We are exclusive Victoria agents for the world's best
Carpet makers, and, buying the immense quantities we do, are in a position to offer you these
finest grades at the price usually asked for the "cheap" sorts. We ask you to investigate OUR
Carpet offerings.
A Special Showing of Art Pottery To-Day.
There is an interesting collection of Art Pottery in our showrooms today—some dainty and
unique examples from the foremost potteries of three continents, and representing the best efforts
of the potters of several countries. From the handsome and interesting Japanese Cloisonne and
Satsuma to the less costly, yet dainty and novel, Ioga; from the artistic examples of Ruskin Pottery to the odd and curious reproductions of Ancient Rome, as shown in Basaltine ware, the
windows and our China showrooms offer "food" for an interesting half hour or more of "looking.''
One line to which we call special attention is the Ruskin Pottery. This is a line with which
we are positive you'll be delighted. The aims of Ruskin Pottery are good potting, beauty of form
and rich and tender colorations. The potting is so good it makes the ware as delightful to handle
as to look upon. The shapes are such as grow only under artistic guidance, and the colorings are
so delightful as to rival Eastern Cloisonne enamels, and are suggestive of rich hues seen in rock
pools by the sea—but Ruskin is only one of many interesting lines we show in our showrooms.
Don't you think you can spare a half-hour today?
OUT-OF-TOWN ORDERS PACKED AND SHIPPED PROMPTLY.
Don't hesitate to send us your orders for China and Glassware from your country home.
Matchings for sets or other needs, the selection of which you may confidently leave to us, will
have most careful attention. Just give us a price limit and a general description. No matter
how small or large the order,,the packing will ensure safe carriage to any distance. Selections
made of articles suitable for card prizes, the best value being assured.
Special" Showing   of  "Kitchen »
Things" on  Our First Floor. +
♦
New Lines Shown.
Supplies for
Restaurants
and Hotels
1_ Do you believe that the largest
and finest collection of Hotel
Supplies in this section is herein
our establishment?
<I Fact!
■^ Do you know that we control
the best patterns in hotel china
made at home and abroad and
carry the most complete stocks of
glassware and bar goods?
fl If you will take tbe pains to investigate you will discover it's a fact.
fl Placing direct orders before tbe
goods are made, large and continuous,
enables the manufacturer to cut the
prices to us, which means a big saving
to our hotel customers.
_ You can prove it any time you drop in.
DAINTY CHINA
In the China store are hundreds of dainty pieces suitable for wedding gifts, card
prizes, etc. You'll be surprised at the low prices on
some of these dainty pieces.
Come in and stroll through.
WEILER BROS.
Complete Home Furnishers,       VICTORIA.
SPRING FURNITURE.
The splendid offerings of our
Furniture Department are attracting special attraction
these days. We have now
an unusually good showing
and we invite you to come in
and see this display. Third
and Fourth Floors.
IVancouver
Horse Show.
There is no more popular attraction
I now-a-days than a first class horse
I show.   In England, United States and
J Eastern   Canada,   it   draws   larger
I crowds of people than any other func-
Ition.    The reason for this is not far
Ito see.   Inherent in the human race
I is a love of animals, and the horse is
I the noblest of all animals.  There may
Ibe more fascination about the wild
beasts of the forest because of their
dangerous  propensities,  but  fascin.v
I tion merges into admiration and even
(affection for the graceful animal which
I has been curbed and trained to the
luses of civilised man..  So universal
lis  this admiration that in the tem-
Iperate    zone    civilization    may    be
[gauged by the extent of the homage
paid to the horse.   Horse worship is
_ species of hero worship.   The lover
r>f horses fulfils his ambition when
|ie owns and drives a span of thoroughbreds.   In this day of exhibition
Tnd   competition   no   self-respecting
■nan is content to drive a scrub.   He
|ooks for breed, and with it style and
•lass.   Indeed it may fairly be said
Ihat the day of the scrub has gone by.
lixpress   Companies, Transfer  Companies, as well as hack drivers employ
very different class of horse now-
-days from the ill-bred, under-sized
linimal   which   did   duty   twenty-five
'ears ago.   The farmer has led the
Ivay in  this  improvement,  and it is
ho  uncommon  thing  now-a-days  to
find, even in the new province of
British Columbia, thoroughbred stock
engaged in the ordinary work of the
farm, while many an aristocrat of the
turf, worth one thousand, two thousand, or even three thousand dollars,
is broken in at the plough tail. The
one conspicuous factor in achieving
this result has been the Horse Show.
To view the lovely and graceful animals which parade, or perform, on
such occasions is a liberal education
in itself. It not only illustrates the
difference between well-bred and ill-
bred stock, but it opens the eyes of
the public to the possibilities and exploits of animals well-bred and well-
trained. For this reason all the world
flocks to the Horse Show. It is a
public exhibition, and the greatest society function of the year. The community which has such an institution
firmly established in its midst, not
only stamps itself progressive, but attains a reputation which becomes a
valuable asset from every standpoint.
The forthcoming Horse Show at Vancouver marks a new departure and
shows that the Terminal City has
reached that stage of development
mhen it is entitled on every ground
to rank with the leading cities of the
Dominion. Seattle, Portland, Tacoma
and Spokane will all contribute largely to the new venture, and success is
assured by the generous response
which has already been made.
a week's engagement in his new play
"The Wheel of Love." Mr. Gilmore
long ago became a positive local favorite and the enthusiasm which
greeted him yesterday is the best evidence that his popularity grows from
year to year, like the proverbial green
bay tree. The principal reason is
perhaps to be found in the fact that
he is always honest with his public.
His sincerity not only as to his own
art, but in the matter of production
has earned him a reward well worth
working for.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Paul Gilmore.
Paul Gilmore has come to Portland
for his annual visit and opened with
a matinee at the Marquam yesterday
Electric Lights.
Victoria, March 5.
Editor The Week.
Dear Sir,—I have not a copy of
the by-laws by me, but if you look
them up you will find one section
which says that the inspector is to
keep a book and record all installation with full particulars such as number of lights and switche-i, size of
wire, whether the wire is properly
insulated, etc. Now then, we come
to the point. Is this book kept? If
so, the inspector should know exactly
how many lights were in each house
at the time of inspection and if any
have been added since without inspection. The question arises: What is
the use of having ninety-nine lights
in one house thoroughly insulated
when the one hundredth is bared and
liable to fire the house at any time.
I do not know whether the inspector
has power to enter any house at reasonable  hours  to ascertain  this  fact
or having the power does not exercise
it. One thing I do know he should
have power and exercise it a little
like the sanitary and other inspectors.
There are houses in this city with 40
or 50 feet of flexible wire on one
light. Is this safe? Will this pass
inspection? If so inspection is very
lax compared with other cities. What
is the use of an inspector or inspection when such things are allowed?
Why is it that only new houses come
under inspection and after inspection
any number of lights can be added
without inspection. There are a number of houses in the city which were
wired before an inspector was appointed. This is no reason why they
do not come under inspection now
there is an inspector. Another question crops up. Does a person safeguard his own house by having it inspected when there are veriitable fire-
traps on each side of them and back
and front.
We constantly hear about defective
wires being the cause of fire (I pass
no comment whether they are or not),
but simply say with the wiring in this
city we should all be too frightened to
go to sleep.
With regard to the by-laws they
certainly want revising and adding to,
and thc inspector wants to come under some department to which he will
have to report his day's work. Then
this state of affairs will be at an end.
There is one more point which calls
for comment. Wc have several large
buildings for public use, such as
churches, theatres, halls, etc.. which
are dependent on electricity alone for
their lighting. This is deplorable. In
the event of the lights suddenly going out while a ghost story is being
told, there would be a stampede and
with no gas jets to mark the exits
and give a faint light in the hall the
death roll would be appaling. Who
is responsible for this satte of affairs?
"LUX."
"My wife never pays any attention
to what I say."
"Mine does—sometimes."
"How do you manage it?"
"I talk in my sleep,"
wmntNiK
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
Social Event of thc Season—A guaranteed Attraction.
JULES MURRY
Presents
PAUL GILMORE
In an Up-to-date  Comedy
THE WHEEL OF LOVE
A Semi-Western Automobile Play,
by George V. Hobart, author of Mrs.
Wilson, May Irwin's Last Season's
Success, Mclntyre & Heath's Great
Hit, "The Ham Tree," Song Birds,"
Eleven John Henry Book's," Creator
of The Famous "Dinkel Spiel Stories,''
and Co-author of Lillian Russell's
Stupendous Success "Wildfire,"
Wonderful Scenic and Light Effects.
Carriages at 10,45.   No Free List.
PRICES: $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c, asc. THE WEEK, SATURDAY, MARCH ,7, 1908.
POLITICS  AND  THE   GROCER.
(Continued from Page Five)
The little man was left gasping. "I
must say, my dear," said he to Nancy,
"there's a—a—a celerityp about
him."
"He's fun," said Nancy.
In the next few weeks some things
happened in the Suburb. That is unusual and not considered quite respectable.
It was largely the fault of the grocer. And here, lest you should think
this story beneath your dignity, let
me explain.that he was not really an
ordinary grocer. Even Mrs. Algernon
Jobson, junior, admits that he is "in
quite a large way." The fact is,
Knight and Son occupy "spacious
premises" in the high-road, and supply all the Suburb with the Sort of
things that the modern grocer does
supply.
Knight and Son were both concerned in the crime; but Son was more
villainous. Son—Jack Knight—proposed to Miss Graham Rawson that
she should marry him. To acquire
some faint notion of what this would
look like to Mrs. Graham Rawson,
conceive of an insect proposing to
take to wife the daughter of an archangel. You can hardly think that the
angelic daughter would consent. But
Miss Graham Rawson did. Then—
•this is one of the signal instances of
British heroism—Jack Knight went to
Mrs. Graham Rawson.
Now we come _o his father's offence. Mrs. Graham Rawson scorned
"the lower classes" to much to pay
them cash. She had a bill with
Knight and Son which appeared to
Mr. Knight too long. So he sent it
in with the comment: "Prompt payment would oblige," and on the same
day Jack Knight went to Mrs. Gra-
Iham Rawson to talk matrimony. It
was a little unfortunate. Jack Knight
found the lady, whose daughter he
came for, fuming over his father's bill.
There was some confusion at first, for
Mrs. Graham Rawson thought he
wanted her money, and abused him
for that, while he was trying to explain that he wanted her daughter.
She grasped the situation at last.
Into a few crowded minutes she compressed rudeness enough for nine
lives. Then Jack Knight—what else
could he do?—went away. And then
Mrs. Graham Rawson sent for her
daughter. What she said to the girl
it is unpleasant to imagine. She has
not a wholesome mind.
Mary Graham Rawson was ill for
some time afterwards. When she
came downstairs again, her mother
forbade her to write to Jack Knight,
or to speak to him, or to see him.
(This sort of thing seemed to Mrs.
Graham Rawson to savour of the true
aristocratic temper.) You may despise the girl for obeying; but think
how little spirit you would have for
yourself if you lived for twenty-two
years in the same house as Mrs. Graham Rawson. Remember also that
Mrs. Graham Rawson threw herself
zealously into the work of a gaoler
and a spy.
These double duties, no doubt, distracted her attention from Edale.
Edale was being busy. He did much
visiting in the Suburb, and his choice
of people to visit would have horrified Mrs. Graham Rawson. They included not only Knight and Son, but
many other specimens of "the lower
classes." And Edale arrived at the
conclusion that if hc wanted to be
elected, he would have to educate his
party into being less respectable and
more human. Hc had no hope of
making Mrs. Graham Rawson very
human; but of the other ruling powers of the Sensiblcs there might be
some chance. Thc little man who
rejoiced in the double honour of being secretary to the Sensiblcs and
Nancy's father, and whose name is
Mr. King, dined with Edale, and
Edale dined with him, and found him
almost as human as his daughter.
Edale went to pay thc after-dinner
call on Mrs. King.   As he knocked at
the door it opened.
"You—horror!" said Nancy.
"I'm sorry to disappoint you, Miss
Kiug," said  Edale,  entering.
Nancy was rosy from thc ripples of
gold brown hair on her brow to her
pale blue blouse. "Oh!" said Nancy,
"I thought you were my brother."
"I can never be a brother to you,'
said Edale, and looked at her solemnly. Then he observed that her hair
was in delicious disorder. An apron
covered her from her neck to her little toes. The cuffs of her blouse were
turned back to show the dainty promise of her arms.
"We're all higgledy-piggledy," said
Nancy.
"It's most becoming," said Edale,
and looked for somewhere to put his
hat. The hall was bare.
"You simply can't come in," said
Nancy.
"I'm awfully good in chaos," Edale
pleaded. "I can be more chaotic than
anyone, except the Prime Minister."
"Oh, we couldn't possibly have any
more chaos."
"And I can be as orderly as a first
lieutenant."
"Can you possibly speak the truth?
Oh, but truly you can't come in. You
see what I'm like—and the rooms are
worse—and mother, poor mother!"
Edale put his hat and stick down
on the floor. "Miss King, you wanted
a brother. You'll find me much more
use than a brother."
Nancy looked at him with her head
on one side. "But much less obedient," said Nancy. She was smiling,
but her cheeks were rosy.
Edale began to take off his frock-
coat.
"Oh, what are you doing?" cried
Nancy in real alarm. She knew Edale
well enough to have fears about what
would come next.
"Something desperate," said Edale,
resuming his coat. "Where shall I do
it?"
Nancy looked at him a moment,
then gave a joyour little gurgling
laugh. "Up the steps," said Nancy,
and whirled away into the drawing-
room, which Edale found bare of furniture, with its carpet covered by
shiny white drugget. "Are you good
at drapery?"
"Splendid.    I'm a politician."
"Then get up there and do that like
this," said Nancy, succintly. The several doors of the room had been removed. One doorway was already
draped with folds of pale blue and
white. The other still required clothing. Necessary yards of pale blue and
white lay with hammer and tacks
upon the steps.
Edale ascended and began to work.
Nancy went to perfect the costume of
the other doorway.... There was for
a while an edifying display of energy,
... Then Edale spoke. His head was
invisible; his voice came muffled out
of folds of pale blue. "I get awful
morose when alone."
Nancy turned to see his rather ruffled head emerge. Nancy struggled—
gave a feeble, helpless chuckle—
laughed outright. Then her conscience, it is to be presumed, smote
her. She came swiftly to Edale's
steps. "It's an awful shame; and you
haven't even been asked," she said.
Edale looked down upon her from
on high. "You certainly might have
guessed I was a draper," he said,
gravely.
Nancy again collapsed into laughter. There was something extremely
incongruous in Lord Edale manipulating a cloud of pale blue musiln, and
his usually sedate, straw-coloured hair
had a dissipated appearance. Nancy
strove with herself. "No. Oh, no.
I mean—you see—I mean it's only i
little dance, and, really, mother didn't
like to ask you.   That's why."
"May I have the first and supper
waltzes?" said Edale, gravely.
Nancy hesitated. "You're doing
that very nicely," said she at last,
looking at his muslin. "And it would
only be fair."
"What a beastly reason!" said
Edale.
For a part of a second Nancy looked at him. "Yes," she said. "For no
reason at all."
"That will do, thank you," said
Edale, and went on with his muslin.
Nancy began to help with thc lower
folds. "I do hope you're sure you
want to come, Lord Edale. You see,"
she looked up with wickedness in her
eyes, "Mrs. Graham Rawson is coming."
"Ah!" Edale turned on the steps.
"And the grocer?"
Nancy became wholly serious. "No.
It wouldn't do any good. But isn't it
a shame?"
"It's nasty foolishness," said Edale,
wit henthusiasm, and then was about
to beg her pardon.   But-—
"Yes I" said Nancy, with hearty
sympathy.   "Poor Mary!"
"Is she coming?"
"Oh, yes. Her mother never lets
her out of her sight. ... Do you
know, I should like to be horribly,
horribly rude to Mrs. Graham Raw-
son."
"You're awfully human," said
Edale. For a little while they continued their labours in silence. . . .
Edale descended.
"Thank you," said Nancy, and
looked from door to door. "Yes,
they'll do." Then she swept critical
eyes round the room and finally let
them linger on Edale. "I suppose
you generally dance on a floor?" she
said.
Edale started. "I don't often dance
on a tight rope," he admitted.
"No. I mean parquet or polished
wood or something. You see, this is
drugget over a carpet. Tom always
says it's heavy going."
"Let's try," said Edale. And Nancy
was swept round in his arm.
Edale does anything that requires
him to move himself very well, and
Nancy is deliciously light of foot. . . .
They enjoyed themselves. . . . And
Mrs. King, entering, beheld her aproned daughter waltzing with Lord
Edale in his shirt-sleeves. "Nancy!"
said Mrs. King. "NANCY!" in large
capitals.
The waltz ended. "We were just
trying the drugget, mother," said
Nancy, calmly.
"And I've been a draper," Edale
explained.
"Lord Edale's rather a good draper,
really, mother '
"My dear child!"
" and he's coming to the dance
to-night."
Poor Mrs. King—she was heavily
aproned and rather flushed—gasped.
"I'm sure, Lord Edale, if you care to
come, I should be delighted. But I
don't know what you can possibly
think of Nancy."
"And I should like to know what
she thinks of me," said Edale. "You
must not blame me, Mrs. King. I was
determined on being a draper. I
shall be very glad to come to-night.
Thank you very much. But if I am
to come, I must go now." And he
went.
A little while after, Tom King, the
peccant brother, arrived. "You're a
horror!" said Nancy, severely. "I've
had to do it all by myself."
"Nancy!" her mother protested
aside.
"Mummy, don't!" Nancy whispered.
Tom was made to carry large palms
about, and rebuked as a brother
should be. . . .
Edale came early to the dance. Mrs.
King received him with less embarrassment in grey silk. Mr. King was
most genial. From them Edale swiftly reverted to Nancy; Nancy, a dainty
form of pale blue with white camellias in the glistening gold of her hair,
and coral pink against the cream of
her neck.
"You're beautifully punctual, Lord
Edale."
"I had to make sure of this first
waltz. Let me see—the first, the third,
the ninth, and supper, wasn't it?" said
Edale, shamelessly.
But Nancy's "Oh!" of horror was
not for him. To her alarm, to her
mother's, to her father's alarm, Jack
Knight, the offending grocer, had
stalked in. "Look!" gasped Nancy in
Edale's ear.
But Edale had quietly possessed
himself of her programme. "First—
third—ninth—supper," he said, writing.
"Oh, look!" Nancy entreated. "And
you kuow we didn't ask him!"
"That makes it all thc more enterprising of him," said Edale, blandly.
Nancy turned upon him swiftly. A
suspicion had suddenly possessed her.
But Edale looked (once again) like a
pleasant schoolboy asleep.
Jack Knight came to his unexpect-
ing  hostess.    She  and  her  husband
stared at him helplessly. They shook
hands with him like jointed dolls. And
even as they did so, Mrs. Graham
Rawson, massive, with jewels resplendent in her frizzy hair, sailed into the
room with her daughter. The wicked
grocer, turning from Mr. King's hand,
met Mrs. Graham Rawson face to
face. Mrs. Graham Rawson checked,
making noises like a motor under the
brake. Jack Knight stepped aside,
bowing, Mrs. Graham Rawson gave
the tips of her fingers to her alarmed
hostess. "I did not know, my dear,
that I was asked to meet the lower
classes," she said, in a strident voice.
"Good evening, Mrs. Graham Raw-
son!" said Lord Edale.
Mrs. Graham Rawson was actually
a trifle perturbed. However much
you may disapprove of him, you cannot, if you are of Mrs. Graham Raw-
son's faith, say that a real lord belongs to the lo-.ver classes. "I—I was
not referring to you, Lord Edale," she
stammered.   "I "
"You're too kind," said Edale. "I
think—have I had the pleasure of
meeting your daughter?"
Mrs. Graham Rawson made the unnecessary introduction. The girl
blushed painfully. Her hands were
trembling. "May I have the honour
of the first waltz?"
"I am sure Mary will be pleased,"
said Mrs. Graham Rawson.
Mary, without daring to look at
Edale, held out her programme. Once
again Edale engaged himself for the
first waltz. The music—a quartette
stationed in the hall—began. Nancy,
deserted, had the pleasure of seeing
Edale's arm go round Mary.
Mrs. Graham Rawson, with the
light of battle in her eye, looked
round for the peccant grocer. He had
vanished. Mrs. Graham Rawson
sought her hostess—who not unskilfully avoided her.
Mary was dancing very badly.
Edale had to save her once from a
fall. He felt her hand trembling in
his. But Edale himself danced like a
Viennese, and steering close on the
outskirts, began to talk softl yin the
girl's ear. "Don't be afraid. There's
nothing in this world worth being
afraid of. And everybody worth
counting on is on your side."
For the first time the girl looked in
his eyes.   "Lord Edale!"
"You know, if you haven't pluck,
you make a mess of all your life—and
somebody else's, too." Edale's voice
was low. He steered beautifully
round the edge of the dance. "You
mustn't be afraid any more. You
mustn't, for his sake. . . . And now
you're coming through the conservatory," he whirled sharply through the
doorway, and drew her on through
the gloom, "into the garden—where
the beggar ought to be."
They came down the steps to the
garden path. The fresh air met them.
Then suddenly the girl's hand tightened on Edale's arm: "Oh, Lord
Edale—I—I—indeed, I won't be a
coward."
The white shirt-front of Jack
Knight came out of the blackness.
Mary—this, perhaps, was not respectable—ran to it.
Edale turned away and lit a cigarette. "That must be quite gratify-
in'," he murmured to himself. "Well,
well. In this case virtue is goin' to
be its own reward." With great contentment he finished that cigarette.
Then another. "I feel excruciatin'ly
benevolent," said he. And he went in
to meet Mrs. Graham Rawson.
The third waltz had begun when he
entered the drawing-room again.
Nancy, forlorn against the wall, looked at him with reproach in her eyes.
Edale smiled upon her benevolently
and approached. Nancy stood very
straight, her chin up in the air. But
before Edale arrived, Mrs. Graham
Rawson crossed his path.
"Lord Edale! Where is my daughter?" she demanded.
"Really, I shouldn't like to say,"
Edale smiled an engaging smile. "But
I'm sure she's enjoyin' herself."
Mrs. Graham Rawson opened her
mouth, but for lack of adequate words
spake not. So she stood, massive and
gaping, and her horrified eyes beheld
the wicked grocer enter the room with
her daughter's arm under his. They
came nearer and nearer.   The grocer
Rhine
WINE
We carry a full stock of "the
good Rhine Wines," both pints
and quarts. The following is
a partial list:
Laubenheim
Nierstein
Steinwein
Zeltinger
Hocheim Vintage, 1893
Liebfraumilch Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Moselle
Rudesheim Vintage, 1900
Berncastler Doctor
Johannisberg Vintage, 1897
Sparkling Hock
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
smiled, and the girl was rosy and]
happy. Mrs. Graham Rawson foundl
her voice. "Mary!" she said. "Mary!":|
that only: but the music, was for thel
moment extinguished and the dancers|
checked, to stare.
A rosier blush came up Mary's neck,|
but she held her grocer's arm still.
"How dare youi" cried Mrs. Gra-j
ham Rawson. "Go and get your cloak
at once. I am ashamed of you." She
had now succeeded in attracting the
attention of all the company. "I am]
ashamed of you!" she repeated in
shriller tones.     .
"I think you forget, Mrs. Grahari
Rawson,"  said Jack Knight,  quietlyl
"you are talking to the lady who is t<j
be my wife."
Mrs. Graham Rawson, Edale re|
lates, seemed to swell all over,
think," she cried, "I am talking to mi
grocer! Kindly be silent till you arJ
addressed. I do not expect you td
know how to behave yourself in del
cent society, but " Edale confessel
that it was he who chuckled at thil
point. Mrs. Graham Rawson's facl
became dark crimson. "Mary! Tell
that person you will never see hin|
again."
"No, mother!"   For the first
since she was a little child Mary Grai
ham Rawson looked in her mother'l
eyes.   "No, mother," she said.
Mrs. Graham Rawson glared il
stupefied silence. Through the silencl
spake a still small voice: "How perl
fectly splendid!" Nancy was lookinf
at Mary with shining eyes.
Mrs. Graham Rawson turned upol
Nancy and made the sound which (al
before remarked) in lower animals il
called snorting. Then she reverteJ
to her daughter and glared. . . . ShJ
had acquired her empire by bullyini
people: hitherto people had alwayl
been afraid. . . . "Mary! You will
tell that person at once you will neves
see him again, ,,r you will never com|
in my house."
There was a rustle in the room.
And Mary, looking into her mother'l
eyes, said: "I—I'm sorry, mother. Bil
—no!" and her hand moved on Jac|
Knight's arm.
"Mary has a home now, Mrs. Gn|
ham Rawson," said Jack Kniglil
quietly.
Then Mrs. Graham Rawson dl
scended to the lowest depths. "0|
In the shop!" she sneered.
Mrs. King started forward, in hoi
est motherly horror. 'Mrs. Grahal
Rawson—you can't possibly me;|
this. | It's terrible!"
Mrs. Graham Rawson sniffed at he!
"One who  chooses her guests  fro|
the lower classes is well qualified
judge me."
"Oh, what does it matter abo|
classes?" Mrs. King cried. "She
your daughter, and " "She is not my daughter," said
Irs. Graham Rawson. "I haVe no-
hing to do with a girl that disgraces
erself."
•{.Nonsense!" said Mrs. King.
||At last Mrs. Graham Rawson heard
|i_ truth.   "Madam!" she gasped.
• f'l shall ask Mary to stay with me
_j she is married."
"No doubt the society will suit
er," Mrs. Graham Rawson sneered.
"My dear chap " —it was Ed-
le's pleasant drawl to Jack Knight—
I want to give you my very best
ongratulations."
"Lord Edale!" cried Mrs. Graham
Lawson.
Edale continued placidly: "And I'm
ure you'll be happy now, Miss Raw-
on. I'm awfully glad I was able to
elp."
"Lord Edale! . . . A-ah!" . . ." A
ght dawned on Mrs. Graham Raw-
on's magnificent mind. "I have you
3 thank for this?"
"I'm delighted to say you have,"
aid Edale.
Mrs. Graham Rawson whirled
sund. She went out of the room,
iys Edale, like an , elephant in hy-
terics. , .
But all that happened was a gather-
lg of everyone to wish her daughter
jy-
In the midst of which, Edale took
fancy by the arm and drew her away.
Lord  Edale 1"  Nancy protested.
I wanted to kiss Mary."
"You might do better," said Edale
ilmly.
The piquant little face was turned
•om him. "This isn't your dance,
,ord Edale," said a cold little voice.
"Isn't it?" Edale was very inno-
:nt.
"If it were, you wouldn't be here,"
lid Nancy, severely.
"I was workin' in a noble cause. I
as tryin' to be unselfish."
"You were being unselfish at my
tpense."
"I say, you did care, then?"
"Of course I  didn't care the least
it-"
"But this is my dance, isn't it?"
"I   haven't   another   left."    Nancy
eld out her programme in triumph.
dale took the programme and	
But Mr. King came up. "Really,
ard Edale, I'm extremely sorry this
lould have occurred in my house. I
•I—it's a very serious matter for the'
irty—it "
"It is," Edale agreed with enthus-:
sm.   "It's beautifully serious."
I—I regret very much you should
ive been concerned in it. If you
ink it would smooth matters over,
m quite ready to resign. But I'm
raid, I'm very much afraid the Sen-
sle Party will lose Mrs. Graham
iwson."
"I've been yearnin' to loose her ever
ice I saw her, Mr. King." Edale
liled an engaging smile. "The fact
I   produced   this   little   play.    I
ought Knight here "
"And you took Mary into the gar-
n," Nancy broke in.
"And   you   said   it   was   perfectly
lendid," said Edah, and Nancy heme pink.
" But — but — but "   Poor   Mr.
ing struggled beneath an avalanche
the unexpected. "Mrs. Graham
awson has been the life of the Sen-
ble Party in the Suburb."
"She's nearly been the death of it,"
id Edale.   "And now we shan't be
lrly so respectable, but we shall
n every time."
Mr. King gazed at him with the
und eyes of amazement, then, still
eechless, was swept away in the dis-
Iving throng.
Edale leant over Nancy. "It's pertly splendid in the garden," he said
a low voice.
idale * put her programme in   his
:ket.
'They're all mine, Nancy," he said,
tly.   "Come."
7or one moment Nancy's eyes look-
into his.    "I suppose you always
: what you want," said Nancy ....
Ie did.   Under his joyous guidance
: Sensibles of the Suburb soon lost
claim to respectability.   He won
! next election by a vast majority.
d  his  victory  was  claimed as  a
•jmph for the Immortal Principles
the  Sensible  Party.    What they
re just then,  I forget.    But   thc
leaders of the party think that Edale
has great ability in the higher politics.
There is at least one person who
agrees with them. Baby, however,
looks as if he thought Edale rather
young.
Correspondence.
The Week accepts no responsibility
for the views expressed by Its corres*
pondents.
The columns of The Week are open
to everyone for the free expression of
their opinion on all subjects which do
not involve religious controversy.
Communications will be Inserted
whether signed by the real name of
the writer or a nom de plume, but the
writer's name and address must be
given to the editor as an evidence of
bona tides. In no case will lt be
divulged without consent.
The Shooting Incident.
Dear Sir,—As the incident commented upon in your issue of the 29th
ult. is not' strictly accurate, I shall
esteem it a favour if you will kindly
give publicity to the following details,
in order that no erroneous impression
might be formed by those interested
in the protection of the public, and
that a correct account be reported.
On 'Sunday afternoon, the 19th of
January, being fine and bright, I
walked down to the water front with
the intention of taking a row. Nearly
opposite to me was a boat containing
two men, and this appeared to be
drifting slowly with the tide. I stood
several minutes on the water's edge,
then launched a canoe about 12 feet in
length, and had paddled out about a
dozen yards, when a puff of smoke
and the report of a gun indicated the
owners of the boat to be hunters, the
shot striking the water on all sides of
the canoe. The gun appeared to be
aimed directly at the canoe, but fortunately I was at such a distance that
the penetrating effect of the shot had
about lost its destroying power. Before I could shout, the gun was turned
a little to the left and a second shot
fired directly in line with the house.
I immediately approached these men,
and their explanation was they did not
see me, neither were they aware there
was a residence there.
These men were good enough to inform me their names were "Jones,"
their address Government street, three
doors below Dixi Ross & Co., and
they kept their boat "at the bottom."
The name being rather common, the
locality not being particularly residential and the boat house being peculiarly situated, I suggested, as a guarantee of good faith, they leave me a
gun, and they could pick it up at the
provincial police office the following
day, which they naturally and pointedly refused. I paddled ashore, the
hunters then rowing towards town;
mounted by cycle and proceeded to
the Gorge Hotel to ring up the provincial police, with the object of intercepting these gentlemen at Point
Ellice bridge, or meeting them by
boat on their way down. At this time
the hunters would be between the
boat landing at the Gorge Park and
the landing at the Victoria Gardens.
Central made two attempts to get the
provincial police, and failed. To lose
little time, I then hurried to town to
the provincial police office, and upon
my arrival found the ojce closed. I
at once rang up Sergeant Murray, reported the matter, asking for immediate assistance to secure these men.
Sergeant Murray informed me it
would take some little time to get
into communication with a constable,
and was afraid he would not be able
to get there in time to secure them.
In ringing up Sergeant Murray I fully
anticipated that the assistance would
have been rendered by himself forthwith.
Later I went along to Point Ellice
bridge, wit lithe intention of seeing
the constable deputed for this duty,
which I informed Sergeant Murray I
would do, intending to give him a description of the boat and its occupants, and although I hung around
the bridge until dark I failed to locate
the constable, returned home, concluding he had displayed the necessary tact in the performance of his
duties to prevent his profession being
discovered.
The following morning I interviewed Sergeant Murray, gave him the details, and he informed me that being
in the South Saanich district I should
A Victorian
Definition of a Kiss.
One man's definition of a kiss is
"a pleasure smack." It's needless to say this man is a sailor.
Another Victorian's definition
of a pleasure smack is "a glass
of Allsopp's Pale Ale." Everybody enjoys a glass of the
famous Burton-on-Trent XXXX
—the best that's brewed.
On draught at all the leading hotels, bars, clubs and cafes.
If your dealer is unable to
supply you with a keg for home
consumption, kindly 'phone the
importers and distributors.
PITHER   &   LEISER
Corner Fort and Wharf Streets.
have reported to their constable, also
that he had reported the matter to
this constable; whose address I did
not know at the time, but have since
learned is near Ced.ar Hill; and also
stated that it was very likely that he
would call and see me.
Up to the time of writing, the district constable has not made the expected call.
On the 2nd of February, just before
it was getting dark, a boat containing
hunters returning from an expedition
to Portage Inlet, were passing the
house, when the occupants were good
enough to discharge their surplus ammunition in front of the house, three
or four shots, the contents being distinctly heard, within thc house, rattling through the trees and around the
house.
I did not approach these men. I
did not report this latter incident. In
the first instance, I was not inclined
to again chase a phantom; secondly,
from previous experience, concluded
it was immaterial whether it was reported then or a month later.
Such incidents as these are to be
found weekly any time during the
shooting season—if looked for by our
police.
When some person is maimed for
life, lost his eyesight, or otherwise
mangled by the reckless sportsmen
that visit these waters, we shall perhaps have a reward offered for their
capture, and the unfortunate party
will, no doubt, be the recipient of a
great amount of sorrow and regret;
but this will not compensate a man
for the loss of his sight, limb, or lifelong injury to his children, when the
deed has been accomplished.
Residents and visitors should have
the pleasure of viewing the natural
beauties of Victoria Arm and Portage
Inlet in safety.
Yours truly,
T. E. WILLEY.
The  Phillipines,  Craigflower   Bridge.
March 4th, 1908.
A new Minister at the War Office
who was consumed with a zeal for
making himself perfect in his work
visited the various rooms and inquired
as to all the details. Meeting a gentleman in the passage he asked at
what hour he usually came to his
duty.
"Oh," said the gentleman in reply,
"I usually stroll in about 11 or 12
o'clock."
"Stroll in!" said the Minister in
surprise; "then I presume you do not
leave until a late hour?"
"Well," replied thc gentleman, "I
generally  slip   off  about  3  o'clock,"
"Slip off at three!" said the Minister. "Pray, sir, may I ask what department you belong to?"
"Certainly, I come every Saturday
to wind up the clocks.
WEEK 9th MARCH.
The New Grand
SULLIVAN » COMIIISI,    Proprietors.
Iimi.ni.iit of MIT. JAHHSON.
YOUNG BUFFALO AND CO.
America's Most Sensational Marksman, in Rifle and Pistol Shooting.
O'NEILL'S COLLEGE BOYS
Musical,    Singing    and    Dancing
Specialty.
GLADYS VAN
America's Star Comedienne.
LOTTIE MEANEY AND CO.
In her own Comedy Sketch
"The Bowery Bud."
BROOKS AND JEANETTE
Sam Rose
In "Fluffy   Ruffles   and   Spooney
Sam," on the Main Street.
SIGNOR DE DOMINICUS
World-Famous Cornetist.
THOS. J. PRICE, Song Illustrator
"That's What  the  Rose  Said  to
Me."
NEW MOVING PICTURES
"The Witch's Kiss."
"The Bellboy's Revenge:"
OUR OWN ORCHESTRA
M.  Nagel,  Director.
"The Pilgrim's Chorus," from
Tannhauser.
Pantage's
Theatre
JOHNSON STREET
VICTORIA B. C.
ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE
Matinees (any part of house)....lie
Evenings, Balcony  Ito
Lower Floor lOe
Boxes  tte
Matinees
Every Afternoon
at
3 O'CIock.
Night Performances
8 and 9.15
EQUIP YOUBSELF
WITB A THOROUGH
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Day and Night Classes. You can
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For particulars write or call
THE  SHORTHAND  SCHOOL
1109 Broad Street Viotoria, B.O.
E. A. MacMillan.
LADIES        MEDICAL   GENTS
MASSAGE
Turkish Baths
VIBRATOR  TBBATKENT
HB.     BJOBNPELT,     SWEDISH
HASBEUB.
Special   Massage and Hometreat-
ment by appointments.
Boom 2, Vernon Blk., Douglaa St.
Body Development.
Hours 1 to 6. Phone 1629.
Most
Particular
Smokers
Experience little or no difficulty
in finding a cigar or blend of
smoking mixture that fits their
taste.
Our Manila or Havana
Cigars can't be beaten.
We carry a most complete line of smokers'
sundries,
nml Navy RlChaf dSOtl
Cigar Store,     "'V11HI U.3VMI
Phone 345
TIMBER
If you have any
timber for sale
list it with us
We can sell it
BURNETT, SON & CO.
533 Pender St.,
Vancouver,   B. C.
The days are getting Cold.
[THE
WILSON BAR
It Warn and Comfortable.1"
VISIT IT.
648 Yates St, Victoria B. C.
COAL.
J. KINGHAM & CO.,
tl ictoria Agentl for the Nanaimo Collier it..
Now Wellington Coal.
The bwt household coal in tht marke  at
turrent rates.  Anthracite coal Ar nie.
34 Broad Street. Phono 647
VICTORIA
P
AatlVTS   an< Trade Markl
obtained in all countries.
ROWLAND BRITTAIN
Registered Patent Attorney and
Mechanical Engineer.
Room 3, Fairfield Block, Granville St.
(near Postoffice) Vancouver.
Leave Vour Baggage Checks at tho
Pacific Transfer Co'y
No. 4 FORT ST.
VICTORIA
Phone 249.      A. E. KENT, Proprietor
LLOYD & CO., practical chimney
cleaners, 716 Pandora St. Chimneys can be cleaned without making an ellova mess. Try us and
be convinced.
Phone A476. NUF SED.
Will You Take
$500 a Year...
for your spare time. In other
words the man who has a couple
of hours morning and evening
and will employ it in operating
A Cyphers Incubator
at his home can make from $500
in twelve months. We have a
unique plan to work on and will
be pleased to explain it to any
one interested.    Call or write.
Watson &
McGregor
647  Johnson   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C. THB WEEK, SATURDAY MARCH 7, 1908,
V 'l' 'V ■l'l||lfl,'Mf*TT*
Social and
Personal.
*
if
if
_____»^____^m___^ _______ ___^___^ ______________ ___^^__________.___\_.
ij,i i^i ij.i i|i . j,. hi ij,i ift .ji hi m i|,i i|.i
Mrs. W. Monteith is visiting relatives in Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. John Hirsch are
spending a couple of weeks in town.
* *   *
Mrs. Tunstall of Tacoma spent a
few days this week with her sister,
Miss Bowron.
* *   *
Miss Garnan, who has been staying
with Captain and Mrs. Martin for the
past few months, left for England
on Thursday morning.
* *   *
The many friends of Mr. Harry
Ross will be sorry that he is ill in
St. Joseph's Hospital, but he hopes
to be out again very soon fully recovered.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. Powell will sail from
England in a few days and expect to
be home about the end of the present
month. Miss Violet Powell has gone
to Germany to study music for two
years.
* *   *
Among those who went out to
Cloverdale to attend the concert given
in aid of St. Marks last Tuesday night
were the Misses Suzette and Viva
Blackwood, Miss Morley, Miss Tuck,
Mrs. Tuck, Mrs. Pearce, Miss Perry,
Miss Troup, Miss Heyland, Mrs. Heyland, Mr. Scott, Mr. C. Pemberton,
Mr. T. King, Mr. Smart, Mr. A.
Gore, Mr. C. Berkeley, Miss Kean,
Miss V. Bolton, Rev. Baugh-Allen
and Mrs. Allen and others.
* *   *
A surprise party was given to Miss
R. Arbuthnot on Tuesday evening by
some of her young friends. Miss
Thain's orchestra supplied the music
and dancing was kept up till an early
hour. The refreshment table was
decorated with scarlet carnations and
streamers of red ribbon. Those present were the Misses Phillys Mason,
G. Savage, E. Pitts, M. Pitts, M.
Little, V. Mason, D. Mason, T. Monteith, W. Troupe, Phippen, and the
Messrs. Bromley, Troup, R. Monteith,
Heyland, W. Brown, B. Parker, I. O.
McKay,   A.   Brown,   McDougal,   C.
Gamble, J. Gaudin, A. and C. Pitts.
* *   *
Mrs. Blackwood, assisted by her
two daughters, gave a large five hundred party last Tuesday afternoon.
The prizes were won by Mrs.
Matthews (ist), Mrs. Genge (2nd),
and the consolation by Mrs. Hall.
The drawing-room and tea table
were very pretty and fresh looking,
with large clusters of daffodils in
handsome bowls.
Among those present were: Mrs.
Matthews, Mrs. Hirsch, Mrs. Alister
Robertson, Mrs. Crowe-Baker, Mrs.
Arundel, Mrs. Roy Troupe, Mrs.
Charles, Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. H. Heisterman, Mrs. J. Wilson, Mrs. Genge,
Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. J. Harvey, Mrs.
Blaiklock, Mrs. Gresley, Mrs. Spratt,
Mrs. Troup, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs.
Courtney, Mrs. McBride, Mrs. Mason,
Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Cleland, Mrs. H. Kent, Mrs.
McKenzie, Mrs. Rome, Mrs. Arbuthnot, Miss Arbuthnot, Miss Gaudin,
Miss Troup, Miss Clapham, Miss
Holmes, Miss M. Lawson and others.
* *   *
The Misses Pitts were the hostesses
at quite one of the most enjoyable
and jolly dances of the season on
Monday evening last. Their beautiful home on Rockland Avenue was
profusely decorated with spring flowers and hot-house plants, and the
supper table was arranged with yellow daffodils, pussy willows and
maidenhair fern. In the hall were
large bowls of calla lillies. The Misses
Pitts, who were assisted in receiving
their friends by' their aunt, Miss Williams, were dressed in white. Among
the many invited guests were M: s.
Genge, Captain and Mrs. Martin, Mr.
and Mrs. V. Eliot, Mr. and Mrs,
Harry Barnard, Mr. and Mrs. Muskett, Mr. and Mrs. Martin, Mr. and
Mrs. C. Pooley, the Misses Pooley,
V. Pooley, Angus, Amy Angus, P,
Irving, N. Dupont, A. King, E.
Browne, Lawson, J. Lawson, Little,
H. Peters, M. Gibson, Day, Walker,
Blackwood, P. Mason, Hanington, P.
Drake, N. Coombe, J. Bell, Bolton,
Loenholm, Page, Arbuthnot, Savage,
Martin, Cobbett, Garnan, Butchart, J.
Butchart, Ethel Tilton, Wigley, Helmcken, Tuck, Phipps, B. Irving, G.
Irving, Troupe, Gillespie, and the
Messrs. B, Wilmot, F. Rome, Owen
Martin, Bromley, Parker, J. Bridgman, R. Gibson, Williams, Kingscote,
Bostock, R. Monteith, C. Keefer, VV.
Pemberton, S. Angus, H. R. Phipps,
Arbuckle, Dewdney, Eves, D, Bullen,
Loenberg, C. Pemberton, Fraser-
Biscoe, Meredith, W. Todd, McDougall, Wallace, Samson, H, Eberts, D.
Gillespie, S. Powell, C. Gamble, Ward,
H. Lawson, J. Lawson, B. Irving, T.
O. Mackay, Holmes, Landry, Captain Hughes, Dr. Dolbey, Lieutenant
Eaton and many others.
Mrs. Savage and Mrs. Arbuthnot
made very charming hostesses at an
"at home" given at the former's residence on Belcher street last Monday.
Miss Thain's orchestra was in attendance during the afternoon. This
and a few tables of bridge assisted
in entertaining the numerous guests.
The first bridge prize was won by
Mrs. Rithet and the second by Mrs.
W. S. Gore.
Mrs. Arbuthnot wore a most becoming gown of black lace and Mrs.
Savage wore a very handsome gown
of black lace over white.
Miss Arbuthnot, pale blue embroidered taffetta.
Miss Savage, pale blue gauze, semi-
Empire, with Empire sash.
Mrs. Robin Dunsmuir, handsomely
attired in a eoline blue Princess clotn
dress with pale blue hat with plumes.
Mrs. Bodwell, in a pale blue taffeta, with white hat, with white plumes.
Miss Phippen (Winnipeg) in a
pretty dress of pink embroidered taffetta.
Mrs.    Guy    Warner    in  s  art
brown suit, pale blue hat, brown fox
furs.
Mrs. B. Tye, red voille semi-Empire dress.
Miss Mary Butchart, in a pretty
pink Princess dress, with black and
white hat.
Mrs. Hirsch, in a smart brown suit.
Miss Drake, green suit, with white
hat.
Miss Little, grey check suit.
Mrs. C. M. Roberts, smart black
taffetta dress, pale blue panne velvet
hat with plumes.
Miss Troupe, pink flowered muslin
dress, white picture hat, with ostrich
plumes.
Mrs. Ker, in a very pretty pink silk
dress, with pink straw hat with roses
of the same shade.
Mrs. Sprate, brown suit and hat.
Mrs. Helmcken, handsome black,
lace robe with white satin finishings.
Miss Vera Mason, biscuit coloured
eolienne green hat.
Miss Doris Mason, green dress with
white and brown hat.
Mrs. James Dunsmuir, plum-coloured gown with hat to match.
Miss   Hickey,  brown  tailor  made.
Mrs. Brett, grey Empire frock.
Among others present were Mrs.
W. S. Gore, Mrs. Ambery, Mrs. T. S.
Gore, Miss P. Mason, Mrs. George
Gillespie, Miss Gillespie, Mrs. Genge,
Mrs. Phippen, Mrs. Blaiklock, Mrs.
Rome, Miss Heyland, Mrs. G. Hunter, Mrs. Matson, Mrs. Coles, Mrs.
H. Tye, Mrs. Gibbs, Mrs. Stevenson,
Miss Day, Mrs. Rocke Robertson,
Mrs. Herman Robertson, Miss Paula
Irving, Mrs. Butchart, Mrs. McCurdy,
Mrs. Johnstone, Miss Johnstone, Mrs.
Roberts (black taffetta blue hat), Mrs.
Troupe, Miss Troupe (flowered muslin, white hat with flowers), Miss P.
O. Irving, Mrs. Troupe, Mrs. Roy
Troupe, Mrs, Ker (pink silk and pink
hat with roses), Mrs. Cleland, Miss
Holmes, Mrs. Hasell, Mrs. Spratt
(brown costume) Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs.
Rithet, Mrs. Berkeley, Mrs. Gaudin,
Mrs. Shallcross, Mrs. Hickey, Misses
Hickey, Mrs. Rycot, Mrs. Shaw, Mrs.
Blackwood, Misses Blackwood, Mrs.
Courtney (brown voile), Mrs. Helmcken (black lace ; :id sequin), Mrs. McCallum, Miss Moresby, Mrs. Raymour.
Angell
Engraving Co.
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS
and DESIGNERS
In All Branches
SIS Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
#
No Breakfast Complete
Without Marmalade.
That is from the Englishman's standpoint.  These delicious dainties
satisfy the most epicurean tastes:
C. & B. Marmalade, glass jars, each 25c
C. & B. Marmalade, 1 lb. tin  15c
C. & B. Marmalade, 4 lb. tin  60c
C. & B. Marmalade, 7 lb. tin  $1.00
Keiller's Malted Marmalade, per jar ....' 35c
Keiller's Pineapple Marmalade, per jar  35c
Keiller's Ginger Marmalade, per jar  35c
Apricot Marmalade, per jar  25c
Marmaroy, the new Fig Marmalade, per jar 25c
DIXI H. ROSS & CO.
UP-TO-DATE GROCERS. 1316 GOVERNMENT ST.
VeRANDA
 5	
•>  '
a
O0O00OOO00O00000O0O00O000OO00OO000O00OO00O0<>0O00004M
Poodle Doa
Hotel
A most pleasant place of sojourn at any time of the year for
either health or pleasure. The handsome dining-room is one of
the largest and brightest in Western Canada. The table is supplied with the best the market affords,—all the delicacies of the
season.
THE ONLY REAL GRILL ROOM IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SMITH & SHAUGHNESSY
Proprietors
Yates Street, Victoria, B. C.
OO00000OO0<KX>000<><)O00<X>00OO0O0<X>000<K)O00000O000O000^
When Percy Proposed.
"Refuse me," cried Percy Pickle,
desperately, "and I shall sink through
the floor."
The beautiful belle of the big department house gazed on him with
cold hauteur.
"Please don't," she said in icy
tones; "the floor has just been stained,
and, besides, you would ruin the paper
on the ceiling of the flat below. Take
the elevator."
A $2,800 Home. Plans of this
beautiful home only $20.00. Full set
of working drawings and specification prepaid. Send 5 cents for booklet on "Homes."
E. STANLEY MITTON
Architect     -     VANCOUVER, B.C.
club
Fierce Critics.
Dick—How  is  your woman's
getting on these days?
Eva—Fine. I am on the "hanging committee" now.
Dick—Hanging committee? Do
you hang pictures?
Eva—Oh, no. The "hanging committee" sits at the club windows on
rainy days and criticises the hang of
their sisters' skirts as the latter pass
outside.
Victoria Theatre
MONDAY, MARCH 9
Third Triumphal Tour and All New
Edition of R. F. Outcault's
BUSTER BROWN
With the best of them all, MASTER
REED, acting "Buster." Replete with
a company of well-known Comedians,
Vocalists, Dancers, Musicians, etc.,
introducing Buster Brown's Bobby
Burns Brigade.
..Prices: 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Box Office opens 10 a.m. Friday,
March 6. Mail orders accompanied
by cheque will receive their usual
attention.
L MUELLER
Hair Specialist
When you wear one of our
toupees you have the satisfaction of knowing that it is a
perfect fit and is natural in
colour and correct in style.
Write today for our descriptive catalogue and price list of
toupees, wigs, switches and
transformations.
B. C. HAIR GOODS CO.
436  Granville  Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
AGENTS WANTED
We pay resident agents good
salary to represent us during
their spare time.
Valuable
Timber Sections
For quick sale, 15 licensed
Timber Sections at Quatsino
Sound, District of Rupert.
These claims adjoin salt
water and are guaranteed to
average 20,000 feet to the acre.
Time for inspection and
cruising allowed.
Price, net cash, $1.25 an acre.
Apply
W. BLAKEMORE
1208 Government St., Victoria.
Reflections of
A Bachelor.
"The comforts of home cannot be fully realized without a Gas Heater. How cold
and cheerless was my room
with the heat nearly always
off when I needed it on. Now
my
Gas Radiator
Hasturned but little expense." Other Victorian shrdlu shrdlus
Has turned my cheerless den into a real 'dulce domum.' Gas is
no trouble and but little expense." Other Victorian "Batches"
should call and inspect our grand values just now in new style
Heaters.
VICTORIA GAS COMPANY, Ltd.
CORNER FORT AND LANGLEY STREETS.
KODAK
You'll need a
KODAK
AT
Vancouver's
First
Horse Show
March 19, 20
and 21
Will Marsden
665 Granville Street,      Vancouver, B.

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